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Sample records for electron cloud mitigation

  1. Comparison of electron cloud mitigating coatings using retarding field analyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvey, J.R., E-mail: jrc97@cornell.edu; Hartung, W.; Li, Y.; Livezey, J.A.; Makita, J.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.

    2014-10-01

    In 2008, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured to serve as a test accelerator (CESRTA) for next generation lepton colliders, in particular for the ILC damping ring. A significant part of this program has been the installation of diagnostic devices to measure and quantify the electron cloud effect, a potential limiting factor in these machines. One such device is the Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA), which provides information on the local electron cloud density and energy distribution. Several different styles of RFAs have been designed, tested, and deployed throughout the CESR ring. They have been used to study the growth of the cloud in different beam conditions, and to evaluate the efficacy of different mitigation techniques. This paper will provide an overview of RFA results obtained in a magnetic field free environment.

  2. Electron Cloud Mitigation in the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, Daniele; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Ludewig, H.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Macek, R.J.; Furman, Miguel A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H - injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron-cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation

  3. Electron-cloud mitigation in the spallation neutron source ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, D.; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M.; Macek, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H- injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation

  4. Measurements of electron cloud growth and mitigation in dipole, quadrupole, and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvey, J.R., E-mail: jrc97@cornell.edu; Hartung, W.; Li, Y.; Livezey, J.A.; Makita, J.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.

    2015-01-11

    Retarding field analyzers (RFAs), which provide a localized measurement of the electron cloud, have been installed throughout the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), in different magnetic field environments. This paper describes the RFA designs developed for dipole, quadrupole, and wiggler field regions, and provides an overview of measurements made in each environment. The effectiveness of electron cloud mitigations, including coatings, grooves, and clearing electrodes, are assessed with the RFA measurements.

  5. Computation of electron cloud diagnostics and mitigation in the main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, S A; Cary, J R; Stoltz, P H; LeBrun, P; Spentzouris, P; Amundson, J F

    2009-01-01

    High-performance computations on Blue Gene/P at Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility have been used to determine phase shifts induced in injected RF diagnostics as a function of electron cloud density in the Main Injector. Inversion of the relationship between electron cloud parameters and induced phase shifts allows us to predict electron cloud density and evolution over many bunch periods. Long time-scale simulations using Blue Gene have allowed us to measure cloud evolution patterns under the influence of beam propagation with realistic physical parameterizations, such as elliptical beam pipe geometry, self-consistent electromagnetic fields, space charge, secondary electron emission, and the application of arbitrary external magnetic fields. Simultaneously, we are able to simulate the use of injected microwave diagnostic signals to measure electron cloud density, and the effectiveness of various mitigation techniques such as surface coating and the application of confining magnetic fields. These simulations provide a baseline for both RF electron cloud diagnostic design and accelerator fabrication in order to measure electron clouds and mitigate the adverse effects of such clouds on beam propagation.

  6. Low Secondary Electron Yield Carbon Coatings for Electron Cloud Mitigation in Modern Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Taborelli, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In order to upgrade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance to be oriented towards higher energies and higher intensities in the future, a series of improvements of the existing LHC injectors is planned to take place over the next few years. Electron cloud effects are expected to be enhanced and play a central role in limiting the performance of the machines of the CERN complex. Electron cloud phenomena in beam pipes are based on electron multiplication and can be sufficiently suppressed if the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of the surface of the beam pipes is lower than unity. The goal of this work is to find and study a thin film coating with reliably low initial Secondary Electron Yield (SEY), which does not require bake-out or conditioning in situ with photons, is robust again air exposure and can easily be applied in the beam pipes of accelerators. In this work, amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering for electron cloud mitigation and antimultipactor applicatio...

  7. Beam Tests of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating for Mitigation of Electron Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey [Fermilab; Backfish, Michael [Fermilab; Kato, Shigeki [KEK, Tsukuba; Tan, Cheng-Yang [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Electron cloud beam instabilities are an important consideration in virtually all high-energy particle accelerators and could pose a formidable challenge to forthcoming high-intensity accelerator upgrades. Our results evaluate the efficacy of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating for the mitigation of electron in the Fermilab Main Injector. The interior surface of the beampipe conditions in response to electron bombardment from the electron cloud and we track the change in electron cloud flux over time in the DLC coated beampipe and uncoated stainless steel beampipe. The electron flux is measured by retarding field analyzers placed in a field-free region of the Main Injector. We find the DLC coating reduces the electron cloud signal to roughly 2\\% of that measured in the uncoated stainless steel beampipe.

  8. Recommendation for Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Instability in the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Electron cloud has been identified as one of the highest priority issues for the international Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Rings (DR). An electron cloud Working Group (WG) has evaluated the electron cloud effect and instability, and mitigation solutions for the electron cloud formation. Working group deliverables include recommendations for the baseline and alternate solutions to the electron cloud formation in various regions of the ILC Positron DR, which is presently assumed to be the 3.2 km design. Detailed studies of a range of mitigation options including coatings, clearing electrodes, grooves and novel concepts, were carried out over the previous several years by nearly 50 researchers, and the results of the studies form the basis for the recommendation. The recommendations are the result of the working group discussions held at numerous meetings and during a dedicated workshop. In addition, a number of items requiring further investigation were identified during the discussions at the Cornell meeting and studies will be carried out at CesrTA, a test accelerator dedicated to electron cloud studies, and other institutions.

  9. Reduction of secondary electron yield for E-cloud mitigation by laser ablation surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, R., E-mail: reza.valizadeh@stfc.ac.uk [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Malyshev, O.B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sian, T. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cropper, M.D. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sykes, N. [Micronanics Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • SEY below 1 can be achieved with Laser ablation surface engineering. • SEY <1 surface can be produced with different types of nanosecond lasers. • Both microstructure (groves) and nano-structures are playing a role in reducing SEY. - Abstract: Developing a surface with low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is one of the main ways of mitigating electron cloud and beam-induced electron multipacting in high-energy charged particle accelerators. In our previous publications, a low SEY < 0.9 for as-received metal surfaces modified by a nanosecond pulsed laser was reported. In this paper, the SEY of laser-treated blackened copper has been investigated as a function of different laser irradiation parameters. We explore and study the influence of micro- and nano-structures induced by laser surface treatment in air of copper samples as a function of various laser irradiation parameters such as peak power, laser wavelength (λ = 355 nm and 1064 nm), number of pulses per point (scan speed and repetition rate) and fluence, on the SEY. The surface chemical composition was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which revealed that heating resulted in diffusion of oxygen into the bulk and induced the transformation of CuO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. The surface topography was examined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) which showed that the laser-treated surfaces are dominated by microstructure grooves and nanostructure features.

  10. Low Secondary Electron Yield Carbon Coatings for Electron-cloud Mitigation in Modern Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Calatroni, Sergio; Chiggiato, Paolo; Costa Pinto, Pedro; Marques, Hugo; Neupert, Holger; Taborelli, Mauro; Vollenberg, Wilhelmus; Wevers, Ivo; Yaqub, Kashif

    2010-01-01

    Electron-cloud is one of the main limitations for particle accelerators with positively charged beams of high intensity and short bunch spacing, as the SPS at CERN. The Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of the inner surface of the vacuum chamber is the main parameter governing the phenomenon. The effect could be eliminated by coating the vacuum chambers with a material of low SEY, which does not require bake-out and is robust against air exposure. For such a purpose amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings were produced by magnetron sputtering of graphite targets. They exhibit maximum SEY between 0.95 and 1.05 after air transfer to the measuring instrument. After 1 month of air exposure the SEY rises by 10 - 20 % of the initial values. Storage in desiccator or by packaging in Al foil makes this increase negligible. The coatings have a similar X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) C1s spectrum for a large set of deposition parameters and exhibit an enlarged linewidth compared to HOPG graphite. The static outgassing witho...

  11. Performance of Carbon Coatings for Mitigation of Electron Cloud in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, C; Costa Pinto, P; Neupert, H; Rumolo, G; Shaposhnikova, E; Taborelli, M; Kato, S

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings have been tested in electron cloud monitors (ECM) in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and have shown for LHC type beams a reduction of the electron cloud current by a factor 104 compared to stainless steel (StSt). This performance has been maintained for more than 3 years under SPS operation conditions. Secondary electron yield (SEY) laboratory data confirm that after more than 1 year of SPS operation, the coating maintains a SEY below 1.0. The compatibility of coexisting StSt and a-C surfaces has been studied in an ECM having coated and uncoated areas. The results show no degradation of the properties of the a-C areas. The performance of diamond like carbon (DLC) coating has also been studied. DLC shows a less effective reduction of the EC current than a-C, but conditioning is faster than for StSt. Three a-C coated dipoles were inserted in the SPS. However, even with no EC detected, the dynamic pressure rise is similar to the one observed in the StSt reference dipoles. Measu...

  12. A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M

    2008-01-01

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine

  13. Recent Experimental Results on Amorphous Carbon Coatings for Electron Cloud Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, C; Chiggiato, P; Costa Pinto, P; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M; Rumolo, G; Shaposhnikova, E; Vollenberg, W

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films, produced in different coating configurations by using DC magnetron sputtering, have been investigated in laboratory for low secondary electron yield (SEY) applications. After the coatings had shown a reliable low initial SEY, the a-C thin films have been applied in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and tested with Large Hadron Collider (LHC) type beams.Currently, we have used a-C thin film coated in so-called liner configuration for the electron cloud monitors. In addition the vacuum chambers of three dipole magnets have been coated and inserted into the machine. After describing the different configurations used for the coatings, results of the tests in the machine and a summary of the analyses after extraction will be presented. Based on comparison between different coating configurations, a new series of coatings has been applied on three further dipole magnet vacuum chambers. They have been installed and will be tested in coming machine development runs.

  14. Implementation of Carbon Thin Film Coatings in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) for Electron Cloud Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Costa Pinto, P; Basso, T; Edwards, P; Mensi, M; Sublet, A; Taborelli, M

    2014-01-01

    Low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) carbon thin films eradicate electron multipacting in accelerator beam pipes. Two magnetic cells of the SPS were coated with such material and installed. In total more than forty vacuum vessels and magnet interconnections were treated. The feasibility of the coating process was validated. The performance of the carbon thin film will be tested with LHC nominal beams after the end of the long shutdown 1. Particular attention will be drawn to the long term behaviour. This paper presents the sputtering techniques used to coat the different components; their characterization (SEY measurements on coupons, RF multipacting tests and pump down curves); and the technology to etch the carbon film in case of a faulty coating. The strategy to coat the entire SPS will also be described.

  15. Mitigation of the electron-cloud effect in the PSR and SNS protonstorage rings by tailoring the bunch profile

    CERN Document Server

    Pivi, M T

    2003-01-01

    For the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, and for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos, both with intense and very long bunches, the electron cloud develops primarily by the mechanism of trailing-edge multipacting. We show, by means of simulations for the PSR, how the resonant nature of this mechanism may be effectively broken by tailoring the longitudinal bunch profile at fixed bunch charge, resulting in a significant decrease in the electron-cloud effect. We briefly discuss the experimental difficulties expected in the implementation of this cure.

  16. MITIGATION OF THE ELECTRON-CLOUD EFFECT IN THE PSR AND SNS PROTONSTORAGE RINGS BY TAILORING THE BUNCH PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, Mauro T F

    2003-01-01

    For the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, and for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos, both with intense and very long bunches, the electron cloud develops primarily by the mechanism of trailing-edge multipacting. We show, by means of simulations for the PSR, how the resonant nature of this mechanism may be effectively broken by tailoring the longitudinal bunch profile at fixed bunch charge, resulting in a significant decrease in the electron-cloud effect. We briefly discuss the experimental difficulties expected in the implementation of this cure

  17. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design and prototyping of a machine for laser treatment of metallic vacuum chamber walls for electron cloud mitigation at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design and prototyping of a machine for laser treatment of metallic vacuum chamber walls for electron cloud mitigation at the High Luminosity LHC

  18. Mitigation of the electron-cloud effect in the PSR and SNS proton storage rings by tailoring the bunch profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    For the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos, both with intense and very long bunches, the electroncloud develops primarily by the mechanism of trailing-edge multipacting. We show, by means of simulations for the PSR, how the resonant nature of this mechanism may be effectively broken by tailoring the longitudinal bunch profile at fixed bunch charge, resulting in a significant decrease in the electron-cloud effect. We briefly discuss the experimental difficulties expected in the implementation of this cure

  19. Coherent Radiation of Electron Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, S.

    2004-01-01

    The electron cloud in positron storage rings is pinched when a bunch passes by. For short bunches, the radiation due to acceleration of electrons of the cloud is coherent. Detection of such radiation can be used to measure the density of the cloud. The estimate of the power and the time structure of the radiated signal is given in this paper

  20. Electron cloud and ion effects

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, Gianluigi

    2002-01-01

    The significant progress in the understanding and control of machine impedances has allowed obtaining beams with increasing brilliance. Dense positively charged beams generate electron clouds via gas ionization, photoemission and multipacting. The electron cloud in turn interacts with the beam and the surrounding environment originating fast coupled and single bunch instabilities, emittance blow-up, additional loads to vacuum and cryogenic systems, perturbation to beam diagnostics and feedbacks and it constitutes a serious limitation to machine performance. In a similar way high brilliance electron beams are mainly affected by positively charged ions produced by residual gas ionization. Recent observations of electron cloud build-up and its effects in present accelerators are reviewed and compared with theory and with the results of state-of-the-art computer simulations. Two-stream instabilities induced by the interaction between electron beams and ions are discussed. The implications for future accelerators ...

  1. Simulation studies on measures to mitigate ion clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu Ganta, Prasanth; Masood, Ahmed; Rienen, Ursula van [Universitaet Rostock, Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik (Germany); Sauerland, Dennis; Hillert, Wolfgang [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, ELSA (Germany); Meseck, Atoosa [HZB, Institut Beschleunigerphysik, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For future Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL), parasitic ions, which are generated by collisions of the beam and the rest gas in the vacuum chamber, present a limiting factor for the high current-low emittance electron beams. Clearing gaps, clearing electrodes and appropriate filling patterns are a remedy to keep the ion density in the accelerator at a level that allows for a minimum stability of the beam parameters. The MOEVE PIC Tracking code, which employs a 2D wake matrix, enables tracking simulations of the ion distribution over a relatively long period of up to thousands of interactions with the passing bunches. It enables to develop a deeper understanding of the ion-cloud behavior in order to design appropriate measures for their mitigation. For certain cases, it is sufficient to study the problem in 2D. Therefore, an additional 2D solver shall be implemented into MOEVE PIC Tracking in order to reduce the computation times. Numerical studies of ion cloud dynamics in beam guiding magnets and drift sections of electron machines will be shown and compared with experimental results obtained at the ELSA facility.

  2. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Macek, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures

  3. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  4. Electron Cloud Measurements in Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey Scott [Indiana U.; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Tan, C. Y. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    This conference paper presents a series of electron cloud measurements in the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler. A new instability was observed in the Recycler in July 2014 that generates a fast transverse excitation in the first high intensity batch to be injected. Microwave measurements of electron cloud in the Recycler show a corresponding depen- dence on the batch injection pattern. These electron cloud measurements are compared to those made with a retard- ing field analyzer (RFA) installed in a field-free region of the Recycler in November. RFAs are also used in the Main Injector to evaluate the performance of beampipe coatings for the mitigation of electron cloud. Contamination from an unexpected vacuum leak revealed a potential vulnerability in the amorphous carbon beampipe coating. The diamond-like carbon coating, in contrast, reduced the electron cloud signal to 1% of that measured in uncoated stainless steel beampipe.

  5. Electron cloud observations: a retrospective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkay, K.

    2004-01-01

    A growing number of observations of electron cloud effects (ECEs) have been reported in positron and proton rings. Low-energy, background electrons ubiquitous in high-intensity particle accelerators. Amplification of electron cloud (EC) can occur under certain operating conditions, potentially giving rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade accelerator performance. EC observations and diagnostics have contributed to a better understanding of ECEs, in particular, details of beam-induced multipacting and cloud saturation effects. Such experimental results can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters for modeling efforts and analytical calculations to improve prediction capability. Electron cloud effects are increasingly important phenomena in high luminosity, high brightness, or high intensity machines - Colliders, Storage rings, Damping rings, Heavy ion beams. EC generation and instability modeling increasingly complex and benchmarked against in situ data: (delta), (delta) 0 , photon reflectivity, and SE energy distributions important. Surface conditioning and use of solenoidal windings in field-free regions are successful cures: will they be enough? What are new observations and how do they contribute to body of work and understanding physics of EC?

  6. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-01-01

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code 'POSINST' was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ∼(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed

  7. Cloud computing in pharmaceutical R&D: business risks and mitigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Karl

    2010-05-01

    Cloud computing provides information processing power and business services, delivering these services over the Internet from centrally hosted locations. Major technology corporations aim to supply these services to every sector of the economy. Deploying business processes 'in the cloud' requires special attention to the regulatory and business risks assumed when running on both hardware and software that are outside the direct control of a company. The identification of risks at the correct service level allows a good mitigation strategy to be selected. The pharmaceutical industry can take advantage of existing risk management strategies that have already been tested in the finance and electronic commerce sectors. In this review, the business risks associated with the use of cloud computing are discussed, and mitigations achieved through knowledge from securing services for electronic commerce and from good IT practice are highlighted.

  8. Electron cloud effects in hadron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Weiland, Thomas [TU-Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder,Schlossgartenstr. 8 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Accelerators operating with intense positively charged beams can suffer from the electron cloud phenomenon. For example, it is the intensity limiting factor in CERN LHC and SPS. In past decades a lot of progress in understanding the electron cloud effects was made worldwide. Methods to suppress or weaken the electron cloud phenomenon were proposed. Theories governing the bunch stability in presence of the electron cloud were developed. Recently the theory was introduced to describe the bunch energy loss due to the electron cloud. However, most of the publications concern the single bunch electron cloud effects. In reality bunches are packed into trains. A disturbance of the cloud caused by the bunch in the beginning of the train affects the subsequent bunches. We present a further investigation of single-bunch electron cloud effects and planned activities to study the phenomenon in case of multiple bunches.

  9. Electron-Cloud Wake Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    The electron cloud gives rise to coherent and incoherent single-bunch wake fields, both in the longitudinal and in the transverse direction, and to coherent coupled-bunch wakes. These wake fields can be computed using the simulation programs ECLOUD and HEADTAIL developed at CERN. We present the wake fields simulated for the LHC beam in the CERN SPS and at injection into the LHC in different magnetic field configurations (field-free region, dipole, and solenoid), where the magnetic field affects both the elec-tron motion during a bunch passage and the overall electron distribution in the beam pipe.

  10. Final Report for 'Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  11. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Benedetto, E.; Fischer, W.; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, K.; Schulte, D.; Sonnad, K.; Tomas, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; Rumolo, G.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2007-01-01

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e+e- scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed

  12. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M A

    2013-01-01

    We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire 'ECLOUD' series. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC. (author)

  13. Modeling microwave/electron-cloud interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattes, M; Sorolla, E; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the separate codes BI-RME and ECLOUD or PyECLOUD, we are developing a novel joint simulation tool, which models the combined effect of a charged particle beam and of microwaves on an electron cloud. Possible applications include the degradation of microwave transmission in telecommunication satellites by electron clouds; the microwave-transmission techniques being used in particle accelerators for the purpose of electroncloud diagnostics; the microwave emission by the electron cloud itself in the presence of a magnetic field; and the possible suppression of electron-cloud formation in an accelerator by injecting microwaves of suitable amplitude and frequency. A few early simulation results are presented. (author)

  14. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Mark; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Livezey, Jesse; Lyndaker, Aaron; Makita, Junki; McDonald, Michael; Medjidzade, Valeri; Meller, Robert; O'Connell, Tim; Peck, Stuart; Peterson, Daniel; Ramirez, Gabriel; Rendina, Matthew; Revesz, Peter; Rider, Nate; Rice, David; Rubin, David; Sagan, David; Savino, James; Schwartz, Robert; Seeley, Robert; Sexton, James; Shanks, James; Sikora, John; Smith, Eric; Strohman, Charles; Williams, Heather; Antoniou, Fanouria; Calatroni, Sergio; Gasior, Marek; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pfingstner, Juergen; Rumolo, Giovanni; Schmickler, Hermann; Taborelli, Mauro; Asner, David; Boon, Laura; Garfinkel, Arthur; Byrd, John; Celata, Christine; Corlett, John; De Santis, Stefano; Furman, Miguel; Jackson, Alan; Kraft, Rick; Munson, Dawn; Penn, Gregory; Plate, David; Venturini, Marco; Carlson, Benjamin; Demma, Theo; Dowd, Rohan; Flanagan, John; Jain, Puneet; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Sakai, Hiroshi; Shibata, Kyo; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Tobiyama, Makoto; Gonnella, Daniel; Guo, Weiming; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Jones, James; Wolski, Andrzej; Kharakh, David; Ng, Johnny; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa; Ross, Marc; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Zwaska, Robert; Schachter, Levi; Wilkinson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud’s effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results

  15. Improvement in the cloud mask for Terra MODIS mitigated by electronic crosstalk correction in the 6.7 μm and 8.5 μm channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Madhavan, S.; Wang, M.

    2016-09-01

    MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a remarkable heritage sensor in the fleet of Earth Observing System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is in space orbit on two spacecrafts. They are the Terra (T) and Aqua (A) platforms which tracks the Earth in the morning and afternoon orbits. T-MODIS has continued to operate over 15 years easily surpassing the 6 year design life time on orbit. Of the several science products derived from MODIS, one of the primary derivatives is the MODIS Cloud Mask (MOD035). The cloud mask algorithm incorporates several of the MODIS channels in both reflective and thermal infrared wavelengths to identify cloud pixels from clear sky. Two of the thermal infrared channels used in detecting clouds are the 6.7 μm and 8.5 μm. Based on a difference threshold with the 11 μm channel, the 6.7 μm channel helps in identifying thick high clouds while the 8.5 μm channel being useful for identifying thin clouds. Starting 2010, it had been observed in the cloud mask products that several pixels have been misclassified due to the change in the thermal band radiometry. The long-term radiometric changes in these thermal channels have been attributed to the electronic crosstalk contamination. In this paper, the improvement in cloud detection using the 6.7 μm and 8.5 μm channels are demonstrated using the electronic crosstalk correction. The electronic crosstalk phenomena analysis and characterization were developed using the regular moon observation of MODIS and reported in several works. The results presented in this paper should significantly help in improving the MOD035 product, maintaining the long term dataset from T-MODIS which is important for global change monitoring.

  16. The Case Of The Elusive Electron Cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Fig. 1 Electron cloud following a controlled beam bump. 'Elementary my dear Watson, you see this footprint proves it was the butler in the foyer with the butcher's knife.' Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes may at first appear a long way from particle physics, but first appearances are often deceiving... The mysteries behind the 'Electron Cloud Effect', a dangerous electron multiplication phenomenon which could possibly limit the LHC's performance, have recently been under a detective level investigation that is yielding data that would make even the valiant Holmes balk. The electron cloud, a group of free floating electrons in the collider, is caused by electron multiplication on the vacuum chamber wall and was first observed in 1976. The cloud that develops is a serious problem because it can lead to beam growth, increased gas release from the collider surface, and a supplementary heat load to the LHC cryogenic system. The phenomenon has been observed since 1999 in the SPS where unexpected pressure...

  17. Electron clouds in high energy hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-08-29

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use of slow extraction will be made. After the acceleration the beam will be debunched and continuously extracted to the experimental area. During this process, residual gas electrons can accumulate in the electric field of the beam. If this accumulation is not prevented, then at some point the beam can become unstable. Under the SPS and LHC conditions the beam is always bunched. The accumulation of electron cloud happens due to secondary electron emission. At the time when this thesis was being written the electron cloud was known to limit the maximum intensity of the two machines. During the operation with 25 ns bunch spacing, the electron cloud was causing significant beam quality deterioration. At moderate intensities below the instability threshold the electron cloud was responsible for the bunch energy loss. In the framework of this thesis it was found that the instability thresholds of the coasting beams with similar space charge tune shifts, emittances and energies are identical. First of their kind simulations of the effect of Coulomb collisions on electron cloud density in coasting beams were performed. It was found that for any hadron coasting beam one can choose vacuum conditions that will limit the accumulation of the electron cloud below the instability threshold. We call such conditions the ''good'' vacuum regime. In application to SIS-100 the design pressure 10{sup -12} mbar corresponds to the good vacuum regime. The transition to the bad vacuum

  18. Electron Cloud Observations during LHC Operation with 25 ns Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Kevin; Iadarola, Giovanni; Mether, Lotta; Romano, Annalisa; Rumolo, Giovanni; Schenk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    While during the Run 1 (2010-2012) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) most of the integrated luminosity was produced with 50 ns bunch spacing, for the Run 2 start-up (2015) it was decided to move to the nominal bunch spacing of 25 ns. As expected, with this beam configuration strong electron cloud effects were observed in the machine, which had to be mitigated with dedicated 'scrubbing' periods at injection energy. This enabled to start the operation with 25 ns beams at 6.5 TeV, but e-cloud effects continued to pose challenges while gradually increasing the number of circulating bunch trains. This contribution will review the encountered limitations and the mitigation measures that where put in place and will discuss possible strategies for further performance gain.

  19. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    I present a summary of topics relevant to the electron-cloud build-up and dissipation that were presented at the International Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects 'ECLOUD 07' (Daegu, S. Korea, April 9-12, 2007). This summary is not meant to be a comprehensive review of the talks. Rather, I focus on those developments that I found, in my personal opinion, especially interesting. The contributions, all excellent, are posted in http://chep.knu.ac.kr/ecloud07/

  20. DAФNE Operation with Electron-Cloud-Clearing Electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D; Gallo, A; Guiducci, S; Milardi, C; Stella, A; Zobov, Mikhail; De Santis, S; Demma, Theo; Raimondi, P

    2013-01-01

    The effects of an electron cloud (e-cloud) on beam dynamics are one of the major factors limiting performances of high intensity positron, proton, and ion storage rings. In the electron-positron collider DAΦNE, namely, a horizontal beam instability due to the electron-cloud effect has been identified as one of the main limitations on the maximum stored positron beam current and as a source of beam quality deterioration. During the last machine shutdown in order to mitigate such instability, special electrodes have been inserted in all dipole and wiggler magnets of the positron ring. It has been the first installation all over the world of this type since long metallic electrodes have been installed in all arcs of the collider positron ring and are currently used during the machine operation in collision. This has allowed a number of unprecedented measurements (e-cloud instabilities growth rate, transverse beam size variation, tune shifts along the bunch train) where the e-cloud contribution is clearly eviden...

  1. Electron Cloud Effect in the Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M

    2004-01-01

    Beam induced multipacting, driven by the electric field of successive positively charged bunches, may arise from a resonant motion of electrons, generated by secondary emission, bouncing back and forth between opposite walls of the vacuum chamber. The electron-cloud effect (ECE) has been observed or is expected at many storage rings [1]. In the beam pipe of the Damping Ring (DR) of a linear collider, an electron cloud is produced initially by ionization of the residual gas and photoelectrons from the synchrotron radiation. The cloud is then sustained by secondary electron emission. This electron cloud can reach equilibrium after the passage of only a few bunches. The electron-cloud effect may be responsible for collective effects as fast coupled-bunch and single-bunch instability, emittance blow-up or incoherent tune shift when the bunch current exceeds a certain threshold, accompanied by a large number of electrons in the vacuum chamber. The ECE was identified as one of the most important R and D topics in the International Linear Collider Report [2]. Systematic studies on the possible electron-cloud effect have been initiated at SLAC for the GLC/NLC and TESLA linear colliders, with particular attention to the effect in the positron main damping ring (MDR) and the positron Low Emittance Transport which includes the bunch compressor system (BCS), the main linac, and the beam delivery system (BDS). We present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud generation in both machine designs. Thus, single and coupled-bunch instability thresholds are estimated for the GLC/NLC design

  2. Electron cloud in the CERN accelerators (PS, SPS, LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iadarola, G; Rumolo, G

    2013-01-01

    Several indicators have pointed to the presence of an Electron Cloud (EC) in some of the CERN accelerators, when operating with closely spaced bunched beams. In particular, spurious signals on the pick ups used for beam detection, pressure rise and beam instabilities were observed at the Proton Synchrotron (PS) during the last stage of preparation of the beams for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), as well as at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Since the LHC has started operation in 2009, typical electron cloud phenomena have appeared also in this machine, when running with trains of closely packed bunches (i.e. with spacings below 150ns). Beside the above mentioned indicators, other typical signatures were seen in this machine (due to its operation mode and/or more refined detection possibilities), like heat load in the cold dipoles, bunch dependent emittance growth and degraded lifetime in store and bunch-by-bunch stable phase shift to compensate for the energy loss due to the electron cloud. An overview of the electron cloud status in the different CERN machines (PS, SPS, LHC) will be presented in this paper, with a special emphasis on the dangers for future operation with more intense beams and the necessary countermeasures to mitigate or suppress the effect. (author)

  3. A New Electronic Commerce Architecture in the Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Guigang Zhang; Chao Li; Sixin Xue; Yuenan Liu; Yong Zhang; Chunxiao Xing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose a new electronic commerce architecture in the cloud that satisfies the requirements of the cloud. This architecture includes five technologies, which are the massive EC data storage technology in the cloud, the massive EC data processing technology in the cloud, the EC security management technology in the cloud, OLAP technology for EC in the cloud, and active EC technology in the cloud. Finally, a detailed discussion of future trends for EC in the cloud env...

  4. Measurement of Electron Cloud Effects in SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, J M

    2004-01-01

    The electron cloud is not a new phenomenon, indeed, it was observed already in other machines like the proton storage rings in BINP Novosibirsk or in the Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR) at CERN. Inside an accelerator beam pipe, the electrons can collectively and coherently interact with the beam potential and degrade the performance of the accelerators operating with intense positively charged bunched beams. In the LHC, electron multipacting is expected to take place in the cold and warm beam pipe due to the presence of the high intensities bunched beams, creating an electron cloud. The additional heat load induced by the electron cloud onto the LHC beam screens of the cold magnets of the LHC bending sections (the arcs represent ~21 km in length) was, and is still, considered as one of the main possible limitation of LHC performances. Since 1997 and in parallel with the SPS studies with LHC-type beams, measurements in other machines or in the laboratory have been made to provide the input parameters required ...

  5. Electron Cloud Parameterization Studies in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O; Baglin, V; Bregliozzi, G; Jimenez, J M; Metral, E; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    During LHC beam commissioning with 150, 75 and 50-ns bunch spacing, important electron-cloud effects, like pressure rise, cryogenic heat load, beam instabilities or emittance growth, were observed. The main strategy to combat the LHC electron cloud, defined about ten years ago, relies on the surface conditioning arising from the chamber-surface bombardment with cloud electrons. In a standard model, the conditioning state of the beam-pipe surface is characterized by three parameters: 1. most importantly, the secondary emission yield δmax; 2. the incident electron energy at which the yield is maximum, ε_max; and 3. the probability of elastic reflection of low-energy primary electrons hitting the chamber wall, R. Since at the LHC no in-situ secondary-yield measurements are available, we compare the relative local pressure-rise measurements taken for different beam configurations against simulations in which surface parameters are scanned. This benchmarking of measurements and simulations is used to infer the s...

  6. Electron cloud buildup studies for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160803; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    Electron clouds can develop in accelerators operating with positively charged particles. The con- sequences of e-cloud related effects are very important for the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and for the design of future accelerators including the LHC luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). High electron densities are generated by an interaction between the beam and the confining chamber. Primary electrons, that can be generated through various mecha- nisms, are accelerated by the beam and impinge on the chamber walls, thereby extracting more electrons from the material. Furthermore they also deposit their kinetic energy in the process, which has to be compensated by the cooling system. Especially in cryogenic environments, as it is the case for a large part of the LHC, high heat loads can pose a serious problem. In order to improve the understanding of the electron cloud, simulation studies are performed with the code PyECLOUD, developed at CERN. The work of the first half of the project is desc...

  7. Method of approximating the effects of blast mitigation materials on particulate-containing clouds formed by explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyckes, G.W.

    1983-09-01

    A numerical model was developed for predicting the effect of blast mitigation materials on the rise and entrainment rate of explosively driven buoyant clouds containing radiotoxic particles. Model predictions for clouds from unmitigated explosions agree with published observations. More experimental data are needed to assess the validity of predictions for clouds from mitigated explosions

  8. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; Vay, J.L.; Grote, D.P.; Ng, J.T.; Pivi, M.F.; Wang, L.F.

    2009-01-01

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l b c , (l b = bunch duration, ω c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ∼ 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed

  9. CLEARING OF ELECTRON CLOUD IN SNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WANG, L.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPRIA, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe a mechanism using the clearing electrodes to remove the electron cloud in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring, where strong multipacting could happen at median clearing fields. A similar phenomenon was reported in an experimental study at Los Alamos laboratory's Proton Synchrotron Ring (PSR). We also investigated the effectiveness of the solenoid's clearing mechanism in the SNS, which differs from the short bunch case, such as in B-factories. The titanium nitride (TiN) coating of the chamber walls was applied to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY)

  10. Experimental Electron Cloud Studies in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Caspers, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Indications for a beam-induced electron cloud build-up are observed since 2000 for the nominal LHC beam in the PS to SPS transfer line and during the last turns before ejection from the PS. A new electron cloud setup was designed, built, and installed in the PS. It contains shielded button-type pickups, a dipole magnet, a vacuum gauge, and a dedicated stripline electrode to experimentally verify the beneficial effect of electron cloud clearing electrodes. During the 2007 run, the electron cloud effect was also clearly observed in the PS and efficient electron cloud suppression has been obtained for negative and positive bias voltages on the clearing electrode. Here, we present electron cloud measurements with different filling patterns and bunch spacings in the PS.

  11. Status of experimental studies of electron cloud effects at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.; Browman, A.A.; Borden, M.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; McCrady, R.C.; Spickermann, T.J.; Zaugg, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Various electron cloud effects (ECE) including the two-stream (e-p) instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have been studied extensively for the past five years with the goal of understanding the phenomena, mitigating the instability and ultimately increasing beam intensity. The specialized diagnostics used in the studies are two types of electron detectors, the retarding field analyzer and the electron sweepmg detector - which have been employed to measure characteristics of the electron cloud as functions of time, location in the ring and various influential beam parameters - plus a short stripline beam position monitor used to measure high frequency motion of the beam centroid. Highlights of this research program are summarized along with more detail on recent results obtained since the ECLOUD'02 workshop. Recent work mcludes a number of parametric studies of the various factors that affect the electron cloud signals, studies of the sources of initial or 'seed' electrons, additional observations of electron cloud dissipation after the beam pulse is extracted, studies of the 'first pulse instability' issue, more data on electron suppression as a cure for the instability, and observations of the effect of a one-turn weak kick on intense beams in the presence of a significant electron cloud.

  12. Electron cloud effects: codes and simulations at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K

    2013-01-01

    Electron cloud effects had been studied at KEK-Photon Factory since 1995. e-p instability had been studied in proton rings since 1965 in BINP, ISR and PSR. Study of electron cloud effects with the present style, which was based on numerical simulations, started at 1995 in positron storage rings. The instability observed in KEKPF gave a strong impact to B factories, KEKB and PEPII, which were final stage of their design in those days. History of cure for electron cloud instability overlapped the progress of luminosity performance in KEKB. The studies on electron cloud codes and simulations in KEK are presented. (author)

  13. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  14. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  15. Simulations of the Electron Cloud Build Up and Instabilities for Various ILC Damping Ring Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, Mauro; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Wang, Lanfa; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Wolski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    In the beam pipe of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an electron cloud may be first produced by photoelectrons and ionization of residual gases and then increased by the secondary emission process. This paper reports the assessment of electron cloud effects in a number of configuration options for the ILC baseline configuration. Careful estimates were made of the secondary electron yield (sometimes in the literature also referred as secondary emission yield SEY or (delta), with a peak value (delta) max ) threshold for electron cloud build-up, and the related single- and coupled-bunch instabilities, as a function of beam current and surface properties for a variety of optics designs. When the configuration for the ILC damping rings was chosen at the end of 2005, the results from these studies were important considerations. On the basis of the joint theoretical and experimental work, the baseline configuration currently specifies a pair of 6 km damping rings for the positron beam, to mitigate the effects of the electron cloud that could present difficulties in a single 6 km ring. However, since mitigation techniques are now estimated to be sufficiently mature, a reduced single 6-km circumference is presently under consideration so as to reduce costs

  16. Emittance growth induced by electron cloud in proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Coppa, G

    2006-01-01

    In proton and positron storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can accumulate in the beam pipe due to various mechanisms (photoemission, residual gas ionization, beam-induced multipacting). The so-formed electron cloud interacts with the positively charged bunches, giving rise to instabilities, emittance growth and losses. This phenomenon has been observed in several existing machines such as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), whose operation has been constrained by the electron-cloud problem, and it is a concern for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud has features which cannot be fully taken into account by the conventional and known theories from accelerators and plasma physics. Computer simulations are indispensable for a proper prediction and understanding of the instability dynamics. The main feature which renders the beam-cloud interactions so peculiar is that the the electron cloud...

  17. Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of η e (le) 130 and η 0 ∼ 10 4 respectively, with 1 MeV K + incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as η e ∝ 1/cos(θ), where θ is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90 o ) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62 o . Gas desorption varies more slowly with θ (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of ∼2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K + ions backscatter when incident at 88-89 o from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within ∼10 o of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90 o . Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams

  18. Electron cloud simulation of the ECR plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Palinkas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The plasma of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) of ATOMKI is being continuously investigated by different diagnostic methods: using small-sized probes or taking X-ray and visible light photographs. In 2011 three articles were published by our team in a special edition of the IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science (Special Issue on Images in Plasma Science) describing our X-ray and visible light measurements and plasma modeling and simulating studies. Simulation is in many cases the base for the analysis of the photographs. The outcomes of the X-ray and visible light experiments were presented already in earlier issues of the Atomki Annual Report, therefore in this year we concentrate on the results of the simulating studies. The spatial distribution of the three main electron components (cold, warm and hot electron clouds) of the ECR plasmas was simulated by TrapCAD code. TrapCAD is a 'limited' plasma simulation code. The spatial and energy evolution of a large number of electrons can be realistically followed; however, these particles are independent, and no particle interactions are included. In ECRISs, the magnetic trap confines the electrons which keep together the ion component by their space charge. The electrons gain high energies while the ions remain very cold throughout the whole process. Thus, the spatial and energy simulation of the electron component gives much important and numerical information even for the ions. The electron components of ECRISs can artificially be grouped into three populations: cold, warm, and hot electrons. Cold electrons (1-200 eV) have not been heated by the microwave; they are mainly responsible for the visible light emission of the plasma. The energized warm electrons (several kiloelectronvolts) are able to ionize atoms and ions and they are mainly responsible for the characteristic Xray photons emitted by the plasma. Electrons having much higher energy than necessary for

  19. Impact of Microwaves on the Electron Cloud and Incoherent Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01

    We consider the use of microwaves for manipulating the electron cloud, describing an exploratory experiment at PEP-II as well as computer simulations of the electron cloud build-up in the presence of a microwave for an LHC dipole. We then show that the incoherent effects of the electron cloud - energy loss and transverse emittance growth due to scattering of the electrons - are negligible. This suggests that the disturbance of the coherent motion may be another possible application of microwaves, which could prevent beam emittance growth and beam loss.

  20. Dynamic electronic institutions in agent oriented cloud robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Vineet; Morel, Olivier; Malik, Aamir; Saad, Naufal; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The dot-com bubble bursted in the year 2000 followed by a swift movement towards resource virtualization and cloud computing business model. Cloud computing emerged not as new form of computing or network technology but a mere remoulding of existing technologies to suit a new business model. Cloud robotics is understood as adaptation of cloud computing ideas for robotic applications. Current efforts in cloud robotics stress upon developing robots that utilize computing and service infrastructure of the cloud, without debating on the underlying business model. HTM5 is an OMG's MDA based Meta-model for agent oriented development of cloud robotic systems. The trade-view of HTM5 promotes peer-to-peer trade amongst software agents. HTM5 agents represent various cloud entities and implement their business logic on cloud interactions. Trade in a peer-to-peer cloud robotic system is based on relationships and contracts amongst several agent subsets. Electronic Institutions are associations of heterogeneous intelligent agents which interact with each other following predefined norms. In Dynamic Electronic Institutions, the process of formation, reformation and dissolution of institutions is automated leading to run time adaptations in groups of agents. DEIs in agent oriented cloud robotic ecosystems bring order and group intellect. This article presents DEI implementations through HTM5 methodology.

  1. Electron-cloud measurements and simulations for the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.; Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    We compare experimental results with simulations of the electron cloud effect induced by a positron beam at the APS synchrotron light source at ANL, where the electron cloud effect has been observed and measured with dedicated probes. We find good agreement between simulations and measurements for reasonable values of certain secondary electron yield (SEY) parameters, most of which were extracted from recent bench measurements at SLAC

  2. Proceedings of Joint INFN-CERN-EuCARD-AccNet Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimino, R; Rumolo, Giovanni; Zimmermann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This report contains the Proceedings of the Joint INFN-Frascati, INFN-Pisa, CERN-LER and EuCARD-AccNet Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects, “ECLOUD12”, held at La Biodola, Isola d’Elba, from 5 to 9 June 2012. The ECLOUD12 workshop reviewed many recent electron-cloud (EC) observations at existing storage rings, EC predictions for future accelerators, electron-cloud studies at DAFNE, EC mitigation by clearing electrodes and graphite/carbon coatings, modeling of incoherent EC effects, self-consistent simulations, synergies with other communities like the Valencia Space Consortium and the European Space Agency. ECLOUD12 discussed new EC observations at existing machines including LHC, CesrTA, PETRA-3, J-PARC, and FNAL MI; latest experimental efforts to characterize the EC – including EC diagnostics, experimental techniques, mitigation techniques such as coating and conditioning, advanced chemical and physical analyses of various vacuum-chamber surfaces, beam instabilities and emittance growth –; the status of EC physics models and (new, more versatile and additional) simulation codes and their comparison with recently acquired experimental data; and the mitigation requirements and potential performance limitations imposed by the EC on upgraded and future machines, including HL-LHC, FAIR, ILC, Project-X, SuperB and SuperKEKB. A dedicated session addressed problems related to RF breakdown and multipacting for space applications. A number of open questions and future R&D needs were identified

  3. Electron cloud in the CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069325; Bartosik, Hannes; Belli, Eleonora; Iadarola, Giovanni; Li, Kevin Shing Bruce; Mether, Lotta Maria; Romano, Annalisa; Schenk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Operation with closely spaced bunched beams causes the build-up of an Electron Cloud (EC) in both the LHC and the two last synchrotrons of its injector chain (PS and SPS). Pressure rise and beam instabilities are observed at the PS during the last stage of preparation of the LHC beams. The SPS was affected by coherent and incoherent emittance growth along the LHC bunch train over many years, before scrubbing has finally suppressed the EC in a large fraction of the machine. When the LHC started regular operation with 50 ns beams in 2011, EC phenomena appeared in the arcs during the early phases, and in the interaction regions with two beams all along the run. Operation with 25 ns beams (late 2012 and 2015), which is nominal for LHC, has been hampered by EC induced high heat load in the cold arcs, bunch dependent emittance growth and degraded beam lifetime. Dedicated and parasitic machine scrubbing is presently the weapon used at the LHC to combat EC in this mode of operation. This talk summarises the EC experi...

  4. Measurement of Electron Clouds in Large Accelerators by Microwave Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Santis, S.; Byrd, J.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Caspers, F.; /CERN; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC; Kroyer, T.; /CERN; Pivi, M.T.F.; /SLAC; Sonnad, K.G.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-03-19

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation at high currents. Furthermore, it is difficult to probe their density over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave transmitted over a section of the accelerator and used it to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  5. Electron cloud dynamics in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Celata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The interference of stray electrons (also called “electron clouds” with accelerator beams is important in modern intense-beam accelerators, especially those with beams of positive charge. In magnetic wigglers, used, for instance, for transverse emittance damping, the intense synchrotron radiation produced by the beam can generate an electron cloud of relatively high density. In this paper the complicated dynamics of electron clouds in wigglers is examined using the example of a wiggler in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with the WARP-POSINST computer code show different density and dynamics for the electron cloud at locations near the maxima of the vertical wiggler field when compared to locations near the minima. Dynamics in these regions, the electron cloud distribution vs longitudinal position, and the beam coherent tune shift caused by the wiggler electron cloud will be discussed.

  6. Simulation of the electron cloud density in BEPC II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yudong; Guo Zhiyuan; Wang Jiuqing

    2004-01-01

    Electron Cloud Instability (ECI) may take place in positron storage ring when the machine is operated with multi-bunch positron beam. According to the actual shape of the vacuum chamber in the BEPC II, a program has been developed. With the code, authors can calculate the electron density in the chamber with different length of antechamber and the different secondary electron yield respectively. By the simulation, the possibility to put clearing electrodes in the chamber to reduce the electron density in the central region of the chamber is investigated. The simulation provides meaningful and important results for the BEPC II project and electron cloud instability research

  7. Electron-cloud effects in high-luminosity colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1998-01-01

    Electron-cloud instabilities are expected to be important in most high-luminosity double-ring colliders. In this report, the author describes a few parameter regimes and some critical parameter dependences of this type of instability, and illustrate these with simulation results for the PEP-II and KEK B factories, the LHC, the VLHC, and DAPHNE. In addition, the author studies the possibility and the potential impact of an electron cloud in the interaction region.

  8. Experimental studies of stable confined electron clouds using Gabor lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Meusel, O.; Glaeser, B.; Schulte, K.

    2013-04-22

    Based on the idea of D. Gabor [1] space charge lenses are under investigation to be a powerful focussing device for intense ion beams. A stable confined electron column is used to provide strong radially symmetric electrostatic focussing, e.g. for positively charged ion beams. The advantages of Gabor lenses are a mass independent focussing strength, space charge compensation of the ion beam and reduced magnetic or electric fields compared to conventional focussing devices. Collective phenomena of the electron cloud result in aberrations and emittance growth of the ion beam. The knowledge of the behaviour of the electron cloud prevents a decrease of the beam brilliance. Numerical models developed to describe the electron confinement and dynamics within a Gabor lens help to understand the interaction of the ion beam with the electron column and show the causes of non-neutral plasma instabilities. The diagnosis of the electron cloud properties helps to evaluate the numerical models and to investigate the influen...

  9. Electron cloud diagnostics in use at the Los Alamos PSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R. J.; Browman, A.; Borden, M.; Fitzgerald, D.; Wang, T. S.; Zaugg, T.; Harkay, K.; Rosenberg, R.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of electron cloud diagnostics have been deployed at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to detect, measure, and characterize the electron cloud generated in this high intensity, long bunch accumulator ring. These include a version of the ANL-developed retarding field analyzers (RFA) augmented with LANL-developed electronics, a variant of the RFA denoted as the electron sweeping diagnostic (ESD), biased collection plates, and gas pulse measuring devices. The designs and experience with the performance and applicability to PSR are discussed

  10. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittenden, J. A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G. F.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D. L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K. G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M. A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.

    2014-03-01

    We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications

  11. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  12. Electron Cloud Buildup Characterization Using Shielded Pickup Measurements and Custom Modeling Code at CESRTA

    CERN Document Server

    Crittenden, James A

    2013-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator experimental program includes investigations into electron cloud buildup, applying various mitigation techniques in custom vacuum chambers. Among these are two 1.1-m-long sections located symmetrically in the east and west arc regions. These chambers are equipped with pickup detectors shielded against the direct beam-induced signal. They detect cloud electrons migrating through an 18-mm-diameter pattern of small holes in the top of the chamber. A digitizing oscilloscope is used to record the signals, providing time-resolved information on cloud development. Carbon-coated, TiN-coated and uncoated aluminum chambers have been tested. Electron and positron beams of 2.1, 4.0 and 5.3 GeV with a variety of bunch populations and spacings in steps of 4 and 14 ns have been used. Here we report on results from the ECLOUD modeling code which highlight the sensitivity of these measurements to the physical phenomena determining cloud buildup such as the photoelectron produ...

  13. Joint INFN-CERN-EuCARD-AccNet Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, Giovanni; Zimmermann, Frank; ECLOUD'12

    2013-01-01

    This report contains the Proceedings of the Joint INFN-Frascati, INFN-Pisa, CERN-LER and EuCARD-AccNet Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects, “ECLOUD12”, held at La Biodola, Isola d’Elba, from 5 to 9 June 2012. The ECLOUD12 workshop reviewed many recent electron-cloud (EC) observations at existing storage rings, EC predictions for future accelerators, electron-cloud studies at DAFNE, EC mitigation by clearing electrodes and graphite/carbon coatings, modeling of incoherent EC effects, self-consistent simulations, synergies with other communities like the Valencia Space Consortium and the European Space Agency. ECLOUD12 discussed new EC observations at existing machines including LHC, CesrTA, PETRA-3, J-PARC, and FNAL MI; latest experimental efforts to characterize the EC – including EC diagnostics, experimental techniques, mitigation techniques such as coating and conditioning, advanced chemical and physical analyses of various vacuum-chamber surfaces, beam instabilities and emittance growth –; the...

  14. Electron cloud effects in SIS-18 and SIS-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF) (Germany); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Electron cloud build-up and associated instabilities are studied in simulations under conditions relevant to SIS-18 and to the projected SIS-100 heavy ion synchrotrons. In both rings coasting beams are foreseen during slow extraction of the beam. Trapped electrons could lead to a reduction of the extraction efficiency. We present the results of electron cloud studies for bunched and for coasting beams. In these two regimes the main production mechanisms are significantly different. For coasting beams the most important mechanism is residual gas ionization, for bunched beam the main source of electrons is secondary emission. In the case of coasting beams electrons are generated in the vicinity of the beam center and a two-stream instability may occur for the projected intensities.Electron clouds due to bunched beams are of concern in SIS-100 because no special coating of the stainless steel beam pipe is presently foreseen. Finally we also discuss experimental studies of electron cloud generation in SIS-18.

  15. Simulating electron clouds in heavy-ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-01-01

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positively charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly magnetized, weakly magnetized, and unmagnetized. The approach to such self-consistency is described, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyroperiod in the magnets. Tests and applications are presented: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the high-current experiment [L. R. Prost, P. A. Seidl, F. M. Bieniosek, C. M. Celata, A. Faltens, D. Baca, E. Henestroza, J. W. Kwan, M. Leitner, W. L. Waldron, R. Cohen, A. Friedman, D. Grote, S. M. Lund, A. W. Molvik, and E. Morse, 'High current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion', Physical Review Special Topics, Accelerators and Beams 8, 020101 (2005)], at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam on an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-time-step mover to accurately calculate the instability

  16. Measurements of the electron cloud in the APS storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkey, K. C.

    1999-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation interacting with the vacuum chamber walls in a storage ring produce photoelectrons that can be accelerated by the beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, as is the case with the aluminum chambers in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, a runaway condition can develop. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored positron or electron bunches, the possibility exists that a transverse perturbation of the head bunch will be communicated to trailing bunches due to interaction with the cloud. In order to characterize the electron cloud, a special vacuum chamber was built and inserted into the ring. The chamber contains 10 rudimentary electron-energy analyzers, as well as three targets coated with different materials. Measurements show that the intensity and electron energy distribution are highly dependent on the temporal spacing between adjacent bunches and the amount of current contained in each bunch. Furthermore, measurements using the different targets are consistent with what would be expected based on the SEY of the coatings. Data for both positron and electron beams are presented

  17. Electron cloud observations at the ISIS Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Pertica, A.

    2013-04-22

    The build up of electron clouds inside a particle accelerator vacuum chamber can produce strong transverse and longitudinal beam instabilities which in turn can lead to high levels of beam loss often requiring the accelerator to be run below its design specification. To study the behaviour of electron clouds at the ISIS Proton Synchrotron, a Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) based electron cloud detector has been developed. The detector is based on the Retarding Field Analyser (RFA) design and consists of a retarding grid, which allows energy analysis of the electron signal, and a MCP assembly placed in front of the collector plate. The MCP assembly provides a current gain over the range 300 to 25K, thereby increasing the signal to noise ratio and dynamic range of the measurements. This paper presents the first electron cloud observations at the ISIS Proton Synchrotron. These results are compared against signals from a beam position monitor and a fast beam loss monitor installed at the same location.

  18. Theory and measurement of the electron cloud effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkey, K. C.

    1999-01-01

    Photoelectrons produced through the interaction of synchrotrons radiation and the vacuum chamber walls can be accelerated by a charged particle beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons (SES) in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, a run-away condition can develop. In addition to the SEY, the degree of amplification depends on the beam intensity and temporal distribution. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored bunches, a transverse perturbation of the head bunch can be communicated to trailing bunches in a wakefield-like interaction with the cloud. The electron cloud effect is especially of concern for the high-intensity PEP-II (SLAC) and KEK B-factories and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. An initiative was undertaken at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring to characterize the electron cloud in order to provide realistic limits on critical input parameters in the models and improve their predictive capabilities. An intensive research program was undertaken at CERN to address key issues relating to the LHC. After giving an overview, the recent theoretical and experimental results from the APS and the other laboratories will be discussed

  19. Theory and measurement of the electron cloud effect

    CERN Document Server

    Harkay, K C

    1999-01-01

    Photoelectrons produced through the interaction of synchrotron radiation and the vacuum chamber walls can be accelerated by a charged particle beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons (SEs) in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, a runaway condition can develop. In addition to the SEY, the degree of amplification depends on the beam intensity and temporal distribution. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored bunches, a transverse perturbation of the head bunch can be communicated to trailing bunches in a wakefield-like interaction with the cloud. The electron cloud effect is especially of concern for the high-intensity PEP-II (SLAC) and KEK B-factories and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. An initiative was undertaken at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring to characterize the electron cloud in order to provide realistic limits on critical input parameters in the models ...

  20. Electron cloud sizes in gas-filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggende, A.J.F. den; Schrijver, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Electron cloud sizes have been calculated for gas mixtures containing Ar, Xe, CO 2 , CH 4 , and N 2 for drifts through a constant electric field. The transport coefficients w and D/μ are in good agreement with experimental data of various sources for pure gases. Results of measurements, also performed in this work, for Ar+CO 2 , Ar+CH 4 , and Ar+Xe+CO 2 mixtures are in fair agreement with the calculated cloud sizes. For a large number of useful gas mixtures calculated electron cloud sizes are presented and discussed, most of which are given for the first time. A suggestion is made for an optimal gas mixture for an X-ray position sensitive proportional counter for medium and low energies. (orig.)

  1. Summary: Electron-cloud effects and fast-ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-01-01

    This is my summary of the talks on the electron-cloud effect and the fast-ion instability that were presented at the 8th ICFA Beam Dynamics Mini-Work shop on Two-Stream Instabilities in Particle Accelerators and Storage Rings,Santa Fe, NM, February 16--18, 2000

  2. Electron-cloud simulation results for the PSR and SNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos. In particular, a complete refined model for the secondary emission process including the so called true secondary, rediffused and backscattered electrons has been included in the simulation code

  3. RFID-based Electronic Identity Security Cloud Platform in Cyberspace

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Chen; Chengxiang Tan; Bo Jin; Xiang Zou; Yuebo Dai

    2012-01-01

    With the moving development of networks, especially Internet of Things, electronic identity administration in cyberspace is becoming more and more important. And personal identity management in cyberspace associated with individuals in reality has been one significant and urgent task for the further development of information construction in China. So this paper presents a RFID-based electronic identity security cloud platform in cyberspace to implement an efficient security management of cyb...

  4. New Electron Cloud Detectors for the PS Main Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Ch; Gilardoni, S; Taborelli, M; Neupert, H; Ferreira Somoza, J

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud (EC) has already been observed during normal operation of the PS, therefore it is necessary to study its in fluence on any beam instability for the future LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU). Two new electron cloud detectors have been discussed, developed and installed during the Long Shutdown (LS1) in one of the PS main magnets. The first measurement method is based on current measurement by using a shielded button-type pick-up. Due to the geometry and space limitation in the PS magnet, the button-type pick-up made of a 96%Al2O3 block coated with a thin layer of solvent-based Ag painting, placed 30 degrees to the bottom part of the vacuum chamber was installed in the horizontal direction where the only opening of the magnet coil is. The other newly developed measurement method is based on detection of photons emitted by the electrons from the electron cloud impinging on the vacuum chamber walls. The emitted photons are reected to a quartz window. A MCP-PMT (Micro-Channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube) wit...

  5. Relation between parameters of self-sustaining magnetically confined electron cloud and external conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the fluid theory of the axisymmetrical self-sustaining magnetically confined electron clouds an approximate analytical method is developed. By means of this method the relations between the parameters of this type of electron cloud and external conditions are studied. The parameters include electron density, electron temperature, drift angular frequency of electrons, radius of the electron cloud and electric potential at the centre of the electron cloud. They depend on the voltage, magnetic induction, pressure, electromagnetic field distribution in the confinement device and parameters of electron-atom collisions

  6. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Theory and Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a broad-brush survey of the phenomenology, history and importance of the electron-cloud effect (ECE). We briefly discuss the simulation techniques used to quantify the electron-cloud (EC) dynamics. Finally, we present in more detail an effective theory to describe the EC density build-up in terms of a few effective parameters. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire 'ECLOUD' series. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC.

  7. Electron Cloud Build Up and Instability in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G; Papaphilippou, Y

    2008-01-01

    Electron cloud can be formed in the CLIC positron damping ring and cause intolerable tune shift and beam instability. Build up simulations with the Faktor2 code, developed at CERN, have been done to predict the cloud formation in the arcs and wigglers of the damping rings. HEADTAIL simulations have been used to study the effect of this electron cloud on the beam and assess the thresholds above which the electron cloud instability would set in.

  8. Electron cloud studies for the LHC and future proton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez Sánchez de la Blanca, César Octavio; Zimmermann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle collider. Its main objectives are to explore the validity of the standard model of particle physics and to look for new physics beyond it, at unprecedented collision energies and rates. A good luminosity performance is imperative to attain these goals. In the last stage of the LHC commissioning (2011-2012), the limiting factor to achieving the design bunch spacing of 25 ns has been the electron cloud effects. The electron cloud is also expected to be the most important luminosity limitation after the first Long Shut-Down of the LHC (LS1), when the machine should be operated at higher energy and with 25-ns spacing, as well as for the planned luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC) and future high energy proton colliders (HE-LHC and VHE-LHC). This thesis contributes to the understanding of the electron cloud observations during the first run of the LHC (2010-2012), presents the first beam dynamics analysis for the next generation of high en...

  9. Electron-cloud build-up in hadron machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The first observations of electron-proton coupling effect for coasting beams and for long-bunch beams were made at the earliest proton storage rings at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in the mid-60's [1]. The effect was mainly a form of the two-stream instability. This phenomenon reappeared at the CERN ISR in the early 70's, where it was accompanied by an intense vacuum pressure rise. When the ISR was operated in bunched-beam mode while testing aluminum vacuum chambers, a resonant effect was observed in which the electron traversal time across the chamber was comparable to the bunch spacing [2]. This effect (''beam-induced multipacting''), being resonant in nature, is a dramatic manifestation of an electron cloud sharing the vacuum chamber with a positively-charged beam. An electron-cloud-induced instability has been observed since the mid-80's at the PSR (LANL) [3]; in this case, there is a strong transverse instability accompanied by fast beam losses when the beam current exceeds a certain threshold. The effect was observed for the first time for a positron beam in the early 90's at the Photon Factory (PF) at KEK, where the most prominent manifestation was a coupled-bunch instability that was absent when the machine was operated with an electron beam under otherwise identical conditions [4]. Since then, with the advent of ever more intense positron and hadron beams, and the development and deployment of specialized electron detectors [5-9], the effect has been observed directly or indirectly, and sometimes studied systematically, at most lepton and hadron machines when operated with sufficiently intense beams. The effect is expected in various forms and to various degrees in accelerators under design or construction. The electron-cloud effect (ECE) has been the subject of various meetings [10-15]. Two excellent reviews, covering the phenomenology, measurements, simulations and historical development, have been recently given by Frank Zimmermann [16

  10. Electron cloud in various kinds of magnetic field of BEPCII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yudong; Guo Zhiyuan; Qin Qing; Wang Jiuqing

    2006-01-01

    Electron cloud instability (ECI) may take place in a positron storage ring when the machine is operated with a multi-bunch positron beam. According to the actual shape of the vacuum chamber in the BEPCII, a programme which is different from the other simulation codes has been developed. Because of the distance between dipole magnet and sextupole, the quadrupole magnet of BEPCII is very short, much of the photoelectrons can be produced and can move in magnetic fields. The motion of electrons in various kinds of magnetic fields is studied in detail, especially for the solenoid field which will be wound in the vacuum pipe of BEPCII. Simulation shows that the solenoid field is very effective to confine the electrons to the vicinity of the vacuum chamber wall and to make an electron free region at the vacuum pipe centre. (authors)

  11. Studies of dynamics of electron clouds in STAR silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bellwied, R; Brandon, N; Caines, H; Chen, W; Dimassimo, D; Dyke, H; Hall, J R; Hardtke, D; Hoffmann, G W; Humanic, T J; Kotova, A I; Kotov, I V; Kraner, H W; Li, Z; Lynn, D; Middelkamp, P; Ott, G; Pandey, S U; Pruneau, C A; Rykov, V L; Schambach, J; Sedlmeir, J; Sugarbaker, E R; Takahashi, J; Wilson, W K

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons generated in silicon drift detectors was studied using an IR LED. Electrons were generated at different drift distances. In this way, the evolution of the cloud as a function of drift time was measured. Two methods were used to measure the cloud size. The method of cumulative functions was used to extract the electron cloud profiles. Another method obtains the cloud width from measurements of the charge collected on a single anode as a function of coordinate of the light spot. The evolution of the electron cloud width with drift time is compared with theoretical calculations. Experimental results agreed with theoretical expectations.

  12. Electron-microscope study of cloud and fog nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, S; Okita, T

    1952-01-01

    Droplets of clouds on a mountain and of fog in an urban area were captured and the form, nature and size of their nuclei were studied by means of an electron-microscope and by a chamber of constant humidity. These nuclei have similar form and nature to the hygroscopic particles in haze and to the artificially produced combustion particles. No sea-salt nuclei were found in our observations, therefore, sea-spray appears to be an insignificant source of condensation nuclei. It was found that both the cloud and the fog nuclei originated in combustion products which were the mixture of hygroscopic and non-hygroscopic substances, and that the greater part of the nuclei did not contain pure sulfuric acid.

  13. Benchmarking headtail with electron cloud instabilities observed in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bartosik, H.; Iadarola, G.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Rumolo, G.

    2013-01-01

    After a successful scrubbing run in the beginning of 2011, the LHC can be presently operated with high intensity proton beams with 50 ns bunch spacing. However, strong electron cloud effects were observed during machine studies with the nominal beam with 25 ns bunch spacing. In particular, fast transverse instabilities were observed when attempting to inject trains of 48 bunches into the LHC for the first time. An analysis of the turn-by-turn bunch-bybunch data from the transverse damper pick-ups during these injection studies is presented, showing a clear signature of the electron cloud effect. These experimental observations are reproduced using numerical simulations: the electron distribution before each bunch passage is generated with PyECLOUD and used as input for a set of HEADTAIL simulations. This paper describes the simulation method as well as the sensitivity of the results to the initial conditions for the electron build-up. The potential of this type of simulations and their clear limitations on th...

  14. Simulation of electron cloud effects to heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Fatih; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2011-07-01

    Electron cloud (EC) driven instability can cause beam loss, emittance growth, trajectory change and wake fields. Mentioned crucial effects of EC motivated researchers to understand the EC build up mechanism and the effects of EC to the beam. This motivation also induced the progress of developing new simulation codes. EC simulations can roughly be divided into two classes such as, softwares whose goals are to simulate the build up of the EC during the passage of a bunch train and the codes which model the interaction of a bunch with an EC. The aim of this study is to simulate the effects of electron cloud (EC) on the dynamics of heavy ion beams which are used in heavy ion synchrotron (SIS-18) at GSI. To do this, a 3-D and self-consistent simulation program based on particle in cell (PIC) method is used. In the PIC cycle, accurate solution of the Maxwell equations is obtained by employing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. As a model, we assumed a perfectly conducting beam pipe which was uniformly (or randomly) loaded with the electrons. Then as parallel with the realistic cases in SIS-18, a single bunch consisting of U{sup +73} ions was extracted which could propagate in this pipe. Due to EC-ion bunch interaction, electrons gained energy and their displacements were observed. Electric and magnetic field components and EC charge density were calculated, numerically.

  15. Observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds in a positron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Spencer, C.M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wang, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    The first experimental observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds is reported. The resonance was observed as a modulation in cloud intensity for uncoated as well as TiN-coated aluminum surfaces in the positron storage ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. Electron clouds frequently arise in accelerators of positively charged particles, and severely impact the machines' performance. The TiN coating was found to be an effective remedy, reducing the cloud intensity by three orders of magnitude.

  16. Electron temperatures within magnetic clouds between 2 and 4 AU: Voyager 2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1998-08-01

    We have performed an analysis of Voyager 2 plasma electron observations within magnetic clouds between 2 and 4 AU identified by Burlaga and Behannon [1982]. The analysis has been confined to three of the magnetic clouds identified by Burlaga and Behannon that had high-quality data. The general properties of the plasma electrons within a magnetic cloud are that (1) the moment electron temperature anticorrelates with the electron density within the cloud, (2) the ratio Te/Tp tends to be >1, and (3) on average, Te/Tp~7.0. All three results are consistent with previous electron observations within magnetic clouds. Detailed analyses of the core and halo populations within the magnetic clouds show no evidence of either an anticorrelation between the core temperature TC and the electron density Ne or an anticorrelation between the halo temperature TH and the electron density. Within the magnetic clouds the halo component can contribute more than 50% of the electron pressure. The anticorrelation of Te relative to Ne can be traced to the density of the halo component relative to the density of the core component. The core electrons dominate the electron density. When the density goes up, the halo electrons contribute less to the electron pressure, so we get a lower Te. When the electron density goes down, the halo electrons contribute more to the electron pressure, and Te goes up. We find a relation between the electron pressure and density of the form Pe=αNeγ with γ~0.5.

  17. Simulation of wake potentials induced by relativistic proton bunches in electron clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF)

    2012-07-01

    Electron clouds limit the intensity of modern high intensity hadron accelerators. Presently electron clouds are the main limiting factor for the LHC operation with 25 ns bunch trains. The bunches passing through an electron cloud induce a wake field. When the electron cloud density exceeds a certain threshold beam instabilities occur. The presence of electron clouds results in a shift of the synchronous phase, which increases if the bunch spacing is reduced. For LHC and SPS conditions we compare the longitudinal electron cloud wake potentials and stopping powers obtained using a simplified 2D electrostatic Particle-in-Cell code with fully electromagnetic simulations using VORPAL. In addition we analyze the wake fields induced by displaced or tilted bunches.

  18. Recent electron-cloud simulation results for the main damping rings of the NLC and TESLA linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler

  19. CESR Conversion Damping Ring Studies of Electron Cloud Instabilities (CESR-TA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, David L.; Palmer, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    In the International Linear Collider, two linear accelerators will accelerate bunches of positrons and electrons to over a hundred billion electron volts and collide them in a central detector. In order to obtain useful collision rates, the bunches, each containing twenty billion particles, must be compressed to a cross section of a few nanometers by a few hundred nanometers. In order to prepare these ultra high density bunches, damping rings (DRs) are employed before the linear accelerators. The DRs take the high emittance bunches that are provided by the electron and positron sources and, through the process of radiation damping, squeeze them into ultra low emittance beams that are ready for the main linear accelerators. In the damping rings, a number of effects can prevent the successful preparation of the beams. In the electron ring, an effect known as the fast ion instability can lead to beam growth and, in the positron ring, the build-up of an electron cloud (EC), which interacts with the circulating bunches, can produce the same effect. EC build-up and the subsequent interaction of the cloud with the positron beam in the DR have been identified as major risks for the successful construction of a linear collider. The CESRTA research program at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was developed in order to study the build-up of the EC, the details of its impact on ultra low emittance beams, as well as methods to mitigate the impact of the cloud. In the DR, the EC forms when synchrotron photons radiated from the circulating beam strike the walls of the vacuum chamber, resulting in the emission of photoelectrons. These low energy electrons can be accelerated across the vacuum chamber by the electric field of the beam, and strike the walls, causing the emission of secondary electrons. The secondary electrons are subsequently accelerated into the walls yet again via the same mechanism. The result is that the EC can rapidly begin to fill the vacuum chamber. In

  20. CESR Conversion Damping Ring Studies of Electron Cloud Instabilities (CESR-TA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, David L.; Palmer, Mark A.

    2011-08-02

    In the International Linear Collider, two linear accelerators will accelerate bunches of positrons and electrons to over a hundred billion electron volts and collide them in a central detector. In order to obtain useful collision rates, the bunches, each containing twenty billion particles, must be compressed to a cross section of a few nanometers by a few hundred nanometers. In order to prepare these ultra high density bunches, damping rings (DRs) are employed before the linear accelerators. The DRs take the high emittance bunches that are provided by the electron and positron sources and, through the process of radiation damping, squeeze them into ultra low emittance beams that are ready for the main linear accelerators. In the damping rings, a number of effects can prevent the successful preparation of the beams. In the electron ring, an effect known as the fast ion instability can lead to beam growth and, in the positron ring, the build-up of an electron cloud (EC), which interacts with the circulating bunches, can produce the same effect. EC build-up and the subsequent interaction of the cloud with the positron beam in the DR have been identified as major risks for the successful construction of a linear collider. The CESRTA research program at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was developed in order to study the build-up of the EC, the details of its impact on ultra low emittance beams, as well as methods to mitigate the impact of the cloud. In the DR, the EC forms when synchrotron photons radiated from the circulating beam strike the walls of the vacuum chamber, resulting in the emission of photoelectrons. These low energy electrons can be accelerated across the vacuum chamber by the electric field of the beam, and strike the walls, causing the emission of secondary electrons. The secondary electrons are subsequently accelerated into the walls yet again via the same mechanism. The result is that the EC can rapidly begin to fill the vacuum chamber. In

  1. First electron-cloud studies at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O; Arduini, G; Metral, E; Rumolo, G; Zimmermann, F; Maury Cuna, H

    2013-01-01

    During the beam commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with 150, 75, 50, and 25-ns bunch spacing, important electron-cloud effects, like pressure rise, cryogenic heat load, beam instabilities, or emittance growth, were observed. Methods have been developed to infer different key beam-pipe surface parameters by benchmarking simulations and pressure rise as well as heat-load observations. These methods allow us to monitor the scrubbing process, i.e., the reduction of the secondary emission yield as a function of time, in order to decide on the most appropriate strategies for machine operation. To better understand the influence of electron clouds on the beam dynamics, simulations have been carried out to examine both the coherent and the incoherent effects on the beam. In this paper we present the methodology and first results for the scrubbing monitoring process at the LHC. We also review simulated instability thresholds and tune footprints for beams of different emittance, interacting with an electr...

  2. Physical Mechanism, Spectral Detection, and Potential Mitigation of 3D Cloud Effects on OCO-2 Radiances and Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, S.; Schmidt, S.; Massie, S. T.; Iwabuchi, H.; Chen, H.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of multiple partially cloudy scenes as observed by OCO-2 in nadir and target mode (published previously and reviewed here) revealed that XCO2 retrievals are systematically biased in presence of scattered clouds. The bias can only partially be removed by applying more stringent filtering, and it depends on the degree of scene inhomogeneity as quantified with collocated MODIS/Aqua imagery. The physical reason behind this effect was so far not well understood because in contrast to cloud-mediated biases in imagery-derived aerosol retrievals, passive gas absorption spectroscopy products do not depend on the absolute radiance level and should therefore be less sensitive to 3D cloud effects and surface albedo variability. However, preliminary evidence from 3D radiative transfer calculations suggested that clouds in the vicinity of an OCO-2 footprint not only offset the reflected radiance spectrum, but introduce a spectrally dependent perturbation that affects absorbing channels disproportionately, and therefore bias the spectroscopy products. To understand the nature of this effect for a variety of scenes, we developed the OCO-2 radiance simulator, which uses the available information on a scene (e.g., MODIS-derived surface albedo, cloud distribution, and other parameters) as the basis for 3D radiative transfer calculations that can predict the radiances observed by OCO-2. We present this new tool and show examples of its utility for a few specific scenes. More importantly, we draw conclusions about the physical mechanism behind this 3D cloud effect on radiances and ultimately OCO-2 retrievals, which involves not only the clouds themselves but also the surface. Harnessed with this understanding, we can now detect cloud vicinity effects in the OCO-2 spectra directly, without actually running the 3D radiance simulator. Potentially, it is even possible to mitigate these effects and thus increase data harvest in regions with ubiquitous cloud cover such as the Amazon

  3. Electron cloud density analysis using microwave cavity resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y-M; Thangaraj, J C; Tan, C-Y; Zwaska, R

    2013-01-01

    We report on a method to detect an electron cloud in proton accelerators through the measurement of the phase shift of microwaves undergoing controlled reflections with an accelerator vacuum vessel. Previous phase shift measurement suffered from interference signals due to uncontrolled reflections from beamline components, leading to an unlocalized region of measurement and indeterminate normalization. The method in this paper introduces controlled reflectors about the area of interest to localize the measurement and allow normalization. This paper describes analyses of the method via theoretical calculations, electromagnetic modeling, and experimental measurements with a bench-top prototype. Dielectric thickness, location and spatial profile were varied and the effect on phase shift is described. The effect of end cap aperture length on phase shift measurement is also reported. A factor of ten enhancement in phase shift is observed at certain frequencies.

  4. Observation of Electron Cloud Instabilities and Emittance Dilution at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzapple, R.L.; Campbell, R.C.; McArdle, K.E.; Miller, M.I.; Totten, M.M.; Tucker, S.L.; Billing, M.G.; Dugan, G.F.; Ramirez, G.A.; Sonnad, K.G.; Williams, H.A.; Flanagan, J.; Palmer, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnotics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud with stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains; 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this paper we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions

  5. Model of the electron acceleration in the clouds of radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of electron turbulent acceleration in the clouds of radio galaxies is studied. It is suggested that clouds of radio galaxies are continuously filled by relativistic matter. A self-consistent turbulent acceleration regime in the clouds of radio galaxies is shown to be realized. The synchrotron energetic losses of the ultra-relativistic electrons are compensated by the turbulent acceleration due to Langmuir and Alfven waves. The source of Langmuir waves turbulence is the relativistic matter emanating from the galaxy nuclei and relaxating within the ''hot spots'' of the clouds

  6. Simulations of the electron cloud buildup and its influence on the microwave transmission measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Oliver Sebastian, E-mail: o.haas@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Petrov, Fedor [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-21

    An electron cloud density in an accelerator can be measured using the Microwave Transmission (MWT) method. The aim of our study is to evaluate the influence of a realistic, nonuniform electron cloud on the MWT. We conduct electron cloud buildup simulations for beam pipe geometries and bunch parameters resembling roughly the conditions in the CERN SPS. For different microwave waveguide modes the phase shift induced by a known electron cloud density is obtained from three different approaches: 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of the electron response, a 2D eigenvalue solver for waveguide modes assuming a dielectric response function for cold electrons, a perturbative method assuming a sufficiently smooth density profile. While several electron cloud parameters, such as temperature, result in minor errors in the determined density, the transversely inhomogeneous density can introduce a large error in the measured electron density. We show that the perturbative approach is sufficient to describe the phase shift under realistic electron cloud conditions. Depending on the geometry of the beam pipe, the external magnetic field configuration and the used waveguide mode, the electron cloud density can be concentrated at the beam pipe or near the beam pipe center, leading to a severe over- or underestimation of the electron density. -- Author-Highlights: •Electron cloud distributions are very inhomogeneous, especially in dipoles. •These inhomogeneities affect the microwave transmission measurement results. •Electron density might be over- or underestimated, depending on setup. •This can be quantified with several models, e.g. a perturbative approach.

  7. Survey on Security Issues in Cloud Computing and Associated Mitigation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Rohit; Sanyal, Sugata

    2012-06-01

    Cloud Computing holds the potential to eliminate the requirements for setting up of high-cost computing infrastructure for IT-based solutions and services that the industry uses. It promises to provide a flexible IT architecture, accessible through internet for lightweight portable devices. This would allow multi-fold increase in the capacity or capabilities of the existing and new software. In a cloud computing environment, the entire data reside over a set of networked resources, enabling the data to be accessed through virtual machines. Since these data-centers may lie in any corner of the world beyond the reach and control of users, there are multifarious security and privacy challenges that need to be understood and taken care of. Also, one can never deny the possibility of a server breakdown that has been witnessed, rather quite often in the recent times. There are various issues that need to be dealt with respect to security and privacy in a cloud computing scenario. This extensive survey paper aims to elaborate and analyze the numerous unresolved issues threatening the cloud computing adoption and diffusion affecting the various stake-holders linked to it.

  8. Single-Bunch Instability Driven by the Electron Cloud Effect in the Positron Damping Ring of the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, Mauro; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Ghalam, Ali; Harkay, Katherine; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Wolski, Andrzej; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Collective instabilities caused by the formation of an electron cloud (EC) are a potential limitation to the performances of the damping rings for a future linear collider. In this paper, we present recent simulation results for the electron cloud build-up in damping rings of different circumferences and discuss the single-bunch instabilities driven by the electron cloud

  9. Electron-cloud updated simulation results for the PSR, and recent results for the SNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M.; Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Recent simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos are presented in this paper. A refined model for the secondary emission process including the so called true secondary, rediffused and backscattered electrons has recently been included in the electron-cloud code

  10. A comparison and benchmark of two electron cloud packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Amundson, James F; Spentzouris, Panagiotis G; Veitzer, Seth A

    2012-01-01

    We present results from precision simulations of the electron cloud (EC) problem in the Fermilab Main Injector using two distinct codes. These two codes are (i)POSINST, a F90 2D+ code, and (ii)VORPAL, a 2D/3D electrostatic and electromagnetic code used for self-consistent simulations of plasma and particle beam problems. A specific benchmark has been designed to demonstrate the strengths of both codes that are relevant to the EC problem in the Main Injector. As differences between results obtained from these two codes were bigger than the anticipated model uncertainties, a set of changes to the POSINST code were implemented. These changes are documented in this note. This new version of POSINST now gives EC densities that agree with those predicted by VORPAL, within {approx}20%, in the beam region. The root cause of remaining differences are most likely due to differences in the electrostatic Poisson solvers. From a software engineering perspective, these two codes are very different. We comment on the pros and cons of both approaches. The design(s) for a new EC package are briefly discussed.

  11. Simulations of Electron Cloud Effects on the Beam Dynamics for the FNAL Main Injector Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnad Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine M.; Grote, David

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab main injector (MI) is being considered for an upgrade as part of the high intensity neutrino source (HINS) effort. This upgrade will involve a significant increasing of the bunch intensity relative to its present value. Such an increase will place the MI in a regime in which electron-cloud effects are expected to become important. We have used the electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP, recently augmented with new modeling capabilities and simulation techniques, to study the dynamics of beam-electron cloud interaction. This work in progress involves a systematic assessment of beam instabilities due to the presence of electron clouds

  12. Simulation and Analysis of Microwave Transmission through an Electron Cloud, a Comparison of Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnad, Kiran; Sonnad, Kiran; Furman, Miguel; Veitzer, Seth; Stoltz, Peter; Cary, John

    2007-01-01

    Simulation studies for transmission of microwaves through electron clouds show good agreement with analytic results. The electron cloud produces a shift in phase of the microwave. Experimental observation of this phenomena would lead to a useful diagnostic tool for accessing the local density of electron clouds in an accelerator. These experiments are being carried out at the CERN SPS and the PEP-II LER at SLAC and is proposed to be done at the Fermilab main injector. In this study, a brief analysis of the phase shift is provided and the results are compared with that obtained from simulations

  13. Electron cloud density measurements in accelerator beam-pipe using resonant microwave excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, John P., E-mail: jps13@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Carlson, Benjamin T. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Duggins, Danielle O. [Gordon College, Wenham, MA 01984 (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); De Santis, Stefano [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tencate, Alister J. [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. In the original technique, microwaves are transmitted through a section of beam-pipe and a change in EC density produces a change in the phase of the transmitted signal. This paper describes a variation on this technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length with a greatly improved signal to noise ratio.

  14. A simulation study of electron-cloud instability and beam-induced multipacting in the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1997-02-01

    In the LHC beam pipe, photoemission and secondary emission give rise to a quasi-stationary electron cloud, which is established after a few bunch passages. The response of this electron cloud to a transversely displaced bunch resembles a short-range wakefield and can cause a fast instability. In addition, beam-induced multipacting of the electrons may lead to an enhanced gas desorption and an associated pressure increase. In this paper the authors report preliminary simulation results of the electron-cloud build-up both in a dipole magnet and in a straight section of the LHC at top energy. The effective wakefield created by the electron cloud translates into an instability rise time of about 25 ms horizontally and 130 ms vertically. This rise time is not much larger than that of the resistive-wall instability at injection energy

  15. Protection of electronic health records (EHRs) in cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulatif, Abdulatif; Khalil, Ibrahim; Mai, Vu

    2013-01-01

    EHR technology has come into widespread use and has attracted attention in healthcare institutions as well as in research. Cloud services are used to build efficient EHR systems and obtain the greatest benefits of EHR implementation. Many issues relating to building an ideal EHR system in the cloud, especially the tradeoff between flexibility and security, have recently surfaced. The privacy of patient records in cloud platforms is still a point of contention. In this research, we are going to improve the management of access control by restricting participants' access through the use of distinct encrypted parameters for each participant in the cloud-based database. Also, we implement and improve an existing secure index search algorithm to enhance the efficiency of information control and flow through a cloud-based EHR system. At the final stage, we contribute to the design of reliable, flexible and secure access control, enabling quick access to EHR information.

  16. The Use of OMPS Near Real Time Products in Volcanic Cloud Risk Mitigation and Smoke/Dust Air Quality Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seftor, C. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; McPeters, R. D.; Li, J. Y.; Durbin, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Near real time (NRT) SO2 and aerosol index (AI) imagery from Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) has proven invaluable in mitigating the risk posed to air traffic by SO2 and ash clouds from volcanic eruptions. The OMI products, generated as part of NASA's Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) NRT system and available through LANCE and both NOAA's NESDIS and ESA's Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS) portals, are used to monitor the current location of volcanic clouds and to provide input into Volcanic Ash (VA) advisory forecasts. NRT products have recently been developed using data from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite onboard the Suomi NPP platform; they are currently being made available through the SACS portal and will shortly be incorporated into the LANCE NRT system. We will show examples of the use of OMPS NRT SO2 and AI imagery to monitor recent volcanic eruption events. We will also demonstrate the usefulness of OMPS AI imagery to detect and track dust storms and smoke from fires, and how this information can be used to forecast their impact on air quality in areas far removed from their source. Finally, we will show SO2 and AI imagery generated from our OMPS Direct Broadcast data to highlight the capability of our real time system.

  17. Analysis of the security and privacy requirements of cloud-based electronic health records systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; de la Torre, Isabel; Fernández, Gonzalo; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2013-08-21

    The Cloud Computing paradigm offers eHealth systems the opportunity to enhance the features and functionality that they offer. However, moving patients' medical information to the Cloud implies several risks in terms of the security and privacy of sensitive health records. In this paper, the risks of hosting Electronic Health Records (EHRs) on the servers of third-party Cloud service providers are reviewed. To protect the confidentiality of patient information and facilitate the process, some suggestions for health care providers are made. Moreover, security issues that Cloud service providers should address in their platforms are considered. To show that, before moving patient health records to the Cloud, security and privacy concerns must be considered by both health care providers and Cloud service providers. Security requirements of a generic Cloud service provider are analyzed. To study the latest in Cloud-based computing solutions, bibliographic material was obtained mainly from Medline sources. Furthermore, direct contact was made with several Cloud service providers. Some of the security issues that should be considered by both Cloud service providers and their health care customers are role-based access, network security mechanisms, data encryption, digital signatures, and access monitoring. Furthermore, to guarantee the safety of the information and comply with privacy policies, the Cloud service provider must be compliant with various certifications and third-party requirements, such as SAS70 Type II, PCI DSS Level 1, ISO 27001, and the US Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA). Storing sensitive information such as EHRs in the Cloud means that precautions must be taken to ensure the safety and confidentiality of the data. A relationship built on trust with the Cloud service provider is essential to ensure a transparent process. Cloud service providers must make certain that all security mechanisms are in place to avoid unauthorized access

  18. Securing services in the cloud: an investigation of the threats and the mitigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farroha, Bassam S.; Farroha, Deborah L.

    2012-05-01

    The stakeholder's security concerns over data in the clouds (Voice, Video and Text) are a real concern to DoD, the IC and private sector. This is primarily due to the lack of physical isolation of data when migrating to shared infrastructure platforms. The security concerns are related to privacy and regulatory compliance required in many industries (healthcare, financial, law enforcement, DoD, etc) and the corporate knowledge databases. The new paradigm depends on the service provider to ensure that the customer's information is continuously monitored and is kept available, secure, access controlled and isolated from potential adversaries.

  19. Elves and associated electron density changes due to cloud-to-ground and in-cloud lightning discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Inan, U. S.; Glukhov, V. S.

    2010-04-01

    A 3-D finite difference time domain model is used to simulate the lightning electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and its interaction with the lower ionosphere. Results agree with the frequently observed, doughnut-shaped optical signature of elves but show that the structure exhibits asymmetry due to the presence of Earth's ambient magnetic field. Furthermore, in-cloud (horizontal) lightning channels produce observable optical emissions without the doughnut shape and, in fact, produce a much stronger optical output for the same channel current. Electron density perturbations associated with elves are also calculated, with contributions from attachment and ionization. Results presented as a function of parameters such as magnetic field direction, dipole current orientation, altitude and amplitude, and ambient ionospheric density profile demonstrate the highly nonlinear nature of the EMP-ionosphere interaction. Ionospheric effects of a sequence of in-cloud discharges are calculated, simulating a burst of in-cloud lightning activity and resulting in large density changes in the overlying ionosphere.

  20. Electron cloud instabilities in the Proton Storage Ring and Spallation Neutron Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blaskiewicz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron cloud instabilities in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring and those foreseen for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source are examined theoretically, numerically, and experimentally.

  1. ELECTRON CLOUD AT COLLIMATOR AND INJECTION REGION OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCUMULATOR RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WANG, L.; HSEUH, H.-C.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; WEI, J.; COUSINEAU, S.

    2005-01-01

    The beam loss along the Spallation Neutron Source's accumulator ring is mainly located at the collimator region and injection region. This paper studied the electron cloud build-up at these two regions with the three-dimension program CLOUDLAND

  2. Fast Transverse Beam Instability Caused by Electron Cloud Trapped in Combined Function Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, Sergey [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Electron cloud instabilities affect the performance of many circular high-intensity particle accelerators. They usually have a fast growth rate and might lead to an increase of the transverse emittance and beam loss. A peculiar example of such an instability is observed in the Fermilab Recycler proton storage ring. Although this instability might pose a challenge for future intensity upgrades, its nature had not been completely understood. The phenomena has been studied experimentally by comparing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, numerically by simulating the build-up of the electron cloud and its interaction with the beam, and analytically by constructing a model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function dipoles. Stabilization of the beam by a clearing bunch reveals that the instability is caused by the electron cloud, trapped in beam optics magnets. Measurements of microwave propagation confirm the presence of the cloud in the combined function dipoles. Numerical simulations show that up to 10$^{-2}$ of the particles can be trapped by their magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated fast instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and low mode frequency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulations. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  3. Electron Cloud Simulations of a Proton Storage Ring Using Cold Proton Bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Lee, S.Y.; Macek, R.

    2008-01-01

    Using the ORBIT code we study the sensitivity of electron cloud properties with respect to different proton beam profiles, the secondary electron yield (SEY) parameter, and the proton loss rate. Our model uses a cold proton bunch to generate primary electrons and electromagnetic field for electron cloud dynamics. We study the dependence of the prompt and swept electron signals vs the bunch charge and the recovery of electron clouds after sweeping on the beam loss rate and the SEY. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data measured at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our simulations indicate that the fractional proton loss rate in the field-free straight section may be an exponential function of proton beam charge and may also be lower than the averaged fractional proton loss rate over the whole ring.

  4. Runaway electron beam generation and mitigation during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coffey, I.; Decker, J.; Drewelow, P.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.C.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Giacomelli, L.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lupelli, I.; Lomas, P. J.; Manzanares, A.; Martin De Aguilera, A.; Matthews, G.F.; Mlynář, Jan; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Perez von Thun, C.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A.E.; Sips, G.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 9 (2015), 093013-093013 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : runaway electrons * disruptions * tokamak * JET * massive gas injection * disruption mitigation * runaway background plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/55/9/093013

  5. Transverse blowup along bunch train caused by electron cloud in BEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yudong; Guo Zhiyuan; Qin Qing; Wang Jiuqing; Zhao Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Electron cloud instability (ECI) may take place in a storage ring when the machine is operated with a multi-bunch positively charged beam. Transverse blowup due to electron cloud has been observed in some machines and is considered to be a major limit factor in the development of high current and high luminosity electron positron colliders. With a streak camera, the transverse blowup along the bunch train was first observed in an experiment at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC) and the simulation results were used to compared with the observation. (authors)

  6. Application of Coherent Tune Shift Measurements to the Characterization of Electron Cloud Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreinick, D.L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Dugan, G.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Randazzo, M.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.; Palmer, M.A.; Ramirez, G.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of coherent tune shifts at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) have been made for electron and positron beams under a wide variety of beam energies, bunch charge, and bunch train configurations. Comparing the observed tunes with the predictions of several electron cloud simulation programs allows the evaluation of important parameters in these models. These simulations will be used to predict the behavior of the electron cloud in damping rings for future linear colliders. We outline recent improvements to the analysis techniques that should improve the fidelity of the modeling.

  7. Experiments on the injection, confinement, and ejection of electron clouds in a magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhouse, S.; Fisher, A.; Rostoker, N.

    1978-01-01

    A cloud of (5 to 10 keV) electrons is injected into a magnetic mirror field. The magnetic field rises in 40--120 μsec to a maximum of 10 kG. Two methods of injection were tried: In the first, the injector is located at the mirror midplane and electrons are injected perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. In the second scheme, the injector is located near the mirror maximum. Up to about 10 11 electrons were trapped in both schemes with a mean kinetic energy of 0.3 MeV. Measured confinement time is limited only by the magnetic field decay time. The compressed electron cloud executes electrostatic oscillations. The frequency of the oscillation is proportional to the number of electrons trapped, and it is independent of the value of the magnetic field and the initial electron energy. The electron cloud was ejected along the mirror axis and properties of the ejected electron cloud were measured by x-ray pulses from bremstrahlung of electrons on the vacuum system wall and by collecting electrons on a Faraday cup

  8. Electron cloud development in the Proton Storage Ring and in the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    We have applied our simulation code ''POSINST'' to evaluate the contribution to the growth rate of the electron-cloud instability in proton storage rings. Recent simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud in the storage ring of the Spallation Neutron Source(SNS) at Oak Ridge, and updated results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos are presented in this paper. A key ingredient in our model is a detailed description of the secondary emitted-electron energy spectrum. A refined model for the secondary emission process including the so-called true secondary, rediffused and backscattered electrons has recently been included in the electron-cloud code

  9. Mitigation of current quench by runaway electrons in LHCD discharges in the HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, H.W.; Hu, L.Q.; Lin, S.Y.; Zhong, G.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Production of runaway electrons during a major disruption has been observed in HT-7 Tokamak. The runaway current plateaus, which can carry part of the pre-disruptive current, are observed in lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) limiter discharges. It is found that the runaway current can mitigate the disruptions effectively. Detailed observations are presented on the runaway electrons generated following disruptions in the HT-7 tokamak with carbon limited discharges. The results indicate that the magnetic oscillations play an important role in the activity of runaway electrons in disruption. (author)

  10. Reconciliation of the cloud computing model with US federal electronic health record regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Eugene J

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing refers to subscription-based, fee-for-service utilization of computer hardware and software over the Internet. The model is gaining acceptance for business information technology (IT) applications because it allows capacity and functionality to increase on the fly without major investment in infrastructure, personnel or licensing fees. Large IT investments can be converted to a series of smaller operating expenses. Cloud architectures could potentially be superior to traditional electronic health record (EHR) designs in terms of economy, efficiency and utility. A central issue for EHR developers in the US is that these systems are constrained by federal regulatory legislation and oversight. These laws focus on security and privacy, which are well-recognized challenges for cloud computing systems in general. EHRs built with the cloud computing model can achieve acceptable privacy and security through business associate contracts with cloud providers that specify compliance requirements, performance metrics and liability sharing.

  11. Reconciliation of the cloud computing model with US federal electronic health record regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing refers to subscription-based, fee-for-service utilization of computer hardware and software over the Internet. The model is gaining acceptance for business information technology (IT) applications because it allows capacity and functionality to increase on the fly without major investment in infrastructure, personnel or licensing fees. Large IT investments can be converted to a series of smaller operating expenses. Cloud architectures could potentially be superior to traditional electronic health record (EHR) designs in terms of economy, efficiency and utility. A central issue for EHR developers in the US is that these systems are constrained by federal regulatory legislation and oversight. These laws focus on security and privacy, which are well-recognized challenges for cloud computing systems in general. EHRs built with the cloud computing model can achieve acceptable privacy and security through business associate contracts with cloud providers that specify compliance requirements, performance metrics and liability sharing. PMID:21727204

  12. Electron-Cloud Simulation and Theory for High-Current Heavy-Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Lee, E; Azevedo, T; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-01-01

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary- electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability: (1) We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2) We simulate of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration). One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3) We report first results from a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics

  13. Electron-cloud simulation and theory for high-current heavy-ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Cohen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy-ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron-cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds (also applicable to other accelerators. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability. (1 We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2 We simulate the effect of specified electron-cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing-mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope “breathing” mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3 We report first results from a long-time-step algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics.

  14. Trapping of Electron Cloud LLC/Cesrta Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    2011-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R and D (1). One of the primary goals of the CesrTA program is to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with low emittance positron beam to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies and benchmark predictions by simulation codes. This paper reports the simulation of the electron-cloud formation in CESRTA and ILC quadrupole and sextupole magnets using the 3D code CLOUDLAND. We found that electrons can be trapped with a long lifetime in a quadrupole and sextupole magnet due to the mirror field trapping mechanism. We study the effects of magnet strength, bunch current, ante-chamber effect, bunch spacing effect and secondary emission yield (SEY) in great detail. The development of an electron cloud in magnets is the main concern where a weak solenoid field is not effective. Quadrupole and sextupole magnets have mirror field configurations which may trap electrons by the mirror field trapping mechanism (2). Fig.1 shows the orbit of a trapped electron in a quadrupole magnet. The electron makes gyration motion (called transverse motion) and also moves along the field line (called longitudinal motion). At the mirror point (middle of the field line), there is a maximum longitudinal energy and minimum transverse energy. When the electron moves away from the mirror point, its longitudinal energy reduces and the transverse energy increases as the magnetic field increases. If the magnetic field is strong enough, the longitudinal energy becomes zero at one point and then the electron is turned back by the strong field. Note that the electrons are trapped in the region near the middle of the field lines. Although all quadrupole and sextupole magnets can trap electrons in principle, the

  15. Simulation of the interaction of positively charged beams and electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovik, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    The incoherent (head-tail) effect on the bunch due to the interaction with electron clouds (e-clouds) leads to a blow up of the transverse beam size in storage rings operating with positively charged beams. Even more the e-cloud effects are considered to be the main limiting factor for high current, high-brightness or high-luminosity operation of future machines. Therefore the simulation of e-cloud phenomena is a highly active field of research. The main focus in this work was set to a development of a tool for simulation of the interaction of relativistic bunches with non-relativistic parasitic charged particles. The result is the Particle-In-Cell Program MOEVE PIC Tracking which can track a 3D bunch under the influence of its own and external electromagnetic fields but first and foremost it simulates the interaction of relativistic positively charged bunches and initially static electrons. In MOEVE PIC Tracking the conducting beam pipe can be modeled with an arbitrary elliptical cross-section to achieve more accurate space charge field computations for both the bunch and the e-cloud. The simulation of the interaction between positron bunches and electron clouds in this work gave a detailed insight of the behavior of both particle species during and after the interaction. Further and ultimate goal of this work was a fast estimation of the beam stability under the influence of e-clouds in the storage ring. The standard approach to simulate the stability of a single bunch is to track the bunch particles through the linear optics of the machine by multiplying the 6D vector of each particle with the transformation matrices describing the lattice. Thereby the action of the e-cloud on the bunch is approximated by a pre-computed wake kick which is applied on one or more points in the lattice. Following the idea of K.Ohmi the wake kick was pre-computed as a two variable function of the bunch part exiting the e-cloud and the subsequent parts of a bunch which receive a

  16. Electron-Cloud Build-up in the FNAL Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade [1] in a fieldfree region at the location of the RFA electron detector [2]. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding measurements obtained with the RFA we infer that the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) (delta) max is ∼> 1.4, and the average electron density is n e ∼> 10 10 m -3 at transition energy for the specific fill pattern and beam intensities defined below. The sensitivity of our results to several variables remains to be explored in order to reach more definitive results. Effects from the electron cloud on the beam are being investigated separately [3

  17. Simulation and analysis of TE wave propagation for measurement of electron cloud densities in particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnad, Kiran G., E-mail: kgs52@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schwartz, Robert M. [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Veitzer, Seth A. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The use of transverse electric (TE) waves has proved to be a powerful, noninvasive method for estimating the densities of electron clouds formed in particle accelerators. Results from the plasma simulation program VSim have served as a useful guide for experimental studies related to this method, which have been performed at various accelerator facilities. This paper provides results of the simulation and modeling work done in conjunction with experimental efforts carried out at the Cornell electron storage ring “Test Accelerator” (CESRTA). This paper begins with a discussion of the phase shift induced by electron clouds in the transmission of RF waves, followed by the effect of reflections along the beam pipe, simulation of the resonant standing wave frequency shifts and finally the effects of external magnetic fields, namely dipoles and wigglers. A derivation of the dispersion relationship of wave propagation for arbitrary geometries in field free regions with a cold, uniform cloud density is also provided.

  18. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  19. Electron-cloud simulation results for the SPS and recent results for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.T.F.

    2002-01-01

    We present an update of computer simulation results for some features of the electron cloud at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and recent simulation results for the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We focus on the sensitivity of the power deposition on the LHC beam screen to the emitted electron spectrum, which we study by means of a refined secondary electron (SE) emission model recently included in our simulation code

  20. Application of new simulation algorithms for modeling rf diagnostics of electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Traveling wave rf diagnostics of electron cloud build-up show promise as a non-destructive technique for measuring plasma density and the efficacy of mitigation techniques. However, it is very difficult to derive an absolute measure of plasma density from experimental measurements for a variety of technical reasons. Detailed numerical simulations are vital in order to understand experimental data, and have successfully modeled build-up. Such simulations are limited in their ability to reproduce experimental data due to the large separation of scales inherent to the problem. Namely, one must resolve both rf frequencies in the GHz range, as well as the plasma modulation frequency of tens of MHz, while running for very long simulations times, on the order of microseconds. The application of new numerical simulation techniques allow us to bridge the simulation scales in this problem and produce spectra that can be directly compared to experiments. The first method is to use a plasma dielectric model to measure plasma-induced phase shifts in the rf wave. The dielectric is modulated at a low frequency, simulating the effects of multiple bunch crossings. This allows simulations to be performed without kinetic particles representing the plasma, which both speeds up the simulations as well as reduces numerical noise from interpolation of particle charge and currents onto the computational grid. Secondly we utilize a port boundary condition model to simultaneously absorb rf at the simulation boundaries, and to launch the rf into the simulation. This method improves the accuracy of simulations by restricting rf frequencies better than adding an external (finite) current source to drive rf, and absorbing layers at the boundaries. We also explore the effects of non-uniform plasma densities on the simulated spectra.

  1. Shielded button electrodes for time-resolved measurements of electron cloud buildup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, J.A.; Billing, M.G.; Li, Y.; Palmer, M.A.; Sikora, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design, deployment and signal analysis for shielded button electrodes sensitive to electron cloud buildup at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These simple detectors, derived from a beam-position monitor electrode design, have provided detailed information on the physical processes underlying the local production and the lifetime of electron densities in the storage ring. Digitizing oscilloscopes are used to record electron fluxes incident on the vacuum chamber wall in 1024 time steps of 100 ps or more. The fine time steps provide a detailed characterization of the cloud, allowing the independent estimation of processes contributing on differing time scales and providing sensitivity to the characteristic kinetic energies of the electrons making up the cloud. By varying the spacing and population of electron and positron beam bunches, we map the time development of the various cloud production and re-absorption processes. The excellent reproducibility of the measurements also permits the measurement of long-term conditioning of vacuum chamber surfaces

  2. Risk mitigation strategy for the ITER electron cyclotron upper port launcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goede, A.P.H.; Bongers, W.A.; Elzendoorn, B.S.Q.; Graswinckel, M.F.; Baar, M.R. de

    2010-01-01

    A basic requirement for ITER equipment to meet is a high level of reliability, because ITER operation time is precious and radioactive operation leaves limited scope for repair. In order to reduce the risk of failure during ITER operation an effective risk mitigation strategy is necessary. This paper presents such strategy for the ITER electron cyclotron upper port launcher (ECUPL). A preliminary ECUPL risk analysis identifies possible failure modes. A probabilistic risk assessment quantifies the risk of failure using a 4 x 4 impact-likelihood matrix. Impact is quantified through technical, cost and schedule elements. Likelihood depends on the risk mitigation strategy adopted. A cost benefit analysis determines the most cost effective risk mitigation strategy. An essential element in risk mitigation is the testing of equipment prior to installation on the ITER machine. This paper argues the need for low- and highpower millimetre wave tests carried out on the fully assembled ECUPL. It presents a conceptual design for a dedicated on-site test bed that can handle 2 of 8 microwave beams at 2 MW long pulse operation.

  3. NAFFS: network attached flash file system for cloud storage on portable consumer electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Huang, Hao; Xie, Changsheng

    Cloud storage technology has become a research hotspot in recent years, while the existing cloud storage services are mainly designed for data storage needs with stable high speed Internet connection. Mobile Internet connections are often unstable and the speed is relatively low. These native features of mobile Internet limit the use of cloud storage in portable consumer electronics. The Network Attached Flash File System (NAFFS) presented the idea of taking the portable device built-in NAND flash memory as the front-end cache of virtualized cloud storage device. Modern portable devices with Internet connection have built-in more than 1GB NAND Flash, which is quite enough for daily data storage. The data transfer rate of NAND flash device is much higher than mobile Internet connections[1], and its non-volatile feature makes it very suitable as the cache device of Internet cloud storage on portable device, which often have unstable power supply and intermittent Internet connection. In the present work, NAFFS is evaluated with several benchmarks, and its performance is compared with traditional network attached file systems, such as NFS. Our evaluation results indicate that the NAFFS achieves an average accessing speed of 3.38MB/s, which is about 3 times faster than directly accessing cloud storage by mobile Internet connection, and offers a more stable interface than that of directly using cloud storage API. Unstable Internet connection and sudden power off condition are tolerable, and no data in cache will be lost in such situation.

  4. Capabilities and Advantages of Cloud Computing in the Implementation of Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Aslani, Nasim

    2018-01-01

    With regard to the high cost of the Electronic Health Record (EHR), in recent years the use of new technologies, in particular cloud computing, has increased. The purpose of this study was to review systematically the studies conducted in the field of cloud computing. The present study was a systematic review conducted in 2017. Search was performed in the Scopus, Web of Sciences, IEEE, Pub Med and Google Scholar databases by combination keywords. From the 431 article that selected at the first, after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 27 articles were selected for surveyed. Data gathering was done by a self-made check list and was analyzed by content analysis method. The finding of this study showed that cloud computing is a very widespread technology. It includes domains such as cost, security and privacy, scalability, mutual performance and interoperability, implementation platform and independence of Cloud Computing, ability to search and exploration, reducing errors and improving the quality, structure, flexibility and sharing ability. It will be effective for electronic health record. According to the findings of the present study, higher capabilities of cloud computing are useful in implementing EHR in a variety of contexts. It also provides wide opportunities for managers, analysts and providers of health information systems. Considering the advantages and domains of cloud computing in the establishment of HER, it is recommended to use this technology.

  5. Accurate simulation of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector with VORPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John R.; Stoltz, Peter; Veitzer, Seth A.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-05-01

    Precision simulations of the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been studied using the plasma simulation code VORPAL. Fully 3D and self consistent solutions that includes E.M. field maps generated by the cloud and the proton bunches have been obtained, as well detailed distributions of the electron's 6D phase space. We plan to include such maps in the ongoing simulation of the space charge effects in the Main Injector. Simulations of the response of beam position monitors, retarding field analyzers and microwave transmission experiments are ongoing.

  6. Progress on electron cloud effects calculations for the FNAL main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, Miguel A; Sonnad, Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the response of the beam to an electron cloud for the Fermilab Main Injector using the Quasistatic Model [1] implemented into the particle-in-cell code Warp [2]. Specifically, we have addressed the effects due to varying the beam intensity, electron cloud density and chromaticity. In addition, we have estimated the contribution to emittance evolution due to beam space-charge effects. We have carried out a comparison between how the beam responds at injection energy and at top energy. We also present some results on the validation of the computational model, and report on progress towards improving the computational model

  7. The size and spatial distribution of microchannel plate output electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapington, J.S.; Edgar, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental technique for measuring the spatial distribution of the output charge cloud from a microchannel plate (MCP), using a planar, charge-division-type anode is discussed. The anode simultaneously measures, for each charge cloud, both the position of the charge centroid and the fractional charge falling to one side of the split in the pattern. The measurements from several thousand events have been combined to calculate the average spatial distribution of the electron cloud and the dominant factors influencing the charge cloud distribution have been found to be the MCP gain and the MCP-anode accelerating field and geometry. Experimental research on the two dominant factors with respect to ranges of distribution is presented. 10 refs

  8. Electronic Health Records in the Cloud: Improving Primary Health Care Delivery in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Liezel; Wright, Graham

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa, the recording of health data is done manually in a paper-based file, while attempts to digitize healthcare records have had limited success. In many countries, Electronic Health Records (EHRs) has developed in silos, with little or no integration between different operational systems. Literature has provided evidence that the cloud can be used to 'leapfrog' some of these implementation issues, but the adoption of this technology in the public health care sector has been very limited. This paper aims to identify the major reasons why the cloud has not been used to implement EHRs for the South African public health care system, and to provide recommendations of how to overcome these challenges. From the literature, it is clear that there are technology, environmental and organisational challenges affecting the implementation of EHRs in the cloud. Four recommendations are provided that can be used by the National Department of Health to implement EHRs making use of the cloud.

  9. Characterization of electron clouds in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator using TE-wave transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Santis, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Billing, M.; Palmer, M.; Sikora, J.; Carlson, B.

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new technique for measuring the electron cloud density in storage rings has been developed and successfully demonstrated (S. De Santis, J.M. Byrd, F. Caspers, A. Krasnykh, T. Kroyer, M.T.F. Pivi, and K.G. Sonnad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 094801 (2008).). We present the experimental results of a systematic application of this technique at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator. The technique is based on the phase modulation of the TE mode transmitted in a synchrotron beam pipe caused by the periodic variation of the density of electron plasma. Because of the relatively simple hardware requirements, this method has become increasingly popular and has been since successfully implemented in several machines. While the principles of this technique are straightforward, quantitative derivation of the electron cloud density from the measurement requires consideration of several effects, which we address in detail.

  10. Electron-cloud instabilities and beam-induced multipacting in the LHC and in the VLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1997-10-01

    In the beam pipe of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), photoemission and secondary emission give rise to a quasi-stationary electron cloud, which is established after a few buncn passages. The response of this electron cloud to a transversely displaced bunch resembles a short-range wakefield and can cause a fast instability. In additoin, beam-induced multipacting of the electrons may lead to an enhanced gas desorption and an associated pressure increase. In this paper the authors report preliminary simulation results of the electron-cloud build-up both in a dipole magnet and in a straight section of the LHC at top energy. The effective wakefield created by the electron cloud translates into an instability rise time of about 40 ms horizontally and 500 ms vertically. This rise time is not much larger than that of the resistive-wall instability at injection energy. Similar simulation studies show that the instability rise time for the proposed Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is about 3--4 s in both trasnverse planes. The smaller growth rate in the VLHC, as compared with the LHC, is primarily due to the much lower bunch population

  11. Preliminary Analysis and Simulation Results of Microwave Transmission Through an Electron Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnad, Kiran; Sonnad, Kiran; Furman, Miguel; Veitzer, Seth; Stoltz, Peter; Cary, John

    2007-01-01

    The electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code VORPAL is being used to simulate the interaction of microwave radiation through an electron cloud. The results so far show good agreement with theory for simple cases. The study has been motivated by previous experimental work on this problem at the CERN SPS [1], experiments at the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC [4], and proposed experiments at the Fermilab Main Injector (MI). With experimental observation of quantities such as amplitude, phase and spectrum of the output microwave radiation and with support from simulations for different cloud densities and applied magnetic fields, this technique can prove to be a useful probe for assessing the presence as well as the density of electron clouds

  12. Study of Electron Cloud E ects in the DAFNE PHI-Factory for the KLOE-2 Run

    CERN Document Server

    Demma, T

    2011-01-01

    A strong horizontal instability has been observed in the the DAFNE positron ring since 2003. Experimental observations suggest an electron cloud induced coupled bunbh instability as a possible explanation. Here is reported a simulation study of the electron cloud effects in the positron ring of the DAFNE PHI factory with particular reference to the machine configuration designed for the KLOE-2 experiment.

  13. Electron cloud studies for SIS-18 and for the FAIR synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Electron clouds generated by residual gas ionization pose a potential threat to the stability of the circulating heavy ion beams in the existing SIS-18 synchrotron and in the projected SIS-100. The electrons can potentially accumulate in the space charge potential of the long bunches. As an extreme case we study the accumulation of electrons in a coasting beam under conditions relevant in the SIS-18. Previous studies of electron clouds in coasting beams used particle-in-cell (PIC) codes to describe the generation of the cloud and the interaction with the ion beam. PIC beams exhibit much larger fluctuation amplitudes than real beams. The fluctuations heat the electrons. Therefore the obtained neutralization degree is strongly reduced, relative to a real beam. In our simulation model we add a Langevin term to the electron equation of motion in order to account for the heating process. The effect of natural beam fluctuations on the neutralization degree is studied. The modification of the beam response function as well as the stability limits in the presence of the electrons is discussed.

  14. Status of the experimental studies of the electron cloud at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.; Browman, A.A.; Borden, M.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; McCrady, R.C.; Spickermann, T.J.; Zaugg, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    The electron cloud (EC) at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) has been studied extensively for the past several years with an overall aim to identify and measure its important characteristics, the factors that influence these characteristics, and to relate these to the two-stream (e-p) transverse instability long observed at PSR. Some new results since PAC2001 are presented.

  15. Beam-Beam Interaction, Electron Cloud and Intrabeam Scattering for Proton Super-bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, F; Rumolo, Giovanni; Papaphilippou, Y

    2003-01-01

    Super-bunches are long bunches with a flat longitudinal profile, which could potentially increase the LHC luminosity in a future upgrade. We present example parameters and discuss a variety of issues related to such superbunches, including beam-beam tune shift, tune footprints, crossing schemes, luminosity, intrabeam scattering, and electron cloud. We highlight the benefits, disadvantages and open questions.

  16. Particle-in-Cell Calculations of the Electron Cloud in the ILC Positron Damping Ring Wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Grote, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    The self-consistent code suite WARP-POSINST is being used to study electron cloud effects in the ILC positron damping ring wiggler. WARP is a parallelized, 3D particle-in-cell code which is fully self-consistent for all species. The POSINST models for the production of photoelectrons and secondary electrons are used to calculate electron creation. Mesh refinement and a moving reference frame for the calculation will be used to reduce the computer time needed by several orders of magnitude. We present preliminary results for cloud buildup showing 3D electron effects at the nulls of the vertical wiggler field. First results from a benchmark of WARP-POSINST vs. POSINST are also discussed

  17. Practical Approaches to Mitigation of Specimen Charging in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Min Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Specimen charging that is associated with the electron bombardment on the sample is a practical hindrance to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM analysis because it causes a severe loss of resolution in either diffraction or image data. Conductive thin film deposition on an insulating specimen has been proposed as an effective approach to the mitigation of the specimen charging; however, this method is generally not useful in HRTEM imaging of materials because the deposited film induces another artifact in the HRTEM image contrast. In this study, we propose practical methods to mitigate the specimen charging that takes place during the HRTEM of materials. For bulk-type specimens prepared by either an ion-thinning or focused-ion beam (FIB process, a plasma cleaning treatment is significantly effective in eliminating the charging phenomenon. In the case of low-dimensional nanomaterials such as nanowires and nanoparticles, the plasma cleaning is not feasible; however, the charging effect can be effectively eliminated by adjusting the electron illumination condition. The proposed methods facilitate a decrease in the buildup of specimen charging, thereby enhancing the quality of high-resolution images significantly.

  18. New simulation capabilities of electron clouds in ion beams with large tune depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Seidl, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new, comprehensive set of simulation tools aimed at modeling the interaction of intense ion beams and electron clouds (e-clouds). The set contains the 3-D accelerator PIC code WARP and the 2-D 'slice' e-cloud code POSINST [M. Furman, this workshop, paper TUAX05], as well as a merger of the two, augmented by new modules for impact ionization and neutral gas generation. The new capability runs on workstations or parallel supercomputers and contains advanced features such as mesh refinement, disparate adaptive time stepping, and a new 'drift-Lorentz' particle mover for tracking charged particles in magnetic fields using large time steps. It is being applied to the modeling of ion beams (1 MeV, 180 mA, K+) for heavy ion inertial fusion and warm dense matter studies, as they interact with electron clouds in the High-Current Experiment (HCX) [experimental results discussed by A. Molvik, this workshop, paper THAW02]. We describe the capabilities and present recent simulation results with detailed comparisons against the HCX experiment, as well as their application (in a different regime) to the modeling of e-clouds in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  19. New simulation capabilities of electron clouds in ion beams with large tune depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new, comprehensive set of simulation tools aimed at modeling the interaction of intense ion beams and electron clouds (e-clouds). The set contains the 3-D accelerator PIC code WARP and the 2-D ''slice'' e-cloud code POSINST [M. Furman, this workshop, paper TUAX05], as well as a merger of the two, augmented by new modules for impact ionization and neutral gas generation. The new capability runs on workstations or parallel supercomputers and contains advanced features such as mesh refinement, disparate adaptive time stepping, and a new ''drift-Lorentz'' particle mover for tracking charged particles in magnetic fields using large time steps. It is being applied to the modeling of ion beams (1 MeV, 180 mA, K+) for heavy ion inertial fusion and warm dense matter studies, as they interact with electron clouds in the High-Current Experiment (HCX) [experimental results discussed by A. Molvik, this workshop, paper THAW02]. We describe the capabilities and present recent simulation results with detailed comparisons against the HCX experiment, as well as their application (in a different regime) to the modeling of e-clouds in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  20. New simulation capabilities of electron clouds in ion beams with large tune depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.L.; Furman, M.A.; Seidl, P.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Stoltz, P.H.; Veitzer, S.; Verboncoeur, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have developed a new, comprehensive set of simulation tools aimed at modeling the interaction of intense ion beams and electron clouds (e-clouds). The set contains the 3-D accelerator PIC code WARP and the 2-D ''slice'' e-cloud code POSINST, as well as a merger of the two, augmented by new modules for impact ionization and neutral gas generation. The new capability runs on workstations or parallel supercomputers and contains advanced features such as mesh refinement, disparate adaptive time stepping, and a new ''drift-Lorentz'' particle mover for tracking charged particles in magnetic fields using large time steps. It is being applied to the modeling of ion beams (1 MeV, 180 mA, K+) for heavy ion inertial fusion and warm dense matter studies, as they interact with electron clouds in the High-Current Experiment (HCX). They describe the capabilities and present recent simulation results with detailed comparisons against the HCX experiment, as well as their application (in a different regime) to the modeling of e-clouds in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  1. Risk mitigation of shared electronic records system in campus institutions: medical social work practice in singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow Yong, Lai Meng; Tan, Amanda Wei Li; Loo, Cecilia Lay Keng; Lim, Esther Li Ping

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Campus initiated a shared electronic system where patient records and documentations were standardized and shared across institutions within the Campus. The project was initiated to enhance quality of health care, improve accessibility, and ensure integrated (as opposed to fragmented) care for best outcomes in our patients. In mitigating the risks of ICT, it was found that familiarity with guiding ethical principles, and ensuring adherence to regulatory and technical competencies in medical social work were important. The need to negotiate and maneuver in a large environment within the Campus to ensure proactive integrative process helped.

  2. Progress in Studies of Electron-Cloud-Induced Optics Distortions at CesrTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, James; Penn, Gregory; Venturini, Marco; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa

    2012-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program has included extensive measurements of coherent betatron tune shifts for a variety of electron and positron beam energies, bunch population levels, and bunch train configurations. The tune shifts have been shown to result primarily from the interaction of the beam with the space-charge field of the beam-induced low-energy electron cloud in the vacuum chamber. Comparison to several advanced electron cloud simulation codes has allowed determination of the sensitivity of these measurements to physical parameters characterizing the synchrotron radiation flux, the production of photo-electrons on the vacuum chamber wall, the beam emittance, lattice optics, and the secondary-electron yield model. We report on progress in understanding the cloud buildup and decay mechanisms in magnetic fields and in field-free regions, addressing quantitatively the precise determination of the physical parameters of the modeling. Validation of these models will serve as essential input in the design of damping rings for future high-energy linear colliders.

  3. Concerning the maximum energy of ions accelerated at the front of a relativistic electron cloud expanding into vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, S.V.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; Koga, J.; Tajima, T.; Farina, D.

    2004-01-01

    Results of particle-in-cell simulations are presented that demonstrate characteristic interaction regimes of high-power laser radiation with plasma. It is shown that the maximum energy of fast ions can substantially exceed the electron energy. A theoretical model is proposed of ion acceleration at the front of a relativistic electron cloud expanding into vacuum in the regime of strong charge separation. The model describes the electric field structure and the dynamics of fast ions inside the electron cloud. The maximum energy the ions can gain at the front of the expanding electron cloud is found

  4. Electron Cloud Generation and Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, Robert J.; Browman, Andrew A.; Ledford, John E.; TechSource, Santa Fe; Los Alamos; Borden, Michael J.; O'Hara, James F.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Spickermann, Thomas; Zaugg, Thomas J.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.

    2008-01-01

    Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR) have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the 'prompt' electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the 'swept' electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 (micro)s. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole

  5. Electron cloud generation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Macek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the “prompt” electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the “swept” electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100  μs. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  6. Study on FPGA SEU Mitigation for the Readout Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhongtao; Feng, Changqing; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Jiang, Di; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2015-06-01

    The BGO calorimeter, which provides a wide measurement range of the primary cosmic ray spectrum, is a key sub-detector of the Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). The readout electronics of calorimeter consists of 16 pieces of Actel ProASIC Plus FLASH-based field-programmable gate array (FPGA), of which the design-level flip-flops and embedded block random access memories (RAM) are single event upset (SEU) sensitive in the harsh space environment. To comply with radiation hardness assurance (RHA), SEU mitigation methods, including partial triple modular redundancy (TMR), CRC checksum, and multi-domain reset are analyzed and tested by the heavy-ion beam test. Composed of multi-level redundancy, a FPGA design with the characteristics of SEU tolerance and low resource consumption is implemented for the readout electronics.

  7. Progress in studies of Electron-Cloud-Induced Optics Distortions at CESRTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, J.A.; Calvey, J.R.; Dugan, G.F.; Kreinick, D.L.; Leong, Z.; Livezey, J.A.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Sagan, D.C.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Furman, M.A.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.; Harkay, K.

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program has included extensive measurements of coherent betatron tune shifts for a variety of electron and positron beam energies, bunch population levels, and bunch train configurations. The tune shifts have been shown to result primarily from the interaction of the beam with the space-charge field of the beam-induced low energy electron cloud in the vacuum chamber. Comparison to several advanced electron cloud simulation program packages has allowed determination of the sensitivity of these measurements to physical parameters characterizing the synchrotron radiation flux, the production of photoelectrons on the vacuum chamberwall, the beam emittance, lattice optics, and the secondary-electron yield model. We report on progress in understanding the cloud buildup and decay mechanisms in magnetic fields and in field-free regions, addressing quantitatively the precise determination of the physical parameters of the modeling. Validation of these models will serve as essential input in the design of damping rings for future high-energy linear colliders.

  8. Identify and rank key factors influencing the adoption of cloud computing for a healthy Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Shukuhy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing as a new technology with Internet infrastructure and new approaches can be significant benefits in providing medical services electronically. Aplying this technology in E-Health requires consideration of various factors. The main objective of this study is to identify and rank the factors influencing the adoption of e-health cloud. Based on the Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE framework and Human-Organization-Technology fit (HOT-fit model, 16 sub-factors were identified in four major factors. With survey of 60 experts, academics and experts in health information technology and with the help of fuzzy analytic hierarchy process had ranked these sub-factors and factors. In the literature, considering newness this study, no internal or external study, have not alluded these number of criteria. The results show that when deciding to adopt cloud computing in E-Health, respectively, must be considered technological, human, organizational and environmental factors.

  9. HINS R and D Collaboration on Electron Cloud Effects: Midyear Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Sonnad, K.; Vay, J.-L.

    2006-01-01

    We present a report on ongoing activities on electron-cloud R and D for the MI upgrade. These results update and extend those presented in Refs. 1, 2. In this report we have significantly expanded the parameter range explored in bunch intensity Nb, RMS bunch length σ z and peak secondary emission yield (SEY) (delta) max , but we have constrained our simulations to a field-free region. We describe the threshold behaviors in all of the above three parameters. For (delta) max (ge) 1.5 we find that, even for N b = 1 x 10 11 , the electron cloud density, when averaged over the entire chamber, exceeds the beam neutralization level, but remains significantly below the local neutralization level (ie., when the electron density is computed in the neighborhood of the beam). This 'excess' of electrons is accounted for by narrow regions of high concentration of electrons very close to the chamber surface, especially at the top and bottom of the chamber, akin to virtual cathodes. These virtual cathodes are kept in equilibrium, on average, by a competition between space-charge forces (including their images) and secondary emission, a mechanism that shares some features with the space-charge saturation of the current in a diode at high fields. For N b = 3 x 10 11 the electron cloud build-up growth rate and saturation density have a strong dependence on σ z as σ z decreases below ∼ 0.4 m, when the average electron-wall impact energy roughly reaches the energy E max where (delta) peaks. We also present improved results on emittance growth simulations of the beam obtained with the code WARP/POSINST in quasi-static mode, in which the beam-(electron cloud) interaction is lumped into N s 'stations' around the ring, where N s = 1, 2,..., 9. The emittance shows a rapid growth of ∼ 20% during the first ∼ 100 turns, followed by a much slower growth rate of ∼ 0.03%/turn. Concerning the electron cloud detection technique using microwave transmission, we present an improved

  10. Electron-Cloud Pinch Dynamics in Presence of Lattice Magnet Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Franchetti, G

    2011-01-01

    The pinch of the electron cloud due to a passing proton bunch was extensively studied in a field free region and in a dipolar magnetic field. For the latter study, a strong field approximation helped to formulate the equations of motion and to understand the complex electron pinch dynamics, which exhibited some similarities with the field-free situation. Here we extend the analysis to the case of electron pinch in quadrupoles and in sextupoles. We discuss the limits of validity for the strong field approximation and we evaluate the relative magnitude of the peak tune shift along the bunch expected for the different fields.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Electron Cloud Containment in a Nonuniform Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dense clouds of electrons were generated and studied in an axisymmetric, nonuniform magnetic field created by a short solenoid. The operation of the experiment was similar to that of a low-pressure (approximately 0.000001 Torr) magnetron discharge. Discharge current characteristics are presented as a function of pressure, magnetic field strength, voltage, and cathode end-plate location. The rotation of the electron cloud is determined from the frequency of diocotron waves. In the space charge saturated regime of operation, the cloud is found to rotate as a solid body with frequency close to V sub a/phi sub a where V sub a is the anode voltage and phi suba is the total magnetic flux. This result indicates that, in regions where electrons are present, the magnetic field lines are electrostatic equipotentials (E bar, B bar = 0). Equilibrium electron density distributions suggested by this conditions are integrated with respect to total ionizing power and are found consistent with measured discharge currents.

  12. Experimental investigation of electron cloud containment in a nonuniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eninger, J.E.

    1974-05-01

    Dense clouds of electrons were generated and studied in an axisymmetric, nonuniform magnetic field created by a short solenoid. The operation of the experiment was similar to that of a low-pressure (approximately 0.000001 torr) magnetron discharge. Discharge current characteristics are presented as a function of pressure, magnetic field strength, voltage, and cathode end-plate location. The rotation of the electron cloud is determined from the frequency of diocotron waves. In the space charge saturated regime of operation, the cloud is found to rotate as a solid body with frequency close to V/sub a/phi/sub a/ where V/sub a/ is the anode voltage and phi/sub a/ is the total magnetic flux. This result indicates that, in regions where electrons are present, the magnetic field lines are electrostatic equipotentials (E bar, B bar = 0). Equilibrium electron density distributions suggested by this condition are integrated with respect to total ionizing power and are found consistent with measured discharge currents. (U.S.)

  13. Combined phenomena of beam-beam and beam-electron cloud interactionsin circular e^{+}e^{-} colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Ohmi

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron cloud causes various effects in high intensity positron storage rings. The positron beam and the electron cloud can be considered a typical two-stream system with a certain plasma frequency. Beam-beam interaction is another important effect for high luminosity circular colliders. Colliding two beams can be considered as a two-stream system with another plasma frequency. We study the combined phenomena of the beam-electron cloud and beam-beam interactions from a viewpoint of two complex two-stream effects with two plasma frequencies.

  14. Enhanced quasi-static particle-in-cell simulation of electron cloud instabilities in circular accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bing

    Electron cloud instabilities have been observed in many circular accelerators around the world and raised concerns of future accelerators and possible upgrades. In this thesis, the electron cloud instabilities are studied with the quasi-static particle-in-cell (PIC) code QuickPIC. Modeling in three-dimensions the long timescale propagation of beam in electron clouds in circular accelerators requires faster and more efficient simulation codes. Thousands of processors are easily available for parallel computations. However, it is not straightforward to increase the effective speed of the simulation by running the same problem size on an increasingly number of processors because there is a limit to domain size in the decomposition of the two-dimensional part of the code. A pipelining algorithm applied on the fully parallelized particle-in-cell code QuickPIC is implemented to overcome this limit. The pipelining algorithm uses multiple groups of processors and optimizes the job allocation on the processors in parallel computing. With this novel algorithm, it is possible to use on the order of 102 processors, and to expand the scale and the speed of the simulation with QuickPIC by a similar factor. In addition to the efficiency improvement with the pipelining algorithm, the fidelity of QuickPIC is enhanced by adding two physics models, the beam space charge effect and the dispersion effect. Simulation of two specific circular machines is performed with the enhanced QuickPIC. First, the proposed upgrade to the Fermilab Main Injector is studied with an eye upon guiding the design of the upgrade and code validation. Moderate emittance growth is observed for the upgrade of increasing the bunch population by 5 times. But the simulation also shows that increasing the beam energy from 8GeV to 20GeV or above can effectively limit the emittance growth. Then the enhanced QuickPIC is used to simulate the electron cloud effect on electron beam in the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac

  15. Simulation study of electron cloud build up in the SPS MKD kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 run, an unusual behavior characterizing pressure and temperature increase in some of the dump kickers of the SPS was noticed. In particular, it was observed that 1) the MKDV2 kicker would exhibit maximum heating with 75 ns spaced LHC beams and 2) the pressure rise was specially critical in MKDV1 in presence of 50 ns spaced LHC beams [1]. While the anomalous heating of MKDV2 with 75 ns beams could be tentatively explained by the denser beam current spectrum that would more likely hit one of the kicker impedance peaks, the fast pressure rise in MKDV1 with 50 ns spaced beams was ascribed to a surface effect, namely beam induced multipacting leading to electron cloud formation. This report summarizes a simulation study that was done in order to check whether the electron cloud behavior in the dump kickers could explain the experimental observations.

  16. Comparison of Enamel and Stainless Steel Electron Cloud Clearing Electrodes Tested in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Mahner, C; Wendel, JC

    2010-01-01

    During the 2007 run with the nominal LHC proton beam, electron cloud has been clearly identified and characterized in the PS using a dedicated setup with shielded button-type pickups. Efficient electron cloud suppression could be achieved with a stainless steel stripline-type electrode biased to negative and positive voltages up to ± 1 kV. For the 2008 run, a second setup was installed in straight section 84 of the PS where the stainless steel was replaced by a stripline composed of an enamel insulator with a resistive coating. In contrast to ordinary stripline electrodes this setup presents a very low beam coupling impedance and could thus be envisaged for long sections of high-intensity machines. Here, we present first comparative measurements with this new type of enamel clearing electrode using the nominal LHC beam with 72 bunches and 25 ns bunch spacing.

  17. Theoretical Studies of TE-Wave Propagation as a Diagnostic for Electron Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, Gregory E.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of TE waves is sensitive to the presence of an electron cloud primarily through phase shifts generated by the altered dielectric function, but can also lead to polarization changes and other effects, especially in the presence of magnetic fields. These effects are studied theoretically and also through simulations using WARP. Examples are shown related to CesrTA parameters, and used to observe different regimes of operation as well as to validate estimates of the phase shift.

  18. Characterization of electron clouds in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator using TE-wave transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. De Santis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new technique for measuring the electron cloud density in storage rings has been developed and successfully demonstrated [S. De Santis, J. M. Byrd, F. Caspers, A. Krasnykh, T. Kroyer, M. T. F. Pivi, and K. G. Sonnad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 094801 (2008.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.094801]. We present the experimental results of a systematic application of this technique at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator. The technique is based on the phase modulation of the TE mode transmitted in a synchrotron beam pipe caused by the periodic variation of the density of electron plasma. Because of the relatively simple hardware requirements, this method has become increasingly popular and has been since successfully implemented in several machines. While the principles of this technique are straightforward, quantitative derivation of the electron cloud density from the measurement requires consideration of several effects, which we address in detail.

  19. Gas Condensates onto a LHC Type Cryogenic Vacuum System Subjected to Electron Cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    Baglin, V

    2004-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the gas desorbed via photon stimulated molecular desorption or electron stimulated molecular desorption will be physisorbed onto the beam screen held between 5 and 20 K. Studies of the effects of the electron cloud onto a LHC type cryogenic vacuum chamber have been done with the cold bore experiment (COLDEX) installed in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Experiments performed with gas condensates such as H2, H2O, CO and CO2 are described. Implications for the LHC design and operation are discussed.

  20. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    Full Text Available This paper discusses new potential reactions of chlorine-bearing anions (negative ions in the upper stratosphere. These reactions are then applied to the negative-ion chemistry following the injection of an electron cloud of very high density, of the order of 106-107 e- cm-3, in the 40-45-km region. The idea is to evaluate the recently proposed scheme to mitigate ozone depletion by converting the reactive chlorine atoms at these altitudes into Cl- ions which are unreactive towards ozone, i.e., electron scavenging of Cl. We find that the previously neglected photodetachment from Cl- is fast. For an overhead sun, this process may have a rate coefficient of 0.08 s-1 when multiple scattering is included. The rate could be even higher, depending on the ground albedo. Switching reaction between Cl-·H2O and HCl might lead to the formation of Cl-·HCl anion. Possible reactions of Cl-·H2O and Cl-·HCl with O atoms could produce ClO- and Cl-2. The production of ClO- in this manner is significant because Cl- having a high photodetachment rate constant would be regenerated in the very likely reactions of ClO- with O. When these possibilities are considered, then it is found that the chlorine anions may not be the major ions inside the electron cloud due to the rapid photodetachment from Cl-. Furthermore, in such a cloud, there may be the hazard that the Cl--Cl-·H2O-ClO--Cl- cycle amounts to catalytic destruction of two O atoms. Thus, the scheme could be risky if practised in the altitude region where atomic oxygen is an important constituent. Similar conclusions apply even if the ClO- species forms ClO-3 by three-body association with O2

  1. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses new potential reactions of chlorine-bearing anions (negative ions in the upper stratosphere. These reactions are then applied to the negative-ion chemistry following the injection of an electron cloud of very high density, of the order of 106-107 e- cm-3, in the 40-45-km region. The idea is to evaluate the recently proposed scheme to mitigate ozone depletion by converting the reactive chlorine atoms at these altitudes into Cl- ions which are unreactive towards ozone, i.e., electron scavenging of Cl. We find that the previously neglected photodetachment from Cl- is fast. For an overhead sun, this process may have a rate coefficient of 0.08 s-1 when multiple scattering is included. The rate could be even higher, depending on the ground albedo. Switching reaction between Cl-·H2O and HCl might lead to the formation of Cl-·HCl anion. Possible reactions of Cl-·H2O and Cl-·HCl with O atoms could produce ClO- and Cl-2. The production of ClO- in this manner is significant because Cl- having a high photodetachment rate constant would be regenerated in the very likely reactions of ClO- with O. When these possibilities are considered, then it is found that the chlorine anions may not be the major ions inside the electron cloud due to the rapid photodetachment from Cl-. Furthermore, in such a cloud, there may be the hazard that the Cl--Cl-·H2O-ClO--Cl- cycle amounts to catalytic destruction of two O atoms. Thus, the scheme could be risky if practised in the altitude region where atomic oxygen is an important constituent. Similar conclusions apply even if the ClO- species forms ClO-3 by three-body association with O2, instead of reacting with O. It must be emphasized that the present study is speculative at this time, because none of the relevant reactions have been investigated in the laboratory as yet. Nevertheless, it is very safe to say that the scheme of ozone preservation by electron scavenging of the upper stratospheric Cl is

  2. MD421: Electron cloud studies on 25 ns beam variants (BCMS, 8b+4e)

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Belli, Eleonora; Carver, Lee Robert; Dijkstal, Philipp; Li, Kevin Shing Bruce; Mether, Lotta; Romano, Annalisa; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This note describes a Machine Development session performed with the main goal of studying the e-cloud mitigation that can be obtained by injecting mixed trains of 8b+4e beam type and trains having the standard 25 ns structure. Additionally, in the course of the MD, the pure 8b+4e beam was also checked to be stable when injected with low chromaticity and octupole current settings. Subsequently, the operational BCMS 25 ns beam was also injected with the 8b+4e settings and found to be unstable. The operational settings for injection were re-found by gradually increasing the chromaticity and octupole knobs until all the bunches of the injected beam could remain stable after injection.

  3. Observation of transverse and longitudinal modes in non-neutral electron clouds confined in a magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhouse, S.; Fisher, A.; Rostoker, N.

    1979-01-01

    Electrostatic modes on non-neutral electron clouds confined in a magnetic mirror field have been investigated. The cloud contains 2 x 10 11 electrons at an average kinetic energy of 0.3 MeV for a magnetic field with a peak intensity of 9 kG at the midplane. It was found that the cloud is moving azimuthally as well as longitudinally. The azimuthal motion has an m=1 spatial nature. The longitudinal modes have a more complicated nature, but their frequency equals that of the azimuthal mode

  4. A spherical electron cloud hopping model for studying product branching ratios of dissociative recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2008-05-21

    A spherical electron cloud hopping (SECH) model is proposed to study the product branching ratios of dissociative recombination (DR) of polyatomic systems. In this model, the fast electron-captured process is treated as an instantaneous hopping of a cloud of uniform spherical fractional point charges onto a target M+q ion (or molecule). The sum of point charges (-1) simulates the incident electron. The sphere radius is determined by a critical distance (Rc eM) between the incoming electron (e-) and the target, at which the potential energy of the e(-)-M+q system is equal to that of the electron-captured molecule M+q(-1) in a symmetry-allowed electronic state with the same structure as M(+q). During the hopping procedure, the excess energies of electron association reaction are dispersed in the kinetic energies of M+q(-1) atoms to conserve total energy. The kinetic energies are adjusted by linearly adding atomic momenta in the direction of driving forces induced by the scattering electron. The nuclear dynamics of the resultant M+q(-1) molecule are studied by using a direct ab initio dynamics method on the adiabatic potential energy surface of M+q(-1), or together with extra adiabatic surface(s) of M+q(-1). For the latter case, the "fewest switches" surface hopping algorithm of Tully was adapted to deal with the nonadiabaticity in trajectory propagations. The SECH model has been applied to study the DR of both CH+ and H3O+(H2O)2. The theoretical results are consistent with the experiment. It was found that water molecules play an important role in determining the product branching ratios of the molecular cluster ion.

  5. Runaway electron mitigation by 3D fields in the ASDEX-Upgrade experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbin, M.; Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Marrelli, L.; Nocente, M.; Papp, G.; Pautasso, G.; Piovesan, P.; Valisa, M.; Carnevale, D.; Esposito, B.; Giacomelli, L.; Gospodarczyk, M.; McCarthy, P. J.; Martin, P.; Suttrop, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Teschke, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-01-01

    Disruption-generated runaway electron (RE) beams represent a severe threat for tokamak plasma-facing components in high current devices like ITER, thus motivating the search of mitigation techniques. The application of 3D fields might aid this purpose and recently was investigated also in the ASDEX Upgrade experiment by using the internal active saddle coils (termed B-coils). Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with dominant toroidal mode number n = 1 have been applied by the B-coils, in a RE specific scenario, before and during disruptions, which are deliberately created via massive gas injection. The application of RMPs affects the electron temperature profile and seemingly changes the dynamics of the disruption; this results in a significantly reduced current and lifetime of the generated RE beam. A similar effect is observed also in the hard-x-ray (HXR) spectrum, associated to RE emission, characterized by a partial decrease of the energy content below 1 MeV when RMPs are applied. The strength of the observed effects strongly depends on the upper-to-lower B-coil phasing, i.e. on the poloidal spectrum of the applied RMPs, which has been reconstructed including the plasma response by the code MARS-F. A crude vacuum approximation fails in the interpretation of the experimental findings: despite the relatively low β (< 0.5 % ) of these discharges, a modest amplification (factor of 2) of the edge kink response occurs, which has to be considered to explain the observed suppression effects.

  6. Numerical Simulations for the Beam-Induced Electron Cloud in the LHC Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, Oliver Sim

    1998-01-01

    The following work summarises simulation results obtained at CERN for the beam-induced electron cloud and looks at possible cures for the heat load in the LHC beam screen. The synchrotron radiation in the LHC creates a continuous flow of photoelectrons. These electrons are accelerated by the electric field of the bunch and hit the vacuum chamber on the opposite side of the beam pipe where they crea te secondary electrons which are again accelerated by the next bunch. For a large secondary emission yield the above mechanism leads to an exponential growth of the electron cloud which is limited by space charge forces. The simulations use a two-dimensional mesh for the space charge calculations and include the effect of image charges on the vacuum chamber wall. Depending on the quantum yield for the production of photoelectrons, the secondary emission yield and the reflectivity, the heat load can vary from 0.1 W/m to more than 15 W/m.

  7. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  8. Self-Consistent 3D Modeling of Electron Cloud Dynamics and Beam Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, Miguel; Furman, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Sonnad, K.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Venturini, M.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Molvik, A.; Stoltz, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present recent advances in the modeling of beam electron-cloud dynamics, including surface effects such as secondary electron emission, gas desorption, etc, and volumetric effects such as ionization of residual gas and charge-exchange reactions. Simulations for the HCX facility with the code WARP/POSINST will be described and their validity demonstrated by benchmarks against measurements. The code models a wide range of physical processes and uses a number of novel techniques, including a large-timestep electron mover that smoothly interpolates between direct orbit calculation and guiding-center drift equations, and a new computational technique, based on a Lorentz transformation to a moving frame, that allows the cost of a fully 3D simulation to be reduced to that of a quasi-static approximation

  9. Electron cloud measurements in heavy-ion driver for HEDP and inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur W.; Friedman, Alex; Cohen, Ronald; Vay, Jean-Luc; Bieniosek, Frank; Baca, David; Seidl, Peter A.; Logan, Grant; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2007-01-01

    The high-current experiment (HCX) at LBNL is a driver scale single beam injector that provides a 1 MeV K + ion beam current of 0.18 A for 5 μs. It transports high-current beams with large fill factor (ratio of the maximum beam envelope radius to the beam pipe radius) and low emittance growth that are required to keep the cost of the power plant competitive and to satisfy the target requirements of focusing ion beams to high-power density. Beam interaction with the background gas and walls desorbs electrons that can multiply and accumulate, creating an electron cloud. This ubiquitous effect grows at higher fill factors and degrades the quality of the beam. We review simulations and diagnostics tools used to measure electron production, accumulation and its properties

  10. Electron Cloud Cyclotron Resonances in the Presence of a Short-bunch-length Relativistic Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Wu, Jennifer W.

    2008-01-01

    Computer simulations using the 2D code 'POSINST' were used to study the formation of the electron cloud in the wiggler section of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider. In order to simulate an x-y slice of the wiggler (i.e., a slice perpendicular to the beam velocity), each simulation assumed a constant vertical magnetic field. At values of the magnetic field where the cyclotron frequency was an integral multiple of the bunch frequency, and where the field strength was less than approximately 0.6 T, equilibrium average electron densities were up to three times the density found at other neighboring field values. Effects of this resonance between the bunch and cyclotron frequency are expected to be non-negligible when the beam bunch length is much less than the product of the electron cyclotron period and the beam

  11. The Curious Case of the PDF Converter that Likes Mozart: Dissecting and Mitigating the Privacy Risk of Personal Cloud Apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harkous Hamza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Third party apps that work on top of personal cloud services, such as Google Drive and Drop-box, require access to the user’s data in order to provide some functionality. Through detailed analysis of a hundred popular Google Drive apps from Google’s Chrome store, we discover that the existing permission model is quite often misused: around two-thirds of analyzed apps are over-privileged, i.e., they access more data than is needed for them to function. In this work, we analyze three different permission models that aim to discourage users from installing over-privileged apps. In experiments with 210 real users, we discover that the most successful permission model is our novel ensemble method that we call Far-reaching Insights. Far-reaching Insights inform the users about the data-driven insights that apps can make about them (e.g., their topics of interest, collaboration and activity patterns etc. Thus, they seek to bridge the gap between what third parties can actually know about users and users’ perception of their privacy leakage. The efficacy of Far-reaching Insights in bridging this gap is demonstrated by our results, as Far-reaching Insights prove to be, on average, twice as effective as the current model in discouraging users from installing over-privileged apps. In an effort to promote general privacy awareness, we deployed PrivySeal, a publicly available privacy-focused app store that uses Far-reaching Insights. Based on the knowledge extracted from data of the store’s users (over 115 gigabytes of Google Drive data from 1440 users with 662 installed apps, we also delineate the ecosystem for 3rd party cloud apps from the standpoint of developers and cloud providers. Finally, we present several general recommendations that can guide other future works in the area of privacy for the cloud. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first work that tackles the privacy risk posed by 3rd party apps on cloud platforms in such depth.

  12. The Electron-Cloud Effect in the Arcs of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Furman, M A

    1998-01-01

    We present an update of our estimates for the power deposition arising from the electron-cloud effect in the dipole bending magnets in the arcs of the LHC. In addition, we present the estimate of the power deposition in the field-free regions in the arcs. We hold the number of particles per bunch and the bunch spacing fixed at their nominal values, and we assume throughout a high photon reflectivi ty. We explore the dependence of the power deposition on the photoelectric efficiency and on secondary emission yield parameters. We find a marked sensitivity to parameters that characterize secondary emission on the scale of 5 - 10 eV.

  13. Electron Cloud induced instabilities in the Fermilab Main Injector(MI) for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnad, Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine; Grote, David

    2006-01-01

    The electrostatic particle-in-cell codeWARP is currently being expanded in order to study electron cloud effects on the dynamics of the beam in storage rings. Results for the Fermilab main injector (MI) show the existence of a threshold in the electron density beyond which there is rapid emittance growth. The Fermilab MI is being considered for an upgrade as part of the high intensity neutrino source (HINS) effort, which will result in a significant increasing of the bunch intensity relative to its present value, placing it in a regime where electron-cloud effects are expected to become important. Various results from the simulations using WARP are discussed here

  14. Simulation of Electron-Cloud Build-Up for the Cold Arcs of the LHC and Comparison with Measured Data

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, H; Rumolo, G; Tavian, L; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    The electron cloud generated by synchrotron radiation or residual gas ionization is a concern for LHC operation and performance. We report the results of simulations studies which examine the electron cloud build-up, at injection energy, 3.5 TeV for various operation parameters. In particular, we determine the value of the secondary emission yield corresponding to the multipacting threshold, and investigate the electron density, and heat as a function of bunch intensity for dipoles and field-free regions. We also include a comparison between simulations results and measured heat-load data from the LHC scrubbing runs in 2011.

  15. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-01-01

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability

  16. Redundancy in electronic health record corpora: analysis, impact on text mining performance and mitigation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Raphael; Elhadad, Michael; Elhadad, Noémie

    2013-01-16

    The increasing availability of Electronic Health Record (EHR) data and specifically free-text patient notes presents opportunities for phenotype extraction. Text-mining methods in particular can help disease modeling by mapping named-entities mentions to terminologies and clustering semantically related terms. EHR corpora, however, exhibit specific statistical and linguistic characteristics when compared with corpora in the biomedical literature domain. We focus on copy-and-paste redundancy: clinicians typically copy and paste information from previous notes when documenting a current patient encounter. Thus, within a longitudinal patient record, one expects to observe heavy redundancy. In this paper, we ask three research questions: (i) How can redundancy be quantified in large-scale text corpora? (ii) Conventional wisdom is that larger corpora yield better results in text mining. But how does the observed EHR redundancy affect text mining? Does such redundancy introduce a bias that distorts learned models? Or does the redundancy introduce benefits by highlighting stable and important subsets of the corpus? (iii) How can one mitigate the impact of redundancy on text mining? We analyze a large-scale EHR corpus and quantify redundancy both in terms of word and semantic concept repetition. We observe redundancy levels of about 30% and non-standard distribution of both words and concepts. We measure the impact of redundancy on two standard text-mining applications: collocation identification and topic modeling. We compare the results of these methods on synthetic data with controlled levels of redundancy and observe significant performance variation. Finally, we compare two mitigation strategies to avoid redundancy-induced bias: (i) a baseline strategy, keeping only the last note for each patient in the corpus; (ii) removing redundant notes with an efficient fingerprinting-based algorithm. (a)For text mining, preprocessing the EHR corpus with fingerprinting yields

  17. Automatic atlas based electron density and structure contouring for MRI-based prostate radiation therapy on the cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, J A; Burdett, N; Chandra, S; Rivest-Hénault, D; Ghose, S; Salvado, O; Fripp, J; Greer, P B; Sun, J; Parker, J; Pichler, P; Stanwell, P

    2014-01-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  18. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  19. Effect of the Electron Cloud and CSR on the Upgrade of the PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, Samuel A

    2001-01-01

    Effects of the electron cloud and of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the possible upgrade of the PEP-II B-factory are studied. PEP-II B factory operates with parameters shown in Table 1 and already exceeds the design luminosity. Nevertheless, a possibility of upgrading the machine to even higher luminosities is under consideration [1]. Several scenarios are summarized in Table 2. This paper describes effects of the electron cloud and of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the proposed upgrades of the PEP-II B-factory. The first effect was observed [3] and caused [4] the degradation of the emittance at KEK B-factory. The analytic expression for the e-wake [2] is used in calculations of the head-tail instability. Other obvious effects of higher beam currents such as additional heat load are not considered. The short wave length CSR has been recently observed at Brookhaven [6]. Consideration of the effect of such CSR on the beam dynamics is based on our previous paper [7

  20. Initial Self-Consistent 3D Electron-Cloud Simulations of the LHC Beam with the Code WARP+POSINST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J; Furman, M A; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P

    2005-01-01

    We present initial results for the self-consistent beam-cloud dynamics simulations for a sample LHC beam, using a newly developed set of modeling capability based on a merge [1] of the three-dimensional parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) accelerator code WARP [2] and the electron-cloud code POSINST [3]. Although the storage ring model we use as a test bed to contain the beam is much simpler and shorter than the LHC, its lattice elements are realistically modeled, as is the beam and the electron cloud dynamics. The simulated mechanisms for generation and absorption of the electrons at the walls are based on previously validated models available in POSINST [3, 4

  1. Considerations for Cloud Security Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Cusick, James

    2016-01-01

    Information Security in Cloud Computing environments is explored. Cloud Computing is presented, security needs are discussed, and mitigation approaches are listed. Topics covered include Information Security, Cloud Computing, Private Cloud, Public Cloud, SaaS, PaaS, IaaS, ISO 27001, OWASP, Secure SDLC.

  2. A stability analysis of electron-positron pair equilibria of a two-temperature plasma cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, M [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA); Zbyszewska, M [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland). Centrum Astronomiczne

    1986-01-01

    The stability of a two-temperature homogeneous static plasma cloud against pair density perturbations is examined. We assumed that the electrons and positrons, cooled via radiation process, are reheated via Coulomb interactions with much hotter protons. Pair equilibrium plasma states are shown to be unstable if deltan{sub e}/deltan{sub p}<0 and deltan{sub e}/deltaT{sub p}<0 on the equilibrium surface n{sub e}{sup eq}(n{sub p},T{sub p}), where n{sub e}=n{sub +}+n{sub -}, n{sub p} and T{sub p} denote electron plus positron density, proton density and proton temperature, respectively. The minimum proton temperature and maximum proton density for which unstable states can appear are: (kT{sub p}){sub min} approx few x m{sub e}c{sup 2} and (n{sub p}){sub max} approx few/Rsigma{sub T}, where R is the plasma cloud radius. We discuss our results in the context of an accreting black hole model assuming that the proton temperature is close to its virial value, kT{sub p}{sup vir} approx GMm{sub p}/R and that subsonic accretion flow is realized at R < tens Schwarzschild radii. The unstable states then correspond to the luminosity range 0.01 L{sub Edd}electron temperature range 2 x 10{sup 9}K

  3. A cloud-based production system for information and service integration: an internet of things case study on waste electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi Vincent; Wang, Lihui

    2017-08-01

    Cloud computing is the new enabling technology that offers centralised computing, flexible data storage and scalable services. In the manufacturing context, it is possible to utilise the Cloud technology to integrate and provide industrial resources and capabilities in terms of Cloud services. In this paper, a function block-based integration mechanism is developed to connect various types of production resources. A Cloud-based architecture is also deployed to offer a service pool which maintains these resources as production services. The proposed system provides a flexible and integrated information environment for the Cloud-based production system. As a specific type of manufacturing, Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) remanufacturing experiences difficulties in system integration, information exchange and resource management. In this research, WEEE is selected as the example of Internet of Things to demonstrate how the obstacles and bottlenecks are overcome with the help of Cloud-based informatics approach. In the case studies, the WEEE recycle/recovery capabilities are also integrated and deployed as flexible Cloud services. Supporting mechanisms and technologies are presented and evaluated towards the end of the paper.

  4. Joint CARE-ELAN, CARE-HHH-APD, and EUROTEV-WP3 Workshop on Electron Cloud Clearing

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F; Electron Cloud Effects and Technological Consequences; ECL2

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the Proceedings of the joint CARE-HHH-APD, CARE-ELAN, and EUROTEV-WP3 Mini-Workshop on 'Electron Cloud Clearing - Electron Cloud and Technical Consequences', "ECL2", held at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, 1-2 March 2007). The ECL2 workshop explored novel technological remedies against electron-cloud formation in an accelerator beam pipe. A primary motivation for the workshop was the expected harmful electron-cloud effects in the upgraded LHC injectors and in future linear colliders, as well as recent beam observations in operating facilities like ANKA, CESR, KEKB, RHIC, and SPS. The solutions discussed at ECL2 included enamel-based clearing electrodes, slotted vacuum chambers, NEG coating, and grooves. Several of the proposed cures were assessed in terms of their clearing efficiency and the associated beam impedance. The workshop also reviewed new simulation tools like the 3D electron-ion build-up 'Faktor', modeling assumptions, analytical calculations, beam experiments, and laboratory meas...

  5. Effect of the LHC Beam Screen Baffle on the Electron Cloud Buildup

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Annalisa; Li, Kevin; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Electron Cloud (EC) has been identified as one of the major intensity-limiting factors in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Due to the EC, an additional heat load is deposited on the perforated LHC beam screen, for which only a small cooling capacity is available. In order to preserve the superconducting state of the magnets, pumping slots shields were added on the outer side of the beam screens. In the framework of the design of the beam screens of the new HL-LHC triplets, the impact of these shields on the multipacting process was studied with macroparticle simulations. For this purpose multiple new features had to be introduced in the PyECLOUD code. This contribution will describe the implemented simulation model and summarize the outcome of this study.

  6. Electron cloud buildup driving spontaneous vertical instabilities of stored beams in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Romano

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the 2016 run, an anomalous beam instability was systematically observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC. Its main characteristic was that it spontaneously appeared after beams had been stored for several hours in collision at 6.5 TeV to provide data for the experiments, despite large chromaticity values and high strength of the Landau-damping octupole magnet. The instability exhibited several features characteristic of those induced by the electron cloud (EC. Indeed, when LHC operates with 25 ns bunch spacing, an EC builds up in a large fraction of the beam chambers, as revealed by several independent indicators. Numerical simulations have been carried out in order to investigate the role of the EC in the observed instabilities. It has been found that the beam intensity decay is unfavorable for the beam stability when LHC operates in a strong EC regime.

  7. Charging dynamics and strong localization of a two-dimensional electron cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dianoux, R; Smilde, H J H; Marchi, F; Buffet, N; Mur, P; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of charge injection in silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon dioxide matrix is studied using electrostatic force microscopy. We show that the presence of silicon nanocrystals with a density of 10 11 cm -2 is essential for strong localization of charges, and results in exceptional charge retention properties compared to nanocrystal-free SiO 2 samples. In both systems, a logarithmic dependence of the diameter of the charged area on the injection time is experimentally observed on a timescale between 0.1 and 10 s (voltage≤10 V). A field-emission injection, limited by Coulomb blockade and a lateral charge spreading due to a repulsive radial electric field are used to model the sample charging. Once the tip is retracted, the electron cloud is strongly confined in the nanocrystals and remains static

  8. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions accelerated by the electric field. The focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets

  9. The electron-cloud instability in PEP-II: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1997-05-01

    The authors present an update on the estimate of the growth time of the multi-bunch transverse instability in the PEP-II collider arising from the interaction of the positron beam with the accumulated electron cloud. They estimate the contributions to the growth rate arising from the dipole magnets and from the pumping straight sections. They emphasize those quantities upon which the instability is most sensitive. The simulation includes measured data on the secondary emission yield for TiN-coated samples of the actual vacuum chamber. Although the analysis is still in progress, they conclude that the instability risetime is of order 1 ms, which is well within the range controllable by the feedback system

  10. Ku/Ka/W-band Antenna for Electronically-Scanned Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Previously, cloud radars such as CloudSat have been separated from precipitation radars such as TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission) and GPM (Global...

  11. Risk mitigation strategy for the ITER electron cyclotron upper port launcher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A. P. H.; Bongers, W. A.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; M. F. Graswinckel,; M.R. de Baar,

    2010-01-01

    A basic requirement for ITER equipment to meet is a high level of reliability, because ITER operation time is precious and radioactive operation leaves limited scope for repair. In order to reduce the risk of failure during ITER operation an effective risk mitigation strategy is necessary. This

  12. High-accuracy diagnostic tool for electron cloud observation in the LHC based on synchronous phase measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban Müller, J F; Shaposhnikova, E; Valuch, D; Mastoridis, T

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud effects such as heat load in the cryogenic system, pressure rise and beam instabilities are among the main limitations for the LHC operation with 25 ns spaced bunches. A new observation tool was developed to monitor the e-cloud activity and has been successfully used in the LHC during Run 1 (2010-2012). The power loss of each bunch due to the e-cloud can be estimated using very precise bunch-by-bunch measurement of the synchronous phase shift. In order to achieve the required accuracy, corrections for reflection in the cables and some systematic errors need to be applied followed by a post-processing of the measurements. Results clearly show the e-cloud build-up along the bunch trains and its evolution during each LHC fill as well as from fill to fill. Measurements during the 2012 LHC scrubbing run reveal a progressive reduction in the e-cloud activity and therefore a decrease in the secondary electron yield (SEY). The total beam power loss can be computed as a sum of the contributions from all...

  13. Implementation and use of cloud-based electronic lab notebook in a bioprocess engineering teaching laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Erin M; Hattaway, Holly Z; Felse, P Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Electronic lab notebooks (ELNs) are better equipped than paper lab notebooks (PLNs) to handle present-day life science and engineering experiments that generate large data sets and require high levels of data integrity. But limited training and a lack of workforce with ELN knowledge have restricted the use of ELN in academic and industry research laboratories which still rely on cumbersome PLNs for recordkeeping. We used LabArchives, a cloud-based ELN in our bioprocess engineering lab course to train students in electronic record keeping, good documentation practices (GDPs), and data integrity. Implementation of ELN in the bioprocess engineering lab course, an analysis of user experiences, and our development actions to improve ELN training are presented here. ELN improved pedagogy and learning outcomes of the lab course through stream lined workflow, quick data recording and archiving, and enhanced data sharing and collaboration. It also enabled superior data integrity, simplified information exchange, and allowed real-time and remote monitoring of experiments. Several attributes related to positive user experiences of ELN improved between the two subsequent years in which ELN was offered. Student responses also indicate that ELN is better than PLN for compliance. We demonstrated that ELN can be successfully implemented in a lab course with significant benefits to pedagogy, GDP training, and data integrity. The methods and processes presented here for ELN implementation can be adapted to many types of laboratory experiments.

  14. An analytic model for the electrostatic contribution of the electron cloud to the vertical tune-shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaechter, Levi

    2008-01-01

    An analytic quasi-static model is developed for the analysis of the tune-shift associated with the presence of an electron cloud in a damping ring. The essential assumption is that in its direction of motion, a bunch experiences a uniform cloud density but the latter varies from one bunch to another. A second important component of the model is the life-time since it controls the build-up, the equilibrium as well as the decay of the cloud. It is demonstrated analytically that in case of a train of positron bunches, electrons may be trapped in the vertical direction for the entire train duration. Assuming that the ring is dominated by vertical magnetic fields due to either bends or wigglers, we found excellent agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results reported at Cornell Electron/Positron Storage Ring. The ratio between the vertical and horizontal tune-shifts is shown to be indicative of the distribution of the cloud in the beam-chamber

  15. Dependability in electronic systems mitigation of hardware failures, soft errors, and electro-magnetic disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Kanekawa, Nobuyasu; Suga, Takashi; Uematsu, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Dependability in Electronic Systems presents practical applications for dependable electronic systems, such as train control, automotive control systems and network servers/routers. Readers will find an overview of dependability, enabling them to select the best choice for maximum results.

  16. Collisional Damping of Electron Bernstein Waves and its Mitigation by Evaporated Lithium Conditioning in Spherical-Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S. J.; Caughman, J. B.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P. C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    The first experimental verification of electron Bernstein wave (EBW) collisional damping, and its mitigation by evaporated Li conditioning, in an overdense spherical-tokamak plasma has been observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Initial measurements of EBW emission, coupled from NSTX plasmas via double-mode conversion to O-mode waves, exhibited <10% transmission efficiencies. Simulations show 80% of the EBW energy is dissipated by collisions in the edge plasma. Li conditioning reduced the edge collision frequency by a factor of 3 and increased the fundamental EBW transmission to 60%.

  17. On a possibility of creation of positive space charge cloud in a system with magnetic insulation of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, A.A.; Dobrovol'skii, A.M.; Dunets, S.P.; Evsyukov, A.N.; Protsenko, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new approach for creation an effective, low-cost, low-maintenance axially symmetric plasma optical tools for focusing and manipulating high-current beams of negatively charged particles, electrons and negative ions. This approach is based on fundamental plasma optical concept of magnetic insulation of electrons and non-magnetized positive ions providing creation of controlled uncompensated cloud of the space charge. The axially symmetric electrostatic plasma optical lens is well-known and well developed tool where this concept is used successfully. This provides control and focusing high-current positive ion beams in wide range of parameters. Here for the first time we present optimistic experimental results describing the application of an idea of magnetic insulation of electrons for generation of the stable cloud of positive space charge by focusing onto axis the converging stream of heavy ions produced by circular accelerator with closed electron drift. The estimations of a maximal concentration of uncompensated cloud of positive ions are also made

  18. Simulation and experimental studies on electron cloud effects in particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Annalisa; Cimino, Roberto; Iadarola, Giovanni; Rumolo, Giovanni

    Electron Cloud (EC) effects represent a serious limitation for particle accelerators operating with intense beams of positively charged particles. This Master thesis work presents simulation and experimental studies on EC effects carried out in collaboration with the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva and with the INFN-LNF laboratories in Frascati. During the Long Shut- down 1 (LS1, 2013-2014), a new detector for EC measurements has been installed in one of the main magnets of the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to study the EC formation in presence of a strong magnetic field. The aim is to develop a reli- able EC model of the PS vacuum chamber in order to identify possible limitation for the future high intensity and high brightness beams foreseen by Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. Numerical simulations with the new PyECLOUD code were performed in order to quantify the expected signal at the detector under different beam conditions. The experimental activity...

  19. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment

  20. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehl, Taylor J., E-mail: tjwoehl@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Jungjohann, Katherine L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Evans, James E. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Arslan, Ilke [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ristenpart, William D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment.

  1. A preliminary comparative study of the electron-cloud effect for the PSR, ISIS, and the ESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.T.F.

    2003-01-01

    We present preliminary electron-cloud simulation results for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at LANL, ISIS at RAL, and the European Spallation Source (ESS). For each storage ring, we simulate the build-up and dissipation of the electron cloud (EC) in a representative field-free section of the vacuum chamber. For all three cases, we choose the same residual gas temperature, secondary emission yield (SEY), and secondary emission spectrum. Other variables such as proton loss rate, bunch profile, intensity and energy, residual gas pressure and chamber geometry, are set at the corresponding values for each machine. Under these assumptions, we conclude that, of the three machines, the PSR is the most severely affected by the electron cloud effect (ECE), followed by the ESS, with ISIS a distant third. We illustrate a strong sensitivity of the ECE to the longitudinal bunch profile by choosing two different shapes for the case of the PSR, and a weak sensitivity to residual gas pressure. This preliminary study does not address the ECE in other regions of the machine, nor the beam instability that might arise from the EC

  2. Examination and Mitigation of Electron Interception Processes in Dye-sensitized Solar Cells through Redox Shuttle and Photoelectrode Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffeditz, William Lawrence

    With the dual challenges of meeting global energy demand and mitigating anthropogenic climate change, significant effort is being applied to generating power from renewable sources. The dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) is a photovoltaic technology capable of generating electricity from sunlight, but suffers losses in efficiency due to deleterious electron transfer processes. Controlling these processes is essential if DSCs are to continue to advance, and this dissertation focuses on isolation, interrogation, and mitigation of these processes via controllable inorganic redox/coordination chemistry and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The redox shuttle is often the subject of innovation in DSCs, the goal being to increase obtainable photovoltage without sacrificing photocurrent. A copper redox shuttle with a favorable (II/I) redox potential for DSC use and intriguing inner-sphere reorganization energy was investigated. The shuttle completely replaces its tetradentate coordinating ligand upon oxidation with multiple pyridine molecules. This new species displays markedly slower electron interception, necessitating fabrication of a new counter electrode in order for the shuttle to function. Upon reduction, the tetradentate ligand re-coordinates, creating a dual-species shuttle that outperforms either species as a Cu(II/I) shuttle in isolation. Photoelectrode modification is also the subject of innovation in DSCs. ALD is ideally suited for this type of innovation as it can coat high aspect surfaces with metal-oxide films of uniform thickness. The ALD post-treatment technique is described and used to deposit Al2O3 around a TiO2 adsorbed zinc-porphyrin dye. This technique is shown to prevent dye degradation from ambient air and/or light. Additionally, the architecture allows the study of dye-influenced electron interception processes. It was found that the presence of dye increased interception, which was attributed to dye-mediated electron hopping and/or superexchange

  3. Negative-mass mitigation of Coulomb repulsion for terahertz undulator radiation of electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balal, N.; Magory, E. [Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel); Bandurkin, I. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Bratman, V. L. [Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel); Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Savilov, A. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Avenue, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-19

    It is proposed to utilize the effect of negative mass for stabilization of the effective axial size of very dense and short electron bunches produced by photo-injector guns by using combined undulator and strong uniform magnetic fields. It has been shown that in the “abnormal” regime, an increase in the electron energy leads to a decrease in the axial velocity of the electron; due to the negative-mass effect, the Coulomb repulsion of electrons leads to their attraction and formation of a fairly stable and compact bunch “nucleus.” An undulator with a strong uniform magnetic field providing the negative-mass effect is designed for an experimental source of terahertz radiation. The use of the negative-mass regime in this experiment should result in a long-pulse coherent spontaneous undulator emission from a short dense moderately relativistic (5.5 MeV) photo-injector electron bunch with a high (up to 20%) efficiency and a narrow frequency spectrum.

  4. Solutions to mitigate heat loads due to electrons on sensitive components of ITER HNB beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.sartori@gmail.com [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Veltri, Pierluigi; Dalla Palma, Mauro; Agostinetti, Piero [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Hemsworth, Ronald; Singh, Mahendrajit [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Serianni, Gianluigi [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Energetic electrons leaking out of the ITER HNB accelerator are simulated. • Electrons generated along the ITER HNB beamline are simulated. • Heat loads and heat load maps on cryopumps are calculated for ITER HNB and test facility. • Protection solutions that will be installed are presented and their effect discussed. - Abstract: The operation of neutral beam injectors for plasma heating and current drive in a fusion device provides challenges in the thermal management of beamline components. Sensitive components such as the cryogenic pumps at beamline periphery shall be protected from the heat flux due to stray electrons. These are emitted by the negative ion accelerator or generated along the beamline by interaction of fast electrons, ions or atoms with background gas and surfaces. In this article the case of the ITER Heating Neutral Beam (HNB) and its test facility MITICA is discussed, for which the beam parameters and the required pulse length of one hour is a major leap forward with respect to the present experience with neutral beam systems. The engineering solutions adopted for effective cryopump protection against the heat load from electrons are described. The use of three-dimensional numerical simulations of particle trajectories in the complex geometry of the beamline was needed for the quantitative estimations of the heat loads. The presented solutions were optimized to minimize the impact on gas pumping and on the functionality of other components.

  5. Status report on the 'Merging' of the Electron-Cloud Code POSINST with the 3-D Accelerator PIC CODE WARP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Azevedo, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Stoltz, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    We have integrated the electron-cloud code POSINST [1] with WARP [2]--a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell accelerator code developed for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion--so that the two can interoperate. Both codes are run in the same process, communicate through a Python interpreter (already used in WARP), and share certain key arrays (so far, particle positions and velocities). Currently, POSINST provides primary and secondary sources of electrons, beam bunch kicks, a particle mover, and diagnostics. WARP provides the field solvers and diagnostics. Secondary emission routines are provided by the Tech-X package CMEE

  6. A Technique for Mitigating Thermal Stress and Extending Life Cycle of Power Electronic Converters Used for Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canras Batunlu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, various models have been developed to assess and improve the reliability of power electronic conversion systems (PECs with a focus on those used for wind turbines. However, only few studies have dealt with mitigating the PECs thermo-mechanical effects on their reliability taking into account variations in wind characteristics. This work critically investigates this issue and attempts to offer a mitigating technique by, first, developing realistic full scale (FS and partial scale (PS induction generator models combined with two level back-to-back PECs. Subsequently, deriving a driving algorithm, which reduces PEC’s operating temperature by controlling its switching patterns. The developed switching procedure ensures minimum temperature fluctuations by adapting the variable DC link and system’s frequency of operation. It was found for both FS and PS topologies, that the generator side converters have higher mean junction temperatures where the grid side ones have more fluctuations on their thermal profile. The FS and PS cycling temperatures were reduced by 12 °C and 5 °C, respectively. Moreover, this led to a significant improvement in stress; approximately 27 MPa stress reduction for the FS induction generator PEC.

  7. CYANOMETHANIMINE ISOMERS IN COLD INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS: INSIGHTS FROM ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND KINETIC CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazart, Fanny; Latouche, Camille; Skouteris, Dimitrios; Barone, Vincenzo [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56125 Pisa (Italy); Balucani, Nadia [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Universitá degli Studi di Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-09-10

    New insights into the formation of interstellar cyanomethanimine, a species of great relevance in prebiotic chemistry, are provided by electronic structure and kinetic calculations for the reaction CN + CH{sub 2} = NH. This reaction is a facile formation route of Z,E-C-cyanomethanimine, even under the extreme conditions of density and temperature typical of cold interstellar clouds. E-C-cyanomethanimine has been recently identified in Sgr B2(N) in the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) PRIMOS survey by P. Zaleski et al. and no efficient formation routes have been envisaged so far. The rate coefficient expression for the reaction channel leading to the observed isomer E-C-cyanomethanimine is 3.15 × 10-10 × (T/300){sup 0.152} × e{sup (−0.0948/T)}. According to the present study, the more stable Z-C-cyanomethanimine isomer is formed with a slightly larger yield (4.59 × 10{sup −10} × (T/300){sup 0.153} × e{sup (−0.0871/T)}. As the detection of E-isomer is favored due to its larger dipole moment, the missing detection of the Z-isomer can be due to the sensitivity limit of the GBT PRIMOS survey and the detection of the Z-isomer should be attempted with more sensitive instrumentation. The CN + CH{sub 2} = NH reaction can also play a role in the chemistry of the upper atmosphere of Titan where the cyanomethanimine products can contribute to the buildup of the observed nitrogen-rich organic aerosols that cover the moon.

  8. Simulation of a Feedback System for the Attenuation of e-Cloud Driven Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Fox, J.; Rivetta, C.; de Maria, R.; Rumolo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electron clouds impose limitations on current accelerators that may be more severe for future machines, unless adequate measures of mitigation are taken. Recently, it has been proposed to use feedback systems operating at high frequency (in the GHz range) to damp single-bunch transverse coherent oscillations that may otherwise be amplified during the interaction of the beam with ambient electron clouds. We have used the simulation package WARP-POSINST and the code Headtail to study the growth rate and frequency patterns in space-time of the electron cloud driven beam breakup instability in the CERN SPS accelerator with, or without, an idealized feedback model for damping the instability.

  9. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  10. Electron cloud effects in intense, ion beam linacs theory and experimental planning for heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Lund, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lee, E.P.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation a large fractional electron population ((ge)1%) is predicted in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the ∼4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron flow is limited to drift velocities (E x B and (del)B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as the their effect on the ion beam

  11. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: A Cloud-Based Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Electron Cutout Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T; Bush, K [Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For electron cutouts of smaller sizes, it is necessary to verify electron cutout factors due to perturbations in electron scattering. Often, this requires a physical measurement using a small ion chamber, diode, or film. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast Monte Carlo based dose calculation framework that requires only a smart phone photograph of the cutout and specification of the SSD and energy to determine the electron cutout factor, with the ultimate goal of making this cloud-based calculation widely available to the medical physics community. Methods: The algorithm uses a pattern recognition technique to identify the corners of the cutout in the photograph as shown in Figure 1. It then corrects for variations in perspective, scaling, and translation of the photograph introduced by the user’s positioning of the camera. Blob detection is used to identify the portions of the cutout which comprise the aperture and the portions which are cutout material. This information is then used define physical densities of the voxels used in the Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm as shown in Figure 2, and select a particle source from a pre-computed library of phase-spaces scored above the cutout. The electron cutout factor is obtained by taking a ratio of the maximum dose delivered with the cutout in place to the dose delivered under calibration/reference conditions. Results: The algorithm has been shown to successfully identify all necessary features of the electron cutout to perform the calculation. Subsequent testing will be performed to compare the Monte Carlo results with a physical measurement. Conclusion: A simple, cloud-based method of calculating electron cutout factors could eliminate the need for physical measurements and substantially reduce the time required to properly assure accurate dose delivery.

  12. Time-resolved Shielded-Pickup Measurements and Modeling of Beam Conditioning Effects on Electron Cloud Buildup at CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Crittenden, J A; Liu, X; Palmer, M A; Santos, S; Sikora, J P; Kato, S; Calatroni, S; Rumolo, G

    2012-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator program includes investigations into electron cloud buildup in vacuum chambers with various coatings. Two 1.1-mlong sections located symmetrically in the east and west arc regions are equipped with BPM-like pickup detectors shielded against the direct beam-induced signal. They detect cloud electrons migrating through an 18-mm-diameter pattern of 0.76 mm-diameter holes in the top of the chamber. A digitizing oscilloscope is used to record the signals, providing time-resolved information on cloud development. We present new measurements of the effect of beam conditioning on a newly-installed amorphous carbon coated chamber, as well as on an extensively conditioned chamber with a diamond-like carbon coating. The ECLOUD modeling code is used to quantify the sensitivity of these measurements to model parameters, differentiating between photoelectron and secondary-electron production processes.

  13. Electron-cloud simulation studies for the CERN-PS in the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    Rioja Fuentelsaz, Sergio

    The present study aims to provide a consistent picture of the electron cloud effect in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and to investigate possible future limitations due to the requirements foreseen by the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. It consists of a complete simulation survey of the electron cloud build-up in the different beam pipe sections of the ring depending on several controllable beam parameters and vacuum chamber surface properties, covering present and future operation parameters. As the combined function magnets of the accelerator constitute almost the $80\\%$ in length of the ring, the implementation of a new feature for the simulation of any external magnetic field on the PyECLOUD code, made it possible to perform this study. All the results of the simulations are given as a function of the vacuum chamber surface properties in order to deduce them, both locally and globally, when compared with experimental data. In a first step, we characterize locally the maximum possible number of ...

  14. Cloud Based Electronic Health Record Applications are Essential to Expeditionary Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Processing Theory Approach,” International Journal of Logistics Management, Vol. 23(2), 2012. Columbus, L. “83% of Healthcare Organizations are Using... International Journal of Cloud Computing and Services Science, Vol.2,No.4, August 2014. 35 Wilson, E. & Lankton, N. “Interdisciplinary Research ...transitions from an EMEDS HRT to a larger EMEDS by adding more laptops and printers to emergency medicine, medical ward, dental clinic , critical care

  15. Cloud services in organization

    OpenAIRE

    FUXA, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The work deals with the definition of the word cloud computing, cloud computing models, types, advantages, disadvantages, and comparing SaaS solutions such as: Google Apps and Office 365 in the area of electronic communications. The work deals with the use of cloud computing in the corporate practice, both good and bad practice. The following section describes the methodology for choosing the appropriate cloud service organization. Another part deals with analyzing the possibilities of SaaS i...

  16. Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams (ECLOUD'02) organized by the SL Accelerator Physics Group at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    This workshop was organized by the SL Accelerator Physics group at CERN from 15 to 18 April 2002. More than 60 participants from 17 institutes reflect the great worldwide interest in the electron-cloud phenomenon, which presently limits the performance of several storage rings and has become a concern for the LHC.

  17. Sawtooth activity of the ion cloud in an electron-beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, R.; Biedermann, C.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of highly charged Ar and Ba ions in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was studied by recording time-resolved x-ray spectra emitted from trapped ions. Sawtoothlike signatures manifest in the spectra for a variety of EBIT operating conditions indicating a sudden collapse of the ion inventory in the trap. The collapse occurs on a time scale of approximately 100 ms and the evolution of the sawteeth is very sensitive to parameters such as electron-beam current and axial trap depth. Analysis of the measurements is based on a time-dependent calculation of the trapping process showing that sawtooth activity is caused by the feedback between the low-Z argon and high-Z barium ions. This unexpected behavior demonstrates the importance of nonlinear effects in electron-beam traps containing more than a single ion species

  18. On 2D electron cloud dynamics in high-current plasma lens for ion beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, A. A.; Litovko, I. V.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Zadorozhny, V. F.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we are dealing with the appear the stable existence and dynamics of 2-D electron vortical structures in crossed electric and magnetic fields. The collective interactions in which the electron motion is nonlinear and ion motion is linear, is concerned. By using of the kinetic equation and the catastrophe theory approach we deduce an origin of the vortical structures. The nonlinear differential equation for the electric potential in a hydrodynamical approximation is obtained. It describes a drift motion of the electrons in oscillating electric fields of the high-current plasma lens(PL), arising due to presence the principal unremoval radical gradient of the axical component of the magnetic field. It was shown that the considered equations have contained the solutions in the form of the single vortical structures. The stability of the structures are given

  19. An Efficient Searchable Encryption Against Keyword Guessing Attacks for Sharable Electronic Medical Records in Cloud-based System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yilun; Lu, Xicheng; Su, Jinshu; Chen, Peixin

    2016-12-01

    Preserving the privacy of electronic medical records (EMRs) is extremely important especially when medical systems adopt cloud services to store patients' electronic medical records. Considering both the privacy and the utilization of EMRs, some medical systems apply searchable encryption to encrypt EMRs and enable authorized users to search over these encrypted records. Since individuals would like to share their EMRs with multiple persons, how to design an efficient searchable encryption for sharable EMRs is still a very challenge work. In this paper, we propose a cost-efficient secure channel free searchable encryption (SCF-PEKS) scheme for sharable EMRs. Comparing with existing SCF-PEKS solutions, our scheme reduces the storage overhead and achieves better computation performance. Moreover, our scheme can guard against keyword guessing attack, which is neglected by most of the existing schemes. Finally, we implement both our scheme and a latest medical-based scheme to evaluate the performance. The evaluation results show that our scheme performs much better performance than the latest one for sharable EMRs.

  20. Molecular clouds near supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootten, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The physical properties of molecular clouds near supernova remnants were investigated. Various properties of the structure and kinematics of these clouds are used to establish their physical association with well-known remmnants. An infrared survey of the most massive clouds revealed embedded objects, probably stars whose formation was induced by the supernova blast wave. In order to understand the relationship between these and other molecular clouds, a control group of clouds was also observed. Excitation models for dense regions of all the clouds are constructed to evaluate molecular abundances in these regions. Those clouds that have embedded stars have lower molecular abundances than the clouds that do not. A cloud near the W28 supernova remnant also has low abundances. Molecular abundances are used to measure an important parameter, the electron density, which is not directly observable. In some clouds extensive deuterium fractionation is observed which confirms electron density measurements in those clouds. Where large deuterium fractionation is observed, the ionization rate in the cloud interior can also be measured. The electron density and ionization rate in the cloud near W28 are higher than in most clouds. The molecular abundances and electron densities are functions of the chemical and dynamical state of evolution of the cloud. Those clouds with lowest abundances are probably the youngest clouds. As low-abundance clouds, some clouds near supernova remnants may have been recently swept from the local interstellar material. Supernova remnants provide sites for star formation in ambient clouds by compressing them, and they sweep new clouds from more diffuse local matter

  1. Identification of the Rice Wines with Different Marked Ages by Electronic Nose Coupled with Smartphone and Cloud Storage Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhebo; Xiao, Xize; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui

    2017-10-31

    In this study, a portable electronic nose (E-nose) was self-developed to identify rice wines with different marked ages-all the operations of the E-nose were controlled by a special Smartphone Application. The sensor array of the E-nose was comprised of 12 MOS sensors and the obtained response values were transmitted to the Smartphone thorough a wireless communication module. Then, Aliyun worked as a cloud storage platform for the storage of responses and identification models. The measurement of the E-nose was composed of the taste information obtained phase (TIOP) and the aftertaste information obtained phase (AIOP). The area feature data obtained from the TIOP and the feature data obtained from the TIOP-AIOP were applied to identify rice wines by using pattern recognition methods. Principal component analysis (PCA), locally linear embedding (LLE) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied for the classification of those wine samples. LDA based on the area feature data obtained from the TIOP-AIOP proved a powerful tool and showed the best classification results. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and support vector machine (SVM) were applied for the predictions of marked ages and SVM (R² = 0.9942) worked much better than PLSR.

  2. Identification of the Rice Wines with Different Marked Ages by Electronic Nose Coupled with Smartphone and Cloud Storage Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhebo Wei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a portable electronic nose (E-nose was self-developed to identify rice wines with different marked ages—all the operations of the E-nose were controlled by a special Smartphone Application. The sensor array of the E-nose was comprised of 12 MOS sensors and the obtained response values were transmitted to the Smartphone thorough a wireless communication module. Then, Aliyun worked as a cloud storage platform for the storage of responses and identification models. The measurement of the E-nose was composed of the taste information obtained phase (TIOP and the aftertaste information obtained phase (AIOP. The area feature data obtained from the TIOP and the feature data obtained from the TIOP-AIOP were applied to identify rice wines by using pattern recognition methods. Principal component analysis (PCA, locally linear embedding (LLE and linear discriminant analysis (LDA were applied for the classification of those wine samples. LDA based on the area feature data obtained from the TIOP-AIOP proved a powerful tool and showed the best classification results. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR and support vector machine (SVM were applied for the predictions of marked ages and SVM (R2 = 0.9942 worked much better than PLSR.

  3. Quasilinear dynamics of a cloud of hot electrons propagating through a plasma with decreasing density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroutan, G.; Khalilpour, H.; Moslehi-Fard, M.; Li, B.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of plasma inhomogeneities on the propagation of a cloud of hot electrons through a cold background plasma and generation of Langmuir waves are investigated using numerical simulations of the quasilinear equations. It is found that in a plasma with decreasing density the quasilinear relaxation of the electron distribution in velocity space is accelerated and the levels of the generated Langmuir waves are enhanced. The magnitude of the induced emission rate is increased and its maximum value moves to lower velocities. Due to density gradient the height of plateau shows an increase at small distances and a corresponding decrease at large distances. It is also found that in a plasma with decreasing temperature, the relaxation of the beam is retarded, the spectral density of Langmuir waves is broadened, and the height of the plateau decreases below its value in a uniform plasma. In the presence of both density and temperature gradients, at given position, the height and upper boundary of the plateau and the level of Langmuir waves are all increased at small velocities. The spatial expansion of the beam is increased by the plasma inhomogeneities, but its average velocity of propagation decreases. Initially, at a given position, the velocity at the upper boundary of the plateau is smaller in the presence of the density gradient than in the uniform plasma but the reverse is true at longer times. Due to temperature gradient, at large times and small distances, the upper boundary of the plateau is increased above its value in the uniform plasma. Because of fast relaxation, the value of the lower boundary of the plateau in the plasma with decreasing density is always less than its value in the uniform plasma. It is found that the local velocity of the beam decreases when the density gradient is present. The local velocity spread of the beam remains unchanged during the propagation of the beam in the uniform plasma, but increases in the presence of inhomogeneities.

  4. Analytical treatment of the nonlinear electron cloud effect and the combined effects with beam-beam and space charge nonlinear forces in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we treat first some nonlinear beam dynamics problems in storage rings, such as beam dynamic apertures due to magnetic multipoles, wiggles, beam-beam effects, nonlinear space charge effect, and then nonlinear electron cloud effect combined with beam-beam and space charge effects, analytically. This analytical treatment is applied to BEPC II. The corresponding analytical expressions developed in this paper are useful both in understanding the physics behind these problems and also in making practical quick hand estimations. (author)

  5. The Electronic Forensics Process under Cloud Environment%云环境下电子取证方式与流程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆智森

    2015-01-01

    in recent years, with the continuous development of cloud computing technology, our life also because cloud computing function has been a lot of convenience, convenient our daily some important information preservation. But the network also ap⁃peared a lot of for cloud computing or cloud computing to steal the target of cyber crime, both at the technical level or in law, cloud computing is gaining achievements is still not big enough, it also gives the cloud computing network security left a loophole. Rising trend of cyber crime, for a criminal record has been unable to use traditional methods of electronic evidence for forensic evidence, which for the evidence is a difficult challenge. Therefore, this paper will be electronic evidence of cloud computing research and analysis. At first, this paper analyzes the difficulty of obtaining evidence under the environment of cloud computing, then pointed out that the cloud computing environment of the primary collection objects, in the end, this article presents a new kind of cloud fo⁃rensics forensic methods. The final result of this article will evidence to bring a lot of convenience, can also provide some reference for the cloud forensics forensic investigators.%近年来,随着云计算技术的不断发展,我们的生活也因为云计算功能得到了很多的便利,方便我们日常的一些重要信息保存。可是网络上也出现了大量的针对云计算或以云计算为窃取目标的网络犯罪,无论是在技术层面还是在法律方面,云计算取得的成就还是不够大,这也给云计算的网络安全留下了一个漏洞。网络犯罪的趋势不断上涨,对犯罪记录进行取证的人员已经无法用传统的电子取证方法为案件取证,这对取证人员来说,是一个困难的挑战。因此,该文将会对云计算的电子取证进行探究和分析。该文首先分析了云计算环境下取证的困难,之后便点明了云计算环境下的

  6. Status report on the 'Merging' of the Electron-Cloud Code POSINST with the 3-D Accelerator PIC CODE WARP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Azevedo, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Stoltz, P.H.

    2004-04-19

    We have integrated the electron-cloud code POSINST [1] with WARP [2]--a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell accelerator code developed for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion--so that the two can interoperate. Both codes are run in the same process, communicate through a Python interpreter (already used in WARP), and share certain key arrays (so far, particle positions and velocities). Currently, POSINST provides primary and secondary sources of electrons, beam bunch kicks, a particle mover, and diagnostics. WARP provides the field solvers and diagnostics. Secondary emission routines are provided by the Tech-X package CMEE.

  7. Phosphate Changes Effect of Humic Acids on TiO2 Photocatalysis: From Inhibition to Mitigation of Electron-Hole Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mingce; Brame, Jonathon; Qin, Fan; Bao, Jiming; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2017-01-03

    A major challenge for photocatalytic water purification with TiO 2 is the strong inhibitory effect of natural organic matter (NOM), which can scavenge photogenerated holes and radicals and occlude ROS generation sites upon adsorption. This study shows that phosphate counteracts the inhibitory effect of humic acids (HA) by decreasing HA adsorption and mitigating electron-hole recombination. As a measure of the inhibitory effect of HA, the ratios of first-order reaction rate constants between photocatalytic phenol degradation in the absence versus presence of HA were calculated. This ratio was very high, up to 5.72 at 30 mg/L HA and pH 4.8 without phosphate, but was decreased to 0.76 (5 mg/L HA, pH 8.4) with 2 mM phosphate. The latter ratio indicates a surprising favorable effect of HA on TiO 2 photocatalysis. FTIR analyses suggest that this favorable effect is likely due to a change in the conformation of adsorbed HA, from a multiligand exchange arrangement to a complexation predominantly between COOH groups in HA and the TiO 2 surface in the presence of phosphate. This configuration can reduce hole consumption and facilitate electron transfer to O 2 by the adsorbed HA (indicated by linear sweep voltammetry), which mitigates electron-hole recombination and enhances contaminant degradation. A decrease in HA surface adsorption and hole scavenging (the predominant inhibitory mechanisms of HA) by phosphate (2 mM) was indicated by a 50% decrease in the photocatalytic degradation rate of HA and 80% decrease in the decay rate coefficient of interfacial-related photooxidation in photocurrent transients. These results, which were validated with other compounds (FFA and cimetidine), indicate that anchoring phosphate - or anions that exert similar effects on the TiO 2 surface - might be a feasible strategy to counteract the inhibitory effect of NOM during photocatalytic water treatment.

  8. A Modular Active Front-End Rectifier with Electronic Phase-Shifting for Harmonic Mitigation in Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zare, Firuz; Davari, Pooya; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an electronic phase-shifting strategy has been optimized for a multi-parallel configuration of line-commutated rectifiers with a common dc-bus voltage used in motor drive application. This feature makes the performance of the system independent of the load profile and maximizes its...

  9. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  10. Local clouds ionization, temperatures, electron densities and interfaces, from GHRS and IMAPS spectra of epsilon Canis Majoris

    CERN Document Server

    Gry, C; Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2001-01-01

    The composition and physical properties of several local clouds, including the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) in which the Sun is embedded, are derived from absorption features in the UV spectrum of the star epsilon CMa. We derive temperatures and densities for three components by combining our interpretations of the ionization balance of magnesium and the relative population of C II in an excited fine-structure level. We find that for the LIC n(e) = 0.12 +/-0.05 cm-3 and T = 7000 +/-1200 K. We derive the ionization fractions of hydrogen and discuss the ionizing processes. In particular the hydrogen and helium ionizations in the LIC are compatible with photoionization by the local EUV radiation fields from the hot stars and the cloud interface with the hot gas. We confirm the detection of high ionization species : Si III is detected in all clouds and C IV in two of them, including the LIC, suggesting the presence of ionized interfaces around the local clouds.

  11. Progress in Development of C60 Nanoparticle Plasma Jet for Diagnostic of Runaway Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction and Disruption Mitigation Study for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Thompson, J. R.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    We produced a C60 nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) with uniquely fast response-to-delivery time (~ 1 - 2 ms) and unprecedentedly high momentum (~ 0 . 6 g .km/s). The C60 NPPJ was obtained by using a solid state TiH2/C60 pulsed power cartridge producing ~180 mg of C60 molecular gas by sublimation and by electromagnetic acceleration of the C60 plasma in a coaxial gun (~35 cm length, 96 kJ energy) with the output of a high-density (>1023 m-3) hyper-velocity (>4 km/s) plasma jet. The ~ 75 mg C60/C plasma jet has the potential to rapidly and deeply deliver enough mass to significantly increase electron density (to ne ~ 2 . 4 ×1021 m-3, i.e. ~ 60 times larger than typical DIII-D pre-disruption value, ne 0 ~ 4 ×1019 m-3), and to modify the 'critical electric field' and the runaway electrons (REs) collisional drag during different phases of REs dynamics. The C60 NPPJ, as a novel injection technique, allows RE beam-plasma interaction diagnostic by quantitative spectroscopy of C ions visible/UV line intensity. The system is scalable to ~ 1 - 2 g C60/C plasma jet output and technology is adaptable to ITER acceptable materials (BN and Be) for disruption mitigation. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-08ER85196 grant.

  12. Simulation studies on the electron cloud build-up in the elements of the LHC Arcs at 6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstal, Philipp; Mether, Lotta; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The formation of electron clouds in the arcs of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been identified as one of the main limitations for the performance of the machine. In particular, the impacting electrons can deposit a significant power on the cold beam screens of the LHC superconducting magnets, which translates into a significant heat load for the cryogenic system. A detailed model of the e-cloud formation in the different elements of the LHC arc half-cell has been developed using the PyECLOUD simulation code. The model includes the main dipole and quadrupole magnets, shorter corrector magnets and drift spaces. Particular care was taken to correctly model the impact of the hotoelectrons produced by the beam synchrotron radiation. For this purpose, we reviewed the available literature on the characterization of the LHC beam screen surface in terms of reflectivity and photoelectron yield and we defined the necessary steps to obtain the photoemission model in the format required in input by t...

  13. A cloud-based electronic medical record for scheduling, tracking, and documenting examinations and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Robert W; Jacob, Jack; Matrix, Zinnia

    2012-01-01

    Screening by neonatologists and staging by ophthalmologists is a cost-effective intervention, but inadvertent missed examinations create a high liability. Paper tracking, bedside schedule reminders, and a computer scheduling and reminder program were compared for speed of input and retrospective missed examination rate. A neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) process was then programmed for cloud-based distribution for inpatient and outpatient retinopathy of prematurity monitoring. Over 11 years, 367 premature infants in one NICU were prospectively monitored. The initial paper system missed 11% of potential examinations, the Windows server-based system missed 2%, and the current cloud-based system missed 0% of potential inpatient and outpatient examinations. Computer input of examinations took the same or less time than paper recording. A computer application with a deliberate NICU process improved the proportion of eligible neonates getting their scheduled eye examinations in a timely manner. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. An Analysis Of Methods For Sharing An Electronic Platform Of Public Administration Services Using Cloud Computing And Service Oriented Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Hamiga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study on how to design and implement a publicadministration services platform, using the SOA paradigm and cloud model forsharing among citizens belonging to particular districts and provinces, providingtight integration with an existing ePUAP system. The basic requirements,architecture and implementation of the platform are all discussed. Practicalevaluation of the solution is elaborated using real-case scenario of the BusinessProcess Management related activities.

  15. Optical emissions associated with energetic electrons produced by stepping leaders in cloud-to-ground lightning discharges

    OpenAIRE

    Xu , Wei; Celestin , Sebastien; Pasko , Victor

    2015-01-01

    All data used in this paper are directly available after a request is made to authors W.X. (), S.C. (), or V.P.P. ().; International audience; Both natural cloud-to-ground and rocket-triggered lightning flashes have been found to be associated with intense and brief bursts of X-ray emissions. Using a full energy Monte Carlo model combined with an optical emission model, we quantify the optical emissions induced by the strong accel...

  16. Experimental project - Cloud chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nour, Elena; Quinchard, Gregory; Soudon, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This document reports an academic experimental project dealing with the general concepts of radioactivity and their application to the cloud room experiment. The author first recalls the history of the design and development of a cloud room, and some definitions and characteristics of cosmic radiation, and proposes a description of the principle and physics of a cloud room. The second part is a theoretical one, and addresses the involved particles, the origins of electrons, and issues related to the transfer of energy (Bremsstrahlung effect, Bragg peak). The third part reports the experimental work with the assessment of a cloud droplet radius, the identification of a trace for each particle (alphas and electrons), and the study of the magnetic field deviation

  17. Service quality of cloud-based applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    This book explains why applications running on cloud might not deliver the same service reliability, availability, latency and overall quality to end users as they do when the applications are running on traditional (non-virtualized, non-cloud) configurations, and explains what can be done to mitigate that risk.

  18. Cloud Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthing, Hans Henrik

    Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing.......Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing....

  19. Electronic measurement equipment for determining the cloud cover of the sky. Elektronisches Messgeraet zur Bestimmung des Bedeckungsgrades des Himmels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebrasse, R

    1990-01-18

    The invention is used for the automatic determination of the degree of cloud cover of the sky. Compared to the state of the art, the invention has the advantage that it manages without mechanical controls, like those of 'sky scanners' for example, and that the measuring head has a very simple, cheap and robust construction. In order to do without any mechanics, a group of 24 photo-transistors of type BPX 43 was mounted on a hemispherical support, which screens the individual elements from one another, so that a certain section of the sky is allocated to each transistor. The optical axes of the individual axes are distributed completely evenly, so that there is an even and beam-shaped alignment to the sky above the measurement head. The individual measurements of the 24 transistors together give a certain optical impression, a 'picture' or a brightness distribution of the sky hemisphere, which can be read by a suitable program via a normal commercial adaptor into a personal computer, where this distribution is compared with given distributions which have degrees of cover of 0-8 or 0-10 as heading. The given 'picture' which comes closest to the current distribution is ejected as the result, and the heading of this picture gives the current degree of cloud cover.

  20. Qualitative analysis of the e-cloud formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, Samuel A

    2002-01-01

    The qualitative analysis of the electron cloud formation is presented. Two mechanisms of the cloud formation, generation of jets of primary photo-electrons and thermalization of electrons in the electron cloud, are analyzed and compared with simulations for the NLC damping ring [1

  1. Implementation of a cloud-based electronic medical record exchange system in compliance with the integrating healthcare enterprise's cross-enterprise document sharing integration profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien Hua; Chiu, Ruey Kei; Yeh, Hong Mo; Wang, Da Wei

    2017-11-01

    In 2011, the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Taiwan established the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Center (EEC) to permit the sharing of medical resources among hospitals. This system can presently exchange electronic medical records (EMRs) among hospitals, in the form of medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, outpatient records, and outpatient medication records. Hospitals can send or retrieve EMRs over the virtual private network by connecting to the EEC through a gateway. International standards should be adopted in the EEC to allow users with those standards to take advantage of this exchange service. In this study, a cloud-based EMR-exchange prototyping system was implemented on the basis of the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise's Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing integration profile and the existing EMR exchange system. RESTful services were used to implement the proposed prototyping system on the Microsoft Azure cloud-computing platform. Four scenarios were created in Microsoft Azure to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed system. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed system successfully completed EMR exchange under the four scenarios created in Microsoft Azure. Additional experiments were conducted to compare the efficiency of the EMR-exchanging mechanisms of the proposed system with those of the existing EEC system. The experimental results suggest that the proposed RESTful service approach is superior to the Simple Object Access Protocol method currently implemented in the EEC system, according to the irrespective response times under the four experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Wake Field of the e-Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, Samuel A

    2001-01-01

    The wake field of the cloud is derived analytically taking into account the finite size of the cloud and nonlinearity of the electron motion. The analytic expression for the effective transverse wake field caused by the electron cloud in a positron storage ring is derived. The derivation includes the frequency spread in the cloud, which is the main effect of the nonlinearity of electron motion in the cloud. This approach allows calculation of the Q-factor and study the tune spread in a bunch

  3. Developing and evaluating a cloud service relationship theory

    CERN Document Server

    Huntgeburth, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This book develops, evaluates and refines a cloud service relationship theory that explains how cloud users' uncertainties arise in these relationships and how they can be mitigated. To that end, the book employs principal-agent theory and the concepts of bounded rationality and social embeddedness. Beyond advancing IS research, the findings presented can greatly benefit governments, IT departments and IT providers, helping them to better understand cloud service relationships and to adjust their cloud service strategies accordingly.

  4. Security of Data Stored in the Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Vrhovec, Andraž

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this diploma thesis is to give an overview of data security in cloud systems. The first part covers basics of cloud and security. Additionally it identifies some risks arising from the use of cloud computing. The second part focuses on cryptography, especially on ciphers, as a tool for mitigation of those risks. We try to convey some recent ideas (especially those interesting in the context of cloud computing) from the cryptographic world to the reader in an easy manner. We conclu...

  5. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Antonopoulos, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has recently emerged as a subject of substantial industrial and academic interest, though its meaning and scope is hotly debated. For some researchers, clouds are a natural evolution towards the full commercialisation of grid systems, while others dismiss the term as a mere re-branding of existing pay-per-use technologies. From either perspective, 'cloud' is now the label of choice for accountable pay-per-use access to third party applications and computational resources on a massive scale. Clouds support patterns of less predictable resource use for applications and services a

  6. The dilemma of "to be or not to be": developing electronically e-health & cloud computing documents for overseas transplant patients from Taiwan organ transplant health professionals' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, F-J; Fan, Y-W; Chiu, C-M; Shih, F-Ji; Wang, S-S

    2012-05-01

    The development of mutually accessible e-health documents (ehD) and cloud computing (CC) for overseas organ transplant health professionals (OTHP) in two medical parties (domestic and overseas) would ensure better quality of care. This project attempted to compare pro and con arguments from the perspective of Taiwan's OTHP. A sample was obtained from three leading medical centers in Taiwan. Eighty subjects including transplant surgeons (n = 20), registered nurses (RN; n = 30), coordinating nurses (OTCN; n = 15), and e-health information and communication technologies experts (ehICTs; n = 15) participated in this research. The pros of developing ehD were: (1) better and continuous care through communication and cooperation in two parties (78%); (2) better collaborative efforts between health professionals, information technology experts in two medical parties is (74%); (3) easier retrieval and communication of personal health documents with the trustworthy OTHP in the different countries (71%); and (4) CC may help develop transplant patients medical cloud based on the collaboration between medical systems in political parties of Taiwan and mainland China (69%). The cons of developing ehD and CC included: (1) inadequate knowledge of benefits and manuals of developing ehD and CC (75%); (2) no reliable communication avenues in developing ehD and CC (73%); (3) increased workload in direct care and documentation in developing new ehD and CC (70%); (4) lack of coaching and accreditation systems in medical, electronic, and law aspects to settle discrepancies in medical diagnosis and treatment protocols between two parties (68%); and (5) lacking systematic ehD and CC plans developed by interdisciplinary teams in two parties (60%). In this initial phase, the establishment of an interdisciplinary team including transplant leaders, transplant surgeon, RN, OTCN, ehICTs, and law experts from two parties might be helpful in working out developing plans with careful monitoring

  7. Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  8. Cloud Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  9. Data intensive ATLAS workflows in the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    From 2025 onwards, the ATLAS collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will experience a massive increase in data quantity as well as complexity. Including mitigating factors, the prevalent computing power by that time will only fulfil one tenth of the requirement. This contribution will focus on Cloud computing as an approach to help overcome this challenge by providing flexible hardware that can be configured to the specific needs of a workflow. Experience with Cloud computing exists, but there is a large uncertainty if and to which degree it can be able to reduce the burden by 2025. In order to understand and quantify the benefits of Cloud computing, the "Workflow and Infrastructure Model" was created. It estimates the viability of Cloud computing by combining different inputs from the workflow side with infrastructure specifications. The model delivers metrics that enable the comparison of different Cloud configurations as well as different Cloud offerings with each other. A wide range of r...

  10. Cloud Computing Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furht, Borko

    In the introductory chapter we define the concept of cloud computing and cloud services, and we introduce layers and types of cloud computing. We discuss the differences between cloud computing and cloud services. New technologies that enabled cloud computing are presented next. We also discuss cloud computing features, standards, and security issues. We introduce the key cloud computing platforms, their vendors, and their offerings. We discuss cloud computing challenges and the future of cloud computing.

  11. A virtual platform for electronic health record (EHR) education for nursing students: moving from in-house solutions to the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Kuo, Mu-Hsing; Parapini, Eric; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop cost effective ways to bring hands-on education about essential information technologies, such as electronic health record (EHR) systems to nursing students, nursing faculty and practitioners. This is especially the case as worldwide there is an increased deployment of these systems and they are transforming the practice of healthcare. However, due to technical, financial and knowledge limitations, many nursing schools and programs do not have an adequate way to bring such technology into their classes and curricula. In this paper we describe an approach to developing Web-based EHR education that allows students from any Web-accessible location to access and work with real EHR systems remotely over the Internet for learning purposes. In this paper we describe our work in moving this approach to a cloud-based solution to allow access to EHRs for educational purposes from any location with Web access and to do so in a way that is both educationally sound and cost effective.

  12. Demonstration of electron clearing effect by means of a clearing electrode in high-intensity positron ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetsugu, Y.; Fukuma, H.; Wang, L.; Pivi, M.; Morishige, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsukamoto, M.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the beam pipe of high-intensity positron/proton storage rings, undesired electron clouds may be first produced by photoelectrons and the ionization of residual gases; then the clouds increase by the secondary electron emission. In this study, a strip-line clearing electrode has been developed to mitigate the electron-cloud effect in high-intensity positron/proton storage rings. The electrode is composed of a thin tungsten layer with a thickness of 0.1 mm formed on a thin alumina ceramic layer with a thickness of 0.2 mm. The narrow alumina gap between the electrode and the beam pipe decreases the beam impedance and also enhances the heat transfer from the electrode to the beam pipe. A test model has been installed in the KEK B-factory (KEKB) positron ring, along with an electron monitor with a retarding grid. The electron density in a field free region decreased by one order of magnitude was observed on the application of ±500 V to the electrode at a beam current of 1.6 A with 1585 bunches. The reduction in the electron density was more drastic in a vertical magnetic field of 0.77 T, that is, the electron density decreased by several orders by applying +500 V to the electrode at the same beam current. This experiment is the first experiment demonstrating the principle of the clearing electrode that is used to mitigate the electron-cloud effect in a positron ring.

  13. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Baun, Christian; Nimis, Jens; Tai, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a buzz-word in today's information technology (IT) that nobody can escape. But what is really behind it? There are many interpretations of this term, but no standardized or even uniform definition. Instead, as a result of the multi-faceted viewpoints and the diverse interests expressed by the various stakeholders, cloud computing is perceived as a rather fuzzy concept. With this book, the authors deliver an overview of cloud computing architecture, services, and applications. Their aim is to bring readers up to date on this technology and thus to provide a common basis for d

  14. Study of the transport parameters of cloud lightning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Z. S.; Yuan, P.; Zhao, N.

    2010-01-01

    Three spectra of cloud lightning have been acquired in Tibet (China) using a slitless grating spectrograph. The electrical conductivity, the electron thermal conductivity, and the electron thermal diffusivity of the cloud lightning, for the first time, are calculated by applying the transport theory of air plasma. In addition, we investigate the change behaviors of parameters (the temperature, the electron density, the electrical conductivity, the electron thermal conductivity, and the electron thermal diffusivity) in one of the cloud lightning channels. The result shows that these parameters decrease slightly along developing direction of the cloud lightning channel. Moreover, they represent similar sudden change behavior in tortuous positions and the branch of the cloud lightning channel.

  15. Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    2013-01-01

    with technological changes, the paradigmatic pendulum has swung between increased centralization on one side and a focus on distributed computing that pushes IT power out to end users on the other. With the introduction of outsourcing and cloud computing, centralization in large data centers is again dominating...... the IT scene. In line with the views presented by Nicolas Carr in 2003 (Carr, 2003), it is a popular assumption that cloud computing will be the next utility (like water, electricity and gas) (Buyya, Yeo, Venugopal, Broberg, & Brandic, 2009). However, this assumption disregards the fact that most IT production......), for instance, in establishing and maintaining trust between the involved parties (Sabherwal, 1999). So far, research in cloud computing has neglected this perspective and focused entirely on aspects relating to technology, economy, security and legal questions. While the core technologies of cloud computing (e...

  16. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    A mobile cloud is a cooperative arrangement of dynamically connected communication nodes sharing opportunistic resources. In this book, authors provide a comprehensive and motivating overview of this rapidly emerging technology. The book explores how distributed resources can be shared by mobile...... users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... performance, improve utilization of resources and create flexible platforms to share resources in very novel ways. Energy efficient aspects of mobile clouds are discussed in detail, showing how being cooperative can bring mobile users significant energy saving. The book presents and discusses multiple...

  17. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  18. Simulation of e-cloud driven instability and its attenuation using a simulated feedback system in the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS, and a feedback system to control the single-bunch instabilities is under active development. We present the latest improvements to the WARP-POSINST simulation framework and feedback model, and its application to the self-consistent simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with an electron cloud in the SPS. Simulations using an idealized feedback system exhibit adequate mitigation of the instability providing that the cutoff of the feedback bandwidth is at or above 450 MHz. Artifacts from numerical noise of the injected distribution of electrons in the modeling of portions of bunch trains are discussed, and benchmarking of WARP against POSINST and HEADTAIL are presented.

  19. LHC Report: Out of the clouds

    CERN Multimedia

    Giovanni Rumolo, Giovanni Iadarola and Hannes Bartosik for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    In order for the LHC to deliver intense proton beams to the experiments, operators have to perform “scrubbing” of the beam pipes. This operation is necessary to reduce the formation of electron clouds, which would generate instabilities in the colliding beams.   Electron clouds are generated in accelerators running with positively charged particles when electrons - produced by the ionisation of residual molecules in the vacuum or by the photoelectric effect from synchrotron radiation - are accelerated by the beam field and hit the surface of the vacuum chamber producing other electrons. This avalanche-like process can result in the formation of clouds of electrons. Electron clouds are detrimental to the beam for a few reasons. First, the electrons impacting the walls desorb molecules and degrade the ultra-high vacuum in the beam chamber. Furthermore, they interact electromagnetically with the beam, leading to the oscillation and expansion of the particle bunches. This increases...

  20. Carbon pellet cloud striations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, P.B.

    1989-01-01

    Fine scale striations, with alternating rows of bright and dark zones, have been observed in the ablation clouds of carbon pellets injected into the TEXT tokamak. The striations extend along the magnetic field for about 1 cm with quite regular cross-field variations characterized by a wavelength of a few mm. Their potential as a diagnostic tool for measuring q-profiles in tokamaks provides motivation for investigating the origin of the striations. The authors propose that the striations are not due to a sequence of high and low ablation rates because of the finite thermal magnetic islands localized at rational surfaces, q = m/n, would be responsible for reducing the electron flux to the pellet region; the length of the closed field line which forms the local magnetic axis of the island is too long to prevent a depletion of plasma electrons in a flux tube intercepting the pellet for the duration 2 rp / vp . Instead, they propose that striations are the manifestation of the saturated state of growing fluctuations inside the cloud. The instability is generated by E x B rotation of the ablation cloud. The outward centrifugal force points down the ablation density gradient inducing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability is not present for wave numbers along the field lines, which may explain why the striations are long and uniform in that direction. The E field develops inside the ablation cloud as a result of cold electron return currents which are induced to cancel the incoming hot plasma electron current streaming along the field lines

  1. Analysis on Cloud Computing Database in Cloud Environment – Concept and Adoption Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Geanina ULARU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the Internet’s new technical functionalities, new concepts have started to take shape. These concepts have an important role especially in the development of corporate IT. Such a concept is „the Cloud”. Various marketing campaigns have started to focus on the Cloud and began to promote it in different but confusing ways. This campaigns do little, to explain what cloud computing is and why it is becoming increasingly necessary. The lack of understanding in this new technology generates a lack of knowledge in business cloud adoption regarding database and also application. Only by focusing on the business processes and objectives an enterprise can achieve the full benefits of the cloud and mitigate the potential risks. In this article we create our own complete definition of the cloud and we analyze the essential aspects of cloud adoption for a banking financial reporting application.

  2. Experimental Observations of In-Situ Secondary Electron Yield Reduction in the PEP-II Particle Accelerator Beam Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of the positron Damping Ring (DR) of future Linear Colliders (LC) such as ILC and CLIC. To test a series of promising possible electron cloud mitigation techniques as surface coatings and grooves, in the Positron Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II accelerator, we have installed several test vacuum chambers including (i) a special chamber to monitor the variation of the secondary electron yield of technical surface materials and coatings under the effect of ion, electron and photon conditioning in situ in the beam line; (ii) chambers with grooves in a straight magnetic-free section; and (iii) coated chambers in a dedicated newly installed 4-magnet chicane to study mitigations in a magnetic field region. In this paper, we describe the ongoing R and D effort to mitigate the electron cloud effect for the LC damping ring, focusing on the first experimental area and on results of the reduction of the secondary electron yield due to in situ conditioning.

  3. Soft Clouding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten; Markussen, Thomas; Wetton, Barnabas

    2012-01-01

    Soft Clouding is a blended concept, which describes the aim of a collaborative and transdisciplinary project. The concept is a metaphor implying a blend of cognitive, embodied interaction and semantic web. Furthermore, it is a metaphor describing our attempt of curating a new semantics of sound...... archiving. The Soft Clouding Project is part of LARM - a major infrastructure combining research in and access to sound and radio archives in Denmark. In 2012 the LARM infrastructure will consist of more than 1 million hours of radio, combined with metadata who describes the content. The idea is to analyse...... the concept of ‘infrastructure’ and ‘interface’ on a creative play with the fundamentals of LARM (and any sound archive situation combining many kinds and layers of data and sources). This paper will present and discuss the Soft clouding project from the perspective of the three practices and competencies...

  4. Perspective-Taking and Empathy Mitigate Family-of-Origin Risk for Electronic Aggression Perpetration Toward Dating Partners: A Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Michelle C; Miller, Kelly F; Moss, Ilana K; Margolin, Gayla

    2017-12-01

    Electronic dating aggression among emerging adults is prevalent and has adverse consequences, yet factors that increase or decrease the risk for perpetrating electronic aggression against a romantic partner are understudied. This investigation advances the literature in two novel ways. First, based on intergenerational transmission of violence theories, we tested the link between family-of-origin aggression (FOA) history and electronic aggression toward romantic partners, using a diverse sample of emerging adults. Second, we examined whether perspective-taking and empathy each moderated the association between FOA and electronic dating aggression and explored the moderating role of gender. Participants included 359 undergraduate students (50% female; 42% White) from an urban university. Results indicated that greater FOA during childhood was associated with perpetrating greater electronic aggression against romantic partners. Furthermore, significant interactions indicated that perspective-taking and empathy separately buffered these associations. Youth from aggressive families did not exhibit increased electronic dating perpetration when they had higher perspective-taking or empathy. Males were especially sensitive to the protective effects of perspective-taking. Findings highlight potential points of intervention (i.e., cognitive and affective empathy training) to decrease electronic aggression in romantic relationships and break intergenerational cycles of aggression.

  5. Cloud Chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gfader, Verina

    Cloud Chamber takes its roots in a performance project, titled The Guests 做东, devised by Verina Gfader for the 11th Shanghai Biennale, ‘Why Not Ask Again: Arguments, Counter-arguments, and Stories’. Departing from the inclusion of the biennale audience to write a future folk tale, Cloud Chamber......: fiction and translation and translation through time; post literacy; world picturing-world typing; and cartographic entanglements and expressions of subjectivity; through the lens a social imaginary of worlding or cosmological quest. Art at its core? Contributions by Nikos Papastergiadis, Rebecca Carson...

  6. Cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes how cloud computing can be used in nursing education.

  7. Cloud Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... There are several types of services available on a cloud. We describe .... CPU speed has been doubling every 18 months at constant cost. Besides this ... Plain text (e.g., email) may be read by anyone who is able to access it.

  8. Multipactor for e-cloud diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa Pinto, P; Edwards, P; Holz, M; Taborelli, M

    2012-01-01

    Electron cloud in particle accelerators can be mitigated by coating the vacuum beam pipe with thin films of low secondary electron yield (SEY). SEY of small samples can be measured in the laboratory. Verifying the performance of long pipes is more complex, since it requires their insertion in the accelerator and the subsequent measurement of the beam induced pressure rise. RF induced multipacting in a coaxial waveguide configuration is proposed as a test before insertion in the machine. The technique is applied to two main bending dipoles of the SPS, where the RF power is fed through a tungsten wire stretched along the vacuum chamber (6.4 m). A dipole with a bare stainless steel chamber shows a clear power threshold initiating an abrupt rise in reflected power and pressure. The effect is enhanced at RF frequencies corresponding to cyclotron resonances for given magnetic fields. Preliminary results show that the dipole with a carbon coated vacuum chamber does not exhibit any pressure rise or reflected RF power...

  9. A Multi-Pulse Front-End Rectifier System with Electronic Phase-Shifting for Harmonic Mitigation in Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zare, Firuz; Davari, Pooya; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an electronic phase-shifting strategy has been optimized for a multi-parallel configuration of line-commutated rectifiers with a common dc-bus voltage used in motor drive application. This feature makes the performance of the system independent of the load profile and maximizes its...

  10. Cloud management and security

    CERN Document Server

    Abbadi, Imad M

    2014-01-01

    Written by an expert with over 15 years' experience in the field, this book establishes the foundations of Cloud computing, building an in-depth and diverse understanding of the technologies behind Cloud computing. In this book, the author begins with an introduction to Cloud computing, presenting fundamental concepts such as analyzing Cloud definitions, Cloud evolution, Cloud services, Cloud deployment types and highlighting the main challenges. Following on from the introduction, the book is divided into three parts: Cloud management, Cloud security, and practical examples. Part one presents the main components constituting the Cloud and federated Cloud infrastructure(e.g., interactions and deployment), discusses management platforms (resources and services), identifies and analyzes the main properties of the Cloud infrastructure, and presents Cloud automated management services: virtual and application resource management services. Part two analyzes the problem of establishing trustworthy Cloud, discuss...

  11. Cloud time

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, Dean

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Cloud’, hailed as a new digital commons, a utopia of collaborative expression and constant connection, actually constitutes a strategy of vitalist post-hegemonic power, which moves to dominate immanently and intensively, organizing our affective political involvements, instituting new modes of enclosure, and, crucially, colonizing the future through a new temporality of control. The virtual is often claimed as a realm of invention through which capitalism might be cracked, but it is precisely here that power now thrives. Cloud time, in service of security and profit, assumes all is knowable. We bear witness to the collapse of both past and future virtuals into a present dedicated to the exploitation of the spectres of both.

  12. Disruption mitigation studies in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Evans, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    Data on the discharge behavior, thermal loads, halo currents, and runaway electrons have been obtained in disruptions on the DIII-D tokamak. These experiments have also evaluated techniques to mitigate the disruptions while minimizing runaway electron production. Experiments injecting cryogenic impurity killer pellets of neon and argon and massive amounts of helium gas have successfully reduced these disruption effects. The halo current generation, scaling, and mitigation are understood and are in good agreement with predictions of a semianalytic model. Results from killer pellet injection have been used to benchmark theoretical models of the pellet ablation and energy loss. Runaway electrons are often generated by the pellets and new runaway generation mechanisms, modifications of the standard Dreicer process, have been found to explain the runaways. Experiments with the massive helium gas puff have also effectively mitigated disruptions without the formation of runaway electrons that can occur with killer pellets

  13. Essentials of cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekaran, K

    2014-01-01

    ForewordPrefaceComputing ParadigmsLearning ObjectivesPreambleHigh-Performance ComputingParallel ComputingDistributed ComputingCluster ComputingGrid ComputingCloud ComputingBiocomputingMobile ComputingQuantum ComputingOptical ComputingNanocomputingNetwork ComputingSummaryReview PointsReview QuestionsFurther ReadingCloud Computing FundamentalsLearning ObjectivesPreambleMotivation for Cloud ComputingThe Need for Cloud ComputingDefining Cloud ComputingNIST Definition of Cloud ComputingCloud Computing Is a ServiceCloud Computing Is a Platform5-4-3 Principles of Cloud computingFive Essential Charact

  14. DDoS Attacks in Cloud Computing: Issues, Taxonomy, and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Somani, Gaurav; Gaur, Manoj Singh; Sanghi, Dheeraj; Conti, Mauro; Buyya, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Security issues related to the cloud computing are relevant to various stakeholders for an informed cloud adoption decision. Apart from data breaches, the cyber security research community is revisiting the attack space for cloud-specific solutions as these issues affect budget, resource management, and service quality. Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack is one such serious attack in the cloud space. In this paper, we present developments related to DDoS attack mitigation solutions i...

  15. The International Symposium on Grids and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Symposium on Grids and Clouds (ISGC) 2012 will be held at Academia Sinica in Taipei from 26 February to 2 March 2012, with co-located events and workshops. The conference is hosted by the Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre (ASGC). 2012 is the decennium anniversary of the ISGC which over the last decade has tracked the convergence, collaboration and innovation of individual researchers across the Asia Pacific region to a coherent community. With the continuous support and dedication from the delegates, ISGC has provided the primary international distributed computing platform where distinguished researchers and collaboration partners from around the world share their knowledge and experiences. The last decade has seen the wide-scale emergence of e-Infrastructure as a critical asset for the modern e-Scientist. The emergence of large-scale research infrastructures and instruments that has produced a torrent of electronic data is forcing a generational change in the scientific process and the mechanisms used to analyse the resulting data deluge. No longer can the processing of these vast amounts of data and production of relevant scientific results be undertaken by a single scientist. Virtual Research Communities that span organisations around the world, through an integrated digital infrastructure that connects the trust and administrative domains of multiple resource providers, have become critical in supporting these analyses. Topics covered in ISGC 2012 include: High Energy Physics, Biomedicine & Life Sciences, Earth Science, Environmental Changes and Natural Disaster Mitigation, Humanities & Social Sciences, Operations & Management, Middleware & Interoperability, Security and Networking, Infrastructure Clouds & Virtualisation, Business Models & Sustainability, Data Management, Distributed Volunteer & Desktop Grid Computing, High Throughput Computing, and High Performance, Manycore & GPU Computing.

  16. Considerations about Cloud Services: Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Cognini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud services are ubiquitous: for small to large companies the phenomenon of cloud service is nowadays a standard business practice. This paper would compile an analysis over a possible implementation of a cloud system, treating especially the legal aspect of this theme. In the Italian market has a large number of issues arise form cloud computing. First of all, this paper investigates the legal issues associated to cloud computing, specific contractual scheme that is able to define rights a duties both of user (private and/or public body and cloud provider. On one side there is all the EU legislative production related to privacy over electronic communication and, furthermore, the Privacy Directive is under a revision process to be more adaptable to new challenges of decentralized data treatment, but concretely there are no any structured and well defined legal instruments. Objectives: we present a possible solution to address the uncertainty of this area, starting from the EU legislative production with the help of the specific Italian scenario that could offer an operative solution. Indeed the Italian legal system is particularly adaptable to changing technologies and it could use as better as possible to adapt the already existing legal tools to this new technological era. Prior work: after an introduction to the state of the art, we show the main issues and their critical points that must be solved. Approach: observation of the state of the art to propose a new approach to find the suitable disciple

  17. Cloud Computing, Tieto Cloud Server Model

    OpenAIRE

    Suikkanen, Saara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out what is cloud computing. To be able to make wise decisions when moving to cloud or considering it, companies need to understand what cloud is consists of. Which model suits best to they company, what should be taken into account before moving to cloud, what is the cloud broker role and also SWOT analysis of cloud? To be able to answer customer requirements and business demands, IT companies should develop and produce new service models. IT house T...

  18. Radon mitigation in schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saum, D.; Craig, A.B.; Leovic, K.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1987, more than 40 schools in Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina were visited by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). School characteristics that potentially influence radon entry and impact mitigation system design and performance were identified. Mitigation systems that had proven successful in house mitigation were then installed in several of these schools. Many of the systems were installed by school personnel with some assistance from EPA and an experienced radon diagnostician. This article presents the diagnostic measurements made in the schools and it discusses in detail the specific mitigation systems that were installed in four Maryland schools by the EPA

  19. Mitigation of solid waste and reuse of effluent from paint and varnish automotive and industrial treated by irradiation at electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Fernando C.; Ribeiro, Marcia A.; Duarte, Celina Lopes; Minamidani, Pedro T.; Guzella, Catia C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most representative industrial segments is the polymeric coatings for house paint, automotive, industrial, marine, maintenance, and repainting markets. The general consumption of paint market in 2010 was 438,364 10 3 gallons of paint, in Brazil. However, when produce paints and varnishes, various kinds of solid wastes and liquid effluent are generated. The present research focus on the effluent from resins, water base paint and paint for electrophoresis, automotive industry, and general industrial coatings. The goal of this study is to use ionizing radiation to destroy the pollutants allowing the use of part of effluent as reuse water, and the rest discarded within the specified requirements. Actual industrial effluent samples were irradiated at Electron beam Accelerator applying absorbed doses of 10 kGy, 30 kGy and 50 kGy. The results, in this preliminary stage, showed a reduction of organic compounds and suspended solids. (author)

  20. Government Cloud Computing Policies: Potential Opportunities for Advancing Military Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeda, Frank J; Zalatoris, Jeffrey J; Scheerer, Julia B

    2018-02-07

    This position paper summarizes the development and the present status of Department of Defense (DoD) and other government policies and guidances regarding cloud computing services. Due to the heterogeneous and growing biomedical big datasets, cloud computing services offer an opportunity to mitigate the associated storage and analysis requirements. Having on-demand network access to a shared pool of flexible computing resources creates a consolidated system that should reduce potential duplications of effort in military biomedical research. Interactive, online literature searches were performed with Google, at the Defense Technical Information Center, and at two National Institutes of Health research portfolio information sites. References cited within some of the collected documents also served as literature resources. We gathered, selected, and reviewed DoD and other government cloud computing policies and guidances published from 2009 to 2017. These policies were intended to consolidate computer resources within the government and reduce costs by decreasing the number of federal data centers and by migrating electronic data to cloud systems. Initial White House Office of Management and Budget information technology guidelines were developed for cloud usage, followed by policies and other documents from the DoD, the Defense Health Agency, and the Armed Services. Security standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Government Services Administration, the DoD, and the Army were also developed. Government Services Administration and DoD Inspectors General monitored cloud usage by the DoD. A 2016 Government Accountability Office report characterized cloud computing as being economical, flexible and fast. A congressionally mandated independent study reported that the DoD was active in offering a wide selection of commercial cloud services in addition to its milCloud system. Our findings from the Department of Health and Human Services

  1. Blue skies for CLOUD

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Through the recently approved CLOUD experiment, CERN will soon be contributing to climate research. Tests are being performed on the first prototype of CLOUD, an experiment designed to assess cosmic radiation influence on cloud formation.

  2. Moving towards Cloud Security

    OpenAIRE

    Edit Szilvia Rubóczki; Zoltán Rajnai

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing hosts and delivers many different services via Internet. There are a lot of reasons why people opt for using cloud resources. Cloud development is increasing fast while a lot of related services drop behind, for example the mass awareness of cloud security. However the new generation upload videos and pictures without reason to a cloud storage, but only few know about data privacy, data management and the proprietary of stored data in the cloud. In an enterprise environment th...

  3. Model of E-Cloud Instability in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-06-24

    Simple model of electron cloud is developed in the paper to explain e-cloud instability of bunched proton beam in the Fermilab Recycler. The cloud is presented as an immobile snake in strong vertical magnetic field. The instability is treated as an amplification of the bunch injection errors from the batch head to its tail. Nonlinearity of the e-cloud field is taken into account. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data demonstrating good correlation.

  4. Cloud chamber photographs of the cosmic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Rochester, George Dixon

    1952-01-01

    Cloud Chamber Photographs of the Cosmic Radiation focuses on cloud chamber and photographic emulsion wherein the tracks of individual subatomic particles of high energy are studied. The publication first offers information on the technical features of operation and electrons and cascade showers. Discussions focus on the relationship in time and space of counter-controlled tracks; techniques of internal control of the cloud chamber; cascade processes with artificially-produced electrons and photons; and nuclear interaction associated with an extensive shower. The manuscript then elaborates on

  5. Cloud-Top Entrainment in Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cloud entrainment, the mixing between cloudy and clear air at the boundary of clouds, constitutes one paradigm for the relevance of small scales in the Earth system: By regulating cloud lifetimes, meter- and submeter-scale processes at cloud boundaries can influence planetary-scale properties. Understanding cloud entrainment is difficult given the complexity and diversity of the associated phenomena, which include turbulence entrainment within a stratified medium, convective instabilities driven by radiative and evaporative cooling, shear instabilities, and cloud microphysics. Obtaining accurate data at the required small scales is also challenging, for both simulations and measurements. During the past few decades, however, high-resolution simulations and measurements have greatly advanced our understanding of the main mechanisms controlling cloud entrainment. This article reviews some of these advances, focusing on stratocumulus clouds, and indicates remaining challenges.

  6. Cloud Infrastructure & Applications - CloudIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulistio, Anthony; Reich, Christoph; Doelitzscher, Frank

    The idea behind Cloud Computing is to deliver Infrastructure-as-a-Services and Software-as-a-Service over the Internet on an easy pay-per-use business model. To harness the potentials of Cloud Computing for e-Learning and research purposes, and to small- and medium-sized enterprises, the Hochschule Furtwangen University establishes a new project, called Cloud Infrastructure & Applications (CloudIA). The CloudIA project is a market-oriented cloud infrastructure that leverages different virtualization technologies, by supporting Service-Level Agreements for various service offerings. This paper describes the CloudIA project in details and mentions our early experiences in building a private cloud using an existing infrastructure.

  7. Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVore, P. T. S.; Jiang, Y.; Lynch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths.......Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths....

  8. Control of Nanoplane Orientation in voBN for High Thermal Anisotropy in a Dielectric Thin Film: A New Solution for Thermal Hotspot Mitigation in Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cometto, Olivier; Samani, Majid K; Liu, Bo; Sun, Shuangxi; Tsang, Siu Hon; Liu, Johan; Zhou, Kun; Teo, Edwin H T

    2017-03-01

    High anisotropic thermal materials, which allow heat to dissipate in a preferential direction, are of interest as a prospective material for electronics as an effective thermal management solution for hot spots. However, due to their preferential heat propagation in the in-plane direction, the heat spreads laterally instead of vertically. This limitation makes these materials ineffective as the density of hot spots increases. Here, we produce a new dielectric thin film material at room temperature, named vertically ordered nanocrystalline h-BN (voBN). It is produced such that its preferential thermally conductive direction is aligned in the vertical axis, which facilitates direct thermal extraction, thereby addressing the increasing challenge of thermal crosstalk. The uniqueness of voBN comes from its h-BN nanocrystals where all their basal planes are aligned in the direction normal to the substrate plane. Using the 3ω method, we show that voBN exhibits high anisotropic thermal conductivity (TC) with a 16-fold difference between through-film TC and in-plane TC (respectively 4.26 and 0.26 W·m -1 ·K -1 ). Molecular dynamics simulations also concurred with the experimental data, showing that the origin of this anisotropic behavior is due to the nature of voBN's plane ordering. While the consistent vertical ordering provides an uninterrupted and preferred propagation path for phonons in the through-film direction, discontinuity in the lateral direction leads to a reduced in-plane TC. In addition, we also use COMSOL to simulate how the dielectric and thermal properties of voBN enable an increase in hot spot density up to 295% compared with SiO 2 , without any temperature increase.

  9. Mitigation Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  10. Cosmic rays, clouds and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensmark, Henrik [Danish Space Research Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    Changes in the intensity of galactic cosmic rays seems alter the Earth's cloudiness. A recent experiment has shown how electrons liberated by cosmic rays assist in making aerosols, the building blocks of cloud condensation nuclei, while anomalous climatic trends in Antarctica confirm the role of clouds in helping to drive climate change. Variations in the cosmic-ray influx due to solar magnetic activity account well for climatic fluctuations on decadal, centennial and millennial timescales. Over longer intervals, the changing galactic environment of the Solar System has had dramatic consequences, including Snowball Earth episodes.

  11. Secondary Electron Yield Measurements and Groove Chambers Tests in the PEP-II Beam Line Straights Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M

    2008-01-01

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of the positron Damping Ring (DR) of future Linear Colliders such as ILC and CLIC [1, 2]. In the Positron Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II accelerator, we have installed vacuum chambers with rectangular grooves in a straight magnetic-free section to test this promising possible electron cloud mitigation technique. We have also installed a special chamber to monitor the secondary electron yield of TiN and TiZrV (NEG) coating, Copper, Stainless Steel and Aluminum under the effect of electron and photon conditioning in situ in the beam line. In this paper, we describe the ongoing R and D effort to mitigate the electron cloud effect for the ILC damping ring, the latest results on in situ secondary electron yield conditioning and recent update on the groove tests in PEP-II

  12. Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  13. FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset contains closed and obligated projects funded under the following Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant programs: Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA)....

  14. Mitigation Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) (September 1992) for the Proposed Renewal of the Contract between the United States Department of Energy and The Regents of the University of California for the Operation and Management of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory identifies the environmental impacts associated with renewing the contract and specifies a series of measures designed to mitigate adverse impacts to the environment. This Mitigation Monitoring Plan describes the procedures the University will use to implement the mitigation measures adopted in connection with the approval of the Contract.

  15. A Risk Management Approach for a Sustainable Cloud Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alifah Aida Lope Abdul Rahman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is not just about resource sharing, cost savings and optimisation of business performance; it also involves fundamental concerns on how businesses need to respond on the risks and challenges upon migration. Managing risks is critical for a sustainable cloud adoption. It includes several dimensions such as cost, practising the concept of green IT, data quality, continuity of services to users and clients, guarantee tangible benefits. This paper presents a risk management approach for a sustainable cloud migration. We consider four dimensions of sustainability, i.e., economic, environmental, social and technology to determine the viability of cloud for the business context. The risks are systematically identified and analysed based on the existing in house controls and the cloud service provider offerings. We use Dempster Shafer (D-S theory to measure the adequacy of controls and apply semi-quantitative approach to perform risk analysis based on the theory of belief. The risk exposure for each sustainability dimension allows us to determine the viability of cloud migration. A practical migration use case is considered to determine the applicability of our work. The results identify the risk exposure and recommended control for the risk mitigation. We conclude that risks depend on specific migration case and both Cloud Service Provider (CSP and users are responsible for the risk mitigation. Inherent risks can evolve due to the cloud migration.

  16. The CLOUD experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment as shown by Jasper Kirkby (spokesperson). Kirkby shows a sketch to illustrate the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formations. The CLOUD experiment uses beams from the PS accelerator at CERN to simulate the effect of cosmic rays on cloud formations in the Earth's atmosphere. It is thought that cosmic ray intensity is linked to the amount of low cloud cover due to the formation of aerosols, which induce condensation.

  17. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE IN CLOUD

    OpenAIRE

    Celina M. Olszak

    2014-01-01

    . The paper reviews and critiques current research on Business Intelligence (BI) in cloud. This review highlights that organizations face various challenges using BI cloud. The research objectives for this study are a conceptualization of the BI cloud issue, as well as an investigation of some benefits and risks from BI cloud. The study was based mainly on a critical analysis of literature and some reports on BI cloud using. The results of this research can be used by IT and business leaders ...

  18. Cloud Robotics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Koken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud robotics is a rapidly evolving field that allows robots to offload computation-intensive and storage-intensive jobs into the cloud. Robots are limited in terms of computational capacity, memory and storage. Cloud provides unlimited computation power, memory, storage and especially collaboration opportunity. Cloud-enabled robots are divided into two categories as standalone and networked robots. This article surveys cloud robotic platforms, standalone and networked robotic works such as grasping, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM and monitoring.

  19. Mitigation win-win

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Dominic; Lucas, Amanda; Barnes, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Win-win messages regarding climate change mitigation policies in agriculture tend to oversimplify farmer motivation. Contributions from psychology, cultural evolution and behavioural economics should help to design more effective policy.

  20. Radon mitigation in schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leovic, K.W.; Craig, A.B.; Saum, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    This article reports on radon mitigation in school buildings. Subslab depressurization (SSD) has been the most successful and widely used radon reduction method in houses. Thus far, it has also substantially reduced radon levels in a number of schools. Schools often have interior footings or thickened slabs that may create barriers for subslab air flow if a SSD system is the mitigation option. Review of foundation plans and subslab air flow testing will help to determine the presence and effect of such barriers. HVAC systems in schools vary considerable and tend to have a greater influence on pressure differentials (and consequently radon levels) than do heating and air-conditioning systems encountered in the radon mitigation of houses. As part of any radon mitigation method, ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 should be consulted to determine if the installed HVAC system is designed and operated to achieve minimum ventilation standards for indoor air quality

  1. Appalachian Stream Mitigation Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 5 day workshop in 2011 developed for state and federal regulatory and resource agencies, who review, comment on and/or approve compensatory mitigation plans for surface coal mining projects in Appalachia

  2. Mitigation Banking Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    A mitigation bank is an aquatic resource area that has been restored, established, enhanced, or preserved for the purpose of providing compensation for unavoidable impacts to aquatic resources permitted under Section 404

  3. Observational study of ion-electron equilibration and of cloud evaporation in supernova remnants under the HEAO-2 guest investigator program. Final project report, 1 June 1985-30 September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    Observations of three selected supernovae remnants (Cygnus Loop, IC 443, and Puppis A) were made in the forbidden coronal iron lines (Fe X) lambda 6374 and (Fe XIV) lambda 5303. The resulting data was compared quantitatively with Einstein images of the same objects, and an attempt was made to determine (a) the process by which ion and electron energies are equilibrated behind the shock front in the ISM and (b) whether cloud evaporation occurs within the hot remnant interiors. Spatially-resolved x-ray emission were modeled for Sedov-Taylor blast wave models of supernovae remnants (SNR) under conditions of non-equlibrium ionization. The computations are intended to provide results that can be directly compared with Einstein high resolution image (HRI) and imaging proportional counter (IPS) data. The computer program for predicting the spatial distribution of HRI and IPS counting rates was completed, and final testing of it had begun

  4. Cloud Processed CCN Suppress Stratus Cloud Drizzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfate within cloud droplets increases the sizes and decreases the critical supersaturation, Sc, of cloud residual particles that had nucleated the droplets. Since other particles remain at the same sizes and Sc a size and Sc gap is often observed. Hudson et al. (2015) showed higher cloud droplet concentrations (Nc) in stratus clouds associated with bimodal high-resolution CCN spectra from the DRI CCN spectrometer compared to clouds associated with unimodal CCN spectra (not cloud processed). Here we show that CCN spectral shape (bimodal or unimodal) affects all aspects of stratus cloud microphysics and drizzle. Panel A shows mean differential cloud droplet spectra that have been divided according to traditional slopes, k, of the 131 measured CCN spectra in the Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) off the Central California coast. K is generally high within the supersaturation, S, range of stratus clouds (< 0.5%). Because cloud processing decreases Sc of some particles, it reduces k. Panel A shows higher concentrations of small cloud droplets apparently grown on lower k CCN than clouds grown on higher k CCN. At small droplet sizes the concentrations follow the k order of the legend, black, red, green, blue (lowest to highest k). Above 13 µm diameter the lines cross and the hierarchy reverses so that blue (highest k) has the highest concentrations followed by green, red and black (lowest k). This reversed hierarchy continues into the drizzle size range (panel B) where the most drizzle drops, Nd, are in clouds grown on the least cloud-processed CCN (blue), while clouds grown on the most processed CCN (black) have the lowest Nd. Suppression of stratus cloud drizzle by cloud processing is an additional 2nd indirect aerosol effect (IAE) that along with the enhancement of 1st IAE by higher Nc (panel A) are above and beyond original IAE. However, further similar analysis is needed in other cloud regimes to determine if MASE was

  5. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Liu; W. Wu; M. P. Jensen; T. Toto

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surfaced-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fractio...

  6. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Gnacinski, P.; Krogulec, M.

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines were called CaFe clouds. The ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. The chemical composition of CaFe clouds is that of the Solar System and no depletion of elements onto dust grains is seen. The CaFe clouds have high electron densities n=1 cm^-3 that leads to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  7. Cloud CCN feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Cloud microphysics affects cloud albedo precipitation efficiency and the extent of cloud feedback in response to global warming. Compared to other cloud parameters, microphysics is unique in its large range of variability and the fact that much of the variability is anthropogenic. Probably the most important determinant of cloud microphysics is the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which display considerable variability and have a large anthropogenic component. When analyzed in combination three field observation projects display the interrelationship between CCN and cloud microphysics. CCN were measured with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) instantaneous CCN spectrometer. Cloud microphysical measurements were obtained with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Lockheed Electra. Since CCN and cloud microphysics each affect the other a positive feedback mechanism can result

  8. Hybrid cloud for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hurwitz, Judith; Halper, Fern; Kirsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Understand the cloud and implement a cloud strategy for your business Cloud computing enables companies to save money by leasing storage space and accessing technology services through the Internet instead of buying and maintaining equipment and support services. Because it has its own unique set of challenges, cloud computing requires careful explanation. This easy-to-follow guide shows IT managers and support staff just what cloud computing is, how to deliver and manage cloud computing services, how to choose a service provider, and how to go about implementation. It also covers security and

  9. Secure cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Jajodia, Sushil; Samarati, Pierangela; Singhal, Anoop; Swarup, Vipin; Wang, Cliff

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a range of cloud computing security challenges and promising solution paths. The first two chapters focus on practical considerations of cloud computing. In Chapter 1, Chandramouli, Iorga, and Chokani describe the evolution of cloud computing and the current state of practice, followed by the challenges of cryptographic key management in the cloud. In Chapter 2, Chen and Sion present a dollar cost model of cloud computing and explore the economic viability of cloud computing with and without security mechanisms involving cryptographic mechanisms. The next two chapters addres

  10. Clouds of Venus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knollenberg, R G [Particle Measuring Systems, Inc., 1855 South 57th Court, Boulder, Colorado 80301, U.S.A.; Hansen, J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York (USA). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Ragent, B [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Moffett Field, Calif. (USA). Ames Research Center; Martonchik, J [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, Calif. (USA); Tomasko, M [Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA)

    1977-05-01

    The current state of knowledge of the Venusian clouds is reviewed. The visible clouds of Venus are shown to be quite similar to low level terrestrial hazes of strong anthropogenic influence. Possible nucleation and particle growth mechanisms are presented. The Pioneer Venus experiments that emphasize cloud measurements are described and their expected findings are discussed in detail. The results of these experiments should define the cloud particle composition, microphysics, thermal and radiative heat budget, rough dynamical features and horizontal and vertical variations in these and other parameters. This information should be sufficient to initialize cloud models which can be used to explain the cloud formation, decay, and particle life cycle.

  11. Disruption mitigation on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Sourd, F.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    During disruptions, the plasma energy is lost on the first wall within 1 ms, forces up to hundred tons are applied to the structures and kA of electrons are accelerated up to 50 MeV (runaway electrons). Already sources of concern in present day tokamaks, extrapolation to ITER shows the necessity of mitigation procedures, to avoid serious damages to in-vessel components. Massive gas injection was proposed, and encouraging tests have been done on Textor and DIII-D. Similar experiments where performed on Tore Supra, with the goal to validate their effect on runaway electrons, observed during the majority of disruptions. 0.1 mole of helium was injected within 5 ms in ohmic plasmas, up to 1.2 MA, either stable, or in a pre-disruptive phase (argon puffing). Beneficial effects where obtained: reduction of the current fall rate and eddy currents, total disappearance of runaway electrons and easy recovery for the next pulse, without noticeable helium pollution of following plasmas. Analysis of the 4 ms period between injection and disruption indicates that to reach these goals, one need to inject enough helium to keep it only partially ionised. It correspond to 0.1 g for Tore Supra, and extrapolate to hundred's of grams for ITER. (author)

  12. Disruption mitigation on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Sourd, F.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Eriksson, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    During disruptions, the plasma energy is lost on the first wall within 1 ms, forces up to hundred tons are applied to the structures and kA of electrons are accelerated up to 50 MeV (runaway electrons). Already sources of concern in present day tokamaks, extrapolation to ITER shows the necessity of mitigation procedures, to avoid serious damages to in-vessel components. Massive gas injection was proposed, and encouraging tests have been done on Textor and DIII-D. Similar experiments where performed on Tore Supra, with the goal to validate their effect on runaway electrons, observed during the majority of disruptions. 0.1 mole of helium was injected within 5 ms in ohmic plasmas, up to 1.2 MA, either stable, or in a pre-disruptive phase (argon puffing). Beneficial effects where obtained: reduction of the current fall rate and eddy currents, total disappearance of runaway electrons and easy recovery for the next pulse, without noticeable helium pollution of following plasmas. Analysis of the 4 ms period between injection and disruption indicates that to reach these goals, one need to inject enough helium to keep it only partially ionised. It corresponds to 0.1 g for Tore Supra, and extrapolate to hundreds of grams for ITER. (authors)

  13. Radiative properties of clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twomey, S.

    1993-01-01

    The climatic effects of condensation nuclei in the formation of cloud droplets and the subsequent role of the cloud droplets as contributors to the planetary short-wave albedo is emphasized. Microphysical properties of clouds, which can be greatly modified by the degree of mixing with cloud-free air from outside, are discussed. The effect of clouds on visible radiation is assessed through multiple scattering of the radiation. Cloudwater or ice absorbs more with increasing wavelength in the near-infrared region, with water vapor providing the stronger absorption over narrower wavelength bands. Cloud thermal infrared absorption can be solely related to liquid water content at least for shallow clouds and clouds in the early development state. Three-dimensional general circulation models have been used to study the climatic effect of clouds. It was found for such studies (which did not consider variations in cloud albedo) that the cooling effects due to the increase in planetary short-wave albedo from clouds were offset by heating effects due to thermal infrared absorption by the cloud. Two permanent direct effects of increased pollution are discussed in this chapter: (a) an increase of absorption in the visible and near infrared because of increased amounts of elemental carbon, which gives rise to a warming effect climatically, and (b) an increased optical thickness of clouds due to increasing cloud droplet number concentration caused by increasing cloud condensation nuclei number concentration, which gives rise to a cooling effect climatically. An increase in cloud albedo from 0.7 to 0.87 produces an appreciable climatic perturbation of cooling up to 2.5 K at the ground, using a hemispheric general circulation model. Effects of pollution on cloud thermal infrared absorption are negligible

  14. Irradiation embrittlement mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torronen, K.; Pelli, R.; Planman, T.; Valo, M.

    1993-01-01

    Mitigation methods for reducing the irradiation damage on pressure vessel materials are reviewed: load leakage loading schemes are commonly used in PWRs to mitigate reactor pressure vessel embrittlement; dummy assemblies have been applied in WWER 440-type and in some old western power plants, when exceptional fast embrittlement has been encountered; shielding of the pressure vessel has been developed, but is not in common use; pre-stressing the pressure vessel has been proposed for preventing PTS failures, but its applicability is not yet demonstrated. The large number of successful annealing treatments performed in WWER 440 type reactors as well as research on the effects of annealing treatments suggest applications for western PWRs. The emergency core cooling systems have been modified in WWER 440-type reactors in connection with other mitigation measures. (authors). 37 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Irradiation embrittlement mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torronen, K; Pelli, R; Planman, T; Valo, M [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Combustion and Thermal Engineering Lab.

    1994-12-31

    Mitigation methods for reducing the irradiation damage on pressure vessel materials are reviewed: load leakage loading schemes are commonly used in PWRs to mitigate reactor pressure vessel embrittlement; dummy assemblies have been applied in WWER 440-type and in some old western power plants, when exceptional fast embrittlement has been encountered; shielding of the pressure vessel has been developed, but is not in common use; pre-stressing the pressure vessel has been proposed for preventing PTS failures, but its applicability is not yet demonstrated. The large number of successful annealing treatments performed in WWER 440 type reactors as well as research on the effects of annealing treatments suggest applications for western PWRs. The emergency core cooling systems have been modified in WWER 440-type reactors in connection with other mitigation measures. (authors). 37 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Disaster mitigation: initial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, George; Richards, Michael; Chicarelli, Michael; Ernst, Amy; Harrell, Andrew; Stites, Danniel

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to stimulate the reader's considerations for developing community disaster mitigation. Disaster mitigation begins long before impact and is defined as the actions taken by a community to eliminate or minimize the impact of a disaster. The assessment of vulnerabilities, the development of infrastructure, memoranda of understanding, and planning for a sustainable response and recovery are parts of the process. Empowering leadership and citizens with knowledge of available resources through the planning and development of a disaster response can strengthen a community's resilience, which can only add to the viability and quality of life enjoyed by the entire community.

  17. A Generic Software Development Process Refined from Best Practices for Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Soojin Park; Mansoo Hwang; Sangeun Lee; Young B. Park

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing has emerged as more than just a piece of technology, it is rather a new IT paradigm. The philosophy behind cloud computing shares its view with green computing where computing environments and resources are not as subjects to own but as subjects of sustained use. However, converting currently used IT services to Software as a Service (SaaS) cloud computing environments introduces several new risks. To mitigate such risks, existing software development processes must undergo si...

  18. Moving towards Cloud Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit Szilvia Rubóczki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing hosts and delivers many different services via Internet. There are a lot of reasons why people opt for using cloud resources. Cloud development is increasing fast while a lot of related services drop behind, for example the mass awareness of cloud security. However the new generation upload videos and pictures without reason to a cloud storage, but only few know about data privacy, data management and the proprietary of stored data in the cloud. In an enterprise environment the users have to know the rule of cloud usage, however they have little knowledge about traditional IT security. It is important to measure the level of their knowledge, and evolve the training system to develop the security awareness. The article proves the importance of suggesting new metrics and algorithms for measuring security awareness of corporate users and employees to include the requirements of emerging cloud security.

  19. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  20. Cloud Computing for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, SS; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future

  1. Cloud computing for radiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit T Kharat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  2. Marine cloud brightening

    OpenAIRE

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identi...

  3. Cloud computing strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Chorafas, Dimitris N

    2011-01-01

    A guide to managing cloud projects, Cloud Computing Strategies provides the understanding required to evaluate the technology and determine how it can be best applied to improve business and enhance your overall corporate strategy. Based on extensive research, it examines the opportunities and challenges that loom in the cloud. It explains exactly what cloud computing is, what it has to offer, and calls attention to the important issues management needs to consider before passing the point of no return regarding financial commitments.

  4. Towards Indonesian Cloud Campus

    OpenAIRE

    Thamrin, Taqwan; Lukman, Iing; Wahyuningsih, Dina Ika

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, Cloud Computing is most discussed term in business and academic environment.Cloud campus has many benefits such as accessing the file storages, e-mails, databases,educational resources, research applications and tools anywhere for faculty, administrators,staff, students and other users in university, on demand. Furthermore, cloud campus reduces universities’ IT complexity and cost.This paper discuss the implementation of Indonesian cloud campus and various opportunies and benefits...

  5. Cloud Infrastructure Security

    OpenAIRE

    Velev , Dimiter; Zlateva , Plamena

    2010-01-01

    Part 4: Security for Clouds; International audience; Cloud computing can help companies accomplish more by eliminating the physical bonds between an IT infrastructure and its users. Users can purchase services from a cloud environment that could allow them to save money and focus on their core business. At the same time certain concerns have emerged as potential barriers to rapid adoption of cloud services such as security, privacy and reliability. Usually the information security professiona...

  6. Orchestrating Your Cloud Orchestra

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, Abram

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing potentially ushers in a new era of computer music performance with exceptionally large computer music instruments consisting of 10s to 100s of virtual machines which we propose to call a `cloud-orchestra'. Cloud computing allows for the rapid provisioning of resources, but to deploy such a complicated and interconnected network of software synthesizers in the cloud requires a lot of manual work, system administration knowledge, and developer/operator skills. This is a barrier ...

  7. Cloud security mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing has brought great benefits in cost and flexibility for provisioning services. The greatest challenge of cloud computing remains however the question of security. The current standard tools in access control mechanisms and cryptography can only partly solve the security challenges of cloud infrastructures. In the recent years of research in security and cryptography, novel mechanisms, protocols and algorithms have emerged that offer new ways to create secure services atop cloud...

  8. Cloud computing for radiologists

    OpenAIRE

    Amit T Kharat; Amjad Safvi; S S Thind; Amarjit Singh

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as...

  9. Cloud Robotics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Mester, Gyula

    2015-01-01

    Cloud Robotics was born from the merger of service robotics and cloud technologies. It allows robots to benefit from the powerful computational, storage, and communications resources of modern data centres. Cloud robotics allows robots to take advantage of the rapid increase in data transfer rates to offload tasks without hard real time requirements. Cloud Robotics has rapidly gained momentum with initiatives by companies such as Google, Willow Garage and Gostai as well as more than a dozen a...

  10. Genomics With Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhamrit Kaur; Sandeep Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Genomics is study of genome which provides large amount of data for which large storage and computation power is needed. These issues are solved by cloud computing that provides various cloud platforms for genomics. These platforms provides many services to user like easy access to data easy sharing and transfer providing storage in hundreds of terabytes more computational power. Some cloud platforms are Google genomics DNAnexus and Globus genomics. Various features of cloud computin...

  11. A cloud on the horizon-a survey into the use of electronic vaping devices for recreational drug and new psychoactive substance (NPS) administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, M; Dargan, P; Wood, D

    2018-01-01

    There is limited published scientific data on vaping recreational drugs other than cannabis. A recent review suggested that 15% of people vaping cannabis have also vaped a synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist (SCRA) and identified over 300 Internet reports of e-liquid manufacture of recreational drugs and/or new psychoactive substances (NPS). To determine the prevalence of use of electronic vaping devices for recreational drug and NPS delivery in the UK. A voluntary online survey using a convenience sample of UK adult participants (aged 16 years old and over) identified by a market research company. Data was collected regarding demographics, smoking history, electronic vaping device history and recreational drug/NPS use and route of administration. There were 2501 respondents. The mean (±SD) age was 46.2 ± 16.8 years old. The commonest lifetime recreational drug used was Cannabis (818, 32.7%). The majority of respondents had smoked (1545, 61.8%) with 731 (29.2%) being current smokers. The most commonly used SCRA product was 'Spice Gold' (173, 6.9%) and SCRA compound was ADB-CHMICA (48, 1.9%). 861 (34.4%) had used an electronic vaping device; 340 (13.6%) having used them for recreational drug administration; 236 (9.4%) reporting current use. The commonest lifetime recreational drug to be vaped was cannabis (155, 65.7%), with electronic cigarettes (230, 48.2%) being the commonest reported route of SCRA compound administration. 9.4% of respondents currently use electronic vaping devices for recreational drug administration with 6.2% reporting lifetime cannabis vaping use. Further larger scale studies are required to help inform the appropriate treatment and primary prevention strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Mitigating tin whisker risks theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Handwerker, Carol A; Bath, Jasbir

    2016-01-01

    Discusses the growth mechanisms of tin whiskers and the effective mitigation strategies necessary to reduce whisker growth risks. This book covers key tin whisker topics, ranging from fundamental science to practical mitigation strategies. The text begins with a review of the characteristic properties of local microstructures around whisker and hillock grains to identify why these particular grains and locations become predisposed to forming whiskers and hillocks. The book discusses the basic properties of tin-based alloy finishes and the effects of various alloying elements on whisker formation, with a focus on potential mechanisms for whisker suppression or enhancement for each element. Tin whisker risk mitigation strategies for each tier of the supply chain for high reliability electronic systems are also described.

  13. Chargeback for cloud services.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, T.; Khadka, R.; Stefanov, H.; Jansen, S.; Batenburg, R.; Heusden, E. van

    2014-01-01

    With pay-per-use pricing models, elastic scaling of resources, and the use of shared virtualized infrastructures, cloud computing offers more efficient use of capital and agility. To leverage the advantages of cloud computing, organizations have to introduce cloud-specific chargeback practices.

  14. On CLOUD nine

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  15. Cloud Computing Explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Rosalyn

    2010-01-01

    While many talk about the cloud, few actually understand it. Three organizations' definitions come to the forefront when defining the cloud: Gartner, Forrester, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). Although both Gartner and Forrester provide definitions of cloud computing, the NIST definition is concise and uses…

  16. Greening the Cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoed, Robert; Hoekstra, Eric; Procaccianti, G.; Lago, P.; Grosso, Paola; Taal, Arie; Grosskop, Kay; van Bergen, Esther

    The cloud has become an essential part of our daily lives. We use it to store our documents (Dropbox), to stream our music and lms (Spotify and Net ix) and without giving it any thought, we use it to work on documents in the cloud (Google Docs). The cloud forms a massive storage and processing

  17. Security in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degaspari, John

    2011-08-01

    As more provider organizations look to the cloud computing model, they face a host of security-related questions. What are the appropriate applications for the cloud, what is the best cloud model, and what do they need to know to choose the best vendor? Hospital CIOs and security experts weigh in.

  18. Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of national and international space debris mitigation guides is to promote the preservation of near-Earth space for applications and exploration missions far into the future. To accomplish this objective, the accumulation of objects, particularly in long-lived orbits, must be eliminated or curtailed.

  19. What factors influence mitigative capacity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Harald; Baumert, Kevin; Blanchard, Odile; Burch, Sarah; Robinson, John

    2007-01-01

    This article builds on Yohe's seminal piece on mitigative capacity, which elaborates 'determinants' of mitigative capacity, also reflected in the IPCC's third assessment report. We propose a revised definition, where mitigative capacity is a country's ability to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions or enhance natural sinks. By 'ability' we mean skills, competencies, fitness, and proficiencies that a country has attained which can contribute to GHG emissions mitigation. A conceptual framework is proposed, linking mitigative capacity to a country's sustainable development path, and grouping the factors influencing mitigative capacity into three main sets: economic factors, institutional ones, and technology. Both quantitative and qualitative analysis of factors is presented, showing how these factors vary across countries. We suggest that it is the interplay between the three economic factors-income, abatement cost and opportunity cost-that shape mitigative capacity. We find that income is an important economic factor influencing mitigative capacity, while abatement cost is important in turning mitigative capacity into actual mitigation. Technology is a critical mitigative capacity, including the ability to absorb existing climate-friendly technologies or to develop innovative ones. Institutional factors that promote mitigative capacity include the effectiveness of government regulation, clear market rules, a skilled work force and public awareness. We briefly investigate such as high abatement cost or lack of political willingness that prevent mitigative capacity from being translated into mitigation

  20. Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, T.; Chen, X.; Mohan, P.; Lao, B. Q.

    2017-09-01

    The observational facilities of radio astronomy keep constant upgrades and developments to achieve better capabilities including increasing the time of the data recording and frequency resolutions, and increasing the receiving and recording bandwidth. However in contrast, only a limited spectrum resource has been allocated to radio astronomy by the International Telecommunication Union, resulting in that the radio observational instrumentations are inevitably exposed to undesirable radio frequency interference (RFI) signals which originate mainly from the terrestrial human activity and are becoming stronger with time. RFIs degrade the quality of data and even lead to invalid data. The impact of RFIs on scientific outcome becomes more and more serious. In this article, the requirement for RFI mitigation is motivated, and the RFI characteristics, mitigation techniques, and strategies are reviewed. The mitigation strategies adopted at some representative observatories, telescopes, and arrays are also introduced. The advantages and shortcomings of the four classes of RFI mitigation strategies are discussed and presented, applicable at the connected causal stages: preventive, pre-detection, pre-correlation, and post-correlation. The proper identification and flagging of RFI is the key to the reduction of data loss and improvement in data quality, and is also the ultimate goal of developing RFI mitigation technique. This can be achieved through a strategy involving a combination of the discussed techniques in stages. The recent advances in the high speed digital signal processing and high performance computing allow for performing RFI excision of the large data volumes generated from large telescopes or arrays in both real time and offline modes, aiding the proposed strategy.

  1. Contributions to the Characterization and Mitigation of Rotorcraft Brownout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritschler, John Kirwin

    Rotorcraft brownout, the condition in which the flow field of a rotorcraft mobilizes sediment from the ground to generate a cloud that obscures the pilot's field of view, continues to be a significant hazard to civil and military rotorcraft operations. This dissertation presents methodologies for: (i) the systematic mitigation of rotorcraft brownout through operational and design strategies and (ii) the quantitative characterization of the visual degradation caused by a brownout cloud. In Part I of the dissertation, brownout mitigation strategies are developed through simulation-based brownout studies that are mathematically formulated within a numerical optimization framework. Two optimization studies are presented. The first study involves the determination of approach-to-landing maneuvers that result in reduced brownout severity. The second study presents a potential methodology for the design of helicopter rotors with improved brownout characteristics. The results of both studies indicate that the fundamental mechanisms underlying brownout mitigation are aerodynamic in nature, and the evolution of a ground vortex ahead of the rotor disk is seen to be a key element in the development of a brownout cloud. In Part II of the dissertation, brownout cloud characterizations are based upon the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), a metric commonly used in the optics community for the characterization of imaging systems. The use of the MTF in experimentation is examined first, and the application of MTF calculation and interpretation methods to actual flight test data is described. The potential for predicting the MTF from numerical simulations is examined second, and an initial methodology is presented for the prediction of the MTF of a brownout cloud. Results from the experimental and analytical studies rigorously quantify the intuitively-known facts that the visual degradation caused by brownout is a space and time-dependent phenomenon, and that high spatial frequency

  2. CLOUD STORAGE SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Cloud computing is a hot topic in recent research and applications. Because it is widely used in various fields. Up to now, Google, Microsoft, IBM, Amazon and other famous co partnership have proposed their cloud computing application. Look upon cloud computing as one of the most important strategy in the future. Cloud storage is the lower layer of cloud computing system which supports the service of the other layers above it. At the same time, it is an effective way to store and manage heavy...

  3. Cloud Computing Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Şiclovan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing was and it will be a new way of providing Internet services and computers. This calculation approach is based on many existing services, such as the Internet, grid computing, Web services. Cloud computing as a system aims to provide on demand services more acceptable as price and infrastructure. It is exactly the transition from computer to a service offered to the consumers as a product delivered online. This paper is meant to describe the quality of cloud computing services, analyzing the advantages and characteristics offered by it. It is a theoretical paper.Keywords: Cloud computing, QoS, quality of cloud computing

  4. Benchmarking Cloud Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of cloud computing, many cloud storage systems like Dropbox, Google Drive and Mega have been built to provide decentralized and reliable file storage. It is thus of prime importance to know their features, performance, and the best way to make use of them. In this context, we introduce BenchCloud, a tool designed as part of this thesis to conveniently and efficiently benchmark any cloud storage system. First, we provide a study of six commonly-used cloud storage systems to ident...

  5. The Magellanic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    As the two galaxies nearest to our own, the Magellanic Clouds hold a special place in studies of the extragalactic distance scale, of stellar evolution and the structure of galaxies. In recent years, results from the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) and elsewhere have shown that it is possible to begin understanding the three dimensional structure of the Clouds. Studies of Magellanic Cloud Cepheids have continued, both to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the Clouds and to learn more about Cepheids and their use as extragalactic distance indicators. Other research undertaken at SAAO includes studies on Nova LMC 1988 no 2 and red variables in the Magellanic Clouds

  6. Cloud Computing Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Sosinsky, Barrie

    2010-01-01

    The complete reference guide to the hot technology of cloud computingIts potential for lowering IT costs makes cloud computing a major force for both IT vendors and users; it is expected to gain momentum rapidly with the launch of Office Web Apps later this year. Because cloud computing involves various technologies, protocols, platforms, and infrastructure elements, this comprehensive reference is just what you need if you'll be using or implementing cloud computing.Cloud computing offers significant cost savings by eliminating upfront expenses for hardware and software; its growing popularit

  7. Mitigating Docker Security Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Yasrab, Robail

    2018-01-01

    It is very easy to run applications in Docker. Docker offers an ecosystem that offers a platform for application packaging, distributing and managing within containers. However, Docker platform is yet not matured. Presently, Docker is less secured as compare to virtual machines (VM) and most of the other cloud technologies. The key of reason of Docker inadequate security protocols is containers sharing of Linux kernel, which can lead to risk of privileged escalations. This research is going t...

  8. Simulations of Neon Pellets for Plasma Disruption Mitigation in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosviel, Nicolas; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Numerical studies of the ablation of neon pellets in tokamaks in the plasma disruption mitigation parameter space have been performed using a time-dependent pellet ablation model based on the front tracking code FronTier-MHD. The main features of the model include the explicit tracking of the solid pellet/ablated gas interface, a self-consistent evolving potential distribution in the ablation cloud, JxB forces, atomic processes, and an improved electrical conductivity model. The equation of state model accounts for atomic processes in the ablation cloud as well as deviations from the ideal gas law in the dense, cold layers of neon gas near the pellet surface. Simulations predict processes in the ablation cloud and pellet ablation rates and address the sensitivity of pellet ablation processes to details of physics models, in particular the equation of state.

  9. CLOUD COMPUTING SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan IOVAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing reprentes the software applications offered as a service online, but also the software and hardware components from the data center.In the case of wide offerd services for any type of client, we are dealing with a public cloud. In the other case, in wich a cloud is exclusively available for an organization and is not available to the open public, this is consider a private cloud [1]. There is also a third type, called hibrid in which case an user or an organization might use both services available in the public and private cloud. One of the main challenges of cloud computing are to build the trust and ofer information privacy in every aspect of service offerd by cloud computingle. The variety of existing standards, just like the lack of clarity in sustenability certificationis not a real help in building trust. Also appear some questions marks regarding the efficiency of traditionsecurity means that are applied in the cloud domain. Beside the economic and technology advantages offered by cloud, also are some advantages in security area if the information is migrated to cloud. Shared resources available in cloud includes the survey, use of the "best practices" and technology for advance security level, above all the solutions offered by the majority of medium and small businesses, big companies and even some guvermental organizations [2].

  10. Single event and TREE latchup mitigation for a star tracker sensor: An innovative approach to system level latchup mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimbrough, J.R.; Colella, N.J.; Davis, R.W.; Bruener, D.B.; Coakley, P.G.; Lutjens, S.W.; Mallon, C.E.

    1994-08-01

    Electronic packages designed for spacecraft should be fault-tolerant and operate without ground control intervention through extremes in the space radiation environment. If designed for military use, the electronics must survive and function in a nuclear radiation environment. This paper presents an innovative ''blink'' approach rather than the typical ''operate through'' approach to achieve system level latchup mitigation on a prototype star tracker camera. Included are circuit designs, flash x-ray test data, and heavy ion data demonstrating latchup mitigation protecting micro-electronics from current latchup and burnout due to Single Event Latchup (SEL) and Transient Radiation Effects on Electronics (TREE)

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic shocks in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernoff, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Part one develops the mathematical and physical theory of one-dimensional, time-independent subalfvenic flow in partially ionized gas with magnetic fields, for application to shocks in molecular clouds. Unlike normal gas-dynamic shocks, the neutral flow may be continuous and cool if the gas radiates efficiently and does not self-ionize. Analytic solutions are given in the limit that the neutral gas is either adiabatic or isothermal (cold). Numerical techniques are developed and applied to find the neutral flow under general circumstances. Part two extends the theory and results of part one in three ways: (1) to faster, superalfvenic flow, (2) to complex gases containing heavy charged particles (grains) in addition to ions, containing heavy charged particles (grains) in addition to ions, electrons and neutrals, and (3) to the entire range in (Omega tau), the ratio of charged particle damping time to gyroperiod, expected in gas flows in molecular clouds

  12. Mitigation by design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Mitigation or 'the act of bringing together' is not to be confused with applied architectural or landscape cosmetics to render development which has been predesigned in terms of engineering parameters to be more 'seemly' or 'attractive'. It is more profoundly an exercise in simultaneous engineering and environmental analysis in which the level of synthesis between the elements of construction and the elements of the physical environment is fundamental to the ultimate design success of projects. This text, having looked firstly at the nature of design and the characteristics of design processes and procedures, considers the linkages and interaction between design and the statutory land use planning system through which major development projects in Scotland are authorised. A case study of the development of the oil handling terminal at Flotta, Orkney, is included to demonstrate the implications of certain problems related to mitigation by design. (author)

  13. Impact mitigation in EIA

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Alan; Cashmore, Matthew; Cobb, Dick; Tinker, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    This study analysed 40 planning applications in the East of England to investigate the practice of translating paper recommendations in the environmental statement (ES) into legal conditions and obligations. A high proportion (50%) of suggested mitigation measures were not translated into planning conditions or obligations. However, a significant number of additional conditions or obligations, not directly based on the ES, were imposed on developers. The research su...

  14. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Victoria

    The emergence of new, transmissible infections poses a significant threat to human populations. As the 2009 novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic and the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic demonstrate, we have observed the effects of rapid spread of illness in non-immune populations and experienced disturbing uncertainty about future potential for human suffering and societal disruption. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of a newly emerged infectious organism are usually gathered in retrospect as the outbreak evolves and affects populations. Knowledge of potential effects of outbreaks and epidemics and most importantly, mitigation at community, regional, national and global levels is needed to inform policy that will prepare and protect people. Study of possible outcomes of evolving epidemics and application of mitigation strategies is not possible in observational or experimental research designs, but computational modeling allows conduct of `virtual' experiments. Results of well-designed computer simulations can aid in the selection and implementation of strategies that limit illness and death, and maintain systems of healthcare and other critical resources that are vital to public protection. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks.

  15. Searchable Encryption in Cloud Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Ren-Junn Hwang; Chung-Chien Lu; Jain-Shing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Cloud outsource storage is one of important services in cloud computing. Cloud users upload data to cloud servers to reduce the cost of managing data and maintaining hardware and software. To ensure data confidentiality, users can encrypt their files before uploading them to a cloud system. However, retrieving the target file from the encrypted files exactly is difficult for cloud server. This study proposes a protocol for performing multikeyword searches for encrypted cloud data by applying ...

  16. Enterprise Cloud Adoption - Cloud Maturity Assessment Model

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Gerry; Doherty, Eileen; Carcary, Marian; Crowley, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The introduction and use of cloud computing by an organization has the promise of significant benefits that include reduced costs, improved services, and a pay-per-use model. Organizations that successfully harness these benefits will potentially have a distinct competitive edge, due to their increased agility and flexibility to rapidly respond to an ever changing and complex business environment. However, as cloud technology is a relatively new ph...

  17. Star clouds of Magellan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, W.

    1981-01-01

    The Magellanic Clouds are two irregular galaxies belonging to the local group which the Milky Way belongs to. By studying the Clouds, astronomers hope to gain insight into the origin and composition of the Milky Way. The overall structure and dynamics of the Clouds are clearest when studied in radio region of the spectrum. One benefit of directly observing stellar luminosities in the Clouds has been the discovery of the period-luminosity relation. Also, the Clouds are a splendid laboratory for studying stellar evolution. It is believed that both Clouds may be in the very early stage in the development of a regular, symmetric galaxy. This raises a paradox because some of the stars in the star clusters of the Clouds are as old as the oldest stars in our galaxy. An explanation for this is given. The low velocity of the Clouds with respect to the center of the Milky Way shows they must be bound to it by gravity. Theories are given on how the Magellanic Clouds became associated with the galaxy. According to current ideas the Clouds orbits will decay and they will spiral into the Galaxy

  18. Cloud Computing Governance Lifecycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Karkošková

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Externally provisioned cloud services enable flexible and on-demand sourcing of IT resources. Cloud computing introduces new challenges such as need of business process redefinition, establishment of specialized governance and management, organizational structures and relationships with external providers and managing new types of risk arising from dependency on external providers. There is a general consensus that cloud computing in addition to challenges brings many benefits but it is unclear how to achieve them. Cloud computing governance helps to create business value through obtain benefits from use of cloud computing services while optimizing investment and risk. Challenge, which organizations are facing in relation to governing of cloud services, is how to design and implement cloud computing governance to gain expected benefits. This paper aims to provide guidance on implementation activities of proposed Cloud computing governance lifecycle from cloud consumer perspective. Proposed model is based on SOA Governance Framework and consists of lifecycle for implementation and continuous improvement of cloud computing governance model.

  19. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 ± 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of ∼ 10 5 M sun , rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A K > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H 2 ) ∼ a few x 10 4 cm -3 .

  20. How to build a cloud chamber?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud chamber had its heyday in the first half of last century and allowed the discovery of new particles such as the anti-electron, the muon and the neutral and the charged kaon. The bubble chamber replaced it in the mid fifties. This article recalls the principle of the cloud chamber and shows, in a detailed way, how to proceed to build one with on-the-shelf materials. This design is based on the use of isopropanol whose liquefaction through the form of droplets materializes the track of the particle and on the use of combined Peltier cells (instead of CO 2 snow) to cool the chamber. This cloud chamber has been successfully used in schools to observe particles mainly electrons, alphas and muons generated by cosmic rays. (A.C.)

  1. Expansion of magnetic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are a carefully defined subclass of all interplanetary signatures of coronal mass ejections whose geometry is thought to be that of a cylinder embedded in a plane. It has been found that the total magnetic pressure inside the clouds is higher than the ion pressure outside, and that the clouds are expanding at 1 AU at about half the local Alfven speed. The geometry of the clouds is such that even though the magnetic pressure inside is larger than the total pressure outside, expansion will not occur because the pressure is balanced by magnetic tension - the pinch effect. The evidence for expansion of clouds at 1 AU is nevertheless quite strong so another reason for its existence must be found. It is demonstrated that the observations can be reproduced by taking into account the effects of geometrical distortion of the low plasma beta clouds as they move away from the Sun

  2. Encyclopedia of cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Bojanova, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Cloud Computing provides IT professionals, educators, researchers and students with a compendium of cloud computing knowledge. Authored by a spectrum of subject matter experts in industry and academia, this unique publication, in a single volume, covers a wide range of cloud computing topics, including technological trends and developments, research opportunities, best practices, standards, and cloud adoption. Providing multiple perspectives, it also addresses questions that stakeholders might have in the context of development, operation, management, and use of clouds. Furthermore, it examines cloud computing's impact now and in the future. The encyclopedia presents 56 chapters logically organized into 10 sections. Each chapter covers a major topic/area with cross-references to other chapters and contains tables, illustrations, side-bars as appropriate. Furthermore, each chapter presents its summary at the beginning and backend material, references and additional resources for further i...

  3. Evaluating statistical cloud schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Grützun, Verena; Quaas, Johannes; Morcrette , Cyril J.; Ament, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Statistical cloud schemes with prognostic probability distribution functions have become more important in atmospheric modeling, especially since they are in principle scale adaptive and capture cloud physics in more detail. While in theory the schemes have a great potential, their accuracy is still questionable. High-resolution three-dimensional observational data of water vapor and cloud water, which could be used for testing them, are missing. We explore the potential of ground-based re...

  4. Cloud Computing Governance Lifecycle

    OpenAIRE

    Soňa Karkošková; George Feuerlicht

    2016-01-01

    Externally provisioned cloud services enable flexible and on-demand sourcing of IT resources. Cloud computing introduces new challenges such as need of business process redefinition, establishment of specialized governance and management, organizational structures and relationships with external providers and managing new types of risk arising from dependency on external providers. There is a general consensus that cloud computing in addition to challenges brings many benefits but it is uncle...

  5. Security in cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Martín, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Security in Cloud Computing is becoming a challenge for next generation Data Centers. This project will focus on investigating new security strategies for Cloud Computing systems. Cloud Computingisarecent paradigmto deliver services over Internet. Businesses grow drastically because of it. Researchers focus their work on it. The rapid access to exible and low cost IT resources on an on-demand fashion, allows the users to avoid planning ahead for provisioning, and enterprises to save money ...

  6. CLOUD TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Dukkardt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the review of main features of cloud computing that can be used in education. Particular attention is paid to those learning and supportive tasks, that can be greatly improved in the case of the using of cloud services. Several ways to implement this approach are proposed, based on widely accepted models of providing cloud services. Nevertheless, the authors have not ignored currently existing problems of cloud technologies , identifying the most dangerous risks and their impact on the core business processes of the university. 

  7. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  8. Genomics With Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhamrit Kaur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genomics is study of genome which provides large amount of data for which large storage and computation power is needed. These issues are solved by cloud computing that provides various cloud platforms for genomics. These platforms provides many services to user like easy access to data easy sharing and transfer providing storage in hundreds of terabytes more computational power. Some cloud platforms are Google genomics DNAnexus and Globus genomics. Various features of cloud computing to genomics are like easy access and sharing of data security of data less cost to pay for resources but still there are some demerits like large time needed to transfer data less network bandwidth.

  9. Mitigating flood exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, James M; McLean, Andrew; Herberman Mash, Holly B; Rosen, Alexa; Kelly, Fiona; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Youngs Jr, Georgia A; Jensen, Jessica; Bernal, Oscar; Neria, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In 2011, following heavy winter snowfall, two cities bordering two rivers in North Dakota, USA faced major flood threats. Flooding was foreseeable and predictable although the extent of risk was uncertain. One community, Fargo, situated in a shallow river basin, successfully mitigated and prevented flooding. For the other community, Minot, located in a deep river valley, prevention was not possible and downtown businesses and one-quarter of the homes were inundated, in the city’s worst flood on record. We aimed at contrasting the respective hazards, vulnerabilities, stressors, psychological risk factors, psychosocial consequences, and disaster risk reduction strategies under conditions where flood prevention was, and was not, possible. Methods. We applied the “trauma signature analysis” (TSIG) approach to compare the hazard profiles, identify salient disaster stressors, document the key components of disaster risk reduction response, and examine indicators of community resilience. Results. Two demographically-comparable communities, Fargo and Minot, faced challenging river flood threats and exhibited effective coordination across community sectors. We examined the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies in situations where coordinated citizen action was able to prevent disaster impact (hazard avoidance) compared to the more common scenario when unpreventable disaster strikes, causing destruction, harm, and distress. Across a range of indicators, it is clear that successful mitigation diminishes both physical and psychological impact, thereby reducing the trauma signature of the event. Conclusion. In contrast to experience of historic flooding in Minot, the city of Fargo succeeded in reducing the trauma signature by way of reducing risk through mitigation. PMID:28228985

  10. Scheduling multimedia services in cloud computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunchang; Li, Chunlin; Luo, Youlong; Shao, Yanling; Zhang, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Currently, security is a critical factor for multimedia services running in the cloud computing environment. As an effective mechanism, trust can improve security level and mitigate attacks within cloud computing environments. Unfortunately, existing scheduling strategy for multimedia service in the cloud computing environment do not integrate trust mechanism when making scheduling decisions. In this paper, we propose a scheduling scheme for multimedia services in multi clouds. At first, a novel scheduling architecture is presented. Then, We build a trust model including both subjective trust and objective trust to evaluate the trust degree of multimedia service providers. By employing Bayesian theory, the subjective trust degree between multimedia service providers and users is obtained. According to the attributes of QoS, the objective trust degree of multimedia service providers is calculated. Finally, a scheduling algorithm integrating trust of entities is proposed by considering the deadline, cost and trust requirements of multimedia services. The scheduling algorithm heuristically hunts for reasonable resource allocations and satisfies the requirement of trust and meets deadlines for the multimedia services. Detailed simulated experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed trust scheduling scheme.

  11. Review of Cloud Computing and existing Frameworks for Cloud adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Victor; Walters, Robert John; Wills, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a selected review for Cloud Computing and explains the benefits and risks of adopting Cloud Computing in a business environment. Although all the risks identified may be associated with two major Cloud adoption challenges, a framework is required to support organisations as they begin to use Cloud and minimise risks of Cloud adoption. Eleven Cloud Computing frameworks are investigated and a comparison of their strengths and limitations is made; the result of the comparison...

  12. +Cloud: An Agent-Based Cloud Computing Platform

    OpenAIRE

    González, Roberto; Hernández de la Iglesia, Daniel; de la Prieta Pintado, Fernando; Gil González, Ana Belén

    2017-01-01

    Cloud computing is revolutionizing the services provided through the Internet, and is continually adapting itself in order to maintain the quality of its services. This study presents the platform +Cloud, which proposes a cloud environment for storing information and files by following the cloud paradigm. This study also presents Warehouse 3.0, a cloud-based application that has been developed to validate the services provided by +Cloud.

  13. Lost in Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.; Shetye, Sandeep D.; Chilukuri, Sri; Sturken, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing can reduce cost significantly because businesses can share computing resources. In recent years Small and Medium Businesses (SMB) have used Cloud effectively for cost saving and for sharing IT expenses. With the success of SMBs, many perceive that the larger enterprises ought to move into Cloud environment as well. Government agency s stove-piped environments are being considered as candidates for potential use of Cloud either as an enterprise entity or pockets of small communities. Cloud Computing is the delivery of computing as a service rather than as a product, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices as a utility over a network. Underneath the offered services, there exists a modern infrastructure cost of which is often spread across its services or its investors. As NASA is considered as an Enterprise class organization, like other enterprises, a shift has been occurring in perceiving its IT services as candidates for Cloud services. This paper discusses market trends in cloud computing from an enterprise angle and then addresses the topic of Cloud Computing for NASA in two possible forms. First, in the form of a public Cloud to support it as an enterprise, as well as to share it with the commercial and public at large. Second, as a private Cloud wherein the infrastructure is operated solely for NASA, whether managed internally or by a third-party and hosted internally or externally. The paper addresses the strengths and weaknesses of both paradigms of public and private Clouds, in both internally and externally operated settings. The content of the paper is from a NASA perspective but is applicable to any large enterprise with thousands of employees and contractors.

  14. Stray voltage mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, B.; Piercy, R.; Dick, P. [Kinetrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada). Transmission and Distribution Technologies

    2008-04-09

    This report discussed issues related to farm stray voltage and evaluated mitigation strategies and costs for limiting voltage to farms. A 3-phase, 3-wire system with no neutral ground was used throughout North America before the 1930s. Transformers were connected phase to phase without any electrical connection between the primary and secondary sides of the transformers. Distribution voltage levels were then increased and multi-grounded neutral wires were added. The earth now forms a parallel return path for the neutral current that allows part of the neutral current to flow continuously through the earth. The arrangement is responsible for causing stray voltage. Stray voltage causes uneven milk production, increased incidences of mastitis, and can create a reluctance to drink water amongst cows when stray voltages are present. Off-farm sources of stray voltage include phase unbalances, undersized neutral wire, and high resistance splices on the neutral wire. Mitigation strategies for reducing stray voltage include phase balancing; conversion from single to 3-phase; increasing distribution voltage levels, and changing pole configurations. 22 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs.

  15. Research on cloud computing solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Liudvikas Kaklauskas; Vaida Zdanytė

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing can be defined as a new style of computing in which dynamically scala-ble and often virtualized resources are provided as a services over the Internet. Advantages of the cloud computing technology include cost savings, high availability, and easy scalability. Voas and Zhang adapted six phases of computing paradigms, from dummy termi-nals/mainframes, to PCs, networking computing, to grid and cloud computing. There are four types of cloud computing: public cloud, private cloud, ...

  16. VMware vCloud security

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Prasenjit

    2013-01-01

    VMware vCloud Security provides the reader with in depth knowledge and practical exercises sufficient to implement a secured private cloud using VMware vCloud Director and vCloud Networking and Security.This book is primarily for technical professionals with system administration and security administration skills with significant VMware vCloud experience who want to learn about advanced concepts of vCloud security and compliance.

  17. Security Architecture of Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    V.KRISHNA REDDY; Dr. L.S.S.REDDY

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud Computing offers service over internet with dynamically scalable resources. Cloud Computing services provides benefits to the users in terms of cost and ease of use. Cloud Computing services need to address the security during the transmission of sensitive data and critical applications to shared and public cloud environments. The cloud environments are scaling large for data processing and storage needs. Cloud computing environment have various advantages as well as disadvantages o...

  18. Security in hybrid cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Koudelka, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the area of hybrid cloud computing, specifically with its security. The major aim of the thesis is to analyze and compare the chosen hybrid cloud providers. For the minor aim this thesis compares the security challenges of hybrid cloud as opponent to other deployment models. In order to accomplish said aims, this thesis defines the terms cloud computing and hybrid cloud computing in its theoretical part. Furthermore the security challenges for cloud computing a...

  19. Cloud security in vogelvlucht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is dé hype in IT op het moment, en hoewel veel aspecten niet nieuw zijn, leidt het concept wel tot de noodzaak voor nieuwe vormen van beveiliging. Het idee van cloud computing biedt echter ook juist kansen om hierover na te denken: wat is de rol van informatiebeveiliging in een

  20. CLOUD SERVICES IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.S. Seydametova

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the on-line services based on cloud computing, provided by Google to educational institutions. We describe the own experience of the implementing the Google Apps Education Edition in the educational process. We analyzed and compared the other universities experience of using cloud technologies.

  1. Cloud MicroAtlas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We begin by outlining the life cycle of a tall cloud, and thenbriefly discuss cloud systems. We choose one aspect of thislife cycle, namely, the rapid growth of water droplets in ice freeclouds, to then discuss in greater detail. Taking a singlevortex to be a building block of turbulence, we demonstrateone mechanism by which ...

  2. Greening the cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoed, Robert; Hoekstra, Eric; Procaccianti, Giuseppe; Lago, Patricia; Grosso, Paolo; Taal, Arie; Grosskop, Kay; van Bergen, Esther

    The cloud has become an essential part of our daily lives. We use it to store our documents (Dropbox), to stream our music and films (Spotify and Netflix) and without giving it any thought, we use it to work on documents in the cloud (Google Docs).

  3. Learning in the Clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butin, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Engaged learning--the type that happens outside textbooks and beyond the four walls of the classroom--moves beyond right and wrong answers to grappling with the uncertainties and contradictions of a complex world. iPhones back up to the "cloud." GoogleDocs is all about "cloud computing." Facebook is as ubiquitous as the sky.…

  4. Kernel structures for Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Eugene H.; Mckendry, Martin S.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the internal structure of the Clouds kernel was presented. An indication of how these structures will interact in the prototype Clouds implementation is given. Many specific details have yet to be determined and await experimentation with an actual working system.

  5. Cloud computing basics

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, S

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Computing Basics covers the main aspects of this fast moving technology so that both practitioners and students will be able to understand cloud computing. The author highlights the key aspects of this technology that a potential user might want to investigate before deciding to adopt this service. This book explains how cloud services can be used to augment existing services such as storage, backup and recovery. Addressing the details on how cloud security works and what the users must be prepared for when they move their data to the cloud. Also this book discusses how businesses could prepare for compliance with the laws as well as industry standards such as the Payment Card Industry.

  6. Solar variability and clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2000-01-01

    Satellite observations have revealed a surprising imprint of the 11- year solar cycle on global low cloud cover. The cloud data suggest a correlation with the intensity of Galactic cosmic rays. If this apparent connection between cosmic rays and clouds is real, variations of the cosmic ray flux caused by long-term changes in the solar wind could have a significant influence on the global energy radiation budget and the climate. However a direct link between cosmic rays and clouds has not been unambiguously established and, moreover, the microphysical mechanism is poorly understood. New experiments are being planned to find out whether cosmic rays can affect cloud formation, and if so how. (37 refs).

  7. In-situ measurements of the secondary electron yield in an accelerator environment: Instrumentation and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, W.H.; Asner, D.M.; Conway, J.V.; Dennett, C.A.; Greenwald, S.; Kim, J.-S.; Li, Y.; Moore, T.P.; Omanovic, V.; Palmer, M.A.; Strohman, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a particle accelerator can be limited by the build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the vacuum chamber. Secondary electron emission from the chamber walls can contribute to EC growth. An apparatus for in-situ measurements of the secondary electron yield (SEY) in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was developed in connection with EC studies for the CESR Test Accelerator program. The CESR in-situ system, in operation since 2010, allows for SEY measurements as a function of incident electron energy and angle on samples that are exposed to the accelerator environment, typically 5.3 GeV counter-rotating beams of electrons and positrons. The system was designed for periodic measurements to observe beam conditioning of the SEY with discrimination between exposure to direct photons from synchrotron radiation versus scattered photons and cloud electrons. The samples can be exchanged without venting the CESR vacuum chamber. Measurements have been done on metal surfaces and EC-mitigation coatings. The in-situ SEY apparatus and improvements to the measurement tools and techniques are described

  8. In-situ measurements of the secondary electron yield in an accelerator environment: Instrumentation and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, W.H., E-mail: wh29@cornell.edu; Asner, D.M.; Conway, J.V.; Dennett, C.A.; Greenwald, S.; Kim, J.-S.; Li, Y.; Moore, T.P.; Omanovic, V.; Palmer, M.A.; Strohman, C.R.

    2015-05-21

    The performance of a particle accelerator can be limited by the build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the vacuum chamber. Secondary electron emission from the chamber walls can contribute to EC growth. An apparatus for in-situ measurements of the secondary electron yield (SEY) in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was developed in connection with EC studies for the CESR Test Accelerator program. The CESR in-situ system, in operation since 2010, allows for SEY measurements as a function of incident electron energy and angle on samples that are exposed to the accelerator environment, typically 5.3 GeV counter-rotating beams of electrons and positrons. The system was designed for periodic measurements to observe beam conditioning of the SEY with discrimination between exposure to direct photons from synchrotron radiation versus scattered photons and cloud electrons. The samples can be exchanged without venting the CESR vacuum chamber. Measurements have been done on metal surfaces and EC-mitigation coatings. The in-situ SEY apparatus and improvements to the measurement tools and techniques are described.

  9. Dynamic Delegation Approach Based on Access Control in the Electronic Evidence Storage of the Cloud Platform%基于云平台的电子证据存储中访问控制的动态委托方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何月; 陈明

    2013-01-01

    对动态云平台电子证据存储代表的必要性的研究,证明所有资源网站的可信任性是安全云平台电子证据存储计算的一个先决条件.分析了现有的代表团类和电网计划,并提出了云平台电子证据存储访问控制的模糊信任、委托模型(FTDM)和基于云平台电子证据存储实体之间信任关系的两个阶段的模糊推理过程,进而决定类的代表团和信任级别授权访问的可能性.并且引用数字取证分析云平台资源的K-means聚类算法的基础上的CGRS资源选择算法,并在实务部门数字取证分析平台的可扩展环境中实施.通过分析和实验结果验证了分析平台的资源选择算法的有效性和正确性.%Study on the necessity of electronic evidence storage on dynamic cloud platform of electronic evidence storage.The trustworthiness of the web resources is a prerequisite for secure cloud platform of electronic evidence storage calculation.I analyze the existing classes of delegation and plan for power grid,put forward the new fuzzy trust and FTDM based on the cloud platform of electronic evidence storage access,advance the fuzzy reasoning process of two stage of trust relationship between electronic evidence storage entities based on the cloud platform,and then decide the possibility of classes of delegation and trust level of authorization access.I use CGRS resource selection algorithm which is based on the K-means clustering algorithm in digital forensics analysis of cloud platform resources,and the algorithm is used to scalable environment for digital forensics analysis platform in substantive departments.The analysis and the experimental results,verify the correctness and effectiveness of the analysis platform of resource selection algoritm.

  10. Stratocumulus Cloud Top Radiative Cooling and Cloud Base Updraft Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Balsells, J.; Klinger, C.

    2017-12-01

    Cloud top radiative cooling is a primary driver of turbulence in the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary. A functional relationship between cloud top cooling and cloud base updraft speeds may therefore exist. A correlation of cloud top radiative cooling and cloud base updraft speeds has been recently identified empirically, providing a basis for satellite retrieval of cloud base updraft speeds. Such retrievals may enable analysis of aerosol-cloud interactions using satellite observations: Updraft speeds at cloud base co-determine supersaturation and therefore the activation of cloud condensation nuclei, which in turn co-determine cloud properties and precipitation formation. We use large eddy simulation and an off-line radiative transfer model to explore the relationship between cloud-top radiative cooling and cloud base updraft speeds in a marine stratocumulus cloud over the course of the diurnal cycle. We find that during daytime, at low cloud water path (CWP correlated, in agreement with the reported empirical relationship. During the night, in the absence of short-wave heating, CWP builds up (CWP > 50 g m-2) and long-wave emissions from cloud top saturate, while cloud base heating increases. In combination, cloud top cooling and cloud base updrafts become weakly anti-correlated. A functional relationship between cloud top cooling and cloud base updraft speed can hence be expected for stratocumulus clouds with a sufficiently low CWP and sub-saturated long-wave emissions, in particular during daytime. At higher CWPs, in particular at night, the relationship breaks down due to saturation of long-wave emissions from cloud top.

  11. Formation of Massive Molecular Cloud Cores by Cloud-cloud Collision

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by the cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive mol...

  12. Integrated disruption avoidance and mitigation in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Woo, M.H.; Han, H.; In, Y.; Bak, J.G.; Eidietis, N.W.

    2014-01-01

    The final target of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) aims advanced tokamak operation at plasma current 2 MA and toroidal field 3.5 T. In order to safely achieve the target, disruption counter-measures are unavoidable when considering the disruption risks, inevitably accompanied with high performance discharges, such as electro-magnetic load on conducting structures, collisional damage by run-away electrons, and thermal load on plasma facing components (PFCs). In this reason, the establishment of integrated disruption mitigation system (DMS) has been started for routine mega-ampere class operations of KSTAR since 2013 campaign. The DMS mainly consists of the disruption prediction and its avoidance/mitigation in company with logical/technical integration of them. We present the details of KSTAR DMS and the related experimental results in this article. (author)

  13. Space Debris & its Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sourabh; Arora, Nishant

    2012-07-01

    Space debris has become a growing concern in recent years, since collisions at orbital velocities can be highly damaging to functioning satellites and can also produce even more space debris in the process. Some spacecraft, like the International Space Station, are now armored to deal with this hazard but armor and mitigation measures can be prohibitively costly when trying to protect satellites or human spaceflight vehicles like the shuttle. This paper describes the current orbital debris environment, outline its main sources, and identify mitigation measures to reduce orbital debris growth by controlling these sources. We studied the literature on the topic Space Debris. We have proposed some methods to solve this problem of space debris. We have also highlighted the shortcomings of already proposed methods by space experts and we have proposed some modification in those methods. Some of them can be very effective in the process of mitigation of space debris, but some of them need some modification. Recently proposed methods by space experts are maneuver, shielding of space elevator with the foil, vaporizing or redirecting of space debris back to earth with the help of laser, use of aerogel as a protective layer, construction of large junkyards around international space station, use of electrodynamics tether & the latest method proposed is the use of nano satellites in the clearing of the space debris. Limitations of the already proposed methods are as follows: - Maneuvering can't be the final solution to our problem as it is the act of self-defence. - Shielding can't be done on the parts like solar panels and optical devices. - Vaporizing or redirecting of space debris can affect the human life on earth if it is not done in proper manner. - Aerogel has a threshold limit up to which it can bear (resist) the impact of collision. - Large junkyards can be effective only for large sized debris. In this paper we propose: A. The Use of Nano Tubes by creating a mesh

  14. Radon mitigation experience in difficult-to-mitigate schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leovic, K.W.; Craig, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Initial radon mitigation experience in schools has shown sub-slab depressurization (SSD) to be generally effective in reducing elevated levels of radon in schools that have a continuous layer of clean, coarse aggregate underneath the slab. However, mitigation experience is limited in schools without sub-slab aggregate and in schools with characteristics such as return-air ductwork underneath the slab or unducted return-air plenums in the drop ceiling that are open to the sub-slab area (via open tops of block walls). Mitigation of schools with utility tunnels and of schools constructed over crawl spaces is also limited. Three Maryland schools exhibiting some of the above characteristics are being researched to help understand the mechanisms that control radon entry and mitigation in schools where standard SSD systems are not effective. This paper discusses specific characteristics of potentially difficult-to-mitigate schools and, where applicable, details examples from the three Maryland schools

  15. Making and Breaking Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Molecular clouds which youre likely familiar with from stunning popular astronomy imagery lead complicated, tumultuous lives. A recent study has now found that these features must be rapidly built and destroyed.Star-Forming CollapseA Hubble view of a molecular cloud, roughly two light-years long, that has broken off of the Carina Nebula. [NASA/ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley)/The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)]Molecular gas can be found throughout our galaxy in the form of eminently photogenic clouds (as featured throughout this post). Dense, cold molecular gas makes up more than 20% of the Milky Ways total gas mass, and gravitational instabilities within these clouds lead them to collapse under their own weight, resulting in the formation of our galaxys stars.How does this collapse occur? The simplest explanation is that the clouds simply collapse in free fall, with no source of support to counter their contraction. But if all the molecular gas we observe collapsed on free-fall timescales, star formation in our galaxy would churn a rate thats at least an order of magnitude higher than the observed 12 solar masses per year in the Milky Way.Destruction by FeedbackAstronomers have theorized that there may be some mechanism that supports these clouds against gravity, slowing their collapse. But both theoretical studies and observations of the clouds have ruled out most of these potential mechanisms, and mounting evidence supports the original interpretation that molecular clouds are simply gravitationally collapsing.A sub-mm image from ESOs APEX telescope of part of the Taurus molecular cloud, roughly ten light-years long, superimposed on a visible-light image of the region. [ESO/APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO)/A. Hacar et al./Digitized Sky Survey 2. Acknowledgment: Davide De Martin]If this is indeed the case, then one explanation for our low observed star formation rate could be that molecular clouds are rapidly destroyed by feedback from the very stars

  16. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Sarga

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As cloud computing is gaining acclaim as a cost-effective alternative to acquiring processing resources for corporations, scientific applications and individuals, various challenges are rapidly coming to the fore. While academia struggles to procure a concise definition, corporations are more interested in competitive advantages it may generate and individuals view it as a way of speeding up data access times or a convenient backup solution. Properties of the cloud architecture largely preclude usage of existing practices while achieving end-users’ and companies’ compliance requires considering multiple infrastructural as well as commercial factors, such as sustainability in case of cloud-side interruptions, identity management and off-site corporate data handling policies. The article overviews recent attempts at formal definitions of cloud computing, summarizes and critically evaluates proposed delimitations, and specifies challenges associated with its further proliferation. Based on the conclusions, future directions in the field of cloud computing are also briefly hypothesized to include deeper focus on community clouds and bolstering innovative cloud-enabled platforms and devices such as tablets, smart phones, as well as entertainment applications.

  17. Cloud Computing Law

    CERN Document Server

    Millard, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This book is about the legal implications of cloud computing. In essence, ‘the cloud’ is a way of delivering computing resources as a utility service via the internet. It is evolving very rapidly with substantial investments being made in infrastructure, platforms and applications, all delivered ‘as a service’. The demand for cloud resources is enormous, driven by such developments as the deployment on a vast scale of mobile apps and the rapid emergence of ‘Big Data’. Part I of this book explains what cloud computing is and how it works. Part II analyses contractual relationships between cloud service providers and their customers, as well as the complex roles of intermediaries. Drawing on primary research conducted by the Cloud Legal Project at Queen Mary University of London, cloud contracts are analysed in detail, including the appropriateness and enforceability of ‘take it or leave it’ terms of service, as well as the scope for negotiating cloud deals. Specific arrangements for public sect...

  18. Community Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  19. Plasma cloud expansion in the ionosphere: Three-dimensional simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T.Z.; Schunk, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    A three-dimensional time-dependent model was developed to study the characteristics of a plasma cloud expansion in the ionosphere. The electrostatic potential is solved in three dimensions taking into account the large parallel-to-perpendicular conductivity ratio. Three sample simulations are presented: a plasma expansion of a nearly spherical 1 km Ba + cloud, both with and without a background neutral wind, and a long thin Ba + cloudlet. With or without the neutral wind the effective potential, which is different from the electrostatic potential if the electron temperature is included, is constant along the magnetic field for typical cloud sizes. The expanding plasma clouds become elongated in the magnetic field direction. The released Ba + ions push the background O + ions away along the magnetic field as they expand. Consequently, a hole develops in the background O + distribution at the cloud location and on the two sides of the cloud O + bumps form. The entire three-dimensional structure, composed of the plasma cloud and the background plasma embedded in the cloud, slowly rotates about the magnetic field, with the ions and electrons rotating in opposite directions. The cloud configuration takes the shape of a rotating ellipsoid with a major axis that expands with time. Perpendicular to the magnetic field, in the absence of the neutral wind the motion is insignificant compared to the parallel motion. With a neutral wind the motion along the magnetic field and the rotational motion are qualitatively unchanged, but the cloud and the perturbed background structure move in the direction of the wind, with a speed less than the wind speed. Perpendicular to the magnetic field the deformation of the cloud indiced by the wind is characterized by steepening of the backside

  20. Apparatus and Methods for Mitigating Electromagnetic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Steven M. (Inventor); Niedra, Janis M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Apparatus, methods, and other embodiments associated with mitigation of magnetic fields are described herein. In an embodiment, a method for mitigating an electromagnetic field includes positioning a mitigating coil around a linear alternator of linear motor so that the mitigating coil is coaxially located with an alternator coil; arranging the mitigating coil to generate a field to mitigate an electromagnetic field generated by the alternator coil; and passing an induced current from the alternator coil through the mitigating coil.

  1. Diffuse interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines and discusses the nature of diffuse interstellar clouds. He discusses how they contribute to the general extinction of starlight. The atomic and molecular species that have been identified in the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared regions of the spectrum of a diffuse cloud are presented. The author illustrates some of the practical considerations that affect absorption line observations of interstellar atoms and molecules. Various aspects of the theoretical description of diffuse clouds required for a full interpretation of the observations are discussed

  2. Cloud Computing Security

    OpenAIRE

    Ngongang, Guy

    2011-01-01

    This project aimed to show how possible it is to use a network intrusion detection system in the cloud. The security in the cloud is a concern nowadays and security professionals are still finding means to make cloud computing more secure. First of all the installation of the ESX4.0, vCenter Server and vCenter lab manager in server hardware was successful in building the platform. This allowed the creation and deployment of many virtual servers. Those servers have operating systems and a...

  3. Aerosols, clouds and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, S [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (USA). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    1991-01-01

    Most of the so-called 'CO{sub 2} effect' is, in fact, an 'H{sub 2}O effect' brought into play by the climate modeler's assumption that planetary average temperature dictates water-vapor concentration (following Clapeyron-Clausius). That assumption ignores the removal process, which cloud physicists know to be influenced by the aerosol, since the latter primarily controls cloud droplet number and size. Droplet number and size are also influential for shortwave (solar) energy. The reflectance of many thin to moderately thick clouds changes when nuclei concentrations change and make shortwave albedo susceptible to aerosol influence.

  4. Trusted cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Krcmar, Helmut; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    This book documents the scientific results of the projects related to the Trusted Cloud Program, covering fundamental aspects of trust, security, and quality of service for cloud-based services and applications. These results aim to allow trustworthy IT applications in the cloud by providing a reliable and secure technical and legal framework. In this domain, business models, legislative circumstances, technical possibilities, and realizable security are closely interwoven and thus are addressed jointly. The book is organized in four parts on "Security and Privacy", "Software Engineering and

  5. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CLOUD COMPUTING AND MOBILE CLOUD COMPUTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nidhi Rajak*, Diwakar Shukla

    2018-01-01

    Present era is of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and there are number of researches are going on Cloud Computing and Mobile Cloud Computing such security issues, data management, load balancing and so on. Cloud computing provides the services to the end user over Internet and the primary objectives of this computing are resource sharing and pooling among the end users. Mobile Cloud Computing is a combination of Cloud Computing and Mobile Computing. Here, data is stored in...

  6. BUSINESS MODELLING AND DATABASE DESIGN IN CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai-Constantin AVORNICULUI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic commerce is growing constantly from one year to another in the last decade, few are the areas that also register such a growth. It covers the exchanges of computerized data, but also electronic messaging, linear data banks and electronic transfer payment. Cloud computing, a relatively new concept and term, is a model of access services via the internet to distributed systems of configurable calculus resources at request which can be made available quickly with minimum management effort and intervention from the client and the provider. Behind an electronic commerce system in cloud there is a data base which contains the necessary information for the transactions in the system. Using business modelling, we get many benefits, which makes the design of the database used by electronic commerce systems in cloud considerably easier.

  7. Taxonomy of cloud computing services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, C.N.; Karagiannis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is a highly discussed topic, and many big players of the software industry are entering the development of cloud services. Several companies want to explore the possibilities and benefits of cloud computing, but with the amount of cloud computing services increasing quickly, the need

  8. Cloud Computing (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  9. Cloud Computing (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  10. IBM SmartCloud essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    A practical, user-friendly guide that provides an introduction to cloud computing using IBM SmartCloud, along with a thorough understanding of resource management in a cloud environment.This book is great for anyone who wants to get a grasp of what cloud computing is and what IBM SmartCloud has to offer. If you are an IT specialist, IT architect, system administrator, or a developer who wants to thoroughly understand the cloud computing resource model, this book is ideal for you. No prior knowledge of cloud computing is expected.

  11. Cloud MicroAtlas∗

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ∗Any resemblance to the title of David Mitchell's book is purely intentional! RESONANCE | March 2017. 269 .... The most comprehensive reference we know of on the subject of cloud microphysics is the book .... Economic and. Political Weekly ...

  12. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  13. Entangled Cloud Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ateniese, Giuseppe; Dagdelen, Özgür; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre

    2012-01-01

    keeps the files in it private but still lets each client P_i recover his own data by interacting with S; no cooperation from other clients is needed. At the same time, the cloud provider is discouraged from altering or overwriting any significant part of c as this will imply that none of the clients can......Entangled cloud storage enables a set of clients {P_i} to “entangle” their files {f_i} into a single clew c to be stored by a (potentially malicious) cloud provider S. The entanglement makes it impossible to modify or delete significant part of the clew without affecting all files in c. A clew...... recover their files. We provide theoretical foundations for entangled cloud storage, introducing the notion of an entangled encoding scheme that guarantees strong security requirements capturing the properties above. We also give a concrete construction based on privacy-preserving polynomial interpolation...

  14. Marine Cloud Brightening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  15. CLOUD COMPUTING SECURITY ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Florin OGIGAU-NEAMTIU

    2012-01-01

    The term “cloud computing” has been in the spotlights of IT specialists the last years because of its potential to transform this industry. The promised benefits have determined companies to invest great sums of money in researching and developing this domain and great steps have been made towards implementing this technology. Managers have traditionally viewed IT as difficult and expensive and the promise of cloud computing leads many to think that IT will now be easy and cheap. The reality ...

  16. Marine cloud brightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-09-13

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could-subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein-have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  17. Cloud benchmarking for performance

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Blesson; Akgun, Ozgur; Miguel, Ian; Thai, Long; Barker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 20/09/2014 How can applications be deployed on the cloud to achieve maximum performance? This question has become significant and challenging with the availability of a wide variety of Virtual Machines (VMs) with different performance capabilities in the cloud. The above question is addressed by proposing a six step benchmarking methodology in which a user provides a set of four weights that indicate how important each of the following groups: memory, processor, computa...

  18. Toward Cloud Computing Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Susanto, Heru; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Kang, Chen Chin

    2012-01-01

    -Information Technology (IT) shaped the success of organizations, giving them a solid foundation that increases both their level of efficiency as well as productivity. The computing industry is witnessing a paradigm shift in the way computing is performed worldwide. There is a growing awareness among consumers and enterprises to access their IT resources extensively through a "utility" model known as "cloud computing." Cloud computing was initially rooted in distributed grid-based computing. ...

  19. A TRUSTWORTHY CLOUD FORENSICS ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Zawoad , Shams; Hasan , Ragib

    2015-01-01

    Part 5: CLOUD FORENSICS; International audience; The rapid migration from traditional computing and storage models to cloud computing environments has made it necessary to support reliable forensic investigations in the cloud. However, current cloud computing environments often lack support for forensic investigations and the trustworthiness of evidence is often questionable because of the possibility of collusion between dishonest cloud providers, users and forensic investigators. This chapt...

  20. On Cloud-based Oversubscription

    OpenAIRE

    Householder, Rachel; Arnold, Scott; Green, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Rising trends in the number of customers turning to the cloud for their computing needs has made effective resource allocation imperative for cloud service providers. In order to maximize profits and reduce waste, providers have started to explore the role of oversubscribing cloud resources. However, the benefits of cloud-based oversubscription are not without inherent risks. This paper attempts to unveil the incentives, risks, and techniques behind oversubscription in a cloud infrastructure....

  1. SOME CONSIDERATIONS ON CLOUD ACCOUNTING

    OpenAIRE

    Doina Pacurari; Elena Nechita

    2013-01-01

    Cloud technologies have developed intensively during the last years. Cloud computing allows the customers to interact with their data and applications at any time, from any location, while the providers host these resources. A client company may choose to run in the cloud a part of its business (sales by agents, payroll, etc.), or even the entire business. The company can get access to a large category of cloud-based software, including accounting software. Cloud solutions are especially reco...

  2. Disruptions and Their Mitigation in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, K.H.; Jaspers, R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Savtchkov, A.; Lehnen, M.; Waidmann, G.

    2005-01-01

    Disruptions remain a major concern for tokamak devices, particularly for large machines. The critical issues are the induced (halo) currents and the resulting forces, the excessive heating of exposed surfaces by the instantaneous power release, and the possible occurrence of highly energetic runaway electrons. The key topics of the investigations on TEXTOR in the recent years concerned (a) the power deposition pattern recorded by a fast infrared scanner, (b) the runaway generation measured by synchrotron radiation in the infrared spectral region, (c) method development for 'healing' discharges that are going to disrupt, and (d) massive gas puffing for mitigating the adverse effects of disruptions

  3. Cybersecurity and privacy issues for socially integrated mobile healthcare applications operating in a multi-cloud environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muhtadi, Jalal; Shahzad, Basit; Saleem, Kashif; Jameel, Wasif; Orgun, Mehmet A

    2017-05-01

    Social media has enabled information-sharing across massively large networks of people without spending much financial resources and time that are otherwise required in the print and electronic media. Mobile-based social media applications have overwhelmingly changed the information-sharing perspective. However, with the advent of such applications at an unprecedented scale, the privacy of the information is compromised to a larger extent if breach mitigation is not adequate. Since healthcare applications are also being developed for mobile devices so that they also benefit from the power of social media, cybersecurity privacy concerns for such sensitive applications have become critical. This article discusses the architecture of a typical mobile healthcare application, in which customized privacy levels are defined for the individuals participating in the system. It then elaborates on how the communication across a social network in a multi-cloud environment can be made more secure and private, especially for healthcare applications.

  4. Interaction of plasma cloud with external electric field in lower ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Dimant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the auroral lower-E and upper-D region of the ionosphere, plasma clouds, such as sporadic-E layers and meteor plasma trails, occur daily. Large-scale electric fields, created by the magnetospheric dynamo, will polarize these highly conducting clouds, redistributing the electrostatic potential and generating anisotropic currents both within and around the cloud. Using a simplified model of the cloud and the background ionosphere, we develop the first self-consistent three-dimensional analytical theory of these phenomena. For dense clouds, this theory predicts highly amplified electric fields around the cloud, along with strong currents collected from the ionosphere and circulated through the cloud. This has implications for the generation of plasma instabilities, electron heating, and global MHD modeling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling via modifications of conductances induced by sporadic-E clouds.

  5. CLOUD COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian IVANUS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing has been a tremendous innovation, through which applications became available online, accessible through an Internet connection and using any computing device (computer, smartphone or tablet. According to one of the most recent studies conducted in 2012 by Everest Group and Cloud Connect, 57% of companies said they already use SaaS application (Software as a Service, and 38% reported using standard tools PaaS (Platform as a Service. However, in the most cases, the users of these solutions highlighted the fact that one of the main obstacles in the development of this technology is the fact that, in cloud, the application is not available without an Internet connection. The new challenge of the cloud system has become now the offline, specifically accessing SaaS applications without being connected to the Internet. This topic is directly related to user productivity within companies as productivity growth is one of the key promises of cloud computing system applications transformation. The aim of this paper is the presentation of some important aspects related to the offline cloud system and regulatory trends in the European Union (EU.

  6. Intense ion beam transport in magnetic quadrupoles: Experiments on electron and gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kireef Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Prost, L.; Vay, J-L.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics have an economic incentive to minimize the clearance between the beam edge and the aperture wall. This increases the risk from electron clouds and gas desorbed from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K + incident on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach values >100, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10 4 . Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. We also discuss the results of beam transport (of 0.03-0.18 A K + ) through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles in the HCX at LBNL. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. A coordinated theory and computational effort has made significant progress towards a self-consistent model of positive-ion beam and electron dynamics. We are beginning to compare experimental and theoretical results

  7. High-performance scientific computing in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, Kevin; Vila, Fernando; Rehr, John

    2011-03-01

    Cloud computing has the potential to open up high-performance computational science to a much broader class of researchers, owing to its ability to provide on-demand, virtualized computational resources. However, before such approaches can become commonplace, user-friendly tools must be developed that hide the unfamiliar cloud environment and streamline the management of cloud resources for many scientific applications. We have recently shown that high-performance cloud computing is feasible for parallelized x-ray spectroscopy calculations. We now present benchmark results for a wider selection of scientific applications focusing on electronic structure and spectroscopic simulation software in condensed matter physics. These applications are driven by an improved portable interface that can manage virtual clusters and run various applications in the cloud. We also describe a next generation of cluster tools, aimed at improved performance and a more robust cluster deployment. Supported by NSF grant OCI-1048052.

  8. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  9. Importance of including ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4 aerosols for ice cloud parameterization in GCMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Bhattacharjee

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A common deficiency of many cloud-physics parameterizations including the NASA's microphysics of clouds with aerosol-cloud interactions (hereafter called McRAS-AC is that they simulate lesser (larger than the observed ice cloud particle number (size. A single column model (SCM of McRAS-AC physics of the GEOS4 Global Circulation Model (GCM together with an adiabatic parcel model (APM for ice-cloud nucleation (IN of aerosols were used to systematically examine the influence of introducing ammonium sulfate (NH42SO4 aerosols in McRAS-AC and its influence on the optical properties of both liquid and ice clouds. First an (NH42SO4 parameterization was included in the APM to assess its effect on clouds vis-à-vis that of the other aerosols. Subsequently, several evaluation tests were conducted over the ARM Southern Great Plain (SGP and thirteen other locations (sorted into pristine and polluted conditions distributed over marine and continental sites with the SCM. The statistics of the simulated cloud climatology were evaluated against the available ground and satellite data. The results showed that inclusion of (NH42SO4 into McRAS-AC of the SCM made a remarkable improvement in the simulated effective radius of ice cloud particulates. However, the corresponding ice-cloud optical thickness increased even more than the observed. This can be caused by lack of horizontal cloud advection not performed in the SCM. Adjusting the other tunable parameters such as precipitation efficiency can mitigate this deficiency. Inclusion of ice cloud particle splintering invoked empirically further reduced simulation biases. Overall, these changes make a substantial improvement in simulated cloud optical properties and cloud distribution particularly over the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ in the GCM.

  10. Study of glow discharge positive column with cloud of disperse particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, D.N.; Shumova, V.V.; Vasilyak, L.M.; Fortov, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to describe plasma parameters changes induced by clouds of disperse micron size particles. Dust clouds were formed in the positive column of glow discharge in air at pressure 0.1-0.6 torr and current 0.1-3 mA. The simultaneous registration of discharge voltage and dust cloud parameters was carried out. Experimental results were simulated using diffusion model. The dust cloud is shown to smooth the radial electron concentration profile, increase electric field strength and electron temperature and stabilize the discharge. The cloud is demonstrated to be a trap for positive ions without increase of discharge current. -- Highlights: → 25% increase of longitudinal electric field strength in discharge with dust cloud. → The smoothing effect of dust cloud on radial electron and ion concentration profiles. → Dust cloud as a trap for positive ions without increase of discharge current. → Increase of electron temperature in discharge with dust cloud. → Increase of discharge stability in presence of dust cloud.

  11. Structure, shape, and evolution of radiatively accelerated QSO emission-line clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenthal, G.R.; Mathews, W.G.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility that the broad emission-line regions of QSOs and active galactic nuclei are formed by a multitude of small clouds which are radiatively accelerated is discussed. Although this model is by no means certain at present, it has four virtues: (1) Observed emission-line widths can be produced with observationally allowed electron densities, UV luminosities, and ionization levels. (2) The acceleration force is coherent in each cloud are found. (3) Reasonable line profiles can result for all emission lines. (4) Photoionization of hydrogen accounts for both heating and acceleration of the emission-line gas. A self-consistent model is developed for the structure, shape, and evolution of radiatively accelerated clouds. The shape varies with cloud mass, and two distinct types of clouds. Fully ionized clouds of very low mass approach a nearly spherical shape. However, all clouds having masses greater than some critical mass adopt a ''pancake'' shape. The condition for constant cloud mass in the cloud frame is shown to be equivalent to the equation of motion of a cloud in the rest frame of the QSO. The emission-line profiles can be sensitive to radial variations in the properties of the intercloud medium, and those properties that correspond to observed profiles are discussed. Finally, the covering factor of a system of pancake clouds is estimated along with the total number of clouds required--approximately 10 14 clouds in each QSO

  12. Regional climate change mitigation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlands, Ian H [UNEP Collaborating Centre on Energy and Environment, and Univ. of Waterloo (Canada)

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the key methodological issues that arise from an analysis of regional climate change mitigation options. The rationale for any analysis of regional mitigation activities, emphasising both the theoretical attractiveness and the existing political encouragement and the methodology that has been developed are reviewed. The differences arising from the fact that mitigation analyses have been taken from the level of the national - where the majority of the work has been completed to date - to the level of the international - that is, the `regional` - will be especially highlighted. (EG)

  13. Regional climate change mitigation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, Ian H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the key methodological issues that arise from an analysis of regional climate change mitigation options. The rationale for any analysis of regional mitigation activities, emphasising both the theoretical attractiveness and the existing political encouragement and the methodology that has been developed are reviewed. The differences arising from the fact that mitigation analyses have been taken from the level of the national - where the majority of the work has been completed to date - to the level of the international - that is, the 'regional' - will be especially highlighted. (EG)

  14. Cloud networking understanding cloud-based data center networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Networking: Understanding Cloud-Based Data Center Networks explains the evolution of established networking technologies into distributed, cloud-based networks. Starting with an overview of cloud technologies, the book explains how cloud data center networks leverage distributed systems for network virtualization, storage networking, and software-defined networking. The author offers insider perspective to key components that make a cloud network possible such as switch fabric technology and data center networking standards. The final chapters look ahead to developments in architectures

  15. Plume trajectory validation study: Brown cloud support project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Strattan, M.A.; Smith, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The brown cloud is an air pollution phenomenon of great concern to the Denver metropolitan area. Regulatory agencies, academia, and research organizations are involved in characterizing the development and transport of the brown cloud and identifying mitigation approaches. In support of this effort, NOAA conducted releases of small (one cubic meter) constant density balloons from sites in Denver and along the South Platte Valley. These balloons, called ''tetroons'' because of their tetrahedral shape, carried five-ounce transponders and were tracked by radar as they rose to predetermined altitudes and followed airflow patterns at those altitudes. The data gathered from these releases included the geographic position and altitude of each tetroon over time. These data will aid efforts to understand brown cloud development, structure, and transport

  16. Model-based mitigation of availability risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambon, E.; Bolzoni, D.; Etalle, S.; Salvato, M.

    2007-01-01

    The assessment and mitigation of risks related to the availability of the IT infrastructure is becoming increasingly important in modern organizations. Unfortunately, present standards for risk assessment and mitigation show limitations when evaluating and mitigating availability risks. This is due

  17. Model-Based Mitigation of Availability Risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambon, Emmanuele; Bolzoni, D.; Etalle, Sandro; Salvato, Marco

    2007-01-01

    The assessment and mitigation of risks related to the availability of the IT infrastructure is becoming increasingly important in modern organizations. Unfortunately, present standards for Risk Assessment and Mitigation show limitations when evaluating and mitigating availability risks. This is due

  18. Marine cloud brightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein—have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud–albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action

  19. USGEO DMWG Cloud Computing Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.; McInerney, M.; Frame, M. T.; Summers, C.

    2017-12-01

    The US Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) Data Management Working Group (DMWG) has been developing Cloud Computing Recommendations for Earth Observations. This inter-agency report is currently in draft form; DMWG hopes to have released the report as a public Request for Information (RFI) by the time of AGU. The recommendations are geared toward organizations that have already decided to use the Cloud for some of their activities (i.e., the focus is not on "why you should use the Cloud," but rather "If you plan to use the Cloud, consider these suggestions.") The report comprises Introductory Material, including Definitions, Potential Cloud Benefits, and Potential Cloud Disadvantages, followed by Recommendations in several areas: Assessing When to Use the Cloud, Transferring Data to the Cloud, Data and Metadata Contents, Developing Applications in the Cloud, Cost Minimization, Security Considerations, Monitoring and Metrics, Agency Support, and Earth Observations-specific recommendations. This talk will summarize the recommendations and invite comment on the RFI.

  20. Cloud GIS Based Watershed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediroğlu, G.; Colak, H. E.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we generated a Cloud GIS based watershed management system with using Cloud Computing architecture. Cloud GIS is used as SAAS (Software as a Service) and DAAS (Data as a Service). We applied GIS analysis on cloud in terms of testing SAAS and deployed GIS datasets on cloud in terms of DAAS. We used Hybrid cloud computing model in manner of using ready web based mapping services hosted on cloud (World Topology, Satellite Imageries). We uploaded to system after creating geodatabases including Hydrology (Rivers, Lakes), Soil Maps, Climate Maps, Rain Maps, Geology and Land Use. Watershed of study area has been determined on cloud using ready-hosted topology maps. After uploading all the datasets to systems, we have applied various GIS analysis and queries. Results shown that Cloud GIS technology brings velocity and efficiency for watershed management studies. Besides this, system can be easily implemented for similar land analysis and management studies.

  1. Security Problems in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Motawie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud is a pool of computing resources which are distributed among cloud users. Cloud computing has many benefits like scalability, flexibility, cost savings, reliability, maintenance and mobile accessibility. Since cloud-computing technology is growing day by day, it comes with many security problems. Securing the data in the cloud environment is most critical challenges which act as a barrier when implementing the cloud. There are many new concepts that cloud introduces, such as resource sharing, multi-tenancy, and outsourcing, create new challenges for the security community. In this work, we provide a comparable study of cloud computing privacy and security concerns. We identify and classify known security threats, cloud vulnerabilities, and attacks.

  2. Cloud screening Coastal Zone Color Scanner images using channel 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, B. A.; Simpson, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Clouds are removed from Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) data using channel 5. Instrumentation problems require pre-processing of channel 5 before an intelligent cloud-screening algorithm can be used. For example, at intervals of about 16 lines, the sensor records anomalously low radiances. Moreover, the calibration equation yields negative radiances when the sensor records zero counts, and pixels corrupted by electronic overshoot must also be excluded. The remaining pixels may then be used in conjunction with the procedure of Simpson and Humphrey to determine the CZCS cloud mask. These results plus in situ observations of phytoplankton pigment concentration show that pre-processing and proper cloud-screening of CZCS data are necessary for accurate satellite-derived pigment concentrations. This is especially true in the coastal margins, where pigment content is high and image distortion associated with electronic overshoot is also present. The pre-processing algorithm is critical to obtaining accurate global estimates of pigment from spacecraft data.

  3. Cloud type comparisons of AIRS, CloudSat, and CALIPSO cloud height and amount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Kahn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The precision of the two-layer cloud height fields derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS is explored and quantified for a five-day set of observations. Coincident profiles of vertical cloud structure by CloudSat, a 94 GHz profiling radar, and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO, are compared to AIRS for a wide range of cloud types. Bias and variability in cloud height differences are shown to have dependence on cloud type, height, and amount, as well as whether CloudSat or CALIPSO is used as the comparison standard. The CloudSat-AIRS biases and variability range from −4.3 to 0.5±1.2–3.6 km for all cloud types. Likewise, the CALIPSO-AIRS biases range from 0.6–3.0±1.2–3.6 km (−5.8 to −0.2±0.5–2.7 km for clouds ≥7 km (<7 km. The upper layer of AIRS has the greatest sensitivity to Altocumulus, Altostratus, Cirrus, Cumulonimbus, and Nimbostratus, whereas the lower layer has the greatest sensitivity to Cumulus and Stratocumulus. Although the bias and variability generally decrease with increasing cloud amount, the ability of AIRS to constrain cloud occurrence, height, and amount is demonstrated across all cloud types for many geophysical conditions. In particular, skill is demonstrated for thin Cirrus, as well as some Cumulus and Stratocumulus, cloud types infrared sounders typically struggle to quantify. Furthermore, some improvements in the AIRS Version 5 operational retrieval algorithm are demonstrated. However, limitations in AIRS cloud retrievals are also revealed, including the existence of spurious Cirrus near the tropopause and low cloud layers within Cumulonimbus and Nimbostratus clouds. Likely causes of spurious clouds are identified and the potential for further improvement is discussed.

  4. Mitigation: Decarbonization unique to cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nadine

    2017-10-01

    Strategies that reduce fossil-fuel use can achieve both global carbon mitigation and local health-protection goals. Now research shows the dual benefits of compact urban design and circular economy policies in Chinese cities.

  5. Tarague Interpretive Trail Mitigation Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welch, David

    2001-01-01

    ...), International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc. (lARfI) has prepared a mitigation plan for development of an interpretive trail at Tarague Beach, located on the north coast of the island of Guam (Fig. 1...

  6. Secure system for personal finances on the cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana i Vidal, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Este documento contiene la memoria de la realización del Trabajo Final de Máster que tiene como objetivo la creación de un Cloud para el almacenamiento de forma segura de las facturas electrónicas. This document contains the memory of the accomplishment of the final Project, which aims to create a Cloud for secure storage of the electronic invoices. Aquest document conté la memòria de la realització del Treball Final de Màster que té com a objectiu la creació d'un Cloud per a l'emmagatz...

  7. Mobile healthcare information management utilizing Cloud Computing and Android OS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charalampos; Pliakas, Thomas; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    Cloud Computing provides functionality for managing information data in a distributed, ubiquitous and pervasive manner supporting several platforms, systems and applications. This work presents the implementation of a mobile system that enables electronic healthcare data storage, update and retrieval using Cloud Computing. The mobile application is developed using Google's Android operating system and provides management of patient health records and medical images (supporting DICOM format and JPEG2000 coding). The developed system has been evaluated using the Amazon's S3 cloud service. This article summarizes the implementation details and presents initial results of the system in practice.

  8. Longitudinal and transverse dynamics of ions from residual gas in an electron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelin, A.; Bruni, C.; Radevych, D.

    2018-05-01

    The ion cloud produced from residual gas in an electron accelerator can degrade machine performances and produce instabilities. The ion dynamics in an accelerator is governed by the beam-ion interaction, magnetic fields and eventual mitigation strategies. Due to the fact that the beam has a nonuniform transverse size along its orbit, the ions move longitudinally and accumulate naturally at some points in the accelerator. In order to design effective mitigation strategies it is necessary to understand the ion dynamics not only in the transverse plane but also in the longitudinal direction. After introducing the physics behind the beam-ion interaction, we show how to get accumulation points for a realistic electron storage ring lattice. Simulations of the ion cloud dynamics, including the effect of magnetic fields on the ions, clearing electrodes and clearing gaps are shown. Longitudinal ion trapping due to the magnetic mirror effect in the dipole fringe fields is also detailed. Finally, the effectiveness of clearing electrode using longitudinal clearing fields is discussed and compared to clearing electrodes producing transverse field only.

  9. Methods of Mitigating Double Taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Lindhe, Tobias

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of existing methods of mitigating double taxation of corporate income within a standard cost of capital model. Two of the most well-known and most utilized methods, the imputation and the split rate systems, do not mitigate double taxation in corporations where the marginal investment is financed with retained earnings. However, all methods are effective when the marginal investment is financed with new share issues. The corporate tax rate, fiscal ...

  10. Counting the clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, David A

    2005-01-01

    Cloud processes are very important for the global circulation of the atmosphere. It is now possible, though very expensive, to simulate the global circulation of the atmosphere using a model with resolution fine enough to explicitly represent the larger individual clouds. An impressive preliminary calculation of this type has already been performed by Japanese scientists, using the Earth Simulator. Within the next few years, such global cloud-resolving models (GCRMs) will be applied to weather prediction, and later they will be used in climatechange simulations. The tremendous advantage of GCRMs, relative to conventional lowerresolution global models, is that GCRMs can avoid many of the questionable 'parameterizations' used to represent cloud effects in lower-resolution global models. Although cloud microphysics, turbulence, and radiation must still be parameterized in GCRMs, the high resolution of a GCRM simplifies these problems considerably, relative to conventional models. The United States currently has no project to develop a GCRM, although we have both the computer power and the expertise to do it. A research program aimed at development and applications of GCRMs is outlined

  11. Trust management in cloud services

    CERN Document Server

    Noor, Talal H; Bouguettaya, Athman

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the design and implementation of Cloud Armor, a novel approach for credibility-based trust management and automatic discovery of cloud services in distributed and highly dynamic environments. This book also helps cloud users to understand the difficulties of establishing trust in cloud computing and the best criteria for selecting a service cloud. The techniques have been validated by a prototype system implementation and experimental studies using a collection of real world trust feedbacks on cloud services.The authors present the design and implementation of a novel pro

  12. Scale analysis of convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Gryschka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The size distribution of cumulus clouds due to shallow and deep convection is analyzed using satellite pictures, LES model results and data from the German rain radar network. The size distributions found can be described by simple power laws as has also been proposed for other cloud data in the literature. As the observed precipitation at ground stations is finally determined by cloud numbers in an area and individual sizes and rain rates of single clouds, the cloud size distributions might be used for developing empirical precipitation forecasts or for validating results from cloud resolving models being introduced to routine weather forecasts.

  13. CloudBiz servicios integrales para pyme

    OpenAIRE

    Lincango Simbaña, Edison Javier; Rodríguez Soto, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    This thesis and research work focuses on developing a cloud application that aims to provide the electronic billing service and what we have termed as e-marketing (corporate website and centralized management of social networks) with the primary objective to provide technological tools to SMEs in Quito-Ecuador and provide advantages that allow them to achieve efficiency in their financial operations, providing accurate and timely information as well as advertising and promotional tools that e...

  14. Mitigating amphibian chytridiomycosis in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Trenton W. J.; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Muths, Erin L.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Weldon, Che; Fisher, Matthew C.; Bosch, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians across the planet face the threat of population decline and extirpation caused by the disease chytridiomycosis. Despite consensus that the fungal pathogens responsible for the disease are conservation issues, strategies to mitigate their impacts in the natural world are, at best, nascent. Reducing risk associated with the movement of amphibians, non-amphibian vectors and other sources of infection remains the first line of defence and a primary objective when mitigating the threat of disease in wildlife. Amphibian-associated chytridiomycete fungi and chytridiomycosis are already widespread, though, and we therefore focus on discussing options for mitigating the threats once disease emergence has occurred in wild amphibian populations. All strategies have shortcomings that need to be overcome before implementation, including stronger efforts towards understanding and addressing ethical and legal considerations. Even if these issues can be dealt with, all currently available approaches, or those under discussion, are unlikely to yield the desired conservation outcome of disease mitigation. The decision process for establishing mitigation strategies requires integrated thinking that assesses disease mitigation options critically and embeds them within more comprehensive strategies for the conservation of amphibian populations, communities and ecosystems.

  15. Moving HammerCloud to CERN's private cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Barrand, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    HammerCloud is a testing framework for the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. Currently deployed on about 20 hand-managed machines, it was desirable to move it to the Agile Infrastructure, CERN's OpenStack-based private cloud.

  16. Modeling of Cloud/Radiation Processes for Cirrus Cloud Formation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liou, K

    1997-01-01

    This technical report includes five reprints and pre-prints of papers associated with the modeling of cirrus cloud and radiation processes as well as remote sensing of cloud optical and microphysical...

  17. Cloud residues and interstitial aerosols from non-precipitating clouds over an industrial and urban area in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijun; Li, Peiren; Sun, Guode; Zhou, Shengzhen; Yuan, Qi; Wang, Wenxing

    2011-05-01

    Most studies of aerosol-cloud interactions have been conducted in remote locations; few have investigated the characterization of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over highly polluted urban and industrial areas. The present work, based on samples collected at Mt. Tai, a site in northern China affected by nearby urban and industrial air pollutant emissions, illuminates CCN properties in a polluted atmosphere. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to obtain the size, composition, and mixing state of individual cloud residues and interstitial aerosols. Most of the cloud residues displayed distinct rims which were found to consist of soluble organic matter (OM). Nearly all (91.7%) cloud residues were attributed to sulfate-related salts (the remainder was mostly coarse crustal dust particles with nitrate coatings). Half the salt particles were internally mixed with two or more refractory particles (e.g., soot, fly ash, crustal dust, CaSO 4, and OM). A comparison between cloud residues and interstitial particles shows that the former contained more salts and were of larger particle size than the latter. In addition, a somewhat high number scavenging ratio of 0.54 was observed during cloud formation. Therefore, the mixtures of salts with OMs account for most of the cloud-nucleating ability of the entire aerosol population in the polluted air of northern China. We advocate that both size and composition - the two influential, controlling factors for aerosol activation - should be built into all regional climate models of China.

  18. Tharsis Limb Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated image of Tharsis Limb Cloud 7 September 2005 This composite of red and blue Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired on 6 July 2005 shows an isolated water ice cloud extending more than 30 kilometers (more than 18 miles) above the martian surface. Clouds such as this are common in late spring over the terrain located southwest of the Arsia Mons volcano. Arsia Mons is the dark, oval feature near the limb, just to the left of the 'T' in the 'Tharsis Montes' label. The dark, nearly circular feature above the 'S' in 'Tharsis' is the volcano, Pavonis Mons, and the other dark circular feature, above and to the right of 's' in 'Montes,' is Ascraeus Mons. Illumination is from the left/lower left. Season: Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  19. Transition to the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedman, Jonas; Xiao, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The rising of cloud computing has dramatically changed the way software companies provide and distribute their IT product and related services over the last decades. Today, most software is bought offthe-shelf and distributed over the Internet. This transition is greatly influencing how software...... companies operate. In this paper, we present a case study of an ERP vendor for SMB (small and mediumsize business) in making a transition towards a cloud-based business model. Through the theoretical lens of ecosystem, we are able to analyze the evolution of the vendor and its business network as a whole......, and find that the relationship between vendor and Value-added-Reseller (VAR) is greatly affected. We conclude by presenting critical issues and challenges for managing such cloud transition....

  20. The photoevaporation of interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoldi, F.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of the photoevaporation of interstellar clouds and its consequences for the structure and evolution of H II regions are studied. An approximate analytical solution for the evolution of photoevaporating clouds is derived under the realistic assumption of axisymmetry. The effects of magnetic fields are taken into account in an approximate way. The evolution of a neutral cloud subjected to the ionizing radiation of an OB star has two distinct stages. When a cloud is first exposed to the radiation, the increase in pressure due to the ionization at the surface of the cloud leads to a radiation-driven implosion: an ionization front drives a shock into the cloud, ionizes part of it and compresses the remaining into a dense globule. The initial implosion is followed by an equilibrium cometary stage, in which the cloud maintains a semistationary comet-shaped configuration; it slowly evaporates while accelerating away from the ionizing star until the cloud has been completely ionized, reaches the edge of the H II region, or dies. Expressions are derived for the cloud mass-loss rate and acceleration. To investigate the effect of the cloud photoevaporation on the structure of H II regions, the evolution of an ensemble of clouds of a given mass distribution is studied. It is shown that the compressive effect of the ionizing radiation can induce star formation in clouds that were initially gravitationally stable, both for thermally and magnetically supported clouds

  1. Cloud Computing: A study of cloud architecture and its patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeep Handa,; Shriya Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet. Cloud computing is a paradigm shift following the shift from mainframe to client–server in the early 1980s. Cloud computing can be defined as accessing third party software and services on web and paying as per usage. It facilitates scalability and virtualized resources over Internet as a service providing cost effective and scalable solution to customers. Cloud computing has...

  2. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  3. Cloud Collaboration: Cloud-Based Instruction for Business Writing Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charlie; Yu, Wei-Chieh Wayne; Wang, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technologies, such as Google Docs, Adobe Creative Cloud, Dropbox, and Microsoft Windows Live, have become increasingly appreciated to the next generation digital learning tools. Cloud computing technologies encourage students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in their learning, facilitate group work, and support…

  4. Cloud blueprints for integrating and managing cloud federations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papazoglou, M.; Heisel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary cloud technologies face insurmountable obstacles. They follow a pull-based, producer-centric trajectory to development where cloud consumers have to ‘squeeze and bolt’ applications onto cloud APIs. They also introduce a monolithic SaaS/PaaS/IaaS stack where a one-size-fits-all mentality

  5. Opaque cloud detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskovensky, John K [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  6. Storm and cloud dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, William R

    1992-01-01

    This book focuses on the dynamics of clouds and of precipitating mesoscale meteorological systems. Clouds and precipitating mesoscale systems represent some of the most important and scientifically exciting weather systems in the world. These are the systems that produce torrential rains, severe winds including downburst and tornadoes, hail, thunder and lightning, and major snow storms. Forecasting such storms represents a major challenge since they are too small to be adequately resolved by conventional observing networks and numerical prediction models.Key Features* Key Highlight

  7. Detailed Information Security in Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Valerievich Ivonin

    2013-01-01

    The object of research in this article is technology of public clouds, structure and security system of clouds. Problems of information security in clouds are considered, elements of security system in public clouds are described.

  8. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  9. Relationships among cloud occurrence frequency, overlap, and effective thickness derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat merged cloud vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Rose, Fred G.; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    A cloud frequency of occurrence matrix is generated using merged cloud vertical profiles derived from the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and cloud profiling radar. The matrix contains vertical profiles of cloud occurrence frequency as a function of the uppermost cloud top. It is shown that the cloud fraction and uppermost cloud top vertical profiles can be related by a cloud overlap matrix when the correlation length of cloud occurrence, which is interpreted as an effective cloud thickness, is introduced. The underlying assumption in establishing the above relation is that cloud overlap approaches random overlap with increasing distance separating cloud layers and that the probability of deviating from random overlap decreases exponentially with distance. One month of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat data (July 2006) support these assumptions, although the correlation length sometimes increases with separation distance when the cloud top height is large. The data also show that the correlation length depends on cloud top hight and the maximum occurs when the cloud top height is 8 to 10 km. The cloud correlation length is equivalent to the decorrelation distance introduced by Hogan and Illingworth (2000) when cloud fractions of both layers in a two-cloud layer system are the same. The simple relationships derived in this study can be used to estimate the top-of-atmosphere irradiance difference caused by cloud fraction, uppermost cloud top, and cloud thickness vertical profile differences.

  10. Securing virtual and cloud environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carroll, M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available targets such as reduced costs, scalability, flexibility, capacity utilisation, higher efficiencies and mobility. Many of these benefits are achieved through the utilisation of technologies such as cloud computing and virtualisation. In many instances cloud...

  11. ECONOMIC DENIAL OF SUSTAINABILITY (EDOS ATTACK ON CLOUD – A SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Somasundaram

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a promising technology aims to provide reliable, customized and quality of service computation environments for cloud users in terms of Software as a Service-SaaS , Plat- form as a Service-PaaS and Infrastructure as Service-IaaS, which is provided on the pay per use basis. Cloud computing enables services to be deployed and accessed globally on demand with little maintenance by providing QoS as per service level agreement (SLA of customer. However, due to elasticity of resources, cloud systems are facing severe security problems. One of the most serious threats to cloud computing is EDoS (economic Distributed Denial of Service aims to consume the cloud resource by attacker and impose financial burden to the legitimate user, where integrity, availability and confidentiality of the cloud services are never compromised but affects the accountability which leads to inaccurate billing. Since the billing models of cloud services may not be mature enough to properly account for an EDoS attack. These paper surveys, the different techniques that generate, detect and mitigate the EDoS Attack on Cloud.

  12. Albeni Falls wildlife mitigation project: annual report of mitigation activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra-Burns, Mary

    2002-01-01

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres (∼4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002

  13. Efficient Resource Management in Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Rushikesh Shingade; Amit Patil; Shivam Suryawanshi; M. Venkatesan

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing, one of the widely used technology to provide cloud services for users who are charged for receiving services. In the aspect of a maximum number of resources, evaluating the performance of Cloud resource management policies are difficult to optimize efficiently. There are different simulation toolkits available for simulation and modelling the Cloud computing environment like GridSim CloudAnalyst, CloudSim, GreenCloud, CloudAuction etc. In proposed Efficient Resource Manage...

  14. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  15. Cloud Computing Security: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Issa; Khreishah, Abdallah; Azeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is an emerging technology paradigm that migrates current technological and computing concepts into utility-like solutions similar to electricity and water systems. Clouds bring out a wide range of benefits including configurable computing resources, economic savings, and service flexibility. However, security and privacy concerns are shown to be the primary obstacles to a wide adoption of clouds. The new concepts that clouds introduce, such as multi-tenancy, resource sharing a...

  16. Database security in the cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Sakhi, Imal

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to get an overview of the database services available in cloud computing environment, investigate the security risks associated with it and propose the possible countermeasures to minimize the risks. The thesis also analyzes two cloud database service providers namely; Amazon RDS and Xeround. The reason behind choosing these two providers is because they are currently amongst the leading cloud database providers and both provide relational cloud databases which makes ...

  17. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR CLOUD COMPUTING

    OpenAIRE

    Sumaira Aslam; Hina Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a greatest and latest thing. Marketers for lots of big companies are all using cloud computing terms in their marketing campaign to make them seem them impressive so, that they can get clients and customers. Cloud computing is overall the philosophy and design concept and it is much more complicated and yet much simpler. The basic underlined thing that cloud computing do is to separate the applications from operating systems from the software from the hardware that runs eve...

  18. Cloud services, networking, and management

    CERN Document Server

    da Fonseca, Nelson L S

    2015-01-01

    Cloud Services, Networking and Management provides a comprehensive overview of the cloud infrastructure and services, as well as their underlying management mechanisms, including data center virtualization and networking, cloud security and reliability, big data analytics, scientific and commercial applications. Special features of the book include: State-of-the-art content. Self-contained chapters for readers with specific interests. Includes commercial applications on Cloud (video services and games).

  19. Security Dynamics of Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Khaled M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores various dimensions of cloud computing security. It argues that security concerns of cloud computing need to be addressed from the perspective of individual stakeholder. Security focuses of cloud computing are essentially different in terms of its characteristics and business model. Conventional way of viewing as well as addressing security such as ‘bolting-in’ on the top of cloud computing may not work well. The paper attempts to portray the security spectrum necessary for...

  20. Green Cloud on the Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mufajjul

    This paper proposes a Green Cloud model for mobile Cloud computing. The proposed model leverage on the current trend of IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and SaaS (Software as a Service), and look at new paradigm called "Network as a Service" (NaaS). The Green Cloud model proposes various Telco's revenue generating streams and services with the CaaS (Cloud as a Service) for the near future.