WorldWideScience

Sample records for electron beam current

  1. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook [and others

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs.

  2. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs

  3. Limiting currents of overcompensated electron beams

    Malafaev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    A possibility of producing recompensated electron beam and increasing its limiting currents in the magnetic field is experimentally investigated. It is shown that such a possibility is realized when the beam is surrounded by a cylindrical net placed into the tube located under the positive potential relative to the net. In this case an increase of limiting current at the expense of increasing the ion life time, takes place. Current, exceeding the Pierce threshold 1.5 times, is obtained

  4. Current neutralization of nanosecond risetime, high-current electron beam

    Lidestri, J.P.; Spence, P.W.; Bailey, V.L.; Putnam, S.D.; Fockler, J.; Eichenberger, C.; Champney, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the authors have recently investigated methods to achieve current neutralization in fast risetime (<3 ns) electron beams propagating in low-pressure gas. For this investigation, they injected a 3-MV, 30-kA intense beam into a drift cell containing gas pressures from 0.10 to 20 torr. By using a fast net current monitor (100-ps risetime), it was possible to observe beam front gas breakdown phenomena and to optimize the drift cell gas pressure to achieve maximum current neutralization. Experimental observations have shown that by increasing the drift gas pressure (P ∼ 12.5 torr) to decrease the mean time between secondary electron/gas collisions, the beam can propagate with 90% current neutralization for the full beam pulsewidth (16 ns)

  5. High current precision long pulse electron beam position monitor

    Nelson, S D; Fessenden, T J; Holmes, C

    2000-01-01

    Precision high current long pulse electron beam position monitoring has typically experienced problems with high Q sensors, sensors damped to the point of lack of precision, or sensors that interact substantially with any beam halo thus obscuring the desired signal. As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using transverse electromagnetic stripline kicker technology, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams for accurate beam position control (6 - 40 MeV, 1 - 4 kA, 2 μs beam pulse, sub millimeter beam position accuracy.) The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (< 20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt position measurements.

  6. Resistance and sheet resistance measurements using electron beam induced current

    Czerwinski, A.; Pluska, M.; Ratajczak, J.; Szerling, A.; KaPtcki, J.

    2006-01-01

    A method for measurement of spatially uniform or nonuniform resistance in layers and strips, based on electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique, is described. High electron beam currents are used so that the overall resistance of the measurement circuit affects the EBIC signal. During the evaluation, the electron beam is scanned along the measured object, whose load resistance varies with the distance. The variation is compensated by an adjustable resistance within an external circuit. The method has been experimentally deployed for sheet resistance determination of buried regions of lateral confinements in semiconductor laser heterostructures manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy

  7. Electron gun for formation of two high-current beams

    Borisov, A.R.; Zherlitsyn, A.G.; Mel'nikov, G.V.; Shtejn, Yu.G.

    1982-01-01

    The design of the ''Tonus'' accelerator electron gun for formation of two high-current beams aiming at the production of the maximum beam power and density is described. The results of investigation of two modes of beam formation are presented. In the first variant the beams were produced by means of two plane diodes with 40 mm diameter cathodes made of stainless steel and anodes made of 50 μm thick titanium foil. In the second variant the beams were formed by means of two coaxial diodes with magnetic insulation. In one diode the cathode diameter equals to 74 mm, the anode diameter - 92 mm, in the other diode 16 and 44 mm respectively. Current redistribution in the diodes and its effect on accelerating voltage are investigated. It is shown that the gun permits formation of synchronized two high-current beams, iaving equal electron energied. Wide range current control of both beams is possible

  8. Silicon radiation detector analysis using back electron beam induced current

    Guye, R.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique for the observation and analysis of defects in silicon radiation detectors is described. This method uses an electron beam from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) impinging on the rear side of the p + n junction of the silicon detector, which itself is active and detects the electron beam induced current (EBIC). It is shown that this current is a sensitive probe of localized trapping centers, either at the junction surface or somewhere in the volume of the silicon crystal. (orig.)

  9. Current-Voltage Characteristic of Nanosecond - Duration Relativistic Electron Beam

    Andreev, Andrey

    2005-10-01

    The pulsed electron-beam accelerator SINUS-6 was used to measure current-voltage characteristic of nanosecond-duration thin annular relativistic electron beam accelerated in vacuum along axis of a smooth uniform metal tube immersed into strong axial magnetic field. Results of these measurements as well as results of computer simulations performed using 3D MAGIC code show that the electron-beam current dependence on the accelerating voltage at the front of the nanosecond-duration pulse is different from the analogical dependence at the flat part of the pulse. In the steady-state (flat) part of the pulse), the measured electron-beam current is close to Fedosov current [1], which is governed by the conservation law of an electron moment flow for any constant voltage. In the non steady-state part (front) of the pulse, the electron-beam current is higher that the appropriate, for a giving voltage, steady-state (Fedosov) current. [1] A. I. Fedosov, E. A. Litvinov, S. Ya. Belomytsev, and S. P. Bugaev, ``Characteristics of electron beam formed in diodes with magnetic insulation,'' Soviet Physics Journal (A translation of Izvestiya VUZ. Fizika), vol. 20, no. 10, October 1977 (April 20, 1978), pp.1367-1368.

  10. RADLAC II high current electron beam propagation experiment

    Frost, C.A.; Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Turman, B.N.; Crist, C.E.; Welch, D.R.; Struve, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    The resistive hose instability of an electron beam was observed to be convective in recent RADLAC II experiments for higher current shots. The effects of air scattering for these shots were minimal. These experiments and theory suggest low-frequency hose motion which does not appear convective may be due to rapid expansion and subsequent drifting of the beam nose

  11. On the limiting stationary currents of relativistic electron beams

    Kavchuk, V.N.; Kondratenko, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    The problem on electron beam transport in the system of different configurations both vacuum and filled with gas or plasma is connected with the problem of the limiting current, which can conduct such systems. Two models of a vacuum relativistic electron beam (REB) are considered. It is shown that there is upper limit for the value of the external magnetic field, H 0 , in the model of isovelocity REB with the constant longitudinal beam particle rate, β z =const. Estimation of the limiting current of REB as a series of inverse power H 0 is obtained. Estimations of the limiting current of magnetized hallow REB with thin walls are obtained in another model with β z ≠ const. Determination used in this case of the limiting current is directly connected with ''trapping'' of the beam central part due to formation of a virtual cathode and based on consideration of uniflux electron motion in the beam. Such an approach allows to obtain estimations of the limiting current of the thin-wall hallow beam. In this case an upper limit for the thickness of the beam wall is connected with the bottom limit for the value of the external magnetic field providing radial beam equilibrium

  12. Ion current reduction in pinched electron beam diodes

    Quintenz, J.P.; Poukey, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    A new version of a particle-in-cell diode code has been written which permits the accurate treatment of higher-current diodes with greater physical dimensions. Using this code, we have studied ways to reduce the ion current in large-aspect-ratio pinched electron beam diodes. In particular, we find that allowing the ions to reflex in such diodes lowers the ion to electron current ratio considerably. In a 3-MV R/d=24 case this ratio was lowered by a factor of 6--8 compared with the corresponding nonreflexing-ion diode, while still producing a superpinched electron beam

  13. Current density monitor for intense relativistic electron beams

    Fiorito, R.B.; Raleigh, M.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a new type of electric probe which is capable of measuring the time-resolved current density profile of a stable, reproducible, high-energy (>4-MeV) high-current (>1-kA) electron beam. The sensing element of this probe is an open-ended but capped-off 50-Ω coaxial line constructed of graphite. The graphite sensor is 4.3 mm in diameter, 6 cm long, and is range thin to the primary beam electrons. The probe produces a signal proportional to the intercepted beam current. When the sensor is scanned radially through the beam during repeated pulses, a curve of signal versus depth of insertion is produced from which the radial current density profile can be determined. Measurements are presented of the profile of the electron beam from the Experimental Test Accelerator (4.5 MeV, 10 kA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement is shown between measurements made with this probe and the beam radius as predicted by transport codes. The advantage of the electric probe lies in its ruggedness, simplicity, inherent fast rise time, and low cost. In contrast to other systems it requires no radiation shielding, water cooling, or auxiliary support equipment to operate in an intense beam environment

  14. Electron beam formation in high-current diode

    Korneev, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of the electron beam formation in diode with cathode on the base of incomplete discharge over the surface of dielectrics with dielectric penetration epsilon 2 . The measurement of current density distribution over transversal cross section reveals an efficient homogeneity [ru

  15. Computer simulation of electron beams. II. Low-cost beam-current reconstruction

    de Wolf, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reconstruction of current density in electron beams is complicated by distortion of phase space which can require very fine discretization of the beam into trajectories. An efficient discretization of phase space is exploited, using conservation of charge and current in hypertriangle patches, to reconstruct the current density by fitting Gaussians through the distorted hypertriangles. Advantages and limitations are discussed

  16. Generation of Low-Energy High-Current Electron Beams in Plasma-Anode Electron Guns

    Ozur, G. E.; Proskurovsky, D. I.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a review of studies on the generation of low-energy high-current electron beams in electron guns with a plasma anode and an explosive-emission cathode. The problems related to the initiation of explosive electron emission under plasma and the formation and transport of high-current electron beams in plasma-filled systems are discussed consecutively. Considerable attention is given to the nonstationary effects that occur in the space charge layers of plasma. Emphasis is also placed on the problem of providing a uniform energy density distribution over the beam cross section, which is of critical importance in using electron beams of this type for surface treatment of materials. Examples of facilities based on low-energy high-current electron beam sources are presented and their applications in materials science and practice are discussed.

  17. A ns-pulsed high-current electron beam source

    Guan, Gexin; Li, Youzhi; Pan, Yuli

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of a pulse electron beam source which is composed of a gun and pulse system depends on not only the time characteristics of the gun and the pulser, but also their combination. This point become apparent if effects of the electron tansit-time between electrodes are studied. A ferrite transmission line (FTL) pulser is used as a grid driver in this source. It has advantages of providing fast risetime, large peak power output and good loading characteristics. It is these advantages of the pulser that compensates the absence of some technological conditions of manufacturing gun and makes the source better. Our testing showed that the cooperation of both the gun and the pulser produced peak currents in the range of 1 to 9 amps with widths of 2 to 2.5 ns (FWHM) at cathode-to-anode potential of 60 to 82 kv, while the grid drives are about in the range of 1 to 3 kv. In addition, the results of the testing instructed that effects of electron transit-time cannot be ignored when the pulses with widths of several nanoseconds are used as a grid drive. Based on the results, electron transit-time effects on the design of the gun and the beam performances are briefly descussed in this paper. (author)

  18. Electron-Beam Produced Air Plasma: Optical Measurement of Beam Current

    Vidmar, Robert; Stalder, Kenneth; Seeley, Megan

    2006-10-01

    Experiments to quantify the electron beam current and distribution of beam current in air plasma are discussed. The air plasma is produced by a 100-keV 10-mA electron beam source that traverses a transmission window into a chamber with air as a target gas. Air pressure is between 1 mTorr and 760 Torr. Strong optical emissions due to electron impact ionization are observed for the N2 2^nd positive line at 337.1 nm and the N2^+ 1^st negative line at 391.4 nm. Calibration of optical emissions using signals from the isolated transmission window and a Faraday plate are discussed. The calibrated optical system is then used to quantify the electron distribution in the air plasma.

  19. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    Haney, Paul M.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Yoon, Heayoung P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Gaury, Benoit [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However, we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces, we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find that the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells are most consistent with a charged surface and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials.

  20. Harp, a short pulse, high current electron beam accelerator

    Prestwich, K.R.

    1974-01-01

    A 3 MV, 800 kA, 24 ns electron beam accelerator is described and the results of initial switching experiments are discussed. The generator will provide a source for studying the physics of processes leading to electron beam driven, inertially confined fusion. The major components of the accelerator are two diodes with a common anode, twelve oil-dielectric Blumleins with low jitter (less than 2 ns) multichannel switches, three intermediate storage capacitors, a trigger pulse generator and two Marx generators. (U.S.)

  1. Intense relativistic electron beam injector system for tokamak current drive

    Bailey, V.L.; Creedon, J.M.; Ecker, B.M.; Helava, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) injection system designed for tokamak current drive experiments. The injection system uses a standard high-voltage pulsed REB generator and a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) to drive an REB-accelerating diode in plasma. A series of preliminary experiments has been carried out to test the system by injecting REBs into a test chamber with preformed plasma and applied magnetic field. REBs were accelerated from two types of diodes: a conventional vacuum diode with foil anode, and a plasma diode, i.e., an REB cathode immersed in the plasma. REB current was in the range of 50 to 100 kA and REB particle energy ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. MITL power density exceeded 10 GW/cm 2 . Performance of the injection system and REB transport properties is documented for plasma densities from 5 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 14 cm -3 . Injection system data are compared with numerical calculations of the performance of the coupled system consisting of the generator, MITL, and diode

  2. Method for controlling low-energy high current density electron beams

    Lee, J.N.; Oswald, R.B. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for controlling the angle of incidence of low-energy, high current density electron beams are disclosed. The apparatus includes a current generating diode arrangement with a mesh anode for producing a drifting electron beam. An auxiliary grounded screen electrode is placed between the anode and a target for controlling the average angle of incidence of electrons in the drifting electron beam. According to the method of the present invention, movement of the auxiliary screen electrode relative to the target and the anode permits reliable and reproducible adjustment of the average angle of incidence of the electrons in low energy, high current density relativistic electron beams

  3. Current algorithms for computed electron beam dose planning

    Brahme, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and sometimes three-dimensional computer algorithms for electron beam irradiation are capable of taking all irregularities of the body cross-section and the properties of the various tissues into account. This is achieved by dividing the incoming broad beams into a number of narrow pencil beams, the penetration of which can be described by essentially one-dimensional formalisms. The constituent pencil beams are most often described by Gaussian, experimentally or theoretically derived distributions. The accuracy of different dose planning algorithms is discussed in some detail based on their ability to take the different physical interaction processes of high energy electrons into account. It is shown that those programs that take the deviations from the simple Gaussian model into account give the best agreement with experimental results. With such programs a dosimetric relative accuracy of about 5% is generally achieved except in the most complex inhomogeneity configurations. Finally, the present limitations and possible future developments of electron dose planning are discussed. (orig.)

  4. An optimized Faraday cage design for electron beam current measurements

    Turner, J.N.; Hausner, G.G.; Parsons, D.F.

    1975-01-01

    A Faraday cage detector is described for measuring electron beam intensity for use with energies up to 1.2 Mev, with the present data taken at 100 keV. The design features a readily changeable limiting aperture and detector cup geometry, and a secondary electron suppression grid. The detection efficiency of the cage is shown to be limited only by primary backscatter through the detector solid angle of escape, which is optimized with respect to primary backscattered electrons and secondary electron escape. The geometry and stopping material of the detection cup are varied, and the results show that for maximum detection efficiency with carbon as the stopping mateiral, the solid angle of escape must be equal to or less than 0.05πsr. The experimental results are consistent within the +-2% accuracy of the detection electronics, and are not limited by the Faraday cage detection efficiency. (author)

  5. Guiding effect of bent macroscopic quartz tube for high current electron beam

    Zhang Mingwu; Chen Jing; Wu Yehong; Yang Bian; Wang Wei; Xue Yingli; Yu Deyang; Cai Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    By using an incident electron beam with the high current and high energy, the guiding effect of the bent macroscopic quartz tube for the electron beam has been investigated. The angular distributions of outgoing electrons depending on the current and energy of incident electrons were measured. The dependences of electron transmitted fraction on energy and current of incident electrons are also shown. As the incident electron energy increasing, the electron transmitted fraction increases, but it decreases while the incident electron current increasing. The results have been compared with the present data. This work presents, the process of guiding electrons is essentially different from that of guiding highly charged ions, the guiding electron beam was caused by both elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons and inner walls of quartz tube, rather than self-organized charging effect on the surface of inner wall of quartz tube. (authors)

  6. Current status of electron beam processing system and its applications

    Taniguchi, S.

    2005-01-01

    The feature and application fields of electron beam processing systems (EPS), the selection of machine ratings and safety measures for EPS are described. EPS has the various features: a) Chemical reactions occurs independent of the temperature, b) it occurs without any added substances such as catalysts, c) mass productivity, d) easy operation, as is exemplified by switch ON and OFF, and e) easy maintenance, compared with radioisotope sources. After briefly explaining acceleration type (DC or AC), power supply (Van-de-Graaf or Cockcroft-walton and others), beam scanning to be used for large area irradiation, and some typical applications (cross-linking, radical polymerization, the paper describes necessary safety measures such as X-ray shielding, ozone control including ozone generation and its disposal, interlock system, warning buzzer, and monitoring and measuring. (S. Ohno)

  7. Simulation of 10 A electron-beam formation and collection for a high current electron-beam ion source

    Kponou, A.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Batazova, M.; Tiunov, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presented is a report on the development of an electron-beam ion source (EBIS) for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which requires operating with a 10 A electron beam. This is approximately an order of magnitude higher current than in any existing EBIS device. A test stand is presently being designed and constructed where EBIS components will be tested. It will be reported in a separate paper at this conference. The design of the 10 A electron gun, drift tubes, and electron collector requires extensive computer simulations. Calculations have been performed at Novosibirsk and BNL using two different programs, SAM and EGUN. Results of these simulations will be presented. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  8. Simulation of 10 A electron-beam formation and collection for a high current electron-beam ion source

    Kponou, A.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Batazova, M.; Tiunov, M.

    1998-02-01

    Presented is a report on the development of an electron-beam ion source (EBIS) for the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which requires operating with a 10 A electron beam. This is approximately an order of magnitude higher current than in any existing EBIS device. A test stand is presently being designed and constructed where EBIS components will be tested. It will be reported in a separate paper at this conference. The design of the 10 A electron gun, drift tubes, and electron collector requires extensive computer simulations. Calculations have been performed at Novosibirsk and BNL using two different programs, SAM and EGUN. Results of these simulations will be presented.

  9. Measurements of high-current electron beams from X pinches and wire array Z pinches

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Bell, K. S.; Hammer, D. A.; Agafonov, A. V.; Romanova, V. M.; Mingaleev, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch cross point to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups are discussed. Results of computer simulation of electron beam propagation from the pinch to the Faraday cup give limits for the measured current for beams having different energy spreads. The beam is partially neutralized as it propagates from the X pinch to a diagnostic system, but within a Faraday cup diagnostic, space charge effects can be very important. Experimental results show evidence of such effects.

  10. A Fast Non Intercepting Linac Electron Beam Position and Current Monitor

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Wille, Mads

    1982-01-01

    A non-intercepting beam monitor consisting of four detecting loops is used to determine the spatial postion and current of a pulsed beam from an electron linear accelerator. The monitor detects the magnetic field radiated by the substructure of the electron bunches created by the accelerating...

  11. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I{sub 2}-I{sub 1}), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current I{sub b} = (I{sub 2} + I{sub 1}). The values of I{sub 1} and I{sub 2} depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. Solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  12. Generation and transportation of low-energy, high-current electron beams

    Ozur, G.E.; Proskurovskij, D.I.; Nazarov, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data on the production of low-energy, high-current electron beams in a plasma-filled diode are presented. The highest beam energy density achieved is about 40 J/cm 2 , which makes it possible to treat materials in the mode of intense evaporation of the surface layer. It was shown that the use of a hollow cathode improves the beam homogeneity. The feasibility was demonstrated of the production of low-energy high-current electron beams in a gun with plasma anode based on the use of a reflective discharge. (author). 6 figs., 6 refs

  13. Generation and transportation of low-energy, high-current electron beams

    Ozur, G E; Proskurovskij, D I; Nazarov, D S [Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation). Institute of High Current Electronics

    1997-12-31

    Experimental data on the production of low-energy, high-current electron beams in a plasma-filled diode are presented. The highest beam energy density achieved is about 40 J/cm{sup 2}, which makes it possible to treat materials in the mode of intense evaporation of the surface layer. It was shown that the use of a hollow cathode improves the beam homogeneity. The feasibility was demonstrated of the production of low-energy high-current electron beams in a gun with plasma anode based on the use of a reflective discharge. (author). 6 figs., 6 refs.

  14. High precision electron beam diagnostic system for high current long pulse beams

    Chen, Y J; Fessenden, T; Holmes, C; Nelson, S D; Selchow, N.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using stripline kicker technology for DARHT II applications, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams (6-40 MeV, 1-4 kA, 2 microseconds) for accurate position control. The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (<20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt measurements performed using capacitive pick-off probes. Likewise, transmission line traveling wave probes have problems with multi-bounce effects due to these longer pulse widths. Finally, the high energy densities experienced in these applications distort typical foil beam position measurements

  15. Electron-beam-induced-current and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast with aberration-corrected electron probes

    Han, Myung-Geun, E-mail: mghan@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Garlow, Joseph A. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marshall, Matthew S.J.; Tiano, Amanda L. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States); Cheong, Sang-Wook [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H. [Department of Applied Physics and Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and active secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) are demonstrated in STEM mode combined with in situ electrical biasing in a TEM. • Electrostatic potential maps in ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC data. • Simultaneous EBIC and active SE-VC performed with atomic resolution STEM are demonstrated. - Abstract: The ability to map out electrostatic potentials in materials is critical for the development and the design of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices in modern industry. Electron holography has been an important tool for revealing electric and magnetic field distributions in microelectronics and magnetic-based memory devices, however, its utility is hindered by several practical constraints, such as charging artifacts and limitations in sensitivity and in field of view. In this article, we report electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) and secondary-electron voltage-contrast (SE-VC) with an aberration-corrected electron probe in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), as complementary techniques to electron holography, to measure electric fields and surface potentials, respectively. These two techniques were applied to ferroelectric thin films, multiferroic nanowires, and single crystals. Electrostatic potential maps obtained by off-axis electron holography were compared with EBIC and SE-VC to show that these techniques can be used as a complementary approach to validate quantitative results obtained from electron holography analysis.

  16. Methods for calculating energy and current requirements for industrial electron beam processing

    Cleland, M.R.; Farrell, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The practical problems of determining electron beam parameters for industrial irradiation processes are discussed. To assist the radiation engineer in this task, the physical aspects of electron beam absorption are briefly described. Formulas are derived for calculating the surface dose in the treated material using the electron energy, beam current and the area thruput rate of the conveyor. For thick absorbers electron transport results are used to obtain the depth-dose distributions. From these the average dose in the material, anti D, and the beam power utilization efficiency, F/sub p/, can be found by integration over the distributions. These concepts can be used to relate the electron beam power to the mass thruput rate. Qualitatively, the thickness of the material determines the beam energy, the area thruput rate and surface dose determine the beam current while the mass thruput rate and average depth-dose determine the beam power requirements. Graphs are presented showing these relationships as a function of electron energy from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV for polystyrene. With this information, the determination of electron energy and current requirements is a relatively simple procedure

  17. Current status of electron beam treatment of flue gas in China

    Wang Zhiguang

    2006-01-01

    Fossil resource especially coal will remain the main energy resource in China over the next 3 ∼4 decades. Pollution of flue gas from fossil power station is one problem being desiderated to solve since 1990's. Electron beam treatment of flue gas as an advanced technique has been developed and used by some institutes and industries in China. The current status of flue gas treatment using electron beam and the development of electron accelerator in China are reviewed. (author)

  18. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  19. Limiting currents of an unneutralized magnetized electron beam in a cylindrical drift tube

    Thompson, J.R.; Sloan, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the steady state injection of a uniform unneutralized, magnetized, relativistic electron beam into a cylindrical drift tube are presented. The space-charge-limited current and the asymptotic kinetic energy of electrons on axis is determined both numerically and analytically as a function of the input kinetic energy (γ 0 -1) mc 2 and of the ratio of beam-to-wall radii. A previously cited ''interpolation formula'' is obtained in the pencil beam limit, but more accurate limiting current expressions are developed for other cases (such as the fat beam limit) where the interpolation formula is as much as 20% in error. The corresponding axial electron energy is also found to be significantly smaller than the previously cited value of (γ/sup 1/3/ 0 -1) mc 2 except in the strong pencil beam limit

  20. Production of a high-current microsecond electron beam with a large cross section

    Abdullin, E.N.; Belomytsev, S.Ya.; Bugaev, S.P.; Gorbachev, S.I.; Zaslavskii, V.M.; Zorin, V.P.; Koval'chuk, B.M.; Loginov, S.V.; Matyukov, Yu.N.; Rasputin, R.M.; Tolkachev, V.S.; Shchanin, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    Obtaining high-current wide-aperture electron beams is an important problem in the development of laser technology for controlled nuclear fusion and for solving ecological and technological problems. The main scheme for producing such beams involves the use of generators with intermediate energy storage devices and burst-emission vacuum diodes. Beam pinching is prevented by using an external magnetic field or sectioning the diode into magnetically insulated diodes with currents lower than the limiting current. The length of the electron-current pulse varies from tens to hundreds of nano-seconds and is limited by the parameters of the intermediate storage device. Here the authors study the formation of a high-current electron beam with a square cross section and a current of the order of the limiting current of the diode in the absence of an external magnetic field as well as a 'fast' storage device in the power supply circuit. These conditions as a whole correspond to a simpler electron-source circuit, but the beam forming becomes more complicated. The reason for this is that there is no external magnetic field and that the role of plasma processes in the diode is enhanced by the greater length of the electron-current pulses

  1. Nano-electron beam induced current and hole charge dynamics through uncapped Ge nanocrystals

    Marchand, A.; El Hdiy, A.; Troyon, M. [Laboratoire de Recherche en Nanosciences, Bat. 6, case no 15, UFR Sciences, Universite de Reims Champagne Ardenne, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Amiard, G.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint Jerome - Case 142, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2012-04-16

    Dynamics of hole storage in spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process on an oxide layer grown on an n-doped <001> silicon substrate is studied using a nano-electron beam induced current technique. Carrier generation is produced by an electron beam irradiation. The generated current is collected by an atomic force microscope--tip in contact mode at a fixed position away from the beam spot of about 0.5 {mu}m. This distance represents the effective diffusion length of holes. The time constants of holes charging are determined and the effect of the NC size is underlined.

  2. Propagation of high-current fast electron beam in a dielectric target

    Klimo, O.; Debayle, A.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. A relativistic electron beam with very high current density may be produced during the interaction of a short high intensity laser pulse with a solid target. In Fast Ignition approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion, such beam is supposed to heat a part of the precompressed DT fuel pellet to the conditions of an efficient ignition. For successful implementation of Fast Ignition understanding the propagation and energy deposition of the beam is crucial. A number of processes, mostly associated with the return current, are dissipating the energy of the beam or inhibiting its collimated transport, namely the filamentation. Weibel, two-stream or the recently proposed ionization instability. Ionization instability may develop in a solid dielectric target due to the dependence of the propagation velocity of the beam on the beam density. To study the propagation of high current electron beam in dielectric target, we use a one-dimensional relativistic electrostatic simulation code based on the Particle in Cell method. The code includes ionization processes in dielectric material and collisions of newly generated cold electrons. The current density of the relativistic electron beam used in this work is in the range 3-300 GA/cm 2 , while its length roughly corresponds to the beam, produced by a 40 fs laser pulse. Propagation of the beam in the polyethylene target is studied. The code is complemented by an analytical model, which is applicable og a wider range of beam parameters that are currently beyond our computational possibilities. When the head of the beam enters the plastic target, electric field grows rapidly in consequence of the charge separation and it starts to ionize atoms. In the maximum of the field, which is less than 10% of the atomic field, the density of new free electrons is two orders of magnitude higher than the beam density, which is enough for the current neutralization. Cold electrons are accelerated by the field

  3. Quasistationary model of high-current relativistic electron beam. 1. Exact solution of Poisson equations

    Brenner, S.E.; Gandyl', E.M.; Podkopaev, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of high-current relativistic electron beam moving trough the cylindrical drift space has been modelled by the large particles, the shape of which allows to solve the Poisson equations exactly, and in such a way to avoid the linearization being usually used in those problems. The expressions for the components of own electric field of electron beam passing through the cylindrical drift space have been obtained. (author). 11 refs., 1 fig

  4. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  5. Simulation of 10 A electron beam formation and collection for a high current EBIS

    Kponou, A.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Batazova, M.; Tiunov, M.

    1997-01-01

    Development of an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL requires operating with a 10 A electron beam, which is approximately an order of magnitude higher current than in any existing EBIS device. A test stand is presently being designed and constructed where EBIS components will be twisted. It will be reported in a separate paper at this Conference. The design of the 10 A electron gun, drift tubes and electron collector requires extensive computer simulations. Calculations have been performed at Novosibirsk and BNL using two different programs, SAM and EGUN. Results of these simulations will be presented

  6. Current status and future prospect of electron beam sterilization in Japan

    Katsura, Ichiro

    1998-01-01

    It seems that electron beam sterilization is being current topic among all applications in Japan and that this tendency will continue until when major companies interested in the technology complete introducing electron beam. Since the Ministry of Health and Welfare(MOHW) officially issued revised regulation on GMP for medical devices in 1995, EtO has become the method regarded as time and money consuming one. On the contrary, electron beam has become as relatively economical and desirable method to achieve same result by its characteristics such as high productivity, rather easy validation and consequent cost reduction, although less penetration limit the kind of products to be treated. Status and prospect of electron beam sterilization in Japan will be presented in the paper along with accelerator related technologies

  7. Measurement of electron- and ion beam energies and currents in a plasma focus discharge

    Yamamoto, Toshikazu; Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Shimoda, Katsuji; Hirano, Katsumi

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of energetic particle beams in a plsma focus with a Mather type device are presented. Rogowski coils are used for time-resolved measurement, and solid-state nuclear track detectors for time-integrated measurement of the beams. In the upstream direction with respect to the discharge current, only the electron beam with the maximum current of several kA was detected, which was approximately one percent of the discharge current. The electron energies of the beam were spread from 0.1 to 1 MeV. In the downstream direction, two successive emissions of ions were observed. The first emission had an extremely high energy of the order of some MeV and a low beam current of less than 10 A. The second emission, the main part of the ion beam, with energies of 100 - 800 keV, followed the first one with a time lag of several tens of nanoseconds, and the beam current reached several tens of amperes. (author)

  8. The dispersion relation of charge and current compensated relativistic electron beam-plasma system

    Vrba, P.; Schroetter, J.; Jarosova, P.; Koerbel, S.

    1978-01-01

    The unstable regions of relativistic electron beam-plasma system were determined by analysing the general dispersion relation numerically. The external parameters were varied to ensure more effective instability excitations. The full charge- and current compensation presumptions lead to the new synchronism predictions. The slow space charge wave and slow cyclotron wave of the return current are synchronous with the plasma ion wave. (author)

  9. Quasistationary model of high current relativistic electron beam. 2. The own magnetic field of relativistic electron beam in cylindrical Drift space

    Brenner, S.E.; Gandul', E.M.; Podkopaev, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is devoted to obtaining the components of own magnetic field of high current relativistic electron beam passing through the cylindrical drift space superconducting walls: the peculiarities of applied numerical scheme have been also described briefly. (author). 6 refs

  10. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    Nation, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The original purpose of this research was an investigation into the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three main objectives namely, the development of a suitable ion injector, the growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components parts into a suitable proof of principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. This work focusses on the first two of these objectives

  11. WE-A-207-02: Electron Beam Therapy - Current Status and Future Directions

    Wu, Q. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    In memory of the significant contribution of Dr. Jacques Ovadia to electron beam techniques, this session will review recent, advanced techniques which are reinvigorating the science of electron beam radiation therapy. Recent research efforts in improving both the applicability and quality of the electron beam therapy will be discussed, including modulated electron beam radiotherapy (MERT) and dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR). Learning Objectives: To learn about recent advances in electron beam therapy, including modulated electron beam therapy and dynamic electron arc therapy (DEAR). Put recent advances in the context of work that Dr. Ovadia pursued during his career in medical physics.

  12. WE-A-207-02: Electron Beam Therapy - Current Status and Future Directions

    Wu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    In memory of the significant contribution of Dr. Jacques Ovadia to electron beam techniques, this session will review recent, advanced techniques which are reinvigorating the science of electron beam radiation therapy. Recent research efforts in improving both the applicability and quality of the electron beam therapy will be discussed, including modulated electron beam radiotherapy (MERT) and dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR). Learning Objectives: To learn about recent advances in electron beam therapy, including modulated electron beam therapy and dynamic electron arc therapy (DEAR). Put recent advances in the context of work that Dr. Ovadia pursued during his career in medical physics

  13. Catastrophic processes in dielectrics in irradiation by high-current electron beams

    Oleshko, V. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lisitsyna, L., E-mail: lisitsyn@tpu.r [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 634003 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Malys, D.; Damamme, G. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique, Paris 75015 (France); Lisitsyn, V. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-01

    The results of the research in explosive decomposition of heavy metal azides initiated by electric ('streamer') charges induced by high-current electron beam have been considered. A physical model for initiation of heavy metal azides explosive decomposition by electron beam has been suggested. The model suggests formation of strong electric field in the sample and its neutralization by ultrasound anode charges. The streamer front generates 'hot spots' which start the formation of explosive decomposition sites in a condensed reactive material.

  14. High-stable secondary-emission monitor for accelerated electron beam current

    Prudnikov, I.A.; Saksaganskij, G.L.; Bazhanov, E.B.; Zabrodin, B.V.

    1977-01-01

    A secondary-emission monitor for a 10 to 30 MeV electron beam (beam current is 10 -4 to 10 -2 A) is described. The monitor comprises a measuring electrode unit, titanium discharge-type pump, getter made of porous titanium, all enclosed in a metal casing. The measuring unit comprises three electrodes made of 20 μm aluminium foil. The secondary emission coefficient (5.19%+-0.06% for the electron energy of 20 MeV) is maintained stable for a long time. The monitor detects pulses of up to some nanoseconds duration. It is reliable in operation, and is recommended for a wide practical application

  15. Current control of the electron beam formed in the magnetron gun with a secondary-emission cathode

    Dovbnya, A.N.; Reshetnyak, N.G.; Zakutin, V.V.; Chertishchev, I.A.; Romas'ko, V.P.; Dovbnyan, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Data are reported on electron beam generation and beam current control in two types of secondary-emission cathode magnetron guns. The influence of the magnetic field value and field distribution on the formation of the beam and its parameters has been investigated in the electron energy range between 20 and 150 keV. The influence of local magnetic field variations on the cathode and the electron beam characteristics has been studied. The possibility to control the electron beam current in various ways has been demonstrated

  16. Excitation of Ion Cyclotron Waves by Ion and Electron Beams in Compensated-current System

    Xiang, L.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.

    2018-04-01

    Ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) can play important roles in the energization of plasma particles. Charged particle beams are ubiquitous in space, and astrophysical plasmas and can effectively lead to the generation of ICWs. Based on linear kinetic theory, we consider the excitation of ICWs by ion and electron beams in a compensated-current system. We also investigate the competition between reactive and kinetic instabilities. The results show that ion and electron beams both are capable of generating ICWs. For ICWs driven by ion beams, there is a critical beam velocity, v bi c , and critical wavenumber, k z c , for a fixed beam density; the reactive instability dominates the growth of ICWs when the ion-beam velocity {v}{bi}> {v}{bi}c and the wavenumber {k}zz≃ 2{k}zc/3 for a given {v}{bi}> {v}{bi}c. For the slow ion beams with {v}{bi}< {v}{bi}c, the kinetic instability can provide important growth rates of ICWs. On the other hand, ICWs driven by electron beams are excited only by the reactive instability, but require a critical velocity, {v}{be}c\\gg {v}{{A}} (the Alfvén velocity). In addition, the comparison between the approximate analytical results based on the kinetic theory and the exact numerical calculation based on the fluid model demonstrates that the reactive instabilities can well agree quantitatively with the numerical results by the fluid model. Finally, some possible applications of the present results to ICWs observed in the solar wind are briefly discussed.

  17. Transdusers for measuring currents and coordinates of subnanosecond accelerated electron beams

    Mocheshnikov, N.I.; Reprintsev, L.V.; Syumak, V.N.; Fedotov, I.F.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of monitors using eddy currents induced in the walls of an electronic channel by electron clusters have been developed. Monitors of the first type use, instead of the resistor belt, the input resistance of a wide-band transformer whose low-resistance input is connected to the break in the electron channel and the high-resistance output - to the output cable. The monitor is used in an electron storage ring. To increase the fast response of second-type monitors the brake in the electron channel is loaded with a low-resistance strip line. The signal from this line is taken near the place of its connection to the brake. The monitors are supposed to be used for resolution of the fine structure of a high-current electron linear accelerator beam. The achieved rise time constituted 0.15 - 0.2 ns

  18. The detection of electron-beam-induced current in junctionless semiconductor

    Tan, Chee Chin; Ong, Vincent K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope is a versatile tool and its electron beam techniques have been widely used in semiconductor material and device characterizations. One of these electron beam techniques is the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. One of the limitations of the conventional EBIC technique is that it requires charge collecting junctions which may not be readily available in junctionless samples such as bare substrates unless some special sample preparation procedure such as the fabrication of a diffused junction is done on the junctionless sample. In this paper, the technique of detecting EBIC current in junctionless samples with the use of a two-point probe is presented. It is found that the EBIC current is independent from its physical parameter when the sample thickness is greater than 4L; the width to the right of probe 2 and the width to the left of probe 1 are greater than 2L and 8L, respectively. The parameters affecting this technique of detecting the EBIC current such as the depth of the generation volume, probe spacing, and the applied bias are also discussed in this paper. A commercially available two-dimensional device simulator was used to verify this technique.

  19. Current state and prospects of industrial application of electron beam irradiation

    Washio, Masakazu

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviewed the low energy, medium energy, and high energy accelerators used for the industrial application of electron beams. Next, it described the absorption of electron beam energy, distribution of the absorbed dose of electron beams in a substance, and the basis of electron beam reaction. Furthermore, as the industrial application examples of electron beams, it briefly described about the reforming and curing of polymers, irradiation effect of inorganic material (characteristic control of semiconductors), and sterilization. Regarding curing, as examples using mainly low energy electron beams (300 keV or below), this paper briefly explained the manufacture of thermosensitive recording materials, electron beam cured silicone for release papers, tunnel metal interior finishing board, high gloss - high smooth paper. Finally, it looked at latest trends and prospects of electron beam generators. (A.O.)

  20. Vehicle charging and return current measurements during electron-beam emission experiments from the Shuttle Orbiter

    Hawkins, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The prime objective of this research was to investigate the electro-dynamic response of the Shuttle Orbiter during electron beam emission from the payload bay. This investigation has been conducted by examining data collected by the Vehicle Charging And Potential (VCAP) Experiment. The VCAP experiment has flown on two Shuttle missions with a Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG) capable of emitting a 100 mA beam of 1 keV electrons. Diagnostics of the charging and return current during beam emission were provided by a combined Charge and Current Probe (CCP) located in the payload bay of the Orbiter. The CCP measurements were used to conduct a parametric study of the vehicle charging and return current as a function of vehicle attitude, ambient plasma parameters, and emitted beam current. In particular, the CCP measurements were found to depend strongly on the ambient plasma density. The vehicle charging during a 100 mA beam emission was small when the predicted ambient plasma density was greater than 3 x 10 5 cm -3 , but appreciable charging occurred when the density was less than this value. These observations indicated that the effective current-collecting area of the Orbiter is approximately 42 m 2 , consistent with estimates for the effective area of the Orbiter's engine nozzles. The operation of the Orbiter's Reaction Control System thrusters can create perturbations in the Orbiter's neutral and plasma environment that affect the CCP measurements. The CCP signatures of thruster firings are quite complex, but in general they are consistent with the depletion of plasma density in the ram direction and the enhancement of plasma density in the Orbiter's wake

  1. Transfer and focusing of high current relativistic electron beams on a target

    Baranchikov, E.I.; Gordeev, A.V.; Koba, Yu.V.; Korolev, V.D.; Penkina, V.S.; Rudakov, L.I.; Smirnov, V.P.; Sukhov, A.D.; Tarumov, E.Z.; Bakshaeev, Yu.L.

    Research is being conducted at the I. V. Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute to investigate possibilities of creating a pulsed thermonuclear reactor based on REBs; this work involves the creation of a multimodel system using vacuum lines for transferring energy and an acute angled external magnetic field for transferring electron beams to the target. A field of this configuration can be used at the same time for accumulating a ''cloud'' of relativistic protons around the target for purposes of irradiating them. This alternative solution of the problem of target irradiation, instead of focusing beams directly on it, may prove to be highly promising. Experiments are described which were conducted recently on high current electron accelerators ''URAL'', ''MS'' and others and which were directed at investigating possibilities of transferring and focusing high current REBs, as well as effective transmission of electromagnetic energy using vacuum lines at considerable distances

  2. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe

  3. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    Nation, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work carried out on DOE contract number DE-AC02-80ER10569 during the period December 15, 1979 to May 31, 1992. The original purpose of this research was to investigate the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three major objectives: development of a suitable ion injector, growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components into a suitable proof-of-principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. Work focused on the first two of these objectives. Control of the space charge waves' phase velocity was not obtained to the degree required for a working accelerator, so the project was duly terminated in favor of a program which focused on generating ultra high power microwave signals suitable for use in the next linear collider. Work done to develop suitable efficient, inexpensive, phase-stable microwave sources, with peak powers of up to 1 GW in the X band in pulses shorter than 1 ns, is described. Included are lists of the journal and conference papers resulting from this work, as well as a list of graduate students who completed their Ph.D. studies on the projects described in this report

  4. Surface modification of steels and magnesium alloy by high current pulsed electron beam

    Hao, Shengzhi; Gao, Bo; Wu, Aimin; Zou, Jianxin; Qin, Ying; Dong, Chuang; An, Jian; Guan, Qingfeng

    2005-11-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is now developing as a useful tool for surface modification of materials. When concentrated electron flux transferring its energy into a very thin surface layer within a short pulse time, superfast processes such as heating, melting, evaporation and consequent solidification, as well as dynamic stress induced may impart the surface layer with improved physico-chemical and mechanical properties. This paper presents our research work on surface modification of steels and magnesium alloy with HCPEB of working parameters as electron energy 27 keV, pulse duration ∼1 μs and energy density ∼2.2 J/cm2 per pulse. Investigations performed on carbon steel T8, mold steel D2 and magnesium alloy AZ91HP have shown that the most pronounced changes of phase-structure state and properties occurring in the near-surface layers, while the thickness of the modified layer with improved microhardness (several hundreds of micrometers) is significantly greater than that of the heat-affected zone. The formation mechanisms of surface cratering and non-stationary hardening effect in depth are discussed based on the elucidation of non-equilibrium temperature filed and different kinds of stresses formed during pulsed electron beam melting treatment. After the pulsed electron beam treatments, samples show significant improvements in measurements of wear and corrosion resistance.

  5. Surface modification of steels and magnesium alloy by high current pulsed electron beam

    Hao, Shengzhi; Gao, Bo; Wu, Aimin; Zou, Jianxin; Qin, Ying; Dong, Chuang; An, Jian; Guan, Qingfeng

    2005-01-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is now developing as a useful tool for surface modification of materials. When concentrated electron flux transferring its energy into a very thin surface layer within a short pulse time, superfast processes such as heating, melting, evaporation and consequent solidification, as well as dynamic stress induced may impart the surface layer with improved physico-chemical and mechanical properties. This paper presents our research work on surface modification of steels and magnesium alloy with HCPEB of working parameters as electron energy 27 keV, pulse duration ∼1 μs and energy density ∼2.2 J/cm 2 per pulse. Investigations performed on carbon steel T8, mold steel D2 and magnesium alloy AZ91HP have shown that the most pronounced changes of phase-structure state and properties occurring in the near-surface layers, while the thickness of the modified layer with improved microhardness (several hundreds of micrometers) is significantly greater than that of the heat-affected zone. The formation mechanisms of surface cratering and non-stationary hardening effect in depth are discussed based on the elucidation of non-equilibrium temperature filed and different kinds of stresses formed during pulsed electron beam melting treatment. After the pulsed electron beam treatments, samples show significant improvements in measurements of wear and corrosion resistance

  6. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam

    Warwick, J.; Dzelzainis, T.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Schumaker, W.; Doria, D.; Romagnani, L.; Poder, K.; Cole, J. M.; Alejo, A.; Yeung, M.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Reville, B.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D. D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Borghesi, M.; Sarri, G.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1 T ) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ɛB≈10-3 is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  7. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam.

    Warwick, J; Dzelzainis, T; Dieckmann, M E; Schumaker, W; Doria, D; Romagnani, L; Poder, K; Cole, J M; Alejo, A; Yeung, M; Krushelnick, K; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z; Reville, B; Samarin, G M; Symes, D D; Thomas, A G R; Borghesi, M; Sarri, G

    2017-11-03

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1  T) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ε_{B}≈10^{-3} is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  8. Investigation of the extraction of short diffusion lengths from simulated electron-beam induced current

    Wee, D.; Parish, G.; Nener, B. [Microelectronics Research Group, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, 6009 Crawley (Perth) (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports on the investigations via 2-D simulation into the accuracy of diffusion length extraction from scanning electron-beam induced current measurements when the diffusion length, L is very short. L is extracted by using the direct method proposed by Chan et al.[1] and later refined by Kurniawan and Ong[2] to take finite junction depth into account. The 2-D simulations were undertaken using Synopsys {sup registered} Sentaurus TCAD and a realistic electron-hole pair generation volume was created using CASINO v2.42[3], a Monte Carlo Scanning Electron Microscope interaction simulation software, and imported into Sentaurus. The voltage and diameter of the electron beam and diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of the semiconductor materials were varied in the simulations to determine the errors in the diffusion length extracted from the EBIC signals as a function of these parameters. The results of the simulation show that the accuracy of the method proposed in[1] is reasonably accurate and that the beam voltage and spot size do not have significant effects on the accuracy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Investigation of the extraction of short diffusion lengths from simulated electron-beam induced current

    Wee, D.; Parish, G.; Nener, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the investigations via 2-D simulation into the accuracy of diffusion length extraction from scanning electron-beam induced current measurements when the diffusion length, L is very short. L is extracted by using the direct method proposed by Chan et al.[1] and later refined by Kurniawan and Ong[2] to take finite junction depth into account. The 2-D simulations were undertaken using Synopsys registered Sentaurus TCAD and a realistic electron-hole pair generation volume was created using CASINO v2.42[3], a Monte Carlo Scanning Electron Microscope interaction simulation software, and imported into Sentaurus. The voltage and diameter of the electron beam and diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of the semiconductor materials were varied in the simulations to determine the errors in the diffusion length extracted from the EBIC signals as a function of these parameters. The results of the simulation show that the accuracy of the method proposed in[1] is reasonably accurate and that the beam voltage and spot size do not have significant effects on the accuracy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Numerical simulation of the processes of small-diameter high-current electron beam shaping and injection

    Gordeev, V S; Myskov, G A

    2001-01-01

    With the aid of BEAM 25 program there was carried out the numerical simulation of the non-stationary process of shaping a small-diameter (<= 20mm) high-current hollow electron beam in a diode with magnetic insulation,as well as of the process of beam injection into the accelerating LIA track. The diode configuration for the purpose of eliminating the leakage of electron flux to the anode surface was update. Presented are the results of calculation of the injected beam characteristics (amplitude-time parameters of a current pulse, space-angle distributions of electrons etc.) depending on diode geometric parameters.

  11. Experimental investigation of focusing and transport of heavy-current electron beams

    Baranchikov, E.I.; Gordeev, A.V.; Koba, Yu.V.; Korolev, V.D.; Pen'kina, V.S.; Rudakov, L.I.; Smirnov, V.P.; Sukhov, A.D.; Tarumov, E.Z.

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of beam transfer through transverse magnetic fields are outlined. The injection and transport of an annular relativistic electron beam due to a magnetic trap of acute-angle geometry are experimentally studied

  12. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  13. Surface modification of TA2 pure titanium by low energy high current pulsed electron beam treatments

    Gao Yukui

    2011-01-01

    Surface integrity changes of TA2 pure titanium including surface topography, microstructure and nanohardness distribution along surface layer were investigated by different techniques of low energy high current pulsed electron beam treatments (LEHCPEBTs). The surface topography was characterized by SEM. Moreover, the TEM observation and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to reveal the surface modification mechanism of TA2 pure titanium by LEHCPEBTs. The surface roughness was modified by electron beam treatment and the polishing mechanism was analyzed by studying the cross section microstructure of electron beam treated specimens by SEM and TEM. The results show that the surface finish obtains good polishing quality and there is no phase transformation but the dislocations by LEHCPEBT. Furthermore, the nanohardness in the surface modified layer is improved. The remelt and fine-grain microstructure of surface layer caused by LEHCPEBTs are the main polishing mechanism and the reason of modification of surface topography and the increment in nanohardness is mainly due to the dislocations and fine grains in the modified layer induced by LEHCPEBT.

  14. Electron Beam Generation in Tevatron Electron Lenses

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  15. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  16. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  17. An electron beam induced current study of gallium nitride and diamond materials

    Cropper, A.D.; Moore, D.J.; Scott, C.S.; Green, R.

    1995-01-01

    The continual need for microelectronic devices that operate under severe electronic and environmental conditions (high temperature, high frequency, high power, and radiation tolerance) has sustained research in wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The properties suggest these wide-bandgap semiconductor materials have tremendous potential for military and commercial applications. High frequency bipolar transistors and field effect transistors, diodes, and short wavelength optical devices have been proposed using these materials. Although research efforts involving the study of transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond have made significant advances, much work is still needed to improve the material quality so that the electrophysical behavior of device structures can be further understood and exploited. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements can provide a method of understanding the transport properties in Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Diamond. This technique basically consists of measuring the current or voltage transient response to the drift and diffusion of carriers created by a short-duration pulse of radiation. This method differs from other experimental techniques because it is based on a fast transient electron beam probe created from a high speed, laser pulsed photoemission system

  18. Electron and ion heat transport with lower hybrid current drive and neutral beam injection heating in ASDEX

    Soeldner, F.X.; Pereverzev, G.V.; Bartiromo, R.; Fahrbach, H.U.; Leuterer, F.; Murmann, H.D.; Staebler, A.; Steuer, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    Transport code calculations were made for experiments with the combined operation of lower hybrid current drive and heating and of neutral beam injection heating on ASDEX. Peaking or flattening of the electron temperature profile are mainly explained by modifications of the MHD induced electron heat transport. They originate from current profile changes due to lower hybrid and neutral beam current drive and to contributions from the bootstrap current. Ion heat transport cannot be described by one single model for all heating scenarios. The ion heat conductivity is reduced during lower hybrid heated phases with respect to Ohmic and neutral beam heating. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs

  19. Positron annihilation and thermally stimulated current of electron beam irradiated polyetheretherketone

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Shinyama, Katsuyoshi; Baba, Makoto [Hachinohe Inst. of Tech., Hachinohe, Aomori (Japan); Suzuki, Takenori

    1997-03-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were applied to electron beam irradiated poly(ether-ether-ketone). The lifetime, {tau}{sub 3}, of the ortho-positronium of unirradiated and 5 MGy irradiated specimen became rapidly longer above about 150degC. {tau}{sub 3} of 50 MGy and 100 MGy irradiated specimen was shorter than that of unirradiated one. Thermally stimulated current (TSC) decreased with increasing the dose before voltage application. In the case of voltage application, a TSC peak appeared and the peak value decreased with increased the dose. The correlation between the results of positron annihilation and TSC was investigated. (author)

  20. Calorimetric beam-current integrator

    Osborne, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A single-cup calorimeter for beam-current integration and its associated electronics are described. The design allows beam power up to 120 W and is shown to integrate with an accuracy of 1% over a range of beam energy, current, and power. (orig.)

  1. Interaction of high-current relativistic electron beams with plasma. Physical nature of the phenomenon and its application in microwave electronics

    Rukhadze, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed high-current electron beams with characteristic parameters: electron energy 10 5 -10 7 eV, electron current 10 3 -10 6 A, pulse duration 10 -8 -10 -6 s, beam energy 10 2 -10 6 J and power 10 8 -10 13 W, are widely used in different branches of science and technology such as controlled thermonuclear fusion, relativistic microwave electronics, powerful semiconductors, chemical and gaseous lasers, new principles of heavy-ion acceleration, and long-distance energy transmission. The paper discusses a new branch of science - pulsed high-current electronics, which has its own experimental technique and methods of theoretical analysis. Parts I and II determine what is meant by ''high current'' in an electron beam and calculate the maximum obtainable current values; these calculations are made for the simplest geometrical configurations realizable in practice. Current methods for theoretical analysis of high-current electron beam physics are described, together with classification of current experimental devices for generating such beams according to high-current parameters. The stability of electron beams is discussed and the concept of critical currents is introduced. Part III gives a detailed account of plasma-beam instability which occurs on the interaction of a high-current electron beam with high-density space-limited plasma. The linear and non-linear stages of beam instability are considered. The given theory is used for calculations for amplifiers and microwave generators of electromagnetic radiation. Finally, the experimental achievements in high-current relativistic microwave electronics are reviewed. (author)

  2. Research of transportation efficiency of low-energy high- current electron beam in plasma channel in external magnetic field

    Vagin, E S; Grigoriev, V P

    2015-01-01

    Effective high current (5-20 kA) and low energy (tens of keV) electrons beam transportation is possible only with almost complete charging neutralization. It is also necessary to use quite high current neutralization for elimination beam self-pinching effect. The research is based on the self-consistent mathematical model that takes into account beam and plasma particles dynamic, current and charge neutralization of electron beam and examines the transportation of electron beam into a chamber with low-pressure plasma in magnetic field. A numerical study was conducted using particle in cell (PIC) method. The study was performed with various system parameters: rise time and magnitude of the beam current, gas pressure and plasma density and geometry of the system. Regularities of local virtual cathode field generated by the beam in the plasma channel, as well as ranges of parameters that let transportation beam with minimal losses, depending on the external magnetic field were determined through a series of numerical studies. In addition, the assessment of the impact of the plasma ion mobility during the transition period and during steady beam was performed. (paper)

  3. LANSCE beam current limiter

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  4. Electron-Cloud Simulation and Theory for High-Current Heavy-Ion Beams

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Lee, E; Azevedo, T; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-01-01

    Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary- electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability: (1) We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2) We simulate of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration). One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3) We report first results from a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics

  5. Electron-cloud simulation and theory for high-current heavy-ion beams

    R. H. Cohen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Stray electrons can arise in positive-ion accelerators for heavy-ion fusion or other applications as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize the distinguishing features of electron-cloud issues in heavy-ion-fusion accelerators and a plan for developing a self-consistent simulation capability for heavy-ion beams and electron clouds (also applicable to other accelerators. We also present results from several ingredients in this capability. (1 We calculate the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam-ion loss, which illustrates the importance of retaining ion reflection at the walls. (2 We simulate the effect of specified electron-cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing-mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also have significant impact. We identify an instability associated with a resonance between the beam-envelope “breathing” mode and the electron perturbation. We estimate its growth rate, which is moderate (compared to the reciprocal of a typical pulse duration. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations. (3 We report first results from a long-time-step algorithm for electron dynamics, which holds promise for efficient simultaneous solution of electron and ion dynamics.

  6. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  7. The effect of electron range on electron beam induced current collection and a simple method to extract an electron range for any generation function

    Lahreche, A.; Beggah, Y.; Corkish, R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electron range on electron beam induced current (EBIC) is demonstrated and the problem of the choice of the optimal electron ranges to use with simple uniform and point generation function models is resolved by proposing a method to extract an electron range-energy relationship (ERER). The results show that the use of these extracted electron ranges remove the previous disagreement between the EBIC curves computed with simple forms of generation model and those based on a more realistic generation model. The impact of these extracted electron ranges on the extraction of diffusion length, surface recombination velocity and EBIC contrast of defects is discussed. It is also demonstrated that, for the case of uniform generation, the computed EBIC current is independent of the assumed shape of the generation volume. -- Highlights: → Effect of electron ranges on modeling electron beam induced current is shown. → A method to extract an electron range for simple form of generation is proposed. → For uniform generation the EBIC current is independent of the choice of it shape. → Uses of the extracted electron ranges remove some existing literature ambiguity.

  8. Surface composite nanostructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    Li, M.C.; Hao, S.Z.; Wen, H.; Huang, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on an AZ91 cast magnesium alloy with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm 2 and pulse duration 2.5 μs. The surface microstructure was characterized by optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The surface corrosion property was tested with electrochemical method in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It is found that after 1 pulse of HCPEB treatment, the initial eutectic α phase and Mg 17 Al 12 particles started to dissolve in the surface modified layer of depth ∼15 μm. When using 15 HCPEB pulses, the Al content in surface layer increased noticeably, and the phase structure was modified as composite nanostructures consisted of nano-grained Mg 3.1 Al 0.9 domains surrounded by network of Mg 17 Al 12 phase. The HCPEB treated samples showed an improved corrosion resistance with cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the initial AZ91 alloy.

  9. Finite-element 3D simulation tools for high-current relativistic electron beams

    Humphries, Stanley; Ekdahl, Carl

    2002-08-01

    The DARHT second-axis injector is a challenge for computer simulations. Electrons are subject to strong beam-generated forces. The fields are fully three-dimensional and accurate calculations at surfaces are critical. We describe methods applied in OmniTrak, a 3D finite-element code suite that can address DARHT and the full range of charged-particle devices. The system handles mesh generation, electrostatics, magnetostatics and self-consistent particle orbits. The MetaMesh program generates meshes of conformal hexahedrons to fit any user geometry. The code has the unique ability to create structured conformal meshes with cubic logic. Organized meshes offer advantages in speed and memory utilization in the orbit and field solutions. OmniTrak is a versatile charged-particle code that handles 3D electric and magnetic field solutions on independent meshes. The program can update both 3D field solutions from the calculated beam space-charge and current-density. We shall describe numerical methods for orbit tracking on a hexahedron mesh. Topics include: 1) identification of elements along the particle trajectory, 2) fast searches and adaptive field calculations, 3) interpolation methods to terminate orbits on material surfaces, 4) automatic particle generation on multiple emission surfaces to model space-charge-limited emission and field emission, 5) flexible Child law algorithms, 6) implementation of the dual potential model for 3D magnetostatics, and 7) assignment of charge and current from model particle orbits for self-consistent fields.

  10. Electron-beam-induced current study of small-angle grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon

    Chen, J.; Sekiguchi, T.; Xie, R.; Ahmet, P.; Chikyo, T.; Yang, D.; Ito, S.; Yin, F.

    2005-01-01

    Recombination activity of small-angle grain boundaries (SA GBs) in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) was studied by means of electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. In the as-grown mc-Si, the EBIC contrasts of special Σ and random GBs were weak at both 300 and 100 K, whereas those of SA GBs were weak (<3%) at 300 K and strong (30-40%) at 100 K. In the contaminated mc-Si, SA GBs showed stronger EBIC contrast than Σ and R GBs at 300 K. It is indicated that SA GBs possess high density of shallow levels and are easily contaminated with Fe compared to other GBs

  11. Advanced electron beam techniques

    Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    After 100 years from the time of discovery of electron, we now have many applications of electron beam in science and technology. In this report, we review two important applications of electron beam: electron microscopy and pulsed-electron beam. Advanced electron microscopy techniques to investigate atomic and electronic structures, and pulsed-electron beam for investigating time-resolved structural change are described. (author)

  12. Suitability of high-current standing-wave linac technology for ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation experiments

    Moir, D.C.; Faehl, R.J.; Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Near-term development of the existing PHERMEX standing-wave linac would provide a 40 to 60 MeV electron beam with a current of 3 kA capable of answering a number of fundamental issues concerning endoatmospheric, ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation. Inherent high-repetition rate and multiple-pulse capability would allow alternative propagation scenarios to be investigated. Much of the theoretical expertise required to support the technology development and time-resolved beam propagation experiments presently resides within the Theoretical Applications Division

  13. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    Ekdahl, Carl A.; Abeyta, Epifanio O.; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Jacquez, Edward B.; Mccuistian, Brian T.; Montoya, Nicholas A.; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M.; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A.; Broste, William B.; Carlson, Carl A.; Frayer, Daniel K.; Johnson, Douglas E.; Tom, C.Y.; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C.; Watson, Jim; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 (micro)s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  14. Low current beam techniques

    Saint, A; Laird, J S; Bardos, R A; Legge, G J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T; Sekiguchi, H [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1994-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Low current beam techniques

    Saint, A.; Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T.; Sekiguchi, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1993-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Simulative research on the expansion of cathode plasma in high-current electron beam diode

    Xu Qifu; Liu Lie

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of cathode plasma has long been recognized as a limiting factor in the impedance lifetime of high-current electron beam diode. Realistic modeling of such plasma is of great necessity in order to discuss the dynamics of cathode plasma. Using the method of particle-in-cell, the expansion of cathode plasma is simulated in this paper by a scaled-down diode model. It is found that the formation of cathode plasma increases the current density in the diode. This consequently leads to the decrease of the potential at plasma front. Once the current density has been increased to a certain value, the potential at plasma front would then be equal to or lower than the plasma potential. Then the ions would move towards the anode, and the expansion of cathode plasma is thereby formed. Different factors affecting the plasma expansion velocity are discussed in this paper. It is shown that the decrease of proton genatation rate has the benefit of reducing the plasma expansion velocity.

  17. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Brown, G.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr 34+ and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th 87+ and U 89+ , which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti 20+ through CO 25+ . A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT

  18. Dynamics of a relativistic electron beam in a high-current diode with a knife-edge cathode

    Babykin, V.M.; Gordeev, A.V.; Golovin, G.T.; Korolev, V.D.; Kopchikov, A.V.; Tulupov, M.V.; Chernenko, A.S.; Shuvaev, V.Yu.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of practical applications, e.g., producing discharges in large volumes in order to pump gas lasers and for short x-ray pulses, it is necessary to generate electron beams in megamp range with electron energies from hundreds of kilovolts to several megavolts. It has been possible to obtain high currents (I ± 1 MA) by using diodes with knife-edge cathodes. Knife-edge diodes have an important advantage over the parapotential type because the ion current in them comprises a relatively small fraction of the total current. This is because the electron path in the accelerating gap of knife-edge diodes is quite short in comparison with that in high-current parapotential diodes. From the point of view of applying ribbon-shaped or narrow electron beams, the important problems are in measuring the current-voltage characteristics of the diodes and determining the dynamics of the energy spectrum and the angular spread of the electrons. The generation of an electron beam with a current ∼130 kA and pulse length ∼60 ns is studied. The current-voltage characteristics of knife-edge diodes with various geometries, the dynamics of the angular spread, and the beam structure are studied. As a result of the study of the REB dynamics it is found that the operation of the diode with these experiments can be approximated by a proposed formula which includes the finite thickness of the knife-edge cathode and the motion of the plasma and ions in the discharge gap. Breaking up of the beam into individual current-carrying channels is observed with the characteristic scale ∼1-2 mm. It is noted that for the diode geometry with a knife-edge cathode, when the magnetic field changes sign and passes through zero, an instability can exist which is analogous to the dissipative tearing instability

  19. Overview of Alternative Bunching and Current-shaping Techniques for Low-Energy Electron Beams

    Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Techniques to bunch or shape an electron beam at low energies (E <15 MeV) have important implications toward the realization of table-top radiation sources [1] or to the design of compact multi-user free-electron lasers[2]. This paper provides an overview of alternative methods recently developed including techniques such as wakefield-based bunching, space-charge-driven microbunching via wave-breaking [3], ab-initio shaping of the electron-emission process [4], and phase space exchangers. Practical applications of some of these methods to foreseen free-electron-laser configurations are also briefly discussed [5].

  20. Experiment study on four button electrode used to monitor position of high current electron-beam

    Xu Tiezheng; Wang Huacen; Xie Yutong; Zhang Wenwei

    2004-01-01

    The button electrode is one that widely used in high energy accelerators, such as storage ring, and the button electrode has many merit like high accuracy, high resolution, resisting magnetic field, simple machinery, without magnetic core and low cost, etc. It's helpful that the button electrode is used as the beam position monitor in the linear induction accelerator. The experimental facilities have been designed and set up and it can simulate the beam of linear induction accelerator. The button electrode beam position monitor experiment have been done on the experimental facilities. The result of the experiment prove that the button electrode has an accuracy of 0.5 mm, and can reflect the wave of electron-beam accurately

  1. Harmonics generation of a terahertz wakefield free-electron laser from a dielectric loaded waveguide excited by a direct current electron beam.

    Li, Weiwei; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We propose to generate high-power terahertz (THz) radiation from a cylindrical dielectric loaded waveguide (DLW) excited by a direct-current electron beam with the harmonics generation method. The DLW supports a discrete set of modes that can be excited by an electron beam passing through the structure. The interaction of these modes with the co-propagating electron beam results in micro-bunching and the coherent enhancement of the wakefield radiation, which is dominated by the fundamental mode. By properly choosing the parameters of DLW and beam energy, the high order modes can be the harmonics of the fundamental one; thus, high frequency radiation corresponding to the high order modes will benefit from the dominating bunching process at the fundamental eigenfrequency and can also be coherently excited. With the proposed method, high power THz radiation can be obtained with an easily achievable electron beam and a large DLW structure.

  2. Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction and the Return-Current Formation

    Karlický, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 690, č. 1 (2009), s. 189-197 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030701; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : plasma instabilities * electron beams * solar flares Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 7.364, year: 2009

  3. Effect of external magnetic field on critical current for the onset of virtual cathode oscillations in relativistic electron beams

    Hramov, Alexander; Koronovskii, Alexey; Morozov, Mikhail; Mushtakov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter we research the space charge limiting current value at which the oscillating virtual cathode is formed in the relativistic electron beam as a function of the external magnetic field guiding the beam electrons. It is shown that the space charge limiting (critical) current decreases with growth of the external magnetic field, and that there is an optimal induction value of the magnetic field at which the critical current for the onset of virtual cathode oscillations in the electron beam is minimum. For the strong external magnetic field the space charge limiting current corresponds to the analytical relation derived under the assumption that the motion of the electron beam is one-dimensional [D.J. Sullivan, J.E. Walsh, E. Coutsias, in: V.L. Granatstein, I. Alexeff (Eds.), Virtual Cathode Oscillator (Vircator) Theory, in: High Power Microwave Sources, vol. 13, Artech House Microwave Library, 1987, Chapter 13]. Such behavior is explained by the characteristic features of the dynamics of electron space charge in the longitudinal and radial directions in the drift space at the different external magnetic fields

  4. Relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds

    Füellekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Non-luminous relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds have been detected by the radio signals of low frequency similar to 40-400 kHz which they radiate. The electron beams occur similar to 2-9 ms after positive cloud-to-ground lightning discharges at heights between similar to 22-72 km above...... thunderclouds. Intense positive lightning discharges can also cause sprites which occur either above or prior to the electron beam. One electron beam was detected without any luminous sprite which suggests that electron beams may also occur independently of sprites. Numerical simulations show that beams...... of electrons partially discharge the lightning electric field above thunderclouds and thereby gain a mean energy of similar to 7MeV to transport a total charge of similar to-10mC upwards. The impulsive current similar to 3 x 10(-3) Am-2 associated with relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds...

  5. Study on Nanostructures Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    Bo Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four techniques using high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB were proposed to obtain surface nanostructure of metal and alloys. The first method involves the distribution of several fine Mg nanoparticles on the top surface of treated samples by evaporation of pure Mg with low boiling point. The second technique uses superfast heating, melting, and cooling induced by HCPEB irradiation to refine the primary phase or the second phase in alloys to nanosized uniform distributed phases in the matrix, such as the quasicrystal phase Mg30Zn60Y10 in the quasicrystal alloy Mg67Zn30Y3. The third technique involves the refinement of eutectic silicon phase in hypereutectic Al-15Si alloys to fine particles with the size of several nanometers through solid solution and precipitation refinement. Finally, in the deformation zone induced by HCPEB irradiation, the grain size can be refined to several hundred nanometers, such as the grain size of the hypereutectic Al-15Si alloys in the deformation zone, which can reach ~400 nm after HCPEB treatment for 25 pulses. Therefore, HCPEB technology is an efficient way to obtain surface nanostructure.

  6. The characterization of high quality multicrystalline silicon by the electron beam induced current method

    Chen, J; Sekiguchi, T; Nara, S; Yang, D

    2004-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) manufactured by a multi-stage solidification control casting method has been characterized by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. The average diffusion length of the ingot was over 250 μm, which was much longer than that of conventional mc-Si. The EBIC study revealed that the electrical activities of grain boundaries (GBs) varied with the ingot position due to the impurity contamination level. The main impurity detected was iron. The concentration of iron in the central position was much lower than that at the bottom and top positions. GBs in the central position showed no significant EBIC contrast at 300 K, suggesting low contamination level. GBs in the top and bottom positions, however, showed strong EBIC contrast at 300 K, suggesting high contamination level. At 100 K, a denuded zone with bright contrast developed around GBs in the top and bottom positions. The existence of the denuded zone suggested that impurities were gettered at the GBs. It was considered that the variation of the diffusion length in the ingot was related to the variation of recombination activities of GBs in the different positions, which mainly depended on the impurity contamination

  7. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device

  8. Chaos control in an electron beam with the supercritical current in the hydrodynamic model of the Pierce diode

    Koronovskij, A.A.; Rempen, I.S.; Khramov, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of controlling the chaos in the electron beam with the supercritical current in the hydrodynamic model of the Pierce diode through the continuous feedback; the methodology of controlling the chaotic dynamics through stabilization of the unstable equilibrium state in the distributed active medium is proposed [ru

  9. Electron beam instabilities in gyrotron beam tunnels

    Pedrozzi, M.; Alberti, S.; Hogge, J.P.; Tran, M.Q.; Tran, T.M.

    1997-10-01

    Electron beam instabilities occurring in a gyrotron electron beam can induce an energy spread which might significantly deteriorate the gyrotron efficiency. Three types of instabilities are considered to explain the important discrepancy found between the theoretical and experimental efficiency in the case of quasi-optical gyrotrons (QOG): the electron cyclotron maser instability, the Bernstein instability and the Langmuir instability. The low magnetic field gradient in drift tubes of QOG makes that the electron cyclotron maser instability can develop in the drift tube at very low electron beam currents. Experimental measurements show that with a proper choice of absorbing structures in the beam tunnel, this instability can be suppressed. At high beam currents, the electrostatic Bernstein instability can induce a significant energy spread at the entrance of the interaction region. The induced energy spread scales approximately linearly with the electron beam density and for QOG one observes that the beam density is significantly higher than the beam density of an equivalent cylindrical cavity gyrotron. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  10. Thermally stimulated current of electron beam irradiation cross-linked polyethylene, (3)

    Aihara, Mitsugu; Aida, Fumio; Shiono, Takeo

    1984-01-01

    In the past, electron-beam irradiation was for the most part applied to rather thin insulation electric cables. Considering application to thick insulation, high voltage power cables (6.6 kV or more), the authors experimented on the charge accumulation and crystallizing properties of polyethylene due to irradiation, using three differently crystallizing samples, high and low density polyethylenes (HDPE and LDPE) and straight chain low density polyethylene (LLDPE), and have obtained some findings. Those are summarized as follows. (1) The crystallizing properties (crystallinity, the size of spherulite, etc.) of polyethylene varied according to the cooling condition, and affected the thermally stimulated current (TSC). (2) In HDPE and LDPE, the behaviour of crystallization differed. In HDPE, fine crystals decreased, and spherulites significantly grew in slow cooling, but in LDPE, the generation of fine crystals and the growth of spherulites simultaneously progressed. (3) The TSC peak area for HDPE was scarcely affected by slow cooling, but that for LDPE greatly increased. (4) The TSC of irradiated polyethylene showed peaks corresponding to the melting temperatures of fine crystals and spherulites when collecting voltage Vc was lowered. (5) The above facts suggest that fine crystals and spherulites took part as charge trap sites, but the aspect of participation was different in HDPE and LDPE. (6) LLDPE has the properties of both HDPE and LDPE in view of the crystallinity, charge accumulation was small, and it was hard to be affected by cooling condition. Accordingly, it seemed to be an interesting material as the PE for irradiation. A differential scanning calorimeter and laser small angle scattering method were used for the analysis of the measured results of TSC. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. Two-section linear direct-current accelerator of 1.2 MeV electrons. Mean beam current of 50 mA

    Alimov, A.S.; Ermakov, D.I.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Shvedunov, V.I.; Sakharov, V.P.; Trower, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental results, obtained by simulation, creation and start-up of the two-section linear electron accelerator, are presented. The following beam parameters: beam current of 49 mA, mean energy of 1.2 MeV, of 59 kV, normalized emittance of 11 mm mrad are determined on the basis of the data on the beam dynamics simulation and the accelerating structure optimization. Special attention is paid to the choice of the version of the SHF-supply system of the two-section accelerator. The version of the SHF-supply system, based on the sections phasing, operating in the auto-oscillation model by means of the synchronizing signal from the feedback chain of the first section into the feedback chain of the second section, is considered. The electron beam parameters on the accelerator outlet (beam current - 44 mA, beam energy - 1.15 MeV, beam efficiency - 50.6 kW) proved to be close to the simulation results [ru

  12. Electron Beam Diagnostics in Plasmas Based on Electron Beam Ionization

    Leonhardt, Darrin; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Over the last few years, electron beam ionization has been shown to be a viable generator of high density plasmas with numerous applications in materials modification. To better understand these plasmas, we have fielded electron beam diagnostics to more clearly understand the propagation of the beam as it travels through the background gas and creates the plasma. These diagnostics vary greatly in sophistication, ranging from differentially pumped systems with energy selective elements to metal 'hockey pucks' covered with thin layers of insulation to electrically isolate the detector from the plasma but pass high energy beam electrons. Most importantly, absolute measurements of spatially resolved beam current densities are measured in a variety of pulsed and continuous beam sources. The energy distribution of the beam current(s) will be further discussed, through experiments incorporating various energy resolving elements such as simple grids and more sophisticated cylindrical lens geometries. The results are compared with other experiments of high energy electron beams through gases and appropriate disparities and caveats will be discussed. Finally, plasma parameters are correlated to the measured beam parameters for a more global picture of electron beam produced plasmas.

  13. Control electron beam oscillation regimes in Pierce diode with overcritical current

    Rempen, I.S.; Khramov, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the delayed feedback on the complex oscillation regimes in the electron flux with the overcritical current in the Pierce diode is studied. The possibility of controlling the oscillation regimes through changing the feedback parameters is shown. The finite-dimensional model, describing the behavior of the electron flux in the Pierce diode hydrodynamic model, is constructed. Its behavior under the effect of the delayed feedback is studied [ru

  14. Current status of electron beam processing applications and the latest accelerator technologies in Japan

    Hoshi, Yasuhisa

    1998-01-01

    Electron Beam (EB) processing has been increasing in popularity as a cross-linking process since the beginning of its industrial use. Examples are heat resistance improvement of electric wires, high quality foamed polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), automotive tire manufacturing and heat shrinkable products. EB is also used in the tire manufacturing process as a pre-vulcanisation of rubber sheet before forming process. Cross-linking of electric wire insulators is the most popular industrial application of electron beam accelerators in Japan. EB cross-linked wires are widely used in electrical appliances and automotive wire harnesses. Curing of inks or coating is a promising application of low energy EB. EB cure is often compared with Ultra-Violet (UV) curing. Both has a common advantage compared with a conventional heat curing process such as no solvent requirement. A typical advantage is that no initiators are required to start curing process. EB can also be used to remove SO 2 and NO x from coal flue gas. This paper reports some of these applications and discusses the latest equipment design. (author)

  15. Coherent radiation from high-current electron beams of linear accelerators and its applications

    Okuda, Shuichi; Takanaka, Makoto; Nakamura, Mitsumi; Kato, Ryukou; Takahashi, Toshiharu; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Taniguchi, Ryouichi; Kojima, Takao

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of the far-infrared light source using the coherent radiation emitted from a high-energy short electron bunch have been investigated. The coherent radiation has a continuous spectrum in a submillimeter to millimeter wavelength range and the brightness is relatively high. The spectrum of the radiation is determined by the longitudinal form factor of the electron bunch. The operational conditions of a high-current linear accelerator have been optimized using an electron bunch shape monitor. The coherent transition radiation light source has been applied to absorption spectroscopy for liquid water and to an imaging experiment for a leaf of rose

  16. Method of measuring the current density distribution and emittance of pulsed electron beams

    Schilling, H.B.

    1979-07-01

    This method of current density measurement employs an array of many Faraday cups, each cup being terminated by an integrating capacitor. The voltages of the capacitors are subsequently displayed on a scope, thus giving the complete current density distribution with one shot. In the case of emittance measurements, a moveable small-diameter aperture is inserted at some distance in front of the cup array. Typical results with a two-cathode, two-energy electron source are presented. (orig.)

  17. Creation of excitations and defects in insulating materials by high-current-density electron beams of nanosecond pulse duration

    Vaisburd, D.I.; Evdokimov, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is concerned with fast and ultra-fast processes in insulating materials under the irradiation by a high-current-density electron beam of a nanosecond pulse duration. The inflation process induced by the interaction of a high-intensity electron beam with a dielectric is examined. The ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes is one of the most important stages of the process. Ionization-passive electrons and holes make the main contribution to many fast processes with a characteristic time in the range 10 -14 /10 -12 s: high-energy conductivity, intraband luminescence, etc. A technique was developed for calculation of the ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes in a dielectric prior to electron-phonon relaxation. The following experimental effects are considered: intraband luminescence, coexistence of intraband electron luminescence and band-to-band hole luminescence in CsI, high energy conductivity; generation of mechanical fields and their interaction with cracks and dislocations. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Application of magnetically insulated transmission lines for high current, high voltage electron beam accelerators

    Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Frost, C.A.; Poukey, J.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines (MITL) adders have been used successfully in a number of Sandia accelerators such as HELIA, HERMES III, and SABRE. Most recently the authors used a MITL adder in the RADLAC/SMILE electron beam accelerator to produce high quality, small radius (r b < 2 cm), 11 to 15 MeV, 50 to 100-kA beams with a small transverse velocity v perpendicular/c = β perpendicular ≤ 0.1. In RADLAC/SMILE, a coaxial MITL passed through the eight, 2 MV vacuum envelopes. The MITL summed the voltages of all eight feeds to a single foilless diode. The experimental results are in good agreement with code simulations. The authors' success with the MITL technology led them to investigate the application to higher energy accelerator designs. They have a conceptual design for a cavity-fed MITL that sums the voltages from 100 identical, inductively-isolated cavities. Each cavity is a toroidal structure that is driven simultaneously by four 8-ohm pulse-forming lines, providing a 1-MV voltage pulse to each of the 100 cavities. The point design accelerator is 100 MV, 500 kA, with a 30-50-ns FWHM output pulse

  19. Application of Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines for high current, high voltage electron beam accelerators

    Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Frost, C.A.; Poukey, J.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines (MITL) adders have been used successfully in a number of Sandia accelerators such as HELIA, HERMES III, and SABRE. Most recently we used at MITL adder in the RADLAC/SMILE electron beam accelerator to produce high quality, small radius (r ρ < 2 cm), 11 to 15 MeV, 50 to 100-kA beams with a small transverse velocity v perpendicular/c = β perpendicular ≤ 0.1. In RADLAC/SMILE, a coaxial MITL passed through the eight, 2 MV vacuum envelopes. The MITL summed the voltages of all eight feeds to a single foilless diode. The experimental results are in good agreement with code simulations. Our success with the MITL technology led us to investigate the application to higher energy accelerator designs. We have a conceptual design for a cavity-fed MITL that sums the voltages from 100 identical, inductively-isolated cavities. Each cavity is a toroidal structure that is driven simultaneously by four 8-ohm pulse-forming lines, providing a 1-MV voltage pulse to each of the 100 cavities. The point design accelerator is 100 MV, 500 kA, with a 30--50 ns FWHM output pulse. 10 refs

  20. Application of magnetically insulated transmission lines for high current, high voltage electron beam accelerators

    Shope, S. L.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Frost, C. A.; Poukey, J. W.; Turman, B. N.

    Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines (MITL) adders were used successfully in a number of Sandia accelerators such as HELIA, HERMES III, and SABRE. Most recently we used at MITL adder in the RADLAC/SMILE electron beam accelerator to produce high quality, small radius (r(sub rho) less than 2 cm), 11 - 15 MeV, 50 - 100-kA beams with a small transverse velocity v(perpendicular)/c = beta(perpendicular) less than or equal to 0.1. In RADLAC/SMILE, a coaxial MITL passed through the eight, 2 MV vacuum envelopes. The MITL summed the voltages of all eight feeds to a single foilless diode. The experimental results are in good agreement with code simulations. Our success with the MITL technology led us to investigate the application to higher energy accelerator designs. We have a conceptual design for a cavity-fed MITL that sums the voltages from 100 identical, inductively-isolated cavities. Each cavity is a toroidal structure that is driven simultaneously by four 8-ohm pulse-forming lines, providing a 1-MV voltage pulse to each of the 100 cavities. The point design accelerator is 100 MV, 500 kA, with a 30 - 50 ns FWHM output pulse.

  1. Electron beam welding

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  2. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e - p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb -1 collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy are presented for Q 2 >200 GeV 2 . The double-differential cross-section d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 is presented in the kinematic range 280 2 and 0.015< x<0.65. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  3. Surface modification of TC4 titanium alloy by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) with different pulsed energy densities

    Gao, Yu-kui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The hardness changes were determined by nanoindention method. •The surface integrity changes were investigated by different techniques. •The mechanism was analyzed based on AFM and TEM investigations. -- Abstract: Surface changes including surface topography and nanohardness distribution along surface layer were investigated for TC4 titanium alloy by different energy densities of high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB). The surface topography was characterized by SEM and AFM, and cross-sectional TEM observation was performed to reveal the surface modification mechanism of TC4 titanium alloy by HCPEB. The surface roughness was modified by HCPEB and the polishing mechanism was analyzed by studying the cross section microstructure of electron beam treated specimens by SEM. The fine grain structure inherited from the rapid solidification of the melted layer as well as the strain hardening of the sub-surface are two of the factors responsible the increase in nanohardness

  4. On 2D electron cloud dynamics in high-current plasma lens for ion beam focusing

    Goncharov, A. A.; Litovko, I. V.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Zadorozhny, V. F.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we are dealing with the appear the stable existence and dynamics of 2-D electron vortical structures in crossed electric and magnetic fields. The collective interactions in which the electron motion is nonlinear and ion motion is linear, is concerned. By using of the kinetic equation and the catastrophe theory approach we deduce an origin of the vortical structures. The nonlinear differential equation for the electric potential in a hydrodynamical approximation is obtained. It describes a drift motion of the electrons in oscillating electric fields of the high-current plasma lens(PL), arising due to presence the principal unremoval radical gradient of the axical component of the magnetic field. It was shown that the considered equations have contained the solutions in the form of the single vortical structures. The stability of the structures are given

  5. Initial Beam Dynamics Simulations of a High-Average-Current Field-Emission Electron Source in a Superconducting RadioFrequency Gun

    Mohsen, O. [Northern Illinois U.; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Kephart, R. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-01-05

    High-power electron beams are sought-after tools in support to a wide array of societal applications. This paper investigates the production of high-power electron beams by combining a high-current field-emission electron source to a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity. We especially carry out beam-dynamics simulations that demonstrate the viability of the scheme to form $\\sim$ 300 kW average-power electron beam using a 1+1/2-cell SRF gun.

  6. High current electron beam acceleration in dielectric-filled RF cavities

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in radio frequency (RF) cavities is a widely used mode in high energy accelerators. Advantages include very high accelerating gradients and very stable phase control. A traditional limitation for such acceleration has been their use for intense, high current beam generation. This constraint arises from the inability to store a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the cavity and from loading effects of the beam on the cavity. The authors have studied a simple modification to transcend these limitations. Following Humphries and Huang, they have conducted analytic and numerical investigations of RF accelerator cavities in which a high dielectric constant material, such as water, replaces most of the cavity volume. This raises the stored energy in a cavity of given dimensions by a factor var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 . For a water fill, var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ∼ 80, depending on the frequency. This introduction of high dielectric constant material into the cavity reduces the resonant frequencies by a factor of (var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ) 1/2 . This reduced operating frequency mans that existing high efficiency power supplies, at lower frequencies, can be used for an accelerator

  7. Beam electron microprobe

    Stoller, D; Muterspaugh, M W; Pollock, R E

    1999-01-01

    A beam profile monitor based on the deflection of a probe electron beam by the electric field of a stored, electron-cooled proton beam is described and first results are presented. Electrons were transported parallel to the proton beam by a uniform longitudinal magnetic field. The probe beam may be slowly scanned across the stored beam to determine its intensity, position, and size. Alternatively, it may be scanned rapidly over a narrow range within the interior of the stored beam for continuous observation of the changing central density during cooling. Examples of a two dimensional charge density profile obtained from a raster scan and of a cooling alignment study illustrate the scope of measurements made possible by this device.

  8. Electron beam welding

    Gabbay, M.

    1972-01-01

    The bead characteristics and the possible mechanisms of the electron beam penetration are presented. The different welding techniques are exposed and the main parts of an electron beam welding equipment are described. Some applications to nuclear, spatial and other industries are cited [fr

  9. Electron beam simulation applicators

    Purdy, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A system for simulating electron beam treatment portals using low-temperature melting point alloy is described. Special frames having the same physical dimensions as the electron beam applicators used on the Varian Clinac 20 linear accelerator were designed and constructed

  10. APPARATUS FOR ELECTRON BEAM HEATING CONTROL

    Jones, W.H.; Reece, J.B.

    1962-09-18

    An improved electron beam welding or melting apparatus is designed which utilizes a high voltage rectifier operating below its temperature saturation region to decrease variations in electron beam current which normally result from the gas generated in such apparatus. (AEC)

  11. Modified electron beam induced current technique for in(Ga)As/InAsSb superlattice infrared detectors

    Yoon, N.; Reyner, C. J.; Ariyawansa, G.; Duran, J. M.; Scheihing, J. E.; Mabon, J.; Wasserman, D.

    2017-08-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements provide a powerful tool for characterizing semiconductor based materials and devices. By measuring the current generated by the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), EBIC allows us to extract the minority carrier diffusion length (L) and the surface recombination velocity to diffusivity ratio (S/D) of a material. When combined with information on minority carrier lifetime (τ), for instance from time-resolved photoluminescence measurements, the minority carrier mobility of the material can be extracted. However, the EBIC technique relies heavily on the accurate modeling of the carrier generation and collection process. Traditionally, this was achieved using a combination of empirical analytical expressions (and later Monte Carlo simulations) for carrier generation and analytical diffusion/recombination expressions for carrier collection. This approach introduces significant uncertainties into the extracted material parameters. Here, we present a numerical approach to EBIC modeling which improves the spatial resolution of our model, while also retaining information regarding the relative EBIC signal as a function of incident beam energies and currents. We apply this technique to investigate the temperature dependent minority carrier mobility of InAs/InAsSb and InGaAs/InAsSb strained layer superlattice infrared detectors and compare our results to the values obtained using external quantum efficiency measurements of the same samples. Our approach not only allows for an improvement in the uncertainty of the extracted material parameters, but also offers insight into the material and device behavior as a function of nonequilibrium carrier concentration. The technique presented here offers potentially improved characterization of not only infrared detectors, but a range of semiconductor-based devices.

  12. Electron-beam lithography

    Harriott, L.; Liddle, A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron beams to write features on silicon wafers. Recent advances in electron beam lithography, as it is known, could enable this technology to be used for the mass manufacture of silicon chips. The validation of space-charge optimization and evaluation of printing techniques is underway. (UK)

  13. Electron beam lithography

    Harriott, L.; Liddle, A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron beams to write features on silicon wafers. Recent advances in electron beam lithography, as it is known, could enable this technology to be used for the mass manufacture of silicon chips. The validation of space-charge optimization and evaluation of printing techniques is underway. 5 figs

  14. A beam position monitor for low current dc beams

    Adderley, P.; Barry, W.; Heefner, J.; Kloeppel, P.; Rossmanith, R.; Wise, M.; Jachim, S.

    1989-01-01

    The 4 GeV recirculating linac, CEBAF, if presently under construction and will produce a CW beam with average current between.1 and 200 μA. In order to measure beam position, the beam current will be amplitude modulated at a frequency of 10 MHz. The modulation is detected by an inductive loop type monitor with electronics sensitive only to the modulation frequency. The first test with beam from the CEBAF injector indicate that beam position can be measured with an accuracy of .1 mm at a modulated beam current of 1 μA. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab

  15. Ionization and breakdown of a low-density gas by a low-current nonrelativistic electron beam

    Alanakyan, Yu.R.; Shternov, N.P.

    1991-01-01

    In the present paper the authors study a plasma formed near a steady-state electron beam traveling in an unbounded low-pressure gas. Beam parameters below and at the breakdown threshold are considered, and the threshold beam parameters corresponding to gas breakdown with formation of a beam-plasma discharge are calculated. Theoretical studies of electron beam propagation in an unbounded gas are of interest in connection with rocket-borne atmospheric experiments laboratory investigations, and observations of natural phenomena in the upper atmosphere (aurora borealis and related phenomena)

  16. Current status of electron beam processing applications and accelerator technology in India

    Sarma, K.S.S.; Lavale, D.S.; Sabharwal, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Electron Beam (EB) processing is now a well established technology world over in a few specific sections of the industry, particularly the polymer industry. The actual use of the technology however is dependent upon the specific socioeconomic needs of the individual country. In India, an industrial type EB accelerator has been operative since 1988 at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. This 2 MeV, 20 kW machine is being utilized to develop and optimize process and material process techniques for research, development and industry in the fields viz., crosslinking, degradation and grafting of polymers; color enhancement in precious and semi-precious stones, lifetime control in semi-conductor devices; food irradiation. Some of these processes have developed into products that are now being carried out on regular commercial basis, meeting the requirements of the Indian industry. These include crosslinked high temperature PE 'O' rings, wire and cable insulation, heat shrinkable tubes; micro-fine PTFE powder, degraded viscose rayon pulp and color diamonds, With the collaboration of Indian cable industry, EB crosslinkable insulation formulations were developed. Suitable irradiation parameters and techniques have been studied, optimized and standardized. Over 100 km length of cables based on PE, PVC and elastomer blends has been irradiated and the results were found to be very encouraging. Since the main parameters to be monitored in the radiation processing is the absorbed dose and its uniformity in the product, dose evaluation and optimization hb been carried out specific to the process and the product under treatment. EB dosimetry based on the graphite calorimetry, thin film and alanine powder dosimeters has been standardized and being used in the facility for dose evaluation and optimization studies. An endless stainless steel mesh conveyor is available in the facility to carry out product irradiation. An eight type cable irradiation gadget has been

  17. Electron beam brightness with field immersed emission

    Boyd, J.K.; Neil, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    The beam quality or brightness of an electron beam produced with field immersed emission is studied with two models. First, an envelope formulation is used to determine the scaling of brightness with current, magnetic field and cathode radius, and examine the equilibrium beam radius. Second, the DPC computer code is used to calculate the brightness of two electron beam sources

  18. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    Trushnikov, D. N., E-mail: trdimitr@yandex.ru [The department for Applied Physics, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Mladenov, G. M., E-mail: gmmladenov@abv.bg; Koleva, E. G., E-mail: eligeorg@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Shose, 1784, Sofia (Bulgaria); Technology Centre of Electron Beam and Plasma Technologies and Techniques, 68-70 Vrania, ap.10, Banishora,1309, Sofia (Bulgaria); Belenkiy, V. Ya., E-mail: mtf@pstu.ru; Varushkin, S. V., E-mail: stepan.varushkin@mail.ru [The department for Welding Production and Technology of Constructional Materials, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup −2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  19. MODULATED PLASMA ELECTRON BEAMS

    Stauffer, L. H.

    1963-08-15

    Techniques have been developed for producing electron beams of two amperes or more, from a plasma within a hollow cathode. Electron beam energies of 20 kilovolts are readily obtained and power densities of the order of 10,000 kilowatts per square inch can be obtained with the aid of auxiliary electromagnetic focusing. An inert gas atmosphere of a few microns pressure is used to initiate and maintain the beam. Beam intensity increases with both gas pressure and cathode potential but may be controlled by varying the potential of an internal electrode. Under constant pressure and cathode potential the beam intensity may be varied over a wide range by adjusting the potential of the internal control electrode. The effects of cathode design on the volt-ampere characteristics of the beam and the design of control electrodes are described. Also, performance data in both helium and argon are given. A tentative theory of the origin of electrons and of beam formation is proposed. Applications to vacuum metallurgy and to electron beam welding are described and illustrated. (auth)

  20. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin, E-mail: maxin@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Ta alloying layer are fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam. • Nano-scaled TaC precipitates forms within the δ-Fe grain after tempering treatment. • The mean diameter of TaC particles is about 5–8 nm. • The hardness of alloying layer increased by over 50% after formation of nano-scaled TaC particle. - Abstract: In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5–8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  1. Digitally compensated beam current transformer

    Kesselman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is being built by a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors (BCMs) will be used to record the current of H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60A fully accumulated in the Ring and dumped to the load as a single pulse in the Ring to Beam Target (RTBT). The time structure of these beams ranges from 645 ns 'mini' bunches at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 ms long macro-pulse. The requirements for the BCMs will depend upon their location within the system. The need to measure individual mini-pulses, examine the characteristics of the chopper edge, as well as the longer average current pulse of the macropulse, or long duration pulses during Linac tuning place wide requirements upon the response of current transformers. To obtain the desired accuracy and resolution, current transformers must have <1 ns rise time and droops of 0.1%/ms. This places a significant design burden on the current transformer; such a design is almost impossible to achieve. Extremely large expensive cores are needed to meet the low droop, while leakage inductance increases with size, thereby reducing the achievable rise time. In this paper, I discuss a digital compensation approach [M. Kesselman, Spallation neutron source beam current monitor electronics, PAC2001 June 18-22, 2001, Chicago, IL.] that extends the lower cut-off frequency of the current transformer, optimized for high frequency response, so that it can be used in this application with improvements in droop of the order of 1000:1. Transformer saturation (current-time product) is a separate issue and the transformer must be designed to handle the current-time product of the signal to assure it does not saturate

  2. Surface Nano crystallization of 3Cr13 Stainless Steel Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam Irradiation

    Han, Z.; Zou, H.; Wang, Z.; Ji, I.; Cai, J.; Guan, Q.

    2013-01-01

    The nanocrystalline surface was produced on 3Cr13 martensite stainless steel surface using high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) technique. The structures of the nano crystallized surface were characterized by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Two nano structures consisting of fine austenite grains (50-150 nm) and very fine carbides precipitates are formed in melted surface layer after multiple bombardments via dissolution of carbides and crater eruption. It is demonstrated that the dissolution of the carbides and the formation of the supersaturated Fe (C) solid solution play a determining role on the microstructure evolution. Additionally, the formation of fine austenite structure is closely related to the thermal stresses induced by the HCPEB irradiation. The effects of both high carbon content and high value of stresses increase the stability of the austenite, which leads to the complete suppression of martensitic transformation.

  3. High peak current operation of x-ray free-electron laser multiple beam lines by suppressing coherent synchrotron radiation effects

    Hara, Toru; Kondo, Chikara; Inagaki, Takahiro; Togawa, Kazuaki; Fukami, Kenji; Nakazawa, Shingo; Hasegawa, Taichi; Morimoto, Osamu; Yoshioka, Masamichi; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Otake, Yuji; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2018-04-01

    The parallel operation of multiple beam lines is an important means to expand the opportunity of user experiments at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facilities. At SPring-8 Angstrom free-electron laser (SACLA), the multi-beam-line operation had been tested using two beam lines, but transverse coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects at a dogleg beam transport severely limited the laser performance. To suppress the CSR effects, a new beam optics based on two double bend achromat (DBA) structures was introduced for the dogleg. After the replacement of the beam optics, high peak current bunches of more than 10 kA are now stably transported through the dogleg and the laser pulse output is increased by a factor of 2-3. In the multi-beam-line operation of SACLA, the electron beam parameters, such as the beam energy and peak current, can be adjusted independently for each beam line. Thus the laser output can be optimized and wide spectral tunability is ensured for all beam lines.

  4. Applying the computer code ''beam scanning' for obtaining the electron beam energy spectrum and monitoring the beam scanning system with a faraday cup and edge current sensors

    Bystrov, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    The results of experiments simulation, obtained in the development of technique for controlling the parameters of the electron beam in a compact radiation sterilization installation are presented. Calculations were performed with a help of a computer code ''BEAM SCANNING'', developed in MRTI. Proposed a method to obtain the spectrum of the electron beam by simulation the experiments in which a Faraday cup waveforms were measured. Preliminary results are presented. Also the results of the experiments and calculations obtained in the development of the amplitude angle sensors are presented. The experiments for the beam irradiation of lead plates proposed as current sensors were modeled. Results are presented in comparison with experimental data. Also are presented the simulation results for the device designed to control scanning system.

  5. Electron beams and applications

    Haouat, G.; Couillaud, C.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the physical properties of the ELSA-linac electron beam are presented. They include measurements of the characteristic beam parameter and analyzes of the beam transport using simulation codes. The aim of these studies is to determine the best conditions for production of intense and very short electron bunches and to optimize the transport of space-charge dominated beams. Precise knowledge of the transport dynamics allows to produce beams with the required characteristics for light production in Free-Electron Laser (FEL), and to give a good description of energy-transfer phenomena between electrons and photons in the wriggler. The particular features of ELSA authorize studies of high-intensity, high-brightness beam properties, especially the halo surrounding the dense core of the electron bunches, which is formed by the space charge effects. It is also shown that the ELSA facility is well suited for the fabrication of very short γ and X-rays sources for applied research in nuclear and plasma physics, or for time response studies of fast detectors. (author)

  6. 2D imaging X-ray diagnostic for measuring the current density distribution in a wide-area electron beam produced in a multiaperture diode with plasma cathode

    Kurkuchekov, V.; Kandaurov, I.; Trunev, Y.

    2018-05-01

    A simple and inexpensive X-ray diagnostic tool was designed for measuring the cross-sectional current density distribution in a low-relativistic pulsed electron beam produced in a source based on an arc-discharge plasma cathode and multiaperture diode-type electron optical system. The beam parameters were as follows: Uacc = 50–110 kV, Ibeam = 20–100 A, τbeam = 0.1–0.3 ms. The beam effective diameter was ca. 7 cm. Based on a pinhole camera, the diagnostic allows one to obtain a 2D profile of electron beam flux distribution on a flat metal target in a single shot. The linearity of the diagnostic system response to the electron flux density was established experimentally. Spatial resolution of the diagnostic was also estimated in special test experiments. The optimal choice of the main components of the diagnostic technique is discussed.

  7. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280

  8. Particle-in-cell simulation of electron trajectories and irradiation uniformity in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping, E-mail: aplpwang@hit.edu.cn; Zhou, Guangxue; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The transmission process of electrons and irradiation uniformity was simulated. • Influence of the irradiation parameters on irradiation uniformity are discussed. • High irradiation uniformity can be obtained in a wide processing window. - Abstract: In order to study electron trajectories in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) source based on carbon fiber bunches, the transmission process of electrons emitted from the annular cathode was simulated using a particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). The simulation results show that the intense flow of the electrons emitted from the annular cathode are expanded during the transmission process, and the uniformity of the electron distribution is improved in the transportation process. The irradiation current decreases with the irradiation distance and the pressure, and increases with the negative voltage. In addition, when the irradiation distance and the cathode voltage are larger than 40 mm and −15 kV, respectively, a uniform irradiation current distribution along the circumference of the anode can be obtained. The simulation results show that good irradiation uniformity of circular components can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  9. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  10. Formation Mechanism of Micropores on the Surface of Pure Aluminum Induced by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam Irradiation

    Zou Yang; Cai Jie; Wan Ming-Zhen; Lv Peng; Guan Qing-Feng

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of micropores formed on the surface of polycrystalline pure aluminum under high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation is explained. It is discovered that dispersed micropores with sizes of 0.1–1 μm on the irradiated surface of pure aluminum can be successfully fabricated after HCPEB irradiation. The dominant formation mechanism of the surface micropores should be attributed to the formation of supersaturation vacancies within the near surface during the HCPEB irradiation and the migration of vacancies along grain boundaries and/or dislocations towards the irradiated surface. It is expected that the HCPEB technique will become a new method for the rapid synthesis of surface porous materials. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  11. Thermal-mechanical simulation of high-current pulsed electron beam surface modification process of pure aluminum

    Zou Jianxin; Qin Ying; Wu Aimin; Hao Shengzhi; Wang Xiaogang; Dong Chuang

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical physics model is established to describe the surface modification process of High Current Pulsed Electron Beams (HCPEB) of pure aluminum alloy. Computer simulation is used to reveal the phenomena of fast heating and cooling, melting, solidification, evaporation, and thermal stress wave associated with the HCPEB bombardment. The calculated melting depth is about 1-10 μm, which is close to the experimental results. The evaporated layer is at nanometer level, which can be omitted in the calculation of temperature field. The thermal stress wave, though as weak as about 0.1 MPa in peak amplitude (proportional to pulsed energy density), has strong impacts on material's structure and properties. (authors)

  12. Plural beam electron gun assembly

    Stratton, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    The invention relates to a cathode ray tube plural-beam-in-line bi-potential electron gun assembly, having applied beam currents of differing levels, manifests structurally modified gun structures to effect focused beam landings at the screen that are evidenced as substantially equi-sized spots thereby providing improved resolution and brightness of the screen imagery. The structural changes embody modifications of the related focusing and accelerator electrodes of the respective guns to provide a partial telescoping arrangement for effecting the discrete placement, forming and shielding of the final focusing lenses. The three lenses so formed are in different planes in partial overlapping axial relationship

  13. Plasma simulation by macroscale, electromagnetic particle code and its application to current-drive by relativistic electron beam injection

    Tanaka, M.; Sato, T.

    1985-01-01

    A new implicit macroscale electromagnetic particle simulation code (MARC) which allows a large scale length and a time step in multi-dimensions is described. Finite mass electrons and ions are used with relativistic version of the equation of motion. The electromagnetic fields are solved by using a complete set of Maxwell equations. For time integration of the field equations, a decentered (backward) finite differencing scheme is employed with the predictor - corrector method for small noise and super-stability. It is shown both in analytical and numerical ways that the present scheme efficiently suppresses high frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in a plasma, and that it accurately reproduces low frequency waves such as ion acoustic waves, Alfven waves and fast magnetosonic waves. The present numerical scheme has currently been coded in three dimensions for application to a new tokamak current-drive method by means of relativistic electron beam injection. Some remarks of the proper macroscale code application is presented in this paper

  14. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    Nayak, B., E-mail: biswaranjan.nayak1@gmail.com; Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K. [Accelerator and Pulsed Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); DasGupta, K. [Accelerator and Pulsed Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Beam Technology Development Group, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-01-15

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ∼10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  15. Electron beam processing system

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam Processing Systems (EPS) are used as useful and powerful tools in many industrial application fields such as the production of cross-linked wire, rubber tire, heat shrinkable film and tubing, curing, degradation of polymers, sterilization and environmental application. In this paper, the feature and application fields, the selection of machine ratings and safety measures of EPS will be described. (author)

  16. About the influence of phase mixing process and current neutralization on the resistive sausage instability dynamics of a relativistic electron beam

    Kolesnikov, E. K.; Manuilov, A. S.; Petrov, V. S.; Zelensky, A. G.

    2018-05-01

    The resistive sausage instability of the relativistic electron beam in dense gas-plasma medium in the case of the generation of equilibrium return plasma current is investigated. In this situation the eigenvalue equation of this instability is obtained. The stabilizing and destabilizing effects of the phase mixing and generation of the return plasma current respectively have been shown.

  17. Magnetic spectrograph with a semicircular focusing for studies on the energy distribution of a high-current relativistic electron beam

    Gosteva, T.S.; Zablotskaya, G.R.; Ivanov, B.A.; Kolyubakin, S.A.; Chernobrovin, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    Specific features of a magnetic spectrograph with a semicircular focusing are described; the spectrograph has been designed to study, using the REP-5 pulsed accelerator, the energy spectra of electrons with a current of 50 kA, pulse duration of 20 ns in the energy range 0.2 to 3 MeV. The beam has been transported in a drift chamber where the air pressure varies from 10 -3 to 40 torr. The chamber is 50 cm long and 12 cm in diameter. The spectrograph vacuum chamber is made in the form of a plane rectangular box with a degassing fitting. The uniform magnetic field in the spectrograph gap is provided with permanent magnets (ferrite-barium plates). The collimator and the chamber walls on which the magnets are located, are made of low-carbon electrotechnical steel. The diameters of the collimator entrance and exit windows are 2 and 0.2 mm, respectively. To screen the photofilm in the spectrograph chamber from x-radiation, there are three disks on the spectrograph flange on the part of the drift chamber, they are made of lead, steel, and aluminium. The steel disk, besides, screens the space in front of the collimator entrance window from the scattered magnetic field. During the experiments the pressure in the spectrograph chamber has varied from 7x10 -3 to 10 -1 torr. Electrons are registered using the RT-1 and RT-5 x-ray films 1x18 cm in size. The spectrograph described makes it possible to have well-resolved electron spectrum during a pulse. The electron spectra obtained by means of the spectrograph at a pressure of 4.10 -1 torr in the drift chamber and a charge voltage of 3.2 MV in the line, are shown [ru

  18. Analyser of sweeping electron beam

    Strasser, A.

    1993-01-01

    The electron beam analyser has an array of conductors that can be positioned in the field of the sweeping beam, an electronic signal treatment system for the analysis of the signals generated in the conductors by the incident electrons and a display for the different characteristics of the electron beam

  19. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    Bruinvis, I.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  20. Electron beam solenoid reactor concept

    Bailey, V.; Benford, J.; Cooper, R.; Dakin, D.; Ecker, B.; Lopez, O.; Putman, S.; Young, T.S.T.

    1977-01-01

    The electron Beam Heated Solenoid (EBHS) reactor is a linear magnetically confined fusion device in which the bulk or all of the heating is provided by a relativistic electron beam (REB). The high efficiency and established technology of the REB generator and the ability to vary the coupling length make this heating technique compatible with several radial and axial enery loss reduction options including multiple-mirrors, electrostatic and gas end-plug techniques. This paper addresses several of the fundamental technical issues and provides a current evaluation of the concept. The enhanced confinement of the high energy plasma ions due to nonadiabatic scattering in the multiple mirror geometry indicates the possibility of reactors of the 150 to 300 meter length operating at temperatures > 10 keV. A 275 meter EBHS reactor with a plasma Q of 11.3 requiring 33 MJ of beam eneergy is presented

  1. Physics with polarized electron beams

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    As a distinct field, elementary particle physics is now approximately forty years old. In all that time, only a few of the thousands of experiments that have been performed have made use of spin polarized particle beams (with apologies to those who have studied neutrino interactions, polarized beam are defined to refer to the case in which the experimenter has control over the polarization direction). If the discussion is restricted to spin polarized electron beams, the number of experiments becomes countable with the fingers of one hand (with several to spare). There are two reasons for this lack of interest. The first is that spin polarized beams are difficult to produce, accelerate, and transport. The second reason is that any physical process that can occur during the collision of a polarized particle with another (polarized or not) can also occur during the collision of unpolarized particles. One might ask then, why has any effort been expended on the subject. The answer, at least in the case of polarized electron beams, is that electron accelerators and storage rings have in recent years achieved sufficient energy to begin to probe the weak interaction directly. The weak interaction distinguishes between left- and right-handed fermionic currents. Left-handed particles interact in a fundamentally different way than their right-handed counterparts. If the experimenter wishes to explore or exploit this difference, he (or she) must either prepare the spin state of the incident particles or analyze the spin state of outgoing particles. For reasons of genearlity and improved statistical precision, the former is usually preferable to the latter. The first of these lectures will review some of the techniques necessary for the production, transport, and monitoring of polarized electron (or positron) beams. The second lecture will survey some of the physics possibilities of polarized electron-positron collisions

  2. Temperature behaviour of photoluminescence and electron-beam-induced current recombination behaviour of extended defects in solar grade silicon

    Arguirov, T; Kittler, M; Reif, J

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of D-band and band-to-band (BB) luminescence was measured in EFG samples between 80 K and room temperature for defects/dislocations presenting different amounts of contamination. The contamination density was estimated from the temperature behaviour of the electron-beam-induced current contrast, ranging between about 10 sup 4 and 10 sup 6 impurities cm sup - sup 1 dislocation length. The D1 line became already visible at room temperature but its intensity was found to exhibit a maximum at about 150 K. D2, D3 and D4 start to show up at about 250, 190 and 170 K, respectively, and increase their intensities upon lowering temperature. At room temperature the width of the D1 line is broad and becomes narrower upon lowering the temperature. D2 shows the opposite behaviour. The intensities of D1 and D2 were observed to show strong variations across the sample, whereas this was not observed for the pair D4/D3. In particular, the origin of the lines D1 and D2 is still far from being understo...

  3. Electron beam generation form a superemissive cathode

    Hsu, T.-Y.; Liou, R.-L.; Kirkman-Amemiya, G.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of electron beams produced by a superemissive cathode in the Back-Lighted Thyratron (BLT) and the pseudospark is presented. This work is motivated by experiments demonstrating very high current densities (≥10 kA/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 ) from the pseudospark and BLT cathode. This high-density current is produced by field-enhanced thermionic emission from the ion beam-heated surface of a molybdenum cathode. This work reports the use of this cathode as a beam source, and is to be distinguished from previous work reporting hollow cathode-produced electron beams. An electron beam of more than 260 A Peak current has been produced with 15 kV applied voltage. An efficiency of ∼10% is estimated. These experimental results encourage further investigation of the super-emissive cathode as an intense electron beam source for applications including accelerator technology

  4. Transmission and compression of an intense relativistic electron beam produced by a converging annular diode with return current feedback through the cathode. Pt. 2. The experiments

    Kelly, J.G.; Schuch, R.L.

    1976-02-01

    The complete results of the experiments with the converging annular diode within return current fedback through the cathode (Triax) are reported herein. The diode was designed to focus a relativistic high-current electron beam to a small focus. It did confirm the Triaxial theory detailed in Part I, and it did achieve a factor of 10 areal compression with 50% efficiency (which was below expectations). There were two principal reasons for this shortfall. First, the rapid diode plasma motion of 10 cm/μsec that was discovered necessitated the use of larger A-K gaps than expected and led to thicker beam sheets than are needed for good focusing. Second, the intrinsic angular spread of the electrons, even from the best cathode surfaces, introduced excessive angular momentum into the beam so that only a minor portion of the electrons could reach the axis. However, the yield of useful information about diode physics in general and about the influence of prepulse, the role of diode plasmas, the motion of energetic beams within conducting boundaries, diode emission properties, and diode diagnostic techniques in particle has had a significant and useful impact on the electron beam program at Sandia

  5. Ion beam neutralization with ferroelectrically generated electron beams

    Herleb, U; Riege, H [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). LHC Division

    1997-12-31

    A technique for ion beam space-charge neutralization with pulsed electron beams is described. The intensity of multiply-charged ions produced with a laser ion source can be enhanced or decreased separately with electron beam trains of MHz repetition rate. These are generated with ferroelectric cathodes, which are pulsed in synchronization with the laser ion source. The pulsed electron beams guide the ion beam in a similar way to the alternating gradient focusing of charged particle beams in circular accelerators such as synchrotrons. This new neutralization technology overcomes the Langmuir-Child space-charge limit and may in future allow ion beam currents to be transported with intensities by orders of magnitude higher than those which can be accelerated today in a single vacuum tube. (author). 6 figs., 10 refs.

  6. Nanosecond electron beams compact generator

    Konkin, D V; Nagovitsin, A Yu; Pavlov, S S; Popkov, N F [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A small-scale accelerator providing a storage energy of 40 J, electron energy of 200 keV, beam current released into air of 1 kA, and current pulse duration of 30-40 ns at the half-height is described. The multi-channel commutation is implemented in the accelerator capacitive energy storage, ensuring an output current pulse front of 10 ns, while the inductiveness is 120 nH. The gross weight of the device is approximately 100 kg. (author). 4 figs., 6 refs.

  7. Nanosecond electron beams compact generator

    Konkin, D.V.; Nagovitsin, A.Yu.; Pavlov, S.S.; Popkov, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    A small-scale accelerator providing a storage energy of 40 J, electron energy of 200 keV, beam current released into air of 1 kA, and current pulse duration of 30-40 ns at the half-height is described. The multi-channel commutation is implemented in the accelerator capacitive energy storage, ensuring an output current pulse front of 10 ns, while the inductiveness is 120 nH. The gross weight of the device is approximately 100 kg. (author). 4 figs., 6 refs

  8. A device for measuring electron beam characteristics

    M. Andreev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a device intended for diagnostics of electron beams and the results obtained with this device. The device comprises a rotating double probe operating in conjunction with an automated probe signal collection and processing system. This provides for measuring and estimating the electron beam characteristics such as radius, current density, power density, convergence angle, and brightness.

  9. Optics of Electron Beam in the Recycler

    Burov, A.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Warner, A.; Kazakevich, G.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of ∼0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within ∼ 0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as ∼0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analysed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved

  10. Compact electron beam focusing column

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-12-01

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  11. Electron beam silicon purification

    Kravtsov, Anatoly [SIA ' ' KEPP EU' ' , Riga (Latvia); Kravtsov, Alexey [' ' KEPP-service' ' Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Purification of heavily doped electronic grade silicon by evaporation of N-type impurities with electron beam heating was investigated in process with a batch weight up to 50 kilos. Effective temperature of the melt, an indicative parameter suitable for purification process characterization was calculated and appeared to be stable for different load weight processes. Purified material was successfully approbated in standard CZ processes of three different companies. Each company used its standard process and obtained CZ monocrystals applicable for photovoltaic application. These facts enable process to be successfully scaled up to commercial volumes (150-300 kg) and yield solar grade silicon. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. SU-E-T-66: Characterization of Radiation Dose Associated with Dark Currents During Beam Hold for Respiratory-Gated Electron Therapy

    Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Rong, Y; Weldon, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to estimate the radiation dose contributed by dark currents associated with the respiratory-gated electron therapy during beam hold. The secondary aim was to determine clinical benefits of using respiratory-gated electron therapy for left-sided breast cancer patients with positive internal mammary nodes (IMN). Methods: Measurements of the dark current-induced dose in all electron modes were performed on multiple Siemens and Varian linear accelerators by manually simulating beam-hold during respiratory gating. Dose was quantified at the machine isocenter by comparing the collected charge to the known output for all energies ranging from 6 to 18 MeV for a 10cm × 10cm field at 100 SSD with appropriate solid-water buildup. Using the Eclipse treatment planning system, we compared the additional dose associated with dark current using gated electron fields to the dose uncertainties associated with matching gated photon fields and ungated electron fields. Dose uncertainties were seen as hot and cold spots along the match line of the fields. Results: The magnitude of the dose associated with dark current is highly correlated to the energy of the beam and the amount of time the beam is on hold. For lower energies (6–12 MeV), there was minimal dark current dose (0.1–1.3 cGy/min). Higher energies (15–18 MeV) showed measurable amount of doses. The dark current associated with the electron beam-hold varied between linear accelerator vendors and depended on dark current suppression and the age of the linear accelerator. Conclusion: For energies up to 12 MeV, the dose associated with the dark current for respiratorygated electron therapy was shown to be negligible, and therefore should be considered an option for treating IMN positive left-sided breast cancer patients. However, at higher energies the benefit of respiratory gating may be outweighed by dose due to the dark current

  13. Electron beam fusion targets

    Clauser, M.J.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    R The behavior of the DT filled gold shells when irradiated by a variety of pulse shapes was studied. In these pulses the power (and beam current) was varied, but the voltage was kept constant at 1 MeV. In general the performance of the target, for a given peak power, was not significantly affected by the pulse shape. Pulses with rise times of up to half the implosion time do not significantly degrade the target performance. The use of the ''optimal pulse'' of laser fusion with a fixed peak power does not appear to improve the performance of these targets. The main function of the ''optimal pulse'' is to produce a large rho r of the target during the thermonuclear burn. In e-beam targets a total rho r of 5--10 g/cm 2 can be obtained without pulse shaping; the problem here is one of achieving high enough temperatures to ignite the DT. (U.S.)

  14. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    Mittal, K.C.; Mondal, J.

    2010-01-01

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V 3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  15. Experimental studies of effect of high current pulse electron and carbon ion beams on high temperature Y-Ba-Cu-O, Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O superconductors

    Korenev, S.A.; Sikolenko, V.V.; Chernakova, A.

    1989-01-01

    This work shows the results of the experiment on the effect of high current electron and carbon ion pulse beams irradiation on High-T c superconductors Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Ca-Cu-O in vacuum (P∼5x10 -5 torr). The parameters of electron beam used in the experiment were: E∼100-300 keV, j e ∼10-1000 A/cm 2 , τ) p ∼300ns. The parameters of carbon ions used in the experiment were: E∼100-300keV j i ∼1-60A/cm, τ p ∼300ns. Experiments had shown the threshold electron beam power density for surface melting in adiabatic heat condition for Y-Ba-Cu-O ceramics up to P 0 >or approx. 10 7 W/cm 2 , and for Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O ceramics up to P 0 ∼4x10 6 W/cm 2 . Increasing of critical current in ∼2 times was observed in samples with a melting surface layer. The integral resistance of Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O decreased in ∼2-2.5 times for electron beam irradiated samples and in ∼1.25-1.8 times for ion irradiated samples. Amorphization did not take place and stoichiometry remained after such irradiation. 6 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Tutorial on beam current monitoring

    Webber, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is a tutorial level review covering a wide range of aspects related to charged particle beam current measurement. The tutorial begins with a look at the characteristics of the beam as a signal source, the associated electromagnetic fields, the influence of the typical accelerator environment on those fields, and the usual means of modifying and controlling that environment to facilitate beam current measurement. Short descriptions of three quite different types of current monitors are presented and a quantitative review of the classical transformer circuit is given. Recognizing that environmental noise pick-up may present a large source of error in quantitative measurements, signal handling considerations are given considerable attention using real-life examples. An example of a successful transport line beam current monitor implementation is presented and the tutorial concludes with a few comments about signal processing and current monitor calibration issues

  17. Device for electron beam machining

    Panzer, S.; Ardenne, T. von; Liebergeld, H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention concerns a device for electron beam machining, in particular welding. It is aimed at continuous operation of the electron irradiation device. This is achieved by combining the electron gun with a beam guiding chamber, to which vacuum chambers are connected. The working parts to be welded can be arranged in the latter

  18. Current transport and capacitance-voltage characteristics of an n-PbTe/p-GaP heterojunction prepared using the electron beam deposition technique

    Nasr, Mahmoud; El Radaf, I. M.; Mansour, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a crystalline n-PbTe/p-GaP heterojunction was fabricated using the electron beam deposition technique. The structural properties of the prepared heterojunction were examined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The dark current-voltage characteristics of the heterojunction were investigated at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 398 K. The rectification factor, series resistance, shunt resistance, diode ideality factor, and effective barrier height (ϕb) were determined. The photovoltaic parameters were identified based on the current density-voltage characteristics under illumination. The capacitance-voltage characteristics showed that the junction was abrupt in nature.

  19. Precision measurement of the cross section of charged-current and neutral current processes at large Q2 at HERA with the polarized-electron beam

    Tran, Trong Hieu

    2010-03-01

    The inclusive cross sections for both charged and neutral current processes have been measured in interactions of longitudinally polarized electrons (positrons) with unpolarized protons using the full data samples collected by H1 at HERA-II. The data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 319 GeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 149.1 pb -1 and 180.0 pb -1 for e - p and e + p collisions, representing an increase in statistics of a factor of 10 and 2, respectively, over the data from HERA-I. The measured double differential cross sections d 2 σ/dxdQ 2 cover more than two orders of magnitude in both Q 2 , the negative four-momentum transfer squared, up to 30000 GeV 2 , and Bjorken x, down to 0.003. The cross section data are compared to predictions of the Standard Model which is able to provide a good description of the data. The polarization asymmetry as a function of Q 2 is measured with improved precision, confirming the previous observation of P violation effect in neutral current ep scattering at distances down to 10 -18 m. The total cross sections of the charged current process, for Q 2 > 400 GeV 2 and inelasticity y ± beams and different polarization values. Together with the corresponding cross section obtained from the previously published unpolarized data, the polarization dependence of the charged current cross section is measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction with the absence of right-handed charged current. The cross sections are combined with previously published data from H1 to obtain the most precise unpolarized measurements. These are used to extract the structure function xF 3 γZ which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low x values. The new cross sections have also been used in a combined electroweak and QCD fit to significantly improve the light quark couplings to the Z-boson than those obtained based on the HERA-I data alone. (orig.)

  20. Cornell electron beam ion source

    Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Beebe, E.N.; Janson, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam ion source (EBIS) for the production of low energy, multiply charged ion beams to be used in atomic physics experiments has been designed and constructed. An external high perveance electron gun is used to launch the electron beam into a conventional solenoid. Novel features of the design include a distributed sputter ion pump to create the ultrahigh vacuum environment in the ionization region of the source and microprocessor control of the axial trap voltage supplies

  1. Squid based beam current meter

    Kuchnir, M.

    1983-01-01

    A SQUID based beam current meter has the capability of measuring the current of a beam with as little as 30 x 155 antiprotons (with a signal to noise ratio of 2). If low noise dc current is used to cancel most of the beam or an up-down counter is used to count auto-resets this sensitivity will be available at any time in the acumulation process. This current meter will therefore be a unique diagnostic tool for optimizing the performance of several Tev I components. Besides requiring liquid helium it seems that its only drawback is not to follow with the above sensitivity a sudden beam change larger than 16 μA, something that could be done using a second one in a less sensitive configuration

  2. High current polarized electron source

    Suleiman, R.; Adderley, P.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; Poelker, M.; Stutzman, M.

    2018-05-01

    Jefferson Lab operates two DC high voltage GaAs photoguns with compact inverted insulators. One photogun provides the polarized electron beam at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 200 µA. The other gun is used for high average current photocathode lifetime studies at a dedicated test facility up to 4 mA of polarized beam and 10 mA of un-polarized beam. GaAs-based photoguns used at accelerators with extensive user programs must exhibit long photocathode operating lifetime. Achieving this goal represents a significant challenge for proposed facilities that must operate in excess of tens of mA of polarized average current. This contribution describes techniques to maintain good vacuum while delivering high beam currents, and techniques that minimize damage due to ion bombardment, the dominant mechanism that reduces photocathode yield. Advantages of higher DC voltage include reduced space-charge emittance growth and the potential for better photocathode lifetime. Highlights of R&D to improve the performance of polarized electron sources and prolong the lifetime of strained-superlattice GaAs are presented.

  3. Intense electron and ion beams

    Molokovsky, Sergey Ivanovich

    2005-01-01

    Intense Ion and Electron Beams treats intense charged-particle beams used in vacuum tubes, particle beam technology and experimental installations such as free electron lasers and accelerators. It addresses, among other things, the physics and basic theory of intense charged-particle beams; computation and design of charged-particle guns and focusing systems; multiple-beam charged-particle systems; and experimental methods for investigating intense particle beams. The coverage is carefully balanced between the physics of intense charged-particle beams and the design of optical systems for their formation and focusing. It can be recommended to all scientists studying or applying vacuum electronics and charged-particle beam technology, including students, engineers and researchers.

  4. Electron beam irradiating device

    Shinohara, K

    1969-12-20

    The efficiency of an electron beam irradiating device is heightened by improving the irradiation atmosphere and the method of cooling the irradiation window. An irradiation chamber one side of which incorporates the irradiation windows provided at the lower end of the scanner is surrounded by a suitable cooling system such as a coolant piping network so as to cool the interior of the chamber which is provided with circulating means at each corner to circulate and thus cool an inert gas charged therewithin. The inert gas, chosen from a group of such gases which will not deleteriously react with the irradiating equipment, forms a flowing stream across the irradiation window to effect its cooling and does not contaminate the vacuum exhaust system or oxidize the filament when penetrating the equipment through any holes which the foil at the irradiation window may incur during the irradiating procedure.

  5. Electron beam-cured coating

    Kishi, Naoyuki

    1976-01-01

    The method for hardening coatings by the irradiation with electron beams is reviewed. The report is divided into seven parts, namely 1) general description and characteristics of electron beam-cured coating, 2) radiation sources of curing, 3) hardening conditions and reaction behaviour, 4) uses and advantages, 5) latest trends of the industry, 6) practice in the field of construction materials, and 7) economy. The primary characteristics of the electron beam hardening is that graft reaction takes place between base resin and coating to produce strong adhesive coating without any pretreatment. A variety of base resins are developed. High class esters of acrylic acid monomers and methacrylic acid monomers are mainly used as dilutants recently. At present, scanning type accelerators are used, but the practical application of the system producing electron beam of curtain type is expected. The dose rate dependence, the repetitive irradiation and the irradiation atmosphere are briefly described. The filed patent applications on the electron beam hardening were analyzed by the officer of Japan Patent Agency. The production lines for coatings by the electron beam hardening in the world are listed. In the electron beam-cured coating, fifty percent of given energy is consumed effectively for the electron beam hardening, and the solvents discharged from ovens and polluting atmosphere are not used, because the paints of high solid type is used. The running costs of the electron beam process are one sixth of the thermal oven process. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. Physics with polarized electron beams

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-06-01

    As a distinct field, elementary particle physics is now approximately forty years old. In all that time, only a few of the thousands of experiments that have been performed have made use of spin polarized particle beams. There are two reasons for this lack of interest. The first is that spin polarized beams are difficult to produce, accelerate, and transport. The second reason is that any physical process that can occur during the collision of a polarized particle with another (polarized or not) can also occur during the collision of unpolarized particles. One might ask then, why has any effort been expended on the subject? The answer, at least in the case of polarized electron beams, is that electron accelerators and storage rings have in recent years achieved sufficient energy to begin to probe the weak interaction directly. The weak interaction distinguishes between left- and right-handed fermionic currents. Left-handed particles interact in a fundamentally different way than their right-handed counterparts. If the experimenter wishes to explore or exploit this difference, he (or she) must either prepare the spin state of the incident particles or analyze the spin state of outgoing particles. For reasons, of generality and improved statistical precision, the former is usually preferable to the latter. The first of these lectures will review some of the techniques necessary for the production, transport, and monitoring of polarized electron (or positron) beams. The second lecture will survey some of the physics possibilities of polarized electron--positron collisions. 33 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Development of spin polarized electron beam

    Nakanishi, Tsutomu

    2001-01-01

    Physical structure of the polarized electron beam production is explained in this paper. Nagoya University group has been improving the quality of beam. The present state of quality and the development objects are described. The new results of the polarized electron reported in 'RES-2000 Workshop' in October 2000, are introduced. The established ground of GaAs type polarized electron beam source, observation of the negative electron affinity (NEA) surface, some problems of NEA surface of high energy polarized electron beam such as the life, time response, the surface charge limited phenomena of NEA surface are explained. The interested reports in the RES-2000 Workshop consisted of observation by SPLEEM (Spin Low Energy Electron Microscope), Spin-STM and Spin-resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy. To increase the performance of the polarized electron source, we will develop low emittance and large current. (S.Y.)

  8. Phase-space holes due to electron and ion beams accelerated by a current-driven potential ramp

    M. V. Goldman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional open-boundary simulations have been carried out in a current-carrying plasma seeded with a neutral density depression and with no initial electric field. These simulations show the development of a variety of nonlinear localized electric field structures: double layers (unipolar localized fields, fast electron phase-space holes (bipolar fields moving in the direction of electrons accelerated by the double layer and trains of slow alternating electron and ion phase-space holes (wave-like fields moving in the direction of ions accelerated by the double layer. The principal new result in this paper is to show by means of a linear stability analysis that the slow-moving trains of electron and ion holes are likely to be the result of saturation via trapping of a kinetic-Buneman instability driven by the interaction of accelerated ions with unaccelerated electrons.

  9. Multigigahertz beam-current and position monitor

    Carlson, R.L.; Stout, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    A self-integrating magnetic-loop device having a risetime of less than 175 ps has been developed to monitor the temporal behavior of the electron beam current and position within each 3.3-ns micropulse generated by the PHERMEX rf linear accelerator. Beam current is measured with a 2-GHz bandwidth by combining these loops in a four-port hybrid summer. Another application of these loops uses two 180 0 hybrids to give 2-GHz time-resolved beam position to an accuracy of 1 mm. These sensors are nonintrusive to the propagating beam and allow ultrafast beam measurements previously restricted to the technique of recording the Cerenkov-light emission from an intercepting Kapton foil using a streak camera

  10. Electron beam processing of wastewater in Malaysia

    Zulkafli Ghazali; Khairul Zaman Dahlan; Ting Teo Ming; Khomsaton A. Bakar

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing technology started in Malaysia in 1991 when two accelerators were installed through JICA cooperation to perform medical product sterilization project. Since then several private companies have installed electron accelerators to develop in removing volatile organic materials and to demonstrate flue gas treatment. In this country report, effort on electron beam processing of wastewater or contaminated groundwater is presented: After de-coloration tests using gamma rays as function of radiation doses, electron beam treatment of textile industry wastewater as function of beam energy and current intensity as well as with combined treatment such as aeration or biological treatment to examine the effectiveness in color and BOD or COD change has been carried out and the main results are reported. Furthermore, the present technique was examined to apply in river water treatment for use as drinking water. Techno-economic feasibility study for recycling of industrial waste water using electron beam technology is now underway. (S. Ohno)

  11. Current neutralization of converging ion beams

    Mosher, D.

    1978-01-01

    It is desired to consider the problem of current neutralization of heavy ion beams traversing gas backgrounds in which the conductivity changes due to beam heating and beam convergence. The procedure is to determine Green's-function solutions to the magnetic-diffusion equation derived from Maxwell's equations and an assumed scaler-plasma conductivity sigma for the background-electron current density j/sub e/. The present calculation is more general than some previously carried out in that arbitrary time variations for the beam current j/sub b/ and conductivity are allowed and the calculation is valid for both weak and strong neutralization. Results presented here must be combined with an appropriate energy-balance equation for the heated background in order to obtain the neutralization self-consistently

  12. Introduction to electron beam processing

    Kawakami, Waichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1994-12-31

    The contents are general features in the irradiation of polymers, electron beam machines - low energy, medium energy, high energy; application of EB machine in industries, engineering of EB processing, dosimetry of EB (electron beam) safe operation of EB machine, recent topics on EB processing under development. 3 tabs., 4 figs., 17 refs.

  13. Introduction to electron beam processing

    Waichiro Kawakami

    1994-01-01

    The contents are general features in the irradiation of polymers, electron beam machines - low energy, medium energy, high energy; application of EB machine in industries, engineering of EB processing, dosimetry of EB (electron beam) safe operation of EB machine, recent topics on EB processing under development. 3 tabs., 4 figs., 17 refs

  14. Noise reduction in the beam current monitor

    Arai, Shigeaki.

    1982-02-01

    A simple noise reduction system using a pulse transformer and a pair of L C low pass filters has been introduced to the beam current monitor of a current transformer type at the INS electron linac. With this system, the pick-up noise has been reduced to be 1% of the noise without noise reduction. Signal deformation caused by this system is relatively small and the beam current pulse down to 20 mA is successfully monitored in the actual accelerator operation. (author)

  15. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    Grunder, H.A.; Bisognano, J.J.; Diamond, W.I.; Hartline, B.K.; Leemann, C.W.; Mougey, J.; Sundelin, R.M.; York, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    On February 13, 1987, construction started on the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility - a 4-GeV, 200-μA, continuous beam, electron accelerator facility designed for nuclear physics research. The machine has a racetrack configuration with two antiparallel, 500-MeV, superconducting linac segments connected by beam lines to allow four passes of recirculation. The accelerating structure consists of 1500-MHz, five-cell niobium cavities developed at Cornell University. A liquid helium cryogenic system cools the cavities to an operating temperature of 2 K. Beam extraction after any three of the four passes allows simultaneous delivery of up to three beams of independently variable currents and different, but correlated, energies to the three experimental areas. Beam breakup thresholds exceed the design current by nearly two orders of magnitude. Project completion and the start of physics operations are scheduled for 1993. The total estimated cost is $255 million

  16. Conical pinched electron beam diode for intense ion beam source

    Matsukawa, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Yoshiro

    1982-01-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the pinched electron beam diode, the production of an ion beam by a diode with electrodes in a conical shape was studied at low voltage operation (--200 kV). The ion beam is emitted from a small region of the diode apex. The mean ion beam current density near the axis at 12 cm from the diode apex is two or three times that from an usual flat parallel diode with the same dimension and impedance. The brightness and the power brightness at the otigin are 450 MA/cm 2 sr and 0.12 TW/cm 2 sr respectively. (author)

  17. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    Seletskiy, Sergei M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  18. Plasma channels for electron beam transport

    Schneider, R.F.; Smith, J.R.; Moffatt, M.E.; Nguyen, K.T.; Uhm, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in transport of intense relativistic electron beams using plasma channels. These channels are formed by either: ionization of an organic gas by UV photoionization or electron impact ionization of a low pressure gas utilizing a low energy (typically several hundred volts) electron gun. The second method is discussed here. As their electron gun, the authors used a 12 volt lightbulb filament which is biased to -400 volts with respect to the grounded 15 cm diameter drift tube. The electrons emitted from the filament are confined by an axial magnetic field of --100 Gauss to create a plasma channel which is less than 1 cm in radius. The channel density has been determined with Langmuir probes and the resulting line densities were found to be 10 11 to 10 12 per cm. When a multi-kiloamp electron beam is injected onto this channel, the beam space charge will eject the plasma electrons leaving the ions behind to charge neutralize the electron beam, hence allowing the beam to propagate. In this work, the authors performed experimental studies on the dynamics of the plasma channel. These include Langmuir probe measurements of a steady state (DC) channel, as well as time-resolved Langmuir probe studies of pulsed channels. In addition they performed experimental studies of beam propagation in these plasma channels. Specifically, they observed the behavior of current transport in these channels. Detailed results of beam transport and channel studies are presented

  19. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R ampersand D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility

  20. Electron beam emission and interaction of double-beam gyrotron

    Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Nitin; Kumar, Narendra; Pratap, Bhanu; Purohit, L.P.; Sinha, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The complete electrical design of electron gun and interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. ► EGUN code is used for the simulation of electron gun of double-beam gyrotron. ► MAGIC code is used for the simulation of interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. ► Design validations with other codes. - Abstract: This paper presents the numerical simulation of a double-beam magnetron injection gun (DB-MIG) and beam-wave interaction for 60 GHz, 500 kW gyrotron. The beam-wave interaction calculations, power and frequency growth estimation are performed by using PIC code MAGIC. The maximum output power of 510 kW at 41.5% efficiency, beam currents of 6 A and 12 A, electron beam velocity ratios of 1.41 and 1.25 and beam voltage of 69 kV are estimated. To obtain the design parameters, the DB-MIG with maximum transverse velocity spread less than 5% is designed. The computer simulations are performed by using the commercially available code EGUN and the in-house developed code MIGANS. The simulated results of DB-MIG design obtained by using the EGUN code are also validated with another trajectory code TRAK, which are in good agreement.

  1. Electron beam emission and interaction of double-beam gyrotron

    Singh, Udaybir, E-mail: uday.ceeri@gmail.com [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Department of Physics, Gurukul Kangri University, Haridwar 249404 (India); Kumar, Anil [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Kumar, Nitin, E-mail: nitin_physika@rediffmail.com [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Kumar, Narendra; Pratap, Bhanu [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Purohit, L.P. [Department of Physics, Gurukul Kangri University, Haridwar 249404 (India); Sinha, A.K., E-mail: aksinha@ceeri.ernet.in [Gyrotron Laboratory, Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complete electrical design of electron gun and interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGUN code is used for the simulation of electron gun of double-beam gyrotron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAGIC code is used for the simulation of interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design validations with other codes. - Abstract: This paper presents the numerical simulation of a double-beam magnetron injection gun (DB-MIG) and beam-wave interaction for 60 GHz, 500 kW gyrotron. The beam-wave interaction calculations, power and frequency growth estimation are performed by using PIC code MAGIC. The maximum output power of 510 kW at 41.5% efficiency, beam currents of 6 A and 12 A, electron beam velocity ratios of 1.41 and 1.25 and beam voltage of 69 kV are estimated. To obtain the design parameters, the DB-MIG with maximum transverse velocity spread less than 5% is designed. The computer simulations are performed by using the commercially available code EGUN and the in-house developed code MIGANS. The simulated results of DB-MIG design obtained by using the EGUN code are also validated with another trajectory code TRAK, which are in good agreement.

  2. Electron beam curing of coating

    Fujioka, S.; Fujikawa, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Electron beam curing (EBC) method, by which hardened coating film is obtained by polymerizing and cross-linking paint with electron beam, has finally reached industrialized stage. While about seven items such as short curing time, high efficiency of energy consumption, and homogeneous curing are enumerated as the advantages of EBC method, it has limitations of the isolation requirement from air needing the injection of inert gas, and considerable amount of initial investment. In the electron accelerators employed in EBC method, the accelerating voltage is 250 to 750 kV, and the tube current is several tens of mA to 200 mA. As an example of EBC applications, EBC ''Erio'' steel sheet was developed by the cooperative research of Nippon Steel Corp., Dai-Nippon Printing Co. and Toray Industries, Inc. It is a high-class pre-coated metal product made from galvanized steel sheets, and the flat sheets with cured coating are sold, and final products are fabricated by being worked in various shapes in users. It seems necessary to develop the paint which enables to raise added value by adopting the EBC method. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Electron beam extraction from a HVPES

    Marghitu, S; Cramariuc, R [Accelerators Laboratory, Institute of Physics and Technology for Radiation Devices, PO Box MG-06, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Nicolescu, I; Niculescu, M [Institute of Research and Design for Electrical Engineering, ICPE - Electrostatica, Splaiul Unirii 313, Sect. 3, R-74204 Bucharest (Romania)

    1997-12-31

    The results of the research concerning the extraction system of the fast electrons from a cold cathode high voltage glow discharge plasma electron source (HVPES) are presented. For using the electron beam in a more flexible way, that is changing the shape of the minimum cross-section, (or beam cross-over), of the beam in a sample S frontal plane, without perturbing the discharge parameters, some modifications to a reference internal geometry were tested. Finally, a geometry was found in which the discharge volume may be separated in two parts, one, `a discharge space`, filled with plasma and fast electrons and another, `working space`, occupied specially by the fast electron beam. In this new geometry the electrical discharge parameters, I{sub d} - discharge current, U{sub d} - discharge voltage, were the same as for the reference geometry. (authors) 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Electron beam extraction from a HVPES

    Marghitu, S.; Cramariuc, R.; Nicolescu, I.; Niculescu, M.

    1996-01-01

    The results of the research concerning the extraction system of the fast electrons from a cold cathode high voltage glow discharge plasma electron source (HVPES) are presented. For using the electron beam in a more flexible way, that is changing the shape of the minimum cross-section, (or beam cross-over), of the beam in a sample S frontal plane, without perturbing the discharge parameters, some modifications to a reference internal geometry were tested. Finally, a geometry was found in which the discharge volume may be separated in two parts, one, 'a discharge space', filled with plasma and fast electrons and another, 'working space', occupied specially by the fast electron beam. In this new geometry the electrical discharge parameters, I d - discharge current, U d - discharge voltage, were the same as for the reference geometry. (authors)

  5. Generation of electron Airy beams.

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lereah, Yossi; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-02-21

    Within the framework of quantum mechanics, a unique particle wave packet exists in the form of the Airy function. Its counterintuitive properties are revealed as it propagates in time or space: the quantum probability wave packet preserves its shape despite dispersion or diffraction and propagates along a parabolic caustic trajectory, even though no force is applied. This does not contradict Newton's laws of motion, because the wave packet centroid propagates along a straight line. Nearly 30 years later, this wave packet, known as an accelerating Airy beam, was realized in the optical domain; later it was generalized to an orthogonal and complete family of beams that propagate along parabolic trajectories, as well as to beams that propagate along arbitrary convex trajectories. Here we report the experimental generation and observation of the Airy beams of free electrons. These electron Airy beams were generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, which imprinted on the electrons' wavefunction a cubic phase modulation in the transverse plane. The highest-intensity lobes of the generated beams indeed followed parabolic trajectories. We directly observed a non-spreading electron wavefunction that self-heals, restoring its original shape after passing an obstacle. This holographic generation of electron Airy beams opens up new avenues for steering electronic wave packets like their photonic counterparts, because the wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories.

  6. Production of slow-positron beams with an electron linac

    Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.; Stanek, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency for low-energy positrons has been determined for electrons with 60 to 120 MeV energy, low-energy positron beams from a linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources

  7. Electron beam diagnostics study

    Garganne, P.

    1989-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study on beam diagnostics, using carbon wire scanners and optical transition radiation (DTR) monitors. The main consideration consists in the material selection, taking their thermal properties and their effect on the beam into account [fr

  8. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    Seletskiy, Sergey M.; Rochester U.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the first cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cooling. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Tevatron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV carrying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 (micro)rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible. Chapter 1 is an introduction where I describe briefly the theory and the history of electron cooling, and derive the requirements to the quality of electron beam and requirements to the basic parameters of the Recycler Electron Cooler. Chapter 2 is devoted to the theoretical consideration of the motion of electrons in the cooling section, description of the cooling section and of the measurement of the magnetic fields. In Chapter 3 I consider different factors that increase the effective electron angle in the cooling section and suggest certain algorithms for the suppression of parasitic angles. Chapter 4 is devoted to the measurements of the energy of the electron beam. In the concluding Chapter 5 I review

  9. Bootstrap current of fast ions in neutral beam injection heating

    Huang Qianhong; Gong Xueyu; Yang Lei; Li Xinxia; Lu Xingqiang; Yu Jun

    2012-01-01

    The bootstrap current of fast ions produced by the neutral beam injection is investigated in a large aspect ratio tokamak with circular cross-section under specific parameters. The bootstrap current density distribution and the total bootstrap current are figured out. In addition, the beam bootstrap current always accompanies the electron return current due to the parallel momentum transfer from fast ions. With the electron return current considered, the net current density obviously decreases due to electron return current, at the same time the peak of current moves towards the centre plasma. Numerical results show that the value of the net current depends sensitively not only on the angle of the neutral beam injection but also on the ratio of the velocity of fast ions to the critical velocity: the value of net current is small for the neutral beam parallel injection but increases multipliedly for perpendicular injection, and increases with beam energy increasing. (authors)

  10. Production of ion beam by conical pinched electron beam diode

    Matsukawa, Y.; Nakagawa, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Some properties of the ion beam produced by pinched electron beam diode having conical shape electrodes and organic insulator anode was studied. Ion energy is about 200keV and the peak diode current is about 30 kA. At 11cm from the diode apex, not the geometrical focus point, concentrated ion beam was obtained. Its density is more than 500A/cm 2 . The mean ion current density within the radius of 1.6cm around the axis from conical diode is two or three times that from an usual pinched electron beam diode with flat parallel electrodes of same dimension and impedance under the same conditions. (author)

  11. Compact high-current, subnanosecond electron accelerator

    Shpak, V G; Shunajlov, S A; Ulmaskulov, M R; Yalandin, M I [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of Electrophysics; Pegel, I V [Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation). High-Current Electronics Inst.; Tarakanov, V P [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). High-Temperature Inst.

    1997-12-31

    A compact subnanosecond, high-current electron accelerator producing an annular electron beam of duration up to 300 - 400 ps, energy about 250 keV, and current up to 1 kA has been developed to study transient processes in pulsed power microwave devices. The measuring and recording techniques used to experimentally investigate the dynamics of the beam current pulse and the transformation of the electron energy during the transportation of the beam in a longitudinal magnetic field are described. The experimental data obtained are compared with the predictions of a numerical simulation. (author). 6 figs., 5 refs.

  12. Electronic regulation of the SPS extraction quadrupole current pulse shape for improved stability of the extracted beam

    Carlier, E; Vossenberg, Eugène B; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1996-01-01

    In order to minimise the event pile-up and therefore optimise the detection efficiency, Chorus and Nomad experiments ask for a long and rectangular spill profile. At present the fast-slow extractio n is generated by driving the beam into a quadrupolar-octopolar resonance by exciting a quadrupole magnet with a semi-trapezoidal current [1]. The trapezoidal pulse shape is obtained by dischargin g a capacitor into the magnet coils. After a few milliseconds of undamped discharge a fixed resistor is switched into the circuit. The attenuation is then higher and the sine wave continues with a lower gradient. The two gradients can be adjusted by varying the initial capacitor voltage and the time at which the resistor is switched into the circuit. A further degree of freedom in determini ng the spill shape has been added by allowing the possibility of changing the second slope value independently of the initial conditions. This task is achieved by means of a variable current sour ce added in parallel to the fixed resis...

  13. Precision intercomparison of beam current monitors at CEBAF

    Kazimi, R.; Dunham, B.; Krafft, G.A.; Legg, R.; Liang, C.; Sinclair, C.; Mamosser, J.

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator delivers a CW electron beam at fundamental 1497 MHz, with average beam current up to 200 μA. Accurate, stable nonintercepting beam current monitors are required for: setup/control, monitoring of beam current and beam losses for machine protection and personnel safety, and providing beam current information to experimental users. Fundamental frequency stainless steel RF cavities have been chosen for these beam current monitors. This paper reports on precision intercomparison between two such RF cavities, an Unser monitor, and two Faraday cups, all located in the injector area. At the low beam energy in the injector, it is straightforward to verify the high efficiency of the Faraday cups, and the Unser monitor included a wire through it to permit an absolute calibration. The cavity intensity monitors have proven capable of stable, high precision monitoring of the beam current

  14. Study of electron beam production by a plasma focus

    Smith, J.R.; Luo, C.M.; Rhee, M.J.; Schneider, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the electron beam produced by a plasma focus device using a current charged transmission line is described. Electron beam currents as high as 10 kA were measured. Interaction of the extracted beam and the filling gas was studied using open shutter photography

  15. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Kangrang, Nopadol; Kusoljariyakul, Keerati; Rhodes, Michael W; Saisut, Jatuporn; Thongbai, Chitrlada; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wichaisirimongkol, Pathom; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond electron pulses. Theses short pulses are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator. The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  16. Numerical simulation of electron-beam-induced current near a silicon grain boundary and impact of a p-n junction space charge region

    Corkish, R.; Altermatt, P.P.; Heiser, G. [Photovoltaics Special Research Centre, University of New South Wales, 2052 Sydney (Australia)

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) near a vertical silicon grain boundary are demonstrated. They are compared with an analytical model which excludes the effect of carrier generation other than in the bulk base region of a solar cell structure. We demonstrate that in a wide range of solar cell structures recombination in the space charge region (SCR) significantly affects the EBIC results and hence needs to be included in the data evaluation. Apart from these findings, simulations of a realistic silicon solar cell structure (thick emitter, field-dependent mobility, etc.) are demonstrated.

  17. Development of time-resolved optical measurement and diagnostic system for parameters of high current and pulsed electron beam

    Jiang Xiaoguo; Wang Yuan; Yang Guojun; Xia Liansheng; Li Hong; Zhang Zhuo; Liao Shuqing; Shi Jinshui

    2013-01-01

    The beam parameters measurement is the most important work for the study of linear induction accelerator(LIA). The beam parameters are important to evaluate the character of the beam. The demands of beam parameters measurement are improving while the development of accelerator is improving. The measurement difficulty feature higher time-resolved ability, higher spatial resolution, larger dynamic range and higher intuitionistic view data. The measurement technology of beam spot, beam emittance, beam energy have been developed for the past several years. Some high performance equipment such as high speed framing camera are developed recently. Under this condition, the relative integrated optical measurement and diagnostic system for the beam parameters is developed based on several principles. The system features time-resolved ability of up to 2 ns, high sensitivity and large dynamic range. The processing program is compiled for the data process and the local real-time process is reached. The measurement and diagnostic system has provided full and accurate data for the debug work and has been put into applications. (authors)

  18. Electron beam interaction with space plasmas

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Active space experiments involving the controlled injection of electron beams and the formation of artificially generated currents can provide in many cases a calibration of natural phenomena connected with the dynamic interaction of charged particles with fields. They have a long history beginning from the launches of small rockets with electron guns in order to map magnetic fields lines in the Earth's magnetosphere or to excite artificial auroras. Moreover, natural beams of charged particles exist in many space and astrophysical plasmas and were identified in situ by several satellites; a few examples are beams connected with solar bursts, planetary foreshocks or suprathermal fluxes traveling in planetary magnetospheres. Many experimental and theoretical works have been performed in order to interpret or plan space experiments involving beam injection as well as to understand the physics of wave-particle interaction, as wave radiation, beam dynamics and background plasma modification. Recently, theoretical studies of the nonlinear evolution of a thin monoenergetic electron beam injected in a magnetized plasma and interacting with a whistler wave packet have led to new results. The influence of an effective dissipation process connected with whistler wave field leakage out of the beam volume to infinity (that is, effective radiation outside the beam) on the nonlinear evolution of beam electrons distribution in phase space has been studied under conditions relevant to active space experiments and related laboratory modelling. The beam-waves system's evolution reveals the formation of stable nonlinear structures continuously decelerated due to the effective friction imposed by the strongly dissipated waves. The nonlinear interaction between the electron bunches and the wave packet are discussed in terms of dynamic energy exchange, particle trapping, slowing down of the beam, wave dissipation and quasi-linear diffusion. (author)

  19. Industrial applications or electron beams

    Martin, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    Industrial use of electron beams began in the 1950's with the crosslinking of polyethylene film and wire insulation. Today the number of electron beam Processing Systems installed for industrial applications throughout the world has grown to more than six hundred stations in over 35 countries. Total installed power is now approaching 40 megawatts (over 8 million tons of products per year). Electron beam is now utilized by many major industries including plastics, automotive, rubber goods, wire and cable, electrical insulation, semiconductor, medical, packaging, or pollution control. The principal effect of high-energy electrons is to produce ions in the materials treated, resulting in the liberation of orbital electrons. As a result, the original molecule is modified and the ree radicals combine to form new molecules with new chemical reactions or dis organisation od the DNA chains of living organisms (insects, fungus, microorganisms, etc.). (Author) 8 refs

  20. Beam profile for Malaysian electron accelerator

    Abu Bakar Ghazali; Muhamad Zahidee Taat

    2007-01-01

    This paper comprises of two calculations that require in designing a dose profile for an electron accelerator machine before its fabrication. The first is to calculate the beam deflection due to changes of high voltage (HV) supply as well as the deflection coil currents so that the electron beam will only scan at the window foil of 18 cm length and 6 cm width. Secondly, we also require to calculate the beam profile at 50 mm underneath the window foil. The electron gun that produces a beam of 10 mm diameter has to be oscillated in a sawtooth wave for the prescribed window size at frequencies of 50 Hz and 400 Hz along the length and width directions respectively. For the beam deflection, we apply a basic formula from Lorentz force law to obtain a set of HV supply and the coil current that is suitable for both deflections and this result can assist in designing the coil current against HV changes via an electronic controller. The dose profile was calculated using the RMS current formulation along the length direction. We found that the measured and the calculated RMS currents are in comparable for the case of 1 MeV, 50 mA accelerator facility that is going to be installed at Nuclear Malaysia complex. A similar measurement will be carried out for our locally designed accelerator of 150 KeV, 10 mA after fabrication and installation of the machine are completed. (Author)

  1. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-01-01

    application range of the EBI diagnostic method and to benchmark the theoretical model. To achieve this goal a code has been developed in the programming language Python. Different charge distributions were considered and the simulation results have been compared with the theoretical model. The numerical investigations have shown a very good agreement with the theoretical model for deflection angles up to 20 mrad. This value defines the limit for the applicability of the theoretical model. Moreover, the magnetic field of the ion beam has also been taken into acount in the simulations. The results show that at high ion beam currents - starting at about 1 A - the electrons experience a non-negligible displacement along the ion beam axis, which has to be taken into consideration in experiments with intense heavy ion beams. The electrons suffer practically the same displacement under the influence of the magnetic field, regardless of their offset. At an offset of 10 mm the deviation from the shift at the ion beam axis is less than 3 %. For the experimental investigations of the EBI diagnostic method an offline experiment had been set up at the HHT experimental area at GSI in Darmstadt. The Coulomb field of the ion beam had been simulated by electrostatically charged wires. In case of a single wire, the experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model for deflection angles up to 20 mrad. This confirms the results of the numerical studies. To simulate the field within an ion beam, several wires have been clamped parallel to each other within a plane perpendicular to the electron beam. The electrons thus could pass through the spaces between the wires. The results of this experiments have quantitatively confirmed the prediction of the theoretical model that the derivative of the deflection angle with respect to the offset is proportional to the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. Quantitatively, however, deviations from the theoretical model

  2. Electron beam interaction with space plasmas.

    Krafft, C.; Bolokitin, A. S.

    1999-12-01

    Active space experiments involving the controlled injection of electron beams and the formation of artificially generated currents can provide in many cases a calibration of natural phenomena connected with the dynamic interaction of charged particles with fields. They have a long history beginning from the launches of small rockets with electron guns in order to map magnetic fields lines in the Earth's magnetosphere or to excite artificial auroras. Moreover, natural beams of charged particles exist in many space and astrophysical plasmas and were identified in situ by several satellites; a few examples are beams connected with solar bursts, planetary foreshocks or suprathermal fluxes traveling in planetary magnetospheres. Many experimental and theoretical works have been performed in order to interpret or plan space experiments involving beam injection as well as to understand the physics of wave-particle interaction, as wave radiation, beam dynamics and background plasma modification.

  3. Plasma heating by a relativistic electron beam

    Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the interaction of a Relativistic Electron Beam (REB) with a plasma. The goal of the experiment described herein is to study in detail the mechanism of energy transfer from the beam to the plasma. The beam particles have an energy of 800 keV, a current of 6 kA, a diameter of 3 cm and an adjustable pulse length of 50-150 ns. This beam is injected into cold hydrogen and helium plasmas with densities ranging from 10 18 to 10 20 m -3 . First, the technical aspects of the experiment are described. Then measurements on the hf fields excited by the REB-plasma are presented (optical line profiles and spectra of beam electrons). The final section is devoted to plasma heating. (Auth.)

  4. Electron beam micromachining of plastics

    Dupák, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, 5-6 (2014), s. 310-314 ISSN 0861-4717 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : micromachining of plastics * Electron beam Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. Low voltage electron beam accelerators

    Ochi, Masafumi

    2003-01-01

    Widely used electron accelerators in industries are the electron beams with acceleration voltage at 300 kV or less. The typical examples are shown on manufactures in Japan, equipment configuration, operation, determination of process parameters, and basic maintenance requirement of the electron beam processors. New electron beam processors with acceleration voltage around 100 kV were introduced maintaining the relatively high dose speed capability of around 10,000 kGy x mpm at production by ESI (Energy Science Inc. USA, Iwasaki Electric Group). The application field like printing and coating for packaging requires treating thickness of 30 micron or less. It does not require high voltage over 110 kV. Also recently developed is a miniature bulb type electron beam tube with energy less than 60 kV. The new application area for this new electron beam tube is being searched. The drive force of this technology to spread in the industries would be further development of new application, process and market as well as the price reduction of the equipment, upon which further acknowledgement and acceptance of the technology to societies and industries would entirely depend. (Y. Tanaka)

  6. Low voltage electron beam accelerators

    Ochi, Masafumi [Iwasaki Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Widely used electron accelerators in industries are the electron beams with acceleration voltage at 300 kV or less. The typical examples are shown on manufactures in Japan, equipment configuration, operation, determination of process parameters, and basic maintenance requirement of the electron beam processors. New electron beam processors with acceleration voltage around 100 kV were introduced maintaining the relatively high dose speed capability of around 10,000 kGy x mpm at production by ESI (Energy Science Inc. USA, Iwasaki Electric Group). The application field like printing and coating for packaging requires treating thickness of 30 micron or less. It does not require high voltage over 110 kV. Also recently developed is a miniature bulb type electron beam tube with energy less than 60 kV. The new application area for this new electron beam tube is being searched. The drive force of this technology to spread in the industries would be further development of new application, process and market as well as the price reduction of the equipment, upon which further acknowledgement and acceptance of the technology to societies and industries would entirely depend. (Y. Tanaka)

  7. Equilibrium state of colliding electron beams

    R. L. Warnock

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available We study a nonlinear integral equation that is a necessary condition on the equilibrium phase-space distribution function of stored, colliding electron beams. It is analogous to the Haïssinski equation, being derived from Vlasov-Fokker-Planck theory, but is quite different in form. The equation is analyzed for the case of the Chao-Ruth model of the beam-beam interaction in 1 degree of freedom, a so-called strong-strong model with nonlinear beam-beam force. We prove the existence of a unique solution, for sufficiently small beam current, by an application of the implicit function theorem. We have not yet proved that this solution is positive, as would be required to establish existence of an equilibrium. There is, however, numerical evidence of a positive solution. We expect that our analysis can be extended to more realistic models.

  8. Electron beam processing of polymers

    Silva, Leonardo G. Andrade e; Dias, Djalma B.; Calvo, Wilson A.P.; Miranda, Leila F. de

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is the use of electron beam produced by industrial electron accelerators to process polymers. There are several applications, such as, irradiation of wires and electric cables for automotive, aerospace, household appliance, naval and computing industries. The effect of different radiation doses in low density polyethylene (LDPE) was also studied. After irradiation and crosslinking it was thermally expanded forming LDPE foam. In addition, poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) hydrogels using electron beam processing were prepared. In all cases studied crosslinking percentages of the samples were determined. (author)

  9. Electron beam generation in z-pinch discharges

    Vikhrev, V.V.; Baronova, E.O. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Russian Research Center

    1997-12-31

    Numerical modelling of the process of electron beam generation in z-pinch discharges are presented. The proposed model represents the electron beam generation under turbulent plasma conditions. Strong current distribution inhomogeneity in the plasma column and the zigzag drift current motion through the plasma have accounted for the adequate generation process investigation. Electron beam is generated near the maximum of compression and it is not related with the current break effect. (author)

  10. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e-p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e - p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ 2 , dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q 2 and x are measured in the kinematic region y 2 > 185GeV 2 for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb -1 taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV. The structure functions xF 3 and xF 3 γZ are determined by combining the e - p results presented in this paper with previously measured e + p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A - is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of high-Q{sup 2} neutral current deep inelastic e{sup -}p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised electron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy and the double-differential cross sections in Q{sup 2} and x are measured in the kinematic region y < 0.9 and Q{sup 2} > 185GeV{sup 2} for both positively and negatively polarised electron beams and for each polarisation state separately. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 169.9 pb{sup -1} taken with the ZEUS detector in 2005 and 2006 at a centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV. The structure functions xF{sub 3} and xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}}{sup Z} are determined by combining the e{sup -}p results presented in this paper with previously measured e{sup +}p neutral current data. The asymmetry parameter A{sup -} is used to demonstrate the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large spacelike photon virtuality. The measurements agree well with the predictions of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  12. Electron beam spectrum monitor using synchrotron light

    Reagan, D.; Hostetler, T.E.

    1979-03-01

    This instrument shows the positions, widths, and shapes of momentum spectra of SLAC beams. It uses synchrotron light produced when the beam is deflected by a magnet. Some of the light is focused on the face of an image splitter consisting of acrylic light pipes. The light pipes illuminate twelve photomultiplier tubes. Pulses from the PM tubes are integrated, multiplexed, and displayed on an oscilloscope. The resolution of the instrument is usually better than 0.2%. It has some advantages over the secondary emitter foil spectrum monitors (SEM's) currently in use at SLAC. It need never be put out of service to avoid disturbing the beam. It is as sensitive as the most sensitive SLAC SEM. (Its performance has been optimized for high-current beams; it can easily be made much more sensitive.) It provides information on a pulse-to-pulse basis and, with better cables, could indicate electron beam pulse shapes

  13. WEBEXPIR: Windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation

    Dierckx, Marc; Schuurmans, Paul; Heyse, Jan; Rosseel, Kris; Tichelen, Katrien Van; Nactergal, Benoit; Vandeplassche, Dirk; Aoust, Thierry; Abs, Michel; Guertin, Arnaud; Buhour, Jean-Michel; Cadiou, Arnaud; Abderrahim, Hamid Ait

    2008-01-01

    The windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation (WEBEXPIR) program was set-up as part of the MYRRHA/XT-ADS R and D effort on the spallation target design to investigate the interaction of a proton beam with a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) free surface. In particular, possible free surface distortion or shockwave effects in nominal conditions and during sudden beam on/off transient situations, as well as possible enhanced evaporation were assessed. An experiment was conceived at the IBA TT-1000 Rhodotron, where a 7 MeV electron beam was used to simulate the high power deposition at the MYRRHA/XT-ADS LBE free surface. The geometry and the LBE flow characteristics in the WEBEXPIR set-up were made as representative as possible of the actual situation in the MYRRHA/XT-ADS spallation target. Irradiation experiments were carried out at beam currents of up to 10 mA, corresponding to 40 times the nominal beam current necessary to reproduce the MYRRHA/XT-ADS conditions. Preliminary analyses show that the WEBEXPIR free surface flow was not disturbed by the interaction with the electron beam and that vacuum conditions stayed well within the design specifications

  14. Generation and acceleration of high-current annular electron beam in linear induction accelerator and generation of the power microwave radiation from Cherenkov TWT

    Abubakirov, E.V.; Arkhipov, O.V.; Bobyleva, L.V.

    1990-01-01

    The section of linear induction accelerator (LIA) with a strong guiding magnetic field (up to 1.5 T), with output beam power up to 2 GW and beam pulse duration 60 ns is created and investigated by experiment. The beam energy gain is equal to 10 keV/sm with explosive emission is used; the large length of the beam propagation (1.5 m) without spolling of the beam with high beam energy gain has been established. The microwave radiation power about 30-100 MW has achieved from relativistic Cherenkov travelling wave tube with high exponential gain on the basis of LIA and high-current diode

  15. METHOD OF ELECTRON BEAM PROCESSING

    2003-01-01

    As a rule, electron beam welding takes place in a vacuum. However, this means that the workpieces in question have to be placed in a vacuum chamber and have to be removed therefrom after welding. This is time−consuming and a serious limitation of a process the greatest advantage of which is the o......As a rule, electron beam welding takes place in a vacuum. However, this means that the workpieces in question have to be placed in a vacuum chamber and have to be removed therefrom after welding. This is time−consuming and a serious limitation of a process the greatest advantage of which...... is the option of welding workpieces of large thicknesses. Therefore the idea is to guide the electron beam (2) to the workpiece via a hollow wire, said wire thereby acting as a prolongation of the vacuum chamber (4) down to workpiece. Thus, a workpiece need not be placed inside the vacuum chamber, thereby...... exploiting the potential of electron beam processing to a greater degree than previously possible, for example by means of electron beam welding...

  16. High-current beam dynamics and transport, theory and experiment

    Reiser, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of beam physics and technology factors determining the current and brightness of ion and electron beams in linear accelerators will be reviewed. Topics to be discussed including phase-space density constraints of particle sources, low-energy beam transport include charge neutralization, emittance growth due to mismatch, energy exchange, instabilities, nonlinear effects, and longitudinal bunching

  17. Structural, Optical, and Dielectric Investigations of the Relaxor PLZT 9,75/65/35 Ceramics Irradiated by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    Efimov, V V; Kalmikov, A V; Klevtsova, E A; Minashkin, V F; Novikova, N N; Sikolenko, V V; Skripnik, A V; Sternberg, A; Tiutiunnikov, S I; Yakovlev, V A

    2002-01-01

    First time comprehensive study of high-current pulsed electron irradiation effects on the structural, optical and dielectric properties of relaxor (Pb_{(1-x)}La^{x}(Zr_{0.65}Ti_{0.35})_{1-x/4}O_{3} ceramics with x=9.75% has been provided. The electron beam had the following parameters: energy E_{e}=250 keV, current density J_{e}=1000 A/cm^{2}, pulse duration tau = 300 ns, density 10^{15} electrons/cm^{2} per pulse. Infrared reflectivity spectra in the region of 100-2000 cm^{-1} were obtained in virgin, irradiated by 1500 pulses and annealed up to t=500^{circ}C ceramics. The reconstruction of perovskite ABO_{3} structure in irradiated samples has been studied by complex use of X-ray and neutron scattering and IR spectroscopy techniques revealing the changes in transverse and longitudinal phonon modes, oscillators strength and damping of modes. Radiation effects on temperature behaviour of dielectric permittivity in the region of phase transition were studied. The possible mechanisms of pulsed electron irradiat...

  18. Development of beam diagnostic devices for characterizing electron guns

    Bhattacharjee, D.; Tiwari, R.; Jayaprakash, D.; Mishra, R.L.; Sarukte, H.; Waghmare, A.; Thakur, N.; Dixit, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    The electron guns for the DC accelerators and RF Linacs are designed and developed at EBC/APPD/BARC, Kharghar. These electron guns need to be characterized for its design and performance. Two test benches were developed for characterizing the electron guns. Various beam diagnostic devices for measuring beam currents and beam sizes were developed. Conical faraday cup, segmented faraday cup, slit scanning bellows movement arrangement, multi-plate beam size measurement setup, multi- wire beam size measurement setup, Aluminum foil puncture assembly etc. were developed and used. The paper presents the in-house development of various beam diagnostics for characterizing electron guns and their use. (author)

  19. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I FC by the mobile plate tuner. The I FC is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I FC and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I FC when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  20. Electron beam curing of coatings

    Schmidt, J.; Mai, H.

    1986-01-01

    Modern low-energy electron beam processors offer the possibility for high-speed curing of coatings on paper, plastics, wood and metal. Today the electron beam curing gets more importance due to the increasing environmental problems and the rising cost of energy. For an effective curing process low-energy electron beam processors as well as very reactive binders are necessary. Generally such binders consist of acrylic-modified unsaturated polyester resins, polyacrylates, urethane acrylates or epoxy acrylates and vinyl monomers, mostly multifunctional acrylates. First results on the production of EBC binders on the base of polyester resins and vinyl monomers are presented. The aim of our investigations is to obtain binders with curing doses ≤ 50 kGy. In order to reduce the curing dose we studied mixtures of resins and acrylates. (author)

  1. High current density ion beam measurement techniques

    Ko, W.C.; Sawatzky, E.

    1976-01-01

    High ion beam current measurements are difficult due to the presence of the secondary particles and beam neutralization. For long Faraday cages, true current can be obtained only by negative bias on the target and by summing the cage wall and target currents; otherwise, the beam will be greatly distorted. For short Faraday cages, a combination of small magnetic field and the negative target bias results in correct beam current. Either component alone does not give true current

  2. Deflection of electron beams by ground planes

    Fernsler, R.F.; Lampe, M.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods are used to determine the effect of a nearby ground plane on the trajectory of a relativistic electron beam passing through dense gas. The beam is shown to respond to the ground plane in one of two distinct modes, determined by beam current and energy. Low-power beams deflect from the ground plane and tear longitudinally. High-power beams do not deflect or tear but tilt, i.e., the beam axis is no longer parallel to the direction of propagation. This conclusion is reached by computing the net beam force as a superposition of the ''bare'' ground-plane forces, the shielding forces from the beam-generated plasma, the body coupling forces induced by beam tilt, and the force that arises as the beam separates from the plasma. Effects from electromagnetic retardation and ground resistivity are shown to be negligible in typical cases of interest, and the interaction between ground planes and other external forces is discussed as well

  3. Foil focusing of relativistic electron beams

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-26

    When an intense relativistic electron beams (IREB) passes through a grounded metal foil, the transverse electric field due to the beam space charge is locally shorted out, and the beam is focused by the magnetic field of its current. The effect can be treated as focusing by a thin lens with first order aberration. Expressions for the focal length and aberration coefficient of the equivalent thin lens are developed in this note. These are then applied to practical examples representative of IREB research at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  4. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  5. Electron beam writing on semiconductors

    Bierhenke, H.; Kutzer, E.; Pascher, A.; Plitzner, H.; Rummel, P.; Siemens A.G., Muenchen; Siemens A.G., Muenchen

    1979-08-01

    Reported are the results of the 3 1/2 year research project 'Electron beam Writing on Semiconductors'. Work has been done in the field of direct wafer exposure techniques, and of mask making. Described are resist technology, setting up of a research device, exploration of alignment procedures, manufacturing of devices and their radiation influence. Furthermore, investigations and measurements of an electron beam machine bought for mask making purposes, the development of LSI-circuits with this machine, the software necessary and important developments of digital subsystems are reported. (orig.) [de

  6. Modular low-voltage electron beams

    Berejka, A.J.; Avnery, Tovi; Carlson, Carl

    2004-01-01

    Modular, low-voltage systems have simplified electron beam (EB) technology for industrial uses and for research and development. Modular EB units are produced in quantity as sealed systems that are evacuated at the factory eliminating the need for vacuum pumps at the point of use. A simple plug-out--plug-in method of replacement eliminates downtime for servicing. Use of ultra-thin beam windows (<10 μm of titanium foil), solid-state 19 in. (48 cm) rack-mounted power supplies, an innovative design to extract and spread the beam (enabling systems to be placed adjacent to each other to extend beam width) and touch-screen computer controls, combine for ease of use and electrical transfer efficiency at voltages that can be varied between 80 and 150 kV and with high beam currents (up to 40 mA across the 25 cm window). These electron systems are available in three widths, the standard 25 cm and new 5 and 40 cm beams. Traditional uses in the graphic arts and coatings areas as well as uses in surface sterilization have found these compact, lightweight (approximately 15 kg) modular beams of interest. Units have been configured around complex shapes to enable three-dimensional surface curing (as for coatings on aluminum tubing) to be achieved at high production rates. Details of the beam construction and some industrial uses are discussed

  7. Modular low-voltage electron beams

    Berejka, Anthony J.; Avnery, Tovi; Carlson, Carl

    2004-09-01

    Modular, low-voltage systems have simplified electron beam (EB) technology for industrial uses and for research and development. Modular EB units are produced in quantity as sealed systems that are evacuated at the factory eliminating the need for vacuum pumps at the point of use. A simple plug-out—plug-in method of replacement eliminates downtime for servicing. Use of ultra-thin beam windows (innovative design to extract and spread the beam (enabling systems to be placed adjacent to each other to extend beam width) and touch-screen computer controls, combine for ease of use and electrical transfer efficiency at voltages that can be varied between 80 and 150 kV and with high beam currents (up to 40 mA across the 25 cm window). These electron systems are available in three widths, the standard 25 cm and new 5 and 40 cm beams. Traditional uses in the graphic arts and coatings areas as well as uses in surface sterilization have found these compact, lightweight (approximately 15 kg) modular beams of interest. Units have been configured around complex shapes to enable three-dimensional surface curing (as for coatings on aluminum tubing) to be achieved at high production rates. Details of the beam construction and some industrial uses are discussed.

  8. Tesla-transformer-type electron beam accelerator

    Liu Jinliang; Zhong Huihuang; Tan Qimei; Li Chuanlu; Zhang Jiande

    2002-01-01

    An electron-beam Tesla-transformer accelerator is described. It consists of the primary storage energy system. Tesla transformer, oil Blumlein pulse form line, and the vacuum diode. The experiments of initial stage showed that diode voltage rises up to about 500 kV with an input of 20 kV and the maximum electron-beam current is about 9 kA, the pulse width is about 50 ns. This device can operate stably and be set up easily

  9. Industrial applications of electron beam

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The review of industrial applications with use of electron beams has been done. Especially the radiation technologies being developed in Poland have been shown. Industrial installations with electron accelerators as radiation source have been applied for: modification of polymers; modification of thyristors; sterilization of health care materials; radiopreservation of food and other consumer products; purification of combustion flue gases in heat and power plants. 14 refs, 6 tabs, 7 figs

  10. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  11. Bootstrap current of fast ions in neutral beam injection heating

    Huang Qianhong; Gong Xueyu; Li Xinxia; Yu Jun

    2012-01-01

    The bootstrap current of fast ions produced by neutral beam injection (NBI) is investigated in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak with circular cross-section under specific parameters. The bootstrap current density distribution and the total bootstrap current are reported. In addition, the beam bootstrap current always accompanies the electron return current due to the parallel momentum transfer from fast ions. With the electron return current taken into consideration, the net current density obviously decreases; at the same time, the peak of the current moves towards the central plasma. Numerical results show that the value of the net current depends sensitively not only on the angle of the NBI but also on the ratio of the velocity of fast ions to the critical velocity: the value of the net current is small for neutral beam parallel injection, but increases severalfold for perpendicular injection, and increases with increasing beam energy. (paper)

  12. Electron beam curable polymer thick film

    Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    Currently, most printed circuit boards are produced by the selective etching of copper clads laminated on dielectric substrates such as paper/phenolic resion or nonwoven glass/epoxy resin composites. After the etchig, various components such as transistors and capacitors are mounted on the boards by soldering. But these are troublesome works, therefore, as an alternative, printing method has been investigated recently. In the printing method, conductor circuits and resistors can be made by printing and curing of the specially prepared paste on dielectric substrates. In the near future, also capacitors are made by same method. Usually, conductor paste, resistor paste and dielectric paste are employed, and in this case, the printing is screen printing, and the curing is done thermally. In order to avoid heating and the deterioration of substrates, attention was paid to electron beam curing, and electron beam curable polymer thick film system was developed. The electron beam curable paste is the milled mixture of a filler and an electron beam curable binder of oligomer/monomer. The major advantage of electron beam curable polymer thick film, the typical data of a printed resistor of this type and its trial are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Electron beam processing of combustion flue gases

    1987-07-01

    This report contains the papers presented at the consultants' meeting on electron beam processing of combustion flue gases. The meeting provided an excellent opportunity for exchanging information and reviewing the current status of technology development. Characteristics of the electron beam processing recognized by the meeting are: capability of simultaneous removals of SO 2 and NO x , safe technology and simplicity of control, dry process without waste water to be treated, cost benefit of electron beam processing compared with conventional technology and the conversion of SO 2 and NO x to a by-product that can be used as agricultural fertilizer. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 22 papers in this technical report

  14. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  15. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  16. Large area electron beam diode development

    Helava, H.; Gilman, C.M.; Stringfield, R.M.; Young, T.

    1983-01-01

    A large area annular electron beam diode has been tested at Physics International Co. on the multi-terawatt PITHON generator. A twelve element post hole convolute converted the coaxial MITL into a triaxial arrangement of anode current return structures both inside and outside the cathode structure. The presence of both inner and outer current return paths provide magnetic pressure balance for the beam, as determined by diode current measurements. X-ray pinhole photographs indicated uniform emission with intensity maxima between the post positions. Current losses in the post hole region were negligible, as evidenced by the absence of damage to the aluminum hardware. Radial electron flow near the cathode ring however did damage the inner anode cylinder between the post positions. Cutting away these regions prevented further damage of the transmission lines

  17. NLC electron injector beam dynamics

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-10-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) being designed at SLAC requires a train of 90 electron bunches 1.4 ns apart at 120 Hz. The intensity and emittance required at the interaction point, and the various machine systems between the injector and the IP determine the beam requirements from the injector. The style of injector chosen for the NLC is driven by the fact that the production of polarized electrons at the IP is a must. Based on the successful operation of the SLC polarized electron source a similar type of injector with a DC gun and subharmonic bunching system is chosen for the NLC

  18. Electron beam cooling by laser

    Urakawa, J; Terunuma, N; Taniguchi, T; Yamazaki, Y; Hirano, K; Nomura, M; Sakai, I; Takano, M; Sasao, N; Honda, Y; Noda, A; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Mystykov, A; Zelinsky, A; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    In 1997, Z.Huang and R.Ruth proposed a compact laser-electron storage ring (LESR) for electron beam cooling or x-ray generation. Because the laser-wire monitor in the ATF storage ring has worked well and demonstrated the achievement of the world's smallest transverse emittance for a circulating electron beam, we have started the design of a small storage ring with about 10 m circumference and the development of basic technologies for the LESR. In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results of pulse stacking in a 42-cm long optical cavity. Since our primary purpose is demonstrating the proof-of-principle of the LESR, we will then discuss the future experimental plan at the KEK-ATF for the generation of high average-brilliance gamma-rays.

  19. Free-electron laser beam

    Minehara, Eisuke

    2003-01-01

    The principle and history of free-electron laser (FEL), first evidenced in 1977, the relationship between FEL wavelength and output power, the high-power FEL driven by the superconducting linac, the X-ray FEL by the linac, and the medical use are described. FEL is the vacuum oscillator tube and essentially composed from the high-energy linac, undulator and light-resonator. It utilizes free electrons in the vacuum to generate the beam with wavelength ranging from microwave to gamma ray. The first high-power FEL developed in Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is based on the development of superconducting linac for oscillating the highest power beam. In the medical field, applications to excise brain tumors (in US) and to reconstruct experimentally blood vessels in the pig heart (in Gunma University) by lasing and laser coagulator are in progress with examinations to remove intra-vascular cholesterol mass by irradiation of 5.7μm FEL beam. Cancer cells are considered diagnosed by FEL beam of far-infrared-THz range. The FEL beam CT is expected to have a wide variety of application without the radiation exposure and its resolution is equal or superior to that of usual imaging techniques. (N.I.)

  20. Producing nano-grained and Al-enriched surface microstructure on AZ91 magnesium alloy by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    Hao, Shengzhi, E-mail: ebeam@dlut.edu.cn; Li, Mincai

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • HCPEB surface treatment was conducted on AZ91 magnesium alloy. • Surface modified microstructure and phase composition were characterized. • Preferential evaporation of Mg and dissolution of Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase occurred. • Nano-grained and Al-enriched surface layer was produced of depth ∼8 μm. • Surface microhardness and corrosion resistance were improved simultaneously. - Abstract: Surface treatment of AZ91 magnesium alloy was carried out by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) with accelerating voltage 27 kV and energy density 3 J/cm{sup 2}. The surface microstructure and phase composition were characterized by using optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The surface microhardness and corrosion resistance were measured. Under HCPEB treatments, the preferential evaporation of Mg element occurred intensively on irradiated surface and the initial large Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phases were dissolved. The nano-grained and Al-enriched surface modified layer was ultimately formed of depth ∼8 μm. According to the testing results, the surface microhardness increased from 63 to 141 HK after 30 pulses of HCPEB treatment, while the best improvement of corrosion resistance was obtained by 15 pulses of HCPEB treatment with a cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared with the initial AZ91 sample.

  1. Current neutralization in ballistic transport of light ion beams

    Hubbard, R.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Ottinger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Intense light ion beams are being considered as drivers to ignite fusion targets in the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). Ballistic transport of these beams from the diode to the target is possible only if the beam current is almost completely neutralized by plasma currents. This paper summarizes related work on relativistic electron beam and heavy ion beam propagation and describes a simple simulation model (DYNAPROP) which has been modified to treat light ion beam propagation. DYNAPROP uses an envelope equation to treat beam dynamics and uses rate equations to describe plasma and conductivity generation. The model has been applied both to the high current, 30 MeV Li +3 beams for LMF as well as low current, 1.2 MeV proton beams which are currently being studied on GAMBLE B at the Naval Research Laboratory. The predicted ratio of net currents to beam current is ∼0.1--0.2 for the GAMBLE experiment and ∼0.01 for LMF. The implications of these results for LMF and the GAMBLE experiments art discussed in some detail. The simple resistive model in DYNAPROP has well-known limitations in the 1 torr regime which arise primarily from the neglect of plasma electron transport. Alternative methods for treating the plasma response are discussed

  2. Determination of the electron beam irradiated area

    Zarbout, K.; Kallel, A.; Moya, G.

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of the charge trapping properties of non-conductive materials open the way to an understanding of the degradation of their characteristics due to ageing and catastrophic phenomena, such as breakdown, which originate from the rapid relaxation of trapped charges. The defects, in particular those introduced during the fabrication process, are responsible for the charging phenomena which limit the technological performances and the reliability of these materials. Several characterisation techniques have been developed and among them the one which uses the electron beam of the scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The study of the charge trapping properties in non-conductive solids by using the electron beam of a SEM requires the knowledge of the current beam and injected charges densities. These densities depend on the irradiated sample area. For this reason, we report in this work two experimental procedures allowing a direct determination of the irradiated area size by the incident defocused beam. The first is based on the charging effect of oxide surfaces (SiO2, MgO, AL2O3) and the second is derived from the electron beam lithography technique. The latter procedure constitutes a convenient experimental method

  3. Cryogenic current comparators for precise ion beam current measurements

    Kurian, Febin

    2015-01-01

    The planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI has to cope with a wide range of beam intensities in its high-energy beam transport systems and in the storage rings. To meet the requirements of a non-intercepting intensity measurement down to nA range, it is planned to install a number of Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) units at different locations in the FAIR beamlines. In this work, the first CCC system for intensity measurement of heavy ion beams, which was developed at GSI, was re-commissioned and upgraded to be used as a 'GSI - CCC prototype' for extensive optimization and development of an improved CCC for FAIR. After installation of a new SQUID sensor and related electronics, as well as implementation of improved data acquisition components, successful beam current measurements were performed at a SIS18 extraction line. The measured intensity values were compared with those of a Secondary Electron Monitor (SEM). Furthermore, the spill-structure of a slowly extracted beam was measured and analyzed, investigating its improvement due to bunching during the slow-extraction process. Due to the extreme sensitivity of the superconducting sensor, the determined intensity values as well as the adjustment of the system for optimal performance are strongly influenced by the numerous noise sources of the accelerators environment. For this reason, detailed studies of different effects caused by noise have been carried out, which are presented together with proposals to reduce them. Similarly, studies were performed to increase the dynamic range and overcome slew rate limitations, the results of which are illustrated and discussed as well. By combining the various optimizations and characterizations of the GSI CCC prototype with the experiences made during beam operation, criteria for a more efficient CCC System could be worked out, which are presented in this work. The details of this new design are worked out with respect to the

  4. From Electron Beams to Photon Beams

    Ranieri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    n this article I try to report at the best the events and the emotions I experienced, together with my colleagues, when I was a young researcher working at the Frascati Center of CNEN. In the middle of 70’s the high energy physics activities carried out in Frascati were transferred from CNEN to INFN (Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare) and the personnel had the chance to chose to continue to work at the CNEN (obviously in a different research field) or to continue to work in high energy physics, but at the INFN. I decided to remain at the CNEN and, consequently, I had to change my research activity. I moved from the high energy accelerators research field to the lasers research field in which, at that time at the CNEN, a new interesting project on “uranium laser isotope separation” was just starting. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental development activity, carried out in the years 70’s-80’s at the CNEN Frascati Center, on a quite particular kind of laser to be utilized in that project. In this laser the active medium is not made of atoms or molecules but is a beam of free electrons running along a spatially periodic magnetic structure: this laser is the “Free Electron Laser” [it

  5. SNS project-wide beam current monitors

    Kesselman, M.; Witkover, R.; Doolittle, L.; Power, J.

    2000-01-01

    A consortium of national laboratories is constructing the Spallation Neutron Source [1] (SNS) to be installed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are signal similarities that exist in the beam diagnostic instrumentation that could permit common designs. This paper will focus on the beam current monitoring requirements, and the methods under consideration to measure beam current in various locations throughout the SNS facility

  6. Ion acceleration in modulated electron beams

    Bonch-Osmolovskij, A.G.; Dolya, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    A method of ion acceleration in modulated electron beams is considered. Electron density and energy of their rotational motion are relatively low. However the effective ion-accelerating field is not less than 10 MeV/m. The electron and ion numbers in an individual bunch are also relatively small, although the number of produced bunches per time unit is great. Some aspects of realization of the method are considered. Possible parameters of the accelerator are given. At 50 keV electron energy and 1 kA beam current a modulation is realized at a wave length of 30 cm. The ion-accelerating field is 12 MeV/m. The bunch number is 2x10 3 in one pulse at a gun pulse duration of 2 μs. With a pulse repetition frequency of 10 2 Hz the number of accelerated ions can reach 10 13 -10 14 per second

  7. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    Loos, H.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of

  8. Isothermal oxidation behaviour of thermal barrier coatings with CoCrAlY bond coat irradiated by high-current pulsed electron beam

    Cai, Jie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Guan, Qingfeng, E-mail: guanqf@mail.ujs.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Hou, Xiuli [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Zhiping; Su, Jingxin; Han, Zhiyong [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The original coarse surface was re-melted by pulsed electron beam irradiation. • Very fine grains were homogeneously dispersed on the irradiated coat surface. • A compact Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale was formed in irradiated TBCs at the onset of oxidation. • The selective oxidation of Al element avoided the formation of other oxides. • The irradiated coating has a much higher oxidation resistance. - Abstract: Thermal sprayed CoCrAlY bond coat irradiated by high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) and thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) prepared with the irradiated bond coat and the ceramic top coat were investigated. The high temperature oxidation resistance of these specimens was tested at 1050 °C in air. Microstructure observations revealed that the original coarse surface of the as-sprayed bond coat was significantly changed as the interconnected bulged nodules with a compact appearance after HCPEB irradiation. Abundant Y-rich alumina particulates and very fine grains were dispersed on the irradiated surface. After high temperature oxidation test, the thermally grown oxide (TGO) in the initial TBCs grew rapidly and was comprised of two distinct layers: a large percentage of mixed oxides in the outer layer and a relatively small portion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the inner layer. Severe local internal oxidation and extensive cracks in the TGO layer were discovered as well. Comparatively, the irradiated TBCs exhibited thinner TGO layer, slower TGO growth rate, and homogeneous TGO composition (primarily consisting of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The results indicate that TBCs with the irradiated bond coat have a much higher oxidation resistance.

  9. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed

  10. Beam line design for a low energy electron beam

    Arvind Kumar; Mahadevan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The design of a beam line for transport of a 70 keV electron beam from a thermionic gun to the Plane Wave Transformer (PWT) linac incorporating two solenoid magnets, a beam profile monitor and drift sections is presented. We used beam dynamics codes EGUN, PARMELA and compare simulated results with analytical calculations. (author)

  11. Experimental study of the stability of a neutralized electron beam

    Kudelainen, V.I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1983-01-01

    Results are reported from measurements of the spectral properties of a long neutralized electron beam in the NAP-M proton storage ring. It is shown that when the number of secondary electrons is small, both the longitudinal and the transverse oscillations are strongly damped, so that beam instability is suppressed. The current density of the neutralized electron beam produced in the experiments was approx.10 2 times greater than the theoretical value determined from the instability threshold for nonaxisymmetric oscillations

  12. Characteristics of plasma in uranium atomic beam produced by electron-beam heating

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    The electron temperature of plasma and the ion flux ratio in the uranium atomic beam produced by electron-beam heating were characterized with Langmuir probes. The electron temperature was 0.13 eV, which was lower than the evaporation surface temperature. The ion flux ratio to atomic beam flux was more than 3% at higher evaporation rates. The ion flux ratio has increased with decreasing acceleration energy of the electron-beam under constant electron-beam power. This is because of an increase of electron-beam current and a large ionization cross-section of uranium by electron-impact. It was confined that the plasma is produced by electron-impact ionization of the evaporated atoms at the evaporation source. (author)

  13. Electron beam gaseous pollutants treatment

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Emission of gaseous pollutants, mostly during combustion of fossil fuels, creates a threat to the environment. New, economical technologies are needed for flue gas treatment. A physico-chemical basis of the process using electron beam for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds are presented in this report. Development of the process and its upscaling has been discussed. (author)

  14. Dosimetry for electron beam sterilization

    Miller, A.

    2007-01-01

    According to ISO 11137-1 (sect 4.3.4) dosimetry used in the development, validation and routine control of the sterilization process shall have measurement traceability to national or international standards and shall have a known level of uncertainty. It can only be obtained through calibration of the dosimeters. In presented lecture different types of dosimeter systems for electron beams (calorimeters, radiochromic film dosimeters, alanine / EPR) and their calibration are described

  15. Beam Dynamics With Electron Cooling

    Uesugi, T; Noda, K; Shibuya, S; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling experiments have been carried out at HIMAC in order to develop new technologies in heavy-ion therapy and related researches. The cool-stacking method, in particular, has been studied to increase the intensity of heavy-ions. The maximum stack intensity was 2 mA, above which a fast ion losses occurred simulatneously with the vertical coherent oscillations. The instability depends on the working point, the stacked ion-density and the electron-beam density. The instability was suppressed by reducing the peak ion-density with RF-knockout heating.

  16. High energy polarized electron beams

    Rossmanith, R.

    1987-01-01

    In nearly all high energy electron storage rings the effect of beam polarization by synchrotron radiation has been measured. The buildup time for polarization in storage rings is of the order of 10 6 to 10 7 revolutions; the spins must remain aligned over this time in order to avoid depolarization. Even extremely small spin deviations per revolution can add up and cause depolarization. The injection and the acceleration of polarized electrons in linacs is much easier. Although some improvements are still necessary, reliable polarized electron sources with sufficiently high intensity and polarization are available. With the linac-type machines SLC at Stanford and CEBAF in Virginia, experiments with polarized electrons will be possible

  17. Study on the nanostructure formation mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Gao, Bo, E-mail: gaob@smm.neu.edu.cn [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Liang [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Li, Shi-wei [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Hao, Yi [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang, Yu-dong [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France); Tu, Gan-feng [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Grosdidier, Thierry [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France)

    2015-08-15

    This work investigates the nanostructure forming mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy associated with the high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment with increasing number of pulses by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and SEM. The surface layers were melted and resolidified rapidly. The treated surfaces show different structural characteristics in different compositions and distribution zones. The top melted-layer zone can be divided into three zones: Si-rich, Ai-rich, and intermediate zone. The Al-rich zone has a nano-cellular microstructure with a diameter of ∼100 nm. The microstructure in the Si-rich zone consists of fine, dispersive, and spherical nano-sized Si crystals surrounded by α(Al) cells. Some superfine eutectic structures form in the boundary of the two zones. With the increase of number of pulses, the proportion of Si-rich zone to the whole top surface increases, and more cellular substructures are transformed to fine equiaxed grain. In other words, with increasing number of pulses, more Si elements diffuse to the Al-rich zone and provide heterogeneous nucleation sites, and Al grains are refined dramatically. Moreover, the relationship between the substrate Si phase and crystalline phase is determined by EBSD; that is, (1 1 1){sub Al}//(0 0 1){sub Si} with a value of disregistry δ at approximately 5%. The HCPEB technique is a versatile technique for refining the surface microstructure of hypereutectic Al–Si alloys.

  18. Sensitive beam current measurement for FAIR

    Schwickert, Marcus; Kurian, Febin; Reeg, Hansjoerg [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Seidel, Paul; Neubert, Ralf [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena (Germany); Geithner, Rene; Vodel, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Institut Jena (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Presently FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, entered the final planning phase at GSI. The new accelerator facility requires precise devices for beam current measurements due to the large dynamics in beam intensities for the various synchrotrons, transport lines and storage rings. We report on the actual developments of beam diagnostic devices for the measurement of beam intensities ranging from 5 x 10{sup 11} uranium ions down to the detection of less than 10{sup 4} antiprotons. This contribution gives an overview of the planned instruments with a focus on non-intercepting beam current transformers, and summarizes the on-going development of a cryogenic current comparator.

  19. Characterisation Of The Beam Plasma In High Current, Low Energy Ion Beams For Implanters

    Fiala, J.; Armour, D. G.; Berg, J. A. van der; Holmes, A. J. T.; Goldberg, R. D.; Collart, E. H. J.

    2006-01-01

    The effective transport of high current, positive ion beams at low energies in ion implanters requires the a high level of space charge compensation. The self-induced or forced introduction of electrons is known to result in the creation of a so-called beam plasma through which the beam propagates. Despite the ability of beams at energies above about 3-5 keV to create their own neutralising plasmas and the development of highly effective, plasma based neutralising systems for low energy beams, very little is known about the nature of beam plasmas and how their characteristics and capabilities depend on beam current, beam energy and beamline pressure. These issues have been addressed in a detailed scanning Langmuir probe study of the plasmas created in beams passing through the post-analysis section of a commercial, high current ion implanter. Combined with Faraday cup measurements of the rate of loss of beam current in the same region due to charge exchange and scattering collisions, the probe data have provided a valuable insight into the nature of the slow ion and electron production and loss processes. Two distinct electron energy distribution functions are observed with electron temperatures ≥ 25 V and around 1 eV. The fast electrons observed must be produced in their energetic state. By studying the properties of the beam plasma as a function of the beam and beamline parameters, information on the ways in which the plasma and the beam interact to reduce beam blow-up and retain a stable plasma has been obtained

  20. Windowless Electron Beam Experimental Irradiation WEBExplr

    Heyse, J.

    2009-01-01

    The design of the MYRRHA/XT-ADS, the European eXperimental Accelerator Driven System for the demonstration of Transmutation, includes a high power windowless spallation target operating with liquid LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) that will be irradiated with a 600 MeV proton beam at currents of up to 2.5 mA. When considering such a high power windowless target design, a number of questions need to be addressed, such as the stability of the free surface flow and its ability to remove the power deposited by the proton beam by forced convection, the compatibility of a large hot LBE reservoir with the beam line vacuum and the outgassing of the LBE in the spallation target circuit. These issues have been studied during previous experiments supported by numerical simulations. Another crucial point in the development of the spallation target is the demonstration of the safe and stable operation of the free LBE surface during irradiation with a high power proton beam. As a first step in this program, the WEBExpIr (Windowless target Electron Beam Experimental Irradiation) experiment was set up. The purpose of the WEBExpIr experiment was to investigate the influence of LBE surface heating caused by a charged particle beam in a situation representative of the MYRRHA/XT-ADS. More in particular, we wanted to assess possible free surface distortion or shockwave effects in nominal conditions and during sudden beam on/off transient situations, as well as possible enhanced evaporation

  1. Regenerative beam breakup in multi-pass electron accelerators

    Vetter, A.M. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Important electron coincidence experiments in the 1 to 2 GeV range require electron beams of high intensity and high duty factor. To provide such beams, multi-pass electron accelerator systems are being developed at many laboratories. The beam current in multi-pass electron machines is limited by bean breakup which arises from interaction of the electron beam with deflection modes of the accelerator structure. Achieving high beam intensity (50 to 100 μA) will require detailed understanding and careful control of beam breakup phenomena, and is the subject of this thesis. The TM 11 -like traveling wave theory is applied to obtain a physical understanding of beam-mode interactions and the principles of focussing in simple two-pass systems, and is used as a basis for general studies of the dependence of starting current on accelerator parameters in systems of many passes. The concepts developed are applied in analyzing beam breakup in the superconducting recyclotron at Stanford. Measurements of beam interactions with selected breakup modes are incorporated in a simple model in order to estimate relative strengths of breakup modes and to predict starting currents in five-pass operation. The improvement over these predicted currents required in order to obtain 50 to 100 μA beams is shown to be achievable with a combination of increased breakup mode loading and improved beam optics

  2. Correlation between morphological defects, electron beam-induced current imaging, and the electrical properties of 4H-SiC Schottky diodes

    Wang, Y.; Ali, G.N.; Mikhov, M.K.; Vaidyanathan, V.; Skromme, B.J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Defects in SiC degrade the electrical properties and yield of devices made from this material. This article examines morphological defects in 4H-SiC and defects visible in electron beam-induced current (EBIC) images and their effects on the electrical characteristics of Schottky diodes. Optical Nomarski microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe the morphological defects, which are classified into 26 types based on appearance alone. Forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics were used to extract barrier heights, ideality factors, and breakdown voltages. Barrier heights decrease about linearly with increasing ideality factor, which is explained by discrete patches of low barrier height within the main contact. Barrier height, ideality, and breakdown voltage all degrade with increasing device diameter, suggesting that discrete defects are responsible. Electroluminescence was observed under reverse bias from microplasmas associated with defects containing micropipes. EBIC measurements reveal several types of features corresponding to recombination centers. The density of dark spots observed by EBIC correlates strongly with ideality factor and barrier height. Most morphological defects do not affect the reverse characteristics when no micropipes are present, but lower the barrier height and worsen the ideality factor. However, certain multiple-tailed defects, irregularly shaped defects and triangular defects with 3C inclusions substantially degrade both breakdown voltage and barrier height, and account for most of the bad devices that do not contain micropipes. Micropipes in these wafers are also frequently found to be of Type II, which do not run parallel to the c axis

  3. Glow-discharge-created electron beams and beam-excited lasers

    Meyer, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Efficiently created glow discharge electron beams have been developed and studied in detail. The beam mode of operation occurs in the abnormal glow adjacent to the glow-to-arc transition regime. In contrast to electron beams generated in high vacuum from thermionic electron emitting sources, this type of discharge creates electrons directly in soft vacuum by secondary electron emission from cold cathode surfaces following the bombardment of the cathode surface by fast ions and neutral atoms. Factors influencing the efficient electron emission from cold cathodes are presented with emphasis on cathode materials. Sintered ceramic-metal cathodes and oxide-coated cathodes are presented, both of which can produce high power, efficiently generated, d.c. electron beams with discharge currents up to 1 amp (∼130 mA/cm 2 ) at volt ages of up to 6 kV. Novel cathode designs and discharge geometries are presented with specific emphasis on both self-focussed beams emitted from circular cathodes and line-source electron beams emitted from rectangular cathodes forming a thin sheet of electrons. Electrostatically focussed line-source electron beams are spatially characterized by experimentally measuring the effect of discharge parameters and cathode design upon the focussed beam width, focal point, and uniformity. This is achieved by scanning a current collecting detector in three dimensions in order to profile the distribution of electron beam current. Discharge electron beams are further characterized by their electron energy distribution. Measured electron flux energy distributions of transmitted beam electrons in the negative glow are compared to theoretical models. The relative effects of elastic and inelastic collisions mechanisms upon both the overall form and detailed structure of the energy distribution are discussed

  4. Absolute beam-charge measurement for single-bunch electron beams

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Furukawa, Kazuro; Akasaka, Nobumasa

    2000-01-01

    The absolute beam charge of a single-bunch electron beam with a pulse width of 10 ps and that of a short-pulsed electron beam with a pulse width of 1 ns were measured with a Faraday cup in a beam test for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB) injector linac. It is strongly desired to obtain a precise beam-injection rate to the KEKB rings, and to estimate the amount of beam loss. A wall-current monitor was also recalibrated within an error of ±2%. This report describes the new results for an absolute beam-charge measurement for single-bunch and short-pulsed electron beams, and recalibration of the wall-current monitors in detail. (author)

  5. Spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics for microsecond, intense electron beams

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Brake, M.; Horton, L.D.; Bidwell, S.; Lucey, R.F.; Smutek, L.; Tucker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are underway to investigate new diagnostics for electron beams in vacuum and in a plasma background. Measured parameters include temporally resolved beam current profile and beam emittance. These characterizations are being performed during electron beam diode closure experiments (1) and beam-plasma interaction experiments with either of two long-pulse accelerators: MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator): Voltage = -1 MV, Current = 10 kA, at Pulselength = 0.1 to 1μs (1.4μs) for voltage flat to within +.7% (+.10%). The second accelerator is a long-pulse Febetron with parameters: Voltage = -0.5 MV, Current = 1 kA, and Pulselength = 0.3 s. Two different configurations have been developed which use Cerenkov radiation to detect electron beam current profiles as a function of time. The first uses Cerenkov emission by electrons which impinge axially on a single fiberoptic lightguide enclosed in a lucite tube. Plasma light is blocked by graphite spray or thin foil covering the end of the optical fiber. This diagnostic has the following advantages: 1) The threshold energy for Cerenkov emission effectively discriminates between high energy beam electrons and low energy (3-5 eV) plasma electrons, 2) The small, nonconducting probe introduces a minimal perturbation into the beam-plasma system, 3) Excellent signal to noise ratio is obtained because the fiberoptic signal is directly transmitted to a photomultiplier tube in the Faraday cage, 4) Quantitative data is obtained directly

  6. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation for HL-LHC - Effects on the Beam Core

    Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Bruce, R. [CERN; Papotti, G [CERN; Redaelli, S. [CERN; Valentino, G. [Malta U.; Valentino, G. [CERN; Valuch, D. [CERN; Xu, C. [CERN

    2017-06-13

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). To ensure the successful operation of the hollow beam collimator the unwanted effects on the beam core, which might arise from the operation with a pulsed electron beam, must be minimized. This paper gives a summary of the effect of hollow electron lenses on the beam core in terms of sources, provides estimates for HL-LHC and discusses the possible mitigation methods.

  7. Two tests of electric fields, second-order in source-velocity terms of closed, steady currents: (1) an electron beam; (2) a superconducting coil

    Kenyon, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    One particular prediction of Maxwell's theory that has been previously neglected is that the motion of charges traveling in closed loops produces no constant electric fields. This study presents and analyzes the results of two new experiments designed to test for second-order, source-velocity electric fields from steady, closed currents and analyzes another experiment in light of these fields. The first experiment employed an electron beam. The second used a niobium-titanium coil designed so that the voltage measurement configuration could be easily switched from a Faraday to a non-faraday configuration between sets of runs. The implications of the observation of a null charge on magnetically suspended superconducting spheres vis-a-vis the second-order, source-velocity fields were discussed as the third case. The observation of a null potential corresponding to a null effective charge from a hypothetical velocity-squared field in both the beam and the coil experiment placed the upper bound on a field term at 0.02 with respect a Coulomb term. An observed null charge on the suspended spheres reduced this bound to 0.001. Such an upper bound is strong evidence against alternative theories predicting a relative contribution of the order of unity for a simple velocity-squared term. A simple velocity-squared electric field would be indistinguishable from a velocity-squared charge variation. The latter test limits such a charge variation to 0.001 of the total charge. The suspended-spheres test allowed the previously neglected issue of a general second-order, source-velocity electric field to be addressed. The observed null charge in this test contradicts and thus eliminates a hypothesized, general, electric field expression containing three second-order, source-velocity terms

  8. Electron gun design study for the IUCF beam cooling system

    Friesel, D.L.; Ellison, T.; Jones, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The design of a low temperature electron beam cooling system for the Indiana University electron-cooled storage ring is in progress. The storage ring, which will accept the light ion beams from the existing k=200, multi-stage cyclotron facility, requires an electron beam variable in energy from about 7 to 275 keV. The electron beam system consists of a high perveance electron gun with Pierce geometry and a flat cathode. The gun and a 28 element accelerating column are immersed in a uniform longitudinal magnetic guide field. A computer modeling study of the system was conducted to determine electron beam density and transverse temperature variations as a function of anode region and accelerator column design parameters. Transverse electron beam temperatures (E /SUB t/ = mc 2 β 2 γ(/theta/ /SUB H/ +/theta/ /SUB v/ )) of less than a few tenths of an electron volt at a maximum current density of 0.4 A/cm 2 are desired over the full energy range. This was achieved in the calculations without the use of resonant focusing for a 2 Amp, 275 keV electron beam. Some systematics of the electron beam temperature variations with system design parameters are presented. A short discussion of the mechanical design of the proposed electron beam system is also given

  9. Study on the compensation of electron beam space charge in facilittes with electron cooling

    Dikanskij, N.S.; Kudelajnen, V.I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of a compensated electron beam on the NAP-M facility are presented. The electron beam is compensated by electrostatic plugs preventing ion leakage along the beam. Cut-off electrodes have the shape of cutted cylinders encircling the electron beam. To eliminate electron accumulation around the plugs one of the electrodes has a zero potential, which results in formation of an transverse electric field causing ionization electron drift in the transverse direction to the electric and magnetic fields. The effect of wave damping, in the compensated beam is observed, that demonstrates the possibility of gaining great current densities in long compensated beams necessary for antiproton storage. For the NAP-M at the 10 10 cm/s electron velocity, 300 cm length of ion column, and 1 kOe field intensity the threshold beam current density is 0.96 A/cm 2 [ru

  10. Transport of a relativistic electron beam through hydrogen gas

    Haan, P. de.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the author describes the transport properties of an electron beam through vacuum and through hydrogen gas with pressure ranging from 25 to 1000 Pa. Maximum beam energy and current are 0.8 MeV and 6 kA, respectively. The pulse length is around 150 ns. A description is given of the experimental device. Also the diagnostics for probing the beam and the plasma, produced by the beam, are discussed, as well as the data acquisition system. The interaction between the beam and hydrogen gas with a pressure around 200 Pa is considered. A plasma with density around 10 19 m -3 is produced within a few nanoseconds. Measurements yield the atomic hydrogen temperature, electron density, beam energy loss, and induced plasma current and these are compared with the results of a model combining gas ionization and dissociation, and turbulent plasma heating. The angular distribution of the beam electrons about the magnetic field axis is discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Dosimetry for electron beam application

    Miller, A.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron beam dosimetry, on one hand development of film dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand development of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film dosimeters have been developed in this department, and the properties of these and commercially available dosimeters have been measured and found to be comparable. Calorimeters which are in use for routine measurements, are being investigated with reference to their application as standardizing instruments, and new calorimeters are being developed. (author)

  12. Apparatus for irradiation with electron beam

    Uehara, K.; Ito, A.; Nishimune, K.; Fujita, K.

    1976-01-01

    An irradiation apparatus with high energy electrons is disclosed in which a wire shaped or linear object to be irradiated is moved back and forth many times under an electron window so as to irradiate it with an electron beam. According to one feature of the invention, an electron beam, which leaks through gaps between the objects to be irradiated or which penetrates the objects to be irradiated, is reversed by a magnetic field approximately perpendicular to the scanning face of the electron beam by means of a magnet which is disposed under the objects to be irradiated, and the reversed electron beam is thereby again applied to the objects to be irradiated. A high utilization rate of the electron beam is accomplished, and the objects can be thereby uniformly irradiated with the electron beam. 4 claims, 6 drawing figures

  13. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    D. Abou-Ras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe2 solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe2 layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w2 and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  14. Electron-beam-induced current study of hydrogen passivation on grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon: Influence of GB character and impurity contamination

    Chen Jun; Yang Deren; Xi Zhenqiang; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The impacts of grain boundary (GB) character and impurity contamination level on the hydrogen passivation of GBs in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) were studied by means of an electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. In mc-Si with a low contamination of Fe, the 300K EBIC contrast of all kinds of GBs in the H-passivated state was weak and similar to that in the as-grown state. The 100K EBIC contrast of Σ (Σ=3, 9, and 27) GBs decreased about 75-80%, whereas that of random and small-angle GBs decreased about 35-40%. Due to the different impurity gettering ability of different GBs, the variation in 100K EBIC contrast has suggested that the effect of H-passivation depends on both the GB character and impurity contamination level. In the mc-Si with heavy contamination of Fe, at both 300 and 100K, the EBIC contrast of both Σ (Σ=3) and random GBs decreased but the ratio was <40%, suggesting that the H-passivation is mainly affected by the impurity contamination level. on

  15. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  16. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500 to 700 keV are needed for this device

  17. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    Devoto, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500-700 keV are needed for this device

  18. Chirping the LCLS Electron Beam

    Emma, P.

    2005-01-01

    We explore scenarios for generating a linear time-correlated energy spread in the LCLS electron bunch, prior to the undulator, that is needed for optical (x-ray) pulse compression. The correlated energy spread (''chirp'') is formed by generating an energy gradient along the length of the electron bunch using RF phasing and/or longitudinal wakefields of the accelerating structures. The sign of the correlation is an important limitation. Excluding a complete re-design of the compression systems, the best possibility is to use ''over-compression'' to effect the required energy chirp. This is easily done with only a slight strength increase (∼10%) in the chicane bends of the second compressor. In this case, the bend-plane emittance dilution associated with the increased coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the bunch compressor may, however, significantly compromise the electron beam density. The CSR calculations for the momentary extremely short (∼1 (micro)m) electron bunch during over-compression are quite subtle and an adequate confidence level may not be achievable. A practical limit in this short-pulse scenario may be to use spontaneous rather than FEL radiation. Ignoring the potential emittance growth, a FWHM electron energy spread of 2% is possible

  19. Intense relativistic electron beam generation from KALI-5000 pulse accelerator

    Roy, A.; Mondal, J.; Mitra, S.; Durga Praveen Kumar, D.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K.V.; Chakravarthy, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Intense Relativistic Electron Beam (IREB) with parameters 420 keV, 22 kA, 100 ns has been generated from indigenously developed pulse power system KALI- 5000. High current electron beam is generated from explosive field emission graphite cathodes. Studies have been conducted by changing the diameter of graphite cathode and also the anode cathode gap. In order to avoid prepulse effect it was concluded that anode cathode (AK) gap should be kept larger than estimated by the Child Langmuir relation. Beam voltage has been measured by a copper sulphate voltage divider, beam current by a self integrating Rogowski coil and B-dot probe. Electron beam diode Impedance and Perveance were obtained from the experimentally measured beam voltage and current. (author)

  20. Ultra-High Density Electron Beams for Beam Radiation and Beam Plasma Interaction

    Anderson, Scott; Frigola, Pedro; Gibson, David J; Hartemann, Fred V; Jacob, Jeremy S; Lim, Jae; Musumeci, Pietro; Rosenzweig, James E; Travish, Gil; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    Current and future applications of high brightness electron beams, which include advanced accelerators such as the plasma wake-field accelerator (PWFA) and beam-radiation interactions such as inverse-Compton scattering (ICS), require both transverse and longitudinal beam sizes on the order of tens of microns. Ultra-high density beams may be produced at moderate energy (50 MeV) by compression and subsequent strong focusing of low emittance, photoinjector sources. We describe the implementation of this method used at LLNL's PLEIADES ICS x-ray source in which the photoinjector-generated beam has been compressed to 300 fsec duration using the velocity bunching technique and focused to 20 μm rms size using an extremely high gradient, permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) focusing system.

  1. Definition of Beam Diameter for Electron Beam Welding

    Burgardt, Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pierce, Stanley W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    It is useful to characterize the dimensions of the electron beam during process development for electron beam welding applications. Analysis of the behavior of electron beam welds is simplest when a single number can be assigned to the beam properties that describes the size of the beam spot; this value we generically call the “beam diameter”. This approach has worked well for most applications and electron beam welding machines with the weld dimensions (width and depth) correlating well with the beam diameter. However, in recent weld development for a refractory alloy, Ta-10W, welded with a low voltage electron beam machine (LVEB), it was found that the weld dimensions (weld penetration and weld width) did not correlate well with the beam diameter and especially with the experimentally determined sharp focus point. These data suggest that the presently used definition of beam diameter may not be optimal for all applications. The possible reasons for this discrepancy and a suggested possible alternative diameter definition is the subject of this paper.

  2. High-current beam transport in electrostatic accelerator tubes

    Ramian, G.; Elais, L.

    1987-01-01

    The UCSB Free Electron Laser (FEL) has successfully demonstrated the use of a commercial 6 megavolt electrostatic accelerator as a high current beam source in a recirculating configuration. The accelerator, manufactured by National Electrostatics Corp. (NEC), Middleton WI, uses two standard high gradient accelerator tubes. Suppression of ion multiplication was accomplished by NEC with apertures and a shaped electrostatic field. This field shaping has fortuitously provided a periodically reversing radial field component with sufficient focusing strength to transport electron beams of up to 3 Amps current. Present two-stage FEL work requires a 20 Amp beam and proposed very high voltage FEL designs require currents as high as 100 Amps. A plan to permit transport of such high current beams by the addition of solenoidal focussing elements is described

  3. 'Electron compression' of beam-beam footprint in the Tevatron

    Shiltsev, V.; Finley, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    The beam-beam interaction in the Tevatron collider sets some limits on bunch intensity and luminosity. These limits are caused by a tune spread in each bunch which is mostly due to head-on collisions, but there is also a bunch-to-bunch tune spread due to parasitic collisions in multibunch operation. We describe a counter-traveling electron beam which can be used to eliminate these effects, and present general considerations and physics limitations of such a device which provides 'electron compression' of the beam-beam footprint in the Tevatron

  4. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  5. Method for surface treatment by electron beams

    Panzer, S.; Doehler, H.; Bartel, R.; Ardenne, T. von.

    1985-01-01

    The invention has been aimed at simplifying the technology and saving energy in modifying surfaces with the aid of electron beams. The described beam-object geometry allows to abandon additional heat treatments. It can be used for surface hardening

  6. Beam heating in solar flares - Electrons or protons?

    Brown, J.C.; Karlicky, M.; Mackinnon, A.L.; Van Den Oord, G.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of electron and proton beam models as candidates for the impulsive phase heating of solar flares is discussed in relation to observational constants and theoretical difficulties. It is concluded that, while the electron beam model for flare heating still faces theoretical and observational problems, the problems faced by low and high energy proton beam models are no less serious, and there are facets of proton models which have not yet been studied. At the present, the electron beam model remains the most viable and best developed of heating model candidates. 58 refs

  7. Electron-beam and microwave treatment of some microbial strains

    Martin, D.; Ferdes, O.S.; Minea, R.; Tirlea, A.; Badea, M.; Plamadeala, S.; Ferdes, M.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental results concerning the combined effects of microwaves and accelerated electron beams on various microbial strains such as E. coli, Salmonella sp. and Monascus purpureus are presented. A special designed microwave applicator with a 2.45 GHz frequency CW magnetron of 850 maximum output power and with associate electronics that allow to control the microwave power, the current intensity, and the exposure time was used. The electron-beam irradiation was performed at different irradiation doses and at a dose rate of 1.5 - 2.0 kGy/min by using a linac at a mean electron energy about 6 MeV, mean bean current of 10 μA, pulse period of 3.5 μs and repetition frequency 100 Hz. The experiments were carried out in 5 variants: microwave treatment; electron-beam irradiation; microwaves followed by electron beam; electrons followed by microwaves; and simultaneous application of microwaves and electron beam. The microbiocidal effect was found to be enhanced by additional use of microwave energy to electron beam irradiation. Enhancement of inactivation rate is only remarkable for the microwave treatment or simultaneous electron beam and microwave irradiation at a temperature above the critical value at which microorganisms begin to perish by heat. Simultaneous irradiation with electron beam and microwaves results in a reduction of temperature and time as well as in the decrease of the upper limit of required electron beam absorbed dose for an assumed microbiological quality parameter. The results obtained indicate the occurrence of a synergistic effect of the two physical fields on a non-thermal basis. Hence, combined microwave-electron beam treatment may be applied as an effective method to reduce microbial load

  8. Charge carrier transport in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar-cells studied by electron beam induced current and temperature and illumination dependent current voltage analysis

    Nichterwitz, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    This work contributes to the understanding of generation dependent charge-carrier transport properties in Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe)/ CdS/ ZnO solar cells and a consistent model for the electronic band diagram of the heterojunction region of the device is developed. Cross section electron-beam induced current (EBIC) and temperature and illumination dependent current voltage (IV) measurements are performed on CIGSe solar cells with varying absorber layer compositions and CdS thickness. For a better understanding of possibilities and limitations of EBIC measurements applied on CIGSe solar cells, detailed numerical simulations of cross section EBIC profiles for varying electron beam and solar cell parameters are performed and compared to profiles obtained from an analytical description. Especially the effects of high injection conditions are considered. Even though the collection function of the solar cell is not independent of the generation function of the electron beam, the local electron diffusion length in CIGSe can still be extracted. Grain specific values ranging from (480±70) nm to (2.3±0.2) μm are determined for a CuInSe 2 absorber layer and a value of (2.8±0.3) μm for CIGSe with a Ga-content of 0.3. There are several models discussed in literature to explain generation dependent charge carrier transport, all assuming a high acceptor density either located in the CIGSe layer close to the CIGSe/CdS interface (p + layer), within the CdS layer or at the CdS/ZnO interface. In all models, a change in charge carrier collection properties is caused by a generation dependent occupation probability of the acceptor type defect state and the resulting potential distribution throughout the device. Numerical simulations of EBIC and IV data are performed with parameters according to these models. The model that explains the experimental data best is that of a p + layer at the CIGSe/CdS interface and acceptor type defect states at the CdS/ZnO interface. The p + layer leads

  9. High-current electron beam coupling to hybrid waveguide and plasma modes in a dielectric Cherenkov maser with a plasma layer

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli S.

    2002-01-01

    The linear theory of a dielectric Cherenkov maser with a plasma layer has been developed. The dispersion relation has been derived for the model of infinitely thin, fully magnetized, monoenergetic hollow electron beam, in the axisymmetric case. The results of the numerical solution of the dispersion relation and the analysis of the beam coupling to hybrid waves, both hybrid waveguide and hybrid plasma modes, are presented. For the hybrid waveguide mode, spatial growth rate dependences on frequency at different plasma densities demonstrate improvement in gain for moderate densities, but strong shifting the amplification band and narrowing the bandwidth. For the hybrid plasma mode, the case of mildly relativistic, 200-250 keV beams is of interest, so that the wave phase velocity is just slightly greater than the speed of light in a dielectric medium. It has been shown that depending on beam and plasma parameters, the hybrid plasma mode can be separated from the hybrid waveguide mode, or be coupled to it through the beam resulting in strong gain increase, or exhibit a flat gain vs frequency dependence over a very broad band. The parameters, at which the -3 dB bandwidth calculated for 30 dB peak gain exceeds an octave, have been found

  10. Transverse electron beam diagnostics at REGAE

    Bayesteh, Shima

    2014-12-15

    The use of high-intensity electron and X-ray pulsed sources allows for the direct observation of atomic motions as they occur. While the production of such high coherent, brilliant, short X-ray pulses requires large-scale and costly accelerator facilities, it is feasible to employ a high-intensity source of electrons by exploiting a more compact design. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) facility is a small linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, equipped with a photocathode radio frequency (RF) gun that produces relativistic ultra-short (<100 fs), low charge (<1 pC) electron bunches of high coherence. By means of time-resolved diffraction experiments, such an electron source can probe ultrafast laser-induced atomic structural changes that occur with a temporal resolution of ∝100 fs. A comprehensive characterization of the electron beam, for every pulse, is of fundamental importance to study the atomic motions with the desired resolution and quality. This thesis reports on the transversal diagnostics of the electron beam with an emphasis on a scintillator-based beam profile monitor. The diagnostics is capable of evaluating the beam parameters such as charge, energy, energy spread and transverse profile, at very low charges and on a shot-to-shot basis. A full characterization of the scintillator's emission, the optical setup and the detector (camera) of the profile monitor is presented, from which an absolute charge calibration of the system is derived. The profile monitor is specially developed to accommodate more applications, such as dark current suppression, overlapping the electron probe and the laser pump within 1 ns accuracy, as well as charge and transverse emittance measurements. For the determination of the transverse emittance two techniques were applied. The first one introduces a new method that exploits a diffraction pattern to measure the emittance, while the second one is based on a version of the Pepper-pot technique. A

  11. Transverse electron beam diagnostics at REGAE

    Bayesteh, Shima

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity electron and X-ray pulsed sources allows for the direct observation of atomic motions as they occur. While the production of such high coherent, brilliant, short X-ray pulses requires large-scale and costly accelerator facilities, it is feasible to employ a high-intensity source of electrons by exploiting a more compact design. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) facility is a small linear accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, equipped with a photocathode radio frequency (RF) gun that produces relativistic ultra-short (<100 fs), low charge (<1 pC) electron bunches of high coherence. By means of time-resolved diffraction experiments, such an electron source can probe ultrafast laser-induced atomic structural changes that occur with a temporal resolution of ∝100 fs. A comprehensive characterization of the electron beam, for every pulse, is of fundamental importance to study the atomic motions with the desired resolution and quality. This thesis reports on the transversal diagnostics of the electron beam with an emphasis on a scintillator-based beam profile monitor. The diagnostics is capable of evaluating the beam parameters such as charge, energy, energy spread and transverse profile, at very low charges and on a shot-to-shot basis. A full characterization of the scintillator's emission, the optical setup and the detector (camera) of the profile monitor is presented, from which an absolute charge calibration of the system is derived. The profile monitor is specially developed to accommodate more applications, such as dark current suppression, overlapping the electron probe and the laser pump within 1 ns accuracy, as well as charge and transverse emittance measurements. For the determination of the transverse emittance two techniques were applied. The first one introduces a new method that exploits a diffraction pattern to measure the emittance, while the second one is based on a version of the Pepper-pot technique. A

  12. Proton-antiproton colliding beam electron cooling

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Skrinskij, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility of effective cooling of high-energy pp tilde beams (E=10 2 -10 3 GeV) in the colliding mode by accompanying radiationally cooled electron beam circulating in an adjacent storage ring is studied. The cooling rate restrictions by the pp tilde beam interaction effects while colliding and the beam self-heating effect due to multiple internal scattering are considered. Some techniques permitting to avoid self-heating of a cooling electron beam or suppress its harmful effect on a heavy particle beam cooling are proposed. According to the estimations the cooling time of 10 2 -10 3 s order can be attained [ru

  13. Plasma lenses for focusing relativistic electron beams

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S.; Leemans, W.

    1997-01-01

    The next generation of colliders require tightly focused beams with high luminosity. To focus charged particle beams for such applications, a plasma focusing scheme has been proposed. Plasma lenses can be overdense (plasma density, n p much greater than electron beam density, n b ) or underdense (n p less than 2 n b ). In overdense lenses the space-charge force of the electron beam is canceled by the plasma and the remaining magnetic force causes the electron beam to self-pinch. The focusing gradient is nonlinear, resulting in spherical aberrations. In underdense lenses, the self-forces of the electron beam cancel, allowing the plasma ions to focus the beam. Although for a given beam density, a uniform underdense lens produces smaller focusing gradients than an overdense lens, it produces better beam quality since the focusing is done by plasma ions. The underdense lens can be improved by tapering the density of the plasma for optimal focusing. The underdense lens performance can be enhanced further by producing adiabatic plasma lenses to avoid the Oide limit on spot size due to synchrotron radiation by the electron beam. The plasma lens experiment at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) is designed to study the properties of plasma lenses in both overdense and underdense regimes. In particular, important issues such as electron beam matching, time response of the lens, lens aberrations and shot-to-shot reproducibility are being investigated

  14. Generation of an intense ion beam by a pinched relativistic electron beam

    Gilad, P.; Zinamon, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The pinched electron beam of a pulsed electron accelerator is used to generate an intense beam of ions. A foil anode and vacuum drift tube are used. The space charge field of the pinched beam in the tube accelerates ions from the foil anode. Ion currents of 10 kA at a density of 5kA/cm 2 with pulse length of 50 ns are obtained using a 5 kJ, 450 kV, 3 Ω diode. (author)

  15. Electron beam treatment of industrial wastewater

    Han, Bumsoo; Kim, JinKyu; Kim, Yuri

    2004-01-01

    For industrial wastewater with low impurity levels such as contaminated ground water, cleaning water and etc., purification only with electron beam is possible, but it should be managed carefully with reducing required irradiation doses as low as possible. Also for industrial wastewater with high impurity levels such as dyeing wastewater, leachate and etc., purification only with electron beam requires high amount of doses and far beyond economies. Electron beam treatment combined with conventional purification methods such as coagulation, biological treatment, etc. is suitable for reduction of non-biodegradable impurities in wastewater and will extend the application area of electron beam. A pilot plant with electron beam for treating 1,000 m 3 /day of wastewater from dyeing industries has constructed and operated continuously since Oct 1998. Electron beam irradiation instead of chemical treatment shows much improvement in removing impurities and increases the efficiency of biological treatment. Actual plant is under consideration based upon the experimental results. (author)

  16. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    Mueller, D.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Watson, R. L.; Horvat, V.; Zaharakis, K. E.; Peng, Y.

    2002-01-01

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters

  17. Optical circular deflector with attosecond resolution for ultrashort electron beam

    Zhen Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel method using high-power laser as a circular deflector is proposed for the measurement of femtosecond (fs and sub-fs electron beam. In the scheme, the electron beam interacts with a laser pulse operating in a radially polarized doughnut mode (TEM_{01^{*}} in a helical undulator, generating angular kicks along the beam in two directions at the same time. The phase difference between the two angular kicks makes the beam form a ring after a propagation section with appropriate phase advance, which can reveal the current profile of the electron beam. Detailed theoretical analysis of the method and numerical results with reasonable parameters are both presented. It is shown that the temporal resolution can reach up to ∼100 attosecond, which is a significant improvement for the diagnostics of ultrashort electron beam.

  18. High current beam transport experiments at GSI

    Klabunde, J.; Schonlein, A.; Spadtke, P.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the high current ion beam transport experiment is reported. 190 keV Ar 1+ ions were injected into six periods of a magnetic quadrupole channel. Since the pulse length is > 0.5 ms partial space charge neutralization occurs. In our experiments, the behavior of unneutralized and partially space charge compensated beams is compared. With an unneutralized beam, emittance growth has been measured for high intensities even in case of the zero-current phase advance sigma 0 0 . This initial emittance growth at high tune depression we attribute to the homogenization effect of the space charge density. An analytical formula based on this assumption describes the emittance growth very well. Furthermore the predicted envelope instabilities for sigma 0 > 90 0 were observed even after 6 periods. In agreement with the theory, unstable beam transport was also experimentally found if a beam with different emittances in the two transverse phase planes was injected into the transport channel. Although the space charge force is reduced for a partially neutralized beam a deterioration of the beam quality was measured in a certain range of beam parameters. Only in the range where an unneutralized beam shows the initial emittance growth, the partial neutralization reduces this effect, otherwise the partially neutralized beam is more unstable

  19. LAMPF experimental-area beam current monitors

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and operational performance of a wide- range current monitor system used to measure charged-particle currents in the experimental areas of the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), a proton accelerator. The major features of the system are high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and the ability to withstand high levels of radiation. The current pulses detected are from 50 μs to 1 ms in duration at repetition rates of from 1 to 120 Hz. The pulse amplitude varies from 1 μA to 17 mA of protons or H - ions. Both real-time and integrated outputs are available, and the minimum detectable currents are 1 μA at the video output and 50 nA at the integrated output. The basic system is comprised of toroids, preamplifiers, signal conditioners, voltage-to-frequency converters, and digital accumulators. The entire system is spread out over 1 km of beam pipe. Provision is made for calibration and for sending the outputs to remote users. The system is normally controlled by a small digital computer, which allows the system to be quite flexible in operation. The design features of the toroids and the associated electronics are discussed in detail, with emphasis on the steps taken to reduce noise and make the toroids temperature and radiation resistant

  20. Process variation in electron beam sterilization

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The qualification and control of electron beam sterilization can be improved by the application of proven statistical analysis techniques such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Statistical Tolerance Limits. These statistical techniques can be useful tools in: •Locating and quantifying the minimum and maximum absorbed dose in a product. •Estimating the expected process maximum dose, given a minimum sterilizing dose. •Setting a process minimum dose target, based on an allowance for random measurement and process variation. •Determining the dose relationship between a reference dosimeter and process minimum and maximum doses. This study investigates and demonstrates the application of these tools in qualifying electron beam sterilization, and compares the conclusions obtained with those obtained using practices recommended in Guide for Process Control in Radiation Sterilization. The study supports the following conclusions for electron beam processes: 1.ANOVA is a more effective tool for evaluating the equivalency of absorbed doses than methods suggested in . 2.Process limits computed using statistical tolerance limits more accurately reflect actual process variability than the AAMI method, which applies +/−2 sample standard deviations (s) regardless of sample size. 3.The use of reference dose ratios lends itself to qualification using statistical tolerance limits. The current AAMI recommended approach may result in an overly optimistic estimate of the reference dose adjustment factor, as it is based on application of +/−2(s) tolerances regardless of sample size.

  1. Electron beam hardened paint binder

    Johnson, O.B.; Labana, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a paint binder hardened by the effect of electron beams (0.1-100 Mrad/sec). It consists of a dispersion of (A) an ethylenic unsaturated material in (B) at least one vinyl monomer. The component (A) in a reaction product of degraded rubber particles (0.1-4 μm) and an ethylenic unsaturated component with a reactive epoxy, hydroxy or carboxy group which is bonded to the rubber particles by ester or urethane compounds. The rubber particles possess a nucleus and a cross-linked elastomeric acryl polymer, an outer shell with reactive groups and an intermediate layer formed by the monomers of the nucleus and the shell. The manner of production is described in great detail and supplemented by 157 examples. The coatings are suitable to coat articles which will be subject to deformation. (UWI) [de

  2. Industrial applications of electron beam accelerators

    Braid, W.G. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The use of electron beam accelerators for crosslinking polyolefins for shrinking food packaging is discussed. Irradiation procedures, accelerator characteristics, and industrial operations are described

  3. Integrated control system for electron beam processes

    Koleva, L.; Koleva, E.; Batchkova, I.; Mladenov, G.

    2018-03-01

    The ISO/IEC 62264 standard is widely used for integration of the business systems of a manufacturer with the corresponding manufacturing control systems based on hierarchical equipment models, functional data and manufacturing operations activity models. In order to achieve the integration of control systems, formal object communication models must be developed, together with manufacturing operations activity models, which coordinate the integration between different levels of control. In this article, the development of integrated control system for electron beam welding process is presented as part of a fully integrated control system of an electron beam plant, including also other additional processes: surface modification, electron beam evaporation, selective melting and electron beam diagnostics.

  4. Shielding in electron beams used in radiotherapy

    Sentenac, Irenee.

    1979-01-01

    The interactions of electron beams with initial energies between 7 and 30 MeV have been studied in various materials including polystyrene, aluminium, copper and lead. The following experimental results have been found: estimation of measurement point displacement in a cylindrical chamber and of its variations with electron beam energy, empirical relations between the energy at the surface and the practical range of the electrons in various materials, an estimation of the relative ionisation due to the 'bremsstrahlung' measured behind different materials with beam complete shielding. Improvement of electron beam collimation is suggested after analysis of the dose distribution behind partial shielding [fr

  5. An electromagnetically focused electron beam line source

    Iqbal, Munawar; Masood, Khalid; Rafiq, Mohammad; Chaudhary, Maqbool A.; Aleem, Fazal-e-

    2003-01-01

    A directly heated thermionic electron beam source was constructed. A tungsten wire of length 140 mm with diameter 0.9 mm was used as a cathode. An emission current of 5000 mA was achieved at an input heating power of 600 W. Cathode to anode distance of 6 mm with acceleration voltage of 10 kV was used. A uniform external magnetic field of 50 G was employed to obtain a well-focused electron beam at a deflection of 180 deg., with cathode to work site distance of 130 mm. Dimensions of the beam (1.25x120 mm) recorded at the work site were found to be in good agreement with the designed length of cathode. The deformation of the cathode was overcome by introducing a spring action mechanism, which gives uniform emission current density throughout the emission surface. We have achieved the saturation limit of the designed source resulting in smooth and swift operation of the gun for many hours (10-15 h continuously). The design of gun is so simple that it can accommodate longer cathodes for obtaining higher emission values. This gun has made it possible to coat large substrate surfaces at much faster evaporation rate at lower cost. It can also be useful in large-scale vacuum metallurgy plants for melting, welding and heat treatment

  6. The development of beam current monitors in the APS

    Wang, X.; Lenkszus, F.; Rotela, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source. The precision measurement of beam current is a challenging task in high energy accelerators, such as the APS, with a wide range of beam parameters and complicated noise, radiation, and thermal environments. The beam pulses in the APS injector and storage ring have charge ranging from 50pC to 25nC with pulse durations varying from 30ps to 30ns. A total of nine non- intercepting beam current monitors have been installed in the APS facility (excluding those in the linac) for general current measurement. In addition, several independent current monitors with specially designed redundant interlock electronics are installed for personnel safety and machine protection. This paper documents the design and development of current monitors in the APS,. discusses the commissioning experience in the past year, and presents the results of recent operations

  7. Simple model of electron beam initiated dielectric breakdown

    Beers, B.L.; Daniell, R.E.; Delmer, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    A steady state model that describes the internal charge distribution of a planar dielectric sample exposed to a uniform electron beam was developed. The model includes the effects of charge deposition and ionization of the beam, separate trap-modulated mobilities for electrons and holes, electron-hole recombination, and pair production by drifting thermal electrons. If the incident beam current is greater than a certain critical value (which depends on sample thickness as well as other sample properties), the steady state solution is non-physical

  8. Electron beam influence on the carbon contamination of electron irradiated hydroxyapatite thin films

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G.; Tranca, Denis E.; Stanciu, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon contamination mechanisms of electron-beam-irradiated hydroxyapatite. • Atomic force microscopy phase imaging used to detect carbon contamination. • Carbon contamination dependence on electron energy, irradiation time, beam current. • Simulation of backscattered electrons confirms the experimental results. - Abstract: Electron beam irradiation which is considered a reliable method for tailoring the surface charge of hydroxyapatite is hindered by carbon contamination. Separating the effects of the carbon contamination from those of irradiation-induced trapped charge is important for a wide range of biological applications. In this work we focus on the understanding of the electron-beam-induced carbon contamination with special emphasis on the influence of the electron irradiation parameters on this phenomenon. Phase imaging in atomic force microscopy is used to evaluate the influence of electron energy, beam current and irradiation time on the shape and size of the resulted contamination patterns. Different processes involved in the carbon contamination of hydroxyapatite are discussed

  9. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates

  10. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  11. Effect of electron beam on in vitro cultured orchid organs

    Ryu, Jaihyunk; Bae, Seho; Bae, Changhyu [Sunchon National Univ., Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Suk; Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Ionizing radiations have been effective mutagen sources to overcome the limitation of the useful genetic resources in natural environment. The study was conducted to investigate an effect of electron beam on organogenesis, growth patterns and genetic variation in the irradiated orchid organs. The in utero cultured rhizomes of orchids were irradiated with the electron beam in the dose range of 15Gy to 2240Gy under the condition of various beam energy and beam current. Significant decreases in survival, growth and organogenesis were observed by increase of intensity of electron beam irradiation. The irradiation intensity of lethal dose 50 of the in utero cultured orchid was estimated as approximately 500Gy to 1000Gy under 10MeV/n, and 1000Gy was optimal for growth and organogenesis of the cultures under 10MeV/n with 0.05mA treatment, and 15Gy {approx} 48Gy under 2MeV/n and 0.5mA electron beam condition. RAPD and ISSR analyses for the electron beam irradiated organs were performed to analyze genetic variation under the electron beam condition. Both of RAPD and ISSR analyses showed higher polymorphic rate in the electron-beam irradiated C. gangrene and C. Kaner.

  12. Electron beam emittance monitor for the SSC

    Tsyganov, E.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Kauffmann, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Taratin, A.

    1993-05-01

    A nondestructive beam profile monitor for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is presented using as a probe a low-energy electron beam interacting with the proton bunch charge. Results using a full Monte Carlo simulation code look promising for the transverse and longitudinal beam profile measurements

  13. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  14. The effect of neodymium on the microcracks generated on the Al–17.5Si alloy surface treated by high current pulsed electron beam

    Hu, Liang; Gao, Bo, E-mail: gaob@smm.neu.edu.cn; Zhu, Guanglin; Hao, Yi; Sun, Shuchen; Tu, Ganfeng

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: SEM results demonstrate that microcracks are remarkably removed from the Al–17.5Si alloy surface after HCPEB treatment due to Nd element, and they decrease in length at high pulse number, showing a decrease in the stress concentration in the primary Si phase during the cooling process of HCPEB, as shown in Fig. 1. Therefore, the microcrack elimination is attributed to reducing the stress concentration. - Highlights: • The main highlights in this paper are summarized as follows: (1) After adding rare earth Nd, the microcracks are remarkably removed from an Al–17.5Si alloy surface by HCPEB, resulting in an improved corrosion resistance of the alloy surface. (2) A site-fixed observation of SEM is first proposed in HCPEB-treated technology, and a microcrack evolution with increasing pulsed numbers is observed for alloy surfaces using this method. (3) The elimination mechanism of microcracks with rare earth Nd is first presented in the present work. (4) Compound modification of rare earth Nd and HCPEB technology on the Al–17.5Si alloy is first investigated. - Abstract: In the present work, the effect of Nd on the microcracks generated on an Al–17.5Si alloy surface by a high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) was investigated. By a newly proposed site-fixed observation, the propagation of microcracks with increasing pulsed numbers first increases and then decreases due to the Nd element. The crack density decreases from 0.0669 mm/mm{sup 2} of 5 pulses to 0.00687 mm/mm{sup 2} of 50 pulses. EPMA analysis results indicate that Nd is uniformly distributed on the HCPEB-treated alloy surface. Nano-silicon particles and nano-Al cellular structures were formed by TEM observation, showing grain refinement of the alloy surface. The microcrack elimination is attributed to a decrease in the stress concentration in the primary Si phase during the cooling process of HCPEB. The electrochemical measurement shows that the corrosion current density

  15. EIC Electron Beam Polarimetry Workshop Summary

    Lorenzon, W.

    2008-01-01

    A summary of the Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry Workshop for a future Electron Ion Collider (EIC) is presented. The workshop was hosted by the University of Michigan Physics Department in Ann Arbor on August 23-24, 2007 with the goal to explore and study the electron beam polarimetry issues associated with the EIC to achieve sub-1% precision in polarization determination. Ideas are being presented that were exchanged among experts in electron polarimetry and source and accelerator design to examine existing and novel electron beam polarization measurement schemes

  16. Dynamics of Pierce instability of hot electron beams

    Ignatov, A.M.; Novikov, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    On the base of a new method of numerical solution of the Vlasov equation evolution of complete function of electron distribution at the injection of hot electron beams into plasma bounded with electrodes is investigated. It is shown that despite the development of electrostatic instabilities in the system the currents can run substantially exceeding the Pierce critical current

  17. A directly heated electron beam line source

    Iqbal, M.; Masood, K.; Rafiq, M.; Chaudhry, M.A.

    2002-05-01

    A 140-mm cathode length, Electron Beam Line Source with a high degree of focusing of the beam is constructed. The design principles and basic characteristic considerations for electron beam line source consists of parallel plate electrode geometric array as well as a beam power of 35kW are worked out. The dimensions of the beam at the work site are 1.25xl00mm. The gun is designed basically for the study of evaporation and deposition characteristic of refractory metals for laboratory use. However, it may be equally used for melting and casting of these metals. (author)

  18. Measurement of centroid trajectory of Dragon-I electron beam

    Jiang Xiaoguo; Wang Yuan; Zhang Wenwei; Zhang Kaizhi; Li Jing; Li Chenggang; Yang Guojun

    2005-01-01

    The control of the electron beam in an intense current linear induction accelerator (LIA) is very important. The center position of the electron beam and the beam profile are two important parameters which should be measured accurately. The setup of a time-resolved measurement system and a data processing method for determining the beam center position are introduced for the purpose of obtaining Dragon-I electron beam trajectory including beam profile. The actual results show that the centroid position error can be controlled in one to two pixels. the time-resolved beam centroid trajectory of Dragon-I (18.5 MeV, 2 kA, 90 ns) is obtained recently in 10 ns interval, 3 ns exposure time with a multi-frame gated camera. The results show that the screw movement of the electron beam is mainly limited in an area with a radius of 0.5 mm and the time-resolved diameters of the beam are 8.4 mm, 8.8 mm, 8.5 mm, 9.3 mm and 7.6 mm. These results have provided a very important support to several research areas such as beam trajectory tuning and beam transmission. (authors)

  19. Development of picosecond pulsed electron beam monitor

    Hosono, Y.; Nakazawa, M.; Ueda, T.; Kobayasi, T.; Yosida, Y.; Ohkuma, J.; Okuda, S.; Suemine, S.

    1993-01-01

    For the picosecond pulsed electron beam of a linear accelerator a simple monitor using an electric connector has been developed which is constructed with SMA, BNC, N type electric connector through pipe (inner diameter = 50 mm or 100 mm). Under the measurement conditions of peak current (26A-900A) and narrow pulse width (Pw = 10 ps(FWHM), Pw = 30 ps(FWHM)), the following characteristics of this monitor were obtained, (A) rise time is less than 25 ps (B) the amplitude of the monitor output pulse is proportional directly to the area of cross section of the electrode. (author)

  20. Electron beam selectively seals porous metal filters

    Snyder, J. A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1968-01-01

    Electron beam welding selectively seals the outer surfaces of porous metal filters and impedances used in fluid flow systems. The outer surface can be sealed by melting a thin outer layer of the porous material with an electron beam so that the melted material fills all surface pores.

  1. Application of electron beam irradiation. 4. Treatment of pollutants by electron beam irradiation

    Tokunaga, Okihiro; Arai, Hidehiko

    1994-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation is capable of dissolving and removing pollutants, such as sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and organic compounds, by easy production of OH radicals in flue gas and water. This paper deals with current status in the search for techniques for treating flue gas and waste water, using electron beam irradiation. Pilot tests have been conducted during the period 1991-1994 for the treatment of flue gas caused by coal and garbage burning and road tunnels. Firstly, techniques for cleaning flue gas with electron beams are outlined, with special reference to their characteristics and process of research development. Secondly, the application of electron beam irradiation in the treatment of waste water is described in terms of the following: (1) disinfection of sewage, (2) cleaning of water polluted with toxic organic compounds, (3) treatment for eliminating sewage sludge, (4) promotion of sewage sludge sedimentation, (5) disinfection and composting of sewage sludge, and (6) regeneration of activated carbon used for the treatment of waste water. (N.K.)

  2. Industrial applications of electron beam technology

    Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam technology was first introduced in Malaysia in 1989 with the conclusion of the bilateral cooperation between the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) and Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA) on Radiation Application Projects. Two electron beam accelerators with energy of 3.0 MeV and 200 keV were installed at MINT. These two accelerators pave the way for R and D to be carried out in radiation processing of polymers for cross-linking and surface curing. In 1994, another electron beam accelerator was installed in the private sector for cross-linking of home appliance wires. Since then, two more accelerators were installed in the private sector for cross-linking of heat shrinkable plastic films. Recently, a local company has acquired a low energy electron beam machine for cross-linking of plastic film. Within a period of 7 years, industrial applications of electron beam technology in Malaysia have increased significantly

  3. Application of electron beam irradiation, (1). Development and application of electron beam processors

    Katsumura, Yosuke

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with characteristics, equipment (principle and kinds), present conditions, and future issues in the application of electron beam irradiation. Characteristics of electron beams are described in terms of the following: chemical and biological effects of radiation; energy and penetrating power of electron beams; and principle and kinds of electron beam accelerator. Industrial application of electron beam irradiation has advantages of high speed procedure and producibility, less energy, avoidance of poisonous gas, and extreme reduction of organic solvents to be used. The present application of electron beam irradiation cen be divided into the following: (1) hardening of resin or coated membrane; (2) improvement of macromolecular materials; (3) environmental protection; (4) sterilization; (5) food sterilization. The present equipment for electron beam irradiation is introduced according to low energy, medium energy, and high energy equipment. Finally, future issues focuses on (1) the improvement of traceability system and development of electron dosimetric techniques and (2) food sterilization. (N.K.)

  4. Absolute beam current monitoring in endstation c

    Bochna, C.

    1995-01-01

    The first few experiments at CEBAF require approximately 1% absolute measurements of beam currents expected to range from 10-25μA. This represents errors of 100-250 nA. The initial complement of beam current monitors are of the non intercepting type. CEBAF accelerator division has provided a stripline monitor and a cavity monitor, and the authors have installed an Unser monitor (parametric current transformer or PCT). After calibrating the Unser monitor with a precision current reference, the authors plan to transfer this calibration using CW beam to the stripline monitors and cavity monitors. It is important that this be done fairly rapidly because while the gain of the Unser monitor is quite stable, the offset may drift on the order of .5μA per hour. A summary of what the authors have learned about the linearity, zero drift, and gain drift of each type of current monitor will be presented

  5. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  6. Monitor tables for electron beams in radiotherapy

    Christ, G.; Dohm, O.S.

    2007-01-01

    The application of electron beams in radiotherapy is still based on tables of monitor units, although 3-D treatment planning systems for electron beams are available. This have several reasons: The need for 3-D treatment planning is not recognized; there is no confidence in the calculation algorithm; Monte-Carlo algorithms are too time-consuming; and the effort necessary to measure basic beam data for 3-D planning is considered disproportionate. However, the increasing clinical need for higher dosimetric precision and for more conformal electron beams leads to the requirement for more sophisticated tables of monitor units. The present paper summarizes and discusses the main aspects concerning the preparation of tables of monitor units for electron beams. The measurement equipment and procedures for measuring basic beam data needed for tables of monitor units for electron beams are described for a standard radiation therapy linac. The design of tables of monitor units for standard electron applicators is presented; this design can be extended for individual electron inserts, to variable applicator surface distances, to oblique beam incidence, and the use of bolus material. Typical data of an Elekta linac are presented in various tables. (orig.)

  7. Electron beam treatment of wastewater

    Arai, H.; Hosono, M.; Shimizu, K.; Sugiyama, M.

    1991-01-01

    Supernatant comes from dewaterization of sewage sludge, and contains biologically nondegradable organics so that it is hard to be treated by conventional activated sludge. By electron beam (EB) irradiation, any kinds of organics in water can be oxidized to biodegradable organic acids. We studied the treatment of supernatant by application of this effect. The direct irradiation of the original supernatant was found not to be so effective to decrease COD. In order to increase the irradiation effect, supernatant was pretreated biologically to decrease the biodegradable organics in it. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) were decreased from 800 and 910 mg/L to 78 and 5 mg/L by this pretreatment, respectively. This pretreated supernatant was irradiated by EB of 2 MeV using a batch type reactor. The COD was gradually decreased with dose. In contrast, BOD was increased markedly, indicating increase in biodegradability. The irradiated sample water was treated biologically again. After the final biological treatment, COD was decreased below 30 mg/L in the case of 10 - 12 kGy irradiation. Finally, the initial COD of 800 mg/L was decreased below 30 mg/L by the combination of EB irradiation and biological treatment. The cost of irradiation for this process was evaluated preliminarily. (author)

  8. Electron-beam-pumped phosphors

    Goldhar, J.; Krupke, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-beam excitation of solid-state scintillators, or phosphors, can result in efficient generation of visible light confined to relatively narrow regions of the spectrum. The conversion efficiency can exceed 20%, and, with proper choice of phosphors, radiation can be obtained anywhere from the near infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV). These properties qualify the phosphors as a potentially useful pump source for new solid-state lasers. New phosphors are being developed for high-brightness television tubes that are capable of higher power dissipation. Here, an epitaxial film of fluorescing material is grown on a crystalline substrate with good thermal properties. For example, researchers at North American Philips Laboratories have developed a cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) grown on a YAG substrate, which has operated at 1 A/cm 2 at 20 kV without observed thermal quenching. The input power is higher by almost two orders of magnitude than that which can be tolerated by a conventional television phosphor. The authors describe tests of these new phosphors

  9. Electron distribution function in electron-beam-excited plasmas

    Brau, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    In monatomic plasmas excited by high-intensity relativistic electron beams, the electron secondary distribution function is dominated by elastic electron-electron collisions at low electron energies and by inelastic electron-atom collisions at high electron energies (above the excitation threshold). Under these conditions, the total rate of excitation by inelastic collisions is limited by the rate at which electron-electron collisions relax the distribution function in the neighborhood of the excitation threshold. To describe this effect quantitatively, an approximate analytic solution of the electron Boltzmann equation is obtained, including both electron-electron and inelastic collisions. The result provides a simple formula for the total rate of excitation

  10. Electron beam acceleration and compression for short wavelength FELs

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1994-11-01

    A single pass UV or X-ray FEL will require a low emittance electron beam with high peak current and relatively high beam energy, a few hundred MeV to many GeV. To achieve the necessary peak current and beam energy, the beams must be bunch compressed and they must be accelerated in long transport lines where dispersive and wakefield emittance dilutions are important. In this paper, we will describe the sources and significance of the dilutions during acceleration, bunch compression, and transport through the undulator. In addition, we will discuss sources of jitter, especially effects arising from the bunch compressions, and the possible cancellation techniques

  11. Efficient Injection of Electron Beams into Magnetic Guide Fields

    Chorny, V.; Cooperstein, G.; Dubyna, V.; Frolov, O.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Hinshelwood, D.; Schneider, R.; Solovyov, V.; Tsepilov, H.; Vitkovitsky, I.; Ware, K.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary experimental and modeling study of injection and transport of high current electron beams in current-neutralized background gas has been performed. Initial analysis of the results indicates that high current triaxial ring diode operates very reproducibly in the pinch mode. High current density beam can be injected efficiently into the drift region, using azimuthal guide field with reduced intensity near the injection region. This was shown to improve the effectiveness of capturing the beam for the transport. The transport length was insufficient to measure losses, such as would arise from scattering with the background gas

  12. Electron beam accelerator facilities at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    Somessari, Samir L.; Silveira, Carlos G. da; Paes, Helio; Somessari, Elizabeth S.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: somessar@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Electron beam processing is a manufacturing technique, which applies a focused beam of high-energy electrons produced by an electron accelerator to promote chemical changes within a product. At IPEN-CNEN/SP there are two electron beam accelerators Type Dynamitron{sup R} (manufactured by RDI- Radiation Dynamics Inc.) Job 188 and Job 307 models. The technical specifications for the Job 188 energy 1.5 MeV, beam current 25 mA, scan 1.20 m, beam power 37.5 kW and for the Job 307 energy 1.5 MeV, beam current 65 mA, Scan 1.20 m, beam power 97.5 kW. Some applications of the electron beam accelerator for radiation processing are wire and cable insulation crosslinking, rubber vulcanization, sterilization and disinfection of medical products, food preservation, heat shrinkable products, polymer degradation, aseptic packaging, semiconductors and pollution control. For irradiating these materials at IPEN-CNEN/SP, there are some equipment such as, underbeam capstan with speed control from 10 to 700 m/min; a track; a system to roll up and unroll wires and electric cables, polyethylene blankets and other systems to improve the quality of the products. (author)

  13. Electron backscattering for process control in electron beam welding

    Ardenne, T. von; Panzer, S.

    1983-01-01

    A number of solutions to the automation of electron beam welding is presented. On the basis of electron backscattering a complex system of process control has been developed. It allows an enlarged imaging of the material's surface, improved adjustment of the beam focusing and definite focus positioning. Furthermore, both manual and automated positioning of the electron beam before and during the welding process has become possible. Monitoring of the welding process for meeting standard welding requirements can be achieved with the aid of a control quantity derived from the results of electronic evaluation of the high-frequency electron backscattering

  14. Beam current monitors in the NLCTA

    Nantista, C.; Adolphsen, C.

    1997-05-01

    The current profile along the 126 ns, multi-bunch beam pulse in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is monitored with fast toroids (rise time ∼ 1 ns). Inserted at several positions along the beam line, they allow one to track current transmission as a function of position along the bunch train. Various measurements, such as rise time, current, width, and slope, are made on the digitized signals, which can be corrected in software by means of stored frequency response files. The design and implementation of these devices is described

  15. FMIT direct-current beam monitor

    Brousseau, A.T.; Chamberlin, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype injector section for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory requires that beam parameters be noninterceptively monitored. This report describes the application of a single toroidal core, coupled with very simple circuitry, that results in the production of a simple instrument, and eliminates the problems inherent in the Faraday cup technique for the current measurements of the FMIT injector beam

  16. Electron Beam Technology for Environmental Pollution Control.

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, there are over 1700 electron beam (EB) units in commercial use, providing an estimated added value to numerous products, amounting to 100 billion USD or more. High-current electron accelerators are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants such as pathogens, toxic byproducts, or emissions. Over the past few decades, EB technologies have been developed aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment. It has been demonstrated that EB technologies for flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Recently, extensive work has been carried out on the use of EB for environmental remediation, which also includes the removal of emerging contaminants such as VOCs, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and potential EDCs.

  17. Generation of Nondiffracting Electron Bessel Beams

    Vincenzo Grillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost 30 years ago, Durnin discovered that an optical beam with a transverse intensity profile in the form of a Bessel function of the first order is immune to the effects of diffraction. Unlike most laser beams, which spread upon propagation, the transverse distribution of these Bessel beams remains constant. Electrons also obey a wave equation (the Schrödinger equation, and therefore Bessel beams also exist for electron waves. We generate an electron Bessel beam by diffracting electrons from a nanoscale phase hologram. The hologram imposes a conical phase structure on the electron wave-packet spectrum, thus transforming it into a conical superposition of infinite plane waves, that is, a Bessel beam. We verify experimentally that these beams can propagate for 0.6 m without measurable spreading and can also reconstruct their intensity distributions after being partially obstructed by an obstacle. Finally, we show by numerical calculations that the performance of an electron microscope can be increased dramatically through use of these beams.

  18. Development of an electron gun for high power CW electron linac (1). Beam experiment for basic performance of electron gun

    Yamazaki, Yoshio; Nomura, Masahiro; Komata, Tomoki

    1999-05-01

    Presently, the Beam Group of Oarai Engineering Center in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) completed the high power CW electron linac. Then we started full-scale beam experiments after the government permission for a radiation equipment had given last January. Measurements of basic performance for the mesh-grid type electron gun have been done to launch stable beam at 300 mA peak current downstream of the accelerator. These experiments disclosed to increase beam loss in the electron gun in some cases of voltage supplied the mesh-grid in spite of same beam current from gun. Consequently, we could find the best condition for mesh-grid voltage and heater current to supply stable beam at 300 mA peak current for accelerator study. (author)

  19. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  20. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  1. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-01-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time

  2. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  3. Electron Beam Lithography for nano-patterning

    Greibe, Tine; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Khomtchenko, Elena

    2014-01-01

    in a polymer. Electron beam lithography is a suitable method for nano-sized production, research, or development of semiconductor components on a low-volume level. Here, we present electron beam lithography available at DTU Danchip. We expertize a JEOL 9500FZ with electrons accelerated to an energy of 100ke......, the room temperature is controlled to an accuracy of 0.1 degrees in order to minimize the thermally induced drift of the beam during pattern writing. We present process results in a standard positive tone resist and pattern transfer through etch to a Silicon substrate. Even though the electron beam...... of electrons in the substrate will influence the patterning. We present solutions to overcome these obstacles....

  4. Applications and technology of electron beam accelerators

    Sethi, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, accelerators have been employed for pursuing research in basic sciences. But over the last couple of decades their uses have proliferated into the applied fields as well. The major credit for which goes to the electron beams. Electron beams or the radiations generated by them are being extensively used in almost all the applied areas. This article is a brief account of the impact made by the accelerator based electron beams and the attempts initiated by DAE for building a base in this technology. (author)

  5. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  6. Recent developments in electron beam machine technology

    Sadat, T.; Ross, A.; Leveziel, H.

    1994-01-01

    Electron beam accelerator provides ionisation energy for industrial processing. Electron beam accelerators are increasingly used for decontamination, conservation and disinfestation of food, for sterilization of medical products, and for polymerisation of materials. These machines are easy to install into a production factory as the radiation stops as soon as the machine is switched off. This safety advantage, together with the flexibility of use of these highly automated machines, has allowed the electron beam accelerator to become an important production tool. (author). 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Beam-ripple monitor with secondary electrons

    Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Noda, Koji; Takada, Eiichi; Komiyama, Akihito; Ichinohe, Ken-ichi; Sano, Yoshinobu

    1997-01-01

    To replace the scintillation-ripple monitor, we have developed a new monitor with a smaller destructive effect on the beam. In this monitor, we use secondary electrons emitted from an aluminum foil with a thickness of 2 μm. The signals of secondary electrons are amplified by an electron multiplier having a maximum gain of 10 6 . By using the new monitor, we could clearly observe the beam ripple with a beam intensity of 3.6x10 8 pps (particle per second). This monitor can also be used as an intensity monitor in the range of 10 4 - 10 9 pps. (author)

  8. Review of electron beam therapy physics

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Almond, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed. (review)

  9. Design studies on high current and grid control electron gun

    Wang Jinnan; Lu Kun; Chi Yunlong; Zhou Zusheng

    2011-01-01

    Electron gun, the source of electrons, is a kind of ultrahigh vacuum device and plays an important role in different kind of accelerators. With the irradiation accelerator demands, describes the design studies on beam optics optimization. The simulation result shows that the beam current is above 5 A with cathode voltage of 80 kV and beam emittance, gun electric field and beam waist radius meet the accelerator needs. The electron gun manufactured and installed in the test stand, the conditioning and test will be done in the near future. (authors)

  10. Electron beam charge state amplifier (EBQA)--a conceptual evaluation

    Dooling, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A concept is presented for stripping low-energy, radioactive ions from 1+ to higher charge states. Referred to as an Electron Beam Charge State Amplifier (EBQA), this device accepts a continuous beam of singly-charged, radioactive ions and passes them through a high-density electron beam confined by a solenoidal magnetic field. Singly-charged ions may be extracted from standard Isotope-Separator-Online (ISOL) sources. An EBQA is potentially useful for increasing the charge state of ions prior to injection into post-acceleration stages at ISOL radioactive beam facilities. The stripping efficiency from q=1+ to 2+ (η 12 ) is evaluated as a function of electron beam radius at constant current with solenoid field, injected ion energy, and ion beam emittance used as parameters. Assuming a 5 keV, 1 A electron beam, η 12 = 0.38 for 0.1 keV, 132 Xe ions passing through an 8 Tesla solenoid, 1 m in length. Multi-pass configurations to achieve 3+ or 4+ charge states are also conceivable. The calculated efficiencies depend inversely on the initial ion beam emittances. The use of a helium-buffer-gas, ion-guide stage to improve the brightness of the 1+ beams [1] may enhance the performance of an EBQA

  11. Production of annular electron beams by foilless diodes

    Miller, R.B.; Prestwich, K.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Shope, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    A number of important aspects of the production of annular electron beams by foilless diodes are examined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theories of Ott, Antonsen, and Lovelace (OAL) and Chen and Lovelace (CL) are compared, and the CL theory is extended to include the effect of an axial gap in an approximate fashion. For the case of finite magnetic field strengths, Larmor orbits are examined and radial oscillations of the beam profile are predicted from a beam envelope analysis. Experimental results obtained with both low- and high-impedance sources have been compared with the theory, and based on such studies, the design and construction of an intense hollow beam generator are described. Experimental results obtained with the new diode compare favorably with both the analytic theory and the results of numerical simulations. The device currently produces 2-MeV electrons at beam currents of 65--70 kA

  12. The physics of high current beams

    Lawson, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    An outline is presented of paraxial charged particle optics in the presence of self-fields arising from the space-charge and current carried by the beam. Solutions of the envelope equations for beams with finite emittance are considered for a number of specific situations, with the approximation that the density profile of the beam is uniform with a sharp edge, so that the focusing remains linear. More realistic beams are then considered, and the problems of matching, emittance growth and stability are discussed. An attempt is made to emphasize physical principles and physical ideas rather than to present the detailed mathematical techniques required for specific problems. The approach is a tutorial one, and several 'exercises' are included in the text. Most of the material is treated in more depth in the author's forthcoming book. (author)

  13. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  14. Generation of helical electron beams by a nonadiabatic gun

    Barroso, J.J.; Stellati, C.

    1996-01-01

    The design of a non-adiabatic gun to produce a 10A, 50kV hollow laminar electron beam for gyrotron applications is reported. The beam is extracted from the emitting ring in a direction parallel to the axial guide magnetic field and then propagates across the radial electric field in the anode gap. The electrons are thereby given a transverse velocity upon passing through the modulation anode region where an electrostatic pumping mechanism takes place, so that a considerable amount of the electron energy is converted to transverse kinetic energy. Such a beam extraction method gives rise to favourable features that are examined throughout the work. The dynamics of hollow electron beams with gyromotion propagating down a cylindrical drift tube are also analysed. Due to the action of the beam's self-space charge field, the transverse velocity spread has an oscillatory behaviour along the drift tube wherein the spatial automodulation period shortens with increasing current. Numerical simulation results indicate that even at a 10A beam current, the resulting transverse velocity spread is still less than the spread for a zero beam current. (UK)

  15. Electron and ion beam transport to fusion targets

    Freeman, J.R.; Baker, L.; Miller, P.A.; Mix, L.P.; Olsen, J.N.; Poukey, J.W.; Wright, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    ICF reactors have been proposed which incorporate a gas-filled chamber to reduce x-ray and debris loading of the first wall. Focused beams of either electrons or ions must be transported efficiently for 2-4 m to a centrally located fusion target. Laser-initiated current-carrying plasma discharge channels provide the guiding magnetic field and the charge- and current-neutralizing medium required for beam propagation. Computational studies of plasma channel formation in air using a 1-D MHD model with multigroup radiation diffusion have provided a good comparison with the expansions velocity and time dependent refractivity profile determined by holographic interferometry. Trajectory calculations have identified a beam expansion mechanism which combines with the usual ohmic dissipation to reduce somewhat the transported beam fluence for electrons. Additional trajectory calculations have been performed for both electrons and light ions to predict the limits on the particle current density which can be delivered to a central target by overlapping the many independently-generated beams. Critical features of the use of plasma channels for transport and overlap of charged particle beams are being tested experimentally with up to twelve electron beams from the Proto II accelerator

  16. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...... on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  17. Neutral beam current drive scaling in DIII-D

    Porter, G.D.; Bhadra, D.K.; Burrell, K.H.

    1989-03-01

    Neutral beam current drive scaling experiments have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. These experiments were performed using up to 10 MW of 80 keV hydrogen beams. Previous current drive experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated beam driven currents up to 340 kA. In the experiments reported here we achieved beam driven currents of at least 500 kA, and have obtained operation with record values of poloidal beta (εβ/sub p/ = 1.4). The beam driven current reported here is obtained from the total plasma current by subtracting an estimate of the residual Ohmic current determined from the measured loop voltage. In this report we discuss the scaling of the current drive efficiency with plasma conditions. Using hydrogen neutral beams, we find the current drive efficiency is similar in Deuterium and Helium target plasmas. Experiments have been performed with plasma electron temperatures up to T/sub e/ = 3 keV, and densities in the range 2 /times/ 10 19 m/sup /minus/3/ 19 m/sup /minus/3/. The current drive efficiency (nIR/P) is observed to scale linearly with the energy confinement time on DIII-D to a maximum of 0.05 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/2/ A/W. The measured efficiency is consistent with a 0-D theoretical model. In addition to comparison with this simple model, detailed analysis of several shots using the time dependent transport code ONETWO is discussed. This analysis indicates that bootstrap current contributes approximately 10--20% of the the total current. Our estimates of this effect are somewhat uncertain due to limited measurements of the radial profile of the density and temperatures. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams.

    Battum, L.J. van; Zee, W. van der; Huizenga, H.

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight

  19. Making electron beams for the SLC linac

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; James, M.B.; Miller, R.H.; Sheppard, J.C.; Sodja, J.; Truher, J.B.; Minten, A.

    1984-01-01

    A source of high-intensity, single-bunch electron beams has been developed at SLAC for the SLC. The properties of these beams have been studied extensively utilizing the first 100-m of the SLAC linac and the computer-based control system being developed for the SLC. The source is described and the properties of the beams are summarized. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  20. High current plasma electron emitter

    Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A.F.; Craig, D.

    1995-07-01

    A high current plasma electron emitter based on a miniature plasma source has been developed. The emitting plasma is created by a pulsed high current gas discharge. The electron emission current is 1 kA at 300 V at the pulse duration of 10 ms. The prototype injector described in this paper will be used for a 20 kA electrostatic current injection experiment in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. The source will be replicated in order to attain this total current requirement. The source has a simple design and has proven very reliable in operation. A high emission current, small size (3.7 cm in diameter), and low impurity generation make the source suitable for a variety of fusion and technological applications

  1. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Permyakov, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    This research examines the process of electron-beam welding in a keyhole mode with the use of beam oscillations. We study the impact of various beam oscillations and their parameters on the shape of the keyhole, the flow of heat and mass transfer processes and weld parameters to develop methodological recommendations. A numerical three-dimensional mathematical model of electron beam welding is presented. The model was developed on the basis of a heat conduction equation and a Navier-Stokes equation taking into account phase transitions at the interface of a solid and liquid phase and thermocapillary convection (Marangoni effect). The shape of the keyhole is determined based on experimental data on the parameters of the secondary signal by using the method of a synchronous accumulation. Calculations of thermal and hydrodynamic processes were carried out based on a computer cluster, using a simulation package COMSOL Multiphysics.

  2. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    Oreshkin, E V; Barengolts, S A; Chaikovsky, S A; Oreshkin, V I

    2015-01-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes. (paper)

  3. Electron Beam interaction with an inhomogeneous

    Zaki, N G; El-Shorbagy, Kh H [Plasma physics and Nuclear Fusion Dept. Nuclear Research Centre Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The linear and nonlinear interaction of an electron beam with an inhomogeneous semi bounded warm plasma is investigated. The amount of energy absorbed by the plasma is obtained. The formation of waves at double frequency at the inlet of the beam into the plasma is also considered.

  4. Electron beam generation in the fore-vacuum pressure range

    Burachevskij, Y A; Kuzemchenko, M N; Mytnikov, A V; Oks, E M

    2001-01-01

    One presents the results of investigations to generate electron beams within 0.01-0.1 Torr gas pressure range. To generate a beam one used a plasma source based on a hollow cathode discharge in combination with a plane accelerating gap. Peculiar features of electron emission and acceleration within the mentioned pressure range are associated with high probability of gas ionization in an accelerating gap and with generation of ion flow meeting electron beam. It results in reduction of discharge combustion intensification, as well as, in plasma concentration range. The developed design of an electron source enables to generate cylindrical beams with up to 1 A current and with up to 10 keV energy

  5. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway

  6. Electron-beam initiated HF lasers

    Gerber, R.A.; Patterson, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    Electron beams were used to ignite hydrogen/fluorine mixtures, producing laser energies up to 4.2 kJ, and giving hope that this approach may soon produce energy levels suitable for laser-fusion studies. (auth)

  7. Electron-beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Brillant, Marcel; de Bony, Yves

    1980-08-15

    The objective of this article is to describe the status of the application of electron-beam welding to aluminum alloys. These alloys are widely employed in the aeronautics, space and nuclear industries.

  8. Photon-Electron Interaction and Condense Beams

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss beams of charged particles and radiation from multiple perspectives. These include fundamental acceleration and radiation mechanisms, underlying electron-photon interaction, various classical and quantum phase-space concepts and fluctuational interpretations

  9. Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring

    Minty, M.

    1993-04-01

    Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms

  10. Cherenkov interaction of hollow electron beam with a dielectric waveguide

    Karbushev, N.I.; Shlapakovskij, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The waveguide excitation methods are used to study magnetized hollow electron beam interaction with electromagnetic waves of a waveguide with a dielectric bush. Characteristic equation with explicit presentation of depression coefficients and the beam coupling with the synchronous wave is derived. Dependences of depression and coupling coefficients on the beam and waveguide parameters are studied. the current limiting values of small and large space charge regimes are determined. Coefficients of synchronous wave amplification by a beam and oscillation set up conditions in the considered finite length system are determined

  11. Development of neutral beam source using electron beam excited plasma

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya; Hara, Tamio

    2011-01-01

    A low-energy neutral beam (NB) source, which consists of an electron-beam-excited plasma (EBEP) source and two carbon electrodes, has been developed for damageless etching of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) devices. It has been confirmed that the Ar ion beam energy was controlled by the acceleration voltage and the beam profile had good uniformity over the diameter of 80 mm. Dry etching of a Si wafer at the floating potential has been carried out by Ar NB. Si sputtering yield by an Ar NB clearly depends on the acceleration voltage. This result shows that the NB has been generated through the charge exchange reaction from the ion beam in the process chamber. (author)

  12. Shaping the electron beams with submicrosecond pulse duration in sources and electron accelerators with plasma emitters

    Gushenets, V I

    2001-01-01

    One studies the techniques in use to shape submicrosecond electron beams and the physical processes associated with extraction of electrons from plasma in plasma emitters. Plasma emitter base sources and accelerators enable to generate pulse beams with currents varying from tens of amperes up to 10 sup 3 A, with current densities up to several amperes per a square centimeter, with pulse duration constituting hundreds of nanoseconds and with high frequencies of repetition

  13. Development of picosecond pulsed electron beam monitor. 2

    Hosono, Y.; Nakazawa, M.; Ueda, T.

    1994-01-01

    A picosecond pulsed electron beam monitor for a 35 MeV linear accelerator has been developed. The monitor consists of an electric SMA connector and aluminium pipe(inner diameter of 50mm). The following characteristics of this monitor were obtained, (a) the rise time is less than 17.5 ps (b) linearity of the monitor output voltage is proportional to the peak current of beam. It is shown that this monitor can be successfully used for bunch measurements of picosecond pulsed electron beam of 35 MeV linac. (author)

  14. Radiation degradation of marine polysaccharides by low energy electron beam

    Yoshii, Fumio; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu

    2003-01-01

    The radiation degradations of marine polysaccharides by both gamma Co-60 and electron beam irradiations are investigated. Polysaccharides and oligosaccharides can be produced by degradation of corresponding polysaccharides including marine polysaccharides such as alginates, chitin chitosan and carrageenan. The viscosity of alginate, chitosan and carrageenan solution decreases markedly with increase of the low energy electron beam irradiation time and the beam current. Furthermore, the viscosity is reduced sharply in short time for polysaccharide solution with low concentration, for instance carrageenan solution of 1%. (author)

  15. On stationary states of electron beams in drift space

    Kovalev, N.F.

    2002-01-01

    The article is devoted to studying the conditions of formation and existence of virtual cathodes. The problem on stationary states of the strongly magnetized electron beams in the homogeneous drift channels is discussed. The problem on the planar and coaxial moduli of the drift spaces is considered. The possibility of existing the virtual cathodes in the coaxial tubular beams by the injection currents, smaller than the threshold ones is highly proved. The inaccuracy of results of a number of works, studying the properties of the virtual cathodes in the strongly magnetized electron beams, is shown [ru

  16. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  17. Beam-current monitor for FMIT

    Chamberlin, D.D.; Brousseau, A.T.

    1981-03-01

    The application of a single toroidal core, coupled with very simple circuitry, that results in the production of a simple instrument, and eliminates the problems inherent in the Faraday cup technique for the current measurements of the FMIT injector beam is described

  18. Buildup of electrons with hot electron beam injection into a homogeneous magnetic field

    Bashko, V.A.; Krivoruchko, A.M.; Tarasov, I.K.

    1989-01-01

    The injection of the monoenergetic beam of electrons into the vacuum drift channel under the conditions when the beam current exceeds a certain threshold value involves a virtual cathode creation. The process of virtual cathode creation leads to an exchange of one-fluid movement of beam particles to three-fluid one corresponding to incident, reflected and passed through anticathode beam particles. For the monoenergetic beam case when the velocity spread Δv dr (v dr is the beam drift velocity), the beam instability was predicted in theory and was observed in experiment. Meanwhile, the injection in the drift space of the 'hot' beam having finite spread in velocities may be accompanied not only by the reflection of particles if their velocity v 1/2 (where φ is the electrostatic potential dip value, e and m are the electron charge and mass, respectively), but also the mutual Coulomb scattering of incident and reflected electrons. The scattering process leads in its turn to appearance of viscosity forces and to trapping of a part of beam electrons into the effective potential well formed by electrostatic potential dip and the viscous force potential. The interaction of travelling and trapped particles may occur even at the stage preceding the virtual electrode formation and it may influence the process of its appearance and also the current flow through the drift space. In this report there are described the experimental results on accumulation of electrons when electron beam propagates in vacuum and has a large spread in particle velocities Δv dr in the homogeneous longitudinal magnetic field when ω pe He where ω pe is the electron Langmuir frequency of beam electrons, ω He is the electron cyclotron frequency. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs

  19. Injection of an electron beam into a plasma and spacecraft charging

    Okuda, H.; Kan, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Injection of a nonrelativistic electron beam into a fully ionized plasma from a spacecraft including the effect of charging has been studied using a one-dimensional particle simulation model. It is found that the spacecraft charging remains negligible and the beam can propagate into a plasma, if the beam density is much smaller than the ambient density. When the injection current is increased by increasing the beam density, significant spacecraft charging takes place and the reflection of beam electrons back to the spacecraft reduces the beam current significantly. On the other hand, if the injection current is increased by increasing the beam energy, spacecraft charging remains negligible and a beam current much larger than the thermal return current can be injected. It is shown that the electric field caused by the beam--plasma instability accelerates the ambient electrons toward the spacecraft thereby enhancing the return current

  20. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed

  1. Beam current monitors at the UNILAC

    Schneider, N.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most basic linac operation tools is a beam current transformer. Using outstanding materials, the latest low-noise amplifiers, and some good ideas, a universal current monitoring system has been developed and installed at the UNILAC at GSI. With a dynamic range of 112 dB, covering the low-current range down to 100 nA peak to peak at S/N=1, as well as 25 mA pulses, provided for high-current injection to the SIS synchrotron, a well-accepted diagnostic instrument could be placed at the disposal of the operaters

  2. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    T. Moore

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20  m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell’s high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  3. Characterization of a low-voltage electron beam

    Berejka, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Growing interests in low-voltage electron beam (EB) processing in areas that may require regulatory compliance, such as the curing of inks and coatings for food packaging materials and in the surface disinfection of medicinal and food containers, lead to the characterization of a low-voltage EB by two methods: a widely used thin radiochromic film and a film strip made on a continuous basis with an alanine coating. Using a laboratory unit, beam currents and voltages were varied and then optical density and alanine/matrix ratios were, respectively, determined. No inferences as to 'dose' were made. The radiochromic film was found to be insensitive to slight changes at low beam currents and to show considerable divergence and a broadening in response as current was increased across a meaningful range at the three applied beam voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) increase in response of the alanine coated film taken as a ratio to an internal reference material within the test instrument itself was shown to have a linear response with respect to beam current and no divergence as current increased. The use of an alanine coating of thickness greater than that of the extrapolated range of the electron penetration offers a method for the characterization of the output of such very low-voltage beams

  4. Generation of runaway electron beams in high-pressure nitrogen

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Burachenko, A. G.; Baksht, E. Kh

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the results of experimental studies of the amplitude-temporal characteristics of a runaway electron beam, as well as breakdown voltage in nitrogen are presented. The voltage pulses with the amplitude in incident wave ≈120 kV and the rise time of ≈0.3 ns was used. The supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) was detected by a collector behind the flat anode. The amplitude-time characteristics of the voltage and SAEB current were studied with subnanosecond time resolution. The maximum pressure at which a SAEB is detectable by collector was ∼1 MPa. This pressure increases with decreasing the voltage rise time. The waveforms of the discharge and runaway electron beam currents was synchronized with the voltage pulses. The mechanism of the runaway electron generation in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  5. Coulomb-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam Compression

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles is a well-known phenomenon in many areas of research. In general, the Coulomb repulsion force broadens the pulse width of an electron bunch and limits the temporal resolution of many scientific facilities such as ultrafast electron diffraction and x-ray free-electron lasers. Here we demonstrate a scheme that actually makes use of the Coulomb force to compress a relativistic electron beam. Furthermore, we show that the Coulomb-driven bunch compression process does not introduce additional timing jitter, which is in sharp contrast to the conventional radio-frequency buncher technique. Our work not only leads to enhanced temporal resolution in electron-beam-based ultrafast instruments that may provide new opportunities in probing material systems far from equilibrium, but also opens a promising direction for advanced beam manipulation through self-field interactions.

  6. Coulomb-Driven Relativistic Electron Beam Compression.

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-01-26

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles is a well-known phenomenon in many areas of research. In general, the Coulomb repulsion force broadens the pulse width of an electron bunch and limits the temporal resolution of many scientific facilities such as ultrafast electron diffraction and x-ray free-electron lasers. Here we demonstrate a scheme that actually makes use of the Coulomb force to compress a relativistic electron beam. Furthermore, we show that the Coulomb-driven bunch compression process does not introduce additional timing jitter, which is in sharp contrast to the conventional radio-frequency buncher technique. Our work not only leads to enhanced temporal resolution in electron-beam-based ultrafast instruments that may provide new opportunities in probing material systems far from equilibrium, but also opens a promising direction for advanced beam manipulation through self-field interactions.

  7. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  8. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  9. Electron beam dynamics in Pasotron microwave sources

    Carmel, Y.; Shkvarunets, A.; Nusinovich, G.S.; Rodgers, J.; Bliokh, Yu.P.; Goebel, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Pasotron is a high efficiency (∼50%), plasma-assisted microwave generator in which the beam electrons exhibit two-dimensional motion in the slow wave structure. The electron beam propagates in the ion-focusing regime (Bennett pinch regime) because there is no applied magnetic field. Since initially only the neutral gas is present in the vacuum system and the ions in the neutralizing plasma channel are produced only due to the beam impact ionization, the beam dynamics in Pasotrons is inherently a nonstationary process, and important for efficient operation. The present paper contains results of experimental studies of stationary and nonstationary effects in the beam dynamics in Pasotrons and their theoretical interpretation

  10. Surface sterilization by low energy electron beams

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Tabei, Masae

    1989-01-01

    The germicidal effectiveness of low energy electron beams (175 KV) against bacterial cells was investigated. The dry spores of Bacillus pumilus ATCC 27142 and Bacillus globigii ATCC 9372 inoculated on carrier materials and irradiated by gamma rays showed the exponential type of survival curves whereas they showed sigmoidal ones when exposed to low energy electron beams. When similarly irradiated, the wet spores inoculated on membrane filter showed the same survival curves as the dry spores inoculated on carrier materials. The wet vegetative cells of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 showed exponential curves when exposed to gamma and electron beam irradiation. Low energy electron beams in air showed little differences from nitrogen stream in their germicidal effectiveness against dry spores of B. pumilus. The D values of B. pumilus spores inoculated on metal plates decreased as the amounts of backscattering electrons from the plates increased. There was adequate correlation between the D value (linear region of survival curve), average D value (6D/6) and 1% survival dose and backscattering factor. Depth dose profile and backscatterig dose of low energy electron beams were measured by radiochromic dye film dosimeter (RCD). These figures were not always in accord with the observed germicidal effectiveness against B. pumilus spores because of varying thickness of RCD and spores inoculated on carrier material. The dry spores were very thin and this thinness was useful in evaluating the behavior of low energy electrons. (author)

  11. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-01-01

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R and D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC

  12. The use of electron beam in RIA R and D

    Gomes, Itacil C.; Nolen, Jerry; Reed, Claude

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses two electron beam applications for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) R and D. The first is for simulating energy deposition of heavy ions on lithium jets. The peak energy deposition for a 400-kW uranium beam will be 4 MW/cm 3 . Calculations have shown that a 1-MeV electron beam with 40mA of current has a peak energy deposition about 4 MW/cm 3 making it suitable to mimic the thermal response of lithium jet at that uranium beam heat load. The second application of electron beams for RIA R and D, discussed in this paper, is the use of low energy electron beam as a diagnosis tool for on-line monitoring of thickness variations of thin foils or thin jets. Thin foils can be corroded and jets might experience instabilities that can compromise their functionality. Low energy electron beams can be used to detect any change in thickness enabling a continuous on-line monitoring of the thin film being monitored. Calculations have indicated that variations in lithium jet thicknesses at the micron level can easily be detected

  13. Generation of valley-polarized electron beam in bilayer graphene

    Park, Changsoo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to produce valley-polarized electron beams using a bilayer graphene npn junction. By analyzing the transmission properties of electrons through the junction with zigzag interface in the presence of trigonal warping, we observe that there exist a range of incident energies and barrier heights in which transmitted electrons are well polarized and collimated. From this observation and by performing numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that valley-dependent electronic currents with nearly perfect polarization can be generated. We also show that the peak-to-peak separation angle between the polarized currents is tunable either by incident energy or by barrier height each of which is controlled by using top and back gate voltages. The results can be used for constructing an electron beam splitter to produce valley-polarized currents

  14. Generation of valley-polarized electron beam in bilayer graphene

    Park, Changsoo

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method to produce valley-polarized electron beams using a bilayer graphene npn junction. By analyzing the transmission properties of electrons through the junction with zigzag interface in the presence of trigonal warping, we observe that there exist a range of incident energies and barrier heights in which transmitted electrons are well polarized and collimated. From this observation and by performing numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that valley-dependent electronic currents with nearly perfect polarization can be generated. We also show that the peak-to-peak separation angle between the polarized currents is tunable either by incident energy or by barrier height each of which is controlled by using top and back gate voltages. The results can be used for constructing an electron beam splitter to produce valley-polarized currents.

  15. Experimental study on generation of large area uniform electron beam

    Tang Ying; Yi Aiping; Liu Jingru; Qian Hang; Huang Xin; Yu Li; Su Jiancang; Ding Zhenjie; Ding Yongzhong; Yu Jianguo

    2007-01-01

    In the experiment of gas laser pumped by electron beam, large area uniform electron beam is important to generate high efficiency laser output. The experimental study on generation of large area uniform electron beam with SPG-200 pulsed power generator is introduced. SPG-200 is an all-solid-state components pulsed power generator based on SOS, and its open voltage is more than 350 kV. The cathode have the area of 24 mm x 294 mm, and the anode-cathode(A-C)gap spacing is adjustable from 0 to 49 mm. The electron beam of cathode emission is transported to the laser chamber through the diode pressure foil, which sepa-rates the vacuum chamber from the laser chamber. Velvet and graphite cathodes are studied, each generates large area electron beam. The diode parameters are presented, and the uniformity of e-beam is diagnosed. The experimental results show that the diode voltage of the graphite cathode is 240-280 kV, and the diode current is 0.7-1.8 kA. The diode voltage of the velvet cathode is 200-250 kV, and the diode current is 1.5-1.7 kA. The uniformity of the velvet cathode emission is better than that of the graphite cathode. (authors)

  16. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    Stancari, Giulio; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  17. Microstructure cantilever beam for current measurement

    M.T.E. Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microelectromechanical systems (MEMS sensors are based on the microcantilever technology, which uses a broad range of design materials and structures. The benefit ofMEMStechnology is in developing devices with a lower cost, lower power consumption, higher performance and greater integration. A free-end cantilever beam with a magnetic material mass has been designed using MEMS software tools. The magnetic material was used to improve the sensitivity of the cantilever beam to an externally-applied magnetic field. The cantilever was designed to form a capacitance transducer, which consisted of variable capacitance where electrical and mechanical energies were exchanged. The aim of this paper was to analyse the system design of the microcantilever when subjected to a magnetic field produced by a current-carrying conductor. When the signal, a sinusoidal current with a constant frequency, was applied, the cantilever beam exhibited a vibration motion along the vertical axis when placed closer to the line current. This motion created corresponding capacitance changes and generated a voltage output proportional to the capacitive change in the signal-processing circuitry attached to the microcantilever. The equivalent massspring system theory was used to describe and analyse the effect of the natural frequency of the system vibrations and motion due to the applied magnetic field, in a single-degree of freedom. The main application of this microcantilever is in current measurements to develop a non-contact current sensor mote.

  18. Pulsed high current ion beam processing equipment

    Korenev, S.A.; Perry, A.

    1995-01-01

    A pulsed high voltage ion source is considered for use in ion beam processing for the surface modification of materials, and deposition of conducting films on different substrates. The source consists of an Arkad'ev-Marx high voltage generator, a vacuum ion diode based on explosive ion emission, and a vacuum chamber as substrate holder. The ion diode allows conducting films to be deposited from metal or allow sources, with ion beam mixing, onto substrates held at a pre-selected temperature. The main variables can be set in the ranges: voltage 100-700 kV, pulse length 0.3 μs, beam current 1-200 A depending on the ion chosen. The applications of this technology are discussed in semiconductor, superconductor and metallizing applications as well as the direction of future development and cost of these devices for commercial application. 14 refs., 6 figs

  19. Pulsed hollow cathode discharge: intense electron beam and filamentary plasma

    Modreanu, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with a transient hollow cathode discharge optimised by a preionization one and providing intense electron beams. It exists a preionization current value for which the pulsed discharge becomes a very straight and bright filament, well collimated on the discharge tube axis for some tenths of centimeters. A remarkable feature of this discharge is that, without internal metallic electrodes very pure plasma could be produced. Using self-biasing by the beam of a Faraday cup placed only few millimeters behind the anode, we deduced the beam electron's distribution function and its temporal behavior for two radial positions, on the axis and 1 millimeter off-axis, respectively. The real advantage of this measurement technique is the transient polarization character, which allows analysis very closely from the electron beam extraction hole. On the other side, using the emission spectroscopy, we have studied the plasma produced in electron beam - gas interaction and deduced the temporal evolution of the electron temperature. The temporal behavior of the filamentary plasma diameter shows a constriction at the last moments of the beam existence, followed by diffusion controlled expansion. The ambipolar diffusion coefficient corresponding to the estimated electron temperature describes quite well this expansion and allows a quantitative interpretation of the measured temperature diminution, with taking into account the preferential fast electrons escape. The analysis of both beam and post-beam plasma phases suggests potential applications of this robust, very reproducible and not expensive discharge also susceptible to be external monitored. The beam - target interaction could be used for PVD, elementary analysis and filamentary or point-like X-ray emission. (author) [fr

  20. Optimization of Beam Transmission of PAL-PNF Electron Linac

    Shin, S. G.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, E. A. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The PNF (Pohang Neutron Facility) electron Linac is providing converted neutrons and photons from electron beams to users for nuclear physics experiments and high energy gamma-ray exposures. This linac is capable of producing 100 MeV electron beams with a beam current of pulsed 100 mA. The pulse length is 2 {mu}s and the pulse repetition rate is typically 30 Hz. This linac consists of two SLAC-type S-band accelerating columns and the thermionic RF gun. They are powered by one klystron and the matching pulse modulator. The electron beams emitted from the RF gun are bunched as they pass through the alpha magnet and are injected into the accelerating column thereafter. In this paper, we discuss procedures and results of the beam transmission optimization with technical details of the accelerator system. We also briefly discuss the future upgrade plan to obtain short-pulse or electron beams for neutron TOF experiments by adopting a triode type thermionic DC electron gun

  1. Electron-Beam Produced Air Plasma: Optical and Electrical Diagnostics

    Vidmar, Robert; Stalder, Kenneth; Seeley, Megan

    2006-10-01

    High energy electron impact excitation is used to stimulate optical emissions that quantify the measurement of electron beam current. A 100 keV 10-ma electron beam source is used to produce air plasma in a test cell at a pressure between 1 mTorr and 760 Torr. Optical emissions originating from the N2 2^nd positive line at 337.1 nm and the N2^+ 1^st negative line at 391.4 nm are observed. Details on calibration using signals from an isolated transmission window and a Faraday plate are discussed. Results using this technique and other electrical signal are presented.

  2. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Migliorati, M.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources [it

  3. 500 MHz narrowband beam position monitor electronics for electron synchrotrons

    Mohos, I.; Dietrich, J.

    1998-01-01

    Narrowband beam position monitor electronics were developed in the Forschungszentrum Juelich-IKP for the orbit measurement equipment used at ELSA Bonn. The equipment uses 32 monitor chambers, each with four capacitive button electrodes. The monitor electronics, consisting of an rf signal processing module (BPM-RF) and a data acquisition and control module (BPM-DAQ), sequentially process and measure the monitor signals and deliver calculated horizontal and vertical beam position data via a serial network

  4. 500 MHz narrowband beam position monitor electronics for electron synchrotrons

    Mohos, I.; Dietrich, J.

    1998-12-01

    Narrowband beam position monitor electronics were developed in the Forschungszentrum Jülich-IKP for the orbit measurement equipment used at ELSA Bonn. The equipment uses 32 monitor chambers, each with four capacitive button electrodes. The monitor electronics, consisting of an rf signal processing module (BPM-RF) and a data acquisition and control module (BPM-DAQ), sequentially process and measure the monitor signals and deliver calculated horizontal and vertical beam position data via a serial network.

  5. Fast pulse beam generation systems for electron accelerators

    Koontz, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    The fast pulse beam generation system to supply the SLAC storage ring, SPEAR, by the two one nanosecond bunch electron beam pulses is described. Generation of these pulses is accomplished with a combination of a fast pulsed grided gun and a synchronized transverse beam chopper. Fast gun based on spherical cathode-grid assembly has output current up to 2As. Fast pulse amplifier system can handle trains of short pulses with repetition rates up to 40 MHz during the 1.6 μs normal accelerating time. Chopping deflector system consists of a resonant coaxial line with the deflecting plates. The resonator frequency is 39.667 MHz. A schematic diagram of the resonant system is shown. The fast beam pickup system has a one hundred picosecond rise time overrall. Fast beam generation and chopper systems permit to generate almost any short or single bunch beam profile needed for experiments

  6. Green coffee decontamination by electron beam irradiation

    Nemtanu, Monica R.; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Minea, R.

    2005-01-01

    Microbiological load of green coffee is a real problem considering that it is extremely sensitive to contamination. Irradiation is a decontamination method for a lot of foodstuffs, being a feasible, very effective and environment friendly one. Beans and ground green coffee were irradiated with electron beams up to 40 kGy. Microbial load, rheological behavior, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and visible spectroscopy were carried out. The results show that electron beam irradiation of green coffee could decontaminate it without severe changes in its properties

  7. Neutral beam current drive with balanced injection

    Eckhartt, D.

    1990-01-01

    Current drive with fast ions has proved its capability to sustain a tokamak plasma free of externally induced electric fields in a stationary state. The suprathermal ion population within the toroidal plasma was created by quasi-tangential and uni-directional injection of high-energy neutral atoms, their ionisation and subsequent deceleration by collisions with the background plasma particles. In future large tokamaks of the NET/INTER-type, with reactor-relevant values of plasma density and temperature, this current drive scheme is expected to maintain the toroidal current at the plasma centre, as current drive by lower hybrid waves will be restricted to the outer plasma regions owing to strong wave damping. Adequate penetration of the neutral atoms through the dense plasma requires particle energies of several hundred kilovolts per nucleon since beam absorption scales roughly with the ratio beam energy over density. The realisation of such high-energy high-power neutral beams, based on negative ion technology, is now under study. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs

  8. AECL IMPELA electron beam industrial irradiators

    Labrie, J.P.; Drewell, N.H.; Ebrahim, N.A.; Lawrence, C.B.; Mason, V.A.; Ungrin, J.; White, B.F.

    1989-01-01

    A family of industrial irradiators is being developed by AECL to cover an electron-beam energy range from 5 to 18 MeV at beam powers between 20 and 250 kW. The IMPELA family of irradiators is designed for push button, reliable operation. The major irradiator components are modular, allowing for later upgrades to meet increased demands in either electron or X-ray mode. Interface between the control system, irradiator availability and dose quality assurance is in conformance with the most demanding specifications. The IMPELA irradiators use a klystron-driven, standing-wave, L-band accelerator structure with direct injection from a rugged, triode electron gun. Direct control of the accelerating field during the beam pulse ensures constant output beam energy, independent of beam power. The first member of the family, the IMPELA 10/50 (10 MeV, 50 kW), is in the final stages of assembly at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. The IMPELA 10/50 is constructed around a 3.25 m long, high-power-capacity accelerator structure operated at a duty factor of 5%. Beam loading exceeds 60%. The rf power is provided by a 2 MW/150 kW modulated-anode klystron protected from load mismatches by a circulator. This prototype will be used to demonstrate the reliability and dose uniformity targets of the IMPELA family. Full beam operation of the IMPELA 10/50 is scheduled for early 1989. (orig.)

  9. Control-grid electron gun as a source of modulated electron beam for a collective accelerator

    Bakumenko, A.A.; Belikov, V.V.; Zvyagintsev, A.V.; Lyul'chenko, V.I.; Lymar', A.G.; Martynenko, P.A.; Suryadnyj, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Structure is described and experimental results of investigations into an electron gun with transverse beam compression and control grid are presented. The pulse trailing edge is formed by a sectioned discharger. A modulated electron beam with the following parameters: 110 keV beam energy, 70 A current amplitude, 3-8 MHz modulation frequency, 100% modulation depth, ≅8-6 mm minimal beam diameter, ≅ 10μs pulse duration, 3% pulse top non-uniformity, more than 200 compression degree is obtained when introducing the positive feedback in auto-generator regime to the gun supply circuit. Further it is supposed to use the developed electron gun for heavy ion acceleration by a field of space charge of a modulated electron beam in a corrugated liner. It should be underlined that power supply of such an accelerator does not require powerful outside HF generator. 5 refs.; 1 fig

  10. Apparatus for electron beam irradiation of objects

    Dmitriev, S.P.; Ivanov, A.S.; Sviniin, M.P.; Fedotov, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    This patent provides an apparatus for electron beam irradiation of objects, comprising a shaper of a ribbon-shaped electron beam and a deflecting electromagnet having a frame-type magnetic circuit and used to direct said electron beam onto an irradiated object substantially at an angle of 90 degrees. The deflecting electromagnet has two poles extended over the width of the irradiated object and comprises two windings embracing said poles and connected to a d.c. source. The deflecting electromagnet is arranged in such a manner that the trajectories of the electrons at an area from the shaper to the electromagnet are inclined to the plane of the frame of its magnetic circuit

  11. A simple electron-beam lithography system

    Mølhave, Kristian; Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Bøggild, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A large number of applications of electron-beam lithography (EBL) systems in nanotechnology have been demonstrated in recent years. In this paper we present a simple and general-purpose EBL system constructed by insertion of an electrostatic deflector plate system at the electron-beam exit...... of the column of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The system can easily be mounted on most standard SEM systems. The tested setup allows an area of up to about 50 x 50 pm to be scanned, if the upper limit for acceptable reduction of the SEM resolution is set to 10 run. We demonstrate how the EBL system can...... be used to write three-dimensional nanostructures by electron-beam deposition. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. High-brightness electron beam diagnostics at the ATF

    Wang, X.J.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1996-01-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a dedicated user facility for accelerator physicists. Its design is optimized to explore laser acceleration and coherent radiation production. To characterize the low-emittance, picoseconds long electron beam produced by the ATF's photocathode RF gun, we have installed electron beam profile monitors for transverse emittance measurement, and developed a new technique to measure electron beam pulse length by chirping the electron beam energy. We have also developed a new technique to measure the ps slice emittance of a 10 ps long electron beam. Stripline beam position monitors were installed along the beam to monitor the electron beam position and intensity. A stripline beam position monitor was also used to monitor the timing jitter between the RF system and laser pulses. Transition radiation was used to measure electron beam energy, beam profile and electron beam bunch length

  13. Accelerated Electron-Beam Formation with a High Capture Coefficient in a Parallel Coupled Accelerating Structure

    Chernousov, Yu. D.; Shebolaev, I. V.; Ikryanov, I. M.

    2018-01-01

    An electron beam with a high (close to 100%) coefficient of electron capture into the regime of acceleration has been obtained in a linear electron accelerator based on a parallel coupled slow-wave structure, electron gun with microwave-controlled injection current, and permanent-magnet beam-focusing system. The high capture coefficient was due to the properties of the accelerating structure, beam-focusing system, and electron-injection system. Main characteristics of the proposed systems are presented.

  14. Beam position dependence of a wall-current monitor

    Tamiya, K.; Asami, A.; Suwada, T.; Urano, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    It was pointed out recently that there exists an appreciable beam position dependence in the wall-current monitor widely used in electron accelerators. Detailed study of this dependence is performed on a test bench varying the pulse width and the frequency of the input signal simulating the beam. The results of experiments show that when the pulse width becomes shorter more appreciable becomes the dependence, and it approaches to that of calculated from the method of images. A unified analysis is under way. (author)

  15. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm 2 and 0.4 pC/(ps mm 2 ), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within ±8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  16. Spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics for microsecond, intense electron beams

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Brake, M.; Horton, L.D.; Bidwell, S.; Lucey, R.F.; Smutek, L.; Tucker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two different configurations have been developed which use Cerenkov radiation to detect electron beam current profiles as a function of time. The first uses Cerenkov emission by electrons which impinge axially on a single fiberoptic lightguide enclosed in a lucite tube. Plasma light is blocked by graphite spray or thin foil covering the end of the optical fiber. This diagnostic has the following advantages: 1) the threshold energy for Cerenkov emission effectively discriminates between high energy beam electrons and low energy (3-5 eV) plasma electrons. 2) The small, nonconducting probe introduces a minimal perturbation into the beam-plasma system. 3) Excellent signal to noise ratio is obtained because the fiberoptic signal is directly transmitted to a photomultiplier tube in the Faraday cage. 4) Quantitative data is obtained directly

  17. Electron Beam Propagation in a Plasma

    Kyoung W. Min

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam propagation in a fully ionized plasma has been studied using a one-dimensional particle simulation model. We compare the results of electrostatic simulations to those of electromagnetic simulations. The electrostatic results show the essential features of beam-plasma instability which accelerates ambient plasmas. The results also show the heating of ambient plasmas and the trapping of plasmas due to the locally generated electric field. The level of the radiation generated by the same non-relativistic beam is slightly higher than the noise level. We discuss the results in context of the heating of coronal plasma during solar flares.

  18. Electron clearing for the ISA proton beam

    Herrera, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The circulating protons in the ISABELLE intersecting storage ring accelerator will collide with the residual gas in the vacuum chamber. The electrons produced will tend to be captured by the potential well of the beam itself and result in a neutralization of the space charge of the beam. A detailed analysis is given of the various mechanisms which can be used to reduce the net degree of beam neutralization. It is concluded that the average neutralization will be about 10 -4 for a residual gas pressure of 3 x 10 -11 torr of hydrogen

  19. Drag of ballistic electrons by an ion beam

    Gurevich, V. L.; Muradov, M. I., E-mail: mag.muradov@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Drag of electrons of a one-dimensional ballistic nanowire by a nearby one-dimensional beam of ions is considered. We assume that the ion beam is represented by an ensemble of heavy ions of the same velocity V. The ratio of the drag current to the primary current carried by the ion beam is calculated. The drag current turns out to be a nonmonotonic function of velocity V. It has a sharp maximum for V near v{sub nF}/2, where n is the number of the uppermost electron miniband (channel) taking part in conduction and v{sub nF} is the corresponding Fermi velocity. This means that the phenomenon of ion beam drag can be used for investigation of the electron spectra of ballistic nanostructures. We note that whereas observation of the Coulomb drag between two parallel quantum wires may in general be complicated by phenomena such as tunneling and phonon drag, the Coulomb drag of electrons of a one-dimensional ballistic nanowire by an ion beam is free of such spurious effects.

  20. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented

  1. Potential ceramics processing applications with high-energy electron beams

    Struve, K.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    High-energy, high-current electron beams may offer unique features for processing of ceramics that are not available with any other heat source. These include the capability to instantaneously heat to several centimeters in depth, to preferentially deposit energy in dense, high-z materials, to process at atmospheric pressures in air or other gases, to have large control over heating volume and heating rate, and to have efficient energy conversion. At a recent workshop organized by the authors to explore opportunities for electron beam processing of ceramics, several applications were identified for further development. These were ceramic joining, fabrication of ceramic powders, and surface processing of ceramics. It may be possible to join ceramics by either electron-beam brazing or welding. Brazing with refractory metals might also be feasible. The primary concern for brazing is whether the braze material can wet to the ceramic when rapidly heated by an electron beam. Raw ceramic powders, such as silicon nitride and aluminum nitride, which are difficult to produce by conventional techniques, could possibly be produced by vaporizing metals in a nitrogen atmosphere. Experiments need to be done to verify that the vaporized metal can fully react with the nitrogen. By adjusting beam parameters, high-energy beams can be used to remove surface flaws which are often sites of fracture initiation. They can also be used for surface cleaning. The advantage of electron beams rather than ion beams for this application is that the heat deposition can be graded into the material. The authors will discuss the capabilities of beams from existing machines for these applications and discuss planned experiments

  2. Dosimetry for Electron Beam Applications

    Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron bean dosimetry, on one hand developaent of thin fil« dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand developaent of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film...

  3. Simulation of Electron Beam Trajectory of Thermionic Electron Gun Type with Pierce Electrode

    Suprapto; Djoko-SP; Djasiman

    2000-01-01

    The simulation of electron beam trajectory for electron gun of electron beam machine has been done. The simulation is carried out according to mechanical design of the electron gun. The simulation is carried out by using the software made by Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk-Poland. The result obtained from simulation is approximately parallel electron beam trajectory of 20 mA beam current at 0.66 kV anode voltage, 15 mm cathode-anode distance and 67.5 o cathode angle. Arrangement of electron gun and accelerating tube with 15 kV voltage between anode and the first electrode of accelerating tube yields focus distance of 34 mm from the to cathode. To obtain the approximately parallel beam trajectory which has -0.03 o entrance angles to accelerating tube, the suitable cathode-anode voltage is 12.66 kV. With the entrance angle of -0.03 o it is expected that the electron beam can be accelerated and the beam profile has a small divergence after passing the accelerating tube. (author)

  4. High-Current Plasma Electron Sources

    Gushenets, J.Z.; Krokhmal, V.A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Felsteiner, J.; Gushenets, V.

    2002-01-01

    In this report we present the design, electrical schemes and preliminary results of a test of 4 different electron plasma cathodes operating under Kg h-voltage pulses in a vacuum diode. The first plasma cathode consists of 6 azimuthally symmetrically distributed arc guns and a hollow anode having an output window covered by a metal grid. Plasma formation is initiated by a surface discharge over a ceramic washer placed between a W-made cathode and an intermediate electrode. Further plasma expansion leads to a redistribution of the discharge between the W-cathode and the hollow anode. An accelerating pulse applied between the output anode grid and the collector extracts electrons from this plasma. The operation of another plasma cathode design is based on Penning discharge for preliminary plasma formation. The main glow discharge occurs between an intermediate electrode of the Penning gun and the hollow anode. To keep the background pressure in the accelerating gap at P S 2.5x10 4 Torr either differential pumping or a pulsed gas puff valve were used. The operation of the latter electron plasma source is based on a hollow cathode discharge. To achieve a sharp pressure gradient between the cathode cavity and the accelerating gap a pulsed gas puff valve was used. A specially designed ferroelectric plasma cathode initiated plasma formation inside the hollow cathode. This type of the hollow cathode discharge ignition allowed to achieve a discharge current of 1.2 kA at a background pressure of 2x10 4 Torr. All these cathodes were developed and initially tested inside a planar diode with a background pressure S 2x10 4 Torr under the same conditions: accelerating voltage 180 - 300 kV, pulse duration 200 - 400 ns, electron beam current - 1 - 1.5 kA, and cross-sectional area of the extracted electron beam 113 cm 2

  5. Relativistic electron beam - plasma interaction with intense self-fields

    Davidson, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The major interest in the equilibrium, stability and radiation properties of relativistic electron beams and in beam-plasma interactions originates from several diverse research areas. It is well known that a many-body collection of charged particles in which there is not overall charge neutrality and/or current neutrality can be characterized by intense self-electric fields and/or self-magnetic fields. Moreover, the intense equilibrium self-fields associated with the lack of charge neutrality and/or current neutrality can have a large effect on particle trajectories and on detailed equilibrium and stability behavior. The main emphasis in Sections 9.1.2-9.1.5 of this chapter is placed on investigations of the important influence of self-fields on the equilibrium and stability properties of magnetically confined electron beam-plasma systems. Atomic processes and discrete particle interactions (binary collisions) are omitted from the analysis, and collective processes are assumed to dominate on the time and length scales of interest. Moreover, both macroscopic (Section 9.1.2) and kinetic (Sections 9.1.3-9.1.5) theoretical models are developed and used to investigate equilibrium and stability properties in straight cylindrical geometry. Several of the classical waves and instabilities characteristic of nonneutral plasmas and beam-plasma systems are analyzed in Sections 9.1.2-9.1.5, including stable surface oscillation on a nonneutral electron beam, the ion resonance instability, the diocotron instability, two-stream instabilities between beam electrons and plasma electrons and between beam electrons and plasma ions, the filamentation instability, the modified two-stream instability, etc

  6. Assessment of Electron Beam Welding in Shipyard Construction,

    1985-12-01

    ELECTRON BEAM APPLICATORS QUESTIONNAIRE 1. Applicators Name: McCay Tool & Engr. Co. 2. Address: 1449 West Lark, Fenton , Mo. 3...had very li tt le undercut and requ ired no cosmet ic pass. TESTING AND RESULTS ’re~t ing wi ~ pt-f’)rimev oil spc inens inl t he- fol lowing manner. 1...Penetration Cosmet . c Accelerating Voltage (KV) 75 70 Beam Current (ma) 115 30 Travel Speed (IPM) 8 18 Beam focus (Amps programmed) 4.38 4.70 Gun to Work

  7. Development of electron beam deflection circuit

    Leo Kwee Wah; Lojius Lombigit; Abu Bakar Ghazali; Azaman

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a development of a power supply circuit to deflect and move the electron beam across the window of the Baby electron beam machine. It comprises a discussion of circuit design, its assembly and the test results. A variety of input and output conditions have been tested and it was found that the design is capable to supply 1.0 A with 50Hz on X-axis coil and 0.4A with 500Hz on Y-axis coil. (Author)

  8. Characterisation of 100 kW electron beam melting gun and its adaptation as electron gun for high power DC electron accelerators

    Banerjee, Srutarshi; Bhattacharjee, Dhruva; Waghmare, Abhay; Tiwari, Rajnish; Bakhtsingh, R.I.; Dasgupta, K.; Gupta, Sachin; Prakash, Baibhaw; Jha, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the characterization of the 100 kW electron beam melting gun for its adaptation in high power DC Electron Accelerators. The indigenously designed electron beam melting system at BARC is chosen for characterization. It comprises of electron gun as source of electrons, two electromagnetic focusing lenses viz. upper focusing lens and lower focusing lens for beam focusing, intermediate beam aperture for vacuum decoupling between gun region and melt zone, deflection and oscillation lens for maneuvering the beam on the melt charge and water cooled crucible that acts as a beam dump. In this system, the electron gun is designed for 40 kV and 100 kW corresponding to a maximum beam current of 2.5 A. The electron gun uses directly heated spiral tungsten filament. The operating temperature of the filament is 2800 °K. The focusing electrode and the anode profile are designed based on Pierce geometry. High Power DC Electron Accelerators require high currents of 1 A. The beam must comply with the requirement of 40 mm beam diameter and 10 mrad divergence at the exit of the electron gun. The characterization of the existing electron gun was done to find out all the beam parameters, for e.g. beam size, beam divergence, perveance etc. to be adapted or to be modified for the design of electron gun for high power DC accelerators. This paper shows limitations and the possible solutions for design of high power DC accelerators. (author)

  9. Design, simulation and construction of quadrupole magnets for focusing electron beam in powerful industrial electron accelerator

    S KH Mousavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the design and simulation of quadrupole magnets and electron beam optical of that by CST Studio code has been studied. Based on simulation result the magnetic quadrupole has been done for using in beam line of first Iranian powerful electron accelerator. For making the suitable magnetic field the effects of material and core geometry and coils current variation on quadrupole magnetic field have been studied. For test of quadrupole magnet the 10 MeV beam energy and 0.5 pi mm mrad emittance of input beam has been considered. We see the electron beam through the quadrupole magnet focus in one side and defocus in other side. The optimum of distance between two quadrupole magnets for low emittance have been achieved. The simulation results have good agreement with experimental results

  10. Solid waste electron beam treatment

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The possible applications of electron accelerators for solid waste treatment are discussed in the report. The elaborated technologies allow to recycle of materials (e.g. cellulosic materials in municipal waste), improve their hygienic standards (agricultural usage of sludge from municipal waste water treatment) and reduce harmful to environment chemical usage (cellulose degradation). These are environment friendly advanced technologies which meets demands waste recycling. (author)

  11. Solid waste electron beam treatment

    Chmielewski, A G

    1998-07-01

    The possible applications of electron accelerators for solid waste treatment are discussed in the report. The elaborated technologies allow to recycle of materials (e.g., cellulosic materials in municipal waste), improve their hygienic standards (agricultural usage of sludge from municipal waste water treatment) and reduce harmful to environment chemical usage (cellulose degradation). These are environment friendly advanced technologies which meets demands waste recycling. (author)

  12. Analysis of emissions from prebunched electron beams

    Jia Qika

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The emissions of the prebunched electron beam, including the coherent spontaneous emission and the self-amplified stimulated emission, are analyzed by using one-dimensional FEL theory. Neglecting the interaction of the electrons and the radiation field, the formula of the coherent spontaneous emission is given, the power of which is proportional to the square of the initial bunching factor and of the undulator length. For the general emission case of the prebunched electron beam, the evolution equation of the optical field is deducted. Then the analytical expression of the emission power is obtained for the resonant case; it is applicable to the regions from the low gain to the high gain. It is found that when the undulator length is shorter than four gain lengths, the emission is just the coherent spontaneous emission, and conversely, it is the self-amplified stimulated emission growing exponentially. For the nonresonant prebunched electron beam, the variations of the emission intensity with the detuning parameter for different interaction length are presented. The radiation field characters of the prebunched electron beam are discussed and compared with that of the seeded FEL amplifier.

  13. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    Johnson, A.W.; Gerardo, J.B.; Patterson, E.L.; Gerber, R.A.; Rice, J.K.; Bingham, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe 2 / sup *(1)/, Kr:O(2 1 S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  14. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Wiggins, S M; Issac, R C; Welsh, G H; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Anania, M P; Cipiccia, S; Manahan, G G; Aniculaesei, C; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Burgess, R T L; Vieux, G; Jaroszynski, D A [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W A [SUPA, Division of Electronic Engineering and Physics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A M [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Van der Geer, S B; De Loos, M J, E-mail: m.wiggins@phys.strath.ac.u [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is {approx}1{pi} mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  15. Radial electron beam laser excitation: the REBLE report

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1978-10-01

    The results of an investigation of techniques to generate high-power radially converging electron beams and the application of these beams to gas lasers is discussed. The design and performance of the REBLE accelerator that was developed for this program is presented. Reliable operation of the radial diode has been obtained at levels up to 1 MV, 200 kA, and 20 ns. It has been demonstrated that the anode current density can be made uniform to better than 15% over 1000 cm 2 areas with 100 to 250 A/cm 2 intensities. The measured total and spatially resolved energy deposition of this radial electron beam in various gases is compared with Monte Carlo calculations. In most cases, these codes give an accurate description of the beam transport and energy deposition. With the electron beam pumping xenon gas, the amplitude of xenon excimer radiation (1720 A 0 ) was radially uniform to within the experimental uncertainty. The efficiency of converting deposited electron beam energy to xenon excimer radiation was 20%

  16. Application of electron beams to environmental conservation technology

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    The paper is a review of current status of the application of electron beams to environmental conservation technology. Different aspects of radiation treatment of natural and polluted drinking water, radiation purification of industrial and municipal wastes, radiation treatment of sewage sludge and radiation purification of exhaust gases are considered. The special attention is paid to the respective pilot and industrial facilities. (author) 70 refs

  17. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  18. Electron beam requirements for soft x-ray/XUV free-electron lasers

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the electron beam quality (peak current, energy spread, and transverse emittance) required to drive short wavelength free-electron lasers in the XUV (10-100 nm) and soft x-ray (<10 nm) optical wavelength ranges is presented

  19. Study of loading by beam of dual-resonator structure of linear electron accelerator

    Milovanov, O.S.; Smirnov, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    Loading by the beam of the accelerating structure of an Argus dual-resonator linear electron accelerator with a kinetic energy of ∼ 1 MeV and a pulsed beam current of up to 0.5 A is studied experimentally. It is shown that the conditions for stable single-frequency operation of the magnetron are disrupted and the acceleration process is cut off at certain electron-beam currents. Experimental curves of the maximum beam current and maximum electron efficiency of the Argus linear electron accelerator as functions of rf power are given

  20. Proposed LLNL electron beam ion trap

    Marrs, R.E.; Egan, P.O.; Proctor, I.; Levine, M.A.; Hansen, L.; Kajiyama, Y.; Wolgast, R.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of energetic electrons with highly charged ions is of great importance to several research fields such as astrophysics, laser fusion and magnetic fusion. In spite of this importance there are almost no measurements of electron interaction cross sections for ions more than a few times ionized. To address this problem an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is being developed at LLNL. The device is essentially an EBIS except that it is not intended as a source of extracted ions. Instead the (variable energy) electron beam interacting with the confined ions will be used to obtain measurements of ionization cross sections, dielectronic recombination cross sections, radiative recombination cross sections, energy levels and oscillator strengths. Charge-exchange recombinaion cross sections with neutral gasses could also be measured. The goal is to produce and study elements in many different charge states up to He-like xenon and Ne-like uranium. 5 refs., 2 figs

  1. Electron beam cladding of titanium on stainless steel plate

    Tomie, Michio; Abe, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Masanori; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental characteristics of electron beam cladding was investigated. Titanium foil of 0.2mm thickness was cladded on stainless steel plate of 3mm thickness by scanning electron beam. Surface roughness and cladded layer were analyzed by surface roughness tester, microscope, scanning electron microscope and electron probe micro analyzer. Electron beam conditions were discussed for these fundamental characteristics. It is found that the energy density of the electron beam is one of the most important factor for cladding. (author)

  2. A simultaneous electron energy and dosimeter calibration method for an electron beam irradiator

    Tanaka, R.; Sunaga, H.; Kojima, T.

    1991-01-01

    In radiation processing using electron accelerators, the reproducibility of absorbed dose in the product depends not only on the variation of beam current and conveyor speed, but also on variations of other accelerator parameters. This requires routine monitoring of the beam current and the scan width, and also requires periodical calibration of routine dosimeters usually in the shape of film, electron energy, and other radiation field parameters. The electron energy calibration is important especially for food processing. The dose calibration method using partial absorption calorimeters provides only information about absorbed dose. Measurement of average electron current density provides basic information about the radiation field formed by the beam scanning and scattering at the beam window, though it does not allow direct dose calibration. The total absorption calorimeter with a thick absorber allows dose and dosimeter calibration, if the depth profile of relative dose in a reference absorber is given experimentally. It also allows accurate calibration of the average electron energy at the surface of the calorimeter core, if electron fluence received by the calorimeter is measured at the same time. This means that both electron energy and dosimeters can be simultaneously calibrated by irradiation of a combined system including the calorimeter, the detector of the electron current density meter, and a thick reference absorber for depth profile measurement of relative dose. We have developed a simple and multifunctional system using the combined calibration method for 5 MeV electron beams. The paper describes a simultaneous calibration method for electron energy and film dosimeters, and describes the electron current density meter, the total absorption calorimeter, and the characteristics of this method. (author). 13 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Electron cloud effects in hadron beams

    Petrov, Fedor; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Weiland, Thomas [TU-Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder,Schlossgartenstr. 8 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Accelerators operating with intense positively charged beams can suffer from the electron cloud phenomenon. For example, it is the intensity limiting factor in CERN LHC and SPS. In past decades a lot of progress in understanding the electron cloud effects was made worldwide. Methods to suppress or weaken the electron cloud phenomenon were proposed. Theories governing the bunch stability in presence of the electron cloud were developed. Recently the theory was introduced to describe the bunch energy loss due to the electron cloud. However, most of the publications concern the single bunch electron cloud effects. In reality bunches are packed into trains. A disturbance of the cloud caused by the bunch in the beginning of the train affects the subsequent bunches. We present a further investigation of single-bunch electron cloud effects and planned activities to study the phenomenon in case of multiple bunches.

  4. Rock excavation by pulsed electron beams

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.; Brekke, T.L.; Finnie, I.

    1976-03-01

    If an intense short pulse of megavolt electrons is deposited in a brittle solid, dynamic spalling can be made to occur with removal of material. Experiments were made on several types of hard rock; results are reproducible and well-described theoretically. An accelerator with a rapidly-pulsed scanning electron beam was designed that could tunnel in hard rock about ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods

  5. Rock excavation by pulsed electron beams

    Avery, R.T.; Keefe, D.; Brekke, T.L.; Finnie, I.

    1976-01-01

    If an intense short pulse of megavolt electrons is deposited in a brittle solid, dynamic spalling can be made to occur with removal of material. Experiments have been made on several types of hard rock; results are reproducible and well-described theoretically. An accelerator with a rapid-pulsed scanning electron-beam has been designed that could tunnel in hard rock about ten times faster than conventional drill/blast methods. (author)

  6. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  7. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    Huang, Z.

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored

  8. Electron-beam-induced conduction in dielectrics

    Acris, F C; Davies, P M; Lewis, T J [University Coll. of North Wales, Bangor (UK). School of Electronic Engineering Science

    1976-03-14

    A model for the enhanced conduction induced in dielectric films under electron bombardment while electrically stressed is discussed. It is assumed that the beam produces a virtual electrode at the end of its range in the dielectric and, as a consequence, the induced conduction is shown to depend on the properties of that part of the dielectric beyond the range of the beam. This model has also been discussed recently by Nunes de Oliviera and Gross. In the present treatment, it is shown how the model permits investigation of beam scattering and carrier generation and recombination processes. Experiments on electron-bombardment-induced conduction of thin (72 to 360 nm) films of anodic tantalum oxide are reported and it is shown that the theoretical model provides a very satisfactory explanation of all features of the results including the apparent threshold energy for enhanced conduction.

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam test stand

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Snydstrup, L.

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the electron beam test stand (EBTS) project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory is to build a versatile device to develop technologies that are relevant for a high intensity electron beam ion source (EBIS) and to study the physics of ion confinement in a trap. The EBTS will have all the main attributes of EBIS: a 1-m-long, 5 T superconducting solenoid, electron gun, drift tube structure, electron collector, vacuum system, ion injection system, appropriate control, and instrumentation. Therefore it can be considered a short prototype of an EBIS for a relativistic heavy ion collider. The drift tube structure will be mounted in a vacuum tube inside a open-quotes warmclose quotes bore of a superconducting solenoid, it will be at room temperature, and its design will employ ultrahigh vacuum technology to reach the 10 -10 Torr level. The first gun to be tested will be a 10 A electron gun with high emission density and magnetic compression of the electron beam. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Space-charge dynamics of polymethylmethacrylate under electron beam irradiation

    Gong, H; Ong, C K

    1997-01-01

    Space-charge dynamics of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) under electron beam irradiation has been investigated employing a scanning electron microscope. Assuming a Gaussian space-charge distribution, the distribution range (sigma) has been determined using a time-resolved current method in conjunction with a mirror image method. sigma is found to increase with irradiation time and eventually attain a stationary value. These observations have been discussed by taking into account radiation-induced conductivity and charge mobility. (author)

  11. Diagnosis and dynamics of low energy electron beams using DIADYN

    Marghitu, S.; Oproiu, C.; Toader, D.; Ruset, C.; Grigore, E.; Marghitu, O.; Vasiliu, M.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents original results concerning electron beam diagnosis and dynamics using DIADYN, a low energy (10 - 50 kV), medium intensity (0.1 - 1 A) laboratory equipment. A key stage in the operation of DIADYN is the beam diagnosis, performed by the non-destructive, modified three-gradient method (MTGM). We concentrate on the better use of experimental and computational techniques, in order to improve the consistency of the results. At present, DIADYN is equipped with a hot filament vacuum electron source (VES), consisting of a convergent Pierce diode, working in a pulse mode. Since the plasma electron sources (PES) have a longer lifetime and produce higher beam currents, we discuss the possibility to replace the VES with a PES. Special attention is given to VES results in a functioning regime typical for a low energy glow discharge PES. (authors)

  12. Diagnosis and dynamics of low energy electron beams using DIADYN

    Marghitu, S [Electrostatica, ICPE-CA S.A., Spaiul Unirii 313, Sector 3, RO-74204 Bucharest (Romania); Oproiu, C; Toader, D; Ruset, C; Grigore, E [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Marghitu, O [Institute for Space Sciences, INCDLPFR, PO Box MG-23, RO-76911 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Vasiliu, M [Politehnica University, 313 Splaiul Independentei, RO-060032, Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents original results concerning electron beam diagnosis and dynamics using DIADYN, a low energy (10 - 50 kV), medium intensity (0.1 - 1 A) laboratory equipment. A key stage in the operation of DIADYN is the beam diagnosis, performed by the non-destructive, modified three-gradient method (MTGM). We concentrate on the better use of experimental and computational techniques, in order to improve the consistency of the results. At present, DIADYN is equipped with a hot filament vacuum electron source (VES), consisting of a convergent Pierce diode, working in a pulse mode. Since the plasma electron sources (PES) have a longer lifetime and produce higher beam currents, we discuss the possibility to replace the VES with a PES. Special attention is given to VES results in a functioning regime typical for a low energy glow discharge PES. (authors)

  13. Relativistic electron-beam transport in curved channels

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Morel, J.E.; Wright, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    Collisionless single particle trajectories are modeled for a single plasma channel having one section curved in a circular arc. The magnetic field is developed by superposition of straight and curved channel segments. The plasma density gives charge and beam-current neutralization. High transport efficiencies are found for turning a relativistic electron beam 90 0 under reasonable conditions of plasma current, beam energy, arc radius, channel radius, and injection distributions in velocity and in position at the channel entrance. Channel exit distributions in velocity and position are found consistent with those for a straight plasma channel of equivalent length. Such transport problems are important in any charged particle-beam application constrained by large diode-to-target distance or by requirements of maximum power deposition in a confined area

  14. Electron beam puts a shine on leather

    Berberich, S.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for curing leather using either ultraviolet or electron-beam radiation has been developed. This type of radiation curing saves at least 60 percent of the energy cost of conventional leather finishing and can also result in considerable savings in plant space and labor. The implications of the new technology in international balance of trade are discussed

  15. Electron beam effects on gelatin polymer

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Souza, Clecia de M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Mastro, Nelida L. del, E-mail: patyoko@yahoo.co [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Colombo, Maria A., E-mail: mascolombo@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Tecnologia da Zona Leste, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The main field of electron-beam radiation processing applications is the modification of polymeric material. Polymer development includes new pathways to produce natural polymers with better mechanical and barrier properties and thermal stability. The aim of this paper was to investigate the behavior of a gelatin/acrylamide polymer treated by electron-beam radiation. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen, a fibrous insoluble protein, which is widely found in nature as the major constituent of skin, bones and connective tissue. Hydrolyzed collagen is composed of a unique sequence of amino acids, characterized particularly by the high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Among biomaterials, gelatin is an interesting material because is a partially crystalline polymer and has a relatively low melting point. Samples of gelatin together with glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer were irradiated with doses of 10 kGy and 40 kGy, using an electron beam accelerator, dose rate 22.41kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. After irradiation, some preliminary analyses were done like viscometry, texture analyses and colorimetry. The results of the diverse tests showed changes that can be ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. The electron-beam processed acrylamide-gelatin polymer using glycerin as plasticizer must be first extensively characterized before to be used for general applications. (author)

  16. Electron acceleration in a plane laser beam

    Petržílka, Václav; Krlín, Ladislav; Tataronis, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, supplement D (2002), s. 279-282 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/20th./. Prague, 10.06.2002-13.06.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : electron acceleration, laser beam Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  17. Penetration of electronic beams in ionizing media

    Martiarena, M.L.; Zanete, D.H.; Garibotti, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    It is studied the penetration of an electron beam in an ionizable medium by means of a generalized kinetic equation. This equation is related to elastic collisions, processes of creation and destruction of particles. By integrating numerically the transport equation, it can be evaluated the relative effects of all the processes involved in the evolution of the system. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  18. Electron beam effects on gelatin polymer

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Souza, Clecia de M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Mastro, Nelida L. del; Colombo, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    The main field of electron-beam radiation processing applications is the modification of polymeric material. Polymer development includes new pathways to produce natural polymers with better mechanical and barrier properties and thermal stability. The aim of this paper was to investigate the behavior of a gelatin/acrylamide polymer treated by electron-beam radiation. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen, a fibrous insoluble protein, which is widely found in nature as the major constituent of skin, bones and connective tissue. Hydrolyzed collagen is composed of a unique sequence of amino acids, characterized particularly by the high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Among biomaterials, gelatin is an interesting material because is a partially crystalline polymer and has a relatively low melting point. Samples of gelatin together with glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer were irradiated with doses of 10 kGy and 40 kGy, using an electron beam accelerator, dose rate 22.41kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. After irradiation, some preliminary analyses were done like viscometry, texture analyses and colorimetry. The results of the diverse tests showed changes that can be ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. The electron-beam processed acrylamide-gelatin polymer using glycerin as plasticizer must be first extensively characterized before to be used for general applications. (author)

  19. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10 -11 -Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2 1/2-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs

  20. Economy in utilizing electron beam accelerators

    Takahashi, Masao

    1980-01-01

    As the typical industrialized processes using electron beam irradiation, the following items may be given: the manufacture of cables covered with cross-linking polyethylene or PVC, heat-contracting material, cross-linking polyethylene foam, etc., and the curing of coatings or surface finishes. The results of investigating economy in these processes are described. First, the running cost of electron beam irradiation equipments is calculated. The result shows that, in general, the unit cost of the equipments becomes small with increasing output, therefore the selection of large power equipments may be advantageous for economy. Other important factors concerning the equipments are the reliability and lifetime which are being improved every year and the improvement of the operational efficiency of the equipments. Next, the comparison of cost was made for each industrialized process of the cables covered with cross-linking polyethylene, polyethylene foam, and the curing of coatings. In general, the processing cost is smaller and the depreciation cost is larger in electron beam irradiation process as compared with conventional processes. In addition, since the productive capacity is larger in electron beam process it is preponderant when the amount of production is large. In the industrialized examples, unique processes or features which are not obtainable by other methods are attained. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor electronics

    Tosi, N.; Fabbri, F.; Montanari, A.; Torromeo, G.; Dabrowski, A.E.; Orfanelli, S.; Grassi, T.; Hughes, E.; Mans, J.; Rusack, R.; Stifter, K.; Stickland, D.P.

    2016-01-01

    The CMS Beam Halo Monitor has been successfully installed in the CMS cavern in LHC Long Shutdown 1 for measuring the machine induced background for LHC Run II. The system is based on 40 detector units composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The readout electronics chain uses many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter electronics, with dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time, with few nanosecond resolution, and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics uses microTCA technology and receives data via a high-speed 5 Gbps asynchronous link. It records histograms with sub-bunch crossing timing resolution and is read out via IPbus using the newly designed CMS data acquisition for non-event based data. The data is processed in real time and published to CMS and the LHC, providing online feedback on the beam quality. A dedicated calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate short triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the system. The electronics has been in operation since the first LHC beams of Run II and has served as the first demonstration of the new QIE10, Microsemi Igloo2 FPGA and high-speed 5 Gbps link with LHC data

  2. Electron beams, lenses, and optics. Volume 2

    El-Kareh, A.B.; El-Kareh, J.C.J.

    1970-01-01

    This volume presents a systematic coverage of aberrations. It analyzes the geometrical aberrations and treats the spherical and chromatic aberrations in great detail. The coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration have been computed for a series of electrostatic and magnetic lenses and are listed in table form. The book also covers space charge and its effect on highly focused electron beams

  3. Electron beam flue gas treatment process. Review

    Honkonen, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The basis of the process for electron beam flue gas treatment are presented in the report. In tabular form the history of the research is reviewed. Main dependences of SO 2 and NO x removal efficiencies on different physico-chemical parameters are discussed. Trends concerning industrial process implementation are presented in the paper,finally. (author). 74 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  4. Radiation dermatitis following electron beam therapy

    Price, N.M.

    1978-01-01

    Ten patients, who had been treated for mycosis fungoides with electron beam radiation ten or more years previously, were examined for signs of radiation dermatitis. Although most patients had had acute radiation dermatitis, only a few manifested signs of mild chronic changes after having received between 1,000 and 2,800 rads

  5. Electron beam welding fundamentals and applications

    Mara, G.L.; Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The electron beam welding process is described and the unique mode of operation and penetration explained by a description of the forces operating within the weld pool. This penetration model is demonstrated by high speed cinematography of the weld pool on several materials. The conditions under which weld defects are formed are discussed and examples are presented. (auth)

  6. The Two-Beam Free Electron Laser Oscillator

    Thompson, Neil R

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a free-electron laser operating simultaneously with two electron beams of different energies [1] is extended to an oscillator configuration. The electron beam energies are chosen so that an harmonic of the lower energy beam is at the fundamental radiation wavelength of the higher energy beam. Potential benefits over a single-beam free-electron laser oscillator are discussed.

  7. Optical fiber Cherenkov detector for beam current monitoring

    Pishchulin, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.G.; Romashkin, O.B.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained in calculation of an optical fiber Cherenkov detector for accelerated beam current monitoring are presented. The technique of beam parameters monitoring is based on Cherenkov radiation excitation by accelerated electrons in the optical fiber. The formulas for calculations of optical power and time dependence of Cherenkov radiation pulse are given. The detector sensitivity and time resolution dependence on the fiber material characteristics are investigated. Parameters of a 10μm one-mode quartz optical fiber detector for the free electron laser photoinjector are calculated. The structure of a monitoring system with the optical fiber Cherenkov detector is considered. Possible applications of this technique are discussed and some recommendations are given

  8. The system of RF beam control for electron gun

    Barnyakov, A.M.; Levichev, A.E.; Chernousov, Yu.D.; Ivannikov, V.I.; Shebolaev, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    The system of RF control of three-electrode electron gun current is described. It consists of a source of microwave signal, coaxial line, coaxial RF switch and RF antenna lead. The system allows one to get the electron beam in the form of bunches with the frequency of the accelerating section to achieve the capture of particles in the acceleration mode close to 100%. The results of calculation and analysis of the elements of the system are presented. Characteristics of the devices are obtained experimentally. The results of using RF control in three-electrode electron gun at electron linear accelerator are described

  9. Space-charge-limited currents in electron-irradiated dielectrics

    Nunes de Oliveira, L.; Gross, B.

    1975-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of steady-state currents generated in a dielectric placed between positively or negatively biased electrodes and irradiated with a partially penetrating electron beam. The dielectric is divided into an irradiated region (IR), which extends from the electrode of incidence to the extrapolated range of the beam, and a nonirradiated region (NIR). In the IR the primary beam generates an electron-hole plasma. Its end plane acts as a virtual electrode embedded in the dielectric. Currents are space-charge limited in the NIR and Ohmic in the IR which is characterized by a uniform radiation-induced conductivity. Depending on the polarity of the electrode bias, electrons or holes are drawn from the IR into the NIR. The theory correctly predicts an apparent threshold effect for the inset of steady-state currents: the current amplitudes remain small as long as the electron range is smaller than half the sample thickness, and increase strongly only afterwards. Calculated current curves for different beam energies are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results. The role of the electron beam as a virtual electrode is discussed

  10. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    Sun, Changchun; /Duke U., DFELL; Li, Jingyi; /Duke U., DFELL; Mikhailov, Stepan; /Duke U., DFELL; Popov, Victor; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Wenzhong; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Ying; /Duke U., DFELL; Chao, Alex; /SLAC; Xu, Hong-liang; /Hefei, NSRL; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  11. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes.

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Pal, Udit Narayan; Rahaman, Hasibur; Prakash, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ∼50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.

  12. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Udit Narayan; Prakash, Ram [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-CEERI), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR-CEERI Campus, Pilani (India); Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Rahaman, Hasibur [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-CEERI), Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India)

    2016-03-15

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ∼50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.

  13. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Udit Narayan; Prakash, Ram; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Rahaman, Hasibur

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ∼50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.

  14. Generation of intense spin-polarized electron beams at the electron accelerator facility ELSA

    Heiliger, Dominik

    2014-08-01

    The inverted source of polarized electrons at the electron accelerator ELSA in Bonn routinely provides a pulsed and low energetic beam of polarized electrons (100 mA, 48 keV) by irradiating a GaAs strained-layer superlattice photocathode with laser light. Due to the beam energy of 48 keV the beam transport to the linear accelerator is strongly space charge dominated and the actual beam current has an impact on the beam dynamics. Thus, the optics of the transfer line to the linear accelerator must be optimized with respect to the chosen beam intensity. An intensity upgrade including numerical simulations of the beam transport as well as a generation and a transport of a beam current of nearly 200 mA was successfully operated. In order to enhance the reliability and uptime of the source, a new extreme high vacuum load lock system was installed and commissioned. It consists of an activation chamber for heat cleaning of the photocathodes and activation with cesium and oxygen, a storage in which different types of photocathodes can be stored and a loading chamber in which an atomic hydrogen source is used to remove nearly any remaining surface oxidation. The new cleaning procedure with atomic hydrogen was investigated regarding its potential to restore the initial quantum efficiency of the photocathode after many activations.

  15. High current relativistic beam propagates stably in gas surrounded by nonconducting walls

    Clark, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    LLL has been studying the propagation of high current electron beams for a number of years to understand their behavior for use in a variety of experimental uses. Our latest experiments have shown that a mildly relativistic electron beam of 10 to 15 kA and a pulse width of 30 to 40 ns can propagate stably and with no net current transfer in insulating tubes filled with neutral gases. These experiments have been performed in the Magnetic Fusion Energy program where Electronics Engineering has been operating an electron beam accelerator, designing some of the diagnostics, such as laser interferometers, and performing the experiments. This article briefly describes our experimental observations

  16. Macrofilament simulation of high current beam transport

    Hayden, R.J.; Jakobson, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Macrofilament simulation of high current beam transport through a series of solenoids has been used to investigate the sensitivity of such calculations to the initial beam distribution and to the number of filaments used in the simulation. The transport line was tuned to approximately 105 0 phase advance per cell at zero current with a tune depression of 65 0 due to the space charge. Input distributions with the filaments randomly uniform throughout a four dimensional ellipsoid and K-V input distributions have been studied. The behavior of the emittance is similar to that published for quadrupoles with like tune depression. The emittance demonstrated little growth in the first twelve solenoids, a rapid rate of growth for the next twenty, and a subsequent slow rate of growth. A few hundred filaments were sufficient to show the character of the instability. The number of filaments utilized is an order of magnitude fewer than has been utilized previously for similar instabilities. The previously published curves for simulations with less than a thousand particles show a rather constant emittance growth. If the solenoid transport line magnetic field is increased a few percent, emittance growth curves are obtained not unlike those curves. Collision growth effects are less important than indicated in the previously published results for quadrupoles

  17. Construction of double discharge pulsed electron beam generator and its applications

    Goektas, H.

    2001-12-01

    Generation of fast pulsed electron beam by superposing DC and pulsed hollow cathode discharge is studied. The electrical characteristics and measurements of the electron beam generator are done dc glow discharge and for the pulsed one. The electron beam current, its density and magnetic field effect, pinch effect, have been studied. The dependence of the electron beam parameters with respect to pressure and magnetic field have been studied. The pulsing effect of the beam is reviewed. By using the generator, micron holes drilling and carbon deposition was done at the laboratory. As a target source for carbon deposition methane gas is used and for Hydrogen-free carbon deposition was graphite

  18. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation For HL-LHC - Effect On The Beam Core

    Fitterer, M; Valishev, A; Bruce, R; Papadopoulou, S; Papotti, G; Pellegrini, D; Redaelli, S; Valuch, D; Wagner, J F

    2017-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams or lenses (HEL) is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in HL-LHC. In previous studies it has been shown that the halo can be efficiently removed with a hollow electron lens. Equally important as an efficient removal of the halo, is also to demonstrate that the core stays unperturbed. In this paper, we present a summary of the experiment at the LHC and simulations in view of the effect of the HEL on the beam core in case of a pulsed operation.

  19. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  20. Using electron beams to investigate catalytic materials

    Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) enables us, not only to reveal the morphology, but also to provide structural, chemical and electronic information about solid catalysts at the atomic level, providing a dramatic driving force for the development of heterogeneous catalysis. Almost all catalytic materials have been studied with TEM in order to obtain information about their structures, which can help us to establish the synthesis-structure-property relationships and to design catalysts with new structures and desired properties. Herein, several examples will be reviewed to illustrate the investigation of catalytic materials by using electron beams. (authors)