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Sample records for electron binding energies

  1. Experimental electron binding energies for thulium in different matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Zbořil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 202, JUL (2015), s. 46-55 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004; GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Tm-169 * (169)yb * atomic environment * electron binding energy * chemical shift * natural atomic level width Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2015

  2. Influence of host matrices on krypton electron binding energies and KLL Auger transition energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Lee, B. Q.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Zhdanov, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 197, DEC (2014), s. 64-71 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896; GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Kr-83 * Rb-83 * Sr-83 * electron binding energy * KLL transitions * natural atomic level width * multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2014

  3. Lanthanide 4f-electron binding energies and the nephelauxetic effect in wide band gap compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenbos, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Employing data from luminescence spectroscopy, the inter 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy U(6, A) in Eu 2+/3+ impurities together with the 5d-centroid energy shift ϵ c (1,3+,A) in Ce 3+ impurities in 40 different fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, oxide, sulfide, and nitride compounds has been determined. This work demonstrates that the chemical environment A affects the two energies in a similar fashion; a fashion that follows the anion nephelauxetic sequence F, O, Cl, Br, N, I, S, Se. One may then calculate U(6, A) from well established and accurate ϵ c (1,3+,A) values which are then used as input to the chemical shift model proposed in Dorenbos (2012) [19]. As output it provides the chemical shift of 4f-electron binding energy and therewith the 4f-electron binding energy relative to the vacuum energy. In addition this method provides a tool to routinely establish the binding energy of electrons at the top of the valence band (work function) and the bottom of the conduction band (electron affinity) throughout the entire family of inorganic compounds. How the electronic structure of the compound and lanthanide impurities therein change with type of compound and type of lanthanide is demonstrated. -- Highlights: ► A relationship between 5d centroid shift and 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy is established. ► Information on the absolute 4f-electron binding energy of lanthanides in 40 compounds is provided. ► A new tool to determine absolute binding energies of electrons in valence and conduction bands is demonstrated

  4. Core electron binding energy shifts of AlBr3 and Al2Br6 vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Astrid M.; Plenge, Juergen; Leone, Stephen R.; Canton, Sophie E.; Rude, Bruce S.; Bozek, John D.

    2006-01-01

    The Al 2p and Br 3d inner-shell photoelectron spectra of aluminum tribromide monomer and dimer vapor were measured at 90 and 95 eV photon energy, respectively, to determine the core electron binding energies of the atoms in the two molecular species. While AlBr 3 has three identical Br atoms, Al 2 Br 6 exhibits four terminal and two bridging Br atoms. The species are identified by their distinct valence photoelectron spectra. Comparison of the observed Al 2p 1/2 and Al 2p 3/2 electron binding energies of AlBr 3 with those of Al 2 Br 6 shows that there is a chemical shift of (0.15 ± 0.03) eV to lower energy in the dimer. In Al 2 Br 6 , an assignment is proposed in which the Br 3d 3/2 and Br 3d 5/2 binding energies of terminal Br atoms are (1.18 ± 0.03) eV lower than those of bridging Br atoms. This assignment assumes that both types of Br atoms have similar cross-sections for ionization. With this result, the Br 3d 3/2 and Br 3d 5/2 binding energies of Br atoms in AlBr 3 are (0.81 ± 0.03) eV lower than those of bridging Br atoms of the dimer but (0.37 ± 0.03) eV higher than those of terminal Br atoms of the dimer. The obtained chemical shifts are considered in terms of the binding relations and electron density distributions in both molecules. Chemical shifts that are larger than a few hundred millielectron volts, as observed in the Al 2 Br 6 /AlBr 3 system, offer potential to study the dissociation dynamics of the dimer in a femtosecond visible or ultraviolet-pump/XUV-probe experiment

  5. Precision measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines and determination of neutron binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braumandl, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper first discusses the energy accuracy of the BILL conversion electron spectrometer at the Grenoble high flux reactor. With an improved temperature stabilisation of the magnets, an energy accuracy of ΔE/E -5 can be reached. After this, highly exact measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines of the 200 Hg, 114 Cd, 165 Dy, 168 Er, 239 U nuclei and the 13 C, 28 Al 3 H and 92 Zr photoelectron lines were carried out. Energy calibration of the spectrometer was carried out in the 1.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV range with intensive high-energy transitions of the 200 Hg nucleus. Systematic calibration errors could be investigated by means of combinations between the calibration lines. A calibration for absolute energies was obtained by comparing low-energy gamma transitions of 200 Hg with the 411.8 keV gold standard. (orig.) [de

  6. A study of core electron binding energies in technetium-99m complexes by internal conversion electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, J.F.; Archer, C.M.; Wei Chiu, K.; Latham, I.A.; Egdell, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Core electron binding energies in a series of 99m Tc complexes have been studied by internal conversion electron spectroscopy (ICES) in a conventional x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. In both 3d and 3p regions, a chemical shift of about 1 eV is observed per unit increase in oxidation state. The role of ICES in characterizing radiopharmaceutical agents is illustrated with studies of some novel 99m Tc-phosphine complexes that have been developed for myocardial perfusion imaging. (author)

  7. Energy spectrum of two-dimensional tight-binding electrons in a spatially varying magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, G.Y.; Lee, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic energy spectrum of a two-dimensional lattice in a spatially varying magnetic field is studied within the framework of the tight-binding model by using the scheme of the transfer matrix. It is found that, in comparison with the case of a uniform magnetic field, the energy spectrum exhibits more complicated behavior; band broadening (or gap closing) and band splitting (or gap opening) occur depending on characteristic parameters of the lattice. The origin of these phenomena lies in the existence of direct touching and indirect overlapping between neighboring subbands. Dependence of direct touching and indirect overlapping, and thus the electronic band structure together with the density of states, on characteristic parameters of the lattice is elucidated in detail. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Accurate core-electron binding energy shifts from density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahata, Yuji; Marques, Alberto Dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Current review covers description of density functional methods of calculation of accurate core-electron binding energy (CEBE) of second and third row atoms; applications of calculated CEBEs and CEBE shifts (ΔCEBEs) in elucidation of topics such as: hydrogen-bonding, peptide bond, polymers, DNA bases, Hammett substituent (σ) constants, inductive and resonance effects, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR), and solid state effect (WD). This review limits itself to works of mainly Chong and his coworkers for the period post-2002. It is not a fully comprehensive account of the current state of the art.

  9. Binding energies and chemical shifts of least bound core electron excitations in cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechstedt, F.; Enderlein, R.; Wischnewski, R.

    1981-01-01

    Core electron binding energies Esup(B) with respect to the vacuum level and their chemical shifts are calculated for the least bound core levels of cations and anions of cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors. Starting from the HF-binding energy of the free atom absolute values of Esup(B) are obtained by adding core level shifts and relaxation energies. Core level shifts are calculated by means of an electrostatic model with ionic and bond charges according to Phillips' bond charge model. For the calculation of relaxation energies the linear dielectric theory of electronic polarization is applied. Valence and core electrons, and diagonal and non-diagonal screening are taken into account. The theoretical results for chemical shifts of binding energies are compared with experimental values from XPS-measurements corrected by work function data. Good agreement is obtained in all cases within the error limit of about one eV. Chemical and atomic trends of core level shifts, relaxation energies, and binding energies are discussed in terms of changes of atomic and solid state parameters. Chemical shifts and relaxation energies are predicted for various ternary Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) compounds. (author)

  10. Electron momentum distributions and binding energies for the valence orbitals of hydrogen bromide and hydrogen iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, C.E.; McCarthy, I.E.; Suzuki, I.H.; Weigold, E.; Williams, G.R.J.; Bedford, K.L.; Kunz, A.B.; Weidman, R.

    1981-12-01

    The electron binding energy spectra and momentum distributions have been obtained for the valence orbitals of HBr and HI using noncoplanar symmetric electron coincidence spectroscopy at 1200eV. The weakly bonding inner valence ns orbitals, which have not been previously observed, have their spectroscopic (pole) strength severely split among a number of ion states. For HBr the strength of the main inner valence (ns) transition is 0.42 0.03 whereas for HI it is 0.37 0.04, in close agreement with that observed for the valence s orbitals of the corresponding isoelectronic inert gas atoms. The spectroscopic strength for the two outermost orbitals is found to be close to unity, in agreement with many body Green's function calculations. The measured momentum distributions are compared with several spherically averaged MO momentum distributions, as well as (for HBr) with a Green's function calculation of the generalized overlap amplitude (GOA). The GOA momentum distributions are in excellent agreement with the HBr data, both in shape and relative magnitude. Not all of the MO momentum distributions are in reasonable agreement with the data. Comparison is also made with the calculated momentum distributions for Kr, Br, Xe and I

  11. Core-electron binding energies from self-consistent field molecular orbital theory using a mixture of all-electron real atoms and valence-electron model atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, C.M.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The chemistry of large systems such as clusters may be readily investigated by valence-electron theories based on model potentials, but such an approach does not allow for the examination of core-electron binding energies which are commonly measured experimentally for such systems. Here we merge our previously developed Gaussian based valence-electron model potential theory with all-electron ab initio theory to allow for the calculation of core orbital binding energies when desired. For the atoms whose cores are to be examined, we use the real nuclear changes, all of the electrons, and the appropriate many-electron basis sets. For the rest of the system we use reduced nuclear charges, the Gaussian based model potentials, only the valence electrons, and appropriate valence-electron basis sets. Detailed results for neutral Al 2 are presented for the cases of all-electron, mixed real--model, and model--model SCF--MO calculations. Several different all-electron and valence electron calculations have been done to test the use of the model potential per se, as well as the effect of basis set choice. The results are in all cases in excellent agreement with one another. Based on these studies, a set of ''double-zeta'' valence and all-electron basis functions have been used for further SCF--MO studies on Al 3 , Al 4 , AlNO, and OAl 3 . For a variety of difference combinations of real and model atoms we find excellent agreement for relative total energies, orbital energies (both core and valence), and Mulliken atomic populations. Finally, direct core-hole-state ionic calculations are reported in detail for Al 2 and AlNO, and noted for Al 3 and Al 4 . Results for corresponding frozen-orbital energy differences, relaxed SCF--MO energy differences, and relaxation energies are in all cases in excellent agreement (never differing by more than 0.07 eV, usually by somewhat less). The study clearly demonstrates the accuracy of the mixed real--model theory

  12. Coordination-resolved local bond relaxation, electron binding-energy shift, and Debye temperature of Ir solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Yang, Xuexian [Department of Physics, Jishou University, Jishou, Hunan 416000 (China); Yang, Yezi [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Cohesive energy of the representative bond determines the core-level shift. • XPS derives the energy level of an isolated atom and its bulk shift. • XPS derives the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density. • Thermal XPS resolves the Debye temperature and atomic cohesive energy. - Abstract: Numerical reproduction of the measured 4f{sub 7/2} energy shift of Ir(1 0 0), (1 1 1), and (2 1 0) solid skins turns out the following: (i) the 4f{sub 7/2} level of an isolated Ir atom shifts from 56.367 eV to 60.332 eV by 3.965 eV upon bulk formation; (ii) the local energy density increases by up to 130% and the atomic cohesive energy decreases by 70% in the skin region compared with the bulk values. Numerical match to observation of the temperature dependent energy shift derives the Debye temperature that varies from 285.2 K (Surface) to 315.2 K (Bulk). We clarified that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms cause local densification and quantum entrapment of electron binding energy, which perturbs the Hamiltonian and the core shifts in the skin region.

  13. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. Ya.; Shpatakovskaya, G. V.

    2017-03-01

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas-Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electrons in an arbitrary atom.

  14. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, V. Ya. [Bruk Institute of Electronic Control Machines (Russian Federation); Shpatakovskaya, G. V., E-mail: shpagalya@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas–Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electrons in an arbitrary atom.

  15. Photodetachment of Isolated Bicarbonate Anion: Electron Binding Energy of HCO3-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue B.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2011-04-29

    We report the first direct photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy of HCO3 in the gas phase under low temperature conditions. The observed photoelectron spectra are complicated due to excitations of manifolds in both vibrational and electronic states. A long and single vibrational progression with a frequency of 530 ± 20 cm-1 is partially resolved in the threshold of the T=20 K, 266 nm spectrum. The adiabatic electron detachment energy (ADE) of HCO3, or in other words the electron affinity (EA) of neutral HCO3, is experimentally determined from the (0-0) transition to be 3.680 ± 0.015 eV. High-level ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of theory produce an anharmonic frequency of 546 cm-1 for HCO3 and a value of 3.62 eV for the (0,0) transition, both in excellent agreement with the experimentally determined values.

  16. Effects of the atomic environment on the electron binding energies in samarium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Vénos, Drahoslav; Yushkevich, Y. V.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Zhdanov, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 207, FEB (2016), s. 38-49 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896; GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Sm-149 * atomic environment * electron ginding energy * intermediate-valence state * chemical shift * natural atomic level width Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.661, year: 2016

  17. Coordination-resolved local bond contraction and electron binding-energy entrapment of Si atomic clusters and solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Zhang, Xi [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China)

    2014-04-14

    Consistency between x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density-function theory calculations confirms our bond order-length-strength notation-incorporated tight-binding theory predictions on the quantum entrapment of Si solid skin and atomic clusters. It has been revealed that bond-order deficiency shortens and strengthens the Si-Si bond, which results in the local densification and quantum entrapment of the core and valence electrons. Unifying Si clusters and Si(001) and (111) skins, this mechanism has led to quantification of the 2p binding energy of 96.089 eV for an isolated Si atom, and their bulk shifts of 2.461 eV. Findings evidence the significance of atomic undercoordination that is of great importance to device performance.

  18. Orbital momentum distribution and binding energies for the complete valence shell of molecular chlorine by electron momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.; Grisogono, A.M.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1986-10-01

    The complete valence shell binding energy spectrum (10-50 eV) of Cl 2 has been determined using electron momentum (binary (e,2e)) spectroscopy. The inner valence region, corresponding to 4σ u and 4σ g ionization, has been measured for the first time and shows extensive splitting of the ionization strength due to electron correlation effects. These measurements are compared with the results of many-body calculations using Green's function and CI methods employing unpolarised as well as polarised wave functions. Momentum distributions, measured in both the outer and inner valence regions, are compared with calculations using a range of unpolarised and polarised wave functions. Computed orbital density maps in momentum and position space for oriented Cl 2 molecules are discussed in comparison with the measured and calculated spherically averaged momentum distributions

  19. Photoelectron spectrum of valence anions of uracil and first-principles calculations of excess electron binding energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachorz, Rafał A; Klopper, Wim; Gutowski, Maciej; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2008-08-07

    The photoelectron spectrum (PES) of the uracil anion is reported and discussed from the perspective of quantum chemical calculations of the vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of the anions of various tautomers of uracil. The PES peak maximum is found at an electron binding energy of 2.4 eV, and the width of the main feature suggests that the parent anions are in a valence rather than a dipole-bound state. The canonical tautomer as well as four tautomers that result from proton transfer from an NH group to a C atom were investigated computationally. At the Hartree-Fock and second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory levels, the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) and the VDE have been converged to the limit of a complete basis set to within +/-1 meV. Post-MP2 electron-correlation effects have been determined at the coupled-cluster level of theory including single, double, and noniterative triple excitations. The quantum chemical calculations suggest that the most stable valence anion of uracil is the anion of a tautomer that results from a proton transfer from N1H to C5. It is characterized by an AEA of 135 meV and a VDE of 1.38 eV. The peak maximum is as much as 1 eV larger, however, and the photoelectron intensity is only very weak at 1.38 eV. The PES does not lend support either to the valence anion of the canonical tautomer, which is the second most stable anion, and whose VDE is computed at about 0.60 eV. Agreement between the peak maximum and the computed VDE is only found for the third most stable tautomer, which shows an AEA of approximately -0.1 eV and a VDE of 2.58 eV. This tautomer results from a proton transfer from N3H to C5. The results illustrate that the characteristics of biomolecular anions are highly dependent on their tautomeric form. If indeed the third most stable anion is observed in the experiment, then it remains an open question why and how this species is formed under the given conditions.

  20. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2015-04-28

    The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  1. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  2. The Bi{sup 3+} 6s and 6p electron binding energies in relation to the chemical environment of inorganic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awater, Roy H.P., E-mail: R.H.P.Awater@tudelft.nl; Dorenbos, Pieter

    2017-04-15

    This paper provides an overview and interpretation of the spectroscopic data of the Bi{sup 3+} activator ion in 117 different inorganic compounds. The energies of the metal-to-metal charge transfer and the interconfigurational transitions of Bi{sup 3+} were collected from the archival literature. Using these energies, in combination with the electron binding energies in the host conduction and valence band, the binding energies in the 6s ground state and 6p excited state were determined relative to the vacuum level. The locations of the Bi{sup 3+} energy levels within the forbidden gap of the host compound provides valuable insight in the physical properties of the Bi{sup 3+} activator ion in different compounds.

  3. Ce3+ 5d-centroid shift and vacuum referred 4f-electron binding energies of all lanthanide impurities in 150 different compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenbos, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    A review on the wavelengths of all five 4f–5d transitions for Ce 3+ in about 150 different inorganic compounds (fluorides, chlorides, bromides, iodides, oxides, sulfides, selenides, nitrides) is presented. It provides data on the centroid shift and the crystal field splitting of the 5d-configuration which are then used to estimate the Eu 2+ inter 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy U(6,A) in compound A. The four semi-empirical models (the redshift model, the centroid shift model, the charge transfer model, and the chemical shift model) on lanthanide levels that were developed past 12 years are briefly reviewed. It will be demonstrated how those models together with the collected data of this work and elsewhere can be united to construct schemes that contain the binding energy of electrons in the 4f and 5d states for each divalent and each trivalent lanthanide ion relative to the vacuum energy. As example the vacuum referred binding energy schemes for LaF 3 and La 2 O 3 will be constructed. - Highlights: ► An compilation on all five Ce 3+ 4f–5d energies in 150 inorganic compounds is presented. ► The relationship between the 5d centroid shift and host cation electronegativity id demonstrated. ► The electronic structure scheme of the lanthanides in La 2 O 3 and LaF 3 is presented.

  4. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang

    2015-04-28

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  5. Binding energies of cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parajuli, R.; Matt, S.; Scheier, P.; Echt, O.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    The binding energy of charged clusters may be measured by analyzing the kinetic energy released in the metastable decay of mass selected parent ions. Using finite heat bath theory to determine the binding energies of argon, neon, krypton, oxygen and nitrogen from their respective average kinetic energy released were carried out. A high-resolution double focussing two-sector mass spectrometer of reversed Nier-Johnson type geometry was used. MIKE ( mass-analysed ion kinetic energy) were measured to investigate decay reactions of mass-selected ions. For the inert gases neon (Ne n + ), argon (Ar n + ) and krypton (Kr n + ), it is found that the binding energies initially decrease with increasing size n and then level off at a value above the enthalpy of vaporization of the condensed phase. Oxygen cluster ions shown a characteristic dependence on cluster size (U-shape) indicating a change in the metastable fragmentation mechanism when going from the dimer to the decamer ion. (nevyjel)

  6. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, Mike, E-mail: m.n.gillard@leeds.ac.uk; Harland, Derek, E-mail: d.g.harland@leeds.ac.uk; Speight, Martin, E-mail: speight@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  7. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, Mike; Harland, Derek; Speight, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values

  8. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Gillard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  9. Quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics modeling of core-electron binding energies of methanol and methyl nitrite on Ag(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T; Li, X; Jänkälä, K; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2016-07-14

    We study a newly devised quantum mechanics capacitance molecular mechanics (QMCMM) method for the calculation of core-electron binding energies in the case of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. This yet untested methodology is applied to systems with monolayer of methanol/methyl nitrite on an Ag(111) surface at 100 K temperature. It was found out that the studied C, N, and O 1s core-hole energies converge very slowly as a function of the radius of the metallic cluster, which was ascribed to build up of positive charge on the edge of the Ag slab. Further analysis revealed that an extrapolation process can be used to obtain binding energies that deviated less than 0.5 eV against experiments, except in the case of methanol O 1s where the difference was as large as 1.8 eV. Additional QM-cluster calculations suggest that the latter error can be connected to the lack of charge transfer over the QM-CMM boundary. Thus, the results indicate that the QMCMM and QM-cluster methods can complement each other in a holistic picture of molecule-adsorbate core-ionization studies, where all types of intermolecular interactions are considered.

  10. Triazatriangulene as binding group for molecular electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Zhongming; Wang, Xintai; Borges, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The triazatriangulene (TATA) ring system was investigated as a binding group for tunnel junctions of molecular wires on gold surfaces. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of TATA platforms with three different lengths of phenylene wires were fabricated, and their electrical conductance was recorded ...... with its high stability and directionality make this binding group very attractive for molecular electronic measurements and devices. (Figure Presented)....

  11. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of photoelectron spectra: the carbon 1s core-electron binding energies of ethanol-water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T; Niskanen, J; Jänkälä, K; Vahtras, O; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2014-11-20

    Using ethanol-water solutions as illustration, we demonstrate the capability of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) paradigm to simulate core photoelectron spectroscopy: the binding energies and the chemical shifts. An integrated approach with QM/MM binding energy calculations coupled to preceding molecular dynamics sampling is adopted to generate binding energies averaged over the solute-solvent configurations available at a particular temperature and pressure and thus allowing for a statistical assessment with confidence levels for the final binding energies. The results are analyzed in terms of the contributions in the molecular mechanics model-electrostatic, polarization, and van der Waals-with atom or bond granulation of the corresponding MM charge and polarizability force-fields. The role of extramolecular charge transfer screening of the core-hole and explicit hydrogen bonding is studied by extending the QM core to cover the first solvation shell. The results are compared to those obtained from pure electrostatic and polarizable continuum models. Particularly, the dependence of the carbon 1s binding energies with respect to the ethanol concentration is studied. Our results indicate that QM/MM can be used as an all-encompassing model to study photoelectron binding energies and chemical shifts in solvent environments.

  12. Auroral electron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, D.J.; Duncan, C.N.; Montalbetti, R.

    1981-01-01

    Auroral electron characteristic energies determined from ground-based photometer measurements of the ratio of 5577 A OI and 4278 A N 2 + emissions are compared with electron energies measured during two rocket flights into pulsating aurora. Electron spectra with Maxwellian energy distributions were observed in both flights with an increase in characteristic energy during each pulsation. During the first flight on February 15, 1980 values of E 0 ranging from 1.4 keV at pulsation minima to 1.8 keV at pulsation maxima were inferred from the 5577/4278 ratios, in good agreement with rocket measurements. During the second flight on February 23, direct electron energy measurements yielded E 0 values of 1.8 keV rising to 2.1 keV at pulsation maxima. The photometric ratio measurements in this case gave inferred E 0 values about 0.5 keV lower. This apparent discrepancy is considered due to cloud cover which impaired the absolute emission intensity measurements. It is concluded that the 5577/4278 ratio does yield a meaningful measure of the characteristic energy of incoming electrons. This ratio technique, when added to the more sensitive 6300/4278 ratio technique usable in stable auroras can now provide more complete monitoring of electron influx characteristics. (auth)

  13. Predicting accurate absolute binding energies in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Halborg

    2015-01-01

    Recent predictions of absolute binding free energies of host-guest complexes in aqueous solution using electronic structure theory have been encouraging for some systems, while other systems remain problematic. In this paper I summarize some of the many factors that could easily contribute 1-3 kcal......-represented by continuum models. While I focus on binding free energies in aqueous solution the approach also applies (with minor adjustments) to any free energy difference such as conformational or reaction free energy differences or activation free energies in any solvent....

  14. Exciton binding energy in a pyramidal quantum dot

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ANITHA

    2018-03-27

    Mar 27, 2018 ... screening function on exciton binding energy in a pyramid-shaped quantum dot of ... tures may generate unique properties and they show .... where Ee is the ground-state energy of the electron in ... Figure 1. The geometry of the pyramidal quantum dot. base and H is the height of the pyramid which is taken.

  15. P-shell hyperon binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetsier, D.; Amos, K.

    1991-01-01

    A shell model for lambda hypernuclei has been used to determine the binding energy of the hyperon in nuclei throughout the p shell. Conventional (Cohen and Kurath) potential energies for nucleon-nucleon interactions were used with hyperon-nucleon interactions taken from Nijmegen one boson exchange potentials. The hyperon binding energies calculated from these potentials compare well with measured values. 7 refs., 2 figs

  16. Alternate Energy Sources for Thermalplastic Binding Agent Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate microwave and electron beam technologies as alternate energy sources to consolidate fiber coated with a thermoplastic binding agent into preforms for composite molding applications. Bench experiments showed that both microwave and electron beam energy can produce heat sufficient to melt and consolidate a thermoplastic binding agent applied to fiberglass mat, and several two- and three-dimensional fiberglass preforms were produced with each method. In both cases, it is postulated that the heating was accomplished by the effective interaction of the microwave or electron beam energy with the combination of the mat preform and the tooling used to shape the preform. Both methods contrast with conventional thermal energy applied via infrared heaters or from a heated tool in which the heat to melt the thermoplastic binding agent must diffuse over time from the outer surface of the preform toward its center under a thermal gradient. For these reasons, the microwave and electron beam energy techniques have the potential to rapidly consolidate thick fiber preforms more efficiently than the thermal process. With further development, both technologies have the potential to make preform production more cost effective by decreasing cycle time in the preform tool, reducing energy costs, and by enabling the use of less expensive tooling materials. Descriptions of the microwave and electron beam consolidation experiments and a summary of the results are presented in this report.

  17. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-03-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 +/- 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone.

  18. Electron energies in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, G.D.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    The modern era of electron-electron interactions began a decade ago. Plummer's group initiated a program of using angular resolved photoemission to examine the band structure of the simple metals. Beginning with aluminum, and carrying on to sodium and potassium, they always found that the occupied energy bands were much narrower than expected. For example, the compressed energy bands for metallic potassium suggest a band effective mass of m* = 1.33m e . This should be compared to the band mass found from optical conductivity m*/m e = 1.01 ± 0.01. The discrepancy between these results is startling. It was this great difference which started my group doing calculations. Our program was two-fold. On one hand, we reanalyzed the experimental data, in order to see if Plummer's result was an experimental artifact. On the other hand, we completely redid the electron-electron self-energy calculations for simple metals, using the most modern choices of local-field corrections and vertex corrections. Our results will be reported in these lectures. They can be summarized as following: Our calculations give the same effective masses as the older calculations, so the theory is relatively unchanged; Our analysis of the experiments suggests that the recent measurements of band narrowing are an experimental artifact. 38 refs., 9 figs

  19. Measuring Intermolecular Binding Energies by Laser Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmuss, Richard; Maity, Surajit; Féraud, Géraldine; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2017-02-22

    The ground-state dissociation energy, D0(S0), of isolated intermolecular complexes in the gas phase is a fundamental measure of the interaction strength between the molecules. We have developed a three-laser, triply resonant pump-dump-probe technique to measure dissociation energies of jet-cooled M•S complexes, where M is an aromatic chromophore and S is a closed-shell 'solvent' molecule. Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) via the S0→S1 electronic transition is used to precisely 'warm' the complex by populating high vibrational levels v" of the S0 state. If the deposited energy E(v") is less than D0(S0), the complex remains intact, and is then mass- and isomer-selectively detected by resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) with a third (probe) laser. If the pumped level is above D0(S0), the hot complex dissociates and the probe signal disappears. Combining the fluorescence or SEP spectrum of the cold complex with the SEP breakoff of the hot complex brackets D0(S0). The UV chromophores 1-naphthol and carbazole were employed; these bind either dispersively via the aromatic rings, or form a hydrogen bond via the -OH or -NH group. Dissociation energies have been measured for dispersively bound complexes with noble gases (Ne, Kr, Ar, Xe), diatomics (N2, CO), alkanes (methane to n-butane), cycloalkanes (cyclopropane to cycloheptane), and unsaturated compounds (ethene, benzene). Hydrogen-bond dissociation energies have been measured for H2O, D2O, methanol, ethanol, ethers (oxirane, oxetane), NH3 and ND3.

  20. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  1. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the {Lambda} single-particle energy in terms of basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body {Lambda}NN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei.

  2. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1996-01-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the Λ single-particle energy in terms of basic Λ-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body ΛNN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei

  3. Probing ionization potential, electron affinity and self-energy effect on the spectral shape and exciton binding energy of quantum liquid water with self-consistent many-body perturbation theory and the Bethe–Salpeter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    An accurate theoretical prediction of ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) is key in understanding complex photochemical processes in aqueous environments. There have been numerous efforts in literature to accurately predict IP and EA of liquid water, however with often conflicting results depending on the level of theory and the underlying water structures. In a recent study based on hybrid-non-self-consistent many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) Gaiduk et al (2018 Nat. Commun. 9 247) predicted an IP of 10.2 eV and EA of 0.2 eV, resulting in an electronic band gap (i.e. electronic gap (IP-EA) as measured by photoelectron spectroscopy) of about 10 eV, redefining the widely cited experimental gap of 8.7 eV in literature. In the present work, we show that GW self-consistency and an implicit vertex correction in MBPT considerably affect recently reported EA values by Gaiduk et al (2018 Nat. Commun. 9 247) by about 1 eV. Furthermore, the choice of pseudo-potential is critical for an accurate determination of the absolute band positions. Consequently, the self-consistent GW approach with an implicit vertex correction based on projector augmented wave (PAW) method on top of quantum water structures predicts an IP of 10.2, an EA of 1.1, a fundamental gap of 9.1 eV and an exciton binding (Eb) energy of 0.9 eV for the first absorption band of liquid water via the Bethe–Salpeter equation (BSE). Only within such a self-consistent approach a simultanously accurate prediction of IP, EA, Eg, Eb is possible.

  4. Binding of two-electron metastable states in semiconductor quantum dots under a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagiola, Mariano; Pont, Federico M.; Osenda, Omar

    2018-04-01

    Applying a strong enough magnetic field results in the binding of few-electron resonant states. The mechanism was proposed many years ago but its verification in laboratory conditions is far more recent. In this work we study the binding of two-electron resonant states. The electrons are confined in a cylindrical quantum dot which is embedded in a semiconductor wire. The geometry considered is similar to the one used in actual experimental setups. The low-energy two-electron spectrum is calculated numerically from an effective-mass approximation Hamiltonian modelling the system. Methods for binding threshold calculations in systems with one and two electrons are thoroughly studied; in particular, we use quantum information quantities to assess when the strong lateral confinement approximation can be used to obtain reliable low-energy spectra. For simplicity, only cases without bound states in the absence of an external field are considered. Under these conditions, the binding threshold for the one-electron case is given by the lowest Landau energy level. Moreover, the energy of the one-electron bounded resonance can be used to obtain the two-electron binding threshold. It is shown that for realistic values of the two-electron model parameters it is feasible to bind resonances with field strengths of a few tens of tesla.

  5. Binding Energy and Equilibrium of Compact Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the existence of a limit mass for compact astronomic ob- jects requires the solution of the Einstein’s equations of g eneral relativity together with an appropriate equation of state. Analytical solutions exi st in some special cases like the spherically symmetric static object without energy sou rces that is here considered. Solutions, i.e. the spacetime metrics, can have a singular m athematical form (the so called Schwarzschild metric due to Hilbert or a nonsingula r form (original work of Schwarzschild. The former predicts a limit mass and, conse quently, the existence of black holes above this limit. Here it is shown that, the origi nal Schwarzschild met- ric permits compact objects, without mass limit, having rea sonable values for central density and pressure. The lack of a limit mass is also demonst rated analytically just imposing reasonable conditions on the energy-matter densi ty, of positivity and decreas- ing with radius. Finally the ratio between proper mass and to tal mass tends to 2 for high values of mass so that the binding energy reaches the lim it m (total mass seen by a distant observer. As it is known the negative binding energ y reduces the gravitational mass of the object; the limit of m for the binding energy provides a mechanism for stable equilibrium of any amount of mass to contrast the gravitatio nal collapse.

  6. electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egerton, R.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The physical and chemical properties of materials can be studied by considering the energy that electrons use as they travel through a solid, often in conjunction with other analytical techniques. The technique is often combined with electron diffraction and high-resolution imaging and can be used to provide elemental identification down to the atomic scale. 6 figs

  7. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egerton, R.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article discusses electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The physical and chemical properties of materials can be studied by considering the energy that electrons use as they travel through a solid, often in conjunction with other analytical techniques. The technique is often combined with electron diffraction and high-resolution imaging and can be used to provide elemental identification down to the atomic scale. (UK)

  8. Charge compensation and binding energy referencing in XPS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metson, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The past decade has seen a number of significant advances in the capabilities of commercial X-ray Photoelectron spectrometers. Of note have been the near universal adoption of monochromatised X-ray sources, very useful advances in spatial resolution, particularly in spectroscopy, and radical developments in sample handling and automation. However one of the most significant advances has been the development of several relatively new concepts in charge compensation. Throughout the evolution of XPS, the ability to compensate for surface charging and accurately determine binding energies, particularly with electrically inhomogenous samples, has remained one of the most intractable problems. Beginning perhaps with the Kratos, 'in the lens' electrostatic mirror/electron source coupled with a magnetic snorkel lens, a number of concepts have been advanced which take a quite different conceptual approach to charge compensation. They differ in a number of quite fundamental ways to the electron flood type compensators widely used and absolutely essential with instruments based on monochromatised sources. The concept of the local return of secondary electrons to their point of emission, largely negates the problems associated with differential charging across different regions of the surface, and suggests the possibility of overcoming one of the central limitations of XPS, that is the inability to compare absolute binding energies of species in different electrical as well as chemical environments. The general status of charge compensation and the use of internal binding energy references in XPS will be reviewed, along with some practical examples of where these techniques work, and where there is clearly still room for further development. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  9. Measurement of Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bairen; Cui, Xiaodong

    Excitonic effects are prominent in monolayer crystal of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) because of spatial confinement and reduced Coulomb screening. Here we use linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE) to measure the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2. Peaks for excitonic absorptions of the direct gap located at K valley of the Brillouin zone and transitions from multiple points near Γ point of the Brillouin zone, as well as trion side band are shown in the linear absorption spectra of WS2. But there is no gap between distinct excitons and the continuum of the interband transitions. Strong electron-phonon scattering, overlap of excitons around Γ point and the transfer of the oscillator strength from interband continuum to exciton states make it difficult to resolve the electronic interband transition edge even down to 10K. The gap between excited states of the band-edge exciton and the single-particle band is probed by TP-PLE measurements. And the energy difference between 1s exciton and the single-particle gap gives the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 to be about 0.71eV. The work is supported by Area of excellency (AoE/P-04/08), CRF of Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU9/CRF/13G) and SRT on New Materials of The University of Hong Kong.

  10. First calculation of the deuteron binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaegger, B.

    2012-01-01

    No universal constant characterizing the nuclear force has yet been found as for gravity and electromagnetism. The neutron is globally neutral with a zero net charge. The charges contained in a neutron may be separated by the electric field of a nearby proton and therefore being attracted by electrostatic induction in the same way as a rubbed plastic pen attracts small pieces of paper. There is also a magnetic force that may repel the nucleons like magnets in the proper relative orientation. In the deuteron, the heavy hydrogen nucleus, the induced electrostatic attraction is equilibrated by the magnetic repulsion between the opposite and colinear moments of the nucleons. Equilibrium is calculated by minimizing the electromagnetic interaction potential, giving a binding energy of 1.6 MeV, not much lower than the experimental value, 2.2 MeV. No fitting parameter is used: it is a true ab initio calculation

  11. Fitting theories of nuclear binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G.F.; Sabbey, B.; Uusnaekki, M.

    2005-01-01

    In developing theories of nuclear binding energy such as density-functional theory, the effort required to make a fit can be daunting because of the large number of parameters that may be in the theory and the large number of nuclei in the mass table. For theories based on the Skyrme interaction, the effort can be reduced considerably by using the singular value decomposition to reduce the size of the parameter space. We find that the sensitive parameters define a space of dimension four or so, and within this space a linear refit is adequate for a number of Skyrme parameters sets from the literature. We find no marked differences in the quality of the fit among the SLy4, the BSk4, and SkP parameter sets. The root-mean-square residual error in even-even nuclei is about 1.5 MeV, half the value of the liquid drop model. We also discuss an alternative norm for evaluating mass fits, the Chebyshev norm. It focuses attention on the cases with the largest discrepancies between theory and experiment. We show how it works with the liquid drop model and make some applications to models based on Skyrme energy functionals. The Chebyshev norm seems to be more sensitive to new experimental data than the root-mean-square norm. The method also has the advantage that candidate improvements to the theories can be assessed with computations on smaller sets of nuclei

  12. Cation Binding to Xanthorhodopsin: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Magnetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky Koganov, Elena; Leitus, Gregory; Rozin, Rinat; Weiner, Lev; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai

    2017-05-04

    Xanthorhodopsin (xR) is a member of the retinal protein family and acts as a proton pump in the cell membranes of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber. In addition to the retinal chromophore, xR contains a carotenoid, which acts as a light-harvesting antenna as it transfers 40% of the quanta it absorbs to the retinal. Our previous studies have shown that the CD and absorption spectra of xR are dramatically affected due to the protonation of two different residues. It is still unclear whether xR can bind cations. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy used in the present study revealed that xR can bind divalent cations, such as Mn 2+ and Ca 2+ , to deionized xR (DI-xR). We also demonstrate that xR can bind 1 equiv of Mn 2+ to a high-affinity binding site followed by binding of ∼40 equiv in cooperative manner and ∼100 equiv of Mn 2+ that are weakly bound. SQUID magnetic studies suggest that the high cooperative binding of Mn 2+ cations to xR is due to the formation of Mn 2+ clusters. Our data demonstrate that Ca 2+ cations bind to DI-xR with a lower affinity than Mn 2+ , supporting the assumption that binding of Mn 2+ occurs through cluster formation, because Ca 2+ cations cannot form clusters in contrast to Mn 2+ .

  13. Binding-energy distribution and dephasing of localized biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Umlauff, M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the binding energy and dephasing of localized biexciton states in narrow ZnSe multiple quantum wells. The measured binding-energy distribution of the localized biexcitons shows a width of 2.2 meV centered at 8.5 meV, and is fairly independent of the exciton localization energy. In fo...

  14. Conformational Transitions and Convergence of Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) is employed to compute the standard binding free energies of a series of ligands to a FK506 binding protein (FKBP12) with implicit solvation. Binding free energy estimates are in reasonably good agreement with experimental affinities. The conformations of the complexes identified by the simulations are in good agreement with crystallographic data, which was not used to restrain ligand orientations. The BEDAM method is based on λ -hopping Hamiltonian parallel Replica Exchange (HREM) molecular dynamics conformational sampling, the OPLS-AA/AGBNP2 effective potential, and multi-state free energy estimators (MBAR). Achieving converged and accurate results depends on all of these elements of the calculation. Convergence of the binding free energy is tied to the level of convergence of binding energy distributions at critical intermediate states where bound and unbound states are at equilibrium, and where the rate of binding/unbinding conformational transitions is maximal. This finding mirrors similar observations in the context of order/disorder transitions as for example in protein folding. Insights concerning the physical mechanism of ligand binding and unbinding are obtained. Convergence for the largest FK506 ligand is achieved only after imposing strict conformational restraints, which however require accurate prior structural knowledge of the structure of the complex. The analytical AGBNP2 model is found to underestimate the magnitude of the hydrophobic driving force towards binding in these systems characterized by loosely packed protein-ligand binding interfaces. Rescoring of the binding energies using a numerical surface area model corrects this deficiency. This study illustrates the complex interplay between energy models, exploration of conformational space, and free energy estimators needed to obtain robust estimates from binding free energy calculations. PMID:22368530

  15. Implicit ligand theory for relative binding free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Minh, David D. L.

    2018-03-01

    Implicit ligand theory enables noncovalent binding free energies to be calculated based on an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF)—the binding free energy between a flexible ligand and rigid receptor—over a precomputed ensemble of receptor configurations. In the original formalism, receptor configurations were drawn from or reweighted to the apo ensemble. Here we show that BPMFs averaged over a holo ensemble yield binding free energies relative to the reference ligand that specifies the ensemble. When using receptor snapshots from an alchemical simulation with a single ligand, the new statistical estimator outperforms the original.

  16. High energy polarized electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossmanith, R.

    1987-01-01

    In nearly all high energy electron storage rings the effect of beam polarization by synchrotron radiation has been measured. The buildup time for polarization in storage rings is of the order of 10 6 to 10 7 revolutions; the spins must remain aligned over this time in order to avoid depolarization. Even extremely small spin deviations per revolution can add up and cause depolarization. The injection and the acceleration of polarized electrons in linacs is much easier. Although some improvements are still necessary, reliable polarized electron sources with sufficiently high intensity and polarization are available. With the linac-type machines SLC at Stanford and CEBAF in Virginia, experiments with polarized electrons will be possible

  17. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  18. Perturbation method for calculating impurity binding energy in an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nilanjan Sil

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... Abstract. In the present paper, we have studied the binding energy of the shallow donor hydrogenic impurity, which is confined in an inhomogeneous cylindrical quantum dot (CQD) of GaAs-AlxGa1−xAs. Perturbation method is used to calculate the binding energy within the framework of effective mass ...

  19. Extrapolations of nuclear binding energies from new linear mass relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, D.; Jensen, A. S.; Riisager, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to extrapolate nuclear binding energies from known values for neighboring nuclei. We select four specific mass relations constructed to eliminate smooth variation of the binding energy as function nucleon numbers. The fast odd-even variations are avoided by comparing nuclei...

  20. Transport Gap and exciton binding energy determination in organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Stefan; Schoell, Achim; Reinert, Friedrich; Umbach, Eberhard [University of Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimental Physics II; Casu, Benedetta [Inst. f. Physik. u. Theor. Chemie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The transport gap of an organic semiconductor is defined as the energy difference between the HOMO and LUMO levels in the presence of a hole or electron, respectively, after relaxation has occurred. Its knowledge is mandatory for the optimisation of electronic devices based on these materials. UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES) are routinely applied to measure these molecular levels. However, the precise determination of the transport gap on the basis of the respective data is not an easy task. It involves fundamental questions about the properties of organic molecules and their condensates, about their reaction on the experimental probe, and on the evaluation of the spectroscopic data. In particular electronic relaxation processes, which occur on the time scale of the photo excitation, have to be considered adequately. We determined the transport gap for the organic semiconductors PTCDA, Alq3, DIP, CuPc, and PBI-H4. After careful data analysis and comparison to the respective values for the optical gap we obtain values for the exciton binding energies between 0.1-0.5 eV. This is considerably smaller than commonly believed and indicates a significant delocalisation of the excitonic charge over various molecular units.

  1. On binding energy of trions in bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2018-03-01

    We study the negatively T- and positively T+ charged trions in bulk materials in the effective mass approximation within the framework of a potential model. The binding energies of trions in various semiconductors are calculated by employing Faddeev equation in configuration space. Results of calculations of the binding energies for T- are consistent with previous computational studies and are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements, while the T+ is unbound for all considered cases. The mechanism of formation of the binding energy of trions is analyzed by comparing contributions of a mass-polarization term related to kinetic energy operators and a term related to the Coulomb repulsion of identical particles.

  2. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  3. Magnetic energy analyser for slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limberg, W.

    1974-08-01

    A differential spectrometer with high time and energy resolution has been developed using the principle of energy analysis with a longitudinal homogeneous magnetic field. This way it is possible to measure the energy distribution of low energy electrons (eV-range) in the presence of high energy electrons without distortions by secondary electrons. The functioning and application of the analyzer is demonstrated by measuring the energy distributions of slow electrons emitted by a filament. (orig.) [de

  4. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  5. K-shell x-ray production cross sections of selected elements Al to Ni for 4. 0 to 38. 0 MeV /sup 10/B ions. [Cross sections, 4. 0 to 38 MeV, binding energy, electron capture decay, PWBA, energy shifts, multiple ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monigold, G.; McDaniel, F.D.; Duggan, J.L.; Mehta, R.; Rice, R.; Miller, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    K-Shell x-ray production cross sections for the target elements Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni were measured for incident /sup 10/B ions over the energy range 4.0 to 38.0 MeV. The cross section data were compared to the theoretical predictions of the binary encounter approximation (BEA); the plane wave born approximation (PWBA); and the PWBA modified to include corrections for increased binding energy (B), Coulomb deflection of the incident ion (C), orbital perturbation due to polarization (P), and relativistic effects (R). In addition, fluorescence yield variations (W/sub K/) and contributions to the cross sections from electron capture (EC) were included. It was found that the predictions of the fully modified PWBA with contributions from electron capture and fluorescence yield variations included provided the best fit to the experimental data over the entire energy range for each target element. The K..beta../K..cap alpha.. x-ray intensity ratios were compared to theoretical values that assume single hole ionization, and the x-ray energy shifts presented as a function of the energy of the incident ion. These two measurements provided confirmation of the occurrence of multiple ionization for /sup 10/B bombardment of target elements in the range 21 less than or equal to Z/sub 2/ less than or equal to 28.

  6. Using the fast fourier transform in binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Minh, David D L

    2018-04-30

    According to implicit ligand theory, the standard binding free energy is an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF), an exponential average of the interaction energy between the unbound ligand ensemble and a rigid receptor. Here, we use the fast Fourier transform (FFT) to efficiently evaluate BPMFs by calculating interaction energies when rigid ligand configurations from the unbound ensemble are discretely translated across rigid receptor conformations. Results for standard binding free energies between T4 lysozyme and 141 small organic molecules are in good agreement with previous alchemical calculations based on (1) a flexible complex ( R≈0.9 for 24 systems) and (2) flexible ligand with multiple rigid receptor configurations ( R≈0.8 for 141 systems). While the FFT is routinely used for molecular docking, to our knowledge this is the first time that the algorithm has been used for rigorous binding free energy calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  8. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yongling; Bo, Maolin; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yonghui; Sun, Chang Q.; Huang, Yongli

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O"2"− lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta"+ electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta"+; the sp"3-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent insight into the

  9. Electron Energy Level Statistics in Graphene Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Katsnellson, M. I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations of size quantization of electron energy levels in graphene quantum dots [7] we investigate the level statistics in the simplest tight-binding model for different dot shapes by computer simulation. The results are in a reasonable agreement with the

  10. Electron Linacs for High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Perry B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce some of the basic physical principles underlying the operation of electron linear accelerators (electron linacs). Electron linacs have applications ranging from linacs with an energy of a few MeV, such that the electrons are approximately relativistic, to future electron-positron linear colliders having a collision energy in the several-TeV energy range. For the most part, only the main accelerating linac is treated in this article.

  11. Orbital momentum profiles and binding energy spectra for the complete valence shell of molecular fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.; Brion, C.E.; Brunger, M.J.; Zhao, K.; Grisogono, A.M.; Braidwood, S.; Weigold, E.; Chakravorty, S.J.; Davidson, E.R.; Sgamellotti, A.; von Niessen, W.

    1996-01-01

    The first electronic structural study of the complete valence shell binding energy spectrum of molecular fluorine, encompassing both the outer and inner valence regions, is reported. These binding energy spectra as well as the individual orbital momentum profiles have been measured using an energy dispersive multichannel electron momentum spectrometer at a total energy of 1500 eV, with an energy resolution of 1.5 eV and a momentum resolution of 0.1 a.u. The measured binding energy spectra in the energy range of 14-60 eV are compared with the results of ADC(4) many-body Green's function and also direct-Configuration Interaction (CI) and MRSD-CI calculations. The experimental orbital electron momentum profiles are compared with SCF theoretical profiles calculated using the target Hartree-Fock approximation with a range of basis sets and with Density Functional Theory predictions in the target Kohn-Sham approximation with non-local potentials. The truncated (aug-cc-pv5z) Dunning basis sets were used for the Density Functional Theory calculations which also include some treatment of correlation via the exchange and correlation potentials. Comparisons are also made with the full ion-neutral overlap amplitude calculated with MRSD-CI wave functions. Large, saturated basis sets (199-GTO) were employed for both the high level SCF near Hartree-Fock limit and MRSD-CI calculations to investigate the effects of electron correlation and relaxation. 66 refs., 9 tabs., 9 figs

  12. Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The research in the Power Electronics, Energy Harvesting and Renewable Energies Laboratory (PEHREL) is mainly focused on investigation, modeling, simulation, design,...

  13. Simple method for determining binding energies of fullerene and complex atomic negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred

    2017-04-01

    A robust potential which embeds fully the vital core polarization interaction has been used in the Regge pole method to explore low-energy electron scattering from C60, Eu and Nb through the total cross sections (TCSs) calculations. From the characteristic dramatically sharp resonances in the TCSs manifesting negative ion formation in these systems, we extracted the binding energies for the C60, Euand Nbanions they are found to be in outstanding agreement with the measured electron affinities of C60, Eu and Nb. Common among these considered systems, including the standard atomic Au is the formation of their ground state negative ions at the second Ramsauer-Townsend (R-T) minima of their TCSs. Indeed, this is a signature of all the fullerenes and complex atoms considered thus far. Shape resonances, R-T minima and binding energies of the resultant anions are presented. This work was supported by U.S. DOE, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research.

  14. Binding energy and single-particle energies in the 16O Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiase, J.O.; Sharma, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present the binding energy of 16 O together with single-particle energies in the oxygen region by folding together a Hamiltonian in the rest-frame of the nucleus with two-body correlation functions based on the Nijmegen potential. We have found that the binding energies are very sensitive to the core radius rc and that the effects of tensor correlations are non-negligible.Our calculated binding energy, E B = - 127.8 MeV with r c = 0.241 fm compares well with the experimental binding energy, E B = - 127.6 MeV

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy on the charge reorganization energy and small polaron binding energy of molecular film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kera, Satoshi, E-mail: kera@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Nanomaterial Science, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ueno, Nobuo [Department of Nanomaterial Science, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Understanding of electron-phonon coupling as well as intermolecular interaction is required to discuss the mobility of charge carrier in functional molecular solids. This article summarizes recent progress in direct measurements of valence hole-vibration coupling in ultrathin films of organic semiconductors by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The experimental study of hole-vibration coupling of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) state in ordered monolayer film by UPS is essential to comprehend hole-hopping transport and small-polaron related transport in organic semiconductors. Only careful measurements can attain the high-resolution spectra and provide key parameters in hole-transport dynamics, namely the charge reorganization energy and small polaron binding energy. Analyses methods of the UPS HOMO fine feature and resulting charge reorganization energy and small polaron binding energy are described for pentacene and perfluoropentacene films. Difference between thin-film and gas-phase results is discussed by using newly measured high-quality gas-phase spectra of pentacene. Methodology for achieving high-resolution UPS measurements for molecular films is also described.

  16. Binding energy effects in cascade evolution and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    The MARLOWE model was extended to include a binding energy dependent on the local crystalline order, so that atoms are bound less strongly to their lattice sites near surfaces or associated damage. Sputtering and cascade evolution were studied on the examples of self-ion irradiations of Cu and Au monocrystals. In cascades, the mean binding energy is reduced ∼8% in Cu with little dependence on the initial recoil energy; in Au, it is reduced ∼9% at 1 keV and ∼15% at 100 keV. In sputtering, the mean binding energy is reduced ∼8% in Cu and ∼15% in Au with little energy dependence; the yields are increased about half as much. Most sites from which sputtered atoms originate are isolated in both metals. Small clusters of such sites occur in Cu, but there are some large clusters in Au, especially in [111] targets. There are always more large clusters with damage-dependent binding than with a constant binding energy, but only a few clusters are compact enough to be regarded as pits

  17. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  18. Funnel metadynamics as accurate binding free-energy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Vittorio; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A detailed description of the events ruling ligand/protein interaction and an accurate estimation of the drug affinity to its target is of great help in speeding drug discovery strategies. We have developed a metadynamics-based approach, named funnel metadynamics, that allows the ligand to enhance the sampling of the target binding sites and its solvated states. This method leads to an efficient characterization of the binding free-energy surface and an accurate calculation of the absolute protein–ligand binding free energy. We illustrate our protocol in two systems, benzamidine/trypsin and SC-558/cyclooxygenase 2. In both cases, the X-ray conformation has been found as the lowest free-energy pose, and the computed protein–ligand binding free energy in good agreement with experiments. Furthermore, funnel metadynamics unveils important information about the binding process, such as the presence of alternative binding modes and the role of waters. The results achieved at an affordable computational cost make funnel metadynamics a valuable method for drug discovery and for dealing with a variety of problems in chemistry, physics, and material science. PMID:23553839

  19. Power electronics for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss some of the most emerging renewable energy sources......, wind energy and photovoltaics, which by means of power electronics are changing from being minor energy sources to be acting as important power sources in the energy system....

  20. Analysis of experimental positron-molecule binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, J R; Surko, C M; Young, J A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments show that positron annihilation on molecules frequently occurs via capture into vibrational Feshbach resonances. In these cases, the downshifts in the annihilation spectra from the vibrational mode spectra provide measures of the positron-molecule binding energies. An analysis of these binding energy data is presented in terms of the molecular dipole polarizability, the permanent dipole moment, and the number of π bonds in aromatic molecules. The results of this analysis are in reasonably good agreement with other information about positron-molecule bound states. Predictions for other targets and promising candidate molecules for further investigation are discussed.

  1. Free energies of binding from large-scale first-principles quantum mechanical calculations: application to ligand hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Tautermann, Christofer S; Fox, Thomas; Christ, Clara; Malcolm, N O J; Essex, Jonathan W; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2013-08-15

    Schemes of increasing sophistication for obtaining free energies of binding have been developed over the years, where configurational sampling is used to include the all-important entropic contributions to the free energies. However, the quality of the results will also depend on the accuracy with which the intermolecular interactions are computed at each molecular configuration. In this context, the energy change associated with the rearrangement of electrons (electronic polarization and charge transfer) upon binding is a very important effect. Classical molecular mechanics force fields do not take this effect into account explicitly, and polarizable force fields and semiempirical quantum or hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) calculations are increasingly employed (at higher computational cost) to compute intermolecular interactions in free-energy schemes. In this work, we investigate the use of large-scale quantum mechanical calculations from first-principles as a way of fully taking into account electronic effects in free-energy calculations. We employ a one-step free-energy perturbation (FEP) scheme from a molecular mechanical (MM) potential to a quantum mechanical (QM) potential as a correction to thermodynamic integration calculations within the MM potential. We use this approach to calculate relative free energies of hydration of small aromatic molecules. Our quantum calculations are performed on multiple configurations from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The quantum energy of each configuration is obtained from density functional theory calculations with a near-complete psinc basis set on over 600 atoms using the ONETEP program.

  2. Cooper-pair size and binding energy for unconventional superconducting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinóla Neto, F.; Neto, Minos A.; Salmon, Octavio D. Rodriguez

    2018-06-01

    The main proposal of this paper is to analyze the size of the Cooper pairs composed by unbalanced mass fermions from different electronic bands along the BCS-BEC crossover and study the binding energy of the pairs. We are considering an interaction between fermions with different masses leading to an inter-band pairing. In addiction to the attractive interaction we have an hybridization term to couple both bands, which in general acts unfavorable for the pairing between the electrons. We get first order phase transitions as the hybridization breaks the Cooper pairs for the s-wave symmetry of the gap amplitude. The results show the dependence of the Cooper-pair size as a function of the hybridization for T = 0 . We also propose the structure of the binding energy of the inter-band system as a function of the two-bands quasi-particle energies.

  3. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seletskiy, Sergey M.; Rochester U.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the first cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cooling. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Tevatron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV carrying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 (micro)rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible. Chapter 1 is an introduction where I describe briefly the theory and the history of electron cooling, and derive the requirements to the quality of electron beam and requirements to the basic parameters of the Recycler Electron Cooler. Chapter 2 is devoted to the theoretical consideration of the motion of electrons in the cooling section, description of the cooling section and of the measurement of the magnetic fields. In Chapter 3 I consider different factors that increase the effective electron angle in the cooling section and suggest certain algorithms for the suppression of parasitic angles. Chapter 4 is devoted to the measurements of the energy of the electron beam. In the concluding Chapter 5 I review

  4. Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, U. M.; Lee, K. B.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    The use of renewable energy sources are increased because of the depletion of natural resources and the increasing pollution level from energy production. The wind energy and the solar energy are most widely used among the renewable energy sources. Power electronics is needed in almost all kinds...... of renewable energy system. It controls the renewable source and interfaces with the load effectively, which can be grid-connected or van work in stand-alone mode. In this presentation, overview of wind and photovoltaic energy systems are introduced. Next, the power electronic circuits behind the most common...

  5. Nuclear Cartography: Patterns in Binding Energies and Subatomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements…

  6. Polaron binding energy in polymers: poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nožár, Juraj; Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Šebera, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2012), s. 623-629 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polaron * polaron binding energy * polysilane Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.984, year: 2012

  7. Binding energy and formation heat of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.R. de; Veado, J.T.; Siqueira, M.L. de

    The Born-Haber cycle is utilized for the calculation of the heat of formation of UO 2 , on the assumption that the binding energy is predominantly ionic in character. The ionization potentials of U and the repulsion energy are two critical values that influence calculations. Calculations of the ionization potentials with non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Gaspar-Kohn-Sham approximation are presented [pt

  8. Depth sectioning using electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alfonso, A J; Findlay, S D; Allen, L J; Cosgriff, E C; Kirkland, A I; Nellist, P D; Oxley, M P

    2008-01-01

    The continued development of electron probe aberration correctors for scanning transmission electron microscopy has enabled finer electron probes, allowing atomic resolution column-by-column electron energy loss spectroscopy. Finer electron probes have also led to a decrease in the probe depth of focus, facilitating optical slicing or depth sectioning of samples. The inclusion of post specimen aberration corrected image forming lenses allows for scanning confocal electron microscopy with further improved depth resolution and selectivity. We show that in both scanning transmission electron microscopy and scanning confocal electron microscopy geometries, by performing a three dimensional raster scan through a specimen and detecting electrons scattered with a characteristic energy loss, it will be possible to determine the location of isolated impurities embedded within the bulk.

  9. Electronic transport of molecular nanowires by considering of electron hopping energy between the second neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rabani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the electronic conductance of molecular nanowires by considering the electron hopping between the first and second neighbors with the help Green’s function method at the tight-binding approach. We investigate three types of structures including linear uniform and periodic chains as well as poly(p-phenylene molecule which are embedded between two semi-infinite metallic leads. The results show that in the second neighbor approximation, the resonance, anti-resonance and Fano phenomena occur in the conductance spectra of these structures. Moreover, a new gap is observed at edge of the lead energy band wich its width depends on the value of the electron hopping energy between the second neighbors. In the systems including intrinsic gap, this hopping energy shifts the gap in the energy spectra.

  10. Electron transfer in organic glass. Distance and energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krongauz, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have investigated the distance and energy dependence of electron transfer in rigid organic glasses containing randomly dispersed electron donor and electron acceptor molecules. Pulsed radiolysis by an electron beam from a linear accelerator was used for ionization resulting in charge deposition on donor molecules. The disappearance kinetics of donor radical anions due to electron transfer to acceptor was monitored spectroscopically by the change in optical density at the wavelength corresponding to that of donor radical anion absorbance. It was found that the rate of the electron transfer observed experimentally was higher than that computed using the Marcus-Levich theory assuming that the electron-transfer activation barrier is equal to the binding energy of electron on the donor molecule. This discrepancy between the experimental and computed results suggests that the open-quotes inertclose quotes media in which electron-transfer reaction takes place may be participating in the process, resulting in experimentally observed higher electron-transfer rates. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, Sergei M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  12. Incremental binding free energies of aluminum (III) vs. magnesium (II) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercero, Jose M.; Mujika, Jon I.; Matxain, Jon M.; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M.

    2003-01-01

    A sequential ligand addition to the aluminum (III) cation has been studied using the B3LYP functional and a combined all-electron/pseudopotentials basis set. The aluminum complexes are compared with analogous magnesium (II) complexes. Different thermodynamical data, such as incremental binding energies, enthalpies, entropies and free energies, are presented for these addition reactions. While the magnesium (II) cation can only accommodate three negatively charged ligands, aluminum (III) accommodates four even after including bulk solvent effects. The main differences between both cations complexing with the neutral ligands, is that aluminum (III) is not able to form complexes with methanol until the number of methanol ligands is equal to 3. Magnesium (II) prefers to bind methanol and formamide when the number of ligands is small, while aluminum prefers formamide. For the largest complexes both cations prefer to bind water

  13. Orbital momentum profiles and binding energy spectra for the complete valence shell of molecular fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.; Brion, C.E. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Brunger, M.J.; Zhao, K.; Grisogono, A.M.; Braidwood, S.; Weigold, E. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Electronic Structure of Materials Centre; Chakravorty, S.J.; Davidson, E.R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Sgamellotti, A. [Univ di Perugia (Italy). Dipartimento di Chimica; von Niessen, W. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst fuer Physikalische

    1996-01-01

    The first electronic structural study of the complete valence shell binding energy spectrum of molecular fluorine, encompassing both the outer and inner valence regions, is reported. These binding energy spectra as well as the individual orbital momentum profiles have been measured using an energy dispersive multichannel electron momentum spectrometer at a total energy of 1500 eV, with an energy resolution of 1.5 eV and a momentum resolution of 0.1 a.u. The measured binding energy spectra in the energy range of 14-60 eV are compared with the results of ADC(4) many-body Green`s function and also direct-Configuration Interaction (CI) and MRSD-CI calculations. The experimental orbital electron momentum profiles are compared with SCF theoretical profiles calculated using the target Hartree-Fock approximation with a range of basis sets and with Density Functional Theory predictions in the target Kohn-Sham approximation with non-local potentials. The truncated (aug-cc-pv5z) Dunning basis sets were used for the Density Functional Theory calculations which also include some treatment of correlation via the exchange and correlation potentials. Comparisons are also made with the full ion-neutral overlap amplitude calculated with MRSD-CI wave functions. Large, saturated basis sets (199-GTO) were employed for both the high level SCF near Hartree-Fock limit and MRSD-CI calculations to investigate the effects of electron correlation and relaxation. 66 refs., 9 tabs., 9 figs.

  14. Electron correlation energy in confined two-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.L. [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Montgomery, H.E., E-mail: ed.montgomery@centre.ed [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Sen, K.D. [School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Thompson, D.C. [Chemistry Systems and High Performance Computing, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharamaceuticals Inc., 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877 (United States)

    2010-09-27

    Radial, angular and total correlation energies are calculated for four two-electron systems with atomic numbers Z=0-3 confined within an impenetrable sphere of radius R. We report accurate results for the non-relativistic, restricted Hartree-Fock and radial limit energies over a range of confinement radii from 0.05-10a{sub 0}. At small R, the correlation energies approach limiting values that are independent of Z while at intermediate R, systems with Z{>=}1 exhibit a characteristic maximum in the correlation energy resulting from an increase in the angular correlation energy which is offset by a decrease in the radial correlation energy.

  15. Electron capture and energy-gain spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taulbjerg, K.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of translation energy spectroscopy as a tool to determine individual reaction cross sections in atomic collisions is analyzed with special emphasis on the electron capture process in highly charged ion collisions. A condition is derived to separate between higher collision energies where translation energy spectroscopy is problem free and lower energies where strong overlap of individual spectra features prohibits an analysis of the total translation energy spectrum by means of a simple deconvolution procedure. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Energy loss and thermalization of low-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVerne, J.A.; Mozumder, A.; Notre Dame Univ., IN

    1984-01-01

    Various processes involved in the moderation of low-energy electrons (< 10 keV in energy) have been delineated in gaseous and liquid media. The discussion proceeds in two stages. The first stage ends and the second stage begins when the electron energy equals the first excitation potential of the medium. The second stage ends with thermalization. Cross sections for electronic excitation and for the excitation (and de-excitation) of sub-electronic processes have been evaluated and incorporated in suitable stopping power and transport theories. Comparison between experiment and theory and intercomparisons between theories and experiments have been provided where possible. (author)

  17. Binding Energy, Vapor Pressure and Melting Point of Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. H. Farrell; C. D. Van Siclen

    2007-01-01

    Current models for the cohesive energy of nanoparticles generally predict a linear dependence on the inverse particle diameter for spherical clusters, or, equivalently, on the inverse of the cube root of the number of atoms in the cluster. Although this is generally true for metals, we find that for the group IV semiconductors, C, Si and Ge, this linear dependence does not hold. Instead, using first principles, density functional theory calculations to calculate the binding energy of these materials, we find a quadratic dependence on the inverse of the particle size. Similar results have also been obtained for the metallic group IV elements Sn and Pb. This is in direct contradiction to current assumptions. Further, as a consequence of this quadratic behavior, the vapor pressure of semiconductor nanoparticles rises more slowly with decreasing size than would be expected. In addition, the melting point of these nanoparticles will experience less suppression than experienced by metal nanoparticles with comparable bulk binding energies. This non-linearity also affects sintering or Ostwald ripening behavior of these nanoparticles as well as other physical properties that depend on the nanoparticle binding energy. The reason for this variation in size dependence involves the covalent nature of the bonding in semiconductors, and even in the 'poor' metals. Therefore, it is expected that this result will hold for compound semiconductors as well as the elemental semiconductors

  18. Rapid long range intramolecular electron transfer within a steroid molecule with two electron binding groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, R.K.; Miller, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer has been observed to have occurred in less than 100 ns in a steroid molecule having two distinct electron binding groups separated by distances distributed from 7--11 A. Experiments were carried out in organic glasses at 77 K with pulse radiolysis techniques to create trapped electrons which were captured by a group on one end of the steroid molecule. Although one of the groups, benzoate, is held to the steroid spacer by a flexible linkage, the rigidity of the glassy matrices prevented movement to alter the initial distance. Interestingly, no effects of distance were seen: all ET processes appeared to have occurred much faster than our 100 ns time resolution, consistent with measurements of the rate of intermolecular electron transfer between the same functional groups in random solutions. Solvation energetics, on the other hand, had a remarkable influence on the extent and direction of electron transfer. A change in solvent polarity was observed to reverse the direction of electron transfer. Evidence was obtained for a distribution of solvation environments for ions in glasses which may be as broad as 0.15 eV

  19. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  20. NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mengesha, W

    2002-01-01

    NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution eta sub e was measured using the Modified Compton Coincidence Technique (MCCT). The MCCT allowed detection of nearly monoenergetic internal electrons resulting from the scattering of incident 662 keV gamma rays within a primary NaI(Tl) detector. Scattered gamma rays were detected using a secondary HPGe detector in a coincidence mode. Measurements were carried out for electron energies ranging from 16 to 438 keV, by varying the scattering angle. Measured HPGe coincidence spectra were deconvolved to determine the scattered energy spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector. Subsequently, the NaI(Tl) electron energy spectra were determined by subtracting the energy of scattered spectra from the incident source energy (662 keV). Using chi-squared minimization, iterative deconvolution of the internal electron energy spectra from the measured NaI(Tl) spectra was then used to determine eta sub e at the electron energy of interest. eta sub e values determined using this technique represent va...

  1. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A.; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Díaz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ∼0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach

  2. Evaluation of binding energies by using quantum mechanical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, Cristian; Matei, Lidia; Postolache, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of binding energies (BE) in molecular structure is needed for modelling chemical and radiochemical processes by quantum-chemical methods. An important field of application is evaluation of radiolysis and autoradiolysis stability of organic and inorganic compounds as well as macromolecular structures. The current methods of calculation do not allow direct determination of BE but only of total binding energies (TBE) and enthalpies. BEs were evaluated indirectly by determining the homolytic dissociation energies. The molecular structures were built and geometrically optimized by the molecular mechanics methods MM+ and AMBER. The energy minimizations were refined by semi-empirical methods. Depending on the chosen molecular structure, the CNDO, INDO, PM3 and AM1 methods were used. To reach a high confidence level the minimizations were done for gradients lower than 10 -3 RMS. The energy values obtained by the difference of the fragment TBLs, of the transition states and initial molecular structures, respectively, were associated to the hemolytic fragmentation energy and BE, respectively. In order to evaluate the method's accuracy and to establish the application fields of the evaluation methods, the obtained values of BEs were compared with the experimental data taken from literature. To this goal there were built, geometrically optimized by semi-empirical methods and evaluated the BEs for 74 organic and inorganic compounds (alkanes, alkene, alkynes, halogenated derivatives, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, nitrogen and sulfur compounds, water, hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, hydrazine, etc. (authors)

  3. ETMB-RBF: discrimination of metal-binding sites in electron transporters based on RBF networks with PSSM profiles and significant amino acid pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yu-Yen; Chen, Shu-An; Wu, Sheng-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Cellular respiration is the process by which cells obtain energy from glucose and is a very important biological process in living cell. As cells do cellular respiration, they need a pathway to store and transport electrons, the electron transport chain. The function of the electron transport chain is to produce a trans-membrane proton electrochemical gradient as a result of oxidation-reduction reactions. In these oxidation-reduction reactions in electron transport chains, metal ions play very important role as electron donor and acceptor. For example, Fe ions are in complex I and complex II, and Cu ions are in complex IV. Therefore, to identify metal-binding sites in electron transporters is an important issue in helping biologists better understand the workings of the electron transport chain. We propose a method based on Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) profiles and significant amino acid pairs to identify metal-binding residues in electron transport proteins. We have selected a non-redundant set of 55 metal-binding electron transport proteins as our dataset. The proposed method can predict metal-binding sites in electron transport proteins with an average 10-fold cross-validation accuracy of 93.2% and 93.1% for metal-binding cysteine and histidine, respectively. Compared with the general metal-binding predictor from A. Passerini et al., the proposed method can improve over 9% of sensitivity, and 14% specificity on the independent dataset in identifying metal-binding cysteines. The proposed method can also improve almost 76% sensitivity with same specificity in metal-binding histidine, and MCC is also improved from 0.28 to 0.88. We have developed a novel approach based on PSSM profiles and significant amino acid pairs for identifying metal-binding sites from electron transport proteins. The proposed approach achieved a significant improvement with independent test set of metal-binding electron transport proteins.

  4. Can Low Energy Electrons Affect High Energy Physics Accelerators?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimino, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The properties of the electrons participating in the build up of an electron cloud (EC) inside the beam-pipe have become an increasingly important issue for present and future accelerators whose performance may be limited by this effect. The EC formation and evolution are determined by the wall-surface properties of the accelerator vacuum chamber. Thus, the accurate modeling of these surface properties is an indispensible input to simulation codes aimed at the correct prediction of build-up thresholds, electron-induced instability or EC heat load. In this letter, we present the results of surface measurements performed on a prototype of the beam screen adopted for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which presently is under construction at CERN. We have measured the total secondary electron yield (SEY) as well as the related energy distribution curves (EDC) of the secondary electrons as a function of incident electron energy. Attention has been paid, for the first time in this context, to the probability at which low-energy electrons (<∼ 20 eV) impacting on the wall create secondaries or are elastically reflected. It is shown that the ratio of reflected to true-secondary electrons increases for decreasing energy and that the SEY approaches unity in the limit of zero primary electron energy

  5. Food irradiation by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    For some special cases, the use of low energy electrons has advantages over the use of gamma-rays or higher energy electrons for the direct irradiation of food. These advantages arise from details of the interaction processes which are responsible for the production of physical, chemical and biological effects. Factors involved include depth of penetration, dose distribution, irradiation geometry, the possible production of radioactivity and costs

  6. Surface sterilization by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Tabei, Masae

    1989-01-01

    The germicidal effectiveness of low energy electron beams (175 KV) against bacterial cells was investigated. The dry spores of Bacillus pumilus ATCC 27142 and Bacillus globigii ATCC 9372 inoculated on carrier materials and irradiated by gamma rays showed the exponential type of survival curves whereas they showed sigmoidal ones when exposed to low energy electron beams. When similarly irradiated, the wet spores inoculated on membrane filter showed the same survival curves as the dry spores inoculated on carrier materials. The wet vegetative cells of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 showed exponential curves when exposed to gamma and electron beam irradiation. Low energy electron beams in air showed little differences from nitrogen stream in their germicidal effectiveness against dry spores of B. pumilus. The D values of B. pumilus spores inoculated on metal plates decreased as the amounts of backscattering electrons from the plates increased. There was adequate correlation between the D value (linear region of survival curve), average D value (6D/6) and 1% survival dose and backscattering factor. Depth dose profile and backscatterig dose of low energy electron beams were measured by radiochromic dye film dosimeter (RCD). These figures were not always in accord with the observed germicidal effectiveness against B. pumilus spores because of varying thickness of RCD and spores inoculated on carrier material. The dry spores were very thin and this thinness was useful in evaluating the behavior of low energy electrons. (author)

  7. High energy electron multibeam diffraction and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, Alain.

    1980-04-01

    The different theories of dynamical scattering of electrons are firstly reviewed with special reference to their basis and the validity of the different approximations. Then after a short description of the different experimental set ups, structural analysis and the investigation of the optical potential by means of high energy electrons will be surveyed

  8. Electron energy-distribution functions in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitchford, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculation of the electron energy distribution functions in the regime of drift tube experiments is discussed. The discussion is limited to constant applied fields and values of E/N (ratio of electric field strength to neutral density) low enough that electron growth due to ionization can be neglected

  9. Compact multi-energy electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, E.; Hamm, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Two distinctly different concepts that have been developed for compact multi-energy, single-section, standing-wave electron linear accelerator structures are presented. These new concepts, which utilize (a) variable nearest neighbor couplings and (b) accelerating field phase switching, provide the capability of continuously varying the electron output energy from the accelerator without degrading the energy spectrum. These techniques also provide the means for continuously varying the energy spectrum while maintaining a given average electron energy, and have been tested successfully with several accelerators of length from 0.1 m to 1.9 m. Theoretical amd experimental results from these accelerators, and demonstrated applications of these techniques to medical and industrial linear accelerator technology will be described. In addition, possible new applications available to research and industry from these techniques are presented. (orig.)

  10. High energy electron positron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Soding, P.

    1987-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA in a year from now, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics will come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of a few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way more useful to any high energy physicist in particular to newcomers in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions. It includes the most relevant data, parametrizations, theoretical background, and a chapter on detectors. Contents: Foreword; Detectors for High Energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ Physics; Lepton Pair Production and Electroweak Parameters; Hadron Production, Strong and Electroweak Properties; tau Physics; Recent Results on the Charm Sector; Bottom Physics; Lifetime Measurements of tau, Charmed and Beauty Hadrons; Υ Spectroscopy; Hadronic Decays of the Υ; Quark and Gluon Fragmentation in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ Continuum; Jet Production and QCD; Two Photon Physics; Search for New Particles

  11. A = 4 0+ - 1+ binding-energy difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.; Lehman, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    The A = 4 Λ-hypernuclei provide a rich source of information about the s-wave properties of the fundamental hyperon-nucleon (YN) force as well as offer a unique opportunity to investigate the complications that arise in calculations of the properties of bound systems in which one baryon (here the Λ) with a given isospin couples strongly to another (the Σ) with a different isospin. The Λ 4 H - Λ 4 He isodoublet ground-state energies are not consistent with a charge symmetry hypothesis for the YN interaction. The (spin-flip) excitation energies are quite sensitive to the ΛN - ΣN coupling of the YN interaction. In particular, when one represents the free YN interaction in terms of one-channel effective ΛN potentials, the resulting 0 + (ground) state and 1 + (excited) spin-flip state are inversely ordered in terms of binding energies, the 1 + state being more bound. It is the Σ suppression that results from the reduced strength of the ΛN - ΣN off-diagonal coupling potential when the trinucleon core is restricted to isospin-1/2 which we study here. We find this spin-isospin suppression of the Λ-Σ conversion, which is due to the composite nature of the nuclear cores of the Λ 4 H and Λ 4 He hypernuclei, to be a significant factor in understanding the 0 + - 1 + binding energy relationship

  12. Golden mean energy equals highest atomic electron orbital energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, Leonard J. [Interdisciplinary Research Club, P.O. Box 371, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)], E-mail: LJMalinowski@gmail.com

    2009-12-15

    The golden mean numerical value {phi} = 0.5({radical}5 - 1) has been given a physical manifestation through E infinity theory. This short paper relates the golden mean energy 0.618034 MeV to atomic electron orbitals.

  13. Golden mean energy equals highest atomic electron orbital energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Leonard J.

    2009-01-01

    The golden mean numerical value φ = 0.5(√5 - 1) has been given a physical manifestation through E infinity theory. This short paper relates the golden mean energy 0.618034 MeV to atomic electron orbitals.

  14. Sampling and energy evaluation challenges in ligand binding protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Jr Greisen, Per; Schena, Alberto; Park, Hahnbeom; Johnsson, Kai; Stoddard, Barry L; Baker, David

    2017-12-01

    The steroid hormone 17α-hydroxylprogesterone (17-OHP) is a biomarker for congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hence there is considerable interest in development of sensors for this compound. We used computational protein design to generate protein models with binding sites for 17-OHP containing an extended, nonpolar, shape-complementary binding pocket for the four-ring core of the compound, and hydrogen bonding residues at the base of the pocket to interact with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups at the more polar end of the ligand. Eight of 16 designed proteins experimentally tested bind 17-OHP with micromolar affinity. A co-crystal structure of one of the designs revealed that 17-OHP is rotated 180° around a pseudo-two-fold axis in the compound and displays multiple binding modes within the pocket, while still interacting with all of the designed residues in the engineered site. Subsequent rounds of mutagenesis and binding selection improved the ligand affinity to nanomolar range, while appearing to constrain the ligand to a single bound conformation that maintains the same "flipped" orientation relative to the original design. We trace the discrepancy in the design calculations to two sources: first, a failure to model subtle backbone changes which alter the distribution of sidechain rotameric states and second, an underestimation of the energetic cost of desolvating the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of the ligand. The difference between design model and crystal structure thus arises from both sampling limitations and energy function inaccuracies that are exacerbated by the near two-fold symmetry of the molecule. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  15. Electron energy measurements in pulsating auroras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, D.J.; Yee, E.; Whalen, B.A.; Yau, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    Electron spectra were obtained during two rocket flights into pulsating aurora from Southend, Saskatchewan. The first rocket launched at 1143:24 UT on February 15, 1980 flew into an aurora of background intensity 275 R of N 2 + 4278 A and showing regular pulsations with about a 17 s period. Electron spectra of Maxwellian energy distributions were observed with an average E 0 = 1.5 keV, rising to 1.8 keV during the pulsations. There was one-to-one correspondence between the electron energy modulation and the observed optical pulsations. The second rocket, launched at 1009:10 UT on February 23, flew into a diffuse auroral surface of intensity 800 R of N 2 + 4278 A and with somewhat irregular pulsations. The electron spectra were again of Maxwellian energy distribution with an average E 0 = 1.8 keV increasing to 2.1 keV during the pulsations. The results from these flights suggest that pulsating auroras occurring in the morning sector may be quite commonly excited by low energy electrons. The optical pulsations are due to periodic increases in the energy of the electrons with the source of modulation in the vicintiy of the geomagnetic equatorial plane. (auth)

  16. Electron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, A.E.; Walters, H.R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The problems of intermediate energy scattering are approached from the low and high energy ends. At low intermediate energies difficulties associated with the use of pseudostates and correlation terms are discussed, special consideration being given to nonphysical pseudoresonances. Perturbation methods appropriate to high intermediate energies are described and attempts to extend these high energy approximations down to low intermediate energies are studied. It is shown how the importance of electron exchange effects develops with decreasing energy. The problem of assessing the 'effective completeness' of pseudostate sets at intermediate energies is mentioned and an instructive analysis of a 2p pseudostate approximation to elastic e - -H scattering is given. It is suggested that at low energies the Pauli Exclusion Principle can act to hide short range defects in pseudostate approximations. (author)

  17. Low Energy Electron Cooler for NICA Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, A P

    2017-01-01

    BINP has developed an electron cooler to increase the ion accumulation efficiency in the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) heavy ion booster (JINR, Dubna). Adjustment of the cooler magnetic system provides highly homogeneous magnetic field in the cooling section B trans/B long ≤ 4∙10-5 which is vital for efficient electron cooling. First experiments with an electron beam performed at BINP demonstrated the target DC current of 500 mA and electron energy 6 keV.

  18. Electron energy recuperation in gyrodevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savilov, A. V.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Sinitsyn, O. V.

    2008-01-01

    For many applications of gyrodevices, it is extremely important to increase their overall efficiency and reduce the power consumption. Therefore, at present, there are many gyrotrons operating with depressed collectors. These gyrotrons and their depressed collectors are typically designed with the use of available numerical codes. This paper is devoted to the analysis of the energy recuperation in gyrotrons, which is performed with the use of the Hamiltonian formalism. Such consideration gives some insight into the physics of gyrodevices and can be useful for estimating the benefits from utilizing depressed collectors. Both single-cavity gyromonotrons and multicavity gyrodevices in which the last cavity is excited by a prebunched beam are analyzed. Special attention is paid to a three-cavity, frequency-quadrupling gyrodevice.

  19. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-09

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  20. How To Deal with Multiple Binding Poses in Alchemical Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  1. Binding energy and single–particle Energies in the 16 0 region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... single-particle energies in the oxygen region by folding together a Hamiltonian in the rest-frame of the nucleus with two-body correlation functions based on the Njimegen potential. We have found that the binding energies are very sensitive to the core radius rc and that the effects of tensor correlations are non-negligible.

  2. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M.

    2011-01-01

    Full text. Accurate and precise values of absolute total cross section (TCS) represent important information in many scientific and technological applications. In our case, for example, we are motivated to provide such information for electron-fuel collision processes which are specifically relevant to modeling spark ignition in alcohol-fuelled internal combustion engines. Many electron scattering TCS measurements are presently available for a diverse range of atomic and molecular targets. However, lack of data for important bio-molecular targets still remains. Disagreements between the available TCS data for the alcohols have prompted several studies of electron scattering collision of slow electrons with these molecules which are currently important in applications as bio- fuels. This relevance, which has attracted much attention, has been one of the subjects of a recent collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. Recently this collaboration reported first measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering by several primary alcohols. In this work we address methanol and ethanol TCSs at low energy range and report additional studies of resonant structure in ethanol using the detection of metastable states produced by electron impact excitation with high energy resolution. We have recently constructed a TCS apparatus in our laboratory at Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, based on the well-known linear transmission technique. The experimental setup is based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through a gas cell containing the atoms or molecules to be studied at a given pressure. It consists essentially of an electron gun, a gas cell and an electron energy analyzer composed of an array of decelerating electrostatic lenses, a cylindrical dispersive 127o analyzer and a Faraday cup. To our knowledge, there exist

  3. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Yates, Brent; Hong, Ling; Khakoo, Murtadha A. [California State University at Fullerton, CA (US). Physics Department; Bettega, Marcio H.F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Costa, Romarly F. da [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, Marco A.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Accurate and precise values of absolute total cross section (TCS) represent important information in many scientific and technological applications. In our case, for example, we are motivated to provide such information for electron-fuel collision processes which are specifically relevant to modeling spark ignition in alcohol-fuelled internal combustion engines. Many electron scattering TCS measurements are presently available for a diverse range of atomic and molecular targets. However, lack of data for important bio-molecular targets still remains. Disagreements between the available TCS data for the alcohols have prompted several studies of electron scattering collision of slow electrons with these molecules which are currently important in applications as bio- fuels. This relevance, which has attracted much attention, has been one of the subjects of a recent collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. Recently this collaboration reported first measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering by several primary alcohols. In this work we address methanol and ethanol TCSs at low energy range and report additional studies of resonant structure in ethanol using the detection of metastable states produced by electron impact excitation with high energy resolution. We have recently constructed a TCS apparatus in our laboratory at Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, based on the well-known linear transmission technique. The experimental setup is based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through a gas cell containing the atoms or molecules to be studied at a given pressure. It consists essentially of an electron gun, a gas cell and an electron energy analyzer composed of an array of decelerating electrostatic lenses, a cylindrical dispersive 127o analyzer and a Faraday cup. To our knowledge, there exist

  4. Electron scattering from sodium at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1986-10-01

    A comprehensive comparison is made between theoretical calculations and experimental data for intermediate energy (≥ 10 eV) electron scattering from sodium vapour. The theoretical predictions of coupled-channels calculations (including one, two or four channels) do not agree with experimental values of the differential cross sections for elastic scattering or the resonant 3s to 3p excitation. Increasingly-more-sophisticated calculations, incorporating electron correlations in the target states, and also including core-excited states in the close-coupling expansion, are done at a few selected energies in an attempt to isolate the cause of the discrepancies between theory and experiment. It is found that these more-sophisticated calculations give essentially the same results as the two- and four-channel calculations using Hartree-Fock wavefunctions. Comparison of the sodium high-energy elastic differential cross sections with those of neon suggests that the sodium differential cross section experiments may suffer from systematic errors. There is also disagreement, at the higher energies, between theoretical values for the scattering parameters and those that are derived from laser-excited superelastic scattering and electron photon coincidence experiments. When allowance is made for the finite acceptance angle of the electron spectrometers used in the experiments by convoluting the theory with a function representing the distribution of electrons entering the electron spectrometer it is found that the magnitudes of the differences between theory and experiment are reduced

  5. Hydrogenic-Donor Impurity Binding Energy Dependence of the Electric Field in GaAs/AlxGa1−xAs Quantum Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a variational method with two-parameter trial wave function and the effective mass approximation, the binding energy of a donor impurity in GaAs/AlxGa1−xAs cylindrical quantum ring (QR subjected to an external field is calculated. It is shown that the donor impurity binding energy is highly dependent on the QR structure parameters (radial thickness and height, impurity position, and external electric field. The binding energy increases inchmeal as the QR parameters (radial thickness and height decrease until a maximum value for a central impurity and then begins to drop quickly. The applied electric field can significantly modify the spread of electronic wave function in the QR and shift electronic wave function from the donor position and then leads to binding energy changes. In addition, results for the binding energies of a hydrogenic donor impurity as functions of the impurity position and applied electric field are also presented.

  6. A BPTTF-based self-assembled electron-donating triangle capable of C60 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeb, Sébastien; Bivaud, Sébastien; Dron, Paul Ionut; Balandier, Jean-Yves; Chas, Marcos; Sallé, Marc

    2012-03-25

    A kinetically stable self-assembled redox-active triangle is isolated. The resulting electron-donating cavity, which incorporates three BPTTF units, exhibits a remarkable binding ability for electron-deficient C(60), supported by a favorable combination of structural and electronic features.

  7. Photoemission and electron-stimulated desorption studies of H on W(110): Single- versus two-binding-site models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, S.

    1982-01-01

    The chemisorption of H on W(110) at room temperature is studied with the use of angle-integrated photoemission and electron-stimulated desorption (ESD). The ESD cross sections of H + are found to be sol low that no significant H + signals with meaningful ion energy distributions are observed. The photoemission results show, however, two types of H adatoms, referred to as β 2 and β 1 states, for this chemisorptive system. Both states are found to appear simultaneously rather than sequentially as suggested by previous studies, and exhibit a simple 1-theta adsorption kinetics with different initial sticking coefficients. The β 2 state induces two binding energy levels at -2.0 and -6.0 eV, respectively, whereas the β 1 state induces a level at -3.8 eV. The work-function change (with a maximum value of -0.45 eV) is found to follow exactly with the intensity of the β 2 state. These results are found to be compatible with the two-binding-site model, inherently suggested by the reflection high-enery electron-diffraction data. However, the results can also be consistent with a single-binding-site model suggested by a recent angle-resolved photoemission and inelastic electron scattering study. A model based on the present results is proposed and critically compared with previous studies. Unresolved problems associated with both single- and two-binding-site models are also discussed

  8. Integrating water exclusion theory into βcontacts to predict binding free energy changes and binding hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Binding free energy and binding hot spots at protein-protein interfaces are two important research areas for understanding protein interactions. Computational methods have been developed previously for accurate prediction of binding free energy change upon mutation for interfacial residues. However, a large number of interrupted and unimportant atomic contacts are used in the training phase which caused accuracy loss. Results This work proposes a new method, βACV ASA , to predict the change of binding free energy after alanine mutations. βACV ASA integrates accessible surface area (ASA) and our newly defined β contacts together into an atomic contact vector (ACV). A β contact between two atoms is a direct contact without being interrupted by any other atom between them. A β contact’s potential contribution to protein binding is also supposed to be inversely proportional to its ASA to follow the water exclusion hypothesis of binding hot spots. Tested on a dataset of 396 alanine mutations, our method is found to be superior in classification performance to many other methods, including Robetta, FoldX, HotPOINT, an ACV method of β contacts without ASA integration, and ACV ASA methods (similar to βACV ASA but based on distance-cutoff contacts). Based on our data analysis and results, we can draw conclusions that: (i) our method is powerful in the prediction of binding free energy change after alanine mutation; (ii) β contacts are better than distance-cutoff contacts for modeling the well-organized protein-binding interfaces; (iii) β contacts usually are only a small fraction number of the distance-based contacts; and (iv) water exclusion is a necessary condition for a residue to become a binding hot spot. Conclusions βACV ASA is designed using the advantages of both β contacts and water exclusion. It is an excellent tool to predict binding free energy changes and binding hot spots after alanine mutation. PMID:24568581

  9. Electronic market places in the energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mons, L.

    2001-12-01

    Electronic market places in the energy domain occurred at the end of the 90's in the US and have started to develop in Europe in the year 2000. About 60 platforms are registered today and this development can be explained by the advantages raised by such an infrastructure: simplification of purchase procedures, reduction of delays in the purchase decision, reduction of administrative costs etc.. However, today none of these electronic market places is profitable and several have closed down. On the other hand, this tool will certainly become necessary in the future and all energy actors are developing projects in this way. This study analyzes the electronic market places phenomenon in the energy domain using 10 market places examples with their key-factors of success. It draws out a complete status of the initiatives developed today and presents some scenarios of evolution. (J.S.)

  10. An Accurate Redetermination of the $^{118}Sn$ Binding Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Borzakov, S B; Faikow-Stanczyk, H; Grigoriev, Yu V; Panteleev, T; Pospísil, S; Smotritsky, L M; Telezhnikov, S A

    2001-01-01

    The energy of well-known strong {gamma}-line from {{^198}Au}, the "gold standard", has been modified in the light of new adjustments in the fundamental constants and the value of 411.80176(12) keV was determined which is 0.29 eV lower than the latest 1999 value. An energy calibration procedure for determining the neutron binding energy, {B_n}, from complicated {(n , gamma)}-spectra has been developed. A mathematically simple minimization function consisting only of terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curve (polynomial) is used. A priori information about the relationships among the energies of different peaks on the spectrum is taking into account by a Monte Carlo simulation. The procedure was used in obtaining of {B_n} for {{^118}Sn} and {{^64}Cu}. The {gamma}-ray spectrum from thermal neutron radiative capture by {{^117}Sn} has been measured on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. {gamma}-rays were detected by a 72 cm^3 HPGe-detector. {B_n} for {{^64}Cu} was obtained from two {gamma}-...

  11. Exciton binding energy in a pyramidal quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, A.; Arulmozhi, M.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of spatially dependent effective mass, non-parabolicity of the conduction band and dielectric screening function on exciton binding energy in a pyramid-shaped quantum dot of GaAs have been investigated by variational method as a function of base width of the pyramid. We have assumed that the pyramid has a square base with area a× a and height of the pyramid H=a/2. The trial wave function of the exciton has been chosen according to the even mirror boundary condition, i.e. the wave function of the exciton at the boundary could be non-zero. The results show that (i) the non-parabolicity of the conduction band affects the light hole (lh) and heavy hole (hh) excitons to be more bound than that with parabolicity of the conduction band, (ii) the dielectric screening function (DSF) affects the lh and hh excitons to be more bound than that without the DSF and (iii) the spatially dependent effective mass (SDEM) affects the lh and hh excitons to be less bound than that without the SDEM. The combined effects of DSF and SDEM on exciton binding energy have also been calculated. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

  12. Non-abelian binding energies from the lightcone bootstrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Daliang [Department of Physics, Yale University,New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University,Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Meltzer, David [Department of Physics, Yale University,New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Poland, David [Department of Physics, Yale University,New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2016-02-23

    We analytically study the lightcone limit of the conformal bootstrap for 4-point functions containing scalars charged under global symmetries. We show the existence of large spin double-twist operators in various representations of the global symmetry group. We then compute their anomalous dimensions in terms of the central charge C{sub T}, current central charge C{sub J}, and the OPE coefficients of low dimension scalars. In AdS, these results correspond to the binding energy of two-particle states arising from the exchange of gravitons, gauge bosons, and light scalar fields. Using unitarity and crossing symmetry, we show that gravity is universal and attractive among different types of two-particle states, while the gauge binding energy can have either sign as determined by the representation of the two-particle state, with universal ratios fixed by the symmetry group. We apply our results to 4D N=1 SQCD and the 3D O(N) vector models. We also show that in a unitary CFT, if the current central charge C{sub J} stays finite when the global symmetry group becomes infinitely large, such as the N→∞ limit of the O(N) vector model, then the theory must contain an infinite number of higher spin currents.

  13. Coherence in electron energy loss spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schattschneider, P.; Werner, W.S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Coherence effects in electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) and in energy filtering are largely neglected although they occur frequently due to Bragg scattering in crystals. We discuss how coherence in the inelastically scattered wave field can be described by the mixed dynamic form factor (MDFF), and how it relates to the density matrix of the scattered electrons. Among the many aspects of 'inelastic coherence' are filtered high-resolution images, dipole-forbidden transitions, coherence in plasma excitations, errors in chemical microanalysis, coherent double plasmons, and circular dichroism

  14. Analysis of oxygen binding-energy variations for BaO on W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, G. A.; Shih, A.; Mueller, D.; Thomas, R. E.

    Interatomic Auger analyses have been made of different forms of BaO layers on W substrates. Variations in Auger spectroscopy energies of the Ba4dBa5pO2p interatomic Auger transition were found to be largely governed by the O2p binding energy of the BaO adsorbate. This was illustrated by comparing results of the Auger data values with values derived from O2p binding energies using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Very good agreement was observed not only for the W substrate but also for the W substrate which showed two oxygen-induced electronics state. Variations in binding energy were noted for different states of BaO lattice formation and for different amounts of oxidation, ranging from the transition of Ba to BaO and continuing to the BaO 2 stoichiometry and beyond. Effects were also reported for adsorbate alignment and thermal activation (i.e., reduction) of the oxidized state. An empirical relationship was found suggesting that the more tightly bound the O2p states of the BaO adsorbate were, the lower its work function would be. This link between binding energy and work function was observed to be valid not only for cases of poisoning by oxidation, but held as well during reactivation by the subsequent reduction of the oxide. In addition, this relationship also appeared to predict the low work function obtained through the introduction of substances such as Sc to the BaO-W system. Possible qualitative reasons which might contribute to this are discussed in terms of enhanced dipole effects and shifts in band structure.

  15. High energy electron irradiation of flowable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offermann, B.P.

    1975-01-01

    In order to efficiently irradiate a flowable material with high energy electrons, a hollow body is disposed in a container for the material and the material is caused to flow in the form of a thin layer across a surface of the body from or to the interior of the container while the material flowing across the body surface is irradiated. (U.S.)

  16. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  17. Simulation of core-level binding energy shifts in germanium-doped lead telluride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyubin, A.S.; Dedyulin, S.N.; Yashina, L.V.; Shtanov, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    To simulate the changes in core-level binding energies in germanium-doped lead telluride, cluster calculations of the changes in the electrostatic potential at the corresponding centers have been performed. Different locations of the Ge atom in the crystal bulk have been considered: near vacancies, near another dopant site, and near the surface. For calculating the potential in the clusters that model the bulk and the surface of the lead telluride crystal (c-PbTe), the electron density obtained in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods has been used [ru

  18. Electron clouds in high energy hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-08-29

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use of slow extraction will be made. After the acceleration the beam will be debunched and continuously extracted to the experimental area. During this process, residual gas electrons can accumulate in the electric field of the beam. If this accumulation is not prevented, then at some point the beam can become unstable. Under the SPS and LHC conditions the beam is always bunched. The accumulation of electron cloud happens due to secondary electron emission. At the time when this thesis was being written the electron cloud was known to limit the maximum intensity of the two machines. During the operation with 25 ns bunch spacing, the electron cloud was causing significant beam quality deterioration. At moderate intensities below the instability threshold the electron cloud was responsible for the bunch energy loss. In the framework of this thesis it was found that the instability thresholds of the coasting beams with similar space charge tune shifts, emittances and energies are identical. First of their kind simulations of the effect of Coulomb collisions on electron cloud density in coasting beams were performed. It was found that for any hadron coasting beam one can choose vacuum conditions that will limit the accumulation of the electron cloud below the instability threshold. We call such conditions the ''good'' vacuum regime. In application to SIS-100 the design pressure 10{sup -12} mbar corresponds to the good vacuum regime. The transition to the bad vacuum

  19. Magnetic field effect on the ground-state binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the effective mass scheme, the ground-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (WZ) (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) subjected to magnetic field is investigated. The finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model is used. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is introduced to describe the lateral confinement strength. The results show that: (i) the binding energy is the largest for the impurity located at a point corresponding to the largest electron probability density and (ii) it increases with increasing external magnetic field

  20. Magnetic field effect on the ground-state binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazi, Haddou, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [LPS, Faculty of sciences, Dhar EL Mehrez, B.P 1796 Atlas Fez (Morocco); Specials Mathematics, CPGE Kénitra, Chakib Arsalane Street, Kénitra (Morocco); Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine [LPS, Faculty of sciences, Dhar EL Mehrez, B.P 1796 Atlas Fez (Morocco)

    2013-07-15

    Within the framework of the effective mass scheme, the ground-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (WZ) (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) subjected to magnetic field is investigated. The finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model is used. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is introduced to describe the lateral confinement strength. The results show that: (i) the binding energy is the largest for the impurity located at a point corresponding to the largest electron probability density and (ii) it increases with increasing external magnetic field.

  1. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-01-01

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress–displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements. (paper)

  2. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-02-05

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress-displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements.

  3. An accurate redetermination of the 118Sn binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzakov, S.B.; Panteleev, Ts.Ts.; Telezhnikov, S.A.; Chrien, R.E.; Faikow-Stanczyk, H.; Grigor'ev, Yu.V.; Pospisil, S.; Smotritskij, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The energy of well-known strong γ-line from 198 Au, the 'gold standard', has been modified in the light of new adjustments in the fundamental constants and the value of 411.80176(12) keV was determined which is 0.29 eV lower than the latest 1999 value. An energy calibration procedure for determining the neutron binding energy, B n , from complicated (n,γ)-spectra has been developed. A mathematically simple minimization function consisting only of terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curve (polynomial) is used. A priori information about the relationships among the energies of different peaks on the spectrum was taken into account by a Monte Carlo simulation. The procedure was used in obtaining of B n for 118 Sn and 64 Cu. The γ-ray spectrum from thermal neutron radiative capture by 117 Sn has been measured on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. γ-rays were detected by a 72 cm 2 HPGe-detector. B n for 64 Cu was obtained from two γ-spectra. One spectrum was measured on the IBR-2 by the same detector. The other spectrum was measured with a pair spectrometer at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. From these two spectra B n for 64 Cu was determined equal to 7915.52(8) keV. The mean value of two most precise results of B n for 118 Sn was determined to be 9326.35(9) keV. The B n for 57Fe was determined to be 7646.08(9) keV

  4. Comparison of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energies in the actinide region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, M. O.; NESTOR, JR., C. W. [OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LAB., TENN. (USA)

    1977-11-15

    The present status of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energy determinations is reviewed. Experimental data and the most recent theoretical predictions are compared for the energies of K..cap alpha../sub 1/ X-rays, M series X-rays, K-LL Auger electrons, K, L/sub 3/, M and N levels, and the 4f spin-orbit splitting. In addition, the K..cap alpha../sub 1/ and L/sub 3/ data are fitted by Moseley-type diagrams, and data on the shallow levels and the valence bands of actinide oxides are discussed. Comparison shows that the single-particle Dirac-Fock theory and the inclusion of quantum-electrodynamic contributions predicts energies of the innermost levels generally within the accuracy of data, that is in the order of magnitude of 1 eV. However, in the N, O... shells large deviations do occur presumably due to strong many-electron interactions. The inclusion of many-electron effects in the relativistic theory remains a challenge, as do experimental investigations affording an accuracy of better than 1 eV for the various electronic levels.

  5. Constraining the gravitational binding energy of PSR J0737-3039B using terrestrial nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, W. G.; Li Baoan

    2009-01-01

    We show that the gravitational binding energy of a neutron star of a given mass is correlated with the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy at 1-2 times nuclear saturation density for equations of state without significant softening (i.e., those that predict maximum masses M max >1.44M · in line with the largest accurately measured neutron star mass). Applying recent laboratory constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy to this correlation we extract a constraint on the baryon mass of the lower mass member of the double pulsar binary system, PSR J0737-3039B. We compare with independent constraints derived from modeling the progenitor star of J0737-3039B up to and through its collapse under the assumption that it formed in an electron capture supernova. The two sets of constraints are consistent only if L < or approx. 70 MeV.

  6. Electron-ion recombination at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    The work is based on results obtained with a merged-beams experiment. A beam of electronics with a well characterized density and energy distribution was merged with a fast, monoenergetic ion beam. Results have been obtained for radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination at low relative energies (0 to ∼70eV). The obtained energy resolution was improved by about a factor of 30. High vacuum technology was used to suppress interactions with electrons from the environments. The velocity distribution of the electron beam was determined. State-selective dielectronic-recombination measurements were performable. Recombination processes were studied. The theoretical background for radiative recombination and Kramers' theory are reviewed. The quantum mechanical result and its relation to the semiclassical theory is discussed. Radiative recombination was also measured with several different non-bare ions, and the applicability of the semiclassical theory to non-bare ions was investigated. The use of an effective charge is discussed. For dielectronic recombination, the standard theoretical approach in the isolated resonance and independent-processes approximation is debated. The applicability of this method was tested. The theory was able to reproduce most of the experimental data except when the recombination process was sensitive to couplings between different electronic configurations. The influence of external perturbing electrostatic fields is discussed. (AB) (31 refs.)

  7. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  8. Can low energy electrons affect high energy physics accelerators?

    CERN Document Server

    Cimino, R; Furman, M A; Pivi, M; Ruggiero, F; Rumolo, Giovanni; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The properties of the electrons participating in the build up of an electron cloud (EC) inside the beam-pipe have become an increasingly important issue for present and future accelerators whose performance may be limited by this effect. The EC formation and evolution are determined by the wall-surface properties of the accelerator vacuum chamber. Thus, the accurate modeling of these surface properties is an indispensible input to simulation codes aimed at the correct prediction of build-up thresholds, electron-induced instability or EC heat load. In this letter, we present the results of surface measurements performed on a prototype of the beam screen adopted for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which presently is under construction at CERN. We have measured the total secondary electron yield (SEY) as well as the related energy distribution curves (EDC) of the secondary electrons as a function of incident electron energy. Attention has been paid, for the first time in this context, to the probability at whic...

  9. An energy monitor for electron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geske, G. (Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (German Democratic Republic). Klinik und Poliklinik des Bereiches Medizin)

    1990-09-01

    A monitor useful for checks of the energy selector scale of medical electron accelerators was developed and tested. It consists of a linear array of flat ionization chambers sandwiched between absorber plates of low-Z material. The first chamber at the electron beam entrance may be used to produce a reference signal S{sub r}, if not another suitable reference signal is taken. The following chambers are electrically connected and deliver the measuring signal S{sub m}. A clinical dosimeter can be used for recording current or charge. The energy-dependent electron range parameters R{sub p}, R{sub 50} and R{sub 80} in water vary as linear functions of the ratio reference singal/measuring signal. The best linear fit was obtained for the half value layer R{sub 50}. Three types of the energy monitor are described, and experimental results obtained with a linear accelerator and a betatron between 5 and 25 MeV are reported. Uncertainties for checks of R{sub 50} with a calibrated energy monitor were not larger than 1 to 2 mm. Theoretical considerations by a computer model support these results. (orig./HP).

  10. An energy monitor for electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geske, G.

    1990-01-01

    A monitor useful for checks of the energy selector scale of medical electron accelerators was developed and tested. It consists of a linear array of flat ionization chambers sandwiched between absorber plates of low-Z material. The first chamber at the electron beam entrance may be used to produce a reference signal S r , if not another suitable reference signal is taken. The following chambers are electrically connected and deliver the measuring signal S m . A clinical dosimeter can be used for recording current or charge. The energy-dependent electron range parameters R p , R 50 and R 80 in water vary as linear functions of the ratio reference singal/measuring signal. The best linear fit was obtained for the half value layer R 50 . Three types of the energy monitor are described, and experimental results obtained with a linear accelerator and a betatron between 5 and 25 MeV are reported. Uncertainties for checks of R 50 with a calibrated energy monitor were not larger than 1 to 2 mm. Theoretical considerations by a computer model support these results. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, Kateryna; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-09-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed.

  12. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Fuller, Franklin D.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.; Mukamel, Shaul; Abramavicius, Darius

    2013-07-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron-hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments.

  13. Prediction of FAD binding sites in electron transport proteins according to efficient radial basis function networks and significant amino acid pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2016-07-30

    Cellular respiration is a catabolic pathway for producing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and is the most efficient process through which cells harvest energy from consumed food. When cells undergo cellular respiration, they require a pathway to keep and transfer electrons (i.e., the electron transport chain). Due to oxidation-reduction reactions, the electron transport chain produces a transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient. In case protons flow back through this membrane, this mechanical energy is converted into chemical energy by ATP synthase. The convert process is involved in producing ATP which provides energy in a lot of cellular processes. In the electron transport chain process, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is one of the most vital molecules for carrying and transferring electrons. Therefore, predicting FAD binding sites in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. We used an independent data set to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, which had an accuracy of 69.84 %. We compared the performance of the proposed method in analyzing two newly discovered electron transport protein sequences with that of the general FAD binding predictor presented by Mishra and Raghava and determined that the accuracy of the proposed method improved by 9-45 % and its Matthew's correlation coefficient was 0.14-0.5. Furthermore, the proposed method enabled reducing the number of false positives significantly and can provide useful information for biologists. We developed a method that is based on PSSM profiles and SAAPs for identifying FAD binding sites in newly discovered electron transport protein sequences. This approach achieved a significant improvement after we added SAAPs to PSSM features to analyze FAD binding proteins in the electron transport chain. The proposed method can serve as an effective tool for predicting FAD binding sites in electron

  14. High Energy Electron Detectors on Sphinx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. R.; Porte, A.; Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Auriel, G.; Coleman, P. L.; Bayol, F.; Lalle, B.; Krishnan, M.; Wilson, K.

    2008-11-01

    Z-pinch plasma radiation sources are used to dose test objects with K-shell (˜1-4keV) x-rays. The implosion physics can produce high energy electrons (> 50keV), which could distort interpretation of the soft x-ray effects. We describe the design and implementation of a diagnostic suite to characterize the electron environment of Al wire and Ar gas puff z-pinches on Sphinx. The design used ITS calculations to model detector response to both soft x-rays and electrons and help set upper bounds to the spurious electron flux. Strategies to discriminate between the known soft x-ray emission and the suspected electron flux will be discussed. H.Calamy et al, ``Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion,'' Phys Plasmas 15, 012701 (2008) J.A.Halbleib et al, ``ITS: the integrated TIGER series of electron/photon transport codes-Version 3.0,'' IEEE Trans on Nuclear Sci, 39, 1025 (1992)

  15. Local energy equation for two-electron atoms and relation between kinetic energy and electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2002-08-01

    In early work, Dawson and March [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5850 (1984)] proposed a local energy method for treating both Hartree-Fock and correlated electron theory. Here, an exactly solvable model two-electron atom with pure harmonic interactions is treated in its ground state in the above context. A functional relation between the kinetic energy density t(r) at the origin r=0 and the electron density p(r) at the same point then emerges. The same approach is applied to the Hookean atom; in which the two electrons repel with Coulombic energy e 2 /r 12 , with r 12 the interelectronic separation, but are still harmonically confined. Again the kinetic energy density t(r) is the focal point, but now generalization away from r=0 is also effected. Finally, brief comments are added about He-like atomic ions in the limit of large atomic number. (author)

  16. Atomistic spectrometrics of local bond-electron-energy pertaining to Na and K clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: YWang8@hnust.edu.cn [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Huang, Yongli; Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Coordination environment resolves electron binding-energy shift of Na and K clusters. • Cohesive energy of the representative bond determines the core-level shift. • XPS derives the energy level of an isolated atom and its bulk shift. • XPS derives the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density. - Abstract: Consistency between density functional theory calculations and photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed our predications on the undercoordination-induced local bond relaxation and core level shift of Na and K clusters. It is clarified that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms cause local densification and local potential well depression and shift the electron binding-energy accordingly. Numerical consistency turns out the energy levels for an isolated Na (E{sub 2p} = 31.167 eV) and K (E{sub 3p} = 18.034 eV) atoms and their respective bulk shifts of 2.401 eV and 2.754 eV, which is beyond the scope of conventional approaches. This strategy has also resulted in quantification of the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density, and atomic cohesive energy associated with the undercoordinated atoms.

  17. Energy Transformation in Molecular Electronic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasha, Michael

    1999-05-17

    This laboratory has developed many new ideas and methods in the electronic spectroscopy of molecules. This report covers the contract period 1993-1995. A number of the projects were completed in 1996, and those papers are included in the report. The DOE contract was terminated at the end of 1995 owing to a reorganizational change eliminating nationally the projects under the Office of Health and Environmental Research, U. S. Department of Energy.

  18. Effect of isovector coupling channel on the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of the isovector coupling channel on the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy is determined utilizing the relativistic density dependent Thomas-Fermi approach for the calculation of the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy, and the dependency of this effect on the numbers of neutrons and protons is studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to increased nuclear binding energy, and this effect sharpens with growing excess of the number of neutrons on the number of protons. (author)

  19. Orbital momentum distributions and binding energies for the complete valence shell of molecular iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisogono, A.M.; Pascual, R.; Weigold, E.

    1988-03-01

    The complete valence shell binding energy spectrum (8-43eV) of I 2 has been measured by using electron momentum spectroscopy at 1000eV. The complete inner valence region, corresponding to ionization from the 10 σ u and 10 σ g orbitals, has been measured for the first time and shows extensive splitting of the ionization strength due to electron correlation effects in the ion. Many-body calculations using the Green's function method have been carried out and are compared with the data. Momentum distributions, measured in both the outer and inner valence regions, are compared with those given by SCF orbital wave functions calculated with a number of different basis sets. Computed orbital position and momentum density maps for oriented I 2 molecules are discussed in comparison with the measured and calculated spherically averaged momentum distributions

  20. Electron detachment energies in high-symmetry alkali halide solvated-electron anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusiewicz, Iwona; Berdys, Joanna; Simons, Jack; Skurski, Piotr

    2003-07-01

    We decompose the vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) in solvated-electron clusters of alkali halides in terms of (i) an electrostatic contribution that correlates with the dipole moment (μ) of the individual alkali halide molecule and (ii) a relaxation component that is related to the polarizability (α) of the alkali halide molecule. Detailed numerical ab initio results for twelve species (MX)n- (M=Li,Na; X=F,Cl,Br; n=2,3) are used to construct an interpolation model that relates the clusters' VDEs to their μ and α values as well as a cluster size parameter r that we show is closely related to the alkali cation's ionic radius. The interpolation formula is then tested by applying it to predict the VDEs of four systems [i.e., (KF)2-, (KF)3-, (KCl)2-, and (KCl)3-] that were not used in determining the parameters of the model. The average difference between the model's predicted VDEs and the ab initio calculated electron binding energies is less than 4% (for the twelve species studied). It is concluded that one can easily estimate the VDE of a given high-symmetry solvated electron system by employing the model put forth here if the α, μ and cation ionic radii are known. Alternatively, if VDEs are measured for an alkali halide cluster and the α and μ values are known, one can estimate the r parameter, which, in turn, determines the "size" of the cluster anion.

  1. Anisotropic Lithium Insertion Behavior in Silicon Nanowires: Binding Energy, Diffusion Barrier, and Strain Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qianfan; Cui, Yi; Wang, Enge

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have recently been shown to be promising as high capacity lithium battery anodes. SiNWs can be grown with their long axis along several different crystallographic directions. Due to distinct atomic configuration and electronic structure of SiNWs with different axial orientations, their lithium insertion behavior could be different. This paper focuses on the characteristics of single Li defects, including binding energy, diffusion barriers, and dependence on uniaxial strain in [110], [100], [111], and [112] SiNWs. Our systematic ab initio study suggests that the Si-Li interaction is weaker when the Si-Li bond direction is aligned close to the SiNW long axis. This results in the [110] and [111] SiNWs having the highest and lowest Li binding energy, respectively, and it makes the diffusion barrier along the SiNW axis lower than other pathways. Under external strain, it was found that [110] and [001] SiNWs are the most and least sensitive, respectively. For diffusion along the axial direction, the barrier increases (decreases) under tension (compression). This feature results in a considerable difference in the magnitude of the energy barrier along different diffusion pathways. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Anisotropic Lithium Insertion Behavior in Silicon Nanowires: Binding Energy, Diffusion Barrier, and Strain Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qianfan

    2011-05-19

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have recently been shown to be promising as high capacity lithium battery anodes. SiNWs can be grown with their long axis along several different crystallographic directions. Due to distinct atomic configuration and electronic structure of SiNWs with different axial orientations, their lithium insertion behavior could be different. This paper focuses on the characteristics of single Li defects, including binding energy, diffusion barriers, and dependence on uniaxial strain in [110], [100], [111], and [112] SiNWs. Our systematic ab initio study suggests that the Si-Li interaction is weaker when the Si-Li bond direction is aligned close to the SiNW long axis. This results in the [110] and [111] SiNWs having the highest and lowest Li binding energy, respectively, and it makes the diffusion barrier along the SiNW axis lower than other pathways. Under external strain, it was found that [110] and [001] SiNWs are the most and least sensitive, respectively. For diffusion along the axial direction, the barrier increases (decreases) under tension (compression). This feature results in a considerable difference in the magnitude of the energy barrier along different diffusion pathways. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Semiphenomenological studies of the ground state binding energies of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, M.

    1987-01-01

    We show that the binding energies of /sub Λ/ 5 He and p-shell hypernuclei can be satisfactorily explained in the folding model approach using a density dependent effective ΛN interaction. Our analysis predicts a very reasonable value of the range of the ΛN interaction. The calculated value of B/sub Λ/ of /sub Λ/ 7 Li using the cluster model density for 6 Li and the best fit parameters of this potential supports the view that 6 Li possesses an α-d cluster structure. Using this potential we also determine the average size parameter (a 0 ) of the oscillator shell model density of nucleons in Nnot =Z core nuclei from fitting the B/sub Λ/ values of the corresponding hypernuclei. The effect of different forms of density distribution of core nuclei on the values of potential parameters is investigated and is found to be very small. As regards the form of density dependence, a rho/sup 2/3/ form is found to be the most appropriate for this purpose and is used throughout this work. Other forms do not give a satisfactory account of the data

  4. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, A.I.; Garcia, G.; Krupa, K.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; Munoz, A.; Jones, D.B.; Brunger, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The cyclic configuration of the furfural molecule is similar to the 5-membered ring structure constituting the sugar units of the DNA helix, hence its importance in biology. In this paper, we report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mtorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed

  5. Dispersion self-energy of the electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawton, M.

    1991-01-01

    Electron mass renormalization and the Lamb shift have been investigated using the dispersion self-energy formalism. If shifts of both the electromagnetic field and quantum-mechanical transitions frequencies are considered, absorption from the electromagnetic field is canceled by emission due to atomic fluctuations. The frequencies of all modes are obtained from the self-consistency condition that the field seen by the electron is the same as the field produced by the expectation value of current. The radiation present can thus be viewed as arising from emission and subsequent reabsorption by matter. As developed here, the numerical predictions of dispersion theory are identical to those of quantum electrodynamics. The physical picture implied by dispersion theory is discussed in the context of semiclassical theories and quantum electrodynamics

  6. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-04-15

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  7. An Energy Conservation Approach to Adsorbate-Induced Surface Stress and the Extraction of Binding Energy Using Nanomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [ORNL; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [ORNL; Fernando, G. W. [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Hawk, J. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wijewardhana, L.C. R. [University of Cincinnati; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Microcantilevers are ideally-suited for the study of surface phenomena due to their large surface-to-volume ratios, which amplify surface effects. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. When the excess energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such experiments were conducted for three binding processes in vapor phase experiments: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. To our knowledge, such an energy conservation approach has not been taken into account in adsorbate-induced surface effect investigations. Furthermore, these experiments illustrate that detailed molecular-level information on binding energies can be extracted from this simple micromechanical sensor.

  8. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania; Mobley, David L.; Guzzi, Rita; Rizzuti, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S

  9. First-principles real-space tight-binding LMTO calculation of electronic structures for atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.L.; Dy, K.S.; Wu, S.Y.

    1997-01-01

    A real-space scheme has been developed for a first-principles calculation of electronic structures and total energies of atomic clusters. The scheme is based on the combination of the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (TBLMTO) method and the method of real-space Green close-quote s function. With this approach, the local electronic density of states can be conveniently determined from the real-space Green close-quote s function. Furthermore, the full electron density of a cluster can be directly calculated in real space. The scheme has been shown to be very efficient due to the incorporation of the method of real-space Green close-quote s function and Delley close-quote s method of evaluating multicenter integrals. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. An energy conservation approach to adsorbate-induced surface stress and the extraction of binding energy using nanomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Boiadjiev, Vassil I.; Hawk, John E.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Fernando, Gayanath W.; Rohana Wijewardhana, L. C.

    2008-03-01

    Surface stress induced by molecular adsorption in three different binding processes has been studied experimentally using a microcantilever sensor. A comprehensive free-energy analysis based on an energy conservation approach is proposed to explain the experimental observations. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. The released binding energy appears to be almost exclusively channeled to the surface energy, and energy distribution to other channels, including heat, appears to be inactive for this micromechanical system. When this excess surface energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such vapor phase experiments were conducted for three binding processes: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. Binding energies for these three processes were also estimated.

  11. An energy conservation approach to adsorbate-induced surface stress and the extraction of binding energy using nanomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A; Boiadjiev, Vassil I; Hawk, John E; Gehl, Anthony C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6122 (United States); Fernando, Gayanath W [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Wijewardhana, L C Rohana [Physics Department, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)

    2008-03-12

    Surface stress induced by molecular adsorption in three different binding processes has been studied experimentally using a microcantilever sensor. A comprehensive free-energy analysis based on an energy conservation approach is proposed to explain the experimental observations. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. The released binding energy appears to be almost exclusively channeled to the surface energy, and energy distribution to other channels, including heat, appears to be inactive for this micromechanical system. When this excess surface energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such vapor phase experiments were conducted for three binding processes: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. Binding energies for these three processes were also estimated.

  12. Electron beam accelerator energy control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Vijay; Rajan, Rehim; Acharya, S.; Mittal, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    A control system has been developed for the energy control of the electron beam accelerator using PLC. The accelerating voltage of 3 MV has been obtained by using parallel coupled voltage multiplier circuit. A autotransformer controlled variable 0-10 KV DC is fed to a tube based push pull oscillator to generate 120 Khz, 10 KV AC. Oscillator output voltage is stepped up to 0-300 KV/AC using a transformer. 0-300 KVAC is fed to the voltage multiplier column to generate the accelerating voltage at the dome 0-3 MV/DC. The control system has been designed to maintain the accelerator voltage same throughout the operation by adjusting the input voltage in close loop. Whenever there is any change in the output voltage either because of beam loading or arcing in the accelerator. The instantaneous accelerator voltage or energy is a direct proportional to 0-10 KVDC obtained from autotransformer. A PLC based control system with user settable energy level has been installed for 3 MeV, EB accelerator. The PLC takes the user defined energy value through a touch screen and compares it to the actual accelerating voltage (obtained using resistive divider). Depending upon the error the PLC generates the pulses to adjust the autotransformer to bring the actual voltage to the set value within the window of error (presently set to +/- 0.1%). (author)

  13. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer...

  14. Electron energy deposition in the middle atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vampola, A.L.; Gorney, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of locally precipating 36- to 317-keV electrons obtained by instrumentation on the S3-2 satellite are used to calculate energy deposition profiles as a function of latitude, longitude, and altitude. In the 70- to 90-km altitude, mid-latitude ionization due to these precipitating energetic electrons can be comparable to that due to direct solar H Lyman α. At night, the electrons produce ionization more than an order of magnitude greater than that expected from scattered H Lyman α. Maximum precipitation rates in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly are of the order of 10 -2 erg/cm 2 s with a spectrum of form j(E) = 1.34 x 10 5 E/sup -2.27/ (keV). Southern hemisphere precipitation dominates that in the north for 1.1< L<6 except for regions of low local surface field in the northern hemisphere. Above L = 6, local time effects dominate: i.e., longitudinal effects due to the asymmetric magnetic field which are strong features below L = 6 disappear and are replaced by high-latitude precipitation events which are local time features

  15. Atom-solid binding energy shifts for K 2p and Rb 3d sublevels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holappa, M.; Aksela, S.; Patanen, M.; Urpelainen, S.; Aksela, H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Binding energy shifts between atom and solid. K 2p and Rb 3d sublevels were studied. → Simultaneous measurements give accurate results. → Results can be used as a reference for cluster studies. - Abstract: Binding energy shifts between free and solid state atoms for K 2p and Rb 3d photolines have been determined by measuring the vapor and solid state spectra simultaneously in similar experimental conditions applying synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. This method has the important benefit that the work function is not needed to correct for different reference energy levels, therefore much more accurate values for binding energy shifts are obtained.

  16. Effect of binding in cyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process and in energy transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A; Beard, D A; Franza, B R

    2006-07-01

    The effects of binding on the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PDPC) - one of the key components of the signal transduction processes - is analyzed based on a mathematical model. The model shows that binding of proteins, forming a complex, diminishes the ultrasensitivity of the PDPC to the differences in activity between kinase and phosphatase in the cycle. It is also found that signal amplification depends upon the strength of the binding affinity of the protein (phosphorylated or dephosphorylated) to other proteins . It is also observed that the amplification of signal is not only dependent on phosphorylation potential but also on binding properties and resulting adjustments in binding energies.

  17. The interaction domain of the redox protein adrenodoxin is mandatory for binding of the electron acceptor CYP11A1, but is not required for binding of the electron donor adrenodoxin reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, Achim; Hannemann, Frank; Mueller, Juergen J.; Heinemann, Udo; Bernhardt, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Adrenodoxin (Adx) is a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin involved in electron transfer reactions in the steroid hormone biosynthesis of mammals. In this study, we deleted the sequence coding for the complete interaction domain in the Adx cDNA. The expressed recombinant protein consists of the amino acids 1-60, followed by the residues 89-128, and represents only the core domain of Adx (Adx-cd) but still incorporates the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Adx-cd accepts electrons from its natural redox partner, adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), and forms an individual complex with this NADPH-dependent flavoprotein. In contrast, formation of a complex with the natural electron acceptor, CYP11A1, as well as electron transfer to this steroid hydroxylase is prevented. By an electrostatic and van der Waals energy minimization procedure, complexes between AdR and Adx-cd have been proposed which have binding areas different from the native complex. Electron transport remains possible, despite longer electron transfer pathways

  18. LDA+U and tight-binding electronic structure of InN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Sánchez, A.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Terentjevs, A.; Cicero, G.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we employ a combined ab initio and tight-binding approach to obtain the electronic and optical properties of hydrogenated Indium nitride (InN) nanowires. We first discuss InN band structure for the wurtzite structure calculated at the LDA+U level and use this information to extract the parameters needed for an empirical tight-binging implementation. These parameters are then employed to calculate the electronic and optical properties of InN nanowires in a diameter range that would not be affordable by ab initio techniques. The reliability of the large nanowires results is assessed by explicitly comparing the electronic structure of a small diameter wire studied both at LDA+U and tight-binding level.

  19. Tight binding electronic band structure calculation of achiral boron nitride single wall nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Prapti; Sanyal, Sankar P

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report the Tight-Binding method, for the electronic structure calculations of achiral single wall Boron Nitride nanotubes. We have used the contribution of π electron only to define the electronic band structure for the solid. The Zone-folding method is used for the Brillouin Zone definition. Calculation of tight binding model parameters is done by fitting them to available experimental results of two-dimensional hexagonal monolayers of Boron Nitride. It has been found that all the boron nitride nanotubes (both zigzag and armchair) are constant gap semiconductors with a band gap of 5.27eV. All zigzag BNNTs are found to be direct gap semiconductors while all armchair nanotubes are indirect gap semiconductors. (author)

  20. Impact of domain knowledge on blinded predictions of binding energies by alchemical free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, Antonia S. J. S.; Jiménez, Jordi Juárez; Michel, Julien

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) consortium organises blinded challenges to address the latest advances in computational methods for ligand pose prediction, affinity ranking, and free energy calculations. Within the context of the second D3R Grand Challenge several blinded binding free energies predictions were made for two congeneric series of Farsenoid X Receptor (FXR) inhibitors with a semi-automated alchemical free energy calculation workflow featuring FESetup and SOMD software tools. Reasonable performance was observed in retrospective analyses of literature datasets. Nevertheless, blinded predictions on the full D3R datasets were poor due to difficulties encountered with the ranking of compounds that vary in their net-charge. Performance increased for predictions that were restricted to subsets of compounds carrying the same net-charge. Disclosure of X-ray crystallography derived binding modes maintained or improved the correlation with experiment in a subsequent rounds of predictions. The best performing protocols on D3R set1 and set2 were comparable or superior to predictions made on the basis of analysis of literature structure activity relationships (SAR)s only, and comparable or slightly inferior, to the best submissions from other groups.

  1. Orbital momentum distribution and binding energies for the complete valence shell of molecular bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.; Grisogono, A.M.; Weigold, E.

    1987-08-01

    The binding energy spectrum of Br 2 has been recorded in both the outer and inner valence regions using electron momentum spectroscopy. The measurements are compared with the results of several Green's function calculations using different approximations and based on both polarized and unpolarized wave functions. The inner valence region, observed for the first time, is found to exhibit complex structure that is shown to be due to many-body effects, thus indicating a breakdown of the simple MO picture for ionization in this region. Momentum distributions for the three outer valence orbitals are also measured and compared with spherically averaged calculations using the target Hartree-Fock and plane wave impulse approximations. The effect of polarization functions in the basis set is investigated. Orbital density maps in both momentum and position space have been calculated and compared with the experimental measurements

  2. Sanitation methods using high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levaillant, C.; Gallien, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Short recycling of waste water and the use of liquid or dehydrated sludge as natural manure for agriculture or animal supplement feed is of great economical and ecological interest. It implies strong biological and chemical disinfection. Ionizing radiations produced by radioactive elements or linear accelerators can be used as a complement of conventional methods in the treatment of liquid and solid waste. An experiment conducted with high-energy electron-beam linear accelerators is presented. Degradation of undesirable metabolites in water occurs for a dose of 50 kRad. Undesirable seeds present in sludge are destroyed with a 200 kRad dose. A 300 kRad dose is sufficient for parasitic and bacterial disinfection (DL 90). Destruction of polio virus (DL 90) is obtained for 400 kRad. Higher doses (1000 to 2000 kRad) produce mineralization of toxic organic mercury, reduce some chemical toxic pollutants present in sludge and improve flocculation. (author)

  3. Benchmarking NaI(Tl) Electron Energy Resolution Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Valentine, J D.

    2002-01-01

    A technique for validating electron energy resolution results measured using the modified Compton coincidence technique (MCCT) has been developed. This technique relies on comparing measured gamma-ray energy resolution with calculated values that were determined using the measured electron energy resolution results. These gamma-ray energy resolution calculations were based on Monte Carlo photon transport simulations, the measured NaI(Tl) electron response, a simplified cascade sequence, and the measured electron energy resolution results. To demonstrate this technique, MCCT-measured NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution results were used along with measured gamma-ray energy resolution results from the same NaI(Tl) crystal. Agreement to within 5% was observed for all energies considered between the calculated and measured gamma-ray energy resolution results for the NaI(Tl) crystal characterized. The calculated gamma-ray energy resolution results were also compared with previously published gamma-ray energy resolution measurements with good agreement (<10%). In addition to describing the validation technique that was developed in this study and the results, a brief review of the electron energy resolution measurements made using the MCCT is provided. Based on the results of this study, it is believed that the MCCT-measured electron energy resolution results are reliable. Thus, the MCCT and this validation technique can be used in the future to characterize the electron energy resolution of other scintillators and to determine NaI(Tl) intrinsic energy resolution

  4. Surface characterization by energy distribution measurements of secondary electrons and of ion-induced electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.E.; Seiler, H.

    1988-01-01

    Instruments for surface microanalysis (e.g. scanning electron or ion microprobes, emission electron or ion microscopes) use the current of emitted secondary electrons or of emitted ion-induced electrons for imaging of the analysed surface. These currents, integrating over all energies of the emitted low energy electrons, are however, not well suited to surface analytical purposes. On the contrary, the energy distribution of these electrons is extremely surface-sensitive with respect to shape, size, width, most probable energy, and cut-off energy. The energy distribution measurements were performed with a cylindrical mirror analyser and converted into N(E), if necessary. Presented are energy spectra of electrons released by electrons and argon ions of some contaminated and sputter cleaned metals, the change of the secondary electron energy distribution from oxidized aluminium to clean aluminium, and the change of the cut-off energy due to work function change of oxidized aluminium, and of a silver layer on a platinum sample. The energy distribution of the secondary electrons often shows detailed structures, probably due to low-energy Auger electrons, and is broader than the energy distribution of ion-induced electrons of the same object point. (author)

  5. Molecularly Stretchable Electronics for Energy and Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipomi, Darren

    The term ``plastic electronics'' masks the wide range of mechanical behavior possessed by films of π-conjugated (semiconducting) small molecules and polymers. Such materials are promising for biosensors, large-area displays, low-energy lighting, and low-cost photovoltaic modules. There is also an apparent trade-off between electronic performance and mechanical compliance in films of some of the best-performing semiconducting polymers, which fracture at tensile strains not significantly greater than those at which conventional inorganic semiconductors fail. The design of intrinsically deformable electronic materials-i.e., imagine a semiconducting rubber band-would facilitate roll-to-roll production, mechanical robustness for potable applications, and conformal bonding to curved surfaces. This seminar describes my group's efforts to understand and control the structural parameters that influence the mechanical properties of π-conjugated polymers. The techniques we employ include synthetic chemistry, spectroscopy and microstructural characterization, computation from the molecular to continuum level, and electrical measurements of devices. A complex picture emerges for the interplay between molecular structure, the way the process of solidification influences the morphology, and how molecular structure and morphology combine to produce a film with a given modulus, elastic range, ductility, and toughness. We are also exploring ways to introduce other properties into organic semiconductors that are inspired by biological tissue. That is, not just elasticity and toughness, but also biodegradability and the capacity for self-repair. The seminar will also touch on our use of self-assembled metallic nanoislands on graphene for ultra-sensitive mechanical sensing using piezoresistive and ``piezoplasmonic'' mechanisms. The applications for these materials are in detecting human motion and measuring the mechanics of cardiac and musculoskeletal cells. My group is broadly

  6. Energy transformation in molecular electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasha, M.

    1985-01-01

    Our new optical pumping spectroscopy (steady state, and double-laser pulse) allows the production and study of the unstable rare tautomer in its ground and excited states, including picosecond dynamic studies. Molecules under study here included 7-azaindole (model for biological purines), 3-hydroxyflavone (model for plant flavones), lumichrome, and other heterocyclics. New detailed molecular mechanisms for proton transfer are derived, especially with catalytic assisting molecules. A new proton-transfer laser of extraordinary efficiency has become a side dividend, possibly worth of industrial development. The excited and highly reactive singlet molecular oxygen species 1 Δ/sub g/) has proven to be ubiquitous in chemical peroxide systems and in physically excited sensitizer-oxygen systems. Hyperbaric oxygen mechanisms in biology probably involve singlet oxygen. We have undertaken a spectroscopic study of tris - dibenzoylmethane chelates of Al, Gd, Eu, and Yb trivalent ions. These chelates offer a variety of electronic behaviors, from Z-effects on π-electron spin-orbital coupling (Al, Gd) to Weissman intramolecular energy transfer to 4f mestable levels (Eu, Gd). Elegant new spectroscopic resolution at 77K permits separation of tautomeric, parasitic self-absorption, dissociation, and cage effects to be resolved. 18 refs., 4 figs

  7. Photoionization cross section and binding energy of single dopant in hollow cylindrical core/shell quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddi, E.; El-Yadri, M.; Dujardin, F.; Restrepo, R. L.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we have investigated the confined donor impurity in a hollow cylindrical-shell quantum dot. The charges are assumed to be completely confined to the interior of the shell with rigid walls. Within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and by using a simple variational approach, we have computed the donor binding energy as a function of the shell sizes in order to study the behavior of the electron-impurity attraction for a very small thickness. Our results show that the binding energy of a donor impurity placed at the center of cylindrical core/shell dots depends strongly on the shell size. The binding energy increases when the shell-wideness becomes smaller and shows the same behavior as in a simple cylindrical quantum dot. A special case has been studied, which corresponds to the ratio between the inner and outer radii near to one (a/b → 1) for which our model gives a non-significant behavior of the impurity binding energy. This fact implies the existence of a critical value (a/b) for which the binding energy of the donor impurity tends to the limit value of 4 effective Rydbergs as in a 2D quantum well. We also analyse the photoionization cross section considering only the in-plane incident radiation polarization. We determine its behavior as a function of photon energy, shell size, and donor position. The measurement of photoionization in such systems would be of great interest to understand the optical properties of carriers in quantum dots.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of netropsin and distamycin binding to an AAAAA DNA binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jožica; Oostenbrink, Chris; Koller, Jože; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on netropsin in two different charge states and on distamycin binding to the minor groove of the DNA duplex d(CGCGAAAAACGCG)·d(CGCGTTTTTCGCG). The relative free energy of binding of the two non-covalently interacting ligands was calculated using the thermodynamic integration method and reflects the experimental result. From 2 ns simulations of the ligands free in solution and when bound to DNA, the mobility and the hydrogen-bonding patterns of the ligands were studied, as well as their hydration. It is shown that even though distamycin is less hydrated than netropsin, the loss of ligand–solvent interactions is very similar for both ligands. The relative mobilities of the ligands in their bound and free forms indicate a larger entropic penalty for distamycin when binding to the minor groove compared with netropsin, partially explaining the lower binding affinity of the distamycin molecule. The detailed structural and energetic insights obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations allow for a better understanding of the factors determining ligand–DNA binding. PMID:15687382

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of netropsin and distamycin binding to an AAAAA DNA binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Oostenbrink, Chris; Koller, Joze; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on netropsin in two different charge states and on distamycin binding to the minor groove of the DNA duplex d(CGCGAAAAACGCG).d(CGCGTTTTTCGCG). The relative free energy of binding of the two non-covalently interacting ligands was calculated using the thermodynamic integration method and reflects the experimental result. From 2 ns simulations of the ligands free in solution and when bound to DNA, the mobility and the hydrogen-bonding patterns of the ligands were studied, as well as their hydration. It is shown that even though distamycin is less hydrated than netropsin, the loss of ligand-solvent interactions is very similar for both ligands. The relative mobilities of the ligands in their bound and free forms indicate a larger entropic penalty for distamycin when binding to the minor groove compared with netropsin, partially explaining the lower binding affinity of the distamycin molecule. The detailed structural and energetic insights obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations allow for a better understanding of the factors determining ligand-DNA binding.

  10. Exciton binding energy in GaAsBiN spherical quantum dot heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhasis; Dhar, S.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state exciton binding energies (EBE) of heavy hole excitons in GaAs1-x-yBixNy - GaAs spherical quantum dots (QD) are calculated using a variational approach under 1s hydrogenic wavefunctions within the framework of effective mass approximation. Both the nitrogen and the bismuth content in the material are found to affect the binding energy, in particular for larger nitrogen content and lower dot radii. Calculations also show that the ground state exciton binding energies of heavy holes increase more at smaller dot sizes as compared to that for the light hole excitons.

  11. The interaction of low-energy electrons with fructose molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, I. V.; Kontrosh, E. E.; Markush, P. P.; Shpenik, O. B.

    2017-11-01

    Using a hypocycloidal electronic spectrometer, the interactions of low energy electrons (0-8.50 eV) with fructose molecules, namely, electron scattering and dissociative attachment, are studied. The results of these studies showed that the fragmentation of fructose molecules occurs effectively even at an electron energy close to zero. In the total electron-scattering cross section by molecules, resonance features (at energies 3.10 and 5.00 eV) were first observed near the formation thresholds of light ion fragments OH- and H-. The correlation of the features observed in the cross sections of electron scattering and dissociative attachment is analyzed.

  12. Equation satisfied by electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional satisfies an equation that links functionals and functional derivatives at N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities for densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential for the N-electron system.

  13. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  14. Development of a secondary electron energy analyzer for a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magara, Hideyuki; Tomita, Takeshi; Kondo, Yukihito; Sato, Takafumi; Akase, Zentaro; Shindo, Daisuke

    2018-04-01

    A secondary electron (SE) energy analyzer was developed for a transmission electron microscope. The analyzer comprises a microchannel plate (MCP) for detecting electrons, a coil for collecting SEs emitted from the specimen, a tube for reducing the number of backscattered electrons incident on the MCP, and a retarding mesh for selecting the energy of SEs incident on the MCP. The detection of the SEs associated with charging phenomena around a charged specimen was attempted by performing electron holography and SE spectroscopy using the energy analyzer. The results suggest that it is possible to obtain the energy spectra of SEs using the analyzer and the charging states of a specimen by electron holography simultaneously.

  15. Study and realization of an electron gun at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camus, P.

    1977-01-01

    This work presents the theoretical concepts and experimental design of an electron gun. This gun is working in the weak energy range and the focus position is independant of electron energy measurements and analysis methods of the electron beam are described [fr

  16. Modified electron acoustic field and energy applied to observation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@yahoo.com, E-mail: hgomaa-eg@mans.edu.eg [College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul Aziz University, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); El-Shewy, E. K. [Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Improved electrostatic acoustic field and energy have been debated in vortex trapped hot electrons and fluid of cold electrons with pressure term plasmas. The perturbed higher-order modified-Korteweg-de Vries equation (PhomKdV) has been worked out. The effect of trapping and electron temperatures on the electro-field and energy properties in auroral plasmas has been inspected.

  17. Atomistic modeling determination of placeholder binding energy of Ti, C, and N atoms on a-Fe (100) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, X J; Liu, Y P; Han, S P

    2015-01-01

    A Fe(100) surface containing Ti, C, and N was constructed and optimized to study the placeholder binding energy of the Ti, C, and N surface atoms; this was achieved by searching the transition state with the LST (linear synchronous transit) method of the CASTEP (Cambridge Serial Total Energy Package) module. Also, the authors analyzed electron structures to determine how Ti, C, and N atoms strengthen the Fe(100) surface. The results show that when Ti, C, or N atoms take placeholder alone, or simultaneously at the Fe(100) surface, the structure stability is at its best. When including Ti, C, and N as solid solutions on the Fe(100) surface, orbital electrons of Fe3d, Ti3d, C2p, and N2p hybridize near the Fermi level; the number of electronic bonding peaks increase and bonding capacity enhances. Also, a large amount of covalent bonds formed. Covalent bonds and metallic bond coexisted. (paper)

  18. Heparin binding sites on Ross River virus revealed by electron cryo-microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Heil, Marintha; Kuhn, Richard J.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    Cell surface glycosaminoglycans play important roles in cell adhesion and viral entry. Laboratory strains of two alphaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus, have been shown to utilize heparan sulfate as an attachment receptor, whereas Ross River virus (RRV) does not significantly interact with it. However, a single amino acid substitution at residue 218 in the RRV E2 glycoprotein adapts the virus to heparan sulfate binding and expands the host range of the virus into chicken embryo fibroblasts. Structures of the RRV mutant, E2 N218R, and its complex with heparin were determined through the use of electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction methods. Heparin was found to bind at the distal end of the RRV spikes, in a region of the E2 glycoprotein that has been previously implicated in cell-receptor recognition and antibody binding

  19. Elemental distribution imaging by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Hiroki

    1996-01-01

    EFTEM is new microscopy with the object of visualizing high resolution quantitative elemental distribution. The measurement principles and the present state of EFTEM studies are explained by the examples of measurement of the elemental distributions. EFTEM is a combination of the transmission electron microscope with the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EFLS). EFTEM method sets the slit in the specific energy field and put the electron passing the slit back in the microscopic image. The qualitative elemental analysis is obtained by observing the position of the absorption end of core electronic excitation spectrum and the quantitative one by determining the core electronic excitation strength of the specific atom depend on filtering with energy selector slit. The binding state and the local structure in the neighborhood of excited atom is determined by the fine structure of absorption end. By the chemical mapping method, the distribution image of chemical binding state is visualized by the imaging chemical map obtained by filtering the specific peak strength of fine structure with the narrow energy selector slit. The fine powder of lead chromate (PbCrO 4 ) covered with silica glass was shown as a typical example of the elemental distribution image of core electronic excitation spectrum. The quantitative analysis method of elemental distribution image is explained. The possibility of single atom analysis at nanometer was shown by the example of nanotube observed by EFTEM. (S.Y.)

  20. Photon and electron collimator effects on electron output and abutting segments in energy modulated electron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, Lennart; Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    In energy modulated electron therapy a large fraction of the segments will be arranged as abutting segments where inhomogeneities in segment matching regions must be kept as small as possible. Furthermore, the output variation between different segments should be minimized and must in all cases be well predicted. For electron therapy with add-on collimators, both the electron MLC (eMLC) and the photon MLC (xMLC) contribute to these effects when an xMLC tracking technique is utilized to reduce the x-ray induced leakage. Two add-on electron collimator geometries have been analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations: One isocentric eMLC geometry with an isocentric clearance of 35 cm and air or helium in the treatment head, and one conventional proximity geometry with a clearance of 5 cm and air in the treatment head. The electron fluence output for 22.5 MeV electrons is not significantly affected by the xMLC if the shielding margins are larger than 2-3 cm. For small field sizes and 9.6 MeV electrons, the isocentric design with helium in the treatment head or shielding margins larger than 3 cm is needed to avoid a reduced electron output. Dose inhomogeneity in the matching region of electron segments is, in general, small when collimator positions are adjusted to account for divergence in the field. The effect of xMLC tracking on the electron output can be made negligible while still obtaining a substantially reduced x-ray leakage contribution. Collimator scattering effects do not interfere significantly when abutting beam techniques are properly applied

  1. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-14

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  2. Electronic energy distribution function at high electron swarm energies in neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.; Fletcher, J.

    1995-01-01

    Electron swarms moving through a gas under the influence of an applied electric field have been extensively investigated. Swarms at high energies, as measured by the ratio of the applied field to the gas number density, E/N, which are predominant in many applications have, in general, been neglected. Discharges at E/N in the range 300 0 < 133 Pa using a differentially pumped vacuum system in which the swarm electrons are extracted from the discharge and energy analysed in both a parallel plate retarded potential analyser and a cylindrical electrostatic analyser. Both pre-breakdown and post-breakdown discharges have been studied. Initial results indicate that as the discharge traverses breakdown no sudden change in the nature of the discharge occurs and that the discharge can be described by both a Monte Carlo simulation and by a Boltzmann treatment given by Phelps et al. (1987). 18 refs., 8 figs

  3. Tight-binding electrons on triangular and kagome lattices under staggered modulated magnetic fields: quantum Hall effects and Hofstadter butterflies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Juan; Wang Yifei; Gong Changde

    2011-01-01

    We consider the tight-binding models of electrons on a two-dimensional triangular lattice and kagome lattice under staggered modulated magnetic fields. Such fields have two components: a uniform-flux part with strength φ, and a staggered-flux part with strength Δφ. Various properties of the Hall conductances and Hofstadter butterflies are studied. When φ is fixed, variation of Δφ leads to the quantum Hall transitions and Chern numbers of Landau subbands being redistributed between neighboring pairs. The energy spectra with nonzero Δφs have similar fractal structures but quite different energy gaps compared with the original Hofstadter butterflies of Δφ = 0. Moreover, the fan-like structure of Landau levels in the low magnetic field region is also modified appreciably by Δφ.

  4. Tight-binding electrons on triangular and kagome lattices under staggered modulated magnetic fields: quantum Hall effects and Hofstadter butterflies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Juan; Wang Yifei; Gong Changde, E-mail: yfwang_nju@hotmail.com [Center for Statistical and Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, and Department of Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2011-04-20

    We consider the tight-binding models of electrons on a two-dimensional triangular lattice and kagome lattice under staggered modulated magnetic fields. Such fields have two components: a uniform-flux part with strength {phi}, and a staggered-flux part with strength {Delta}{phi}. Various properties of the Hall conductances and Hofstadter butterflies are studied. When {phi} is fixed, variation of {Delta}{phi} leads to the quantum Hall transitions and Chern numbers of Landau subbands being redistributed between neighboring pairs. The energy spectra with nonzero {Delta}{phi}s have similar fractal structures but quite different energy gaps compared with the original Hofstadter butterflies of {Delta}{phi} = 0. Moreover, the fan-like structure of Landau levels in the low magnetic field region is also modified appreciably by {Delta}{phi}.

  5. Electronic structure of xenon implanted with low energy in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, P.F.; Landers, R.; Oliveira, M.H. de; Alvarez, F.; Marques, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure of Xe implanted in amorphous silicon (a-Si) films are investigated. Xe atoms were implanted with low energy by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) technique during growth of the a-Si films. The Xe implantation energy varied in the 0-300 eV energy range. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Auger excited spectroscopy (XAES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used for investigating the Xe electronic structure. The Xe M 4 N 45 N 45 transitions were measured to extract the Auger parameter and to analyze the initial state and relaxation contributions. It was found that the binding energy variation is mainly due to initial state contribution. The relaxation energy variation also shows that the Xe trapped environment depends on the implantation energy. XAS measurements reveals that Xe atoms are dispersed in the a-Si matrix

  6. Magnetic field-dependent of binding energy in GaN/InGaN/GaN spherical QDQW nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous study of magnetic field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN (core|well|shell) spherical quantum dot–quantum well (SQDQW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and an infinite deep potential describing the quantum confinement effect. A Ritz variational approach is used taking into account of the electron-impurity correlation and the magnetic field effect in the trial wave-function. It appears that the binding energy depends strongly on the external magnetic field, the impurity's position and the structure radius. It has been found that: (i) the magnetic field effect is more marked in large layer than in thin layer and (ii) it is more pronounced in the spherical layer center than in its extremities

  7. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spherical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic field, the ...

  8. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spher- ical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic ...

  9. Electronic configurations and energies in some thermodynamically correlated laves compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.M.

    1979-04-01

    The known electronic configurations of simple elements in Laves compounds are correlated with those of the more complex systems to determine their electronic configurations and gaseous state promotion energies

  10. Systematic studies of binding energy dependence of neutron-proton momentum correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y B; Ma, Y G; Shen, W Q; Ma, G L; Wang, K; Cai, X Z; Zhong, C; Guo, W; Chen, J G; Fang, D Q; Tian, W D; Zhou, X F

    2004-01-01

    Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) results of the neutron-proton correlation function have been systematically investigated for a series of nuclear reactions with light projectiles with the help of the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The relationship between the binding energy per nucleon of the projectiles and the strength of the neutron-proton HBT at small relative momentum has been obtained. Results show that neutron-proton HBT results are sensitive to the binding energy per nucleon

  11. Formation of a superhigh energy electron spectrum in the Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaronyan, F.A.; Ambartsumyan, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of superhigh energy electron spectrum in the disk of the galaxy and halo is considered. A different behaviour of the electron spectrum within the framework of capture models in disk or halo, in the energy region E> or approximately 10 5 GeV is revealed due to the account of relativistic corrections ir the energy losses of electrons during the inverse Compton scattering. A comparison with the existing experimental data is carried out

  12. SAAMBE: Webserver to Predict the Charge of Binding Free Energy Caused by Amino Acids Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Dai, Luogeng; Alexov, Emil

    2016-04-12

    Predicting the effect of amino acid substitutions on protein-protein affinity (typically evaluated via the change of protein binding free energy) is important for both understanding the disease-causing mechanism of missense mutations and guiding protein engineering. In addition, researchers are also interested in understanding which energy components are mostly affected by the mutation and how the mutation affects the overall structure of the corresponding protein. Here we report a webserver, the Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) webserver, which addresses the demand for tools for predicting the change of protein binding free energy. SAAMBE is an easy to use webserver, which only requires that a coordinate file be inputted and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The user specifies the mutation position, wild type residue and type of mutation to be made. The server predicts the binding free energy change, the changes of the corresponding energy components and provides the energy minimized 3D structure of the wild type and mutant proteins for download. The SAAMBE protocol performance was tested by benchmarking the predictions against over 1300 experimentally determined changes of binding free energy and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.62 was obtained. How the predictions can be used for discriminating disease-causing from harmless mutations is discussed. The webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/saambe_webserver/.

  13. Ion Binding Energies Determining Functional Transport of ClC Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Guo, Xu; Zou, Xian-Wu; Sang, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    The ClC-type proteins, a large family of chloride transport proteins ubiquitously expressed in biological organisms, have been extensively studied for decades. Biological function of ClC proteins can be reflected by analyzing the binding situation of Cl- ions. We investigate ion binding properties of ClC-ec1 protein with the atomic molecular dynamics simulation approach. The calculated electrostatic binding energy results indicate that Cl- at the central binding site Scen has more binding stability than the internal binding site Sint. Quantitative comparison between the latest experimental heat release data isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and our calculated results demonstrates that chloride ions prefer to bind at Scen than Sint in the wild-type ClC-ec1 structure and prefer to bind at Sext and Scen than Sint in mutant E148A/E148Q structures. Even though the chloride ions make less contribution to heat release when binding to Sint and are relatively unstable in the Cl- pathway, they are still part contributors for the Cl- functional transport. This work provides a guide rule to estimate the importance of Cl- at the binding sites and how chloride ions have influences on the function of ClC proteins.

  14. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered

  15. Power electronic converter systems for direct drive renewable energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents power electronic conversion systems for wind and marine energy generation applications, in particular, direct drive generator energy conversion systems. Various topologies are presented and system design optimization and reliability are briefly discussed....

  16. LAT Perspectives in Detection of High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Ormes, J.F.; Funk, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The LAT science objectives and capabilities in the detection of high energy electrons in the energy range from 20 GeV to ∼1.5 TeV are presented. LAT simulations are used to establish the event selections. It is found that maintaining the efficiency of electron detection at the level of 30%, the residual hadron contamination does not exceed 2-3% of the electron flux. It is expected to collect ∼ ten million of electrons with the energy above 20 GeV for one year of observation. Precise spectrum reconstruction with collected electron statistics opens the unique opportunity to investigate several important problems such as models of IC radiation, revealing the signatures of nearby sources such as high energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, testing the propagation model, and search for KKDM particles decay through their contribution to the electron spectrum

  17. Enhanced energy deposition symmetry by hot electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.; Mack, J.; Stover, E.; VanHulsteyn, D.; McCall, G.; Hauer, A.

    1981-01-01

    High energy electrons produced by resonance absorption carry the CO 2 laser energy absorbed in a laser fusion pellet. The symmetrization that can be achieved by lateral transport of the hot electrons as they deposit their energy is discussed. A K/sub α/ experiment shows a surprising symmetrization of energy deposition achieved by adding a thin layer of plastic to a copper sphere. Efforts to numerically model this effect are described

  18. Accurate determination of the binding energy of the formic acid dimer: The importance of geometry relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    The formic acid dimer in its C2h-symmetrical cyclic form is stabilized by two equivalent H-bonds. The currently accepted interaction energy is 18.75 kcal/mol whereas the experimental binding energy D0 value is only 14.22 ±0.12 kcal/mol [F. Kollipost, R. W. Larsen, A. V. Domanskaya, M. Nörenberg, and M. A. Suhm, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 151101 (2012)]. Calculation of the binding energies De and D0 at the CCSD(T) (Coupled Cluster with Single and Double excitations and perturbative Triple excitations)/CBS (Complete Basis Set) level of theory, utilizing CCSD(T)/CBS geometries and the frequencies of the dimer and monomer, reveals that there is a 3.2 kcal/mol difference between interaction energy and binding energy De, which results from (i) not relaxing the geometry of the monomers upon dissociation of the dimer and (ii) approximating CCSD(T) correlation effects with MP2. The most accurate CCSD(T)/CBS values obtained in this work are De = 15.55 and D0 = 14.32 kcal/mol where the latter binding energy differs from the experimental value by 0.1 kcal/mol. The necessity of employing augmented VQZ and VPZ calculations and relaxing monomer geometries of H-bonded complexes upon dissociation to obtain reliable binding energies is emphasized.

  19. Electron emission from materials at low excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urma, N.; Kijek, M.; Millar, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: An experimental system has been designed and developed with the purpose of measuring the total electron emission yield from materials at low energy excitation. In the first instance the reliability of the system was checked by measuring the total electron emission yield for a well defined surface (aluminium 99.45%). The obtained data was in the expected range given by the literature, and consequently the system will be used further for measuring the total electron yield for a range of materials with interest in the instrumentation industry. We intend to measure the total electron emission yield under electron bombardment as a function of incident electron energy up to 1200 eV, angle of incidence, state of the surface and environment to which the surface has been exposed. Dependence of emission on total electron irradiated dose is also of interest. For many practical application of the 'Secondary Electron Emission', the total electron yield is desired to be as large as possible. The above phenomenon has practical applicability in electron multiplier tube and Scanning electron microscopy - when by means of the variation of the yield of the emitted electrons one may produce visible images of small sample areas. The electron multiplier tube, is a device which utilises the above effect to detect and amplify both single particles and low currents streams of charged particles. The majority of electron tubes use electrons with low energy, hundreds of eV. Not a lot has been published in the literature about this regime and also about the emission when the impinging electrons have small energy, up to 1 KeV. The information obtained from the experimental measurements concerning the total electron emission yield is used to asses the investigated materials as a potential electron emitting surfaces or dynodes in an electron multiplier tube

  20. Influence of high energy electrons on ECRH in LHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogasawara S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The central bulk electron temperature of more than 20 keV is achieved in LHD as a result of increasing the injection power and the lowering the electron density near 2 × 1018 m−3. Such collision-less regime is important from the aspect of the neoclassical transport and also the potential structure formation. The presences of appreciable amount of high energy electrons are indicated from hard X-ray PHA, and the discrepancy between the stored energy and kinetic energy estimated from Thomson scattering. ECE spectrum are also sensitive to the presence of high energy electrons and discussed by solving the radiation transfer equation. The ECRH power absorption to the bulk and the high energy electrons are dramatically affected by the acceleration and the confinement of high energy electrons. The heating mechanisms and the acceleration process of high energy electrons are discussed by comparing the experimental results and the ray tracing calculation under assumed various density and mean energy of high energy electrons.

  1. ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers in the format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series, and within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 will composed of four Terms throughout the year: Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Winter Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 10:00 to 12:30. The...

  2. Role of Electrostatics in Protein-RNA Binding: The Global vs the Local Energy Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Zhaleh; Guzman, Irisbel; Gnutt, David; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-09-14

    U1A protein-stem loop 2 RNA association is a basic step in the assembly of the spliceosomal U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein. Long-range electrostatic interactions due to the positive charge of U1A are thought to provide high binding affinity for the negatively charged RNA. Short range interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and contacts between RNA bases and protein side chains, favor a specific binding site. Here, we propose that electrostatic interactions are as important as local contacts in biasing the protein-RNA energy landscape toward a specific binding site. We show by using molecular dynamics simulations that deletion of two long-range electrostatic interactions (K22Q and K50Q) leads to mutant-specific alternative RNA bound states. One of these states preserves short-range interactions with aromatic residues in the original binding site, while the other one does not. We test the computational prediction with experimental temperature-jump kinetics using a tryptophan probe in the U1A-RNA binding site. The two mutants show the distinct predicted kinetic behaviors. Thus, the stem loop 2 RNA has multiple binding sites on a rough RNA-protein binding landscape. We speculate that the rough protein-RNA binding landscape, when biased to different local minima by electrostatics, could be one way that protein-RNA interactions evolve toward new binding sites and novel function.

  3. Metal centre effects on HNO binding in porphyrins and the electronic origin: metal's electronic configuration, position in the periodic table, and oxidation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Fang, Weihai; Zhang, Yong

    2012-04-21

    HNO binds to many different metals in organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. To help understand experimentally observed metal centre effects, a quantum chemical investigation was performed, revealing clear general binding trends with respect to metal centre characteristics and the electronic origin for the first time. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  4. Scaling laws in high energy electron-nuclear processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemtob, M.

    1980-11-01

    We survey the parton model description of high momentum transfer electron scattering processes with nuclei. We discuss both nucleon and quark parton models and confront the patterns of scaling laws violations, induced by binding effects, in the former, and perturbative QCD effects, in the latter

  5. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on the binding energy and optical absorption of a multilayered quantum dot with a parabolic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortakaya, Sami; Kirak, Muharrem

    2016-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and impurity on the electronic and optical properties of spherical core/shell/well/shell (CSWS) nanostructure with parabolic confinement potential is investigated theoretically. The energy levels and wave functions of the structure are calculated by using shooting method within the effective-mass approximation. The numerical results show that the ground state donor binding energy as a function layer thickness very sensitively depends on the magnitude of pressure and temperature. Also, we investigate the probability distributions to understand clearly electronic properties. The obtained results show that the existence of the pressure and temperature has great influence on the electronic and optical properties. (paper)

  6. Communication: Towards the binding energy and vibrational red shift of the simplest organic hydrogen bond: Harmonic constraints for methanol dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, Matthias; Suhm, Martin A.; Mata, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    The discrepancy between experimental and harmonically predicted shifts of the OH stretching fundamental of methanol upon hydrogen bonding to a second methanol unit is too large to be blamed mostly on diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicity corrections. It is shown that a decisive contribution comes from post-MP2 electron correlation effects, which appear not to be captured by any of the popular density functionals. We also identify that the major deficiency is in the description of the donor OH bond. Together with estimates for the electronic and harmonically zero-point corrected dimer binding energies, this work provides essential constraints for a quantitative description of this simple hydrogen bond. The spectroscopic dissociation energy is predicted to be larger than 18 kJ/mol and the harmonic OH-stretching fundamental shifts by about −121 cm −1 upon dimerization, somewhat more than in the anharmonic experiment (−111 cm −1 )

  7. Evaluations of the electron energy distribution in multidipole plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.R.; Kessel, M.A.; Sealock, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    In a previous paper a preliminary evaluation of the electron energy distribution in multidipole plasmas was presented. A polynominal regression technique for evaluating the distribution function from Langmuir probe current-voltage characteristics was described. This paper presents an extension of that analysis and the evaluations of the electron energy distributions in multidipole argon and hydrogen plasmas

  8. Sequential Proton Loss Electron Transfer in Deactivation of Iron(IV) Binding Protein by Tyrosine Based Food Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    The iron(IV) binding protein ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)=O, was found to be reduced by tyrosine based food components in aqueous solution through a sequential proton loss electron transfer reaction mechanism without binding to the protein as confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Dopamine a...

  9. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Intitute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10, Bandung, Indonesia 40132 dhani@as.itb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  10. Scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    A source of spin polarized electrons with remarkable characteristics based on negative electron affinity (NEA) GaAs has recently been developed. It constitutes a unique tool to investigate spin dependent interactions in electron scattering processes. The characteristics and working principles of the source are briefly described. Some theoretical aspects of the scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals are discussed. Finally, the results of the first polarized low-energy electron diffraction experiment using the NEA GaAs source are reviewed; they give information about the surface magnetization of ferromagnetic Ni (110). (Author) [pt

  11. Stark effect-dependent of ground-state donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Zorkani, Izeddine; Jorio, Anouar

    2013-01-01

    Using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model and effective mass approximation, the ground-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (WZ) (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wires (PQWWs) subjected to external electric field is investigated. An effective radius of a cylindrical QWW describing the strength of the lateral confinement is introduced. The results show that (i) the position of the largest electron probability density in x–y plane is located at a point and it is pushed along the negative sense by the electric field directed along the positive sense, (ii) the ground-state binding energy is largest for the impurity located at this point and starts to decrease when the impurity is away from this point, (iii) the ground-state binding energy decreases with increase in the external electric field and effective radius, and (iv) the Stark-shift increases with the increase of the external electric field and the effective radius

  12. Electron energy distribution from intense electron beams in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Cheng, Wai; Dvore, D.; Zahniser, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A model was developed to calculate the electron energy spectrum created by an electron beam in the upper atmosphere. A significant feature of the model is the inclusion of the effects of electron-electron collisions which are important at high beam intensity when the ratio of the electron to ambient gas density is high. Comparing the calculated results for a 2.6-kV, 20-A beam at 110-km altitude from models with and without the electron-electron collision term, the electron-electron collisions have the effect of smoothing out the electron spectrum in the low-energy region ( 2 and O 2 are filled in, resulting in an increase in the calculated production rate of these species compared with model calculations that neglect this effect

  13. Contribution of charge symmetry breaking interactions in binding energy difference of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghari, M.

    2006-01-01

    Nolen-Schiffer Anomaly in mirror nuclei due to the NN interactions with isospin mixing between T=0 and T=1 mesons of the same spin and parity are investigated. With the computation of coulomb energy along with the charge symmetry breaking effects provide a reasonably accurate description of binding energy differences between 39 Ca- 39 K , 41 Sc- 41 Ca mirror nuclei

  14. A condensed matter electron momentum spectrometer with parallel detection in energy and momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storer, P; Caprari, R S; Clark, S A.C.; Vos, M; Weigold, E

    1994-03-01

    An electron momentum spectrometer has been constructed which measures electron binding energies and momenta by fully determining the kinematics of the incident, scattered and ejected electrons resulting from (e,2e) ionizing collisions in a thin solid foil. The spectrometer operates with incident beam energies of 20-30 keV in an asymmetric, non-coplanar scattering geometry. Bethe ridge kinematics are used. The technique uses transmission through the target foil, but it is most sensitive to the surface from which the 1.2 keV electrons emerge, to a depth of about 5 nm. Scattered and ejected electron energies and azimuthal angles are detected in parallel using position sensitive detection, yielding true coincidence count rates of 6 Hz from a 5.5 nm thick evaporated carbon target and an incident beam current of around 100 nA. The energy resolution is approximately 1.3 eV and momentum resolution approximately 0.15 a{sub 0}{sup -1}. The energy resolution could readily be improved by monochromating the incident electron beam. 28 refs., 15 figs.

  15. A condensed matter electron momentum spectrometer with parallel detection in energy and momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storer, P.; Caprari, R.S.; Clark, S.A.C.; Vos, M.; Weigold, E.

    1994-03-01

    An electron momentum spectrometer has been constructed which measures electron binding energies and momenta by fully determining the kinematics of the incident, scattered and ejected electrons resulting from (e,2e) ionizing collisions in a thin solid foil. The spectrometer operates with incident beam energies of 20-30 keV in an asymmetric, non-coplanar scattering geometry. Bethe ridge kinematics are used. The technique uses transmission through the target foil, but it is most sensitive to the surface from which the 1.2 keV electrons emerge, to a depth of about 5 nm. Scattered and ejected electron energies and azimuthal angles are detected in parallel using position sensitive detection, yielding true coincidence count rates of 6 Hz from a 5.5 nm thick evaporated carbon target and an incident beam current of around 100 nA. The energy resolution is approximately 1.3 eV and momentum resolution approximately 0.15 a 0 -1 . The energy resolution could readily be improved by monochromating the incident electron beam. 28 refs., 15 figs

  16. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Fibril Binding to Catalase: A Transmission Electron Microscopy and Microplate Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G. N. Milton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-associated human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a 37-amino-acid peptide that forms fibrils in vitro and in vivo. Human IAPP fibrils are toxic in a similar manner to Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ and prion protein (PrP fibrils. Previous studies have shown that catalase binds to Aβ fibrils and appears to recognize a region containing the Gly-Ala-Ile-Ile sequence that is similar to the Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu sequence found in human IAPP residues 24-27. This study presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM—based analysis of fibril formation and the binding of human erythrocyte catalase to IAPP fibrils. The results show that human IAPP 1-37, 8-37, and 20-29 peptides form fibrils with diverse and polymorphic structures. All three forms of IAPP bound catalase, and complexes of IAPP 1-37 or 8-37 with catalase were identified by immunoassay. The binding of biotinylated IAPP to catalase was high affinity with a KD of 0.77nM, and could be inhibited by either human or rat IAPP 1-37 and 8-37 forms. Fibrils formed by the PrP 118-135 peptide with a Gly-Ala-Val-Val sequence also bound catalase. These results suggest that catalase recognizes a Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu—like sequence in amyloid fibril-forming peptides. For IAPP 1-37 and 8-37, the catalase binding was primarily directed towards fibrillar rather than ribbon-like structures, suggesting differences in the accessibility of the human IAPP 24-27 Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu region. This suggests that catalase may be able to discriminate between different structural forms of IAPP fibrils. The ability of catalase to bind IAPP, Aβ, and PrP fibrils demonstrates the presence of similar accessible structural motifs that may be targets for antiamyloid therapeutic development.

  17. Low-energy electron microdosimetry of CS-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1980-09-01

    The mass of tissue irradiated by an internal emitter depends upon the distribution of the radionuclide within the organism and the type of radiation emitted. The range (95% absorption) of low-energy electron effectively defines the sensitive volume in which the energy of the emitted electron is deposited. Accordingly, in the case of Auger electron microdosimetry of internal emitters the correct definition of the sensitive volume is of paramount importance. The amount of energy delivered by the monoenergetic electrons emitted by the decay system 137 Cs → sup(137m)Ba to spherical volumes of water-like tissue media of radii equivalent to the estimated ranges of those electrons in water is calculated and discussed as far as the variations of the estimated ranges of electrons as a function of the initial energy of emission are concerned. Although there are still many uncertainties on the actual ranges of low-energy electrons, one can state confidently that the ranges of the Auger electrons of the decay system 137 Cs → 137 sup(m) Ba → 137 Ba can be considered to be in the same order of magnitude of the diameter of a cell. The energy deposition in spherical volumes of water-like tissue media, considered equivalent to the sensitive volumes for the Auger electrons of the decay system 137 Cs → 137 sub(m) Ba → 137 Ba, range for several orders of magnitude from 10 2 to about 10 10 times higher than the energy deposition in similar media by the internal conversion electrons of this decay system. If equivalent variations of energy deposition per unit mass occur when the masses considered are cellular, and subcellular structures, then the effects into the sensitive volume should be taken into biological consideration as far as the microdosimetry of low-energy electrons (approximately equal to 10 keV) is considered, whenever there is internal localization of Auger emitters. (Author) [pt

  18. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  19. Trends in Power Electronics and Control of Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Iov, Florin; Kerekes, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    term) based energy sources to renewable energy sources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss trends of the most emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy and photovoltaics, which...... by means of power electronics are changing the future electrical infrastructure but also contributes steadily more to non-carbon based electricity production. Most focus is on the power electronics technologies used. In the case of photovoltaics transformer-less systems are discussed as they have...

  20. Hypernuclear interactions and the binding energies of and hypernuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1988-01-01

    By use of variational calculations a reasonable hadronic description is obtained of the s-shell hypernuclei, of /sub /ZBe, and of the well depth, with N forces which are consistent with p scattering and which are quite strongly spin-dependent, with reasonable TPE NN forces with strongly repulsive dispersive-type NN forces. For the latter we also consider a spin-dependent version which is somewhat favored by our analysis. /sub /ZBe is treated as a 2ed + system and is significantly overbound, approx. =1 MeV, if only ed ed and ed potentials are used. An ed ed potential obtained from the NN forces nicely accounts for this overbinding. The hypernuclei /sub /WHe and /sub / Be are treated as ed + 2 and 2ed + 2 systems. Use of the /sub / Be event gives approx. =1.5 MeV too little binding for /sub /WHe. The S0 potential obtained from /sub / Be is quite strongly attractive, comparable to the N and also to the NN potential without OPE. 18 refs.

  1. Electronic Properties of SiNTs Under External Electric and Magnetic Fields Using the Tight-Binding Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the electronic properties of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) under external transverse electric fields and axial magnetic fields using the tight-binding approximation. It was found that, after switching on the electric and magnetic fields, band modifications such as distortion of degeneracy, change in energy dispersion and subband spacing, and bandgap size reduction occur. The bandgap of silicon gear-like nanotubes (Si g-NTs) decreases linearly with increasing electric field strength, but the bandgap for silicon hexagonal nanotubes (Si h-NTs) first increases and then decreases (metallic) or first remains constant and then decreases (semiconducting). Our results show that the bandgap of Si h-NTs is very sensitive to both electric and magnetic fields, unlike Si g-NTs, which are more sensitive to electric than magnetic fields.

  2. Power Electronics Control of Wind Energy in Distributed Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2008-01-01

    is to change the electrical power production sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. The other is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss the most...... emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy, which by means of power electronics are changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. Power electronics is the enabling technology and the presentation will cover the development in wind turbine...... technology from kW to MW, discuss which power electronic solutions are most feasible and used today....

  3. Polaron binding energy and effective mass in the GaAs film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhenhua; Yan Liangxing; Tian Qiang; Li Hua; Liu Bingcan

    2012-01-01

    The binding energy and effective mass of a polaron in a GaAs film deposited on the Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As substrate are studied theoretically by using the fractional-dimensional space approach. Our calculations show that the polaron binding energy and mass shift decrease monotonously with increasing the film thickness. For the film thicknesses with L w ≤ 70Å and the substrate thicknesses with L b ≤ 200Å, the different values of the substrate thickness influence the polaron binding energy and mass shift in the GaAs film. The polaron binding energy and mass shift increase monotonously with increasing the substrate thickness. For the film thickness with L w ≥ 70Å or the substrate thicknesses with L b ≤ 200Å, the different values of the substrate thickness have no significant influence on the polaron binding energy and mass shift in the GaAs film deposited on the Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As substrate.

  4. BFEE: A User-Friendly Graphical Interface Facilitating Absolute Binding Free-Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haohao; Gumbart, James C; Chen, Haochuan; Shao, Xueguang; Cai, Wensheng; Chipot, Christophe

    2018-03-26

    Quantifying protein-ligand binding has attracted the attention of both theorists and experimentalists for decades. Many methods for estimating binding free energies in silico have been reported in recent years. Proper use of the proposed strategies requires, however, adequate knowledge of the protein-ligand complex, the mathematical background for deriving the underlying theory, and time for setting up the simulations, bookkeeping, and postprocessing. Here, to minimize human intervention, we propose a toolkit aimed at facilitating the accurate estimation of standard binding free energies using a geometrical route, coined the binding free-energy estimator (BFEE), and introduced it as a plug-in of the popular visualization program VMD. Benefitting from recent developments in new collective variables, BFEE can be used to generate the simulation input files, based solely on the structure of the complex. Once the simulations are completed, BFEE can also be utilized to perform the post-treatment of the free-energy calculations, allowing the absolute binding free energy to be estimated directly from the one-dimensional potentials of mean force in simulation outputs. The minimal amount of human intervention required during the whole process combined with the ergonomic graphical interface makes BFEE a very effective and practical tool for the end-user.

  5. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, K.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limao-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, D. B.; Brunger, M. J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulat...

  6. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weina; Li Ping; Gou Qingquan; Zhao Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li 13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li 13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of -96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a 0 . When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of -96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li 13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li 13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li 2 , 0.494 eV for Li 3 , 0.7878 eV for Li 4 , 0.632 eV for Li 5 , and 0.674 eV for Li 7 calculated by us previously. This means that the Li 13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy

  7. Performance of the electron energy-loss spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Huebner, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the electron energy-loss spectrometer incorporating a new high-resolution hemispherical monochromator are reported. The apparatus achieved an energy-resolution of 25 meV in the elastic scattering mode, and angular distributions of elastically scattered electrons were in excellent agreement with previous workers. Preliminary energy-loss spectra for several atmospheric gases demonstrate the excellent versatility and stable operation of the improved system. 12 references

  8. Estimating Atomic Contributions to Hydration and Binding Using Free Energy Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Benedict W J; Huggins, David J

    2018-05-08

    We present a general method called atom-wise free energy perturbation (AFEP), which extends a conventional molecular dynamics free energy perturbation (FEP) simulation to give the contribution to a free energy change from each atom. AFEP is derived from an expansion of the Zwanzig equation used in the exponential averaging method by defining that the system total energy can be partitioned into contributions from each atom. A partitioning method is assumed and used to group terms in the expansion to correspond to individual atoms. AFEP is applied to six example free energy changes to demonstrate the method. Firstly, the hydration free energies of methane, methanol, methylamine, methanethiol, and caffeine in water. AFEP highlights the atoms in the molecules that interact favorably or unfavorably with water. Finally AFEP is applied to the binding free energy of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease to lopinavir, and AFEP reveals the contribution of each atom to the binding free energy, indicating candidate areas of the molecule to improve to produce a more strongly binding inhibitor. FEP gives a single value for the free energy change and is already a very useful method. AFEP gives a free energy change for each "part" of the system being simulated, where part can mean individual atoms, chemical groups, amino acids, or larger partitions depending on what the user is trying to measure. This method should have various applications in molecular dynamics studies of physical, chemical, or biochemical phenomena, specifically in the field of computational drug discovery.

  9. Binding energies of hypernuclei and Λ-nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1984-01-01

    Variational calculations indicate that a reasonable description of Λp scattering and of Λ separation energies can be obtained in terms of ΛN plus dispersive and TPE ΛNN forces. Results for the ΛΛ interaction and for 6 /sub Λ/He obtained from an analysis of 10 /sub ΛΛ/Be are discussed. Coulomb and ΛN charge symmetry breaking effects in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed

  10. Towards Automated Binding Affinity Prediction Using an Iterative Linear Interaction Energy Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ruben Vosmeer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Binding affinity prediction of potential drugs to target and off-target proteins is an essential asset in drug development. These predictions require the calculation of binding free energies. In such calculations, it is a major challenge to properly account for both the dynamic nature of the protein and the possible variety of ligand-binding orientations, while keeping computational costs tractable. Recently, an iterative Linear Interaction Energy (LIE approach was introduced, in which results from multiple simulations of a protein-ligand complex are combined into a single binding free energy using a Boltzmann weighting-based scheme. This method was shown to reach experimental accuracy for flexible proteins while retaining the computational efficiency of the general LIE approach. Here, we show that the iterative LIE approach can be used to predict binding affinities in an automated way. A workflow was designed using preselected protein conformations, automated ligand docking and clustering, and a (semi-automated molecular dynamics simulation setup. We show that using this workflow, binding affinities of aryloxypropanolamines to the malleable Cytochrome P450 2D6 enzyme can be predicted without a priori knowledge of dominant protein-ligand conformations. In addition, we provide an outlook for an approach to assess the quality of the LIE predictions, based on simulation outcomes only.

  11. Computational scheme for pH-dependent binding free energy calculation with explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juyong; Miller, Benjamin T; Brooks, Bernard R

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to compute the pH-dependence of binding free energy with explicit solvent. Despite the importance of pH, the effect of pH has been generally neglected in binding free energy calculations because of a lack of accurate methods to model it. To address this limitation, we use a constant-pH methodology to obtain a true ensemble of multiple protonation states of a titratable system at a given pH and analyze the ensemble using the Bennett acceptance ratio (BAR) method. The constant pH method is based on the combination of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) with the Hamiltonian replica exchange method (HREM), which yields an accurate semi-grand canonical ensemble of a titratable system. By considering the free energy change of constraining multiple protonation states to a single state or releasing a single protonation state to multiple states, the pH dependent binding free energy profile can be obtained. We perform benchmark simulations of a host-guest system: cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and benzimidazole (BZ). BZ experiences a large pKa shift upon complex formation. The pH-dependent binding free energy profiles of the benchmark system are obtained with three different long-range interaction calculation schemes: a cutoff, the particle mesh Ewald (PME), and the isotropic periodic sum (IPS) method. Our scheme captures the pH-dependent behavior of binding free energy successfully. Absolute binding free energy values obtained with the PME and IPS methods are consistent, while cutoff method results are off by 2 kcal mol(-1) . We also discuss the characteristics of three long-range interaction calculation methods for constant-pH simulations. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  12. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet kinetic energy is transferred into the form of mechanical stress forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate. Experimental results show energy of 0.3 μJ per droplet. The scenario of moderate falling drop intensity, i.e. 230 drops per second, yields a total energy of 400 μJ. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  13. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  14. Applications of Electronstatic Lenses to Electron Gun and Energy Analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sise, O.

    2004-01-01

    Focal properties and geometries are given for several types of electrostatic lens systems commonly needed in electron impact studies. One type is an electron gun which focuses electrons over a wide range of energy onto a fixed point, such as target, and the other type is an analyzer system which focuses scattered electrons of variable energy onto a fixed position, such as the entrance plane of an analyzer. There are many different types and geometries of these lenses for controlling and focusing of the electron beams. In this presentation we discussed the criteria used for the design of the electrostatic lenses associated with the electron gun and energy analyzers and determined the fundamental relationships between the operation and behaviour of multi-element electrostatic lenses, containing five, six and seven elements. The focusing of the electron beam was achieved by applying suitable voltages to the series of these lens elements, Design of the lens system for electron gun was based on our requirements that the beam at the target had a small spot size and zero beam angle, that is, afocal mode. For energy analyzer systems we considered the entrance of the hemispherical analyzer which determines the energy of the electron beam and discussed the focusing condition of this lens systems

  15. Degradation of vitamin C by low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Illenberger, Eugen

    2004-06-01

    We report on the degradation of gas phase vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) induced by low-energy electrons. In the energy range of (0-12) eV, different negatively charged fragments, attributed to the dehydro-ascorbic acid anion ((AA-H) -), OH -, O - and H -, are observed. The yield functions indicate that these ions are formed via dissociative electron attachment, DEA. While the formation of (AA-H) - is exclusively observed at sub-excitation energies (<1.5 eV), the other fragments arise from resonance features at higher energies. Possible implications of these observations for radiation damage and food treatment by high energy radiation are considered.

  16. CAMAC high energy physics electronics hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolpakov, I.F.

    1977-01-01

    CAMAC hardware for high energy physics large spectrometers and control systems is reviewed as is the development of CAMAC modules at the High Energy Laboratory, JINR (Dubna). The total number of crates used at the Laboratory is 179. The number of CAMAC modules of 120 different types exceeds 1700. The principles of organization and the structure of developed CAMAC systems are described. (author)

  17. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-09-10

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature.

  18. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  19. Nonequilibrium electron energy-loss kinetics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillon, C; Fatti, N D; Vallee, F

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafast energy exchanges of a non-Fermi electron gas with the lattice are investigated in silver clusters with sizes ranging from 4 to 26 nm using a femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence for a cluster-size-dependent slowing down of the short-time energy losses of the electron gas when it is strongly athermal. A constant rate is eventually reached after a few hundred femtoseconds, consistent with the electron gas internal thermalization kinetics, this behaviour reflecting evolution from an individual to a collective electron-lattice type of coupling. The timescale of this transient regime is reduced in small nanoparticles, in agreement with speeding up of the electron-electron interactions with size reduction. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron kinetics.

  20. Asymptotic theory of charge exchange for relativistic velocities and binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkov, Yu.N.; Ostrovskij, V.N.; Shevchenko, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The asymptotic theory of charge exchange (ATCE) at a large shock parameter rho is applied to the case of relativistic velocities and binding energies. The charge exchange reaction (1+e)+2 → 1+(e+2), when an electron from the bound 1Ssub(1/2) state on one particle transforms to the 1Ssub(1/2) state on the other, is considered. Oasic features of the method are as follows: 1) the representation of the transition amplitude in the form of multidimensional integral over some hypersurface; 2) the use of the saddle-point method for calculating necessary multidimensional integrals; 3) the refinement of wave functions as compared with the case of the absence of the interaction. The ATCE (at rho → infinity) makes it possible to obtain analytical results whose accuracy is determined solely with the shock parameter rho. A basic term of charge exchange amplitude asymptotics for 1Ssub(1/2) → 1Ssub(1/2) transitions has been calculated. It is possible to consider the ATCE as a peculiar reference with which theoretical and experimental results can be compared as well as to use the ATCE as boundary conditions during numerical calculations

  1. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employs crossed electric and magnetic fields to separate the electrons from ions as they are extracted from a negative ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full kinetic energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90* to each other, the electrons are separated from the plasma and remain at approximately the electrical potential of the generator in which they were generated. The electrons migrate from the ion beam path in a precessing motion out of the ion accelerating field region into an electron recovery region provided by a specially designed electron collector electrode. The electron collector electrode is uniformly spaced from a surface of the ion generator which is transverse to the direction of migration of the electrons and the two surfaces are contoured in a matching relationship which departs from a planar configuration to provide an electric field component in the recovery region which is parallel to the magnetic field thereby forcing the electrons to be directed into and collected by the electron collector electrode. The collector electrode is maintained at a potential slightly positive with respect to the ion generator so that the electrons are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply voltage energy

  2. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  3. Secondary electron emission yield in the limit of low electron energy

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, A.N.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Startsev, E.A.; Raitses, Y.; Demidov, V.I.

    2013-04-22

    Secondary electron emission (SEE) from solids plays an important role in many areas of science and technology.1 In recent years, there has been renewed interest in the experimental and theoretical studies of SEE. A recent study proposed that the reflectivity of very low energy electrons from solid surface approaches unity in the limit of zero electron energy2,3,4, If this was indeed the case, this effect would have profound implications on the formation of electron clouds in particle accelerators,2-4 plasma measurements with electrostatic Langmuir probes, and operation of Hall plasma thrusters for spacecraft propulsion5,6. It appears that, the proposed high electron reflectivity at low electron energies contradicts to numerous previous experimental studies of the secondary electron emission7. The goal of this note is to discuss possible causes of these contradictions.

  4. Thermalisation of high energy electrons and positrons in water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, A.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Thorn, P. A.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Garcia, G.

    2008-07-01

    In this study we describe a method to simulate single electron tracks of electrons in molecular gases, particularly in water vapour, from relatively high energies, where Born (Inokuti 1971) approximation is supposed to be valid, down to thermal energies paying special attention to the low energy secondary electrons which are abundantly generated along the energy degradation procedure. Experimental electron scattering cross sections (Munoz et al. 2007) and energy loss spectra (Thorn et al. 2007) have been determined, where possible, to be used as input parameters of the simulating program. These experimental data have been complemented with optical potential calculation (Blanco and Garcia 2003) providing a complete set of interaction probability functions for each type of collision which could take place in the considered energy range: elastic, ionization, electronic excitation, vibrational and rotational excitation. From the simulated track structure (Munoz et al. 2005) information about energy deposition and radiation damage at the molecular level can be derived. A similar procedure is proposed to the study of single positron tracks in gases. Due to the lack of experimental data for positron interaction with molecules, especially for those related to energy loss and excitation cross sections, some distribution probability data have been derived from those of electron scattering by introducing positron characteristics as positroniun formation. Preliminary results for argon are presented discussing also the utility of the model to biomedical applications based on positron emitters.

  5. Tests of an electron monitor for routine quality control measurements of electron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, E.B.; Reinstein, L.E.; Meek, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    The depth dose for electrons is sensitive to energy and the AAPM Task Group 24 has recommended that tests be performed at monthly intervals to assure electron beam energy constancy by verifying the depth for the 80% dose to within ±3 mm. Typically, this is accomplished by using a two-depth dose ratio technique. Recently, a new device, the Geske monitor, has been introduced that is designed for verifying energy constancy in a single reading. The monitor consists of nine parallel plate detectors that alternate with 5-mm-thick absorbers made of an aluminum alloy. An evaluation of the clinical usefulness of this monitor for the electron beams available on a Varian Clinac 20 has been undertaken with respect to energy discrimination. Beam energy changes of 3 mm of the 80% dose give rise to measurable output changes ranging from 1.7% for 20-MeV electron beams to 15% for 6-MeV electron beams

  6. Binding energies of hypernuclei and Λ-nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1985-01-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations have been made for the s-shell hypernuclei and also of 9 Be hypernuclei with a 2α + Λ model. The well depth is calculated variationally with the Fermi hypernetted chain method. A satisfactory description of all the relevant experimental Λ separation energies and also of the Λp scattering can be obtained with reasonable TPE ΛN and ΛNN forces and strongly repulsive dispersive ΛNN forces which are preferred to be spin dependent. We discuss variational calculations for 6 He and 10 Be hypernuclei with α + 2Λ and 2α + 2Λ models, and the results obtained for the ΛΛ interaction and for 6 He hypernuclei from analysis of 10 Be hypernuclei Coulomb effects and charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed. 24 refs., 5 figs

  7. Binding energies of hypernuclei and. lambda. -nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1985-01-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations have been made for the s-shell hypernuclei and also of /sup 9/Be hypernuclei with a 2..cap alpha.. + ..lambda.. model. The well depth is calculated variationally with the Fermi hypernetted chain method. A satisfactory description of all the relevant experimental ..lambda.. separation energies and also of the ..lambda..p scattering can be obtained with reasonable TPE ..lambda..N and ..lambda..NN forces and strongly repulsive dispersive ..lambda..NN forces which are preferred to be spin dependent. We discuss variational calculations for /sup 6/He and /sup 10/Be hypernuclei with ..cap alpha.. + 2..lambda.. and 2..cap alpha.. + 2..lambda.. models, and the results obtained for the ..lambda lambda.. interaction and for /sup 6/He hypernuclei from analysis of /sup 10/Be hypernuclei Coulomb effects and charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Scattering of high energy electrons on deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossetete, B.

    1964-12-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain information on the neutron form factor from the study of the scattering of electrons on deuterium. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical study of the elastic and inelastic scattering. We introduce different form factors: Sachs form factor, the Pauli and Dirac form factors, they appear in the analytic expression of the scattering cross-section. We show how the deuteron form factors can be deduced from neutron's and proton's form factors. In the case of the inelastic scattering we show how the cross section can be broken into components associated to partial waves and we obtain different formulas for the inelastic cross-section based on the Breit formula or the Durand formalism. The second part is dedicated to the experiment setting of electron scattering on deuterium. The elastic scattering experiment has been made on solid or liquid CD 2 targets while inelastic scattering has been studied on a liquid target. We have used an electron beam produced by the Orsay linear accelerator and the scattered electrons have been analysed by a magnetic spectrometer and a Cerenkov detector. The results give a very low value (slightly positive)for the charge form factor of the neutron and a magnetic form factor for the neutron slightly below that of the proton [fr

  9. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6 ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  10. Biexciton binding energy in ZnSe quantum wells and quantum wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans-Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    The biexciton binding energy E-XX is investigated in ZnSe/ZnMgSe quantum wells and quantum wires as a function of the lateral confinement by transient four-wave mixing. In the quantum wells one observes for decreasing well width a significant increase in the relative binding energy, saturating...... for well widths less than 8 nm. In the quantum wires an increase of 30% is found in the smallest quantum wire structures compared to the corresponding quantum well value. A simple analytical model taking into account the quantum confinement in these low-dimensional systems is used to explain...

  11. Binding energy of impurity states in an inverse parabolic quantum well under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Soekmen, I.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the magnetic field which is directed perpendicular to the well on the binding energy of the hydrogenic impurities in an inverse parabolic quantum well (IPQW) with different widths as well as different Al concentrations at the well center. The Al concentration at the barriers was always x max =0.3. The calculations were performed within the effective mass approximation, using a variational method. We observe that IPQW structure turns into parabolic quantum well with the inversion effect of the magnetic field and donor impurity binding energy in IPQW strongly depends on the magnetic field, Al concentration at the well center and well dimensions

  12. Pressure-dependent shallow donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN square QWWs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, Haddou El; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Using a variational approach, we perform a theoretical study of hydrostatic pressure effect on the ground-state of axial hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN square quantum well wire (SQWWs) as a function of the side length within the effective-mass scheme and finite potential barrier. The pressure dependence of wire length, effective mass, dielectric constant and potential barrier are taken into account. Numerical results show that: (i) the binding energy is strongly affected by the wire length and the external applied pressure and (ii) its maximum moves to the narrow wire in particular for height pressure.

  13. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films

  14. Structure-based prediction of free energy changes of binding of PTP1B inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Ling Chan, Shek; Ramnarayan, Kal

    2003-08-01

    The goals were (1) to understand the driving forces in the binding of small molecule inhibitors to the active site of PTP1B and (2) to develop a molecular mechanics-based empirical free energy function for compound potency prediction. A set of compounds with known activities was docked onto the active site. The related energy components and molecular surface areas were calculated. The bridging water molecules were identified and their contributions were considered. Linear relationships were explored between the above terms and the binding free energies of compounds derived based on experimental inhibition constants. We found that minimally three terms are required to give rise to a good correlation (0.86) with predictive power in five-group cross-validation test (q2 = 0.70). The dominant terms are the electrostatic energy and non-electrostatic energy stemming from the intra- and intermolecular interactions of solutes and from those of bridging water molecules in complexes.

  15. Angular distribution of scattered electron and medium energy electron spectroscopy for metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguri, Takeo; Ishioka, Hisamichi; Fukuda, Hisashi; Irako, Mitsuhiro

    1986-01-01

    The angular distribution (AD) of scattered electrons produced by medium energy incident electrons (E P = 50 ∼ 300 eV) from polycrystalline Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu and Au were obtained by the angle-resolved medium energy electron spectrometer. The AD of the energy loss peaks are similar figures to AD of the elastically reflected electron peaks. Therefore, the exchanged electrons produced by the knock-on collision between the incident electrons and those of metals without momentum transfer are observed as the energy loss spectra (ELS). This interpretation differs from the inconsequent interpretation by the dielectric theory or the interband transition. The information depth and penetration length are obtained from AD of the Auger electron peaks. The contribution of the surface to spectra is 3 % at the maximum for E P = 50 eV. The true secondary peaks representing the secondary electron emission spectroscopy (SES) are caused by the emissions of the energetic electrons (kT e ≥ 4 eV), and SES is the inversion of ELS. The established fundamental view is that the medium energy electron spectra represent the total bulk density of states. (author)

  16. Derivation of electron and photon energy spectra from electron beam central axis depth dose curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)]. E-mail: jun@reyes.stanford.edu; Jiang, Steve B.; Pawlicki, Todd; Li Jinsheng; Ma, C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2001-05-01

    A method for deriving the electron and photon energy spectra from electron beam central axis percentage depth dose (PDD) curves has been investigated. The PDD curves of 6, 12 and 20 MeV electron beams obtained from the Monte Carlo full phase space simulations of the Varian linear accelerator treatment head have been used to test the method. We have employed a 'random creep' algorithm to determine the energy spectra of electrons and photons in a clinical electron beam. The fitted electron and photon energy spectra have been compared with the corresponding spectra obtained from the Monte Carlo full phase space simulations. Our fitted energy spectra are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated spectra in terms of peak location, peak width, amplitude and smoothness of the spectrum. In addition, the derived depth dose curves of head-generated photons agree well in both shape and amplitude with those calculated using the full phase space data. The central axis depth dose curves and dose profiles at various depths have been compared using an automated electron beam commissioning procedure. The comparison has demonstrated that our method is capable of deriving the energy spectra for the Varian accelerator electron beams investigated. We have implemented this method in the electron beam commissioning procedure for Monte Carlo electron beam dose calculations. (author)

  17. Stability of electron-beam energy monitor for quality assurance of the electron-beam energy from radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Koichi; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Saito, Haruo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Mitsuya, Masatoshi; Sakakida, Hideharu; Yamada, Shogo; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Information on electron energy is important in planning radiation therapy using electrons. The Geske 3405 electron beam energy monitor (Geske monitor, PTW Nuclear Associates, Carle Place, NY, USA) is a device containing nine ionization chambers for checking the energy of the electron beams produced by radiotherapy accelerators. We wondered whether this might increase the likelihood of ionization chamber trouble. In spite of the importance of the stability of such a quality assurance (QA) device, there are no reports on the stability of values measured with a Geske monitor. The purpose of this paper was therefore to describe the stability of a Geske monitor. It was found that the largest coefficient of variation (CV) of the Geske monitor measurements was approximately 0.96% over a 21-week period. In conclusion, the stability of Geske monitor measurements of the energy of electron beams from a linear accelerator was excellent. (author)

  18. Secondary electrons monitor for continuous electron energy measurements in UHF linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Zbigniew; Bulka, Sylwester; Mirkowski, Jacek; Roman, Karol

    2001-01-01

    Continuous energy measurements have now became obligatory in accelerator facilities devoted to radiation sterilization process. This is one of several accelerator parameters like dose rate, beam current, bean scan parameters, conveyer speed which must be recorded as it is a required condition of accelerator validation procedure. Electron energy measurements are rather simple in direct DC accelerator, where the applied DC voltage is directly related to electron energy. High frequency linacs are not offering such opportunity in electron energy measurements. The analyzing electromagnet is applied in some accelerators but that method can be used only in off line mode before or after irradiation process. The typical solution is to apply the non direct method related to control and measurements certain accelerator parameters like beam current and microwave energy pulse power. The continuous evaluation of electron energy can be performed on the base of calculation and result comparison with calibration curve

  19. Design, development and characterization of tetrode type electron gun system for generation of low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deore, A.V.; Bhoraskar, V.N.; Dhole, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    A tetrode type electron gun system for the generation of low energy electrons was designed, developed and characterized. An electron gun having four electrodes namely cathode, focusing electrode, control electrode and anode has been designed for the irradiation experiments. This electron gun is capable to provide electrons of energy over the range of 1 keV to 20 keV, with current maximum upto 100 μA. The electron gun and a faraday cup are mounted in the evacuated cylindrical chamber. The samples are fixed on the faraday cup and irradiated with low energy electrons at a pressure around 10 -6 mbar. In this electron gun system, at any electron energy over the entire range, the electron beam diameter can be varied from 5 to 120 mm on the Faraday cup mounted at a distance of 200 mm from the anode in the chamber. Also, the circular shape of the beam spot was maintained, even though the beam current and beam diameter are varied. The uniformity of the electron beam over the entire beam area was measured with a multi electrode assembly and found to be well within 15%. This system is being used for the synthesis and diffusion of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles in polymeric materials. (author)

  20. Treatment of foods with 'soft-electrons' (low-energy electrons)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Toru [Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Todoriki, Setsuko [National Food Research Institute (NFRI), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Electrons with energies of 300 keV or lower were defined as soft-electrons'. Soft-electrons can eradicate microorganisms residing on the surface of grains, pulses, spices, dehydrated vegetables, tea leaves and seeds, and reduce their microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g with little quality deterioration. Soft-electrons can inactivate insect pests infesting grains and pulses and inhibit sprouting of potatoes. (author)

  1. Treatment of foods with 'soft-electrons' (low-energy electrons)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2003-01-01

    Electrons with energies of 300 keV or lower were defined as soft-electrons'. Soft-electrons can eradicate microorganisms residing on the surface of grains, pulses, spices, dehydrated vegetables, tea leaves and seeds, and reduce their microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g with little quality deterioration. Soft-electrons can inactivate insect pests infesting grains and pulses and inhibit sprouting of potatoes. (author)

  2. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding......-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that explicit use...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  3. Energy Saving and Efficient Energy Use By Power Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Wang, Huai; Davari, Pooya

    2017-01-01

    In the development of the modern society, one of the key factors is to save energy in order to become more independent of other energy resources. Two important approaches can be taken—one is to change behavior and thereby save energy—the second one is to develop new technology which is able to sa...

  4. Characterization of alternate reductant binding and electron transfer in the dopamine β-monooxygenase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.C.; Klinman, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The steady-state limiting kinetic parameters V/sub max/, V/K/sub DA/, and V/K/sub O 2 /, together with deuterium isotope effects on these parameters, have been determined for the dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM) reaction in the presence of structurally distinct reductants. The results show the one-electron reductant ferrocyanide to be nearly as kinetically competent as the presumed in vivo reductant ascrobate. Further, a reductant system of ferricyanide plus substrate dopamine yields steady-state kinetic parameters and isotope effects very similar to those measured solely in the presence of ferrocyanide, indicating a role for catecholamine in the rapid recycling of oxidized ferrocyanide. Use of substrate dopamine as the sole reductant is found to lead to a highly unusual kinetic independence of oxygen concentration, as well as significantly reduced values of V/sub max/ and V/K/sub DA/, and the authors conclude that dopamine reduces enzymic copper in a rate-limiting step that is 40-fold slower than with ascorbate. The near-identical kinetic parameters measured in the presence of either ascorbate or ferrocyanide, together with markedly reduced rates with dopamine, are interpreted in terms of a binding site for reductant that is physically distinct from the substrate binding site. This view is supported by molecular modeling, which reveals ascorbate and ferrocyanide to possess an unexpected similarity in potential sites for interaction with enzymic residues. With regard to electron flux, identical values of V/K/sub O 2 / have been measured with [2,2- 2 H 2 ]dopamine as substrate both in the presence and in the absence of added ascorbate. This key result unambiguously rules out an entry of electrons to enzyme forms leading from the enzyme-dopamine complex to enzyme-bound product and, hence, reaction mechanisms involving a reductive activation of the putative Cu(II)-OOH prior to substrate hydroxylation

  5. Secondary electron emission studied by secondary electron energy loss coincidence spectroscopy (SE2ELCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emission of secondary electrons is of importance in many branches of fundamental and applied science. It is widely applied in the electron microscope for the investigation of the structure and electronic state of solid surfaces and particle detection in electron multiplier devices, and generally it is related to the energy dissipation of energetic particles moving inside a solid. The process of secondary electron emission is a complex physical phenomenon, difficult to measure experimentally and treat theoretically with satisfactory accuracy. The secondary electron spectrum measured with single electron spectroscopy does not provide detailed information of the energy loss processes responsible for the emission of secondary electrons. This information can be accessed when two correlated electron pairs are measured in coincidence and the pair consists of a backscattered electron after a given energy loss and a resulting emitted secondary electron. To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the emission of secondary electrons, a reflection (e,2e) coincidence spectrometer named Secondary Electron Electron Energy Loss Coincidence Spectrometer (SE2ELCS) has been developed in the framework of this thesis which allows one to uncover the relation between the features in the spectra which are due to energy losses and true secondary electron emission structures. The correlated electron pairs are measured with a hemispherical mirror analyzer (HMA) and a time of flight analyzer (TOF) by employing a continuous electron beam. An effort has been made to increase the coincidence count rate by increasing the effective solid angle of the TOF analyzer and optimizing the experimental parameters to get optimum energy resolution. Double differential coincidence spectra for a number of materials namely, nearly free electron metals (Al, Si), noble metals (Ag, Au, Cu, W) and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been measured using this coincidence spectrometer. The

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  7. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  8. Electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Holovatsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire and elliptic semiconductor nanotubes are investigated within the effective mass approximation. The solution of Schrodinger equation based on the Mathieu functions is obtained in elliptic coordinates. The dependencies of the electron size quantization spectrum on the size and shape of the core-shell nanowire and nanotube are calculated. It is shown that the ellipticity of a quantum wire leads to break of degeneration of quasiparticle energy spectrum. The dependences of the energy of odd and even electron states on the ratio between semiaxes are of a nonmonotonous character. The anticrosing effects are observed at the dependencies of electron energy spectrum on the transversal size of the core-shell nanowire.

  9. Ultra high energy electrons powered by pulsar rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Swadesh; Machabeli, George; Osmanov, Zaza; Chkheidze, Nino

    2013-01-01

    A new mechanism of particle acceleration, driven by the rotational slow down of the Crab pulsar, is explored. The rotation, through the time dependent centrifugal force, can efficiently excite unstable Langmuir waves in the electron-positron (hereafter e(±)) plasma of the star magnetosphere. These waves, then, Landau damp on electrons accelerating them in the process. The net transfer of energy is optimal when the wave growth and the Landau damping times are comparable and are both very short compared to the star rotation time. We show, by detailed calculations, that these are precisely the conditions for the parameters of the Crab pulsar. This highly efficient route for energy transfer allows the electrons in the primary beam to be catapulted to multiple TeV (~ 100 TeV) and even PeV energy domain. It is expected that the proposed mechanism may, unravel the puzzle of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic ray electrons.

  10. Hydrostatic-pressure effects on the donor binding energy in GaAs-(Ga, Al)As quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Merchancano, S T; Paredes-Gutierrez, H; Silva-Valencia, J

    2007-01-01

    The binding energy of shallow hydrogenic impurities in a spherical quantum dot under isotropic hydrostatic pressure is calculated using a variational approach within the effective mass approximation. The binding energy is computed as a function of hydrostatic pressure, dot size and impurity position. The results show that the impurity binding energy increases with the pressure for any position of the impurity. Also, we have found that the binding energy depends on the location of the impurity and the pressure effects are less pronounced for impurities on the edge

  11. Electronic structures of elements according to ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Dariush H

    2017-11-28

    The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were analyzed using available experimental ionization energies. Two new parameters were defined to carry out the study. The first parameter-apparent nuclear charge (ANC)-quantified the overall charge of the nucleus and inner electrons observed by an outer electron during the ionization process. This parameter was utilized to define a second parameter, which presented the shielding ability of an electron against the nuclear charge. This second parameter-electron shielding effect (ESE)-provided an insight into the electronic structure of atoms. This article avoids any sort of approximation, interpolation or extrapolation. First experimental ionization energies were used to obtain the two aforementioned parameters. The second parameter (ESE) was then graphed against the electron number of each element, and was used to read the corresponding electronic structure. The ESE showed spikes/peaks at the end of each electronic shell, providing insight into when an electronic shell closes and a new one starts. The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were mapped using this methodology. These graphs did not show complete agreement with the previously known "Aufbau" filling rule. A new filling rule was suggested based on the present observations. Finally, a new way to organize elements in the periodic table is suggested. Two earlier topics of effective nuclear charge, and shielding factor were also briefly discussed and compared numerically to demonstrate the capability of the new approach.

  12. Generation of Low-Energy High-Current Electron Beams in Plasma-Anode Electron Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozur, G. E.; Proskurovsky, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies on the generation of low-energy high-current electron beams in electron guns with a plasma anode and an explosive-emission cathode. The problems related to the initiation of explosive electron emission under plasma and the formation and transport of high-current electron beams in plasma-filled systems are discussed consecutively. Considerable attention is given to the nonstationary effects that occur in the space charge layers of plasma. Emphasis is also placed on the problem of providing a uniform energy density distribution over the beam cross section, which is of critical importance in using electron beams of this type for surface treatment of materials. Examples of facilities based on low-energy high-current electron beam sources are presented and their applications in materials science and practice are discussed.

  13. Metastable decay and binding energies of van der Waals cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernstberger, B.; Krause, H.; Neusser, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this work the appearance potentials for the metastable decay channel of a series of van der Waals dimer ions are presented. Ionization and metastable dissociation is achieved by resonance-enhanced two-photon absorption in a linear reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. From the appearance potentials the binding energy of the neutral dimers is obtained and from the additionally measured ionization potentials binding energies of the dimer cations are achieved. The contribution of charge transfer resonance interaction to the binding in cluster ions is evaluated by investigation of several homo- and heterodimers of aromatic components and the heterodimer benzene/cyclohexane as an example for a dimer consisting of an aromatic and a nonaromatic component. (orig.)

  14. Low Energy Electron Gun on Board a Scientific Satellite GEOTAIL

    OpenAIRE

    TSUTSUI, Minoru; ONISHI, Yoshiaki; MATSUMOTO, Hiroshi; KIMURA, Iwane; 筒井, 稔; 大西, 嘉昭; 松本, 紘; 木村, 磐根

    1988-01-01

    A low energy electron gun to be used for beam-plasma interaction experiments by a scientific satellite GEOTAIL has been designed and manufactured. Electrodes of the gun have been modified from the Pierce type gun because of the use of a directly heated cathode. Spatial density distributions of beam electrons emitted from the new gun have been measured in a large vacuum chamber, and characteristic curves of emission currents for some beam energies and cathode powers have been checked repeatedl...

  15. Treatment of basal cell epithelioma with high energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y. (Hyogo-ken Cancer Center, Kobe (Japan)); Kumano, M.; Kumano, K.

    1981-11-01

    Thirty patients with basal cell epithelioma received high energy electron beam therapy. They were irradiated with a dose ranging from 4,800 rad (24 fractions, 35 days) to 12,000 rad (40 fractions, 57 days). Tumors disappeared in all cases. These were no disease-related deaths; in one patient there was recurrence after 2 years. We conclude that radiotherapy with high energy electron beam is very effective in the treatment of basal cell epithelioma.

  16. International Conference on Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suresh, L; Dash, Subhransu; Panigrahi, Bijaya

    2015-01-01

    The book is a collection of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers presented in Proceedings of International Conference on Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems (ICPERES 2014) held at Rajalakshmi Engineering College, Chennai, India. These research papers provide the latest developments in the broad area of Power Electronics and Renewable Energy. The book discusses wide variety of industrial, engineering and scientific applications of the emerging techniques. It presents invited papers from the inventors/originators of new applications and advanced technologies.

  17. Reactions induced by low energy electrons in cryogenic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, A.D.; Sanche, L.

    2003-01-01

    We review recent research on reactions (including dissociation) initiated by low-energy electron bombardment of monolayer and multilayer molecular solids at cryogenic temperatures. With incident electrons of energies below 20 eV, dissociation is observed by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions from target films and is attributed to the processes of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and to dipolar dissociation. It is shown that DEA to condensed molecules is sensitive to environmental factors such as the identity of co-adsorbed species and film morphology. The effects of image-charge induced polarization on cross-sections for DEA to CH3Cl are also discussed. Taking as examples, the electron-induced production of CO within multilayer films of methanol and acetone, it is shown that the detection of electronic excited states by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy can be used to monitor electron beam damage. In particular, the incident energy dependence of the CO indicates that below 19 eV, dissociation proceeds via the decay of transient negative ions (TNI) into electronically excited dissociative states. The electron induced dissociation of biomolecular targets is also considered, taking as examples the ribose analog tetrahydrofuran and DNA bases adenine and thymine, cytosine and guanine. The ESD of anions from such films also show dissociation via the formation of TNI. In multilayer molecular solids, fragment species resulting from dissociation, may react with neighboring molecules, as is demonstrated in anion ESD measurements from films containing O 2 and various hydrocarbon molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reported for electron irradiated monolayers of H 2 O and CF 4 on a Si - H passivated surface further show that DEA is an important initial step in the electron-induced chemisorption of fragment species

  18. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano, G.; Ferron, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He + , Ne + and Ar + ) and Li + ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  19. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  20. Charge-coupled device area detector for low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    A fast position-sensitive detector was designed for the angle- and energy-selective detection of signal electrons in the scanning low energy electron microscope (SLEEM), based on a thinned back-side directly electron-bombarded charged-coupled device (CCD) sensor (EBCCD). The principle of the SLEEM operation and the motivation for the development of the detector are explained. The electronics of the detector is described as well as the methods used for the measurement of the electron-bombarded gain and of the dark signal. The EBCCD gain of 565 for electron energy 5 keV and dynamic range 59 dB for short integration time up to 10 ms at room temperature were obtained. The energy dependence of EBCCD gain and the detection efficiency are presented for electron energy between 2 and 5 keV, and the integration time dependence of the output signals under dark conditions is given for integration time from 1 to 500 ms

  1. Charge-coupled device area detector for low energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 7 (2003), s. 3379 - 3384 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/P001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : low energy electrons * charged-coupled device * detector Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2003

  2. Utilization of low-energy electron accelerators in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    There are more than 20 electron accelerators in Korea. Most of those are installed in factories for heat-resistant cables, heat-shrinkable cables, radial tires, foams, tube/ films, curing, etc. Four low-energy electron accelerators are in operation for research purposes such as polymer modification, purification of flue gas, waste water treatment, modification of semiconductor characteristics, etc. (author)

  3. Utilization of low-energy electron accelerators in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Cheol

    2003-01-01

    There are more than 20 electron accelerators in Korea. Most of those are installed in factories for heat-resistant cables, heat-shrinkable cables, radial tires, foams, tube/ films, curing, etc. Four low-energy electron accelerators are in operation for research purposes such as polymer modification, purification of flue gas, waste water treatment, modification of semiconductor characteristics, etc. (author)

  4. Computation of the average energy for LXY electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau, A.

    1996-01-01

    The application of an atomic rearrangement model in which we only consider the three shells K, L and M, to compute the counting efficiency for electron capture nuclides, requires a fine averaged energy value for LMN electrons. In this report, we illustrate the procedure with two example, ''125 I and ''109 Cd. (Author) 4 refs

  5. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  6. Molecular design of new P3HT derivatives: Adjusting electronic energy levels for blends with PCBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eliezer Fernando [UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, POSMAT – Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência e Tecnologia de Materiais, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Lavarda, Francisco Carlos, E-mail: lavarda@fc.unesp.br [UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, POSMAT – Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência e Tecnologia de Materiais, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Ciências, UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Física, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 14-01, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    An intensive search is underway for new materials to make more efficient organic solar cells through improvements in thin film morphology, transport properties, and adjustments to the energy of frontier electronic levels. The use of chemical modifications capable of modifying the electronic properties of materials already known is an interesting approach, as it can, in principle, provide a more adequate adjustment of the frontier electronic levels while preserving properties such as solubility. Based on this idea, we performed a theoretical study of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and 13 new derivatives obtained by substitution with electron acceptor and donor groups, in order to understand how the energy levels of the frontier orbitals are modified. The results show that it is possible to deduce the modification of the electronic levels in accordance with the substituent's acceptor/donor character. We also evaluated how the substituents influence the open circuit voltage and the exciton binding energy. - Highlights: • Prediction of P3HT derivatives properties for bulk-heterojunction solar cells. • Correlating substituent properties with electronic levels of P3HT derivatives. • Fluorinated P3HT improves open circuit voltage and stability.

  7. Power electronics - key technology for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Iov, Florin; Kerekes, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    sources to renewable energy sources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss trends of the most emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy and photovoltaics, which by means of power electronics...... as efficient as possible. Further, the emerging climate changes is arguing to find sustainable future solutions. Of many options, two major technologies will play important roles to solve parts of those future problems. One is to change the electrical power production from conventional, fossil based energy......The electrical energy consumption continues to grow and more applications are based on electricity. We can expect that more 60% of all energy consumption will be converted and used as electricity. Therefore, it is a demand that production, distribution and use of electrical energy are done...

  8. Comparison of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energies in the actinide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.O.; Nestor, C.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The status of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energy determinations is reviewed extending the comparison between experiment and theory to encompass representative series of data for all actinides. This comprehensive comparison reveals areas where improvements may be indicated, showing whether theoretical treatments including all known contributions to the lowest order would be adequate in all instances. 45 references

  9. Analysis of binding energy activity of TIBO and HIV-RT based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5,l-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2 (1 H)one (TIBO) is a noncompetitive non nucleotide antiretroviral drug with a specific allosteric binding site of HIV-1 RT. The conformational analysis shows that the effect of the drug depends on the potential energy which varied due to the beta rotatable dihedral angles (N6 ...

  10. A test of Wigner's spin-isospin symmetry from double binding energy differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Warner, D.D.; Brenner, D.S.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalously large double binding energy differences for even-even N = Z nuclei are a consequence of Wigner's SU(4) symmetry. These, and similar quantities for odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei, provide a simple and distinct signature of this symmetry in N ≅ Z nuclei. (authors). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Exciton binding energy in wurtzite InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Jae; Kim, Hwa-Min

    2004-01-01

    The internal field and carrier density effects on the exciton binding energies in wurtzite (WZ) InGaN/GaN quantum-well (QW) structures are investigated using the multiband effective-mass theory, and are compared with those obtained from the at-band model and with those of GaN/AlGaN QW structures. The exciton binding energy is significantly reduced with increasing sheet carrier density, suggesting that excitons are nearly bleached at densities around 10 12 cm -2 for both InGaN/GaN and GaN/AlGaN QW structures. With the inclusion of the internal field, the exciton binding energy is substantialy reduced compared to that of the at-band model in the investigated region of the wells. This can be explained by a decrease in the momentum matrix element and an increase in the inverse screening length due to the internal field. The exciton binding energy of the InGaN/GaN structure is smaller than that of the GaN/AlGaN structure because InGaN/GaN structures have a smaller momentum matrix element and a larger inverse screening length than GaN/AlGaN structures.

  12. Estimation of the characteristic energy of electron precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. del Pozo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from simultaneous observations (on 13 February 1996, 9 November 1998, and 12 February 1999 with the IRIS, DASI and EISCAT systems are employed in the study of the energy distribution of the electron precipitation during substorm activity. The estimation of the characteristic energy of the electron precipitation over the common field of view of IRIS and DASI is discussed. In particular, we look closely at the physical basis of the correspondence between the characteristic energy, the flux-averaged energy, as defined below, and the logarithm of the ratio of the green-light intensity to the square of absorption. This study expands and corrects results presented in the paper by Kosch et al. (2001. It is noticed, moreover, that acceleration associated with diffusion processes in the magnetosphere long before precipitation may be controlling the shape of the energy spectrum. We propose and test a "mixed" distribution for the energy-flux spectrum, exponential at the lower energies and Maxwellian or modified power-law at the higher energies, with a threshold energy separating these two regimes. The energy-flux spectrum at Tromsø, in the 1–320 keV range, is derived from EISCAT electron density profiles in the 70–140 km altitude range and is applied in the "calibration" of the optical intensity and absorption distributions, in order to extrapolate the flux and characteristic energy maps.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation; particle acceleration

  13. Estimation of the characteristic energy of electron precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. del Pozo

    Full Text Available Data from simultaneous observations (on 13 February 1996, 9 November 1998, and 12 February 1999 with the IRIS, DASI and EISCAT systems are employed in the study of the energy distribution of the electron precipitation during substorm activity. The estimation of the characteristic energy of the electron precipitation over the common field of view of IRIS and DASI is discussed. In particular, we look closely at the physical basis of the correspondence between the characteristic energy, the flux-averaged energy, as defined below, and the logarithm of the ratio of the green-light intensity to the square of absorption. This study expands and corrects results presented in the paper by Kosch et al. (2001. It is noticed, moreover, that acceleration associated with diffusion processes in the magnetosphere long before precipitation may be controlling the shape of the energy spectrum. We propose and test a "mixed" distribution for the energy-flux spectrum, exponential at the lower energies and Maxwellian or modified power-law at the higher energies, with a threshold energy separating these two regimes. The energy-flux spectrum at Tromsø, in the 1–320 keV range, is derived from EISCAT electron density profiles in the 70–140 km altitude range and is applied in the "calibration" of the optical intensity and absorption distributions, in order to extrapolate the flux and characteristic energy maps.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation; particle acceleration

  14. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  15. Variation of kinetic energy release with temperature and electron energy for unimolecular ionic transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabia, M.A.; Fahmy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic energy released during seven unimolecular ionic transitions, generated from benzyl alcohol and benzyl amine have been studied as a function of ion source temperature and ionizing electron energy. Only, the kinetic energy released during H CN elimination from fragment [C 7 H 8 N]+ ion of benzyl amine displays a temperature dependence. For only two transitions, generated from benzyl alcohol, the kinetic energy released show a significant ionizing electron energy dependence. These results may reveal the role of the internal energy of reacting ions in producing the kinetic energy released some transitions produced from benzyl alcohol

  16. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.; Munro, Andrew W.; Gorton, Lo; Wachenfeldt, Claes von; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer reactions of trHb-Bs were electrochemically studied in solution and at graphite electrodes. Spectrophotometrical potentiometric titration and direct electrochemical measurements gave a heme iron redox potential of −103 ± 4 mV and −108 ± 2 mV vs. NHE, at pH 7, respectively. The redox potential of the heme in trHb-Bs shifted −59 mV per pH unit at pH higher than 7, consistently with a 1e − /1 H + – transfer reaction. The heterogeneous rate constant k s for a quasi-reversible 1e − – 1H + – transfer reaction between graphite and trHb-Bs was 10.1 ± 2.3 s −1 . Upon reversible cyanide binding the k s doubled, while the redox potential of heme shifted 21 mV negatively, presumably reflecting changes in redox activity and in vivo signaling functions of trHb-Bs associated with ligand binding. Bioelectrocatalytic reduction of O 2 catalyzed by trHb-Bs was one of the most efficient hitherto reported for Hbs, with an apparent catalytic rate constant, k cat , of 56 ± 6 s −1 . The results obtained are of particular interest for applications of trHb in environmental biosensing and toxicity screening

  17. Strict calculation of electron energy distribution functions in inhomogeneous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.

    1996-01-01

    It is objective of the paper to report on strict calculations of the velocity or energy distribution function function and related macroscopic properties of the electrons from appropriate electron kinetic equations under various plasma conditions and to contribute to a better understanding of the electron behaviour in inhomogeneous plasma regions. In particular, the spatial relaxation of plasma electrons acted upon by uniform electric fields, the response of plasma electrons on spatial disturbances of the electric field, the electron kinetics under the impact of space charge field confinement in the dc column plasma and the electron velocity distribution is stronger field as occurring in the electrode regions of a dc glow discharge is considered. (author)

  18. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy in nanotechnology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mika, Filip; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, 8/9 (2012), s. 695-716 ISSN 1475-7435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * grain contrast * strain contrast * imaging of participates * dopant contrast * very low energy STEM * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2012

  19. Electronic structure and formation energy of a vacancy in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, B.; Siegel, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    The electronic structure of a vacancy in Al was calculated self-consistently using norm-conserving ionic pseudopotentials obtained from ab initio atomic calculations. A 27-atom-site supercell containing 1 vacancy and 26 atoms was used to simulate the environment of the vacancy. A vacancy formation energy of 1.5 eV was also calculated (cf. the experimental value of 0.66 eV). The effects of the supercell and the nature of the ionic potential on the resulting electronic structure and formation energy are discussed. Results for the electronic structure of a divacancy are also presented. 3 figures

  20. Ultra-low-energy wide electron exposure unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonago, Akinobu; Oono, Yukihiko; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Kishimoto, Junichi; Wakamoto, Ikuo

    2001-01-01

    Heat and ultraviolet ray processes are used in surface dryness of paint, surface treatment of construction materials and surface sterilization of food containers. A process using a low-energy wide-area electron beam (EB) has been developed that features high speed and low drive cost. EB processing is not widespread in general industry, however, due to high equipment cost and difficult maintenance. We developed an ultra-low-energy wide-area electron beam exposure unit, the Mitsubishi Wide Electron Exposure Unit (MIWEL) to solve these problems. (author)

  1. Towards accurate free energy calculations in ligand protein-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Labahn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a multitude of different chemical reaction paths running simultaneously and quite independently next to each other. This amazing feat is enabled by molecular recognition, the ability of biomolecules to form stable and specific complexes with each other and with their substrates. A better understanding of this process, i.e. of the kinetics, structures and thermodynamic properties of biomolecule binding, would be invaluable in the study of biological systems. In addition, as the mode of action of many pharmaceuticals is based upon their inhibition or activation of biomolecule targets, predictive models of small molecule receptor binding are very helpful tools in rational drug design. Since the goal here is normally to design a new compound with a high inhibition strength, one of the most important thermodynamic properties is the binding free energy DeltaG(0). The prediction of binding constants has always been one of the major goals in the field of computational chemistry, because the ability to reliably assess a hypothetical compound's binding properties without having to synthesize it first would save a tremendous amount of work. The different approaches to this question range from fast and simple empirical descriptor methods to elaborate simulation protocols aimed at putting the computation of free energies onto a solid foundation of statistical thermodynamics. While the later methods are still not suited for the screenings of thousands of compounds that are routinely performed in computational drug design studies, they are increasingly put to use for the detailed study of protein ligand interactions. This review will focus on molecular mechanics force field based free energy calculations and their application to the study of protein ligand interactions. After a brief overview of other popular methods for the calculation of free energies, we will describe recent advances in methodology and a variety of exemplary studies of molecular dynamics

  2. Low-energy electron collisions with metal clusters: Electron capture and cluster fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresin, V.V.; Scheidemann, A.; Knight, W.D.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have carried out the first measurement of absolute cross sections for the interaction between electrons and size-resolved free metal clusters. Integral inelastic scattering cross sections have been determined for electron-Na n cluster collisions in the energy range from 0.1 eV to 30 eV. At energies ≤1 eV, cross sections increase with decreasing impact energies, while at higher energies they remain essentially constant. The dominant processes are electron attachment in the low-energy range, and collision-induced fragmentation at higher energies. The magnitude of electron capture cross sections can be quantitatively explained by the effect of the strong polarization field induced in the cluster by the incident electron. The cross sections are very large, reaching values of hundreds of angstrom 2 ; this is due to the highly polarizable nature of metal clusters. The inelastic interaction range for fragmentation collisions is also found to considerably exceed the cluster radius, again reflecting the long-range character of electron-cluster interactions. The important role played by the polarization interaction represents a bridge between the study of collision processes and the extensive research on cluster response properties. Furthermore, insight into the mechanisms of electron scattering is important for understanding production and detection of cluster ions in mass spectrometry and related processes

  3. The effects of optical phonon on the binding energy of bound polaron in a wurtzite ZnO/MgxZn1−xO quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Feng-Qi; Guo, Zi-Zheng; Zhu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    An improved Lee-Low-Pines intermediate coupling method is used to study the energies and binding energies of bound polarons in a wurtzite ZnO/Mg x Zn 1−x O quantum well. The contributions from different branches of long-wave optical phonons, i.e., confined optical phonons, interface optical phonons, and half-space optical phonons are considered. In addition to electron-phonon interaction, the impurity-phonon interaction, and the anisotropy of material parameters, such as phonon frequency, electron effective mass, and dielectric constant, are also included in our computation. Ground-state energies, binding energies and detailed phonon contributions from various phonons as functions of well width, impurity position and composition are presented. Our result suggests that total phonon contribution to ground state and binding energies in the studied wurtzite ZnO/Mg 0.3 Zn 0.7 O quantum wells varies between 28–23 meV and 62–45 meV, respectively, which are much larger than the corresponding values (about 3.2–1.8 meV and 1.6–0.3 meV) in GaAs/Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As quantum wells. For a narrower quantum well, the phonon contribution mainly comes from interface and half-space phonons, for a wider quantum well, most of phonon contribution originates from confined phonons. The contribution from all the phonon modes to binding energies increases slowly either when impurity moves far away from the well center in the z direction or with the increase in magnesium composition (x). It is found that different phonons have different influences on the binding energies of bound polarons. Furthermore, the phonon contributions to binding energies as functions of well width, impurity position, and composition are very different from one another. In general, the electron-optical phonon interaction and the impurity center-optical phonon interaction play an important role in electronic states of ZnO-based quantum wells and cannot be neglected.

  4. Gadgets and Gigawatts - Policies for Energy Efficient Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-13

    By 2010 there will be over 3.5 billion mobile phones subscribers, 2 billion TVs in use around the world and 1 billion personal computers. Electronic devices are a growing part of our lives and many of us can count between 20 and 30 separate items in our homes, from major items like televisions to a host of small gadgets. The communication and entertainment benefits these bring are not only going to people in wealthier nations - in Africa, for example, one in nine people now has a mobile phone. But as these electronic devices gain popularity, they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption. How 'smart' is this equipment from an energy efficiency perspective and should we be concerned about how much energy these gadgets use? What is the potential for energy savings? This new book, Gadgets and Gigawatts: Policies for Energy Efficient Electronics, includes a global assessment of the changing pattern in residential electricity consumption over the past decade and an in-depth analysis of the role played by electronic equipment. It reviews the influence that government policies have had on creating markets for more energy efficient appliances and identifies new opportunities for creating smarter, more energy efficient homes. This book is essential reading for policy makers and others interested in improving the energy efficiency of our homes.

  5. Middle-energy electron anisotropies in the auroral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned anisotropic electron distribution functions of T > T type are observed on auroral field lines at both low and high altitudes. We show that typically the anisotropy is limited to a certain range of energies, often below 1keV, although sometimes extending to slightly higher energies as well. Almost always there is simultaneously an isotropic electron distribution at higher energies. Often the anisotropies are up/down symmetrical, although cases with net upward or downward electron flow also occur. For a statistical analysis of the anisotropies we divide the energy range into low (below 100eV, middle (100eV–1keV and high (above 1keV energies and develop a measure of anisotropy expressed in density units. The statistical magnetic local time and invariant latitude distribution of the middle-energy anisotropies obeys that of the average auroral oval, whereas the distributions of the low and high energy anisotropies are more irregular. This suggests that it is specifically the middle-energy anisotropies that have something to do with auroral processes. The anisotropy magnitude decreases monotonically with altitude, as one would expect, because electrons have high mobility along the magnetic field and thus, the anisotropy properties spread rapidly to different altitudes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena. Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions; changed particle motion and acceleration

  6. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique us- ing an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle. EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such ...

  7. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Mel, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  8. Structure of X-ray photoelectron spectra of low-energy and core electrons of Ln(C6H4OCH3COO-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the results of an X-ray photo electron spectroscopy of lanthanide ortho-metoxybenzoates Ln(C6H4OCH3COO-3, where Ln represents lanthanides La through Lu except for Pm and C6H4OCH3COO- - residuum of ortho-metoxybenzoic acid. The core and outer electron X-ray photo electron spectroscopy spectra in the binding energy range of 0-1250 eV were shown to exhibit a complex, fine structure. The said structure was established due to the outer (0-15 eV binding energy and inner (15-50 eV binding energy valence molecular orbital from the filled Ln5p and O2s atomic shells multiple splitting, many-body perturbation, dynamic effect, etc. The mechanisms of such a fine structure formation were shown to manifest different probabilities in the spectrum of a certain electronic shell. There fore, the fine X-ray photo electron spectroscopy spectral structure resulting from a certain mechanism can be interpreted and its quantitative parameters related to the physical and chemical properties of the studied com pounds (degree of delocalization and participation of Ln4f electrons in the chemical bond, electronic configuration and oxidation states, density of uncoupled electrons on paramagnetic ions, degree of participation of the low binding energy filled electronic shells of lanthanide and ligands information of the outer and in nervalence molecular orbitals, lanthanide close environment structure in amorphous materials, etc.

  9. An energy recovery electron linac-on-ring collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merminga, L.; Krafft, G.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present the design of high-luminosity electron-proton/ion colliders in which the electrons are produced by an Energy Recovering Linac (ERL). Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10 33 (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at currents of a few hundred mA and multi-GeV energies. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented

  10. Renewable Energy Systems in the Power Electronics Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Teodorescu, Remus

    2005-01-01

    of the most important area is renewable energy systems. This paper will discuss the basic courses for the power electronics curriculum. It will also discuss how to teach power electronic systems efficiently through a projectoriented and problem-based learning approach with Aalborg University in Denmark...... as a full-scale example. Different project examples will be given as well as important laboratories for adjustable speed drives and renewable energy systems which are used at the university are described.......Power Electronics is still an emerging technology and its applications are increasing. The primary function is to convert electrical energy from one stage to another and it is used in many different applications. The power electronics curriculum is multidisciplinary covering fields like devices...

  11. Elastic scattering of low-energy electrons with Sr atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, J.; Zhang, Z.; Wan, H.

    1990-01-01

    Static-exchange, plus correlation-polarization-potential calculations are performed for elastic low-energy electron scattering from Sr atoms while paying attention to the low-lying shape resonances. The correlation potential is calculated both with and without a scaling factor. A 2 D-shape resonance is produced at 1.0 eV with a parameter-free, and at 1.25 eV with a scaled, correlation potential. No 2 P-shape resonances are predicted, but evidence to support the existence of a stable negative ion Sr - in the 5s 2 5p electron configuration is given from the viewpoint of electron scattering. The bound energy of the extra electron in the negative ion is estimated by transforming the phase shift of the corresponding partial wave into the polarization quantum-defect number and extrapolating the number from positive to negative energies

  12. Electron energy distribution in a weakly ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, C.

    1967-03-01

    The aim of this work is to determine from both the theoretical and experimental points of view the type of distribution function for the electronic energies existing in a positive-column type cold laboratory plasma having an ionization rate of between 10 -6 and 10 -7 . The theoretical analysis, based on the imperfect Lorentz model and taking into account inelastic collisions is developed from the Boltzmann equation. The experimental method which we have employed for making an electrostatic analysis of the electronic energies makes use of a Langmuir probe used in conjunction with a transistorized electronic device. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results yields information concerning the mechanisms governing electronic energy transfer on a microscopic scale. (author) [fr

  13. Microanalysis by spectroscopy of transmitted electron energy losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colliex, C.; Trebbia, P.

    1978-01-01

    Among the various signals which, in a transmission electron microscope, result from the interactions between the primary beam of well defined energy E 0 and the sample, the spectrum of the energy distribution of the electrons transmitted contains useful informations on the chemical and physical properties of the sample. Consequently the adaptation of an energy dispersive system on an electron microscope enables new fields of research to be investigated, particularly a localised chemical analysis technique with a space resolution scale equal to that of the electron microscope. It is this second aspect that we suggest describing in particular here. Already, this technique appears to be indispensable in the problems arising from the analysis of very small quantities of matter: detection limits in the order of 10 -19 to 10 -20 g (around 100 to 1000 atoms) would seem to be resonably possible [fr

  14. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports

  15. Low Energy Electrons in the Mars Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The ionosphere of Mars is rather poorly understood. The only direct measurements were performed by the Viking 1 and 2 landers in 1976, both of which carried a Retarding Potential Analyzer. The RPA was designed to measure ion properties during the descent, although electron fluxes were estimated from changes in the ion currents. Using these derived low-energy electron fluxes, Mantas and Hanson studied the photoelectron and the solar wind electron interactions with the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. Unanswered questions remain regarding the origin of the low-energy electron fluxes in the vicinity of the Mars plasma boundary. Crider, in an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer measurements, has attributed the formation of the magnetic pile-up boundary to electron impact ionization of exospheric neutral species by solar wind electrons. However, the role of photoelectrons escaping from the lower ionosphere was not determined. In the proposed work, we will examine the role of solar wind and ionospheric photoelectrons in producing ionization in the upper ionosphere of Mars. Low-energy (internal (photoelectron) sources of ionization, and accounts for Auger electron production. The code will be used to analyze Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar wind and photoelectrons down to altitudes below 200 km in the Mars ionosphere, in order to determine the relative roles of solar wind and escaping photoelectrons in maintaining plasma densities in the region of the Mars plasma boundary.

  16. Low energy electron attachment to the uracil molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanel, G.; Gstir, B.; Denifl, S.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Using a recently constructed high resolution crossed beam apparatus involving a hemispherical electron monochromator, electron attachment to the uracil molecule C 4 H 4 N 2 O 2 was studied. The electron energy range investigated was in the region between 0 and 12 eV. What will happen when slow electrons are colliding with the cellular RNA compound uracil was the objective of this investigation. The following anion fragments were detected: (C 4 H 3 N 2 O 2 ) - , OCN - , (H 2 C 3 NO) - , CN - , O - . The most important result was that within the detection efficiency any traces of the parent anion were observed. The most intense fragment anion appeared on a mass to charge ratio 111 amu., it corresponds to a uracil molecule missing one hydrogen. Another observation was whereas the parent minus H anion is observed at zero electron energy, all other fragments appear in other range. (nevyjel)

  17. Developing a Novel Hydrogen Sponge with Ideal Binding Energy and High Surface Area for Practical Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, T. C. Mike

    2018-04-19

    This Phase I (5 quarters) research project was to examine the validity of a new class of boron-containing polymer (B-polymer) frameworks, serving as the adsorbents for the practical onboard H2 storage applications. Three B-polymer frameworks were synthesized and investigated, which include B-poly(butyenylstyrene) (B-PBS) framework (A), B-poly(phenyldiacetyene) (B-PPDA) framework (B), and B-poly(phenyltriacetylene) (B-PPTA) framework (C). They are 2-D polymer structures with the repeating cyclic units that spontaneously form open morphology and the B-doped (p-type) π-electrons delocalized surfaces. The ideal B-polymer framework shall exhibit open micropores (pore size in the range of 1-1.5nm) with high surface area (>3000 m2/g), and the B-dopants in the conjugated framework shall provide high surface energy for interacting with H2 molecules (an ideal H2 binding energy in the range of 15-25 kJ/mol). The pore size distribution and H2 binding energy were investigated at both Penn State and NREL laboratories. So far, the experimental results show the successful synthesis of B-polymer frameworks with the relatively well-defined planar (2-D) structures. The intrinsically formed porous morphology exhibits a broad pore size distribution (in the range of 0.5-10 nm) with specific surface area (~1000 m2/g). The miss-alignment between 2-D layers may block some micropore channels and limit gas diffusion throughout the entire matrix. In addition, the 2-D planar conjugated structure may also allow free π-electrons delocalization throughout the framework, which significantly reduces the acidity of B-moieties (electron-deficiency).The resulting 2-D B-polymer frameworks only exhibit a small increase of H2 binding energy in the range of 8-9 KJ/mole (quite constant over the whole sorption range).

  18. High energy electron acceleration with PW-class laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Suzuki, S.; Asaka, T.; Yanagida, K.; Hanaki, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    We performed electron acceleration experiment with PW-class laser and a plasma tube, which was created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder. In this experiment, electron energies in excess of 600 MeV have been observed. Moreover, the spectra of a comparatively high-density plasma ∼10 19 cm -3 had a bump around 10 MeV. Additionally, we performed the absolute sensitivity calibration of imaging plate for 1 GeV electrons from the injector Linac of Spring-8 in order to evaluate absolute number of GeV-class electrons in the laser acceleration experiment

  19. Electrons with continuous energy distribution from energetic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, D.

    1984-01-01

    The properties and origin of continuous electron spectrum emitted in high energy heavy ion collisions are reviewed. The basic processes causing the characteristic regions of the continuous spectrum are described. The contribution of electrons ejected from the target and from the projectile are investigated in detail in the cases of light and heavy projectiles. The recently recognized mechanisms, electron-capture-to-continuum (ECC) and electron-loss-to-continuum (ELC), leading to a cusp in forward direction, and their theoretical interpretations are discussed. The importance of data from ion-atom collisions in the field of atomic physics and in applications are briefly summarized. (D.Gy)

  20. Household energy consumption and consumer electronics: The case of television

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of consumer electronics in households. These new technologies and the services that support them enable new highly energy intensive behaviours. Using in-depth interview data collected from 20 households in 2006, this paper explores these energy intensive behaviours, using the example of the use of televisions. In doing so, it illustrates how the design and marketing of consumer electronics, and the services which support them, actively encourage energy intensive behaviours and how householders are reconfiguring their homes and lifestyles to fit these behaviours. This latter point is significant because, as householders change their homes and daily lives to fit energy intensive consuming behaviours, it will become increasingly difficult to encourage people to reduce their household energy consumption. This paper concludes with the implications of the research findings for policies designed to reduce household energy consumption

  1. Ab initio calculation of electron excitation energies in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, S.G.

    1996-02-01

    Progress in the first-principles calculation of electron excitation energies in solids is discussed. Quasiparticle energies are computed by expanding the electron self energy to first order in the screened Coulomb interaction in the so-called GW approximation. The method was applied to explain and predict spectroscopic properties of a variety of systems. Several illustrative applications to semiconductors, materials under pressure, chemisorption, and point defects in solids are presented. A recent reformulation of the method employing mixed- space functions and imaginary time techniques is also discussed

  2. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  3. Study of absorbed dose distribution to high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecatti, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The depth absorbed dose distribution by electron beams was studied. The influence of the beam energy, the energy spread, field size and design characteristics of the accelerator was relieved. Three accelerators with different scattering and collimation systems were studied leading todifferent depth dose distributions. A theoretical model was constructed in order to explain the increase in the depth dose in the build-up region with the increase of the energy. The model utilizes a three-dimensional formalism based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, with the introduction of modifications that takes into account the criation of secondary electrons. (Author) [pt

  4. Analytic approach to auroral electron transport and energy degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamnes, K.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of a beam of auroral electrons with the atmosphere is described by the linear transport equation, encompassing discrete energy loss, multiple scattering, and secondary electrons. A solution to the transport equation provides the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle (with respect to the geomagnetic field) and energy. A multi-stream (discrete ordinate) approximation to the transport equation is developed. An analytic solution is obtained in this approximation. The computational scheme obtained by combining the present transport code with the energy degradation method of Swartz (1979) conserves energy identically. The theory provides a framework within which angular distributions can be easily calculated and interpreted. Thus, a detailed study of the angular distributions of 'non-absorbed' electrons (i.e., electrons that have lost just a small fraction of their incident energy) reveals a systematic variation with incident angle and energy, and with penetration depth. The present approach also gives simple yet accurate solutions in low order multi-stream approximations. The accuracy of the four-stream approximation is generally within a few per cent, whereas two-stream results for backscattered mean intensities and fluxes are accurate to within 10-15%. (author)

  5. Temporal and spatial distribution of high energy electrons at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, I.; Garrett, H. B.; Ratliff, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) were used to study the high energy electron environment in the Jovian magnetosphere, especially in the region between 8 to 18 Rj (1 Rj = 1 Jovian radius = 71,400 km). 10-minute averages of the EPD data collected between Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) in 1995 and the orbit number 33 (I33) in 2002 form an extensive dataset, which has been extremely useful to observe temporal and spatial variability of the Jovian high energy electron environment. The count rates of the EPD electron channels (0.174, 0.304, 0.527, 1.5, 2.0, and 11 MeV) were grouped into 0.5 Rj or 0.5 L bins and analyzed statistically. The results indicate that: (1) a log-normal Gaussian distribution well describes the statistics of the high energy electron environment (for example, electron differential fluxes) in the Jovian magnetosphere, in the region studied here; (2) the high energy electron environments inferred by the Galileo EPD measurements are in a close agreement with the data obtained using the Divine model, which was developed more than 30 years ago from Pioneer 10, 11 and Voyager 1, 2 data; (3) the data are better organized when plotted against magnetic radial parameter L than Rj; (4) the standard deviations of the 0.174, 0.304, 0.527 MeV channel count rates are larger than those of the 1.5, 2.0, 11 MeV count rates in 12 Rj. These observations are very helpful to understand short- and long-term, and local variability of the Jovian high energy electron environment, and are discussed in detail.

  6. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  7. Modeling power electronics and interfacing energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    2017-01-01

    Discusses the application of mathematical and engineering tools for modeling, simulation and control oriented for energy systems, power electronics and renewable energy. This book builds on the background knowledge of electrical circuits, control of dc/dc converters and inverters, energy conversion and power electronics. The book shows readers how to apply computational methods for multi-domain simulation of energy systems and power electronics engineering problems. Each chapter has a brief introduction on the theoretical background, a description of the problems to be solved, and objectives to be achieved. Block diagrams, electrical circuits, mathematical analysis or computer code are covered. Each chapter concludes with discussions on what should be learned, suggestions for further studies and even some experimental work.

  8. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng, E-mail: dssu@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  9. A simultaneous electron energy and dosimeter calibration method for an electron beam irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sunaga, H.; Kojima, T.

    1991-01-01

    In radiation processing using electron accelerators, the reproducibility of absorbed dose in the product depends not only on the variation of beam current and conveyor speed, but also on variations of other accelerator parameters. This requires routine monitoring of the beam current and the scan width, and also requires periodical calibration of routine dosimeters usually in the shape of film, electron energy, and other radiation field parameters. The electron energy calibration is important especially for food processing. The dose calibration method using partial absorption calorimeters provides only information about absorbed dose. Measurement of average electron current density provides basic information about the radiation field formed by the beam scanning and scattering at the beam window, though it does not allow direct dose calibration. The total absorption calorimeter with a thick absorber allows dose and dosimeter calibration, if the depth profile of relative dose in a reference absorber is given experimentally. It also allows accurate calibration of the average electron energy at the surface of the calorimeter core, if electron fluence received by the calorimeter is measured at the same time. This means that both electron energy and dosimeters can be simultaneously calibrated by irradiation of a combined system including the calorimeter, the detector of the electron current density meter, and a thick reference absorber for depth profile measurement of relative dose. We have developed a simple and multifunctional system using the combined calibration method for 5 MeV electron beams. The paper describes a simultaneous calibration method for electron energy and film dosimeters, and describes the electron current density meter, the total absorption calorimeter, and the characteristics of this method. (author). 13 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Converging ligand‐binding free energies obtained with free‐energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A.; Söderhjelm, Pär

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free‐energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa‐acid deep‐cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158–224 atoms). We use single‐step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non‐Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi‐empirical PM6‐DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free‐energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117350

  12. On the possibility of obtaining high-energy polarized electrons on Yerevan synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melikyan, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A possibility of producing high-energy polarized electrons on the Yerevan synchrotron is discussed. A review of a number of low-energy polarized electron sources and of some of experiments with high-energy polarized electrons is given

  13. Dissipation and energy balance in electronic dynamics of Na clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, Marc; Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the impact of dissipation on the energy balance in the electron dynamics of metal clusters excited by strong electro-magnetic pulses. The dynamics is described theoretically by Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) at the level of Local Density Approximation (LDA) augmented by a self interaction correction term and a quantum collision term in Relaxation-Time Approximation (RTA). We evaluate the separate contributions to the total excitation energy, namely energy exported by electron emission, potential energy due to changing charge state, intrinsic kinetic and potential energy, and collective flow energy. The balance of these energies is studied as function of the laser parameters (frequency, intensity, pulse length) and as function of system size and charge. We also look at collisions with a highly charged ion and here at the dependence on the impact parameter (close versus distant collisions). Dissipation turns out to be small where direct electron emission prevails namely for laser frequencies above any ionization threshold and for slow electron extraction in distant collisions. Dissipation is large for fast collisions and at low laser frequencies, particularly at resonances. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  14. Binding Energy and Lifetime of Excitons in InxGa1-xAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orani, D.; Polimeni, A.; Patane, A.

    1997-01-01

    We report a systematic study of exciton binding energies and lifetimes in InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. The experimental binding energies have been deduced from photoluminescence excitation measurements taking into account the contribution of the 2s state of the exciton and the line broadening...

  15. Design for Reliability of Power Electronics in Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics is the enabling technology for maximizing the power captured from renewable electrical generation, e.g., the wind and solar technology, and also for an efficient integration into the grid. Therefore, it is important that the power electronics are reliable and do not have too many...... failures during operation which otherwise will increase cost for operation, maintenance and reputation. Typically, power electronics in renewable electrical generation has to be designed for 20–30 years of operation, and in order to do that, it is crucial to know about the mission profile of the power...... electronics technology as well as to know how the power electronics technology is loaded in terms of temperature and other stressors relevant, to reliability. Hence, this chapter will show the basics of power electronics technology for renewable energy systems, describe the mission profile of the technology...

  16. Technical Training: ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC! ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics - Spring Term ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms: the Winter Term, Introduction to electronics in HEP, already took place; the next three Terms will run throughout the year: Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) - now open for registration Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Autumn Term: Ele...

  17. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  18. Effect of strong correlations on the high energy anomaly in hole- and electron-doped high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritz, B; Johnston, S; Greven, M; Shen, Z-X; Devereaux, T P; Schmitt, F; Meevasana, W; Motoyama, E M; Lu, D H; Kim, C; Scalettar, R T

    2009-01-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). This paper demonstrates, using a combination of new ARPES measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that the HEA is not simply the by-product of matrix element effects, but rather represents a cross-over from a quasi-particle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character, in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. the 'waterfall'-like behavior, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying both hole and electron doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram.

  19. Atomic and electronic structures of a-SiC:H from tight-binding molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivashchenko, V I; Shevchenko, V I; Ivashchenko, L A; Rusakov, G V

    2003-01-01

    The atomic and electronic properties of amorphous unhydrogenated (a-SiC) and hydrogenated (a-SiC:H) silicon carbides are studied using an sp sup 3 s sup * tight-binding force model with molecular dynamics simulations. The parameters of a repulsive pairwise potential are determined from ab initio pseudopotential calculations. Both carbides are generated from dilute vapours condensed from high temperature, with post-annealing at low temperature for a-SiC:H. A plausible model for the inter-atomic correlations and electronic states in a-SiC:H is suggested. According to this model, the formation of the amorphous network is weakly sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Hydrogen passivates effectively only the weak bonds of threefold-coordinated atoms. Chemical ordering is very much affected by the cooling rate and the structure of the high-temperature vapour. The as-computed characteristics are in rather good agreement with the results for a-SiC and a-Si:H from ab initio calculations.

  20. Lysine desuccinylase SIRT5 binds to cardiolipin and regulates the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Lu, Jie; Maringer, Katherine V; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Prochownik, Edward V; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2017-06-16

    SIRT5 is a lysine desuccinylase known to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and the urea cycle. Here, SIRT5 was observed to bind to cardiolipin via an amphipathic helix on its N terminus. In vitro , succinyl-CoA was used to succinylate liver mitochondrial membrane proteins. SIRT5 largely reversed the succinyl-CoA-driven lysine succinylation. Quantitative mass spectrometry of SIRT5-treated membrane proteins pointed to the electron transport chain, particularly Complex I, as being highly targeted for desuccinylation by SIRT5. Correspondingly, SIRT5 -/- HEK293 cells showed defects in both Complex I- and Complex II-driven respiration. In mouse liver, SIRT5 expression was observed to localize strictly to the periportal hepatocytes. However, homogenates prepared from whole SIRT5 -/- liver did show reduced Complex II-driven respiration. The enzymatic activities of Complex II and ATP synthase were also significantly reduced. Three-dimensional modeling of Complex II suggested that several SIRT5-targeted lysine residues lie at the protein-lipid interface of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B. We postulate that succinylation at these sites may disrupt Complex II subunit-subunit interactions and electron transfer. Lastly, SIRT5 -/- mice, like humans with Complex II deficiency, were found to have mild lactic acidosis. Our findings suggest that SIRT5 is targeted to protein complexes on the inner mitochondrial membrane via affinity for cardiolipin to promote respiratory chain function. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Tuning the electronic properties of gated multilayer phosphorene: A self-consistent tight-binding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. L.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-04-01

    By taking account of the electric-field-induced charge screening, a self-consistent calculation within the framework of the tight-binding approach is employed to obtain the electronic band structure of gated multilayer phosphorene and the charge densities on the different phosphorene layers. We find charge density and screening anomalies in single-gated multilayer phosphorene and electron-hole bilayers in dual-gated multilayer phosphorene. Due to the unique puckered lattice structure, both intralayer and interlayer charge screenings are important in gated multilayer phosphorene. We find that the electric-field tuning of the band structure of multilayer phosphorene is distinctively different in the presence and absence of charge screening. For instance, it is shown that the unscreened band gap of multilayer phosphorene decreases dramatically with increasing electric-field strength. However, in the presence of charge screening, the magnitude of this band-gap decrease is significantly reduced and the reduction depends strongly on the number of phosphorene layers. Our theoretical results of the band-gap tuning are compared with recent experiments and good agreement is found.

  2. Ultralow energy calibration of LUX detector using Xe 127 electron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Fallon, S. R.; Fan, A.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2017-12-01

    We report an absolute calibration of the ionization yields (Qy ) and fluctuations for electronic recoil events in liquid xenon at discrete energies between 186 eV and 33.2 keV. The average electric field applied across the liquid xenon target is 180 V /cm . The data are obtained using low energy Xe 127 electron capture decay events from the 95.0-day first run from LUX (WS2013) in search of weakly interacting massive particles. The sequence of gamma-ray and x-ray cascades associated with I 127 deexcitations produces clearly identified two-vertex events in the LUX detector. We observe the K-(binding energy, 33.2 keV), L-(5.2 keV), M-(1.1 keV), and N-(186 eV) shell cascade events and verify that the relative ratio of observed events for each shell agrees with calculations. The N-shell cascade analysis includes single extracted electron (SE) events and represents the lowest-energy electronic recoil in situ measurements that have been explored in liquid xenon.

  3. Construction of energy loss function for low-energy electrons in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayashankar, [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1976-02-01

    The energy loss function for electrons in the energy range from 50 eV to 1 keV in helium gas has been constructed by considering separately the energy loss in overcoming the ionization threshold, the loss manifested as kinetic energy of secondary electrons and the loss in the discrete state excitations. This has been done by utilizing recent measurements of Opal et al. on the energy spectrum of secondary electrons and incorporating the experimental data on cross sections for twenty-four excited states. The present results of the energy loss function are in good agreement with the Bethe formula for energies above 500 eV. For lower energies, where the Bethe formula is not applicable, the present results should be particularly useful.

  4. Vibrational and electronic excitation of hexatriacontane thin films by low energy electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, M.R.; Schott, M.; Pfluger, P.

    1990-01-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of hexatriacontane (HTC) were irradiated with low energy (E=0.5--15 eV) electrons, and off-specular backscattered electron spectra were measured. Below E∼7 eV, single and multiple vibrational excitations only are observed, which relax the electrons down to the bottom of the HTC conduction band. Due to the negative electron affinity of HTC, thermal electrons are emitted into vacuum. Structure in the backscattered electron current at kinetic energies about 1.5 and 4 eV are associated to conduction band density of states. Above E∼7 eV, the dominant losses correspond to electronic excitations, excitons, or above a threshold (energy of the electron inside the HTC film) at 9.2±0.1 eV, electron--hole pair generation. The latter process is very efficient and reaches a yield of the order of one ∼11 eV. Evidence for chemical reaction above E∼4 eV is observed

  5. Binding energy and preferred adsorption sites of CO on gold and silver-gold cluster cations: adsorption kinetics and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, Marco; Weigend, Florian; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the reactivity of trapped pure gold (Au(n)+, n cations (Ag(m)Au(n)+, m + n carbon monoxide as studied in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The experimental results are discussed in terms of ab initio computations which provide a comprehensive picture of the chemical binding behaviour (like binding energy, adsorption sites, associated vibrational frequencies) of CO to the noble metal as a function of cluster size and composition. Starting from results for pure gold cluster cations for which an overall decrease of CO binding energy with increasing cluster size was experimentally observed--from about 1.09 +/- 0.1 eV (for n = 6) to below 0.65 +/- 0.1 eV (for n > 26) we demonstrate that metal--CO bond energies correlate with the total electron density and with the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) on the bare metal cluster cation as obtained by density functional theory (DFT) computations. This is a consequence of the predominantly sigma-donating character of the CO-M bond. Further support for this concept is found by contrasting the predictions of binding energies to the experimental results for small alloy cluster cations (Ag(m)Au(n)+, 4 < m + n < 7) as a function of composition. Here, binding energy drops with increasing silver content, while CO still binds always in a head-on fashion to a gold atom. Finally we show how the CO stretch frequency of Ag(m)Au(n)CO+ may be used to identify possible adsorption sites and pre-screen favorable isomers.

  6. Dependence of electron inelastic mean free paths on electron energy and materials at low energy region, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanuma, Shigeo; Powell, C.J.; Penn, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    We have proposed a general formula of electron inelastic mean free path (IMFP) to describe the calculated IMFPs over the 50-2000 eV energy range based on the Inokuti's modified Bethe formula for the inelastic scattering cross section. The IMFPs for 50-2000 eV electrons in 27 elements were calculated using Penn's algorithm. The IMFP dependence on electron energy in the range 50-200 eV varies considerably from material to material. These variations are associated with substantial differences in the electron energy-loss functions amongst the material. We also found that the modified Bethe formula by Inokuti could be fitted to the calculated IMFPs in the range 50-2000 eV within 3% relative error. (author)

  7. Galectin-3 binding protein links circulating microparticles with electron dense glomerular deposits in lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, C T; Østergaard, O; Rekvig, O P; Sturfelt, G; Jacobsen, S; Heegaard, N H H

    2015-10-01

    A high level of galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) appears to distinguish circulating cell-derived microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of this study is to characterize the population of G3BP-positive microparticles from SLE patients compared to healthy controls, explore putative clinical correlates, and examine if G3BP is present in immune complex deposits in kidney biopsies from patients with lupus nephritis. Numbers of annexin V-binding and G3BP-exposing plasma microparticles from 56 SLE patients and 36 healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. Quantitation of microparticle-associated G3BP, C1q and immunoglobulins was obtained by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Correlations between microparticle-G3BP data and clinical parameters were analyzed. Co-localization of G3BP with in vivo-bound IgG was examined in kidney biopsies from one non-SLE control and from patients with class IV (n = 2) and class V (n = 1) lupus nephritis using co-localization immune electron microscopy. Microparticle-G3BP, microparticle-C1q and microparticle-immunoglobulins were significantly (P microparticle populations could be discerned by flow cytometry, including two subpopulations that were significantly increased in SLE samples (P = 0.01 and P = 0.0002, respectively). No associations of G3BP-positive microparticles with clinical manifestations or disease activity were found. Immune electron microscopy showed co-localization of G3BP with in vivo-bound IgG in glomerular electron dense immune complex deposits in all lupus nephritis biopsies. Both circulating microparticle-G3BP numbers as well as G3BP expression are increased in SLE patients corroborating G3BP being a feature of SLE microparticles. By demonstrating G3BP co-localized with deposited immune complexes in lupus nephritis, the study supports cell-derived microparticles as a major autoantigen source and provides a new understanding of the origin of

  8. Energy and temperature fluctuations in the single electron box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Tineke L van den; Brange, Fredrik; Samuelsson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In mesoscopic and nanoscale systems at low temperatures, charge carriers are typically not in thermal equilibrium with the surrounding lattice. The resulting, non-equilibrium dynamics of electrons has only begun to be explored. Experimentally the time-dependence of the electron temperature (deviating from the lattice temperature) has been investigated in small metallic islands. Motivated by these experiments, we investigate theoretically the electronic energy and temperature fluctuations in a metallic island in the Coulomb blockade regime, tunnel coupled to an electronic reservoir, i.e. a single electron box. We show that electronic quantum tunnelling between the island and the reservoir, in the absence of any net charge or energy transport, induces fluctuations of the island electron temperature. The full distribution of the energy transfer as well as the island temperature is derived within the framework of full counting statistics. In particular, the low-frequency temperature fluctuations are analysed, fully accounting for charging effects and non-zero reservoir temperature. The experimental requirements for measuring the predicted temperature fluctuations are discussed. (paper)

  9. Detectors for low energy electron cooling in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlier, F. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Low-energy operation of RHIC is of particular interest to study the location of a possible critical point in the QCD phase diagram. The performance of RHIC at energies equal to or lower than 10 GV/nucleon is limited by nonlinearities, Intra-BeamScattering (IBS) processes and space-charge effects. To successfully address the luminosity and ion store lifetime limitations imposed by IBS, the method of electron cooling has been envisaged. During electron cooling processes electrons are injected along with the ion beam at the nominal ion bunch velocities. The velocity spread of the ion beam is reduced in all planes through Coulomb interactions between the cold electron beam and the ion beam. The electron cooling system proposed for RHIC will be the first of its kind to use bunched beams for the delivery of the electron bunches, and will therefore be accompanied by the necessary challenges. The designed electron cooler will be located in IP2. The electron bunches will be accelerated by a linac before being injected along side the ion beams. Thirty consecutive electron bunches will be injected to overlap with a single ion bunch. They will first cool the yellow beam before being extracted, turned by 180-degrees, and reinjected into the blue beam for cooling. As such, both the yellow and blue beams will be cooled by the same ion bunches. This will pose considerable challenges to ensure proper electron beam quality to cool the second ion beam. Furthermore, no ondulator will be used in the electron cooler so radiative recombination between the ions and the electrons will occur.

  10. Energy transfer between two vacuum-gapped metal plates: Coulomb fluctuations and electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zu-Quan; Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    Recent experimental measurements for near-field radiative heat transfer between two bodies have been able to approach the gap distance within 2 nm , where the contributions of Coulomb fluctuation and electron tunneling are comparable. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method in the G0W0 approximation, based on a tight-binding model, we obtain for the energy current a Caroli formula from the Meir-Wingreen formula in the local equilibrium approximation. Also, the Caroli formula is consistent with the evanescent part of the heat transfer from the theory of fluctuational electrodynamics. We go beyond the local equilibrium approximation to study the energy transfer in the crossover region from electron tunneling to Coulomb fluctuation based on a numerical calculation.

  11. Effects of an Intense Laser Field and Hydrostatic Pressure on the Intersubband Transitions and Binding Energy of Shallow Donor Impurities in a Quantum Well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesilgul, U.; Ungan, F.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sökmen, I.

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the intersubband transitions and the ground-state binding energies of a hydrogenic donor impurity in a quantum well in the presence of a high-frequency laser field and hydrostatic pressure. The calculations are performed within the effective mass approximation, using a variational method. We conclude that the laser field amplitude and the hydrostatic pressure provide an important effect on the electronic and optical properties of the quantum wells. According to the results obtained from the present work, it is deduced that (i) the binding energies of donor impurity decrease as the laser field increase, (ii) the binding energies of donor impurity increase as the hydrostatic pressure increase, (iii) the intersubband absorption coefficients shift toward lower energies as the hydrostatic pressure increases, (iv) the magnitude of absorption coefficients decrease and also shift toward higher energies as the laser field increase. It is hopeful that the obtained results will provide important improvements in device applications. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizen, Teruhiko; Asano, Yoshihiro; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Seike, Takamitsu; Aoki, Tsuyoshi; Fukami, Kenji; Hosoda, Naoyasu; Yonehara, Hiroto; Takagi, Tetsuya; Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd 2 Fe 14 B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small

  13. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizen, Teruhiko [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)]. E-mail: bizen@spring8.or.jp; Asano, Yoshihiro [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Marechal, Xavier-Marie [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Seike, Takamitsu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Aoki, Tsuyoshi [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, Kenji [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hosoda, Naoyasu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yonehara, Hiroto [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takagi, Tetsuya [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hara, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kitamura, Hideo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-05-11

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small.

  14. Power electronics - The key technology for Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng

    2014-01-01

    The energy paradigms in many countries (e.g. Germany and Denmark) have experienced a significant change from fossil-based resources to clean renewables (e.g. wind turbines and photovoltaics) in the past few decades. The scenario of highly penetrated renewables is going to be further enhanced...... - Denmark expects to be 100 % fossil-free by 2050. Consequently, it is required that the production, distribution and use of the energy should be as technologically efficient as possible and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be strengthened. In order to realize the transition smoothly...... and effectively, energy conversion systems, currently based on power electronics technology, will again play an essential role in this energy paradigm shift. Using highly efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application, together with advanced control...

  15. From Molecular Electronics to Solar Thermal Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stine Tetzschner

    The Sun's signicant resource potential provides a solution for the world's increasing energy demand in a sustainable and responsible manner. However, the intrinsic property of the on-o cycles of the solar irradiation, i.e. daynight, sunny-cloudy, and summer-winter, constitutes a signicant challenge...... for the utilization of solar energy. An eective technology for storing the solar energy is required. This thesis focuses on solar thermal energy storage in molecules, since it oers a very compact and eective storage method. The rst chapter after the introduction of the thesis, chapter two, introduces the fundamental...... properties of the molecule, i.e. the electronic behaviour of the molecule in dierent environments, which is a key property for investigations of solar energy storage. The main focus of the research is on the electron transport in the Coulomb blockade regime. The third chapter goes into the challenge...

  16. Binding free energy calculations to rationalize the interactions of huprines with acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C M; Oliva, Mónica; Andrés, Juan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, the binding free energy of a family of huprines with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation method, based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics potentials. Binding free energy calculations and the analysis of the geometrical parameters highlight the importance of the stereochemistry of huprines in AChE inhibition. Binding isotope effects are calculated to unravel the interactions between ligands and the gorge of AChE. New chemical insights are provided to explain and rationalize the experimental results. A good correlation with the experimental data is found for a family of inhibitors with moderate differences in the enzyme affinity. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and interaction energy per residue reveals that Asp72, Glu199, and His440 contribute significantly to the network of interactions between active site residues, which stabilize the inhibitors in the gorge. It seems that a cooperative effect of the residues of the gorge determines the affinity of the enzyme for these inhibitors, where Asp72, Glu199, and His440 make a prominent contribution.

  17. Binding free energy calculations to rationalize the interactions of huprines with acetylcholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C. M.; Oliva, Mónica; Andrés, Juan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, the binding free energy of a family of huprines with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation method, based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics potentials. Binding free energy calculations and the analysis of the geometrical parameters highlight the importance of the stereochemistry of huprines in AChE inhibition. Binding isotope effects are calculated to unravel the interactions between ligands and the gorge of AChE. New chemical insights are provided to explain and rationalize the experimental results. A good correlation with the experimental data is found for a family of inhibitors with moderate differences in the enzyme affinity. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and interaction energy per residue reveals that Asp72, Glu199, and His440 contribute significantly to the network of interactions between active site residues, which stabilize the inhibitors in the gorge. It seems that a cooperative effect of the residues of the gorge determines the affinity of the enzyme for these inhibitors, where Asp72, Glu199, and His440 make a prominent contribution.

  18. Computational identification of binding energy hot spots in protein-RNA complexes using an ensemble approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuliang; Wang, Zixiang; Zhan, Weihua; Deng, Lei

    2018-05-01

    Identifying RNA-binding residues, especially energetically favored hot spots, can provide valuable clues for understanding the mechanisms and functional importance of protein-RNA interactions. Yet, limited availability of experimentally recognized energy hot spots in protein-RNA crystal structures leads to the difficulties in developing empirical identification approaches. Computational prediction of RNA-binding hot spot residues is still in its infant stage. Here, we describe a computational method, PrabHot (Prediction of protein-RNA binding hot spots), that can effectively detect hot spot residues on protein-RNA binding interfaces using an ensemble of conceptually different machine learning classifiers. Residue interaction network features and new solvent exposure characteristics are combined together and selected for classification with the Boruta algorithm. In particular, two new reference datasets (benchmark and independent) have been generated containing 107 hot spots from 47 known protein-RNA complex structures. In 10-fold cross-validation on the training dataset, PrabHot achieves promising performances with an AUC score of 0.86 and a sensitivity of 0.78, which are significantly better than that of the pioneer RNA-binding hot spot prediction method HotSPRing. We also demonstrate the capability of our proposed method on the independent test dataset and gain a competitive advantage as a result. The PrabHot webserver is freely available at http://denglab.org/PrabHot/. leideng@csu.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Accurate Estimation of the Standard Binding Free Energy of Netropsin with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is the target of chemical compounds (drugs, pollutants, photosensitizers, etc., which bind through non-covalent interactions. Depending on their structure and their chemical properties, DNA binders can associate to the minor or to the major groove of double-stranded DNA. They can also intercalate between two adjacent base pairs, or even replace one or two base pairs within the DNA double helix. The subsequent biological effects are strongly dependent on the architecture of the binding motif. Discriminating between the different binding patterns is of paramount importance to predict and rationalize the effect of a given compound on DNA. The structural characterization of DNA complexes remains, however, cumbersome at the experimental level. In this contribution, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the standard binding free energy of DNA with netropsin, a well-characterized antiviral and antimicrobial drug, which associates to the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. To overcome the sampling limitations of classical molecular dynamics simulations, which cannot capture the large change in configurational entropy that accompanies binding, we resort to a series of potentials of mean force calculations involving a set of geometrical restraints acting on collective variables.

  20. Proposal to detect an emission of unusual super-high energy electrons in electron storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-peng Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an extended Lorentz–Einstein mass formula taken into the uncertainty principle, it is predicted that the electron beams passing accelerating electric field should with a small probability generate abnormal super-high energy electrons which are much higher than the beam energy. Author’s preliminary experiment result at electron storage ring has hinted these signs, so suggests to more strictly detect this unusual phenomenon, and thus to test the extended mass formula as well as a more perfect special relativity.

  1. Free energy profiles of cocaine esterase-cocaine binding process by molecular dynamics and potential of mean force simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Han, Keli; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-11-25

    The combined molecular dynamics (MD) and potential of mean force (PMF) simulations have been performed to determine the free energy profile of the CocE)-(+)-cocaine binding process in comparison with that of the corresponding CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process. According to the MD simulations, the equilibrium CocE-(+)-cocaine binding mode is similar to the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding mode. However, based on the simulated free energy profiles, a significant free energy barrier (∼5 kcal/mol) exists in the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process whereas no obvious free energy barrier exists in the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process, although the free energy barrier of ∼5 kcal/mol is not high enough to really slow down the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process. In addition, the obtained free energy profiles also demonstrate that (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine have very close binding free energies with CocE, with a negligible difference (∼0.2 kcal/mol), which is qualitatively consistent with the nearly same experimental K M values of the CocE enzyme for (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine. The consistency between the computational results and available experimental data suggests that the mechanistic insights obtained from this study are reasonable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Positive XPS binding energy shift of supported Cu{sub N}-clusters governed by initial state effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.; Peredkov, S. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Al-Hada, M. [Department of Physics, College of Education and Linguistics, University of Amran (Yemen); Neeb, M., E-mail: matthias.neeb@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Campus Adlershof, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Eberhardt, W. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); DESY, Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Size dependent initial and final state effects of mass-selected deposited clusters. • Initial state effect dominates positive XPS shift in supported Cu-clusters. • Size dependent Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state of Cu cluster. • Size-dependent Auger parameter analysis. • Positive XPS shift differs from negative surface core level shift in crystalline copper. - Abstract: An initial state effect is established as origin for the positive 2p core electron binding energy shift found for Cu{sub N}-clusters supported by a thin silica layer of a p-doped Si(1 0 0) wafer. Using the concept of the Auger parameter and taking into account the usually neglected Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state (M{sub 4,5}M{sub 4,5}) it is shown that the initial state shift is comparable to the measured XPS shift while the final state relaxation shift contributes only marginally to the binding energy shift. The cluster results differ from the negative surface core-level shift of crystalline copper which has been explained in terms of a final state relaxation effect.

  3. Magnetic field-dependent of binding energy in GaN/InGaN/GaN spherical QDQW nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazi, Haddou, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [Solid State Laboratory, Faculty of science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco); Special mathematics, CPGE Kénitra, Chakib Arsalane Street (Morocco); Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine [Solid State Laboratory, Faculty of science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco)

    2013-10-15

    Simultaneous study of magnetic field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN (core|well|shell) spherical quantum dot–quantum well (SQDQW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and an infinite deep potential describing the quantum confinement effect. A Ritz variational approach is used taking into account of the electron-impurity correlation and the magnetic field effect in the trial wave-function. It appears that the binding energy depends strongly on the external magnetic field, the impurity's position and the structure radius. It has been found that: (i) the magnetic field effect is more marked in large layer than in thin layer and (ii) it is more pronounced in the spherical layer center than in its extremities.

  4. Power Electronics and Reliability in Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Zhou, Dao

    2012-01-01

    Power Electronics are needed in almost all kind of renewable energy systems. It is used both for controlling the renewable source and also for interfacing to the load, which can be grid-connected or working in stand-alone mode. More and more efforts are put into making renewable energy systems...... better in terms of reliability in order to ensure a high availability of the power sources, in this case the knowledge of mission profile of a certain application is crucial for the reliability evaluation/design of power electronics. In this paper an overview on the power electronic circuits behind...... the most common converter configurations for wind turbine and photovoltaic is done. Next different aspects of improving the system reliability are mapped. Further on examples of how to control the chip temperature in different power electronic configurations as well as operation modes for wind power...

  5. Low-energy electron inelastic mean free path in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Truong, Hieu T., E-mail: nguyentruongthanhhieu@tdt.edu.vn [Theoretical Physics Research Group & Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City 756636 (Viet Nam)

    2016-04-25

    We show that the dielectric approach can determine electron inelastic mean free paths in materials with an accuracy equivalent to those from first-principle calculations in the GW approximation of many-body theory. The present approach is an alternative for calculating the hot-electron lifetime, which is an important quantity in ultrafast electron dynamics. This approach, applied here to solid copper for electron energies below 100 eV, yields results in agreement with experimental data from time-resolved two-photon photoemission, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the energy ranges 2–3.5, 10–15, and 60–100 eV, respectively.

  6. Dependence of Energetic Electron Precipitation on the Geomagnetic Index Kp and Electron Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Park

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the magnetospheric particles can precipitate into the atmosphere of the Earth. In this paper we examine such precipitation of energetic electrons using the data obtained from low-altitude polar orbiting satellite observations. We analyze the precipitating electron flux data for many periods selected from a total of 84 storm events identified for 2001-2012. The analysis includes the dependence of precipitation on the Kp index and the electron energy, for which we use three energies E1 > 30 keV, E2 > 100 keV, E3 > 300 keV. We find that the precipitation is best correlated with Kp after a time delay of < 3 hours. Most importantly, the correlation with Kp is notably tighter for lower energy than for higher energy in the sense that the lower energy precipitation flux increases more rapidly with Kp than does the higher energy precipitation flux. Based on this we suggest that the Kp index reflects excitation of a wave that is responsible for scattering of preferably lower energy electrons. The role of waves of other types should become increasingly important for higher energy, for which we suggest to rely on other indicators than Kp if one can identify such an indicator.

  7. High-Energy Electron Beam Application to Air Pollutants Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ighigeanu, D.; Martin, D.; Manaila, E.; Craciun, G.; Calinescu, I.

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of electron beam (EB) process in pollutants removal is connected to its high efficiency to transfer high amount of energy directly into the matter under treatment. Disadvantage which is mostly related to high investment cost of accelerator may be effectively overcome in future as the result of use accelerator new developments. The potential use of medium to high-energy high power EB accelerators for air pollutants removal is demonstrated in [1]. The lower electrical efficiencies of accelerators with higher energies are partially compensated by the lower electron energy losses in the beam windows. In addition, accelerators with higher electron energies can provide higher beam powers with lower beam currents [1]. The total EB energy losses (backscattering, windows and in the intervening air space) are substantially lower with higher EB incident energy. The useful EB energy is under 50% for 0.5 MeV and about 95% above 3 MeV. In view of these arguments we decided to study the application of high energy EB for air pollutants removal. Two electron beam accelerators are available for our studies: electron linear accelerators ALIN-10 and ALID-7, built in the Electron Accelerator Laboratory, INFLPR, Bucharest, Romania. Both accelerators are of traveling-wave type, operating at a wavelength of 10 cm. They utilize tunable S-band magnetrons, EEV M 5125 type, delivering 2 MW of power in 4 μ pulses. The accelerating structure is a disk-loaded tube operating in the 2 mode. The optimum values of the EB peak current IEB and EB energy EEB to produce maximum output power PEB for a fixed pulse duration EB and repetition frequency fEB are as follows: for ALIN-10: EEB = 6.23 MeV; IEB =75 mA; PEB 164 W (fEB = 100 Hz, EB = 3.5 s) and for ALID-7: EEB 5.5 MeV; IEB = 130 mA; PEB = 670 W (fEB = 250 Hz, EB = 3.75 s). This paper presents a special designed installation, named SDI-1, and several representative results obtained by high energy EB application to SO 2 , NOx and VOCs

  8. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Yu Xiaoqi; Yang Tao

    2005-01-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown

  9. Elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alle, D.T.; Gulley, R.J.; Buckman, S.J.; Brunger, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    We report absolute differential cross section measurements for vibrationally elastic electron scattering from NH 3 at incident energies from 2-30 eV. The present results, from a crossed electron-molecular beam apparatus, represent the first comprehensive experimental attempt to quantify the elastic electron-NH 3 scattering process. At each energy studied we have integrated our differential cross section data to generate total elastic and elastic momentum transfer cross sections and a critical comparison of both our differential and integral cross sections against previous experiment and theory is provided. We also report our observation of a strong Feshbach resonance in the elastic channel at an energy of 5.59 ± 0.05 eV. (Author)

  10. Stochasticity of the energy absorption in the electron cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez T, C.; Hernandez A, O.

    1998-01-01

    The energy absorption mechanism in cyclotron resonance of the electrons is a present problem, since it could be considered from the stochastic point of view or this related with a non-homogeneous but periodical of plasma spatial structure. In this work using the Bogoliubov average method for a multi periodical system in presence of resonances, the drift equations were obtained in presence of a RF field for the case of electron cyclotron resonance until first order terms with respect to inverse of its cyclotron frequency. The absorbed energy equation is obtained on part of electrons in a simple model and by drift method. It is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. (Author)

  11. Vibrational excitation of D2 by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.J.; Phelps, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Excitation coefficients for the production of vibrationally exicted D 2 by low energy electrons have been determined from measurements of the intensity of infrared emission from mixtures of D 2 and small concentrations of CO 2 or CO. The measurements were made using the electron drift tube technique and covered electric field to gas density ratios (E/n) from (5 to 80) x 10 -21 V m 2 , corresponding to mean electron energies between 0.45 and 4.5 eV. The CO 2 and CO concentrations were chosen to allow efficient excitation transfer from the D 2 to the carbon containing molecule, but to minimize direct excitation of the CO 2 or CO. The measured infrared intensities were normalized to predicted values for N 2 --CO 2 and N 2 --CO mixtures at E/n where the efficiency of vibrational excitation is known to be very close to 100%. The experimental excitation coefficients are in satisfactory agreement with predictions based on electron--D 2 cross sections at mean electron energies below 1 eV, but are about 50% too high at mean energies above about 2 eV. Application of the technique to H 2 did not yield useful vibrational excitation coefficients. The effective coefficients in H 2 --CO 2 mixtures were a factor of about 3 times the predicted values. For our H 2 --CO mixtures the excitation of CO via excitation transfer from H 2 is small compared to direct electron excitation of CO molecules. Published experiments and theories on electron--H 2 and electron--D 2 collisions are reviewed to obtain the cross sections used in the predictions

  12. Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems - Status and Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng

    2014-01-01

    electronics in generation, transmission/distribution and end-user application, together with advanced controls, can pave the way for renewable energy resources. In view of this, some of the most promising renewable candidates like wind power and photovoltaic, which are becoming a significant part...... in the electricity production, are explored in this paper. Issues like technology demands, power converter topologies, and control structures are addressed. Some special focuses are also paid on the emerging trends in power electronics development for those systems....

  13. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons by hydrogen molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, L.C.G.; Mu-Tao, L.; Botelho, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    The coherent version of the Renormalized Multiple-Centre Potential Model (RMPM) has been extended to treat the elastic scattering of low energy electrons by H2 molecule. The intramolecular Multiple Scattering (MS) effect has also been included. The comparison against the experimental data shows that the inclusion of the MS improves significantly with experiment. The extension of the present method to study electron-polyatomic molecule interaction is also discussed. (author) [pt

  14. Power Electronics and Control of Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Sera, Dezso

    2007-01-01

    sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss some of the most emerging renewable energy sources......The global electrical energy consumption is still rising and there is a demand to double the power capacity within 20 years. The production, distribution and use of energy should be as technological efficient as possible and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be set up....... Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources may be very high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One is to change the electrical power production...

  15. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations in Drug Discovery: Recent Advances and Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournia, Zoe; Allen, Bryce; Sherman, Woody

    2017-12-26

    Accurate in silico prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities has been a primary objective of structure-based drug design for decades due to the putative value it would bring to the drug discovery process. However, computational methods have historically failed to deliver value in real-world drug discovery applications due to a variety of scientific, technical, and practical challenges. Recently, a family of approaches commonly referred to as relative binding free energy (RBFE) calculations, which rely on physics-based molecular simulations and statistical mechanics, have shown promise in reliably generating accurate predictions in the context of drug discovery projects. This advance arises from accumulating developments in the underlying scientific methods (decades of research on force fields and sampling algorithms) coupled with vast increases in computational resources (graphics processing units and cloud infrastructures). Mounting evidence from retrospective validation studies, blind challenge predictions, and prospective applications suggests that RBFE simulations can now predict the affinity differences for congeneric ligands with sufficient accuracy and throughput to deliver considerable value in hit-to-lead and lead optimization efforts. Here, we present an overview of current RBFE implementations, highlighting recent advances and remaining challenges, along with examples that emphasize practical considerations for obtaining reliable RBFE results. We focus specifically on relative binding free energies because the calculations are less computationally intensive than absolute binding free energy (ABFE) calculations and map directly onto the hit-to-lead and lead optimization processes, where the prediction of relative binding energies between a reference molecule and new ideas (virtual molecules) can be used to prioritize molecules for synthesis. We describe the critical aspects of running RBFE calculations, from both theoretical and applied perspectives

  16. Higher energy dissociative electron attachment cross sections in sulfur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurepa, M.; Pejcev, V.; Cadez, I.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental results of total electron attachment cross sections are presented with, for comparison, two additional sets of data, those of Orient and Srivastava and of Spyrou et al.. Both were normalized to present values of the first attachment peak at 4,6 eV, in order to show more clearly differences in cross section curve shapes. In fact, data of Orient and Srivastava are larger that the present ones for a factor of 2,82; while those of Spyrou et al. are higher only for 3,70 %. Both these sets of data, as well as those by Cadez et al., cover an incident electron energy range 3,40 - 9,40 eV. Electron attachment processes at energies higher that 9,40 eV have been in fact detected and measured in the same set of experiments that led to former publication of lower energy attachment processes by Cadez et al.. At that time in none of experiments, that could distinguished ionic species formed in dissociation attachment processes, was a sign of ions at incident electron energies exceeding 9,40 eV. That caused our ignorance toward processes detected and measured at higher incident electron energies, mainly since they were at least one order of magnitude lower that the two peaks at 4,6 eV and 7,3 eV, respectively. Without additional experiments, that include mass analysis of ionic species formed in dissociative electron attachment processes, it is not possible to give any sound explanation to causes of peaks at energies higher that 8,0 eV

  17. Dose controlled low energy electron irradiator for biomolecular films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S V K; Tare, Satej T; Upalekar, Yogesh V; Tsering, Thupten

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a multi target, Low Energy Electron (LEE), precise dose controlled irradiator for biomolecular films. Up to seven samples can be irradiated one after another at any preset electron energy and dose under UHV conditions without venting the chamber. In addition, one more sample goes through all the steps except irradiation, which can be used as control for comparison with the irradiated samples. All the samples are protected against stray electron irradiation by biasing them at -20 V during the entire period, except during irradiation. Ethernet based communication electronics hardware, LEE beam control electronics and computer interface were developed in house. The user Graphical User Interface to control the irradiation and dose measurement was developed using National Instruments Lab Windows CVI. The working and reliability of the dose controlled irradiator has been fully tested over the electron energy range of 0.5 to 500 eV by studying LEE induced single strand breaks to ΦX174 RF1 dsDNA.

  18. Dose controlled low energy electron irradiator for biomolecular films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. V. K., E-mail: svkk@tifr.res.in; Tare, Satej T.; Upalekar, Yogesh V.; Tsering, Thupten [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2016-03-15

    We have developed a multi target, Low Energy Electron (LEE), precise dose controlled irradiator for biomolecular films. Up to seven samples can be irradiated one after another at any preset electron energy and dose under UHV conditions without venting the chamber. In addition, one more sample goes through all the steps except irradiation, which can be used as control for comparison with the irradiated samples. All the samples are protected against stray electron irradiation by biasing them at −20 V during the entire period, except during irradiation. Ethernet based communication electronics hardware, LEE beam control electronics and computer interface were developed in house. The user Graphical User Interface to control the irradiation and dose measurement was developed using National Instruments Lab Windows CVI. The working and reliability of the dose controlled irradiator has been fully tested over the electron energy range of 0.5 to 500 eV by studying LEE induced single strand breaks to ΦX174 RF1 dsDNA.

  19. Quantum confinement effect and exciton binding energy of layered perovskite nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the preparation of monolayer (n = 1, few-layer (n = 2–5 and 3D (n = ∞ organic lead bromide perovskite nanoplatelets (NPLs by tuning the molar ratio of methylammonium bromide (MABr and hexadecammonium bromide (HABr. The absorption spectrum of the monolayer (HA2PbBr4 perovskite NPLs shows about 138 nm blue shift from that of 3D MAPbBr3 perovskites, which is attributed to strong quantum confinement effect. We further investigate the two-photon photoluminescence (PL of the NPLs and measure the exciton binding energy of monolayer perovskite NPLs using linear absorption and two-photon PL excitation spectroscopy. The exciton binding energy of monolayer perovskite NPLs is about 218 meV, which is far larger than tens of meV in 3D lead halide perovskites.

  20. Relativistic deformed mean-field calculation of binding energy differences of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepf, W.; Barreiro, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Binding energy differences of mirror nuclei for A=15, 17, 27, 29, 31, 33, 39 and 41 are calculated in the framework of relativistic deformed mean-field theory. The spatial components of the vector meson fields and the photon are fully taken into account in a self-consistent manner. The calculated binding energy differences are systematically smaller than the experimental values and lend support to the existence of the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly found decades ago in nonrelativistic calculations. For the majority of the nuclei studied, however, the results are such that the anomaly is significantly smaller than the one obtained within state-of-the-art nonrelativistic calculations. (author). 35 refs

  1. Binding energies of double-Λ hypernuclei and ΛΛ G-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himeno, Hiroyuki; Sakuda, Toshimi; Nagata, Sinobu; Yamamoto, Yasuo.

    1993-01-01

    Binding energies of double-Λ hypernuclei ΛΛ 10 Be, ΛΛ 13 B and ΛΛ 6 He are calculated on the basis of G-matrix theory in finite nuclei. The core + Λ + Λ three-body model is adopted and the G-matrix for ΛΛ interaction is treated consistently with the model space. As the bare interaction the Nijmegen model D and model F are used. It is discussed that the consistency of the interaction with the model space is very important to calculate reliably the binding energies. It is shown that if the new event of double-Λ hypernuclei is interpreted as ΛΛ 13 B, model D reproduces the experimental data very well, whereas model F does not. (author)

  2. Electron-energy deposition in skin and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, G.T.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The primary object of this study was to investigate the relations between dosimeter response and skin dose resulting from beta-particle irradiation. This object was achieved by combining evaluation of beta-source energy spectra, calculation of flux energy spectra, and employment of a Monte-Carlo electron-transport computer program for determination of depth-dose distribution in multislab geometries. Intermediate results from three steps of evaluation were compared individually with experimental data or with other theoretical results and showed excellent agreement. The combined method is applicable for the electron agreement. The combined method is applicable for the electron energy range of 1 keV to 5 MeV for both monoenergetic electrons and energy-distributed electrons. Determination of dosimeter response - skin dose relationships for homogeneous atmospheric beta-particle sources and for two specific configurations of LiF TLD's have been carried out in this study. Information based on these calculations is of value in designing beta-particle dosimeters as well as in assessing potential occupational and public health risks associated with the nuclear power industry

  3. Development of real-time low energy electron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali; Smith, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    A low energy electron beam calorimeter with a thin film window has been fabricated to facilitate a reliable method of dose assessment for electron beam energies down to 200 keV. The system was designed to incorporate a data-logger in order that it could be used on the self-shielded 200 keV facility at MINT. In use, the calorimeter started logging temperature a short time before it passed under the beam and it continued taking data until well after the end of the irradiation. Data could be retrieved at any time after the calorimeter had emerged from the irradiator

  4. Studies on functional polymer films utilizing low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masayuki

    1992-01-01

    Also in adhesives and tackifiers, with the expansion of the fields of application, the required characteristics have become high grade and complex. As one of them, the instantaneous hardening of adhesives can be taken up. In the field of lamination works, the low energy type electron beam accelerators having the linear filament of accelerating voltage below 300 kV were developed in 1970s, and the interest in the development of electron beam-handened adhesives has heightend. The authors have carried out research aiming at heightening the functions of the polymer films obtained by electron beam hardening reaction, and developed the adhesives. In this report, the features of electron beam hardening reaction, the structure and properties of electron beam-hardened polymer films and the molecular design of electron beam-hardened monomer oligomers are described. The feature of electron beam hardening reaction is the cross-linking of high degree as the structure of oligomers is maintained. By controlling the structure at the time of electron beam hardening, the heightening of the functions of electron beam-hardened polymer films is feasible. (K.I.)

  5. Electron energy distribution function control in gas discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godyak, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and electron temperature in low temperature gas discharge plasmas is analyzed in frames of local and non-local electron kinetics. It is shown, that contrary to the local case, typical for plasma in uniform electric field, there is the possibility for EEDF modification, at the condition of non-local electron kinetics in strongly non-uniform electric fields. Such conditions “naturally” occur in some self-organized steady state dc and rf discharge plasmas, and they suggest the variety of artificial methods for EEDF modification. EEDF modification and electron temperature control in non-equilibrium conditions occurring naturally and those stimulated by different kinds of plasma disturbances are illustrated with numerous experiments. The necessary conditions for EEDF modification in gas discharge plasmas are formulated

  6. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Lejeune, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 407, JUN 15 (2017), s. 105-108 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Low- energy electrons * Electron beam induced release * Graphene * Ultimate cleaning of surfaces Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Nano-processes (applications on nano-scale) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  7. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, G. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: gdruano@ceride.gov.ar; Ferron, J. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2008-11-15

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and Ar{sup +}) and Li{sup +} ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  8. Binding energies of sd-shell nuclei with a realistic effective Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.J.; Vary, J.P.; Baldridge, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear shell model with a second-order effective Hamiltonian derived within Brueckner theory from the free nucleon-nucleon interaction is shown to yield accurate binding energies of nuclei with 16 < A < 40. This agreement is obtained by choosing the spectrum of low-lying unoccupied orbitals in a justified manner and, when necessary, by employing a statistical method to approximate the lowest eigenvalue of very large shell-model diagonalizations

  9. Prediction of trypsin/molecular fragment binding affinities by free energy decomposition and empirical scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Mark L.; Faver, John C.; Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-05-01

    Two families of binding affinity estimation methodologies are described which were utilized in the SAMPL3 trypsin/fragment binding affinity challenge. The first is a free energy decomposition scheme based on a thermodynamic cycle, which included separate contributions from enthalpy and entropy of binding as well as a solvent contribution. Enthalpic contributions were estimated with PM6-DH2 semiempirical quantum mechanical interaction energies, which were modified with a statistical error correction procedure. Entropic contributions were estimated with the rigid-rotor harmonic approximation, and solvent contributions to the free energy were estimated with several different methods. The second general methodology is the empirical score LISA, which contains several physics-based terms trained with the large PDBBind database of protein/ligand complexes. Here we also introduce LISA+, an updated version of LISA which, prior to scoring, classifies systems into one of four classes based on a ligand's hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Each version of the two methodologies (a total of 11 methods) was trained against a compiled set of known trypsin binders available in the Protein Data Bank to yield scaling parameters for linear regression models. Both raw and scaled scores were submitted to SAMPL3. Variants of LISA showed relatively low absolute errors but also low correlation with experiment, while the free energy decomposition methods had modest success when scaling factors were included. Nonetheless, re-scaled LISA yielded the best predictions in the challenge in terms of RMS error, and six of these models placed in the top ten best predictions by RMS error. This work highlights some of the difficulties of predicting binding affinities of small molecular fragments to protein receptors as well as the benefit of using training data.

  10. Effect of the dielectric constant of mesoscopic particle on the exciton binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Zuyou; Gu Shiwei

    1991-09-01

    For materials with big exciton reduced mass and big dielectric constant, such as TiO 2 , the variation of dielectric constant with the radius of an ultrafine particle (UFP) is important for determining the exciton binding energy. For the first time a phenomenological formula of the dielectric constant of a UFP with its radius in mesoscopic range is put forward in order to explain the optical properties of TiO 2 UFP. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  11. Energy spectra variations of high energy electrons in magnetic storms observed by ARASE and HIMAWARI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, T.; Higashio, N.; Mitani, T.; Nagatsuma, T.; Yoshizumi, M.

    2017-12-01

    The ARASE spacecraft was launched in December 20, 2016 to investigate mechanisms for acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts during space storms. The six particle instruments with wide energy range (a few eV to 10MeV) are onboard the ARASE spacecraft. Especially, two particle instruments, HEP and XEP observe high energy electron with energy range from 70keV to over 10Mev. Those instruments observed several geomagnetic storms caused by coronal hole high speed streams or coronal mass ejections from March in 2017. The relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt were disappeared/increased and their energy spectra were changed dynamically in some storms observed by XEP/HEP onboard the ARASE spacecraft. In the same time, SEDA-e with energy range 200keV-4.5MeV for electron on board the HIMAWARI-8, Japanese weather satellite on GEO, observed increase of relativistic electron in different local time. We will report on energy spectra variations of high energy electrons including calibrations of differential flux between XEP and HEP and discuss comparisons with energy spectra between ARAE and HIMAWARI that observed each storm in different local time.

  12. Electron correlations in narrow energy bands: modified polar model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Didukh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron correlations in narrow energy bands are examined within the framework of the modified form of polar model. This model permits to analyze the effect of strong Coulomb correlation, inter-atomic exchange and correlated hopping of electrons and explain some peculiarities of the properties of narrow-band materials, namely the metal-insulator transition with an increase of temperature, nonlinear concentration dependence of Curie temperature and peculiarities of transport properties of electronic subsystem. Using a variant of generalized Hartree-Fock approximation, the single-electron Green's function and quasi-particle energy spectrum of the model are calculated. Metal-insulator transition with the change of temperature is investigated in a system with correlated hopping. Processes of ferromagnetic ordering stabilization in the system with various forms of electronic DOS are studied. The static conductivity and effective spin-dependent masses of current carriers are calculated as a function of electron concentration at various DOS forms. The correlated hopping is shown to cause the electron-hole asymmetry of transport and ferromagnetic properties of narrow band materials.

  13. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, L.; Mikmeková, E.; Lejeune, M.

    2017-06-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  14. Dose characteristics of high-energy electrons, muons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Krupnyj, G.I.; Peleshko, V.N.; Rastsvetalov, Ya.N.

    1980-01-01

    Differential distribution of energy release at different depth of tissue-equivalent phantoms (plexiglas, polystyrene, polyethylene) at the energy of incident electrons, muons of 0.2-40 GeV and photons with the mean energy of 3.6 GeV are measured. The error of experimental results does not exceed 7%. On the basis of the data obtained dose characteristics of electrons, muons and photons for standard geometry are estimated. For all types of irradiation the maximum value of specific equivalent dose, nremxcm 2 /part. is presented. It is shown that published values of specific equivalent dose of electron radiation are higher in all the investigated energy range from 0.2 to 40 GeV, and for muon radiation a good agreement with the present experiment is observed. The highly precise results obtained which cover the wide dynamic range according to the energy of incident particles can serve as the basis for reconsidering the existing recommendations for dose characteristics of electron radiation [ru

  15. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  16. Wettability Modification of Nanomaterials by Low-Energy Electron Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchinsky I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controllable modification of surface free energy and related properties (wettability, hygroscopicity, agglomeration, etc. of powders allows both understanding of fine physical mechanism acting on nanoparticle surfaces and improvement of their key characteristics in a number of nanotechnology applications. In this work, we report on the method we developed for electron-induced surface energy and modification of basic, related properties of powders of quite different physical origins such as diamond and ZnO. The applied technique has afforded gradual tuning of the surface free energy, resulting in a wide range of wettability modulation. In ZnO nanomaterial, the wettability has been strongly modified, while for the diamond particles identical electron treatment leads to a weak variation of the same property. Detailed investigation into electron-modified wettability properties has been performed by the use of capillary rise method using a few probing liquids. Basic thermodynamic approaches have been applied to calculations of components of solid–liquid interaction energy. We show that defect-free, low-energy electron treatment technique strongly varies elementary interface interactions and may be used for the development of new technology in the field of nanomaterials.

  17. Binding mode and free energy prediction of fisetin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodee Nutho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, our aim is to investigate the preferential binding mode and encapsulation of the flavonoid fisetin in the nano-pore of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD at the molecular level using various theoretical approaches: molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and binding free energy calculations. The molecular docking suggested four possible fisetin orientations in the cavity through its chromone or phenyl ring with two different geometries of fisetin due to the rotatable bond between the two rings. From the multiple MD results, the phenyl ring of fisetin favours its inclusion into the β-CD cavity, whilst less binding or even unbinding preference was observed in the complexes where the larger chromone ring is located in the cavity. All MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA free energy predictions supported the more stable fisetin/β-CD complex of the bound phenyl ring. Van der Waals interaction is the key force in forming the complexes. In addition, the quantum mechanics calculations with M06-2X/6-31G(d,p clearly showed that both solvation effect and BSSE correction cannot be neglected for the energy determination of the chosen system.

  18. Hydrogenic impurity binding energy in vertically coupled Ga1-xAlxAs quantum-dots under hydrostatic pressure and applied electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, C.M.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Duque, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with a theoretical study, using a variational method and the effective mass approximation, of the ground state binding energy of a hydrogenic donor impurity in a vertically coupled multiple quantum dot structure under the effects of hydrostatic pressure and in-growth direction applied electric field. The low dimensional structure consists of three cylindrical shaped GaAs quantum dots coupled by Ga 1-x Al x As barriers. For the hydrostatic pressure has been considered the Γ-X crossover in the Ga 1-x Al x As material. As a general, the results show that: (1) the binding energy as a function of the impurity position has a similar shape to that shown by the electron wave function without the Coulomb interaction, (2) the presence of the electric field changes dramatically the binding energy profile destroying (favoring) the symmetry in the structures, and (3) depending on the impurity position the binding energy can increase or decrease with the hydrostatic pressure mainly due to increases or decreases of the carrier-wave function symmetry by changing the height of the potential barrier.

  19. The energy broadening resulting from electron stripping process of a low energy Au- beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniike, Akira; Sasao, Mamiko; Hamada, Yasuji; Fujita, Junji; Wada, Motoi.

    1994-12-01

    Energy loss spectra of Au + ions produced from Au - ions by electron stripping in He, Ar, Kr and Xe have been measured in the impact energy range of 24-44 keV. The energy broadening of the Au + beam increases as the beam energy increases, and the spectrum shows a narrower energy width for heavy target atoms. The dependence of the spectrum width upon the beam energy and that upon the target mass are well described by the calculation based on the unified potential and semi-classical internal energy transfer model of Firsov's. (author)

  20. Electronic energy spectra in antiferromagnetic media with broken reciprocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitebsky, I.; Edelkind, J.; Bogachek, E.N.; Scherbakov, A.G.; Landman, U.

    1997-01-01

    Electronic energy spectra var-epsilon(q) of antiferromagnetically ordered media may display nonreciprocity; that is, the energies corresponding to Bloch states with wave numbers q and -q may be different. In this paper a simple Kronig-Penney model, which includes a staggered microscopic magnetic and electric fields of the proper symmetry, is employed to estimate the magnitude of nonreciprocity effects in systems such as antiferromagnetically ordered crystals as well as periodical layered structures. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. Possibility of some radionuclides production using high energy electron Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balzhinnyam, N.; Belov, A.G.; Gehrbish, Sh; Maslov, O.D.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Ganbold, G.

    2008-01-01

    The method of some radionuclides production using high energy Bremsstrahlung of electron accelerators and determination of photonuclear reaction yield and specific activities for some radionuclides is described. Photonuclear reaction yield and specific activities for some radionuclides are determined for 117m Sn, 111 In and 195m Pt. Based on the experimental data obtained at low energy (E e- e- = 75 MeV) of the IREN facility (FLNR, JINR) at irradiation of high purity platinum and tin metals

  2. Electrostatics, structure prediction, and the energy landscapes for protein folding and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Yeh; Zheng, Weihua; Balamurugan, D; Schafer, Nicholas P; Kim, Bobby L; Cheung, Margaret S; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    While being long in range and therefore weakly specific, electrostatic interactions are able to modulate the stability and folding landscapes of some proteins. The relevance of electrostatic forces for steering the docking of proteins to each other is widely acknowledged, however, the role of electrostatics in establishing specifically funneled landscapes and their relevance for protein structure prediction are still not clear. By introducing Debye-Hückel potentials that mimic long-range electrostatic forces into the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure, and Energy Model (AWSEM), a transferable protein model capable of predicting tertiary structures, we assess the effects of electrostatics on the landscapes of thirteen monomeric proteins and four dimers. For the monomers, we find that adding electrostatic interactions does not improve structure prediction. Simulations of ribosomal protein S6 show, however, that folding stability depends monotonically on electrostatic strength. The trend in predicted melting temperatures of the S6 variants agrees with experimental observations. Electrostatic effects can play a range of roles in binding. The binding of the protein complex KIX-pKID is largely assisted by electrostatic interactions, which provide direct charge-charge stabilization of the native state and contribute to the funneling of the binding landscape. In contrast, for several other proteins, including the DNA-binding protein FIS, electrostatics causes frustration in the DNA-binding region, which favors its binding with DNA but not with its protein partner. This study highlights the importance of long-range electrostatics in functional responses to problems where proteins interact with their charged partners, such as DNA, RNA, as well as membranes. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  3. Momentum distributions and binding energies for the valence orbitals of methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minchinton, A.; Brion, C.E.; Weigold, E.

    1981-06-01

    Methanol has been studied by binary (e,2e) coincidence spectroscopy at 1200 eV using symmetric non-coplanar geometry. The binding energy spectrum has been determined in the energy range up to 46eV at azimuthal angles of 0 deg. and 7 deg. Momentum distributions measured for the valence orbitals are compared with calculations using the wave functions (essentially double-zeta quality) reported by Snyder and Basch. Agreement is generally quite good except for the outermost orbitals and the 5a' orbital which all show somewhat larger low momentum components than predicted by the calculations. This is indicative of a more spatially extended orbital than is predicted

  4. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Transition-Metal Oxide Nanocomposites: A Tight-Binding Modeling at Mesoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yuan-Yen; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) exhibit many emergent phenomena ranging from high-temperature superconductivity and giant magnetoresistance to magnetism and ferroelectricity. In addition, when TMOs are interfaced with each other, new functionalities can arise, which are absent in individual components. In this talk, I will present an overview on our recent efforts in theoretical understanding of the electronic and magnetic properties TMO nanocomposites. In particular, I will introduce our recently developed tight-binding modeling of these properties arising from the interplay of competing interactions at the interfaces of planar and pillar nanocomposites. Our theoretical tool package will provide a unique capability to address the emergent phenomena in TMO nanocomposites and their mesoscale response to such effects like strain and microstructures at the interfaces, and ultimately help establish design principles of new multifunctionality with TMOs. This work was carried out under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, and was supported by the LANL LDRD Program.

  5. Low energy electron beam processing of YBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chromik, Š., E-mail: stefan.chromik@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Camerlingo, C. [CNR-SPIN, Istituto Superconduttori, Materiali Innovativi e Dispositivi, via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Sojková, M.; Štrbík, V.; Talacko, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Malka, I.; Bar, I.; Bareli, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Jung, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of superconducting properties of irradiated bridges under certain conditions. • 30 keV irradiation influence CuO{sub 2} planes as well as oxygen chains. • Direct confirmation of changes in oxygen chains using micro-Raman spectroscopy. • Possibility of electron writing. - Abstract: Effects of low energy 30 keV electron irradiation of superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} thin films have been investigated by means of transport and micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The critical temperature and the critical current of 200 nm thick films initially increase with increasing fluency of the electron irradiation, reach the maximum at fluency 3 − 4 × 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}, and then decrease with further fluency increase. In much thinner films (75 nm), the critical temperature increases while the critical current decreases after low energy electron irradiation with fluencies below 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The Raman investigations suggest that critical temperature increase in irradiated films is due to healing of broken Cu−O chains that results in increased carrier’s concentration in superconducting CuO{sub 2} planes. Changes in the critical current are controlled by changes in the density of oxygen vacancies acting as effective pinning centers for flux vortices. The effects of low energy electron irradiation of YBCO turned out to result from a subtle balance of many processes involving oxygen removal, both by thermal activation and kick-off processes, and ordering of chains environment by incident electrons.

  6. Simultaneous integral measurement of electron energy and charge albedoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    Results of a series of experiments in which backscattered energy has been determined from precise energy deposition measurements using an improved technique are presented. The fraction of the energy backscattered for electrons incident on Be, Ti, Mo, and Ta is determined as a function of energy and angle of incidence. The improved technique for the absolute measurement of energy deposition using calorimeters involves square-wave (on-off) modulation of the beam. Uncertainties in the measured backscattered energy are 1 to 6 percent, except for Be at normal incidence where they must agree by definition. Experiment and theory agree quite well for Mo and Be at 60 0 . The measured data for Ta and Ti are clearly higher than the calculated results, which is not completely understood. (U.S.)

  7. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides (60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source beta-, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the 192Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for 60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for 60Co and 192Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., > 0.5%) within 3.3 mm of 60Co and 1.7 mm of 192Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for 137Cs and 169Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  8. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Ganesh, E-mail: ghegde@purdue.edu; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard, E-mail: gekco@purdue.edu [Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Boykin, Timothy [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

    2014-03-28

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales.

  9. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Ganesh; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard; Boykin, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales

  10. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Ganesh; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Boykin, Timothy; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales.

  11. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikmeková, E. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lejeune, M. [LPMC – Faculte des Sciences d’Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Using proper irradiation parameters, adsorbed hydrocarbons are released from surfaces. • Slow electrons remove hydrocarbons instead of depositing carbon. • Prolonged irradiation with very slow electrons does not create defects in graphene. - Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  12. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  13. Atomic excitation and molecular dissociation by low energy electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyland, Marvin

    2016-11-16

    In this work, momentum imaging experiments have been conducted for the electron impact excitation of metastable states in noble gases and for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in polyatomic molecules. For the electron impact excitation study a new experimental technique has been developed which is able to measure the scattering angle distribution of the electrons by detection of the momentum transfer to the atoms. Momentum transfer images have been recorded for helium and neon at fixed electron impact energy close to the excitation threshold and good agreement with current R-matrix theory calculations was found. A new momentum imaging apparatus for negative ions has been built for the purpose of studying DEA in biologically relevant molecules. During this work, DEA was investigated in the molecules ammonia, water, formic acid, furan, pyridine and in two chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, the change of DEA resonance energies when molecules form clusters compared to monomers was investigated in ammonia and formic acid. The experimental results of most studied molecules could be compared to recent theoretical calculations and they support further development in the theoretical description of DEA. The new apparatus built in this work also delivered a superior momentum resolution compared to existing setups. This allows the momentum imaging of heavier fragments and fragments with lower kinetic energy.

  14. A real-time low energy electron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mod Ali, N.; Smith, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    A real-time low energy electron calorimeter with a thin film window has been designed and fabricated to facilitate a reliable method of dose assessment for electron beam energies down to 200 keV. The work was initiated by the Radiation Physics Group of Queen Mary and Westfield College in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington. Irradiations were performed on the low and medium electron energy electron accelerators at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). Calorimeter response was initially tested using the on-line temperature measurements for a 500-keV electron beam. The system was later redesigned by incorporating a data-logger to use on the self-shielded 200-keV beam. In use, the final version of the calorimeter could start logging temperature a short time before the calorimeter passed under the beam and continue measurements throughout the irradiation. Data could be easily retrieved at the end of the exposure. (author)

  15. Some Effective Tight-Binding Models for Electrons in DNA Conduction: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Iguchi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum transport for DNA conduction has been widely studied with interest in application as a candidate in making nanowires as well as interest in the scientific mechanism. In this paper, we review recent works concerning the electronic states and the conduction/transfer in DNA polymers. We have mainly investigated the energy-band structure and the correlation effects of localization property in the two- and three-chain systems (ladder model) with long-range correlation as a simple model for electronic property in a double strand of DNA by using the tight-bindingmodel. In addition, we investigated the localization properties of electronic states in several actual DNA sequences such as bacteriophages of Escherichia coli, human-chromosome 22, compared with those of the artificial disordered sequences with correlation. The charge-transfer properties for poly(dA)-poly(dT) and poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA polymers are also presented in terms of localization lengths within the frameworks of the polaron models due to the coupling between the charge carriers and the lattice vibrations of the double strand of DNA

  16. Competition between electronic energy transfer and relaxation in Xe doped Ar and Ne matrices studied by photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwentner, N.; Koch, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    Thin films of solid Ar and Ne doped with 1% Xe were excited with photons in the energy range from 10 eV to 20 eV in order to measure the energy distribution of the emitted electrons. Binding energies of th host and guest levels are deduced. When host excitons are excited, strong emission of electrons is observed indicating an efficient transfer of the host exciton energy to the Xe guest atoms. The energy of the free excitons is transferred, as can be deduced from the kinetic energy of the photoemitted electrons, rather than the energy of the bound (self-trapped) excitons which are observed in luminescence experiments. Furthermore, there is a striking difference between the Ar and the Ne matrix: In the Ne matrix a fast relaxation from the n = 2 to the n = 1 state was observed and only the energy of the n = 1 exciton is transferred even when higher excitons are excited, in contrast to Ar, where the transferred energy is higher for excitation of the n = 2 excitons than for n = 1. From these observations, time hierarchies for the competition between electronic energy transfer and relaxation are deduced. (orig.) [de

  17. Bremsstrahlung of La and its dependence on electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riehle, F.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of La-bremsstrahlung isocromates with high resolution for quantum energies between 135 eV and 1867 eV are presented and discussed. In the whole energy range investigated, the isocromate structure, identified with the 4f band of La, is placed 5,45 +- 10,1 eV above the Fermi level. This is in contradiction with a calculation of Gloetzel, which predicts the 4f band maximum about 3eV above the Fermi level. This discrepancy is explained in the present work by the fact that the La electronic density of states depends on the occupation number of the states. The bremsstrahlung isocromate has to be considered as a direct copy of the La ion density of states, consisting of the La-atom and the additional primary electron. Resonance like intensity modulations of the x-ray radiation, resulting from transitions of the primary electron in f-like final states, are observed in an analysis of the La-bremsstrahlung isochromate energy dependence. For transitions of the primary electron in d-like final states, no resonances have been found. The energy dependence of the scattering probability in f-like final states can be explained by a model which assumes the final state as composed by a continuum state and a discrete state. (orig.) [de

  18. Electron emission in collisions of intermediate energy ions with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibotti, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work, is the analysis of the processes of electronic emission produced in the collisions of small ions (H + , He ++ ) of intermediate energy (50 a 200 KeV/amu) with light gaseous targets. (A.C.A.G.) [pt

  19. High Energy Electron Dosimetry by Alanine/ESR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Sil

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry based on electron spin resonance(ESR) analysis of radiation induced free radicals in amino acids is relevant to biological dosimetry applications. Alanine detectors are without walls and are tissue equivalent. Therefore, alanine ESR dosimetry looks promising for use in the therapy level. The dose range of the alanine/ESR dosimetry system can be extended down to l Gy. In a water phantom the absorbed dose of electrons generated by a medical linear accelerator of different initial energies (6-21 MeV) and therapeutic dose levels(1-60 Gy) was measured. Furthermore, depth dose measurements carried out with alanine dosimeters were compared with ionization chamber measurements. As the results, the measured absorbed doses for shallow depth of initial electron energies above 15 MeV were higher by 2-5% than those calculated by nominal energy CE factors. This seems to be caused by low energy scattered beams generated from the scattering foil and electron cones of beam projecting device in medical linear accelerator

  20. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) in himematsutake was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The atomic percentage of the metals was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Results show that the accumulation of ...

  1. Benchmark calculations with correlated molecular wave functions. VII. Binding energy and structure of the HF dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogen bond energy and geometry of the HF dimer have been investigated using the series of correlation consistent basis sets from aug-cc-pVDZ to aug-cc-pVQZ and several theoretical methods including Moller--Plesset perturbation and coupled cluster theories. Estimates of the complete basis set (CBS) limit have been derived for the binding energy of (HF) 2 at each level of theory by utilizing the regular convergence characteristics of the correlation consistent basis sets. CBS limit hydrogen bond energies of 3.72, 4.53, 4.55, and 4.60 kcal/mol are estimated at the SCF, MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory, respectively. CBS limits for the intermolecular F--F distance are estimated to be 2.82, 2.74, 2.73, and 2.73 A, respectively, for the same correlation methods. The effects of basis set superposition error (BSSE) on both the binding energies and structures have also been investigated for each basis set using the standard function counterpoise (CP) method. While BSSE has a negligible effect on the intramolecular geometries, the CP-corrected F--F distance and binding energy differ significantly from the uncorrected values for the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set; these differences decrease regularly with increasing basis set size, yielding the same limits in the CBS limit. Best estimates for the equilibrium properties of the HF dimer from CCSD(T) calculations are D e =4.60 kcal/mol, R FF =2.73 A, r 1 =0.922 A, r 2 =0.920 A, Θ 1 =7 degree, and Θ 2 =111 degree

  2. Locating Temporal Functional Dynamics of Visual Short-Term Memory Binding using Graph Modular Dirichlet Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Keith; Ricaud, Benjamin; Shahid, Nauman; Rhodes, Stephen; Starr, John M.; Ibáñez, Augustin; Parra, Mario A.; Escudero, Javier; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Visual short-term memory binding tasks are a promising early marker for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To uncover functional deficits of AD in these tasks it is meaningful to first study unimpaired brain function. Electroencephalogram recordings were obtained from encoding and maintenance periods of tasks performed by healthy young volunteers. We probe the task’s transient physiological underpinnings by contrasting shape only (Shape) and shape-colour binding (Bind) conditions, displayed in the left and right sides of the screen, separately. Particularly, we introduce and implement a novel technique named Modular Dirichlet Energy (MDE) which allows robust and flexible analysis of the functional network with unprecedented temporal precision. We find that connectivity in the Bind condition is less integrated with the global network than in the Shape condition in occipital and frontal modules during the encoding period of the right screen condition. Using MDE we are able to discern driving effects in the occipital module between 100-140 ms, coinciding with the P100 visually evoked potential, followed by a driving effect in the frontal module between 140-180 ms, suggesting that the differences found constitute an information processing difference between these modules. This provides temporally precise information over a heterogeneous population in promising tasks for the detection of AD.

  3. Preliminary investigations on high energy electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertling, Yves; Hoppe, Dietrich; Hampel, Uwe

    2010-12-15

    In computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the attenuation distribution within a slice are created by scanning radiographic projections of an object with a rotating X-ray source detector compound and subsequent reconstruction of the images from these projection data on a computer. CT can be made very fast by employing a scanned electron beam instead of a mechanically moving X-ray source. Now this principle was extended towards high-energy electron beam tomography with an electrostatic accelerator. Therefore a dedicated experimental campaign was planned and carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk. There we investigated the capabilities of BINP's accelerators as an electron beam generating and scanning unit of a potential high-energy electron beam tomography device. The setup based on a 1 MeV ELV-6 (BINP) electron accelerator and a single detector. Besides tomographic measurements with different phantoms, further experiments were carried out concerning the focal spot size and repeat accuracy of the electron beam as well as the detector's response time and signal to noise ratio. (orig.)

  4. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam

  5. Toroidal electron beam energy storage for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.; Korn, P.; Mondelli, A.; Rostoker, N.

    1976-01-01

    In the presence of an external magnetic field stable equilibria exist for an unneutralized electron beam with ν/γ >1. As a result, it is in principle, possible to store very large quantities of energy in relatively small volumes by confining an unneutralized electron beam in a Tokamak-like device. The energy is stored principally in the electrostatic and self-magnetic fields associated with the beam and is available for rapid heating of pellets for controlled fusion. The large electrostatic potential well in such a device would be sufficient to contain energetic alpha particles, thereby reducing reactor wall bombardment. This approach also avoids plasma loss and wall bombardment by charge exchange neutrals. The conceptual design of an electrostatic Tokamak fusion reactor (ETFR) is discussed. A small toroidal device (the STP machine) has been constructed to test the principles involved. Preliminary experiments on this device have produced electron densities approximately 10% of those required in a reactor

  6. Medipix 2 detector applied to low energy electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastel, R. van; Sikharulidze, I.; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, B.; Tromp, R.M.; Molen, S.J. van der

    2009-01-01

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photo-emission electron microscopy (PEEM) traditionally use microchannel plates (MCPs), a phosphor screen and a CCD-camera to record images and diffraction patterns. In recent years, however, MCPs have become a limiting factor for these types of microscopy. Here, we report on a successful test series using a solid state hybrid pixel detector, Medipix 2, in LEEM and PEEM. Medipix 2 is a background-free detector with an infinite dynamic range, making it very promising for both real-space imaging and spectroscopy. We demonstrate a significant enhancement of both image contrast and resolution, as compared to MCPs. Since aging of the Medipix 2 detector is negligible for the electron energies used in LEEM/PEEM, we expect Medipix to become the detector of choice for a new generation of systems.

  7. Medipix 2 detector applied to low energy electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastel, R. van, E-mail: R.vanGastel@utwente.nl [University of Twente, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 217, NL-7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Sikharulidze, I. [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, P.O. Box 9502, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schramm, S. [Leiden University, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, P.O. Box 9504, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Abrahams, J.P. [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, P.O. Box 9502, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Poelsema, B. [University of Twente, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 217, NL-7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Tromp, R.M. [Leiden University, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, P.O. Box 9504, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Molen, S.J. van der [Leiden University, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, P.O. Box 9504, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photo-emission electron microscopy (PEEM) traditionally use microchannel plates (MCPs), a phosphor screen and a CCD-camera to record images and diffraction patterns. In recent years, however, MCPs have become a limiting factor for these types of microscopy. Here, we report on a successful test series using a solid state hybrid pixel detector, Medipix 2, in LEEM and PEEM. Medipix 2 is a background-free detector with an infinite dynamic range, making it very promising for both real-space imaging and spectroscopy. We demonstrate a significant enhancement of both image contrast and resolution, as compared to MCPs. Since aging of the Medipix 2 detector is negligible for the electron energies used in LEEM/PEEM, we expect Medipix to become the detector of choice for a new generation of systems.

  8. Diagnosis and dynamics of low energy electron beams using DIADYN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marghitu, S.; Oproiu, C.; Toader, D.; Ruset, C.; Grigore, E.; Marghitu, O.; Vasiliu, M.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents original results concerning electron beam diagnosis and dynamics using DIADYN, a low energy (10 - 50 kV), medium intensity (0.1 - 1 A) laboratory equipment. A key stage in the operation of DIADYN is the beam diagnosis, performed by the non-destructive, modified three-gradient method (MTGM). We concentrate on the better use of experimental and computational techniques, in order to improve the consistency of the results. At present, DIADYN is equipped with a hot filament vacuum electron source (VES), consisting of a convergent Pierce diode, working in a pulse mode. Since the plasma electron sources (PES) have a longer lifetime and produce higher beam currents, we discuss the possibility to replace the VES with a PES. Special attention is given to VES results in a functioning regime typical for a low energy glow discharge PES. (authors)

  9. Diagnosis and dynamics of low energy electron beams using DIADYN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marghitu, S [Electrostatica, ICPE-CA S.A., Spaiul Unirii 313, Sector 3, RO-74204 Bucharest (Romania); Oproiu, C; Toader, D; Ruset, C; Grigore, E [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Marghitu, O [Institute for Space Sciences, INCDLPFR, PO Box MG-23, RO-76911 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Vasiliu, M [Politehnica University, 313 Splaiul Independentei, RO-060032, Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents original results concerning electron beam diagnosis and dynamics using DIADYN, a low energy (10 - 50 kV), medium intensity (0.1 - 1 A) laboratory equipment. A key stage in the operation of DIADYN is the beam diagnosis, performed by the non-destructive, modified three-gradient method (MTGM). We concentrate on the better use of experimental and computational techniques, in order to improve the consistency of the results. At present, DIADYN is equipped with a hot filament vacuum electron source (VES), consisting of a convergent Pierce diode, working in a pulse mode. Since the plasma electron sources (PES) have a longer lifetime and produce higher beam currents, we discuss the possibility to replace the VES with a PES. Special attention is given to VES results in a functioning regime typical for a low energy glow discharge PES. (authors)

  10. Energy Conversion Mechanism for Electron Perpendicular Energy in High Guide-Field Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuehan; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Kaminou, Yasuhiro; Cheng, Frank; Ono, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    The energy conversion mechanism for electron perpendicular energy, both the thermal and the kinetic energy, is investigated by means of two-dimensional, full-particle simulations in an open system. It is shown that electron perpendicular heating is mainly due to the breaking of magnetic moment conservation in separatrix region because the charge separation generates intense variation of electric field within the electron Larmor radius. Meanwhile, electron perpendicular acceleration takes place manly due to the polarization drift term as well as the curvature drift term of E . u⊥ in the downstream near the X-point. The enhanced electric field due to the charge separation there results in a significant effect of the polarization drift term on the dissipation of magnetic energy within the ion inertia length in the downstream. Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  11. Study of optical and electronic properties of nickel from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Yang, L. H.; Da, B.; Tóth, J.; Tőkési, K.; Ding, Z. J.

    2017-09-01

    We use the classical Monte Carlo transport model of electrons moving near the surface and inside solids to reproduce the measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. With the combination of the classical transport model and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters the so-called reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method was developed, and used to obtain optical constants of Ni in this work. A systematic study of the electronic and optical properties of Ni has been performed in an energy loss range of 0-200 eV from the measured REELS spectra at primary energies of 1000 eV, 2000 eV and 3000 eV. The reliability of our method was tested by comparing our results with the previous data. Moreover, the accuracy of our optical data has been confirmed by applying oscillator strength-sum rule and perfect-screening-sum rule.

  12. Secondary Electrons as an Energy Source for Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Kamil B; Neveu, Marc; Vick-Majors, Trista J; Mickol, Rebecca L; Chou, Luoth; Webster, Kevin D; Tilley, Matt; Zacchei, Federica; Escudero, Cristina; Flores Martinez, Claudio L; Labrado, Amanda; Fernández, Enrique J G

    2018-01-01

    Life on Earth is found in a wide range of environments as long as the basic requirements of a liquid solvent, a nutrient source, and free energy are met. Previous hypotheses have speculated how extraterrestrial microbial life may function, among them that particle radiation might power living cells indirectly through radiolytic products. On Earth, so-called electrophilic organisms can harness electron flow from an extracellular cathode to build biomolecules. Here, we describe two hypothetical mechanisms, termed "direct electrophy" and "indirect electrophy" or "fluorosynthesis," by which organisms could harness extracellular free electrons to synthesize organic matter, thus expanding the ensemble of potential habitats in which extraterrestrial organisms might be found in the Solar System and beyond. The first mechanism involves the direct flow of secondary electrons from particle radiation to a microbial cell to power the organism. The second involves the indirect utilization of impinging secondary electrons and a fluorescing molecule, either biotic or abiotic in origin, to drive photosynthesis. Both mechanisms involve the attenuation of an incoming particle's energy to create low-energy secondary electrons. The validity of the hypotheses is assessed through simple calculations showing the biomass density attainable from the energy supplied. Also discussed are potential survival strategies that could be used by organisms living in possible habitats with a plentiful supply of secondary electrons, such as near the surface of an icy moon. While we acknowledge that the only definitive test for the hypothesis is to collect specimens, we also describe experiments or terrestrial observations that could support or nullify the hypotheses. Key Words: Radiation-Electrophiles-Subsurface life. Astrobiology 18, 73-85.

  13. Secondary Electrons as an Energy Source for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Kamil B.; Neveu, Marc; Vick-Majors, Trista J.; Mickol, Rebecca L.; Chou, Luoth; Webster, Kevin D.; Tilley, Matt; Zacchei, Federica; Escudero, Cristina; Flores Martinez, Claudio L.; Labrado, Amanda; Fernández, Enrique J. G.

    2018-01-01

    Life on Earth is found in a wide range of environments as long as the basic requirements of a liquid solvent, a nutrient source, and free energy are met. Previous hypotheses have speculated how extraterrestrial microbial life may function, among them that particle radiation might power living cells indirectly through radiolytic products. On Earth, so-called electrophilic organisms can harness electron flow from an extracellular cathode to build biomolecules. Here, we describe two hypothetical mechanisms, termed "direct electrophy" and "indirect electrophy" or "fluorosynthesis," by which organisms could harness extracellular free electrons to synthesize organic matter, thus expanding the ensemble of potential habitats in which extraterrestrial organisms might be found in the Solar System and beyond. The first mechanism involves the direct flow of secondary electrons from particle radiation to a microbial cell to power the organism. The second involves the indirect utilization of impinging secondary electrons and a fluorescing molecule, either biotic or abiotic in origin, to drive photosynthesis. Both mechanisms involve the attenuation of an incoming particle's energy to create low-energy secondary electrons. The validity of the hypotheses is assessed through simple calculations showing the biomass density attainable from the energy supplied. Also discussed are potential survival strategies that could be used by organisms living in possible habitats with a plentiful supply of secondary electrons, such as near the surface of an icy moon. While we acknowledge that the only definitive test for the hypothesis is to collect specimens, we also describe experiments or terrestrial observations that could support or nullify the hypotheses.

  14. Observation of second harmonics in laser-electron scattering using low energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iinuma, Masataka [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)]. E-mail: iinuma@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Matsukado, Koji [Venture Business Laboratory, Hiroshima University, 1-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Endo, Ichita [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Hashida, Masaki [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, Kenji [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Kohara, Akitsugu [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Matsumoto, Fumihiko [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoshitaka [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Sakabe, Shuji [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Shimizu, Seiji [Institute for chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tauchi, Toshiaki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ken [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Takahashi, Tohru [ADSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2005-10-17

    We observed photon generation in the second harmonic region in collisions of 10 keV free electrons and the intense laser beam with the peak intensity of 4.0x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Observed photon yield was 3 orders of magnitude higher than expectation from the nonlinear Compton scattering. The observation indicates necessity of further investigation for the interaction between the intense laser field and the low energy electron beam.

  15. Energy-Filtered Tunnel Transistor: A New Device Concept Toward Extremely-Low Energy Consumption Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...excellent agreement with experimental findings. The energy filtering has been applied to single-electron transport and clear Coulomb staircases and... Coulomb oscillations have been demonstrated at room temperature. A new architecture of energy-filtered cold electron transistors has been designed and

  16. Energy of ground state of laminar electron-hole liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of a possible existence of metal electron-hole liquid in semiconductors is considered. The calculation has been carried out for the following model: two parallel planes are separated with the distance on one of the planes electrons moving, on the other holes doing. Transitions between the planes are forbidden. The density of particles for both planes is the same. The energy of the ground state and correlation functions for such electron-and hole system are calculated. It is shown that the state of a metal liquid is more advantageous against the exciton gas. For the mass ratio of electrons and holes, msub(e)/msub(h) → 0 a smooth rearrangement of the system into a state with ordered heavy particles is observed

  17. Low-energy collisions between electrons and BeD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonzima, S.; Pop, N.; Iacob, F.; Larson, Å; Orel, A. E.; Mezei, J. Zs; Chakrabarti, K.; Laporta, V.; Hassouni, K.; Benredjem, D.; Bultel, A.; Tennyson, J.; Reiter, D.; Schneider, I. F.

    2018-02-01

    Multichannel quantum defect theory is applied in the treatment of the dissociative recombination and vibrational excitation processes for the BeD+ ion in the 24 vibrational levels of its ground electronic state ({{X}}{}1{{{Σ }}}+,{v}{{i}}+=0\\ldots 23). Three electronic symmetries of BeD** states ({}2{{\\Pi }}, {}2{{{Σ }}}+, and {}2{{Δ }}) are considered in the calculation of cross sections and the corresponding rate coefficients. The incident electron energy range is 10-5-2.7 eV and the electron temperature range is 100-5000 K. The vibrational dependence of these collisional processes is highlighted. The resulting data are useful in magnetic confinement fusion edge plasma modeling and spectroscopy, in devices with beryllium based main chamber materials, such as ITER and JET, and operating with the deuterium-tritium fuel mix. An extensive rate coefficients database is presented in graphical form and also by analytic fit functions whose parameters are tabulated in the supplementary material.

  18. Disinfection of wastewaters: high-energy electron vs gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooq, S [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Kurucz, C N; Waite, T D [Miami Univ., Coral Gables, FL (United States); Cooper, W J [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States). Drinking Water Research Center

    1993-07-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the sensitivity of a wastewater population of coliphage, total coliforms and total flora present in raw sewage and secondary effluent after irradiating with similar doses delivered by a high-energy electron beam and [gamma]-radiation. The electron beam study was conducted on a large scale at the Virginia Key Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami, Florida. The facility is equipped with a 1.5 MeV, 50 mA electron accelerator, with a wastewater flow rate of 8ls[sup -1]. Concurrent [gamma]-radiation studies were conducted at laboratory scale using a 5000 Ci, [sup 60]Co [gamma]-source. Three logs reduction of all three test organisms were observed at an electron beam dose of 500 krads, while at least four logs reduction were observed at the same dose utilizing the [gamma]'source. (Author).

  19. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-08-09

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  20. Plasma Jet Braking: Energy Dissipation and Nonadiabatic Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Cully, C. M.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Owen, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    We report in situ observations by the Cluster spacecraft of wave-particle interactions in a magnetic flux pileup region created by a magnetic reconnection outflow jet in Earth's magnetotail. Two distinct regions of wave activity are identified: lower-hybrid drift waves at the front edge and whistler-mode waves inside the pileup region. The whistler-mode waves are locally generated by the electron temperature anisotropy, and provide evidence for ongoing betatron energization caused by magnetic flux pileup. The whistler-mode waves cause fast pitch-angle scattering of electrons and isotropization of the electron distribution, thus making the flow braking process nonadiabatic. The waves strongly affect the electron dynamics and thus play an important role in the energy conversion chain during plasma jet braking.

  1. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2018-01-30

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  2. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation from silver films bombarded by low-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.S.; Callcott, T.A.; Kretschmann, E.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1980-01-01

    Emission spectra from Ag films irradiated by low energy electrons (20-1500 eV) have been measured, and the results compared with theory. For relatively smooth films, two peaks in the spectra are resolved. One at 3.73 eV, the volume plasmon energy, is attributed to transition radiation and/or bremsstrahlung. The second, at about 3.60 eV, is very sensitive to surface roughness in both position and magnitude and is produced by roughness-coupled radiation from surface plasmons. For rough films, the roughness-coupled radiation dominates the emission. In addition to spectral shapes, the polarization of the radiation and its intensity as a function of electron energy were measured. The experimental results are compared with new calculations of roughness-coupled emission which account for most of our observations. They indicate that high wavevector roughness components play the dominant role in the emission process. (orig.)

  4. Electron energy confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroe, S.; Haste, G.R.; Dandl, R.A.

    1979-06-01

    Using a calibrated, solid-state, soft x-ray detector, the electron temperature and density have been measured over a wide range of operating conditions of ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT). The empirical relations of the temperature or the density to the microwave power and the ambient pressure have been determined. The toroidally stored energy has been observed to increase as the stored energy of the hot electron annulus increases. The energy confinement time has been obtained for various plasma parameters and has been found to agree with the neoclassical theory. The advantages of EBT collisionless scaling for fusion plasma confinement have been noted, i.e., n/sub e/tau/sub E/ increases as T/sub e/ 1 5 in the collisionless regime

  5. Electron microscopy of the complexes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) and Rubisco subunit-binding protein from pea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuprun, V.L.; Boekema, E.J.; Samsonidze, T.G.; Pushkin, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) subunit-binding protein and its interaction with pea leaf chloroplast Rubisco were studied by electron microscopy and image analysis. Electron-microscopic evidence for the association of Rubisco subunit-binding protein, consisting of

  6. Binding of a cyclic organoselenium compound with gold nanoparticles (GNP) and its effect on electron transfer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavitra V; Singh, Beena G; Maiti, Nandita; Iwaoka, Michio; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2014-12-15

    Binding of a cyclic organoselenium compound, DL-trans-3,4-dihydroxy-1-selenolane (DHSred) with gold nanoparticles (GNP) of different sizes was studied by absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and zeta-potential (ζ) measurements. GNP of different size were synthesized by varying the reaction conditions and their size was determined by DLS and TEM techniques. The absorption spectral data showed red shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band indicating increase in the size of GNP on binding to DHSred. SERS studies confirmed that the binding of DHSred with GNP is through selenium center with planar orientation of DHSred on the GNP surface. The product of the number of binding sites (n) in GNP and the binding constant (K) was estimated for GNP of different particle size. The zeta potential (ζ) value of GNP decreased marginally in the presence of DHSred. Further, the binding of DHSred with GNP was found to enhance its reactivity with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals (ABTS(·-)) and the reactivity increased with decrease in the GNP size. Such enhancement in the reducing ability may have a greater impact on the antioxidant activity of DHSred. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Free Electron Laser as Energy Driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, E.L.; Shnejdmiller, E.A.; Ul'yanov, Yu.N.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    A FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength λ = 0.5 μm and providing flash energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 10 22 W cm -2 sr -1 within steering pulse duration 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. Dimensions of such an ICF driver are comparable with those of heavy-ion ICF driver, while the problem of technical realization seems to be more realistic. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R and D. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Power Electronics as Efficient Interface of Renewable Energy Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Kjær, Søren Bækhøj

    2004-01-01

    The global electrical energy consumption is steadily rising and consequently there is a demand to increase the power generation capacity. A significant percentage of the required capacity increase can be based on renewable energy sources. Wind turbine technology, as the most cost effective...... renewable energy conversion system, will play an important part in our future energy supply. But other sources like microturbines, photovoltaics and fuel cell systems may also be serious contributor to the power supply. Characteristically, power electronics will be an efficient and important interface...... to the grid and this paper will first briefly discuss three different alternative/ renewable energy sources. Next, various configurations of the wind turbine technology are presented, as this technology seems to be most developed and cost-effective. Finally, the developments and requirements from the grid...

  9. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-09-01

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 μm precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  10. Electronic energy loss of fast molecules in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.

    1975-06-01

    In high velocity collisions of molecular ions the correlated motion influence of the ion cores on the electronic energy loss is investigated. The stopping power in first Born approximation for a random arrangement of target atoms can be formulated in terms of the inelastic electronic structure factor. In treating the target atoms in Hartree-Fock approximation each electron can be regarded as stopping the ion independent of all other electrons without restriction by the Pauli principle. A second equivalent formulation of the stopping power leads to the dielectric function of the target. The results are applied to the stopping of H 2 + -ions. For vanishing distance between the two protons the stopping power per particle is twice that for single proton collisions. For distances in the order of the Bohr radius the correlated stopping power may even be smaller than for uncorrelated protons. With increasing distances the correlation influence vanishes. The stopping of H 2 + -ions in C, Si and Ge is discussed using Clementi wave functions for the core electrons and a free electron approximation with Lindhard's dielectric function for the valence electrons. The comparison with the only experimental result available for H 2 + in C at 300 keV yields qualitative agreement. (orig.) [de

  11. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  12. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeyratne, S.; Accardi, A.; Ahmed, S.; Barber, D.; Bisognano, J.; Bogacz, A.; Castilla, A.; Chevtsov, P.; Corneliussen, S.; Deconinck, W.; Degtiarenko, P.; Delayen, J.; Derbenev, Ya.; DeSilva, S.; Douglas, D.; Dudnikov, V.; Ent, R.; Erdelyi, B.; Evtushenko, P.; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Guzey, V.; Horn, T.; Hutton, A.; Hyde, C.; Johnson, R.; Kim, Y.; Klein, F.; Kondratenko, A.; Kondratenko, M.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Lin, F.; Manikonda, S.; Marhauser, F.; McKeown, R.; Morozov, V.; Dadel-Turonski, P.; Nissen, E.; Ostroumov, P.; Pivi, M.; Pilat, F.; Poelker, M.; Prokudin, A.; Rimmer, R.; Satogata, T.; Sayed, H.; Spata, M.; Sullivan, M.; Tennant, C.; Terzic, B.; Tiefenback, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, S.; Weiss, C.; Yunn, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  13. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations for protein-ligand complexes: free energies of binding of water molecules in influenza neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Shaw, Katherine E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2015-01-22

    The applicability of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for the calculation of absolute binding free energies of conserved water molecules in protein/ligand complexes is demonstrated. Here, we apply QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations to investigate binding of water molecules to influenza neuraminidase. We investigate five different complexes, including those with the drugs oseltamivir and peramivir. We investigate water molecules in two different environments, one more hydrophobic and one hydrophilic. We calculate the free-energy change for perturbation of a QM to MM representation of the bound water molecule. The calculations are performed at the BLYP/aVDZ (QM) and TIP4P (MM) levels of theory, which we have previously demonstrated to be consistent with one another for QM/MM modeling. The results show that the QM to MM perturbation is significant in both environments (greater than 1 kcal mol(-1)) and larger in the more hydrophilic site. Comparison with the same perturbation in bulk water shows that this makes a contribution to binding. The results quantify how electronic polarization differences in different environments affect binding affinity and also demonstrate that extensive, converged QM/MM free-energy simulations, with good levels of QM theory, are now practical for protein/ligand complexes.

  14. Benchmark CCSD(T) and DFT study of binding energies in Be7 - 12: in search of reliable DFT functional for beryllium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labanc, Daniel; Šulka, Martin; Pitoňák, Michal; Černušák, Ivan; Urban, Miroslav; Neogrády, Pavel

    2018-05-01

    We present a computational study of the stability of small homonuclear beryllium clusters Be7 - 12 in singlet electronic states. Our predictions are based on highly correlated CCSD(T) coupled cluster calculations. Basis set convergence towards the complete basis set limit as well as the role of the 1s core electron correlation are carefully examined. Our CCSD(T) data for binding energies of Be7 - 12 clusters serve as a benchmark for performance assessment of several density functional theory (DFT) methods frequently used in beryllium cluster chemistry. We observe that, from Be10 clusters on, the deviation from CCSD(T) benchmarks is stable with respect to size, and fluctuating within 0.02 eV error bar for most examined functionals. This opens up the possibility of scaling the DFT binding energies for large Be clusters using CCSD(T) benchmark values for smaller clusters. We also tried to find analogies between the performance of DFT functionals for Be clusters and for the valence-isoelectronic Mg clusters investigated recently in Truhlar's group. We conclude that it is difficult to find DFT functionals that perform reasonably well for both beryllium and magnesium clusters. Out of 12 functionals examined, only the M06-2X functional gives reasonably accurate and balanced binding energies for both Be and Mg clusters.

  15. Piezoelectric energy harvesting for powering low power electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinonen, M.; Palosaari, J.; Hannu, J.; Juuti, J.; Jantunen, H. (Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Electrical and Information Engineering (Finland)). email: jajuu@ee.oulu.fi

    2009-07-01

    Although wireless data transmission techniques are commonly used in electronic devices, they still suffer from wires for the power supply or from batteries which require charging, replacement and other maintenance. The vision for the portable electronics and industrial measurement systems of the future is that they are intelligent and independent on their energy supply. The major obstacle in this path is the energy source which enables all other functions and 'smartness' of the systems as the computing power is also restricted by the available energy. The development of long-life energy harvesters would reduce the need for batteries and wires thus enabling cost-effective and environment friendlier solutions for various applications such as autonomous wireless sensor networks, powering of portable electronics and other maintenance-free systems. One of the most promising techniques is mechanical energy harvesting e.g. by piezoelectric components where deformations produced by different means is directly converted to electrical charge via direct piezoelectric effect. Subsequently the electrical energy can be regulated or stored for further use. The total mechanical energy in vibration of machines can be very large and usually only a fraction of it can be transformed to electrical energy. Recently, piezoelectric vibration based energy harvesters have been developed widely for different energy consumption and application areas. As an example for low energy device an piezoelectric energy harvester based on impulse type excitations has been developed for active RFID identification. Moreover, piezoharvester with externally leveraged mechanism for force amplification was reported to be able to generate mean power of 0.4 mW from backpack movement. Significantly higher power levels are expected from larger scale testing in Israel, where piezoelectric material is embedded under active walking street, road, airport or railroad. The energy is harvested from human or

  16. Low-Energy Electron Scattering by Sugarcane Lignocellulosic Biomass Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Eliane; Sanchez, Sergio; Bettega, Marcio; Lima, Marco; Varella, Marcio

    2012-06-01

    The use of second generation (SG) bioethanol instead of fossil fuels could be a good strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the efficient production of SG bioethanol has being a challenge to researchers around the world. The main barrier one must overcome is the pretreatment, a very important step in SG bioethanol aimed at breaking down the biomass and facilitates the extraction of sugars from the biomass. Plasma-based treatment, which can generate reactive species, could be an interesting possibility since involves low-cost atmospheric-pressure plasma. In order to offer theoretical support to this technique, the interaction of low-energy electrons from the plasma with biomass is investigated. This study was motived by several works developed by Sanche et al., in which they understood that DNA damage arises from dissociative electron attachment, a mechanism in which electrons are resonantly trapped by DNA subunits. We will present elastic cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by sugarcane biomass molecules, obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. Our calculations indicate the formation of π* shape resonances in the lignin subunits, while a series of broad and overlapping σ* resonances are found in cellulose and hemicellulose subunits. The presence of π* and σ* resonances could give rise to direct and indirect dissociation pathways in biomass. Then, theoretical resonance energies can be useful to guide the plasma-based pretreatment to break down specific linkages of interest in biomass.

  17. Application of low energy electron beam to precoated steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiishi, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    Recently in the fields of home electric appliances, machinery and equipment and interior building materials, the needs for the precoated steel plates having the design and function of high class increase rapidly. In order to cope with such needs, the authors have advanced the examination on the application of electron beam hardening technology to precoated steel plates, and developed the precoated steel plates of high grade and high design 'Super Tecstar EB Series' by utilizing low energy electron beam. The features of this process are (1) hardening can be done at room temperature in a short time-thermally weak films can be adhered, (2) high energy irradiation-the hardening of thick enamel coating and the adhesion of colored films are feasible, (3) the use of monomers of low molecular weight-by high crosslinking, the performance of high sharpness, high hardness, anti-contamination property and so on can be given. The application to precoated steel plate production process is the coating and curing of electron beam hardening type paints, the coating of films with electron beam hardening type adhesives, and the reforming of surface polymer layers by impregnating monomers and causing graft polymerization with electron beam irradiation. The outline of the Super Tecstar EB Series is described. (K.I.)

  18. Potential ceramics processing applications with high-energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struve, K.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    High-energy, high-current electron beams may offer unique features for processing of ceramics that are not available with any other heat source. These include the capability to instantaneously heat to several centimeters in depth, to preferentially deposit energy in dense, high-z materials, to process at atmospheric pressures in air or other gases, to have large control over heating volume and heating rate, and to have efficient energy conversion. At a recent workshop organized by the authors to explore opportunities for electron beam processing of ceramics, several applications were identified for further development. These were ceramic joining, fabrication of ceramic powders, and surface processing of ceramics. It may be possible to join ceramics by either electron-beam brazing or welding. Brazing with refractory metals might also be feasible. The primary concern for brazing is whether the braze material can wet to the ceramic when rapidly heated by an electron beam. Raw ceramic powders, such as silicon nitride and aluminum nitride, which are difficult to produce by conventional techniques, could possibly be produced by vaporizing metals in a nitrogen atmosphere. Experiments need to be done to verify that the vaporized metal can fully react with the nitrogen. By adjusting beam parameters, high-energy beams can be used to remove surface flaws which are often sites of fracture initiation. They can also be used for surface cleaning. The advantage of electron beams rather than ion beams for this application is that the heat deposition can be graded into the material. The authors will discuss the capabilities of beams from existing machines for these applications and discuss planned experiments

  19. Silicon passivation study under low energy electron irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluzel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Backside illuminated thinned CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) imaging system is a technology developed to increase the signal to noise ratio and the sensibility of such sensors. This configuration is adapted to the electrons detection from the energy range of [1 - 12 keV]. The impinging electron creates by multiplication several hundreds of secondary electrons close to the surface. A P ++ highly-doped passivation layer of the rear face is required to reduce the secondary electron surface recombination rate. Thanks to the potential barrier induced by the P ++ layer, the passivation layer increases the collected charges number and so the sensor collection gain. The goal of this study is to develop some experimental methods in order to determine the effect of six different passivation processes on the collection gain. Beforehand, the energy profile deposited by an incident electron is studied with the combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and some analytical calculations. The final collection gain model shows that the mirror effect from the passivation layer is a key factor at high energies whereas the passivation layer has to be as thin as possible at low energies. A first experimental setup which consists in irradiating P ++ /N large diodes allows to study the passivation process impacts on the surface recombinations. Thanks to a second setup based on a single event upset directly on thinned CMOS sensor, passivation techniques are discriminated in term of mirror effect and the implied spreading charges. The doping atoms activation laser annealing is turn out to be a multiplication gain inhomogeneity source impacting directly the matrix uniformity. (author)

  20. Energies of rare-earth ion states relative to host bands in optical materials from electron photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Charles Warren

    There are a vast number of applications for rare-earth-activated materials and much of today's cutting-edge optical technology and emerging innovations are enabled by their unique properties. In many of these applications, interactions between the rare-earth ion and the host material's electronic states can enhance or inhibit performance and provide mechanisms for manipulating the optical properties. Continued advances in these technologies require knowledge of the relative energies of rare-earth and crystal band states so that properties of available materials may be fully understood and new materials may be logically developed. Conventional and resonant electron photoemission techniques were used to measure 4f electron and valence band binding energies in important optical materials, including YAG, YAlO3, and LiYF4. The photoemission spectra were theoretically modeled and analyzed to accurately determine relative energies. By combining these energies with ultraviolet spectroscopy, binding energies of excited 4fN-15d and 4fN+1 states were determined. While the 4fN ground-state energies vary considerably between different trivalent ions and lie near or below the top of the valence band in optical materials, the lowest 4f N-15d states have similar energies and are near the bottom of the conduction band. As an example for YAG, the Tb3+ 4f N ground state is in the band gap at 0.7 eV above the valence band while the Lu3+ ground state is 4.7 eV below the valence band maximum; however, the lowest 4fN-15d states are 2.2 eV below the conduction band for both ions. We found that a simple model accurately describes the binding energies of the 4fN, 4fN-1 5d, and 4fN+1 states. The model's success across the entire rare-earth series indicates that measurements on two different ions in a host are sufficient to predict the energies of all rare-earth ions in that host. This information provides new insight into electron transfer transitions, luminescence quenching, and valence

  1. On the binding energy of double Λ hypernuclei in the relativistic mean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, S.; Lombard, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The binding energy of two Λ hyperons bound to a nuclear core is calculated within the relativistic mean field theory. The starting point is a two body relativistic equation of the Breit type suggested by the RMFT, and corrected for the two-particle interaction. The 2 Λ correlation energy is evaluated and the contribution of the δ and φ mesons, acting solely between hyperons, to the bond energy σB ΛΛ of ( ΛΛ ) 6 He, ( ΛΛ ) 10 Be and ( ΛΛ ) 13 B is calculated. Predictions of the ΔB ΛΛ A dependence are made for heavier Λ-hypernuclei. (K.A.)

  2. Inverse planning of energy-modulated electron beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, John R.; Steeves, Richard; Paliwal, Bhudatt A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of megavoltage electron beams often poses a clinical challenge in that the planning target volume (PTV) is anterior to other radiosensitive structures and has variable depth. To ensure that skin as well as the deepest extent of the PTV receives the prescribed dose entails prescribing to a point beyond the depth of peak dose for a single electron energy. This causes dose inhomogeneities and heightened potential for tissue fibrosis, scarring, and possible soft tissue necrosis. Use of bolus on the skin improves the entrant dose at the cost of decreasing the therapeutic depth that can be treated. Selection of a higher energy to improve dose homogeneity results in increased dose to structures beyond the PTV, as well as enlargement of the volume receiving heightened dose. Measured electron data from a linear accelerator was used as input to create an inverse planning tool employing energy and intensity modulation using bolus (e-IMRT TM ). Using tools readily available in a radiotherapy department, the applications of energy and intensity modulation on the central axis makes it possible to remove hot spots of 115% or more over the depths clinically encountered. The e-IMRT TM algorithm enables the development of patient-specific dose distributions with user-defined positions of peak dose, range, and reduced dose to points beyond the prescription point

  3. Shielding for high energy, high intensity electron accelerator installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warawas, C.; Chongkum, S.

    1997-03-01

    The utilization of electron accelerators (eBA) is gradually increased in Thailand. For instance, a 30-40 MeV eBA are used for tumor and cancer therapy in the hospitals, and a high current eBA in for gemstone colonization. In the near future, an application of eBA in industries will be grown up in a few directions, e.g., flue gases treatment from the coal fire-power plants, plastic processing, rubber vulcanization and food preservation. It is the major roles of Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) to promote the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to regulate the public safety and protection of the environment. By taking into account of radiation safety aspect, high energy electrons are not only harmful to human bodies, but the radioactive nuclides can be occurred. This report presents a literature review by following the National Committee on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) report No.31. This reviews for parametric calculation and shielding design of the high energy (up to 100 MeV), high intensity electron accelerator installation

  4. Energy principle for excitations in plasmas with counterstreaming electron flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2018-05-01

    A relativistic electron beam propagating through plasma induces a return electron current in the system. Such a system of interpenetrating forward and return electron current is susceptible to a host of instabilities. The physics of such instabilities underlies the conversion of the flow kinetic energy to the electromagnetic field energy. Keeping this in view, an energy principle analysis has been enunciated in this paper. Such analyses have been widely utilized earlier in the context of conducting fluids described by MHD model [I. B. Bernstein et al., Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences 244(1236), 17-40 (1958)]. Lately, such an approach has been employed for the electrostatic two stream instability for the electron beam plasma system [C. N. Lashmore-Davies, Physics of Plasmas 14(9), 092101 (2007)]. In contrast, it has been shown here that even purely growing mode like Weibel/current filamentation instability for the electron beam plasma system is amenable to such a treatment. The treatment provides an understanding of the energetics associated with the growing mode. The growth rate expression has also been obtained from it. Furthermore, it has been conclusively demonstrated in this paper that for identical values of S4=∑αn0 αv0α 2/n0γ0 α, the growth rate is higher when the counterstreaming beams are symmetric (i.e. S3 = ∑αn0αv 0α/n0γ0α = 0) compared to the case when the two beams are asymmetric (i.e. when S3 is finite). Here, v 0α, n0α and γ0α are the equilibrium velocity, electron density and the relativistic factor for the electron species `α' respectively and n0 = ∑αn0α is the total electron density. Particle - In - Cell simulations have been employed to show that the saturated amplitude of the field energy is also higher in the symmetric case.

  5. Radiation degradation of marine polysaccharides by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu

    2003-01-01

    The radiation degradations of marine polysaccharides by both gamma Co-60 and electron beam irradiations are investigated. Polysaccharides and oligosaccharides can be produced by degradation of corresponding polysaccharides including marine polysaccharides such as alginates, chitin chitosan and carrageenan. The viscosity of alginate, chitosan and carrageenan solution decreases markedly with increase of the low energy electron beam irradiation time and the beam current. Furthermore, the viscosity is reduced sharply in short time for polysaccharide solution with low concentration, for instance carrageenan solution of 1%. (author)

  6. Energy spectra from coupled electron-photon slowing down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, H.L.

    1976-08-01

    A coupled electron-photon slowing down calculation for determining electron and photon track length in uniform homogeneous media is described. The method also provides fluxes for uniformly distributed isotropic sources. Source energies ranging from 10 keV to over 10 GeV are allowed and all major interactions are treated. The calculational technique and related cross sections are described in detail and sample calculations are discussed. A listing of the Fortran IV computer code used for the calculations is also included. 4 tables, 7 figures, 16 references

  7. Introduction to the theory of low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerland, A.; Tomasek, M.

    1975-01-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic principles of the theory of low-energy electron diffraction is presented. General scattering theory is used to classify the hitherto known approaches to the problem (optical potential and one-electron approximation; formal scattering theory: Born expansion and multiple scattering; translational symmetry: Ewald construction; classification of LEED theories by means of the T matrix; pseudokinematical theory for crystal with clean surface and with an adsorbed monomolecular layer; dynamical theory; inclusion of inelastic collisions; discussion of a simple example by means of the band-structure approach)

  8. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  9. Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications

    CERN Document Server

    Skarda, Vlad

    2017-01-01

    EuCARD-2 Workshop, 8-9 December 2016, Warsaw, Poland. Organizers: Science and Technology Facilities Council, UK CERN - The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Switzerland, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Poland, Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, Germany, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland. An article presents short information about EuCARD-2 Workshop “Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications”, which was held in December 2016 in Warsaw. Objectives, main topics and expected output of meeting are described. List of organizers is included.

  10. An extension of the fenske-hall LCAO method for approximate calculations of inner-shell binding energies of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, Ch.; Reinhold, J.

    1980-02-01

    The approximate LCAO MO method of Fenske and Hall has been extended to an all-election method allowing the calculation of inner-shell binding energies of molecules and their chemical shifts. Preliminary results are given.

  11. Low-dose electron energy-loss spectroscopy using electron counting direct detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maigné, Alan; Wolf, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    Since the development of parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have been the default detectors for EELS. With the recent development of electron-counting direct-detection cameras, micrographs can be acquired under very low electron doses at significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. In spectroscopy, in particular in combination with a monochromator, the signal can be extremely weak and the detection limit is principally defined by noise introduced by the detector. Here we report the use of an electron-counting direct-detection camera for EEL spectroscopy. We studied the oxygen K edge of amorphous ice and obtained a signal noise ratio up to 10 times higher than with a conventional CCD.We report the application of electron counting to record time-resolved EEL spectra of a biological protein embedded in amorphous ice, revealing chemical changes observed in situ while exposed by the electron beam. A change in the fine structure of nitrogen K and the carbon K edges were recorded during irradiation. A concentration of 3 at% nitrogen was detected with a total electron dose of only 1.7 e-/Å2, extending the boundaries of EELS signal detection at low electron doses.

  12. Electron energy distribution function, effective electron temperature, and dust charge in the temporal afterglow of a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Kersten, H.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions describing the variation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an afterglow of a plasma are obtained. Especially, the case when the electron energy loss is mainly due to momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is considered. The study is carried out for different EEDFs in the steady state, including Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions. The analytical results are not only obtained for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy but also for the case when the collisions are a power function of electron energy. Using analytical expressions for the EEDF, the effective electron temperature and charge of the dust particles, which are assumed to be present in plasma, are calculated for different afterglow durations. An analytical expression for the rate describing collection of electrons by dust particles for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy is also derived. The EEDF profile and, as a result, the effective electron temperature and dust charge are sufficiently different in the cases when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy and when the rate is a power function of electron energy.

  13. Low energy intense electron beams with extra-low energy spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.V.; Calabrese, R.; Ciullo, G.; Dikansky, N.S.; Guidi, V.; Kot, N.C.; Kudelainen, V.I.; Lamanna, G.; Lebedev, V.A.; Logachov, P.V.; Tecchio, L.; Yang, B.

    1994-01-01

    Maximum achievable intensity for low energy electron beams is a feature that is not very often compatible with low energy spread. We show that a proper choice of the source and the acceleration optics allows one to match them together. In this scheme, a GaAs photocathode excited by a single-mode infrared laser and adiabatic acceleration in fully magnetised optics enables the production of a low-energy-spread electron beam with relatively high intensity. The technological problems associated with the method are discussed together with its limitations. (orig.)

  14. Binding Energy of Quantum Bound States in X-shaped Nanowire Intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    α0)〉 = 3~2 mb2 ( 2α0 + 2 11 ) = 6~2 mb2 ( α0 + 1 11 ) = 1.058 ~2 ma2 ∆2 (111) The threshold energy is found to be Et = π2~2 2mw2 (112) Since the...energy (Eb) of the electron taking the threshold energy as zero level is given by Eb = −Emin = −1.058 ~2 ma2 ∆2 = −4.232 ~ 2 mw2 cos2(θ1 − θ2

  15. Prediction of binding free energy for adsorption of antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B on a POPC membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivcharuk, Victor; Tomberli, Bruno; Tolokh, Igor S.; Gray, C. G.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the interaction of a zwitterionic palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer with the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin (LFCinB) in a 100 mM NaCl solution at 310 K. The interaction of LFCinB with POPC is used as a model system for studying the details of membrane-peptide interactions, with the peptide selected because of its antimicrobial nature. Seventy-two 3 ns MD simulations, with six orientations of LFCinB at 12 different distances from a POPC membrane, are carried out to determine the potential of mean force (PMF) or free energy profile for the peptide as a function of the distance between LFCinB and the membrane surface. To calculate the PMF for this relatively large system a new variant of constrained MD and thermodynamic integration is developed. A simplified method for relating the PMF to the LFCinB-membrane binding free energy is described and used to predict a free energy of adsorption (or binding) of -1.05±0.39kcal/mol , and corresponding maximum binding force of about 20 pN, for LFCinB-POPC. The contributions of the ions-LFCinB and the water-LFCinB interactions to the PMF are discussed. The method developed will be a useful starting point for future work simulating peptides interacting with charged membranes and interactions involved in the penetration of membranes, features necessary to understand in order to rationally design peptides as potential alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

  16. Energy analyzer for Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy backscattering ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, S.S.; Gorelik, V.A.; Gutenko, V.T.; Protopopov, O.D.; Trubitsin, A.A.; Shuvalova, Z.A.; Yakushev, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Energy analyzer for electron Auger spectroscopy and low-energy backscattering ion spectroscopy is described. Analyzer presents one-cascade variant of cylindrical mirror with second-order focusing. Energy relative resolution is continuously adjusted within 0.2-1.2% limits. Signal/noise relation by Cu Auger-line at 1 muA current of exciting beam changes upper limit of range 150-450

  17. Electron capture by multicharged ions at eV energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havener, C.C.; Huq, M.S.; Meyer, F.W.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    A multicharged ion-atom merged-beams apparatus has been used in conjunction with the ORNL-ECR ion source to measure accurate absolute electron-capture cross sections in the energy range from below 1 eV/amu to 1500 eV/amu. Measurements for N/sup 3+,4+,5+/ /plus/ H(D) collisions indicate good agreement with available theoretical calculations. However, measurements with O 5+ /plus/ H(D) show an unexpected low-energy behavior which may be attributable to the ion-induced-dipole attraction between the reactants. Scaled Landau-Zener calculations presented here identify a transfer plus excitation channel which has the correct energy dependence at low energies. This finding suggest the need for a comprehensive coupled channel calculation which would include such product states. 25 refs., 8 figs

  18. Evolution of Structure in Nuclei: Meditation by Sub-Shell Modifications and Relation to Binding Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the development of configuration mixing, coherence, collectivity, and deformation in nuclei is one of the crucial challenges in nuclear structure physics, and one which has become all the more important with the advent of next generation facilities for the study of exotic nuclei. We will discuss recent work on phase/shape transitional behavior in nuclei, and the role of changes in sub-shell structure in mediating such transitional regions. We will also discuss a newly found, much deeper, link between nuclear structure and nuclear binding energies.

  19. Free energy calculations on Transthyretin dissociation and ligand binding from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper; Hamelberg, Donald; McCammon, J. Andrew

    experimental results have helped to explain this aberrant behavior of TTR, however, structural insights of the amyloidgenic process are still lacking. Therefore, we have used all-atom molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculations to study the initial phase of this process. We have calculated......Many questions about the nature of aggregation and the proteins that are involved in these events are still left unanswered. One of the proteins that is known to form amyloids is Transthyretine (TTR), the secondary transporter of thyroxine and transporter of retinol-binding-protein. Several...

  20. Folding model analysis of Λ binding energies and three-body ΛNN force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, M.; Rahman Khan, M.Z.

    1988-02-01

    Working within the framework of the folding model, we analyze the Λ binding energy data of light hypernuclei with effective two-body ΛN plus three-body ΛNN interaction. The two-body density for the core nucleus required for evaluating the three-body force contribution is obtained in terms of the centre of mass pair correlation. It is found that except for Λ 5 He the data are fairly well explained. The three-body force seems to account for the density dependence of the effective two-body ΛN interaction proposed earlier. (author). 13 refs, 2 tabs