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Sample records for electromyography semg analysis

  1. Analysis of throwing a ball in American football by means of the surface electromyography

    OpenAIRE

    Jenšík, Ladislav

    2009-01-01

     Title: Analysis of throwing a football in American football by means of the surface electromyography.  Purposes: Describing and evaluating selected muscles integration structure during throwing a football movement and making a comparison of two kinds passes and valorize their usage.  Methods: Surface electromyography (SEMG) measure in combination with usage of simple kinematics analysis.  Results: Drop back pass is better for a faster or longer delivery football on target. Play-action pa...

  2. Surface electromyography analysis of blepharoptosis correction by transconjunctival incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Lung-Chen; Wu, Ming-Chya; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chiang, Yi-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Lin; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2016-06-01

    Upper eyelid movement depends on the antagonistic actions of orbicularis oculi muscle and levator aponeurosis. Blepharoptosis is an abnormal drooping of upper eyelid margin with the eye in primary position of gaze. Transconjunctival incisions for upper eyelid ptosis correction have been a well-developed technique. Conventional prognosis however depends on clinical observations and lacks of quantitatively analysis for the eyelid muscle controlling. This study examines the possibility of using the assessments of temporal correlation in surface electromyography (SEMG) as a quantitative description for the change of muscle controlling after operation. Eyelid SEMG was measured from patients with blepharoptosis preoperatively and postoperatively, as well as, for comparative study, from young and aged normal subjects. The data were analyzed using the detrended fluctuation analysis method. The results show that the temporal correlation of the SEMG signals can be characterized by two indices associated with the correlation properties in short and long time scales demarcated at 3ms, corresponding to the time scale of neural response. Aging causes degradation of the correlation properties at both time scales, and patient group likely possess more serious correlation degradation in long-time regime which was improved moderately by the ptosis corrections. We propose that the temporal correlation in SEMG signals may be regarded as an indicator for evaluating the performance of eyelid muscle controlling in postoperative recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SEMG analysis of astronaut upper arm during isotonic muscle actions with normal standing posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qianxiang, Zhou; Chao, Ma; Xiaohui, Zheng

    sEMG analysis of astronaut upper arm during isotonic muscle actions with normal standing posture*1 Introduction Now the research on the isotonic muscle actions by using Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is becoming a pop topic in fields of astronaut life support training and rehabilitations. And researchers paid more attention on the sEMG signal processes for reducing the influence of noise which is produced during monitoring process and the fatigue estimation of isotonic muscle actions with different force levels by using the parameters which are obtained from sEMG signals such as Condition Velocity(CV), Median Frequency(MDF), Mean Frequency(MNF) and so on. As the lucubrated research is done, more and more research on muscle fatigue issue of isotonic muscle actions are carried out with sEMG analysis and subjective estimate system of Borg scales at the same time. In this paper, the relationship between the variable for fatigue based on sEMG and the Borg scale during the course of isotonic muscle actions of the upper arm with different contraction levels are going to be investigated. Methods 13 young male subjects(23.4±2.45years, 64.7±5.43Kg, 171.7±5.41cm) with normal standing postures were introduced to do isotonic actions of the upper arm with different force levels(10% MVC, 30%MVC and 50%MVC). And the MVC which means maximal voluntary contraction was obtained firstly in the experiment. Also the sEMG would be recorded during the experiments; the Borg scales would be recorded for each contraction level. By using one-third band octave method, the fatigue variable (p) based on sEMG were set up and it was expressed as p = i g(fi ) · F (fi ). And g(fi ) is defined as the frequent factor which was 0.42+0.5 cos(π fi /f0 )+0.08 cos(2π fi /f0 ), 0 f0 . According to the equations, the p could be computed and the relationship between variable p and the Borg scale would be investigated. Results In the research, three kinds of fitted curves between variable p and Borg

  4. The detection of long-range correlations of operation force and sEMG with multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Li, Dongxu; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Shanguang; Lv, Ming; Wang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the application of multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) on the nonlinear characteristics of correlation between operation force and surface electromyography (sEMG), which is an applied frontier of human neuromuscular system activity. We established cross-correlation functions between the signal of force and four typical sEMG time-frequency domain index sequences (force-sEMG cross-correlation sequences), and dealt with the sequences with MF-DFA. In addition, we demonstrated that the force-sEMG cross-correlation sequences have strong statistical self-similarity and the fractal characteristic of the signal spectrum is similar to 1/f noise or fractional Brownian motion.

  5. Surface Electromyography for Speech and Swallowing Systems: Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Cara E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Applying surface electromyography (sEMG) to the study of voice, speech, and swallowing is becoming increasingly popular. An improved understanding of sEMG and building a consensus as to appropriate methodology will improve future research and clinical applications. Method: An updated review of the theory behind recording sEMG for the…

  6. Evaluation of Applied Kinesiology meridian techniques by means of surface electromyography (sEMG: demonstration of the regulatory influence of antique acupuncture points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncayo Helga

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Applied Kinesiology techniques based on manual muscle tests relies on the relationship between muscles and acupuncture meridians. Applied Kinesiology detects body dysfunctions based on changes in muscle tone. Muscle tonification or inhibition within the test setting can be achieved with selected acupoints. These acupoints belong to either the same meridian or related meridians. The aim of this study is to analyze muscle sedation and tonification by means of surface electromyography. Methods Manual muscle tests were carried out using standard Applied Kinesiology (AK techniques. The investigation included basic AK procedures such as sedation and tonification with specific acupoints. The sedation and tonification acupoints were selected from related meridians according to the Five Elements. The tonification effect of these acupoints was also tested while interfering effects were induced by manual stimulation of scars. The effects of selective neural therapy, i.e. individually tested and selected anesthetic agent, for the treatment of scars were also studied. The characteristics of muscle action were documented by surface electromyographys (sEMG. Results The sEMG data showed a diminution of signal intensity when sedation was used. Graded sedation resulted in a graded diminution of signal amplitude. Graded increase in signal amplitude was observed when antique acupuncture points were used for tonification. The tactile stretch stimulus of scars localized in meridian-independent places produced diminution of signal intensity on a reference muscle, similar to sedation. These changes, however, were not corrected by tonification acupoints. Correction of these interferences was achieved by lesion specific neural therapy with local anesthetics. Conclusion We demonstrated the central working principles, i.e. sedation and tonification, of Applied Kinesiology through the use of specific acupoints that have an influence on manual

  7. Evaluation of Applied Kinesiology meridian techniques by means of surface electromyography (sEMG): demonstration of the regulatory influence of antique acupuncture points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga

    2009-05-29

    The use of Applied Kinesiology techniques based on manual muscle tests relies on the relationship between muscles and acupuncture meridians. Applied Kinesiology detects body dysfunctions based on changes in muscle tone. Muscle tonification or inhibition within the test setting can be achieved with selected acupoints. These acupoints belong to either the same meridian or related meridians. The aim of this study is to analyze muscle sedation and tonification by means of surface electromyography. Manual muscle tests were carried out using standard Applied Kinesiology (AK) techniques. The investigation included basic AK procedures such as sedation and tonification with specific acupoints. The sedation and tonification acupoints were selected from related meridians according to the Five Elements. The tonification effect of these acupoints was also tested while interfering effects were induced by manual stimulation of scars. The effects of selective neural therapy, i.e. individually tested and selected anesthetic agent, for the treatment of scars were also studied. The characteristics of muscle action were documented by surface electromyographys (sEMG). The sEMG data showed a diminution of signal intensity when sedation was used. Graded sedation resulted in a graded diminution of signal amplitude. Graded increase in signal amplitude was observed when antique acupuncture points were used for tonification. The tactile stretch stimulus of scars localized in meridian-independent places produced diminution of signal intensity on a reference muscle, similar to sedation. These changes, however, were not corrected by tonification acupoints. Correction of these interferences was achieved by lesion specific neural therapy with local anesthetics. We demonstrated the central working principles, i.e. sedation and tonification, of Applied Kinesiology through the use of specific acupoints that have an influence on manual muscle tests. Sedation decreases RMS signal in sEMG, whereas

  8. SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY IN BIOMECHANICS: APPLICATIONS AND SIGNAL ANALYSIS ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEAK GRAłIELA-FLAVIA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface electromyography (SEMG is a technique for detecting and recording the electrical activity of the muscles using surface electrodes. The EMG signal is used in biomechanics mainly as an indicator of the initiation of muscle activation, as an indicator of the force produced by a contracting muscle, and as an index ofthe fatigue occurring within a muscle. EMG, used as a method of investigation, can tell us if the muscle is active or not, if the muscle is more or less active, when it is on or off, how much active is it, and finally, if it fatigues.The purpose of this article is to discuss some specific EMG signal analysis aspects with emphasis on comparison type analysis and frequency fatigue analysis.

  9. Foot and Ankle Kinematics and Dynamic Electromyography: Quantitative Analysis of Recovery From Peroneal Neuropathy in a Professional Football Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Coleman Wood, Krista A; Spinner, Robert J; Kaufman, Kenton R

    The assessment of neuromuscular recovery after peripheral nerve surgery has typically been a subjective physical examination. The purpose of this report was to assess the value of gait analysis in documenting recovery quantitatively. A professional football player underwent gait analysis before and after surgery for a peroneal intraneural ganglion cyst causing a left-sided foot drop. Surface electromyography (SEMG) recording from surface electrodes and motion parameter acquisition from a computerized motion capture system consisting of 10 infrared cameras were performed simultaneously. A comparison between SEMG recordings before and after surgery showed a progression from disorganized activation in the left tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles to temporally appropriate activation for the phase of the gait cycle. Kinematic analysis of ankle motion planes showed resolution from a complete foot drop preoperatively to phase-appropriate dorsiflexion postoperatively. Gait analysis with dynamic SEMG and motion capture complements physical examination when assessing postoperative recovery in athletes.

  10. Surface electromyography analysis for variable gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roetenberg, D.; Buurke, Jaap; Veltink, Petrus H.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Forner Cordero, A.

    2003-01-01

    The surface electromyographic (SEMG) signal obtained during gait is often presented as the SEMG profile, the average SEMG activation pattern during one gait cycle. A disadvantage of this method is that it omits the step-to-step variability of the timing of the muscle activation patterns that might

  11. Discrete wavelet transform analysis of surface electromyography for the fatigue assessment of neck and shoulder muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Suman Kanti; Nimbarte, Ashish D; Jaridi, Majid; Creese, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Assessment of neuromuscular fatigue is essential for early detection and prevention of risks associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. In recent years, discrete wavelet transform (DWT) of surface electromyography (SEMG) has been used to evaluate muscle fatigue, especially during dynamic contractions when the SEMG signal is non-stationary. However, its application to the assessment of work-related neck and shoulder muscle fatigue is not well established. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish DWT analysis as a suitable method to conduct quantitative assessment of neck and shoulder muscle fatigue under dynamic repetitive conditions. Ten human participants performed 40min of fatiguing repetitive arm and neck exertions while SEMG data from the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles were recorded. The ten of the most commonly used wavelet functions were used to conduct the DWT analysis. Spectral changes estimated using power of wavelet coefficients in the 12-23Hz frequency band showed the highest sensitivity to fatigue induced by the dynamic repetitive exertions. Although most of the wavelet functions tested in this study reasonably demonstrated the expected power trend with fatigue development and recovery, the overall performance of the "Rbio3.1" wavelet in terms of power estimation and statistical significance was better than the remaining nine wavelets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of Muscle Fatigue Progression using Cyclostationary Property of Surface Electromyography Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Venugopal, G; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of neuromuscular fatigue finds various applications ranging from clinical studies to biomechanics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals are widely used for these studies due to its non-invasiveness. During cyclic dynamic contractions, these signals are nonstationary and cyclostationary. In recent years, several nonstationary methods have been employed for the muscle fatigue analysis. However, cyclostationary based approach is not well established for the assessment of muscle fatigue. In this work, cyclostationarity associated with the biceps brachii muscle fatigue progression is analyzed using sEMG signals and Spectral Correlation Density (SCD) functions. Signals are recorded from fifty healthy adult volunteers during dynamic contractions under a prescribed protocol. These signals are preprocessed and are divided into three segments, namely, non-fatigue, first muscle discomfort and fatigue zones. Then SCD is estimated using fast Fourier transform accumulation method. Further, Cyclic Frequency Spectral Density (CFSD) is calculated from the SCD spectrum. Two features, namely, cyclic frequency spectral area (CFSA) and cyclic frequency spectral entropy (CFSE) are proposed to study the progression of muscle fatigue. Additionally, degree of cyclostationarity (DCS) is computed to quantify the amount of cyclostationarity present in the signals. Results show that there is a progressive increase in cyclostationary during the progression of muscle fatigue. CFSA shows an increasing trend in muscle fatiguing contraction. However, CFSE shows a decreasing trend. It is observed that when the muscle progresses from non-fatigue to fatigue condition, the mean DCS of fifty subjects increases from 0.016 to 0.99. All the extracted features found to be distinct and statistically significant in the three zones of muscle contraction (p < 0.05). It appears that these SCD features could be useful in the automated analysis of sEMG signals for different neuromuscular conditions.

  13. Analysis of prosody in finger braille using electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Manabi; Nishida, Masafumi; Horiuchi, Yasuo; Ichikawa, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Finger braille is one of the communication methods for the deaf blind. The interpreter types braille codes on the fingers of deaf blind. Finger braille seems to be the most suitable medium for real-time communication by its speed and accuracy of transmitting characters. We hypothesize that the prosody information exists in the time structure and strength of finger braille typing. Prosody is the paralinguistic information that has functions to transmit the sentence structure, prominence, emotions and other form of information in real time communication. In this study, we measured the surface electromyography (sEMG) of finger movement to analyze the typing strength of finger braille. We found that the typing strength increases at the beginning of a phrase and a prominent phrase. The result shows the possibility that the prosody in the typing strength of finger braille can be applied to create an interpreter system for the deafblind.

  14. Identification and agreement of first turn point by mathematical analysis applied to heart rate, carbon dioxide output and electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamunér, Antonio R.; Catai, Aparecida M.; Martins, Luiz E. B.; Sakabe, Daniel I.; Silva, Ester Da

    2013-01-01

    Background The second heart rate (HR) turn point has been extensively studied, however there are few studies determining the first HR turn point. Also, the use of mathematical and statistical models for determining changes in dynamic characteristics of physiological variables during an incremental cardiopulmonary test has been suggested. Objectives To determine the first turn point by analysis of HR, surface electromyography (sEMG), and carbon dioxide output () using two mathematical models and to compare the results to those of the visual method. Method Ten sedentary middle-aged men (53.9±3.2 years old) were submitted to cardiopulmonary exercise testing on an electromagnetic cycle ergometer until exhaustion. Ventilatory variables, HR, and sEMG of the vastus lateralis were obtained in real time. Three methods were used to determine the first turn point: 1) visual analysis based on loss of parallelism between and oxygen uptake (); 2) the linear-linear model, based on fitting the curves to the set of data (Lin-Lin ); 3) a bi-segmental linear regression of Hinkley' s algorithm applied to HR (HMM-HR), (HMM- ), and sEMG data (HMM-RMS). Results There were no differences between workload, HR, and ventilatory variable values at the first ventilatory turn point as determined by the five studied parameters (p>0.05). The Bland-Altman plot showed an even distribution of the visual analysis method with Lin-Lin , HMM-HR, HMM-CO2, and HMM-RMS. Conclusion The proposed mathematical models were effective in determining the first turn point since they detected the linear pattern change and the deflection point of , HR responses, and sEMG. PMID:24346296

  15. Vitamin D, surface electromyography and physical function in uraemic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, J.G.; Mølsted, Stig; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2010-01-01

    parameters were measured including 25-OHD, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-OHD) and parathyroid hormone analysis. Muscle function was determined by 30-second surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings of a right thigh muscle (vastus lateralis) and a second left finger muscle (second dorsal interosseous...

  16. Seizure Onset Detection based on one sEMG channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Hoppe, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method to detect seizure onsets of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography (sEMG) data. The proposed method is generic and based on a single channel making it ideal for a small detection or monitoring device. The sEMG signal is high-pass filtered with a ...

  17. Standardization of surface electromyography utilized to evaluate patients with dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaiman Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgorund Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. We introduce surface electromyography (sEMG to carry out rapid assessment of such patients and propose suggestions for standardizing sEMGs in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Methods Specifics steps for establishing standards for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles, the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water are presented in detail. A previously described normative database for single swallowing and drinking and standard approach to analysis was compared to data on the duration and electric activity of muscles involved in deglutition and with sEMG recordings in order to estimate stages of a swallow. Conclusion SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, timesaving and inexpensive to perform. With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG can serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management.

  18. Multifractal analysis of sEMG signal of the complex muscle activity

    CERN Document Server

    Trybek, Paulina; Nowakowski, Michal; Machura, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    The neuro--muscular activity while working on laparoscopic trainer is the example of the complex (and complicated) movement. This class of problems are still waiting for the proper theory which will be able to describe the actual properties of the muscle performance. Here we consider the signals obtained from three states of muscle activity: at maximum contraction, during complex movements (at actual work) and in the completely relaxed state. In addition the difference between a professional and an amateur is presented. The Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis was used in description of the properties the kinesiological surface electromyographic signals (sEMG). We demonstrate the dissimilarity between each state of work for the selected group of muscles as well as between trained and untrained individuals.

  19. Analysis of sEMG signals using discrete wavelet transform for muscle fatigue detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez-Prias, L. A.; Contreras-Ortiz, S. H.

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the present article is to characterize sEMG signals to determine muscular fatigue levels. To do this, the signal is decomposed using the discrete wavelet transform, which offers noise filtering features, simplicity and efficiency. sEMG signals on the forearm were acquired and analyzed during the execution of cyclic muscular contractions in the presence and absence of fatigue. When the muscle fatigues, the sEMG signal shows a more erratic behavior of the signal as more energy is required to maintain the effort levels.

  20. Electromyography-based analysis of human upper limbs during 45-day head-down bed-rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Anshuang; Wang, Chunhui; Qi, Hongzhi; Li, Fan; Wang, Zheng; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Chen, Shanguang; Ming, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Muscle deconditioning occurs in response to simulated or actual microgravity. In spaceflight, astronauts become monkey-like for mainly using their upper limbs to control the operating system and to complete corresponding tasks. The changes of upper limbs' athletic ability will directly affect astronauts' working performance. This study investigated the variation trend of surface electromyography (sEMG) during prolonged simulated microgravity. Eight healthy males participating in this study performed strict 45-day head-down bed-rest (HDBR). On the 5th day of pre-HDBR, and the 15th, the 30th and the 45th days of HDBR, the subjects performed maximum pushing task and maximum pulling task, and sEMG was collected from upper limbs synchronously. Each subject's maximum volunteer contractions of both the tasks during these days were compared, showing no significant change. However, changes were detected by sEMG-based analysis. It was found that integrated EMG, root mean square, mean frequency, fuzzy entropy of deltoid, and fuzzy entropy of triceps brachii changed significantly when comparing pre-HDBR with HDBR. The variation trend showed a recovery tendency after significant decline, which is inconsistent with the monotonic variation of lower limbs that was proved by previous research. These findings suggest that EMG changes in upper limbs during prolonged simulated microgravity, but has different variation trend from lower limbs.

  1. Evaluation of muscle force classification using shape analysis of the sEMG probability density function: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, F S; Boudaoud, S; Marque, C

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we propose to classify, by simulation, the shape variability (or non-Gaussianity) of the surface electromyogram (sEMG) amplitude probability density function (PDF), according to contraction level, using high-order statistics (HOS) and a recent functional formalism, the core shape modeling (CSM). According to recent studies, based on simulated and/or experimental conditions, the sEMG PDF shape seems to be modified by many factors as: contraction level, fatigue state, muscle anatomy, used instrumentation, and also motor control parameters. For sensitivity evaluation against these several sources (physiological, instrumental, and neural control) of variability, a large-scale simulation (25 muscle anatomies, ten parameter configurations, three electrode arrangements) is performed, by using a recent sEMG-force model and parallel computing, to classify sEMG data from three contraction levels (20, 50, and 80% MVC). A shape clustering algorithm is then launched using five combinations of HOS parameters, the CSM method and compared to amplitude clustering with classical indicators [average rectified value (ARV) and root mean square (RMS)]. From the results screening, it appears that the CSM method obtains, using Laplacian electrode arrangement, the highest classification scores, after ARV and RMS approaches, and followed by one HOS combination. However, when some critical confounding parameters are changed, these scores decrease. These simulation results demonstrate that the shape screening of the sEMG amplitude PDF is a complex task which needs both efficient shape analysis methods and specific signal recording protocol to be properly used for tracking neural drive and muscle activation strategies with varying force contraction in complement to classical amplitude estimators.

  2. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gazzoni

    Full Text Available The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1 the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2 the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1 it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2 hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  3. Quantifying Forearm Muscle Activity during Wrist and Finger Movements by Means of Multi-Channel Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported. PMID:25289669

  4. Surface Electromyographic (SEMG) Biofeedback for Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Randy Neblett

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback is a process in which biological information is measured and fed back to a patient and clinician for the purpose of gaining increased awareness and control over physiological domains. Surface electromyography (SEMG), a measure of muscle activity, allows both a patient and clinician to have direct and immediate access to muscle functioning that is not possible with manual palpation or visual observation. SEMG biofeedback can be used to help “down-train” elevated muscle activity or ...

  5. Surface Electromyographic (SEMG Biofeedback for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Neblett

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofeedback is a process in which biological information is measured and fed back to a patient and clinician for the purpose of gaining increased awareness and control over physiological domains. Surface electromyography (SEMG, a measure of muscle activity, allows both a patient and clinician to have direct and immediate access to muscle functioning that is not possible with manual palpation or visual observation. SEMG biofeedback can be used to help “down-train” elevated muscle activity or to “up-train” weak, inhibited, or paretic muscles. This article presents a historical and clinical overview of SEMG and its use in chronic low back pain assessment and biofeedback training.

  6. Surface Electromyographic (SEMG) Biofeedback for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett, Randy

    2016-05-17

    Biofeedback is a process in which biological information is measured and fed back to a patient and clinician for the purpose of gaining increased awareness and control over physiological domains. Surface electromyography (SEMG), a measure of muscle activity, allows both a patient and clinician to have direct and immediate access to muscle functioning that is not possible with manual palpation or visual observation. SEMG biofeedback can be used to help "down-train" elevated muscle activity or to "up-train" weak, inhibited, or paretic muscles. This article presents a historical and clinical overview of SEMG and its use in chronic low back pain assessment and biofeedback training.

  7. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG) spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental) and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity. Key pointsThe spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activityThe motion artifacts are more pronounced in the first spike than the following spikes in the sEMG spectrumReflex activity during WBV exercises is enhanced with an additional load of approximately 50% of the body mass.

  8. Surface electromyography in animals: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Stephanie; Zsoldos, Rebeka R.

    2017-01-01

    The study of muscle activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) is commonly used for investigations of the neuromuscular system in man. Although sEMG has faced methodological challenges, considerable technical advances have been made in the last few decades. Similarly, the field of animal biomechanics, including sEMG, has grown despite being confronted with often complex experimental conditions. In human sEMG research, standardised protocols have been developed, however these are lacking in animal sEMG. Before standards can be proposed in this population group, the existing research in animal sEMG should be collated and evaluated. Therefore the aim of this review is to systematically identify and summarise the literature in animal sEMG focussing on (1) species, breeds, activities and muscles investigated, and (2) electrode placement and normalisation methods used. The databases PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Vetmed Resource were searched systematically for sEMG studies in animals and 38 articles were included in the final review. Data on methodological quality was collected and summarised. The findings from this systematic review indicate the divergence in animal sEMG methodology and as a result, future steps required to develop standardisation in animal sEMG are proposed. PMID:26763600

  9. Clinical efficacy and sEMG analysis of a new traditional Chinese medicine therapy in the treatment of spasticity following apoplectic hemiparalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenzong; Zheng, Guoqing; Gu, Yong; Chen, Xi; Jin, Yongxi; Zhang, Guowei; Huang, Jianping; Shen, Jiangang

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the clinical effect and surface electromyography (sEMG) of rehabilitation exercise therapy in combination with total glucosides form Shaoyao Gancao decoction in treating spasticity after apoplectic hemiparalysis. Composite spasticity scale (CSS), Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) and modified Barthel index were compared between the exercise only group and the combined therapy group before and 1 month after the treatment to scale muscular tension, function and activities of daily living. Meanwhile, integrate EMG and root mean square (RMS) were used to detect the tension of upper limbs (biceps brachii) and ankles (tibialis anterior muscle and gastrocnemius) after the 1-month treatment. In the combined therapy group, the Ashworth and CSS scales were significantly improved compared to before the treatment (P exercise therapy in the treatment of spasticity after apoplectic hemiparalysis, and its mechanism might involve the decrease of muscular tension.

  10. Multi-modal myocontrol: Testing combined force- and electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Markus; Eiband, Thomas; Castellini, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    Myocontrol, that is control of prostheses using bodily signals, has proved in the decades to be a surprisingly hard problem for the scientific community of assistive and rehabilitation robotics. In particular, traditional surface electromyography (sEMG) seems to be no longer enough to guarantee dexterity (i.e., control over several degrees of freedom) and, most importantly, reliability. Multi-modal myocontrol is concerned with the idea of using novel signal gathering techniques as a replacement of, or alongside, sEMG, to provide high-density and diverse signals to improve dexterity and make the control more reliable. In this paper we present an offline and online assessment of multi-modal sEMG and force myography (FMG) targeted at hand and wrist myocontrol. A total number of twenty sEMG and FMG sensors were used simultaneously, in several combined configurations, to predict opening/closing of the hand and activation of two degrees of freedom of the wrist of ten intact subjects. The analysis was targeted at determining the optimal sensor combination and control parameters; the experimental results indicate that sEMG sensors alone perform worst, yielding a nRMSE of 9.1%, while mixing FMG and sEMG or using FMG only reduces the nRMSE to 5.2-6.6%. To validate these results, we engaged the subject with median performance in an online goal-reaching task. Analysis of this further experiment reveals that the online behaviour is similar to the offline one.

  11. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lienhard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05, and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05. This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity.

  12. Electromyography Activation Levels of the 3 Gluteus Medius Subdivisions During Manual Strength Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otten, Roald; Tol, Johannes L; Holmich, Per

    2015-01-01

    deficits and guide specific rehabilitation programs. However, the optimal positions for assessing the strength and activation of these subdivisions are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The first aim was to establish which strength-testing positions produce the highest surface electromyography (sEMG) activation levels...... of the individual GM subdivisions. The second aim was to evaluate differences in sEMG activation levels between the tested and contralateral (stabilizing) leg. METHOD: Twenty healthy physically active male subjects participated in this study. Muscle activity using sEMG was recorded for the GM subdivisions in 8...... different strength-testing positions and analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: Significant differences between testing positions for all 3 GM subdivisions were found. There were significant differences between the tested and the contralateral anterior and middle GM subdivisions (P...

  13. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography: Biomarkers for convulsive seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Pressler, Ronit; Wolf, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Muscle activity during seizures is in electroencephalographical (EEG) praxis often considered an irritating artefact. This article discusses ways by surface electromyography (EMG) to turn it into a valuable tool of epileptology. Muscles are in direct synaptic contact with motor neurons. Therefore, EMG signals provide direct information about the electric activity in the motor cortex. Qualitative analysis of EMG has traditionally been a part of the long-term video-EEG recordings. Recent development in quantitative analysis of EMG signals yielded valuable information on the pathomechanisms of convulsive seizures, demonstrating that it was different from maximal voluntary contraction, and different from convulsive psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. Furthermore, the tonic phase of the generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) proved to have different quantitative features than tonic seizures. The high temporal resolution of EMG allowed detailed characterisation of temporal dynamics of the GTCS, suggesting that the same inhibitory mechanisms that try to prevent the build-up of the seizure activity, contribute to ending the seizure. These findings have clinical implications: the quantitative EMG features provided the pathophysiologic substrate for developing neurophysiologic biomarkers that accurately identify GTCS. This proved to be efficient both for seizure detection and for objective, automated distinction between convulsive and non-convulsive epileptic seizures. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. WAVELET TRANSFORM ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHY KUNG FU STRIKES DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Miranda Marzullo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In martial arts and contact sports strikes are performed at near maximum speeds. For that reason, electromyography (EMG analysis of such movements is non-trivial. This paper has three main goals: firstly, to investigate the differences in the EMG activity of muscles during strikes performed with and without impacts; secondly, to assess the advantages of using Sum of Significant Power (SSP values instead of root mean square (rms values when analyzing EMG data; and lastly to introduce a new method of calculating median frequency values using wavelet transforms (WMDF. EMG data of the deltoid anterior (DA, triceps brachii (TB and brachioradialis (BR muscles were collected from eight Kung Fu practitioners during strikes performed with and without impacts. SSP results indicated significant higher muscle activity (p = 0.023 for the strikes with impact. WMDF results, on the other hand, indicated significant lower values (p = 0. 007 for the strikes with impact. SSP results presented higher sensitivity than rms to quantify important signal differences and, at the same time, presented lower inter-subject coefficient of variations. The result of increase in SSP values and decrease in WMDF may suggest better synchronization of motor units for the strikes with impact performed by the experienced Kung Fu practitioners

  15. Implementation of a real-time automatic onset time detection for surface electromyography measurement systems using NI myRIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lersviriyanantakul Chaiwat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For using surface electromyography (sEMG in various applications, the process consists of three parts: an onset time detection for detecting the first point of movement signals, a feature extraction for extracting the signal attribution, and a feature classification for classifying the sEMG signals. The first and the most significant part that influences the accuracy of other parts is the onset time detection, particularly for automatic systems. In this paper, an automatic and simple algorithm for the real-time onset time detection is presented. There are two main processes in the proposed algorithm; a smoothing process for reducing the noise of the measured sEMG signals and an automatic threshold calculation process for determining the onset time. The results from the algorithm analysis demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm to detect the sEMG onset time in various smoothing-threshold equations. Our findings reveal that using a simple square integral (SSI as the smoothing-threshold equation with the given sEMG signals gives the best performance for the onset time detection. Additionally, our proposed algorithm is also implemented on a real hardware platform, namely NI myRIO. Using the real-time simulated sEMG data, the experimental results guarantee that the proposed algorithm can properly detect the onset time in the real-time manner.

  16. Electromyography (EMG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tests and Procedures Electromyography (EMG) By Mayo Clinic Staff Electromyography (EMG) is a diagnostic procedure to assess the health of ... Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. About your electromyography (EMG) examination. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education ... . Mayo ...

  17. A study on the effect of age, gender and paralysis on sEMG signals

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a technology to measure the bio-potentials across the muscles. The true prospective of this technology is yet to be explored. In this paper, a simple and economic construction of a sEMG sensor is proposed. These sensors are used to determine the differences in the Electromyography (EMG) signal patterns of different individuals. Signals of several volunteers from different age groups, gender and individual having paralysis have been obtained. The sEMG data acquisition is done using the soundcard of a computer, hence reducing the need of additional hardware. Finally, the data is used to analyse the relationship between electromyography and factors like age, gender and health condition i.e. paralysis.

  18. Surface electromyography in animal biomechanics: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Stephanie; Zsoldos, Rebeka R

    2016-06-01

    The study of muscle activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) is commonly used for investigations of the neuromuscular system in man. Although sEMG has faced methodological challenges, considerable technical advances have been made in the last few decades. Similarly, the field of animal biomechanics, including sEMG, has grown despite being confronted with often complex experimental conditions. In human sEMG research, standardised protocols have been developed, however these are lacking in animal sEMG. Before standards can be proposed in this population group, the existing research in animal sEMG should be collated and evaluated. Therefore the aim of this review is to systematically identify and summarise the literature in animal sEMG focussing on (1) species, breeds, activities and muscles investigated, and (2) electrode placement and normalisation methods used. The databases PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Vetmed Resource were searched systematically for sEMG studies in animals and 38 articles were included in the final review. Data on methodological quality was collected and summarised. The findings from this systematic review indicate the divergence in animal sEMG methodology and as a result, future steps required to develop standardisation in animal sEMG are proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Data collection of signals in the multi-channel sEMG system of masticatory muscles and development and preliminary clinical application of an analytic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongliang; Li, Xin; Li, Shan; Zhang, Rui; Song, Rong; Li, Lan; Wang, Wei; Kang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to design a simple, economic, with high Common Mode Rejection Ratio (CMRR), preamplifier and multi-channel masticatory muscle surface electromyography (sEMG) signal acquisition system assisting to diagnose temporomandibular disorders (TMD). We used the USB interface technology in the EMG data with the aid of the windows to operate system and graphical interface. Eight patients with TMD and eight controls were analyzed separately using this system. In this system, we analyzed sEMG by an optional combination of time domain, frequency domain, time-frequency, several spectral analysis, wavelets and other special algorithms under multi-parameter. Multi-channel sEMG System of Masticatory Muscles is a simple, economic system. It has high sensitivity and specificity. The sEMG signals were changed in patients with TMD. The system would pave the way for diagnosis TMD and help us to assess the treatment effect. A novel and objective method is provided for diagnosis and treatment of oral-maxillofacial disease and functional reconstruction.

  20. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remijn, L.; Groen, B.E.; Speyer, R.; Limbeek, J. van; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the

  1. Transradial Amputee Gesture Classification Using an Optimal Number of sEMG Sensors: An Approach Using ICA Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ganesh R; Al-Timemy, Ali H; Nguyen, Hung T

    2016-08-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG)-based pattern recognition studies have been widely used to improve the classification accuracy of upper limb gestures. Information extracted from multiple sensors of the sEMG recording sites can be used as inputs to control powered upper limb prostheses. However, usage of multiple EMG sensors on the prosthetic hand is not practical and makes it difficult for amputees due to electrode shift/movement, and often amputees feel discomfort in wearing sEMG sensor array. Instead, using fewer numbers of sensors would greatly improve the controllability of prosthetic devices and it would add dexterity and flexibility in their operation. In this paper, we propose a novel myoelectric control technique for identification of various gestures using the minimum number of sensors based on independent component analysis (ICA) and Icasso clustering. The proposed method is a model-based approach where a combination of source separation and Icasso clustering was utilized to improve the classification performance of independent finger movements for transradial amputee subjects. Two sEMG sensor combinations were investigated based on the muscle morphology and Icasso clustering and compared to Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) and greedy search algorithm. The performance of the proposed method has been validated with five transradial amputees, which reports a higher classification accuracy ( > 95%). The outcome of this study encourages possible extension of the proposed approach to real time prosthetic applications.

  2. Comparison of six electromyography acquisition setups on hand movement classification tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Stefano; Tagliapietra, Luca; Cognolato, Matteo; Reggiani, Monica; Müller, Henning; Atzori, Manfredo

    2017-01-01

    Hand prostheses controlled by surface electromyography are promising due to the non-invasive approach and the control capabilities offered by machine learning. Nevertheless, dexterous prostheses are still scarcely spread due to control difficulties, low robustness and often prohibitive costs. Several sEMG acquisition setups are now available, ranging in terms of costs between a few hundred and several thousand dollars. The objective of this paper is the relative comparison of six acquisition setups on an identical hand movement classification task, in order to help the researchers to choose the proper acquisition setup for their requirements. The acquisition setups are based on four different sEMG electrodes (including Otto Bock, Delsys Trigno, Cometa Wave + Dormo ECG and two Thalmic Myo armbands) and they were used to record more than 50 hand movements from intact subjects with a standardized acquisition protocol. The relative performance of the six sEMG acquisition setups is compared on 41 identical hand movements with a standardized feature extraction and data analysis pipeline aimed at performing hand movement classification. Comparable classification results are obtained with three acquisition setups including the Delsys Trigno, the Cometa Wave and the affordable setup composed of two Myo armbands. The results suggest that practical sEMG tests can be performed even when costs are relevant (e.g. in small laboratories, developing countries or use by children). All the presented datasets can be used for offline tests and their quality can easily be compared as the data sets are publicly available.

  3. [Electromyography Analysis of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Natsuko; Kinoshita, Fumiya; Takada, Hiroki; Nakayama, Meiho

    2018-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG), which records physiological phenomena including brain waves, breathing status, and muscle tonus, is useful for the diagnosis of sleep disorders as a gold standard. However, measurement and analysis are complex for several specific sleep disorders, such as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Usually, brain waves during REM sleep indicate an awakening pattern under relaxed conditions of skeletal and antigravity muscles. However, these muscles are activated during REM sleep when patients suffer from RBD. These activated muscle movements during REM, so-called REM without atonia (RWA) recorded by PSG, may be related to a neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease. Thus, careful analysis of RWA is significant not only physically, but also clinically. Commonly, manual viewing measurement analysis of RWA is time-consuming. Therefore, quantitative studies on RWA are rarely reported. A software program, developed from Microsoft Office Excel ® , was used to semiautomatically analyze the RWA ratio extracted from PSG to compare with manual viewing measurement analysis. In addition, a quantitative muscle tonus study was carried out to evaluate the effect of medication on RBD patients. Using this new software program, we were able to analyze RWA on the same cases in approximately 15 min as compared with 60 min in the manual viewing measurement analysis. This software program can not only quantify RWA easily but also identify RWA waves for either phasic or tonic bursts. We consider that this software program will support physicians and scientists in their future research on RBD. We are planning to offer this software program for free to physicians and scientists.

  4. Surface electromyography as a measure of trunk muscle activity in patients with spinal cord injury: a meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-ji; Li, Jian-jun; Zhou, Hong-jun; Liu, Geng-lin; Zheng, Ying; Wei, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Hao, Chun-xia; Kang, Hai-qiong; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Lian-jun

    2016-01-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) may be a sensitive marker for distinguishing the activity of trunk muscles, which are critical to functional mobility recovery in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). This manuscript presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature on the effect of SEMG as a measure of trunk muscle activity in patients with SCI. A comprehensive search of the research literature included Pubmed, Medline, CNKI, WANFANG DATA, Web of Science, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Karger, OVID, and a review of reference lists within found articles. Case-control, cohort, and cross-sectional studies were included in the review. Eleven studies were included in this meta-analysis. Trunk muscle activities for the sitting condition were greater in patients with SCI than normal subjects. SEMG activity of trunk muscles for the sitting condition and posterior transfer was greater in patients with high level (HL)-SCI compared to those with low level (LL)-SCI. In addition, across studies, the level of trunk muscle activity for various difficulty settings was different for a given SCI group. This systematic review evaluated the value of trunk muscles for patients with SCI. We recommend use of SEMG as an assessment tool for improving the comparability and interpretability of trunk muscle activity of SCI therapeutic strategies.

  5. A two-dimensional matrix image based feature extraction method for classification of sEMG: A comparative analysis based on SVM, KNN and RBF-NN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tingxi; Zhang, Zhongnan; Qiu, Ming; Zeng, Ming; Luo, Weizhen

    2017-01-01

    The computer mouse is an important human-computer interaction device. But patients with physical finger disability are unable to operate this device. Surface EMG (sEMG) can be monitored by electrodes on the skin surface and is a reflection of the neuromuscular activities. Therefore, we can control limbs auxiliary equipment by utilizing sEMG classification in order to help the physically disabled patients to operate the mouse. To develop a new a method to extract sEMG generated by finger motion and apply novel features to classify sEMG. A window-based data acquisition method was presented to extract signal samples from sEMG electordes. Afterwards, a two-dimensional matrix image based feature extraction method, which differs from the classical methods based on time domain or frequency domain, was employed to transform signal samples to feature maps used for classification. In the experiments, sEMG data samples produced by the index and middle fingers at the click of a mouse button were separately acquired. Then, characteristics of the samples were analyzed to generate a feature map for each sample. Finally, the machine learning classification algorithms (SVM, KNN, RBF-NN) were employed to classify these feature maps on a GPU. The study demonstrated that all classifiers can identify and classify sEMG samples effectively. In particular, the accuracy of the SVM classifier reached up to 100%. The signal separation method is a convenient, efficient and quick method, which can effectively extract the sEMG samples produced by fingers. In addition, unlike the classical methods, the new method enables to extract features by enlarging sample signals' energy appropriately. The classical machine learning classifiers all performed well by using these features.

  6. Surface electromyography in orthodontics – a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    WoŸniak, Krzysztof; Piątkowska, Dagmara; Lipski, Mariusz; Mehr, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Electromyography is the most objective and reliable technique for evaluating muscle function and efficiency by detecting their electrical potentials. It makes it possible to assess the extent and duration of muscle activity. The main aim of surface electromyography is to detect signals from many muscle fibers in the area of the detecting surface electrodes. These signals consist of a weighted summation of the spatial and temporal activity of many motor units. Hence, the analysis of the recordings is restricted to an assessment of general muscle activity, the cooperation of different muscles, and the variability of their activity over time. This study presents the main assumptions in the assessment of electrical muscle activity through the use of surface electromyography, along with its limitations and possibilities for further use in many areas of orthodontics. The main clinical uses of sEMG include the diagnostics and therapy of temporomandibular joint disorders, an assessment of the extent of stomatognathic system dysfunctions in subjects with malocclusion, and the monitoring of orthodontic therapies. PMID:23722255

  7. A more precise, repeatable and diagnostic alternative to surface electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian P

    2018-01-01

    Acoustic myography (AMG) enables a detailed and accurate measurement of those muscles involved in a particular movement and is independent of electrical signals between the nerve and muscle, measuring solely muscle contractions, unlike surface electromyography (sEMG). With modern amplifiers and d...

  8. Evaluation of Feature Extraction and Recognition for Activity Monitoring and Fall Detection Based on Wearable sEMG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xugang; Tang, Minyan; Miran, Seyed M; Luo, Zhizeng

    2017-05-27

    As an essential subfield of context awareness, activity awareness, especially daily activity monitoring and fall detection, plays a significant role for elderly or frail people who need assistance in their daily activities. This study investigates the feature extraction and pattern recognition of surface electromyography (sEMG), with the purpose of determining the best features and classifiers of sEMG for daily living activities monitoring and fall detection. This is done by a serial of experiments. In the experiments, four channels of sEMG signal from wireless, wearable sensors located on lower limbs are recorded from three subjects while they perform seven activities of daily living (ADL). A simulated trip fall scenario is also considered with a custom-made device attached to the ankle. With this experimental setting, 15 feature extraction methods of sEMG, including time, frequency, time/frequency domain and entropy, are analyzed based on class separability and calculation complexity, and five classification methods, each with 15 features, are estimated with respect to the accuracy rate of recognition and calculation complexity for activity monitoring and fall detection. It is shown that a high accuracy rate of recognition and a minimal calculation time for daily activity monitoring and fall detection can be achieved in the current experimental setting. Specifically, the Wilson Amplitude (WAMP) feature performs the best, and the classifier Gaussian Kernel Support Vector Machine (GK-SVM) with Permutation Entropy (PE) or WAMP results in the highest accuracy for activity monitoring with recognition rates of 97.35% and 96.43%. For fall detection, the classifier Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network (FMMNN) has the best sensitivity and specificity at the cost of the longest calculation time, while the classifier Gaussian Kernel Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (GK-FDA) with the feature WAMP guarantees a high sensitivity (98.70%) and specificity (98.59%) with a short

  9. Evaluation of Feature Extraction and Recognition for Activity Monitoring and Fall Detection Based on Wearable sEMG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xugang Xi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As an essential subfield of context awareness, activity awareness, especially daily activity monitoring and fall detection, plays a significant role for elderly or frail people who need assistance in their daily activities. This study investigates the feature extraction and pattern recognition of surface electromyography (sEMG, with the purpose of determining the best features and classifiers of sEMG for daily living activities monitoring and fall detection. This is done by a serial of experiments. In the experiments, four channels of sEMG signal from wireless, wearable sensors located on lower limbs are recorded from three subjects while they perform seven activities of daily living (ADL. A simulated trip fall scenario is also considered with a custom-made device attached to the ankle. With this experimental setting, 15 feature extraction methods of sEMG, including time, frequency, time/frequency domain and entropy, are analyzed based on class separability and calculation complexity, and five classification methods, each with 15 features, are estimated with respect to the accuracy rate of recognition and calculation complexity for activity monitoring and fall detection. It is shown that a high accuracy rate of recognition and a minimal calculation time for daily activity monitoring and fall detection can be achieved in the current experimental setting. Specifically, the Wilson Amplitude (WAMP feature performs the best, and the classifier Gaussian Kernel Support Vector Machine (GK-SVM with Permutation Entropy (PE or WAMP results in the highest accuracy for activity monitoring with recognition rates of 97.35% and 96.43%. For fall detection, the classifier Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network (FMMNN has the best sensitivity and specificity at the cost of the longest calculation time, while the classifier Gaussian Kernel Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (GK-FDA with the feature WAMP guarantees a high sensitivity (98.70% and specificity (98.59% with a

  10. The classification for "equilibrium triad" sensory loss based on sEMG signals of calf muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairong Yu; Kairui Guo; Jie Luo; Kai Cao; Nguyen, Hung T; Su, Steven W

    2017-07-01

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) has been commonly applied for analysing the electrical activities of skeletal muscles. The sensory system of maintaining posture balance includes vision, proprioception and vestibular senses. In this work, an attempt is made to classify whether the body is missing one of the sense during balance control by using sEMG signals. A trial of combination with different features and muscles is also developed. The results demonstrate that the classification accuracy between vision loss and the normal condition is higher than the one between vestibular sense loss and normal condition. When using different features and muscles, the impact on classification results is also different. The outcomes of this study could aid the development of sEMG based classification for the function of sensory systems during human balance movement.

  11. Evaluation of novel algorithm embedded in a wearable sEMG device for seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Wolf, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We implemented a modified version of a previously published algorithm for detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures into a prototype wireless surface electromyography (sEMG) recording device. The method was modified to require minimum computational load, and two parameters were trained...... on prior sEMG data recorded with the device. Along with the normal sEMG recording, the device is able to set an alarm whenever the implemented algorithm detects a seizure. These alarms are annotated in the data file along with the signal. The device was tested at the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU......) at the Danish Epilepsy Center. Five patients were included in the study and two of them had generalized tonic-clonic seizures. All patients were monitored for 2–5 days. A double-blind study was made on the five patients. The overall result showed that the device detected four of seven seizures and had a false...

  12. Automated Algorithm for Generalized Tonic–Clonic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Based on sEMG Zero-Crossing Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Hoppe, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Patients are not able to call for help during a generalized tonic–clonic epileptic seizure. Our objective was to develop a robust generic algorithm for automatic detection of tonic–clonic seizures, based on surface electromyography (sEMG) signals suitable for a portable device. Twenty-two seizure...

  13. A Preliminary Investigation of an Electromyography-controlled Video Game as a Home Program for Persons in the Chronic Phase of Stroke Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso Brown, Elena V.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Fechko, Amber S.; Price, Robert; Gilbertson, Torey; Moritz, Chet T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the preliminary effectiveness of surface electromyography (sEMG) biofeedback delivered via interaction with a commercial computer game to improve motor control in chronic stroke survivors. Design Single-blinded, one-group repeated measures design A1, A2, B, A3 (A=assessment, B=intervention). Setting Laboratory and participants’ homes. Participants A convenience sample of nine persons between 40–75 years of age with moderate to severe upper extremity motor impairment and at least six months post-stroke completed the study. Intervention The electromyography-controlled video game system targeted the wrist muscle activation with the goal of increasing selective muscle activation. Participants received several laboratory training sessions with the system and then were instructed to use the system at home for 45 minutes five times per week for the following four weeks. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures included duration of system use, sEMG during home play and pre/post sEMG measures during active wrist motion. Secondary outcomes included kinematic analysis of movement and functional outcomes, including the Wolf Motor Function Test and the Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory-9. Results One-third of participants completed or exceeded the recommended amount of system use. Statistically significant changes were observed on both game play and pre/post sEMG outcomes. Limited carryover, however, was observed on kinematic or functional outcomes. Conclusion This preliminary investigation indicates that use of the electromyography-controlled video game impacts muscle activation. Limited changes in kinematic and activity level outcomes, however, suggest that the intervention may benefit from the inclusion of a functional activity component. PMID:24657112

  14. Robust Features Of Surface Electromyography Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, M. I.; Miskon, M. F.; Yaacob, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, application of robotics in human life has been explored widely. Robotics exoskeleton system are one of drastically areas in recent robotic research that shows mimic impact in human life. These system have been developed significantly to be used for human power augmentation, robotics rehabilitation, human power assist, and haptic interaction in virtual reality. This paper focus on solving challenges in problem using neural signals and extracting human intent. Commonly, surface electromyography signal (sEMG) are used in order to control human intent for application exoskeleton robot. But the problem lies on difficulty of pattern recognition of the sEMG features due to high noises which are electrode and cable motion artifact, electrode noise, dermic noise, alternating current power line interface, and other noise came from electronic instrument. The main objective in this paper is to study the best features of electromyography in term of time domain (statistical analysis) and frequency domain (Fast Fourier Transform).The secondary objectives is to map the relationship between torque and best features of muscle unit activation potential (MaxPS and RMS) of biceps brachii. This project scope use primary data of 2 male sample subject which using same dominant hand (right handed), age between 20-27 years old, muscle diameter 32cm to 35cm and using single channel muscle (biceps brachii muscle). The experiment conduct 2 times repeated task of contraction and relaxation of biceps brachii when lifting different load from no load to 3kg with ascending 1kg The result shows that Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) has less error than mean value of reading compare to root mean square (RMS) value. Thus, Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) show the linear relationship against torque experience by elbow joint to lift different load. As the conclusion, the best features is MaxPS because it has the lowest error than other features and show

  15. Normalization of the trapezius sEMG signal - a reliability study on women with and without neck-shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Marina Machado; Januario, Leticia Bergamin; Zanca, Gisele Garcia; Mattiello, Stela Marcia; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz

    2017-09-29

    To evaluate within- and between-days reliability of two normalization methods of surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings of the trapezius muscle. Nineteen women were allocated into 2 groups (healthy and with neck-shoulder pain). The sEMG was recorded in two sessions with 7 days in between sessions. The four portions of the trapezius muscle (the clavicular and acromial fibers of the upper trapezius, the middle and the lower trapezius) were evaluated during maximal and submaximal isometric voluntary contractions. The within- and between-days reliability of both maximal and submaximal contractions were assessed through Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC(2,1) was used for within-day analyses of both maximal and submaximal contractions, and for between-days analyses of maximal contractions while ICC(2,3) was used for between-days analyses of submaximal contractions), Coefficient of Variation, Standard Error of Measurement, and Bland-Altman analysis. In general, submaximal contractions presented higher within-day reliability, with higher ICC values (e.g., middle trapezius - mean of 0.97), smaller Coefficient of Variation and Standard Error of Measurement ranges compared to maximal contractions (ICC values, e.g. for middle trapezius - mean of 0.94) in both groups. The same pattern was observed for between-days analyses, with submaximal contractions presenting higher ICC values (e.g., middle trapezius - mean of 0.84), smaller Coefficient of Variation and Standard Error of Measurement ranges than maximal contractions (ICC values, e.g. for middle trapezius - mean of 0.73) in both groups. Submaximal contractions are recommended for normalization procedures of trapezius sEMG, in both subjects with neck-shoulder pain and healthy individuals. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency analysis of lower extremity electromyography signals for the quantitative diagnosis of dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Shanette A.; Coleman-Wood, Krista; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an objective, quantitative tool for the diagnosis of lower extremity dystonia. Frequency domain analysis was performed on surface and fine-wire electromyography (EMG) signals collected from the lower extremity musculature of ten patients with suspected dystonia while performing walking trials at self-selected speeds. The median power frequency (MdPF) and percentage of total power contained in the low frequency range (%AUCTotal) were determined for each muscle studied. Muscles exhibiting clinical signs of dystonia were found to have a shift of the MdPF to lower frequencies and a simultaneous increase in the %AUCTotal. A threshold frequency of 70 Hz identified dystonic muscles with 73% sensitivity and 63% specificity. These results indicate that frequency analysis can accurately distinguish dystonic from non-dystonic muscles. PMID:24295542

  17. Heart rate variability and surface electromyography of trained cyclists at different cadences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Saraiva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The heart rate variability (HRV and surface electromyography (sEMG are important tools in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic system and neuromuscular parameters, respectively. The aim of the study was to evaluate the behavior of HRV and sEMG of the vastus lateralis in two exercise protocols on a cycle ergometer at 60 and 80 rpm. Eight healthy men cyclists who have trained for at least two years were evaluated. Reduction was observed followed by stabilization of RMSSD and SDNN indices of HRV (p<0.05 along with increases in the amplitude of the sEMG signal (p<0.05 in both protocols. Significant correlations were observed between the responses of HRV and sEMG in the cadence of 60 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.42, p=0.03; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.45, p=0.01 and 80 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.47, p=0.02; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.49, p=0.01, yet no difference was observed for these variables between the two protocols. We concluded that the parasympathetic cardiac responses and sEMG are independent of cadences applied at the same power output.

  18. A method for quantitative SEMG decomposition and MUAP classification during voluntary isovelocity elbow flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Jun; Okuno, Ryuhei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm for surface electromyogram (SEMG) decomposition and classification of surface motor unit (MU) action potential (MUAP) detected during isovelocity elbow flexion. In our proposed algorithm, firstly the measured SEMG was extracted for 3 seconds by every 1.5 seconds. SEMG was decomposed with Independent Component Analysis (ICA) technique, and classified with template matching. Finally, the MUAP trains were identified under the firing time of the MUAPs classified in each extracted period. The SEMG was measured from the biceps short head muscle during voluntary elbow flexion of 0 to 90 degrees at constant velocity 9 degree/s against a constant load torque of 10%MVC and the MUAPs were classified with our proposed algorithm. As a result, calculated MUs firing rates were almost same as the results in the previous studies. It was shown that the proposed algorithm was useful for decomposing SEMG detected during flexion movements.

  19. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remijn, Lianne; Groen, Brenda E; Speyer, Renée; van Limbeek, Jacques; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the masticatory muscles were obtained over two sessions with four conditions: two food textures (biscuit and bread) of two sizes (small and large). Twelve healthy adults (mean age 29.1 years) completed the study. The second to the fifth chewing cycle of 5 bites were used for analyses. The reproducibility per outcome variable was calculated with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman analysis was applied to determine the standard error of measurement relative error of measurement and smallest detectable differences of all variables. ICCs ranged from 0.71 to 0.98 for all outcome variables. The outcome variables consisted of four bite and fourteen chewing cycle variables. The relative standard error of measurement of the bite variables was up to 17.3% for 'time-to-swallow', 'time-to-transport' and 'number of chewing cycles', but ranged from 31.5% to 57.0% for 'change of chewing side'. The relative standard error of measurement ranged from 4.1% to 24.7% for chewing cycle variables and was smaller for kinematic variables than sEMG variables. In general, measurements obtained with 3D kinematics and sEMG are reproducible techniques to assess the mastication process. The duration of the chewing cycle and frequency of chewing were the best reproducible measurements. Change of chewing side could not be reproduced. The published measurement error and smallest detectable differences will aid the interpretation of the results of future clinical studies using the same study variables. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics of sustained muscle activation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), as compared to voluntary muscle activation. The main goal was to find surface electromyography (EMG) features that can distinguish between convuls...

  1. Comparison of Antagonist Muscle Activity During Walking Between Total Knee Replacement and Control Subjects Using Unnormalized Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Hannah J; Rojas, Idubijes L; Foucher, Kharma C; Wimmer, Markus A

    2016-06-01

    Although satisfactory outcomes have been reported after total knee replacement (TKR), full recovery of muscle strength and physical function is rare. We developed a relative activation index (RAI) to compare leg muscle activity from unnormalized surface electromyography (sEMG) between TKR and control subjects. Nineteen TKR and 19 control subjects underwent gait analysis and sEMG. RAIs were calculated by dividing the average sEMG for 2 consecutive subphases of stance defined by the direction of the external sagittal plane moment (flexion or extension). RAIs and external moments indicate TKR subjects have less initial stance antagonist rectus femoris activity (P = .004), greater middle stance antagonist biceps femoris activity (P < .001), and less late stance agonist biceps femoris activity (P < .001) than control subjects. Individuals with TKR demonstrate increased flexor muscle activation during weight bearing, potentially contributing to altered gait patterns found during the stance phase of gait. The RAI helps detail whether decreased external moments correspond to less agonist or more antagonist muscle activity to determine true muscle activity differences between subject groups. Identifying the mechanisms underlying altered muscle function both before and after TKR is critical for developing rehabilitation strategies to address functional deficits and disability found in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pre- and postoperative evaluation of pelvic floor muscle function in POP patients using surface electromyography and digital palpation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinliang; Gong, Yao; Wu, Dan; Li, Xiaocui; Li, Huaifang; Tong, Xiaowen; Cheng, Weiwei

    2014-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) pre- and postoperatively using digital palpation and surface electromyography. In this non-randomized prospective study, two groups of patients were recruited for assessment. The surgical group included 74 POP patients receiving the modified pelvic reconstructive surgery and the control group consisted of 30 non-POP patients. One physiotherapist conducted the digital palpation and SEMG evaluation. The scale of PFM strength, the duration and voltage of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) as well as numbers and voltage of short, fast contractions (SFC) by SEMG were documented and compared in both groups. For statistical analysis, t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon test were used with a significant level 0.05. A total of 68 POP patients finished the two follow-ups. Sixty-four patients were objectively cured with a 94.1% cure rate. Mesh erosions happened in three patients (4.8%). By digital palpation, the PFM strength increased significantly in POP patients after surgery but still lower than non-POP patients (Pdigital palpation and SEMG. The evaluation of PFM function should be included in the overall assessment of pelvic reconstructive surgeries. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Biosignal Analysis to Assess Mental Stress in Automatic Driving of Trucks: Palmar Perspiration and Masseter Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rencheng; Yamabe, Shigeyuki; Nakano, Kimihiko; Suda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays insight into human-machine interaction is a critical topic with the large-scale development of intelligent vehicles. Biosignal analysis can provide a deeper understanding of driver behaviors that may indicate rationally practical use of the automatic technology. Therefore, this study concentrates on biosignal analysis to quantitatively evaluate mental stress of drivers during automatic driving of trucks, with vehicles set at a closed gap distance apart to reduce air resistance to save energy consumption. By application of two wearable sensor systems, a continuous measurement was realized for palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography, and a biosignal processing method was proposed to assess mental stress levels. In a driving simulator experiment, ten participants completed automatic driving with 4, 8, and 12 m gap distances from the preceding vehicle, and manual driving with about 25 m gap distance as a reference. It was found that mental stress significantly increased when the gap distances decreased, and an abrupt increase in mental stress of drivers was also observed accompanying a sudden change of the gap distance during automatic driving, which corresponded to significantly higher ride discomfort according to subjective reports. PMID:25738768

  4. Biosignal analysis to assess mental stress in automatic driving of trucks: palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rencheng; Yamabe, Shigeyuki; Nakano, Kimihiko; Suda, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-02

    Nowadays insight into human-machine interaction is a critical topic with the large-scale development of intelligent vehicles. Biosignal analysis can provide a deeper understanding of driver behaviors that may indicate rationally practical use of the automatic technology. Therefore, this study concentrates on biosignal analysis to quantitatively evaluate mental stress of drivers during automatic driving of trucks, with vehicles set at a closed gap distance apart to reduce air resistance to save energy consumption. By application of two wearable sensor systems, a continuous measurement was realized for palmar perspiration and masseter electromyography, and a biosignal processing method was proposed to assess mental stress levels. In a driving simulator experiment, ten participants completed automatic driving with 4, 8, and 12 m gap distances from the preceding vehicle, and manual driving with about 25 m gap distance as a reference. It was found that mental stress significantly increased when the gap distances decreased, and an abrupt increase in mental stress of drivers was also observed accompanying a sudden change of the gap distance during automatic driving, which corresponded to significantly higher ride discomfort according to subjective reports.

  5. Corticospinal excitability measurements using transcranial magnetic stimulation are valid with intramuscular electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Rebekah L S; Chen, Mo; Kimberley, Teresa J

    2017-01-01

    Muscular targets that are deep or inaccessible to surface electromyography (sEMG) require intrinsic recording using fine-wire electromyography (fEMG). It is unknown if fEMG validly record cortically evoked muscle responses compared to sEMG. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the validity and agreement of fEMG compared to sEMG to quantify typical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures pre and post repetitive TMS (rTMS). The hypotheses were that fEMG would demonstrate excellent validity and agreement compared with sEMG. In ten healthy volunteers, paired pulse and cortical silent period (CSP) TMS measures were collected before and after 1200 pulses of 1Hz rTMS to the motor cortex. Data were simultaneously recorded with sEMG and fEMG in the first dorsal interosseous. Concurrent validity (r and rho) and agreement (Tukey mean-difference) were calculated. fEMG quantified corticospinal excitability with good to excellent validity compared to sEMG data at both pretest (r = 0.77-0.97) and posttest (r = 0.83-0.92). Pairwise comparisons indicated no difference between sEMG and fEMG for all outcomes; however, Tukey mean-difference plots display increased variance and questionable agreement for paired pulse outcomes. CSP displayed the highest estimates of validity and agreement. Paired pulse MEP responses recorded with fEMG displayed reduced validity, agreement and less sensitivity to changes in MEP amplitude compared to sEMG. Change scores following rTMS were not significantly different between sEMG and fEMG. fEMG electrodes are a valid means to measure CSP and paired pulse MEP responses. CSP displays the highest validity estimates, while caution is warranted when assessing paired pulse responses with fEMG. Corticospinal excitability and neuromodulatory aftereffects from rTMS may be assessed using fEMG.

  6. Development of PDMS-based flexible dry type SEMG electrodes by micromachining technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jung Mo; Cha, Doo Yeol; Kim, Deok Su; Yang, Hee Jun; Choi, Kyo Sang; Choi, Jong Myoung; Chang, Sung Pil

    2014-09-01

    The authors developed PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane)-based dry type surface electromyography (SEMG) electrodes for myoelectric prosthetic hands. The SEMG electrodes were strongly recommended to be fabricated on a flexible substrate to be compatible with the surface of skin. In this study, the authors designed a bar-shaped dry-type flexible SEMG electrodes comprised of two input electrodes and a reference electrode on a flexible PDMS substrate to measure EMG signals. The space distance between each electrode with a size of 10 mm × 2 mm was chosen to 18 mm to get optimal result according to the simulation result with taking into consideration the conduction velocity and the median frequency of EMG signals. Raw EMG signals were measured from Brachioradialis, Biceps brachii, deltoideus, and pectoralis major muscles, to drive the application of the myoelectric hand prosthesis. Measured raw EMG signals were transformed to root mean square (RMS) EMG signals using Acqknowledge4.2. The experimental peak voltage values of RMS EMG signals from Brachioradialis, Biceps brachii, deltoideus, and pectoralis major muscles were 2.96 V, 4.45 V, 1.74 V, and 2.62 V, respectively. Values from the dry type flexible SEMG electrodes showed higher peak values than a commercially available wet type Ag-AgCl electrode. The study shows that the PDMS-based flexible electrode devised for measuring myoelectric signals from the surface of skin is more useful for prosthetic hands because of its greater sensitivity and flexibility.

  7. Muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb based on sEMG and subjective assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Xiaoqi; Zhou, Qianxiang; Li, Yun

    2012-07-01

    All movements are driven by muscle contraction, and it is easy to cause muscle fatigue. Evaluation of muscle fatigue is a hot topic in the area of astronaut life support training and rehabilitation. If muscle gets into fatigue condition, it may reduce work efficiency and has an impact on psychological performance. Therefore it is necessary to develop an accurate and usable method on muscle fatigue evaluation of astronaut upper limb. In this study, we developed a method based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and subjective assessment (Borg scale) to evaluate local muscle fatigue. Fifteen healthy young male subjects participated in the experiment. They performed isometric muscle contractions of the upper limb. sEMG of the biceps brachii were recorded during the entire process of isotonic muscle contraction and Borg scales of muscle fatigue were collected in certain times. sEMG were divided into several parts, and then mean energy of each parts were calculated by the one-twelfth band octave method. Equations were derived based on the relationship between the mean energy of sEMG and Borg scale. The results showed that cubic curve could describe the degree of local muscle fatigue, and could be used to evaluate and monitor local muscle fatigue during the entire process.

  8. TOWARDS THE CONTROL OF AN ACTIVE HAND ORTHOSIS FOR PEOPLE WITH DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY: DESIGN AND VALIDATION OF A WIRELESS SEMG SLEEVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizamis, Kostas; Ganseij, Maarten; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscular disease. Active hand orthoses can greatly improve the quality of life of people with DMD. Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is commonly used for the control of active devices. The interfacing between the human and the sensor is regularly done

  9. Towards the control of an active hand orthosis for people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy : Design and Validation of a wireless sEMG sleeve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizamis, Kostas; Ganseij, Maarten; Koopman, H.F.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscular disease. Active hand orthoses can greatly improve the quality of life of people with DMD. Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is commonly used for the control of active devices. The interfacing between the human and the sensor is regularly done

  10. Effects of 12-wk eccentric calf muscle training on muscle-tendon glucose uptake and SEMG in patients with chronic Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Magnusson, S Peter

    2014-01-01

    and Achilles tendon GU. A longitudinal study design with control (n = 10) and patient (n = 10) groups was used. Surface electromyography (SEMG) from four ankle plantar flexors and GU from the same muscles and the Achilles tendon were measured during submaximal intermittent isometric plantar flexion task...

  11. Analysis of statistical and standard algorithms for detecting muscle onset with surface electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Tenan

    Full Text Available The timing of muscle activity is a commonly applied analytic method to understand how the nervous system controls movement. This study systematically evaluates six classes of standard and statistical algorithms to determine muscle onset in both experimental surface electromyography (EMG and simulated EMG with a known onset time. Eighteen participants had EMG collected from the biceps brachii and vastus lateralis while performing a biceps curl or knee extension, respectively. Three established methods and three statistical methods for EMG onset were evaluated. Linear envelope, Teager-Kaiser energy operator + linear envelope and sample entropy were the established methods evaluated while general time series mean/variance, sequential and batch processing of parametric and nonparametric tools, and Bayesian changepoint analysis were the statistical techniques used. Visual EMG onset (experimental data and objective EMG onset (simulated data were compared with algorithmic EMG onset via root mean square error and linear regression models for stepwise elimination of inferior algorithms. The top algorithms for both data types were analyzed for their mean agreement with the gold standard onset and evaluation of 95% confidence intervals. The top algorithms were all Bayesian changepoint analysis iterations where the parameter of the prior (p0 was zero. The best performing Bayesian algorithms were p0 = 0 and a posterior probability for onset determination at 60-90%. While existing algorithms performed reasonably, the Bayesian changepoint analysis methodology provides greater reliability and accuracy when determining the singular onset of EMG activity in a time series. Further research is needed to determine if this class of algorithms perform equally well when the time series has multiple bursts of muscle activity.

  12. Analysis of statistical and standard algorithms for detecting muscle onset with surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenan, Matthew S; Tweedell, Andrew J; Haynes, Courtney A

    2017-01-01

    The timing of muscle activity is a commonly applied analytic method to understand how the nervous system controls movement. This study systematically evaluates six classes of standard and statistical algorithms to determine muscle onset in both experimental surface electromyography (EMG) and simulated EMG with a known onset time. Eighteen participants had EMG collected from the biceps brachii and vastus lateralis while performing a biceps curl or knee extension, respectively. Three established methods and three statistical methods for EMG onset were evaluated. Linear envelope, Teager-Kaiser energy operator + linear envelope and sample entropy were the established methods evaluated while general time series mean/variance, sequential and batch processing of parametric and nonparametric tools, and Bayesian changepoint analysis were the statistical techniques used. Visual EMG onset (experimental data) and objective EMG onset (simulated data) were compared with algorithmic EMG onset via root mean square error and linear regression models for stepwise elimination of inferior algorithms. The top algorithms for both data types were analyzed for their mean agreement with the gold standard onset and evaluation of 95% confidence intervals. The top algorithms were all Bayesian changepoint analysis iterations where the parameter of the prior (p0) was zero. The best performing Bayesian algorithms were p0 = 0 and a posterior probability for onset determination at 60-90%. While existing algorithms performed reasonably, the Bayesian changepoint analysis methodology provides greater reliability and accuracy when determining the singular onset of EMG activity in a time series. Further research is needed to determine if this class of algorithms perform equally well when the time series has multiple bursts of muscle activity.

  13. Epidermal electronics for electromyography: An application to swallowing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Gabriela; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Li, Xinda; Scott, Dylan K; Jang, Kyung-In; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Rogers, John A; Rieger, Jana

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck cancer treatment alters the anatomy and physiology of patients. Resulting swallowing difficulties can lead to serious health concerns. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used as an adjuvant to swallowing therapy exercises. sEMG signal collected from the area under the chin provides visual biofeedback from muscle contractions and is used to help patients perform exercises correctly. However, conventional sEMG adhesive pads are relatively thick and difficult to effectively adhere to a patient's altered chin anatomy, potentially leading to poor signal acquisition in this population. Here, the emerging technology of epidermal electronics is introduced, where ultra-thin geometry allows for close contouring of the chin. The two objectives of this study were to (1) assess the potential of epidermal electronics technology for use with swallowing therapy and (2) assess the significance of the reference electrode placement. This study showed comparative signals between the new epidermal sEMG patch and the conventional adhesive patches used by clinicians. Furthermore, an integrated reference yielded optimal signal for clinical use; this configuration was more robust to head movements than when an external reference was used. Improvements for future iterations of epidermal sEMG patches specific to day-to-day clinical use are suggested. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementation of a real-time automatic onset time detection for surface electromyography measurement systems using NI myRIO

    OpenAIRE

    Lersviriyanantakul Chaiwat; Booranawong Apidet; Sengchuai Kiattisak; Phukpattaranont Pornchai; Wongkittisuksa Booncharoen; Jindapetch Nattha

    2016-01-01

    For using surface electromyography (sEMG) in various applications, the process consists of three parts: an onset time detection for detecting the first point of movement signals, a feature extraction for extracting the signal attribution, and a feature classification for classifying the sEMG signals. The first and the most significant part that influences the accuracy of other parts is the onset time detection, particularly for automatic systems. In this pa...

  15. Detecting and Predicting Muscle Fatigue during Typing By SEMG Signal Processing and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghoochani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive strain injuries are one of the most prevalent problems in occupational diseases. Repetition, vibration and bad postures of the extremities are physical risk factors related to work that can cause chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Repetitive work on a computer with low level contraction requires the posture to be maintained for a long time, which can cause muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue in shoulders and neck is one of the most prevalent problems reported with computer users especially during typing. Surface electromyography (SEMG signals are used for detecting muscle fatigue as a non-invasive method. Material and Methods: Nine healthy females volunteered for signal recoding during typing. EMG signals were recorded from the trapezius muscle, which is subjected to muscle fatigue during typing.  After signal analysis and feature extraction, detecting and predicting muscle fatigue was performed by using the MLP artificial neural network. Results: Recorded signals were analyzed in time and frequency domains for feature extraction. Results of classification showed that the MLP neural network can detect and predict muscle fatigue during typing with 80.79 % ± 1.04% accuracy. Conclusion: Intelligent classification and prediction of muscle fatigue can have many applications in human factors engineering (ergonomics, rehabilitation engineering and biofeedback equipment for mitigating the injuries of repetitive works.

  16. Surface electromyography pattern of human swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadaro Alessandro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiology of swallowing is characterized by a complex and coordinated activation of many stomatognathic, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles. Kinetics and electromyographic studies have widely investigated the pharyngeal and laryngeal pattern of deglutition in order to point out the differences between normal and dysphagic people. In the dental field, muscular activation during swallowing is believed to be the cause of malocclusion. Despite the clinical importance given to spontaneous swallowing, few physiologic works have studied stomatognathic muscular activation and mandibular movement during spontaneous saliva swallowing. The aim of our study was to investigate the activity patterns of the mandibular elevator muscles (masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, the submental muscles, and the neck muscles (sternocleidomastoid muscles in healthy people during spontaneous swallowing of saliva and to relate the muscular activities to mandibular movement. Methods The spontaneous swallowing of saliva of 111 healthy individuals was analyzed using surface electromyography (SEMG and a computerized kinesiography of mandibular movement. Results Fifty-seven of 111 patients swallowed without occlusal contact (SNOC and 54 individuals had occlusal contact (SOC. The sternocleidomastoid muscles showed a slight, but constant activation during swallowing. The SEMG of the submental and sternocleidomastoid muscles showed no differences between the two groups. The SEMG of the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles showed significant differences (p Conclusion The data suggest that there is not a single "normal" or "typical" pattern for spontaneous saliva swallowing. The polygraph seemed a valuable, simple, non-invasive and reliable tool to study the physiology of swallowing.

  17. Analysis of Muscle Contraction on Pottery Manufacturing Process Using Electromyography (EMG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soewardi, Hartomo; Azka Rahmayani, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common problems in pottery manufacturing process is musculoskeletal disorders on workers. This disorder was caused by uncomfortable posture where the workers sit on the floor with one leg was folded and another was twisted for long duration. Back, waist, buttock, and right knee frequently experience the disorders. The objective of this research is to investigate the muscle contraction at such body part of workers in manufacturing process of pottery. Electromyography is used to investigate the muscle contraction based on the median frequency signal. Focus measurements is conducted on four muscles types. They are lower interscapular muscle on the right and left side, dorsal lumbar muscle, and lateral hamstring muscle. Statistical analysis is conducted to test differences of muscle contraction between female and male. The result of this research showed that the muscle which reached the highest contraction is dorsal lumbar muscle with the average of median frequency is 51,84 Hz. Then followed by lower interscapular muscle on the left side with the average of median frequency is 31,30 hz, lower interscapular muscle on the right side average of median frequency is 31,24 Hz, and lateral hamstring muscle average of median frequency is 21,77 Hz. Based on the statistic analysis result, there were no differences between male and female on left and right lower interscapular muscle and dorsal lumbar muscle but there were differences on lateral hamstring muscle with the significance level is 5%. Besides that, there were differences for all combination muscle types with the level of significance is 5%.

  18. Deep Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks Applied to Electromyography Data: A Resource for the Classification of Movements for Prosthetic Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Cognolato, Matteo; Müller, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Natural control methods based on surface electromyography (sEMG) and pattern recognition are promising for hand prosthetics. However, the control robustness offered by scientific research is still not sufficient for many real life applications, and commercial prostheses are capable of offering natural control for only a few movements. In recent years deep learning revolutionized several fields of machine learning, including computer vision and speech recognition. Our objective is to test its methods for natural control of robotic hands via sEMG using a large number of intact subjects and amputees. We tested convolutional networks for the classification of an average of 50 hand movements in 67 intact subjects and 11 transradial amputees. The simple architecture of the neural network allowed to make several tests in order to evaluate the effect of pre-processing, layer architecture, data augmentation and optimization. The classification results are compared with a set of classical classification methods applied on the same datasets. The classification accuracy obtained with convolutional neural networks using the proposed architecture is higher than the average results obtained with the classical classification methods, but lower than the results obtained with the best reference methods in our tests. The results show that convolutional neural networks with a very simple architecture can produce accurate results comparable to the average classical classification methods. They show that several factors (including pre-processing, the architecture of the net and the optimization parameters) can be fundamental for the analysis of sEMG data. Larger networks can achieve higher accuracy on computer vision and object recognition tasks. This fact suggests that it may be interesting to evaluate if larger networks can increase sEMG classification accuracy too.

  19. Surface electromyography based muscle fatigue detection using high-resolution time-frequency methods and machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Ghosh, Diptasree Maitra; Ramakrishnan, S

    2018-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) based muscle fatigue research is widely preferred in sports science and occupational/rehabilitation studies due to its noninvasiveness. However, these signals are complex, multicomponent and highly nonstationary with large inter-subject variations, particularly during dynamic contractions. Hence, time-frequency based machine learning methodologies can improve the design of automated system for these signals. In this work, the analysis based on high-resolution time-frequency methods, namely, Stockwell transform (S-transform), B-distribution (BD) and extended modified B-distribution (EMBD) are proposed to differentiate the dynamic muscle nonfatigue and fatigue conditions. The nonfatigue and fatigue segments of sEMG signals recorded from the biceps brachii of 52 healthy volunteers are preprocessed and subjected to S-transform, BD and EMBD. Twelve features are extracted from each method and prominent features are selected using genetic algorithm (GA) and binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO). Five machine learning algorithms, namely, naïve Bayes, support vector machine (SVM) of polynomial and radial basis kernel, random forest and rotation forests are used for the classification. The results show that all the proposed time-frequency distributions (TFDs) are able to show the nonstationary variations of sEMG signals. Most of the features exhibit statistically significant difference in the muscle fatigue and nonfatigue conditions. The maximum number of features (66%) is reduced by GA and BPSO for EMBD and BD-TFD respectively. The combination of EMBD- polynomial kernel based SVM is found to be most accurate (91% accuracy) in classifying the conditions with the features selected using GA. The proposed methods are found to be capable of handling the nonstationary and multicomponent variations of sEMG signals recorded in dynamic fatiguing contractions. Particularly, the combination of EMBD- polynomial kernel based SVM could be used to

  20. Electroencephalogram–Electromyography Coupling Analysis in Stroke Based on Symbolic Transfer Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunyuan Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The coupling strength between electroencephalogram (EEG and electromyography (EMG signals during motion control reflects the interaction between the cerebral motor cortex and muscles. Therefore, neuromuscular coupling characterization is instructive in assessing motor function. In this study, to overcome the limitation of losing the characteristics of signals in conventional time series symbolization methods, a variable scale symbolic transfer entropy (VS-STE analysis approach was proposed for corticomuscular coupling evaluation. Post-stroke patients (n = 5 and healthy volunteers (n = 7 were recruited and participated in various tasks (left and right hand gripping, elbow bending. The proposed VS-STE was employed to evaluate the corticomuscular coupling strength between the EEG signal measured from the motor cortex and EMG signal measured from the upper limb in both the time-domain and frequency-domain. Results showed a greater strength of the bi-directional (EEG-to-EMG and EMG-to-EEG VS-STE in post-stroke patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, the strongest EEG–EMG coupling strength was observed in the beta frequency band (15–35 Hz during the upper limb movement. The predefined coupling strength of EMG-to-EEG in the affected side of the patient was larger than that of EEG-to-EMG. In conclusion, the results suggested that the corticomuscular coupling is bi-directional, and the proposed VS-STE can be used to quantitatively characterize the non-linear synchronization characteristics and information interaction between the primary motor cortex and muscles.

  1. Surface electromyography and ultrasound evaluation of pelvic floor muscles in hyperandrogenic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassimon, Flávia Ignácio Antonio; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Martins, Wellington Paula; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Batista, Roberta Leopoldino de Andrade; Bo, Kari

    2016-04-01

    High levels of androgens increase muscle mass. Due to the characteristics of hyperandrogenism in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), it is plausible that women with PCOS may have increased pelvic floor muscle (PFM) thickness and neuromuscular activity levels compared with controls. The aim of this study was to assess PFM thickness and neuromuscular activity among hyperandrogenic women with PCOS and controls. This was an observational, cross-sectional, case-control study evaluating PFM by ultrasound (US) and surface electromyography (sEMG) in nonobese women with and without PCOS. Seventy-two women were divided into two groups: PCOS (n = 33) and controls (n = 39). PFM thickness during contraction was assessed by US (Vingmed CFM 800). Pelvic floor muscle activity was assessed by sEMG (MyoTrac Infinit) during contractions at different time lengths: quick, and 8 and 60 s. Descriptive analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Student's t test were used for statistical analyses. There were no significant differences in PFM sEMG activity between PCOS and controls in any of the contractions: quick contraction (73.23 mV/ 71.56 mV; p = 0.62), 8 s (55.77 mV/ 54.17 mV; p = 0.74), and 60 s (49.26 mV/ 47.32 mV; p = 0.68), respectively. There was no difference in PFM thickness during contractions evaluated by US between PCOS and controls (12.78 mm/ 13.43 mm; p =  .48). This study did not find statistically significant differences in pelvic floor muscle thickness or in muscle activity between PCOS women and controls.

  2. Using surface electromyography to detect changes in innervation zones pattern after human cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharipour, Babak; Sandhu, Milap S; Rasool, Ghulam; Suresh, Nina L; Rymer, William Z

    2016-08-01

    Human spinal cord injuries (SCI) disrupt the pathways between brain and spinal cord, resulting in substantial impairment and loss of function. Currently, we do not have the ability to precisely quantify the "functional" level of motor injury. The aim of this study is to determine if high-density surface electromyography imaging (SEI) can be used to characterize the location and extent of the spinal lesion. SEI is a safe and non-invasive technique, which uses several electrodes to provide a map of muscle activity. We applied the SEI technique to characterize muscle activity in individuals with chronic incomplete cervical SCI. Surface electromyogram signals (sEMG) from Biceps Brachii (BB) were recorded at submaximal levels (20%, 40%, and 60%) of maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) during isometric elbow flexion, shoulder flexion, and elbow abduction in two individuals with SCI. Through time-domain analysis of the collected data, we detected signs of de-innervation and re-innervations by analyzing the innervation zones (IZ) on the left and right BB muscles. We found that the distribution of IZs was different between the two sides. In addition, analysis of sEMG data collected at rest (no voluntary contraction) showed evidence of superficial active motor units that were active during rest (in the absence of spasms). These findings highlight the potential of SEI technique as a potential clinical tool to quantitatively describe the extent of the damage to motor spinal circuitry, and provide added precision to the clinical examinations and radiological findings.

  3. Frenulectomy of the tongue and the influence of rehabilitation exercises on the sEMG activity of masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecco, Simona; Baldini, Aberto; Mummolo, Stefano; Marchetti, Enrico; Giuca, Maria Rita; Marzo, Giuseppe; Gherlone, Enrico Felice

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess by surface electromyography (sEMG) the changes in sub-mental, orbicularis oris, and masticatory muscle activity after a lingual frenulectomy. Rehabilitation exercises in subjects with ankyloglossia, characterized by Class I malocclusion, were assessed as well. A total of 24 subjects were selected. Thirteen subjects (mean age 7±2.5years) with Class I malocclusion and ankyloglossia were treated with lingual frenulectomy and rehabilitation exercises, while 11 subjects (mean age 7±0.8years) with normal occlusion and normal lingual frenulum were used as controls. The inclusion criteria for both groups were the presence of mixed dentition and no previous orthodontic treatment. The sEMG recordings were taken at the time of the first visit (T0), and after 1 (T1) and 6months (T2) for the treated group. Recordings were taken at the same time for the control group. Due to the noise inherent with the sEMG recording, special attention was paid to obtain reproducible and standardized recordings. The tested muscles were the masseter, anterior temporalis, upper and lower orbicularis oris, and sub-mental muscles. The sEMG recordings were performed at rest, while kissing, swallowing, opening the mouth, clenching the teeth and during protrusion of the mandible. These recordings were made by placing electrodes in the area of muscle contraction. At T0, the treated group showed different sEMG activity of the muscles with respect to the control group, with significant differences at rest and during some test tasks (pmuscle, from T0 to T2, during maximal voluntary clenching. During swallowing and kissing, the masseter and sub-mental muscles showed a significant increase in their sEMG potentials from T0 to T2. During the protrusion of the mandible, the masseter and anterior temporalis significantly decreased their sEMG activity, while the sub-mental area increased significantly. No significant change was observed in the control group during the follow-up. The sEMG

  4. Research on Lower Limb Motion Recognition Based on Fusion of sEMG and Accelerometer Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Ai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since surface electromyograghic (sEMG signals are non-invasive and capable of reflecting humans’ motion intention, they have been widely used for the motion recognition of upper limbs. However, limited research has been conducted for lower limbs, because the sEMGs of lower limbs are easily affected by body gravity and muscle jitter. In this paper, sEMG signals and accelerometer signals are acquired and fused to recognize the motion patterns of lower limbs. A curve fitting method based on median filtering is proposed to remove accelerometer noise. As for movement onset detection, an sEMG power spectral correlation coefficient method is used to detect the start and end points of active signals. Then, the time-domain features and wavelet coefficients of sEMG signals are extracted, and a dynamic time warping (DTW distance is used for feature extraction of acceleration signals. At last, five lower limbs’ motions are classified and recognized by using Gaussian kernel-based linear discriminant analysis (LDA and support vector machine (SVM respectively. The results prove that the fused feature-based classification outperforms the classification with only sEMG signals or accelerometer signals, and the fused feature can achieve 95% or higher recognition accuracy, demonstrating the validity of the proposed method.

  5. Uses of electromyography in dentistry: An overview with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Shamima Easmin; Basri, Rehana; ALAM, Mohammad Khursheed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the uses of electromyography (EMG) in dentistry in the last few years in related research. EMG is an advanced technique to record and evaluate muscle activity. In the previous days, EMG was only used for medical sciences, but now EMG playing a tremendous role in medical as well as dental sector. Materials and Methods: Several electronic databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, Science Direct, and Web of Science were systematically searched f...

  6. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul; Fabricius, Martin; Benedek, Krisztina; Andersen, Noémi; Hjalgrim, Helle; Wolf, Peter

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the characteristics of sustained muscle activation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), as compared to voluntary muscle activation. The main goal was to find surface electromyography (EMG) features that can distinguish between convulsive epileptic seizures and convulsive PNES. In this case-control study, surface EMG was recorded from the deltoid muscles during long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring in 25 patients and in 21 healthy controls. A total of 46 clinical episodes were recorded: 28 generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) from 14 patients with epilepsy, and 18 convulsive PNES from 12 patients (one patient had both GTCS and PNES). The healthy controls were simulating GTCS. To quantitatively characterize the signals we calculated the following parameters: root mean square (RMS) of the amplitude, median frequency (MF), coherence, and duration of the seizures, of the clonic EMG discharges, and of the silent periods between the cloni. Based on wavelet analysis, we distinguished between a low-frequency component (LF 2-8 Hz) and a high-frequency component (HF 64-256 Hz). Duration of the seizure, and separation between the tonic and the clonic phases distinguished at group-level but not at individual level between convulsive PNES and GTCS. RMS, temporal dynamics of the HF/LF ratio, and the evolution of the silent periods differentiated between epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures at the individual level. A combination between HF/LF ratio and RMS separated all PNES from the GTCS. A blinded review of the EMG features distinguished correctly between GTCS and convulsive PNES in all cases. The HF/LF ratio and the RMS of the PNES were smaller compared to the simulated seizures. In addition to providing insight into the mechanism of muscle activation during convulsive PNES, these results have diagnostic significance, at the individual level. Surface EMG features can accurately distinguish

  7. Improved evaluation of back muscle SEMG characteristics by modelling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grassme, R.; Arnold, D.; Anders, Ch.; Dijk, J.P. van; Stegeman, D.F.; Linss, W.; Bradl, I.; Schumann, N.P.; Scholle, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Surface EMG (SEMG) as non-invasive method is a valuable tool in functional studies of movement co-ordination. The interpolation of the SEMG power (EMG mapping) gives information about intra- and inter-muscular co-ordination. It has been shown that SEMG maps of low back pain patients and healthy

  8. High Quality Acquisition of Surface Electromyography - Conditioning Circuit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Malik, Noreha Abdul; Khan, Sheroz; Nurashikin, Anis; Haider, Samnan; Larbani, Sofiane; Arshad, Atika; Tasnim, Rumana

    2013-12-01

    The acquisition of Surface Electromyography (SEMG) signals is used for many applications including the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases, and prosthesis control. The diagnostic quality of the SEMG signal is highly dependent on the conditioning circuit of the SEMG acquisition system. This paper presents the design of an SEMG conditioning circuit that can guarantee to collect high quality signal with high SNR such that it is immune to environmental noise. The conditioning circuit consists of four stages; consisting of an instrumentation amplifier that is used with a gain of around 250; 4th order band pass filter in the 20-500Hz frequency range as the two initial stages. The third stage is an amplifier with adjustable gain using a variable resistance; the gain could be changed from 1000 to 50000. In the final stage the signal is translated to meet the input requirements of data acquisition device or the ADC. Acquisition of accurate signals allows it to be analyzed for extracting the required characteristic features for medical and clinical applications. According to the experimental results, the value of SNR for collected signal is 52.4 dB which is higher than the commercial system, the power spectrum density (PSD) graph is also presented and it shows that the filter has eliminated the noise below 20 Hz.

  9. Towards an SEMG-based tele-operated robot for masticatory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Hadi; Moghimi, Sahar; Akbarzadeh, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a real-time trajectory generation for a masticatory rehabilitation robot based on surface electromyography (SEMG) signals. We used two Gough-Stewart robots. The first robot was used as a rehabilitation robot while the second robot was developed to model the human jaw system. The legs of the rehabilitation robot were controlled by the SEMG signals of a tele-operator to reproduce the masticatory motion in the human jaw, supposedly mounted on the moving platform, through predicting the location of a reference point. Actual jaw motions and the SEMG signals from the masticatory muscles were recorded and used as output and input, respectively. Three different methods, namely time-delayed neural networks, time delayed fast orthogonal search, and time-delayed Laguerre expansion technique, were employed and compared to predict the kinematic parameters. The optimal model structures as well as the input delays were obtained for each model and each subject through a genetic algorithm. Equations of motion were obtained by the virtual work method. Fuzzy method was employed to develop a fuzzy impedance controller. Moreover, a jaw model was developed to demonstrate the time-varying behavior of the muscle lengths during the rehabilitation process. The three modeling methods were capable of providing reasonably accurate estimations of the kinematic parameters, although the accuracy and training/validation speed of time-delayed fast orthogonal search were higher than those of the other two aforementioned methods. Also, during a simulation study, the fuzzy impedance scheme proved successful in controlling the moving platform for the accurate navigation of the reference point in the desired trajectory. SEMG has been widely used as a control command for prostheses and exoskeleton robots. However, in the current study by employing the proposed rehabilitation robot the complete continuous profile of the clenching motion was reproduced in the sagittal plane. Copyright

  10. A Discrete-Time Algorithm for Stiffness Extraction from sEMG and Its Application in Antidisturbance Teleoperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peidong Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new discrete-time algorithm of stiffness extraction from muscle surface electromyography (sEMG collected from human operator’s arms and have applied it for antidisturbance control in robot teleoperation. The variation of arm stiffness is estimated from sEMG signals and transferred to a telerobot under variable impedance control to imitate human motor control behaviours, particularly for disturbance attenuation. In comparison to the estimation of stiffness from sEMG, the proposed algorithm is able to reduce the nonlinear residual error effect and to enhance robustness and to simplify stiffness calibration. In order to extract a smoothing stiffness enveloping from sEMG signals, two enveloping methods are employed in this paper, namely, fast linear enveloping based on low pass filtering and moving average and amplitude monocomponent and frequency modulating (AM-FM method. Both methods have been incorporated into the proposed stiffness variance estimation algorithm and are extensively tested. The test results show that stiffness variation extraction based on the two methods is sensitive and robust to attenuation disturbance. It could potentially be applied for teleoperation in the presence of hazardous surroundings or human robot physical cooperation scenarios.

  11. sEMG Sensor Using Polypyrrole-Coated Nonwoven Fabric Sheet for Practical Control of Prosthetic Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yinlai; Togane, Masami; Lu, Baoliang; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of using a myoelectric prosthetic hand in daily life is to conveniently measure stable myoelectric signals. This study proposes a novel surface electromyography (sEMG) sensor using polypyrrole-coated nonwoven fabric sheet as electrodes (PPy electrodes) to allow people with disabilities to control prosthetic limbs. The PPy electrodes are sewn on an elastic band to guarantee close contact with the skin and thus reduce the contact electrical impedance between the electrodes and the skin. The sensor is highly customizable to fit the size and the shape of the stump so that people with disabilities can attach the sensor by themselves. The performance of the proposed sensor was investigated experimentally by comparing measurements of Ag/AgCl electrodes with electrolytic gel and the sEMG from the same muscle fibers. The high correlation coefficient (0.87) between the two types of sensors suggests the effectiveness of the proposed sensor. Another experiment of sEMG pattern recognition to control myoelectric prosthetic hands showed that the PPy electrodes are as effective as Ag/AgCl electrodes for measuring sEMG signals for practical myoelectric control. We also investigated the relation between the myoelectric signals' signal-to-noise ratio and the source impedances by simultaneously measuring the source impedances and the myoelectric signals with a switching circuit. The results showed that differences in both the norm and the phase of the source impedance greatly affect the common mode noise in the signal.

  12. sEMG Sensor Using Polypyrrole-Coated Nonwoven Fabric Sheet for Practical Control of Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yinlai; Togane, Masami; Lu, Baoliang; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of using a myoelectric prosthetic hand in daily life is to conveniently measure stable myoelectric signals. This study proposes a novel surface electromyography (sEMG) sensor using polypyrrole-coated nonwoven fabric sheet as electrodes (PPy electrodes) to allow people with disabilities to control prosthetic limbs. The PPy electrodes are sewn on an elastic band to guarantee close contact with the skin and thus reduce the contact electrical impedance between the electrodes and the skin. The sensor is highly customizable to fit the size and the shape of the stump so that people with disabilities can attach the sensor by themselves. The performance of the proposed sensor was investigated experimentally by comparing measurements of Ag/AgCl electrodes with electrolytic gel and the sEMG from the same muscle fibers. The high correlation coefficient (0.87) between the two types of sensors suggests the effectiveness of the proposed sensor. Another experiment of sEMG pattern recognition to control myoelectric prosthetic hands showed that the PPy electrodes are as effective as Ag/AgCl electrodes for measuring sEMG signals for practical myoelectric control. We also investigated the relation between the myoelectric signals' signal-to-noise ratio and the source impedances by simultaneously measuring the source impedances and the myoelectric signals with a switching circuit. The results showed that differences in both the norm and the phase of the source impedance greatly affect the common mode noise in the signal. PMID:28220058

  13. Electromyography physiology engineering and noninvasive applications

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Philip; John Wiley & Sons

    2004-01-01

    "Featuring contributions from key innovators working in the field today, Electromyography reveals the broad applications of EMG data in areas as diverse as neurology, ergonomics, exercise physiology, rehabilitation, movement analysis, biofeedback, and myoelectric control of prostheses." "Electromyography offers physiologists, medical professionals, and students in biomedical engineering a new window into the possibilities of this technology."--Jacket.

  14. A research on the effects of practicing Baduanjin on the lower extremities by using sEMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Li, Ran; Chen, Jing; Tian, Ye

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of practicing Baduanjin exercises on the lower extremities of subjects, using electromyography analysis, and values of IEMG were calculated. [Subjects] Forty, healthy adults were randomly assigned as subjects to two groups: SG (Study Group, n=20) who received twelve weeks of Baduanjin training, and CG (Control Group, n=20), who received no training. [Methods] A sixteen-channel sEMG system (ME6000, Mega Electronics Ltd., Kuopio, Finland) was selected to record and measure activity changes in two muscles (vastus medialis and vastus lateralis). [Results] After twelve-week of Baduanjin training, the results of this study showed that the SG group had significant increases in values of IEMG in second, fifth and seventh section of the Baduanjin exercises. In second section, the values of IEMG had increased for 56.95% in vastus lateralis (p strength and the physical function of the lower extremities among healthy adults. With no adverse events from exercise were reported during the training procedure, the safety and low intensity of Baduanjin exercise was also proved, it could be widely taken as an appropriate no-risk treatment exercise for healthy adults.

  15. Comparison of algorithms to quantify muscle fatigue in upper limb muscles based on sEMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Lorenz; Hofmann, Ulrich G

    2016-11-01

    This work compared the performance of six different fatigue detection algorithms quantifying muscle fatigue based on electromyographic signals. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was obtained by an experiment from upper arm contractions at three different load levels from twelve volunteers. Fatigue detection algorithms mean frequency (MNF), spectral moments ratio (SMR), the wavelet method WIRM1551, sample entropy (SampEn), fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn) and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA%DET) were calculated. The resulting fatigue signals were compared considering the disturbances incorporated in fatiguing situations as well as according to the possibility to differentiate the load levels based on the fatigue signals. Furthermore we investigated the influence of the electrode locations on the fatigue detection quality and whether an optimized channel set is reasonable. The results of the MNF, SMR, WIRM1551 and fApEn algorithms fell close together. Due to the small amount of subjects in this study significant differences could not be found. In terms of disturbances the SMR algorithm showed a slight tendency to out-perform the others. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved Prediction of Preterm Delivery Using Empirical Mode Decomposition Analysis of Uterine Electromyography Signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Ren

    Full Text Available Preterm delivery increases the risk of infant mortality and morbidity, and therefore developing reliable methods for predicting its likelihood are of great importance. Previous work using uterine electromyography (EMG recordings has shown that they may provide a promising and objective way for predicting risk of preterm delivery. However, to date attempts at utilizing computational approaches to achieve sufficient predictive confidence, in terms of area under the curve (AUC values, have not achieved the high discrimination accuracy that a clinical application requires. In our study, we propose a new analytical approach for assessing the risk of preterm delivery using EMG recordings which firstly employs Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD to obtain their Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF. Next, the entropy values of both instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency of the first ten IMF components are computed in order to derive ratios of these two distinct components as features. Discrimination accuracy of this approach compared to those proposed previously was then calculated using six differently representative classifiers. Finally, three different electrode positions were analyzed for their prediction accuracy of preterm delivery in order to establish which uterine EMG recording location was optimal signal data. Overall, our results show a clear improvement in prediction accuracy of preterm delivery risk compared with previous approaches, achieving an impressive maximum AUC value of 0.986 when using signals from an electrode positioned below the navel. In sum, this provides a promising new method for analyzing uterine EMG signals to permit accurate clinical assessment of preterm delivery risk.

  17. Interpreting Signal Amplitudes in Surface Electromyography Studies in Sport and Rehabilitation Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Halperin, Israel; Lehman, Gregory J; Trajano, Gabriel S; Vieira, Taian M

    2017-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is a popular research tool in sport and rehabilitation sciences. Common study designs include the comparison of sEMG amplitudes collected from different muscles as participants perform various exercises and techniques under different loads. Based on such comparisons, researchers attempt to draw conclusions concerning the neuro- and electrophysiological underpinning of force production and hypothesize about possible longitudinal adaptations, such as strength and hypertrophy. However, such conclusions are frequently unsubstantiated and unwarranted. Hence, the goal of this review is to discuss what can and cannot be inferred from comparative research designs as it pertains to both the acute and longitudinal outcomes. General methodological recommendations are made, gaps in the literature are identified, and lines for future research to help improve the applicability of sEMG are suggested.

  18. Interpreting Signal Amplitudes in Surface Electromyography Studies in Sport and Rehabilitation Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigotsky, Andrew D.; Halperin, Israel; Lehman, Gregory J.; Trajano, Gabriel S.; Vieira, Taian M.

    2018-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is a popular research tool in sport and rehabilitation sciences. Common study designs include the comparison of sEMG amplitudes collected from different muscles as participants perform various exercises and techniques under different loads. Based on such comparisons, researchers attempt to draw conclusions concerning the neuro- and electrophysiological underpinning of force production and hypothesize about possible longitudinal adaptations, such as strength and hypertrophy. However, such conclusions are frequently unsubstantiated and unwarranted. Hence, the goal of this review is to discuss what can and cannot be inferred from comparative research designs as it pertains to both the acute and longitudinal outcomes. General methodological recommendations are made, gaps in the literature are identified, and lines for future research to help improve the applicability of sEMG are suggested. PMID:29354060

  19. Proximal Neuromuscular Control Protects Against Hamstring Injuries in Male Soccer Players: A Prospective Study With Electromyography Time-Series Analysis During Maximal Sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuermans, Joke; Danneels, Lieven; Van Tiggelen, Damien; Palmans, Tanneke; Witvrouw, Erik

    2017-05-01

    With their unremittingly high incidence rate and detrimental functional repercussions, hamstring injuries remain a substantial problem in male soccer. Proximal neuromuscular control ("core stability") is considered to be of key importance in primary and secondary hamstring injury prevention, although scientific evidence and insights on the exact nature of the core-hamstring association are nonexistent at present. The muscle activation pattern throughout the running cycle would not differ between participants based on injury occurrence during follow-up. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Sixty amateur soccer players participated in a multimuscle surface electromyography (sEMG) assessment during maximal acceleration to full-speed sprinting. Subsequently, hamstring injury occurrence was registered during a 1.5-season follow-up period. Hamstring, gluteal, and trunk muscle activity time series during the airborne and stance phases of acceleration were evaluated and statistically explored for a possible causal association with injury occurrence and absence from sport during follow-up. Players who did not experience a hamstring injury during follow-up had significantly higher amounts of gluteal muscle activity during the front swing phase ( P = .027) and higher amounts of trunk muscle activity during the backswing phase of sprinting ( P = .042). In particular, the risk of sustaining a hamstring injury during follow-up lowered by 20% and 6%, with a 10% increment in normalized muscle activity of the gluteus maximus during the front swing and the trunk muscles during the backswing, respectively ( P < .024). Muscle activity of the core unit during explosive running appeared to be associated with hamstring injury occurrence in male soccer players. Higher amounts of gluteal and trunk muscle activity during the airborne phases of sprinting were associated with a lower risk of hamstring injuries during follow-up. Hence, the present results provide a basis for improved

  20. Electromyography analysis of natural mastication behavior using varying mouthful quantities of two types of gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Kaoru; Gao, Zhihong; Ishihara, Sayaka; Funami, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of mouthful quantities and mechanical properties of gels on natural mastication behaviors using electromyography (EMG). Two types of hydrocolloid gels (A and K) with similar fracture loads but different moduli and fracture strains were served to eleven normal women in 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-g masses in a randomized order. EMG activities from both masseter muscles were recorded during natural mastication. Because of the similar fracture loads, the numbers of chews, total muscle activities, and entire oral processing times were similar for similar masses of both gel types. Prior to the first swallow, the more elastic K gel with a higher fracture strain required higher muscle activities than the brittle A gel, which had higher modulus. Majority of subjects had preferred sides of chewing, but all subjects with or without preferred sides used both masseters during the consumption of gels. Similar effects of masses and types of gels were observed in EMG activities of both sides of masseters. Contributions of the dominant side of chewing were diminished with increasing masses of gels, and the mass dependency on ratio of the dominant side was more pronounced with K gel. More repetitions of smaller masses required greater muscle activities and longer periods for the consumption of 24-g gel portions. Reduction in the masses with an increased number of repetitions necessitated slower eating and more mastication to consume the gel portions. These observations suggest that chewing using both sides is more effective and unconsciously reduces mastication times during the consumption of gels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Continuous Wavelet Transform Analysis of Surface Electromyography for Muscle Fatigue Assessment on the Elbow Joint Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto Triwiyanto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying muscle fatigue plays an important role in preventing the risks associated with musculoskeletal disorders. The effect of elbow-joint angle on time-frequency parameters during a repetitive motion provides valuable information in finding the most accurate position of the angle causing muscle fatigue. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of muscle fatigue on the spectral and time-frequency domain parameters derived from electromyography (EMG signals using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT. Four male participants were recruited to perform a repetitive motion (flexion and extension movements from a non-fatigue to fatigue condition. EMG signals were recorded from the biceps muscle. The recorded EMG signals were then analyzed offline using the complex Morlet wavelet. The time-frequency domain data were analyzed using the time-averaged wavelet spectrum (TAWS and the Scale-Average Wavelet Power (SAWP parameters. The spectral domain data were analyzed using the Instantaneous Mean Frequency (IMNF and the Instantaneous Mean Power Spectrum (IMNP parameters. The index of muscle fatigue was observed by calculating the increase of the IMNP and the decrease of the IMNF parameters. After performing a repetitive motion from non-fatigue to fatigue condition, the average of the IMNF value decreased by 15.69% and the average of the IMNP values increased by 84%, respectively. This study suggests that the reliable frequency band to detect muscle fatigue is 31.10-36.19Hz with linear regression parameters of 0.979mV^2Hz^(-1 and 0.0095mV^2Hz^(-1 for R^2 and slope, respectively.

  2. Experimental Study and Characterization of SEMG Signals for Upper Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veer, Karan

    2015-04-01

    Surface electromyogram (SEMG) is used to measure the activity of superficial muscles and is an essential tool to carry out biomechanical assessments required for prosthetic design. Many previous attempts suggest that, electromyogram (EMG) signals have random nature. Here, dual channel evaluation of EMG signals acquired from the amputed subjects using computational techniques for classification of arm motion are presented. After recording data from four predefined upper arm motions, interpretation of signal was done for six statistical features. The signals are classified by the neural network (NN) and then interpretation was done using statistical technique to extract the effectiveness of recorded signals. The network performances are analyzed by considering the number of input features, hidden layer, learning algorithm and mean square error. From the results, it is observed that there exists calculative difference in amplitude gain across different motions and have great potential to classify arm motions. The outcome indicates that NN algorithm performs significantly better than other algorithms with classification accuracy (CA) of 96.40%. Analysis of variance technique presents the results to validate the effectiveness of recorded data to discriminate SEMG signals. Results are of significant thrust in identifying the operations that can be implemented for classifying upper limb movements suitable for prostheses design.

  3. Electromyography and Mechanomyography Signals During Swallowing in Healthy Adults and Head and Neck Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Gabriela; Hodgetts, William; Scott, Dylan; Kuffel, Kristina; King, Ben; Brodt, Chris; Rieger, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used as an adjuvant to dysphagia therapy to demonstrate the activity of submental muscles during swallowing exercises. Mechanomyography (MMG) has been suggested as a potential superior alternative to sEMG; however, this advantage is not confirmed for signal acquired from submental muscles. This study compared the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained from sEMG and MMG sensors during swallowing tasks, in healthy participants and those with a history of head and neck cancer (HNC), a population with altered anatomy and a high incidence of dysphagia. Twenty-two healthy adults and 10 adults with a history of HNC participated in this study. sEMG and MMG signals were acquired during dry, thin liquid, effortful, and Mendelsohn maneuver swallows. SNR was compared between the two sensors using repeated measures ANOVAs and subsequent planned pairwise comparisons. Test-retest measures were collected on 20 % of participants. In healthy participants, MMG SNR was higher than that of sEMG for dry [t(21) = -3.02, p = 0.007] and thin liquid swallows [t(21) = -4.24, p < 0.001]. Although a significant difference for sensor was found in HNC participants F(1,9) = 5.54, p = 0.043, planned pairwise comparisons by task revealed no statistically significant difference between the two sensors. sEMG also showed much better test-retest reliability than MMG. Biofeedback provided as an adjuvant to dysphagia therapy in patients with HNC should employ sEMG technology, as this sensor type yielded better SNR and overall test-retest reliability. Poor MMG test-retest reliability was noted in both healthy and HNC participants and may have been related to differences in sensor application.

  4. Spatial variability in cortex-muscle coherence investigated with magnetoencephalography and high-density surface electromyography

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    Botter, Alberto; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Cortex-muscle coherence (CMC) reflects coupling between magnetoencephalography (MEG) and surface electromyography (sEMG), being strongest during isometric contraction but absent, for unknown reasons, in some individuals. We used a novel nonmagnetic high-density sEMG (HD-sEMG) electrode grid (36 mm × 12 mm; 60 electrodes separated by 3 mm) to study effects of sEMG recording site, electrode derivation, and rectification on the strength of CMC. Monopolar sEMG from right thenar and 306-channel whole-scalp MEG were recorded from 14 subjects during 4-min isometric thumb abduction. CMC was computed for 60 monopolar, 55 bipolar, and 32 Laplacian HD-sEMG derivations, and two derivations were computed to mimic “macroscopic” monopolar and bipolar sEMG (electrode diameter 9 mm; interelectrode distance 21 mm). With unrectified sEMG, 12 subjects showed statistically significant CMC in 91–95% of the HD-sEMG channels, with maximum coherence at ∼25 Hz. CMC was about a fifth stronger for monopolar than bipolar and Laplacian derivations. Monopolar derivations resulted in most uniform CMC distributions across the thenar and in tightest cortical source clusters in the left rolandic hand area. CMC was 19–27% stronger for HD-sEMG than for “macroscopic” monopolar or bipolar derivations. EMG rectification reduced the CMC peak by a quarter, resulted in a more uniformly distributed CMC across the thenar, and provided more tightly clustered cortical sources than unrectifed sEMGs. Moreover, it revealed CMC at ∼12 Hz. We conclude that HD-sEMG, especially with monopolar derivation, can facilitate detection of CMC and that individual muscle anatomy cannot explain the high interindividual CMC variability. PMID:26354317

  5. Surface electromyography as a screening method for evaluation of dysphagia and odynophagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2009-01-01

    Objective Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. The article analyzes various instrumental methods of dysphagia assessment, introduces surface electromyography (sEMG) to carry out rapid assessment of such patients, and debates proposed suggestions for sEMG screening protocol in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Data sources Subject related books and articles from 1813 to 2007 were obtained through library search, MEDLINE (1949–2007) and EMBASE (1975–2007). Methods Specifics steps for establishing the protocol for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles), the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water) are presented in detail. SEMG is compared with other techniques in terms of cost, timing, involvement of radiation, etc. Results According to the published data, SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, time-saving and inexpensive to perform. The major weakness of the method seems to be inability for precise diagnostic of neurologically induced dysphagia. Conclusion With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG might serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management but cannot serve for proper investigation of neurogenic dysphagia. PMID:19232090

  6. Surface electromyography as a screening method for evaluation of dysphagia and odynophagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eviatar Ephraim

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. The article analyzes various instrumental methods of dysphagia assessment, introduces surface electromyography (sEMG to carry out rapid assessment of such patients, and debates proposed suggestions for sEMG screening protocol in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Data sources Subject related books and articles from 1813 to 2007 were obtained through library search, MEDLINE (1949–2007 and EMBASE (1975–2007. Methods Specifics steps for establishing the protocol for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles, the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water are presented in detail. SEMG is compared with other techniques in terms of cost, timing, involvement of radiation, etc. Results According to the published data, SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, time-saving and inexpensive to perform. The major weakness of the method seems to be inability for precise diagnostic of neurologically induced dysphagia. Conclusion With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG might serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management but cannot serve for proper investigation of neurogenic dysphagia.

  7. The integration of surface electromyography in the clinical decision making process: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, W Reg

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate how the findings of surface electromyography (S.E.M.G.) were integrated into the clinical decision-making process. Clinical Features: This is a retrospective review of the file of a 27-year-old male suffering from mechanical low back pain. He was evaluated on 3 separate occasions over a 3 year period. History, radiography, functional outcome studies, visual-numerical pain score, pain drawing, physical examination and surface electromyography were utilized in evaluating this patient. Intervention and Outcome: The two clinical interventions of spinal manipulative therapy (S.M.T.) had positive results in that the patient achieved an asymptomatic state and returned to his position of employment. The S.E.M.G. data collected during the industrial assessment, did not provide the outcome that the patient had anticipated. Conclusion: Surface electromyography is a useful clinical tool in the author’s decision-making process for the treatment of mechanical lower back pain. Therapeutic intervention by S.M.T., therapeutic exercises and rating risk factors were influenced by the S.E.M.G. findings.

  8. Repeatability of grasp recognition for robotic hand prosthesis control based on sEMG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Francesca; Cognolato, Matteo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Muller, Henning; Caputo, Barbara; Atzori, Manfredo

    2017-07-01

    Control methods based on sEMG obtained promising results for hand prosthetics. Control system robustness is still often inadequate and does not allow the amputees to perform a large number of movements useful for everyday life. Only few studies analyzed the repeatability of sEMG classification of hand grasps. The main goals of this paper are to explore repeatability in sEMG data and to release a repeatability database with the recorded experiments. The data are recorded from 10 intact subjects repeating 7 grasps 12 times, twice a day for 5 days. The data are publicly available on the Ninapro web page. The analysis for the repeatability is based on the comparison of movement classification accuracy in several data acquisitions and for different subjects. The analysis is performed using mean absolute value and waveform length features and a Random Forest classifier. The accuracy obtained by training and testing on acquisitions at different times is on average 27.03% lower than training and testing on the same acquisition. The results obtained by training and testing on different acquisitions suggest that previous acquisitions can be used to train the classification algorithms. The inter-subject variability is remarkable, suggesting that specific characteristics of the subjects can affect repeatibility and sEMG classification accuracy. In conclusion, the results of this paper can contribute to develop more robust control systems for hand prostheses, while the presented data allows researchers to test repeatability in further analyses.

  9. Can triggered electromyography thresholds assure accurate pedicle screw placements? A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Hong Rye; Lee, Cheol-Young; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sala, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Triggered electromyography (t-EMG) for pedicle screw placement was introduced to prevent the misplacement of screws; however, its diagnostic value is still debated. This study aimed to clarify the diagnostic value of t-EMG and to compare thresholds. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, and 179 studies were identified. Among them, 11 studies were finally enrolled. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) plots were analyzed. The enrolled studies included 13,948 lumbar and 2070 thoracic screws. The overall summary sensitivity/specificity/DOR values of t-EMG were 0.55/0.97/42.16 in the lumbar spine and 0.41/0.95/14.52 in the thoracic spine, respectively, indicating a weak diagnostic value. However, subgroup analysis by each threshold value showed that the cutoff value of 8mA in the lumbar spine indicated high sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.97), and DOR (147.95), thereby showing high diagnostic accuracy of identifying misplaced screws. The most useful application of t-EMG may be as a warning tool for lumbar pedicle screw malpositioning in the presence of positive stimulation at a threshold of ⩽8mA. t-EMG by screw stimulation may be valuable in the lumbar region at a threshold of ⩽8mA. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparative analysis of three non-invasive Human-Machine Interfaces for the disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram eRavindra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of rehabilitation robotics, a major role is played by theHuman-Machine Interface (HMI used to gather the patient's intent from biologicalsignals, and convert them into control signals for the robotic artifact. Surprisingly,decades of research haven't yet declared what the optimal HMI is in this context;in particular, the traditional approach based upon surface electromyography (sEMGstill yields unreliable results due to the inherent variability of the signal. Toovercome this problem, the scientific community has recently been advocating thediscovery, analysis and usage of novel HMIs to supersede or augment sEMG; a comparativeanalysis of such HMIs is therefore a very desirable investigation.In this paper we compare three such HMIs employed in the detection of finger forces,namely sEMG, ultrasound imaging and pressure sensing. The comparison is performed alongfour main lines: the accuracy in the prediction, the stability over time, the wearabilityand the cost. A psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects engaged ina simple finger-flexion task was set up. Our results show that, at least in thisexperiment, pressure sensing and sEMG yield comparably good prediction accuraciesas opposed to ultrasound imaging; and that pressure sensing enjoys a much better stabilitythan sEMG.Given that pressure sensors are as wearable as sEMG electrodes but way cheaper, we claimthat this HMI could represent a valid alternative /augmentation to sEMG to control amulti-fingered hand prosthesis.

  11. Multiparameter Electromyography Analysis of the Masticatory Muscle Activities in Patients with Brainstem Stroke at Different Head Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Chuyao; Wei, Miaoluan; Luo, Jie; Lin, Jiayin; Zeng, Wen; Huang, Weitian; Song, Rong

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the masticatory muscle is frequently affected and presents high heterogeneity poststroke. Surface electromyography (EMG) is widely used to quantify muscle movement patterns. However, only a few studies applied EMG analysis on the research of masticatory muscle activities poststroke, and most of which used single parameter—root mean squares (RMS). The aim of this study was to fully investigate the performance of masticatory muscle at different head positions in healthy subjects and brainstem stroke patients with multiparameter EMG analysis. In this study, 15 healthy subjects and six brainstem stroke patients were recruited to conduct maximum voluntary clenching at five different head positions: upright position, left rotation, right rotation, dorsal flexion, and ventral flexion. The EMG signals of bilateral temporalis anterior and masseter muscles were recorded, and parameters including RMS, median frequency, and fuzzy approximate entropy of the EMG signals were calculated. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures and Bonferroni post hoc test were used to evaluate the effects of muscle and head position on EMG parameters in the healthy group, and the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank test was conducted in the patient group. The Welch–Satterthwaite t-test was used to compare the between-subject difference. We found a significant effect of subject and muscles but no significant effect of head positions, and the masticatory muscles of patients after brainstem stroke performed significantly different from healthy subjects. Multiparameter EMG analysis might be an informative tool to investigate the neural activity related movement patterns of the deficient masticatory muscles poststroke. PMID:28611725

  12. Multiparameter Electromyography Analysis of the Masticatory Muscle Activities in Patients with Brainstem Stroke at Different Head Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuyao Jian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the masticatory muscle is frequently affected and presents high heterogeneity poststroke. Surface electromyography (EMG is widely used to quantify muscle movement patterns. However, only a few studies applied EMG analysis on the research of masticatory muscle activities poststroke, and most of which used single parameter—root mean squares (RMS. The aim of this study was to fully investigate the performance of masticatory muscle at different head positions in healthy subjects and brainstem stroke patients with multiparameter EMG analysis. In this study, 15 healthy subjects and six brainstem stroke patients were recruited to conduct maximum voluntary clenching at five different head positions: upright position, left rotation, right rotation, dorsal flexion, and ventral flexion. The EMG signals of bilateral temporalis anterior and masseter muscles were recorded, and parameters including RMS, median frequency, and fuzzy approximate entropy of the EMG signals were calculated. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni post hoc test were used to evaluate the effects of muscle and head position on EMG parameters in the healthy group, and the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank test was conducted in the patient group. The Welch–Satterthwaite t-test was used to compare the between-subject difference. We found a significant effect of subject and muscles but no significant effect of head positions, and the masticatory muscles of patients after brainstem stroke performed significantly different from healthy subjects. Multiparameter EMG analysis might be an informative tool to investigate the neural activity related movement patterns of the deficient masticatory muscles poststroke.

  13. Quantification of the safe maximal lift in functional capacity evaluations: comparison of muscle recruitment using SEMG and therapist observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Carole; Mackenzie, Lynette; Capra, Mike

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to identify any correlation between muscle activity using surface electromyography (SEMG) and therapist determined safe maximal lift (SML) during the bench to shoulder lift of the WorkHab FCE. This would support construct (convergent) validity of SML determination in the WorkHab FCE. An experimental laboratory based study design was used. Twenty healthy volunteers performed the bench to shoulder lift of the WorkHab FCE whilst SEMG of upper trapezius, mid deltoid, thoracic, brachioradialis and bicep muscles were recorded. A summary of the data is presented using descriptive statistics and differences between groups were tested using generalised linear mixed models. Results showed a significant difference in activity and duration of muscle activation with increasing weight lifted [p = 0.000 and p = 0.024 (brachioradialis)]. There was a significant difference between the up lift (bench to shoulder) and the down lift (shoulder to bench) for all muscles (p = 0.000) except the brachioradialis (p = 0.819). No significant change was found in muscle activity before or after the SML. Convergent validity of the bench to shoulder lift of the WorkHab FCE was not established as no relationship between the muscle recruitment using SEMG and SML, as determined by therapist observation was identified during this lift.

  14. Multichannel noninvasive human–machine interface via stretchable µm thick sEMG patches for robot manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Wang, Youhua; Liu, Runfeng; Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Qin; Huang, YongAn

    2018-01-01

    Epidermal electronics (e-skin) emerging in recent years offer the opportunity to noninvasively and wearably extract biosignals from human bodies. The conventional processes of e-skin based on standard microelectronic fabrication processes and a variety of transfer printing methods, nevertheless, unquestionably constrains the size of the devices, posing a serious challenge to collecting signals via skin, the largest organ in the human body. Herein we propose a multichannel noninvasive human–machine interface (HMI) using stretchable surface electromyography (sEMG) patches to realize a robot hand mimicking human gestures. Time-efficient processes are first developed to manufacture µm thick large-scale stretchable devices. With micron thickness, the stretchable µm thick sEMG patches show excellent conformability with human skin and consequently comparable electrical performance with conventional gel electrodes. Combined with the large-scale size, the multichannel noninvasive HMI via stretchable µm thick sEMG patches successfully manipulates the robot hand with eight different gestures, whose precision is as high as conventional gel electrodes array.

  15. Electromyography (EMG) analysis on impact of classroom chair and table usage among primary school students in Perlis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ewe Hui; Shan, Lim Shaiu; Effendi, M. S. M.; Rosli, Muhamad Farizuan

    2017-09-01

    The existing design of primary school classroom chair and table had brought low back pain, neck pain and shoulder pain problems respectively among students in primary school. The purpose of this study is to relate the electromyography (EMG) analysis with the most critical area of the body during sitting and writing. Six male and six female primary school students from SK Seri Perlis with no back pain, neck pain and shoulder pain problems involved were invited as respondents in this study. EMG experiment was carried out by first determined the critical point at T9 and L3 from thoracic and lumbar segment respectively for ECG electrode placement and performed with a series of sitting trials for analysis. The sitting trials performed were slouch to lumbopelvic sitting and slouch to thoracic sitting follow by instruction. Next, the electrode placement was identified at C2-C3 on cervical spine for neck and at midpoint between C7 to the lateral edge of acromion spanning for shoulder respectively. These points were identified for a series of writing task performing for the EMG analysis. There were two type of writing task which included writing by looking at the whiteboard and paper placed on the table. The subjects were instructed to rest during the experiment when necessary. During lumbopelvic sitting posture, the average muscle activation on lumbar area was at the highest peak. The peak indicated that there was critical effect from the experimental finding. The performance of writing task from whiteboard gave rise a higher impact on neck muscle while writing task from paper had a greater impact on shoulder muscle. The critical affected muscle on these areas was proven on these written tasks. The EMG experiment showed that the existing design of primary school classroom chair and table had brought impact on lumbar, neck and shoulder towards the students who were using. A future recommendation suggests that to redesign primary school classroom chair and table which

  16. A frequency and pulse-width co-modulation strategy for transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation based on sEMG time-domain features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Wang, Hai-Peng; Bao, Xue-Liang; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gong

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is often used as a control signal in neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) systems to enhance the voluntary control and proprioceptive sensory feedback of paralyzed patients. Most sEMG-controlled NMES systems use the envelope of the sEMG signal to modulate the stimulation intensity (current amplitude or pulse width) with a constant frequency. The aims of this study were to develop a strategy that co-modulates frequency and pulse width based on features of the sEMG signal and to investigate the torque-reproduction performance and the level of fatigue resistance achieved with our strategy. Approach. We examined the relationships between wrist torque and two stimulation parameters (frequency and pulse width) and between wrist torque and two sEMG time-domain features (mean absolute value (MAV) and number of slope sign changes (NSS)) in eight healthy volunteers. By using wrist torque as an intermediate variable, customized and generalized transfer functions were constructed to convert the two features of the sEMG signal into the two stimulation parameters, thereby establishing a MAV/NSS dual-coding (MNDC) algorithm. Wrist torque reproduction performance was assessed by comparing the torque generated by the algorithms with that originally recorded during voluntary contractions. Muscle fatigue was assessed by measuring the decline percentage of the peak torque and by comparing the torque time integral of the response to test stimulation trains before and after fatigue sessions. Main Results. The MNDC approach could produce a wrist torque that closely matched the voluntary wrist torque. In addition, a smaller decay in the wrist torque was observed after the MNDC-coded fatigue stimulation was applied than after stimulation using pulse-width modulation alone. Significance. Compared with pulse-width modulation stimulation strategies that are based on sEMG detection, the MNDC strategy is more effective for both voluntary muscle

  17. A frequency and pulse-width co-modulation strategy for transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation based on sEMG time-domain features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Wang, Hai-Peng; Bao, Xue-Liang; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gong

    2016-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is often used as a control signal in neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) systems to enhance the voluntary control and proprioceptive sensory feedback of paralyzed patients. Most sEMG-controlled NMES systems use the envelope of the sEMG signal to modulate the stimulation intensity (current amplitude or pulse width) with a constant frequency. The aims of this study were to develop a strategy that co-modulates frequency and pulse width based on features of the sEMG signal and to investigate the torque-reproduction performance and the level of fatigue resistance achieved with our strategy. We examined the relationships between wrist torque and two stimulation parameters (frequency and pulse width) and between wrist torque and two sEMG time-domain features (mean absolute value (MAV) and number of slope sign changes (NSS)) in eight healthy volunteers. By using wrist torque as an intermediate variable, customized and generalized transfer functions were constructed to convert the two features of the sEMG signal into the two stimulation parameters, thereby establishing a MAV/NSS dual-coding (MNDC) algorithm. Wrist torque reproduction performance was assessed by comparing the torque generated by the algorithms with that originally recorded during voluntary contractions. Muscle fatigue was assessed by measuring the decline percentage of the peak torque and by comparing the torque time integral of the response to test stimulation trains before and after fatigue sessions. The MNDC approach could produce a wrist torque that closely matched the voluntary wrist torque. In addition, a smaller decay in the wrist torque was observed after the MNDC-coded fatigue stimulation was applied than after stimulation using pulse-width modulation alone. Compared with pulse-width modulation stimulation strategies that are based on sEMG detection, the MNDC strategy is more effective for both voluntary muscle force reproduction and muscle fatigue reduction.

  18. Effects of Force Load, Muscle Fatigue, and Magnetic Stimulation on Surface Electromyography during Side Arm Lateral Raise Task: A Preliminary Study with Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of force load, muscle fatigue, and extremely low-frequency (ELF magnetic stimulation on surface electromyography (SEMG signal features during side arm lateral raise task. SEMG signals were recorded from 18 healthy subjects on the anterior deltoid using a BIOSEMI ActiveTwo system during side lateral raise task (with the right arm 90 degrees away from the body with three different loads on the forearm (0 kg, 1 kg, and 3 kg; their order was randomized between subjects. The arm maintained the loads until the subject felt exhausted. The first 10 s recording for each load was regarded as nonfatigue status and the last 10 s before the subject was exhausted was regarded as fatigue status. The subject was then given a five-minute resting between different loads. Two days later, the same experiment was repeated on every subject, and this time the ELF magnetic stimulation was applied to the subject’s deltoid muscle during the five-minute rest period. Three commonly used SEMG features, root mean square (RMS, median frequency (MDF, and sample entropy (SampEn, were analyzed and compared between different loads, nonfatigue/fatigue status, and ELF stimulation and no stimulation. Variance analysis results showed that the effect of force load on RMS was significant (p0.05. In comparison with nonfatigue status, for all the different force loads with and without ELF stimulation, RMS was significantly larger at fatigue (all p<0.001 and MDF and SampEn were significantly smaller (all p<0.001.

  19. Rotationplasty type B IIIa according to Winkelmann: electromyography and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, A; Rosenbaum, D; Gosheger, G; Hoffmann, C; Rödl, R; Winkelmann, W

    2001-03-01

    After resection of a malignant bone tumor of the femur, rotationplasty is considered a treatment option in addition to other limb salvage procedures such as endoprosthetic replacement, allograft, or autograft reconstruction. A Type B IIIa rotationplasty is indicated when the tumor involves the total femur or when skip lesions are detected. After the total femur is resected, the lateral tibial plateau is placed into the acetabulum after rotating the tibia and foot segment 180 degrees. Eight patients at an average age of 5.9 years underwent a rotationplasty Type B IIIa at the authors' institution. After a median followup of 59.6 months (range, 24-86 months) the clinical results were excellent and the functional status according to the criteria of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society was good (23 of 30 points). In electromyographic analysis the muscle activity of the affected leg revealed good function of the stance and the swing phase muscles according to their new function with comparable amplitudes to the unaffected limb. The kinematics (range of motion of the hip and knee) were slightly assymmetric. Gait analysis showed a slight lateral trunk lean over the ipsilateral limb with reduced joint moment. All patients had full weightbearing ability. Remodeling of the tibial plateau into a round form mimicking a new femoral head is confirmed by radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging scans. In young children with a tumor of the total femur, rotationplasty Type B IIIa is a good treatment modality with excellent clinical and good functional results. The electromyographic and gait analysis data underscore a good functional restoration of gait after rotationplasty.

  20. Fine wire electromyography analysis of muscles of the shoulder during swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuber, G W; Jobe, F W; Perry, J; Moynes, D R; Antonelli, D

    1986-01-01

    Fine wire EMG of the shoulder was performed on 11 swimmers; 5 performed during dry land studies and 7 during aquatic studies. One individual underwent both studies. A cinematographic analysis was synchronized with the EMG data to determine what muscles were firing at each phase of the swim stroke. Eight muscles were studied: biceps, subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, serratus anterior, and deltoid. Three strokes were analyzed: freestyle, breaststroke, and butterfly. The freestyle and butterfly are frequently associated with impingement type syndromes in swimmers. It was determined that the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, middle deltoid, and serratus anterior were predominately recovery phase muscles. The latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major were predominately pull-through phase muscles. The biceps had mixed inconsistent activity during both phases. From dry land quantifications of the EMG signal it was determined that the serratus anterior functions near maximal muscle test during each stroke, and theoretically may fatigue with repetition. It is hoped that a training program aimed to strengthen the scapular rotators may help alleviate impingement syndrome in swimmers.

  1. Diagnostic yield of electromyography in children with myopathic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Partha S; Sorenson, Eric J

    2014-08-01

    Interpretation of pediatric electromyography interpretation in myopathic disorders is technically challenging. We assessed our electromyographic experience with respect to sensitivity and specificity in pediatric myopathy. We did a retrospective chart review of patients ≤18 years between 2009 and 2013. Two hundred twenty-four electromyographic studies were reviewed with the following referral diagnoses: myopathy, muscle weakness, neuromuscular disorders, myositis, myalgia, myoglobinuria, myasthenia, myotonia, cramps, periodic paralysis, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Only children who had an electromyography and muscle biopsy were included for analysis. Patients with neurogenic electromyography and neuromuscular junction disorders were excluded. Myopathic electromyography was defined as short duration, low amplitude, polyphasic motor unit potentials with rapid recruitment. Seventy-two patients were included (age range, 6 months-18 years). The following observations were made: group A: myopathic electromyography or pathognomonic of muscle disease and biopsy or genetically confirmed myopathy (32 cases); group B: myopathic electromyography but biopsy normal or nondiagnostic (12 cases); group C: normal electromyography but biopsy or genetically confirmed myopathy (three cases, all with metabolic myopathy); and group D: electromyography normal and biopsy normal or nondiagnostic (25 cases). The most common diagnoses were congenital myopathy (seven cases), metabolic myopathy (six cases), muscular dystrophy (six cases), genetically confirmed myopathy (five cases), myopathy, undefined (five cases), and inflammatory myopathy (four cases). Pediatric electromyography was 91% sensitive and 67% specific in myopathic disorders. The metabolic myopathies were commonly missed by electromyography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of 12-wk eccentric calf muscle training on muscle-tendon glucose uptake and SEMG in patients with chronic Achilles tendon pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Magnusson, S Peter; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2014-07-15

    High-load eccentric exercises have been a key component in the conservative management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy. This study investigated the effects of a 12-wk progressive, home-based eccentric rehabilitation program on ankle plantar flexors' glucose uptake (GU) and myoelectric activity and Achilles tendon GU. A longitudinal study design with control (n = 10) and patient (n = 10) groups was used. Surface electromyography (SEMG) from four ankle plantar flexors and GU from the same muscles and the Achilles tendon were measured during submaximal intermittent isometric plantar flexion task. The results indicated that the symptomatic leg was weaker (P effect on the tendon GU. Concerning SEMG, at baseline, soleus showed more relative activity in the symptomatic leg compared with both the asymptomatic and control legs (P effective in decreasing subjective severity of Achilles tendinopathy. It also resulted in redistribution of relative electrical activity, but not metabolic activity, within the triceps surae muscle. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Exploration of Force Myography and surface Electromyography in hand gesture classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianta; Merhi, Lukas-Karim; Xiao, Zhen Gang; Menon, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    Whereas pressure sensors increasingly have received attention as a non-invasive interface for hand gesture recognition, their performance has not been comprehensively evaluated. This work examined the performance of hand gesture classification using Force Myography (FMG) and surface Electromyography (sEMG) technologies by performing 3 sets of 48 hand gestures using a prototyped FMG band and an array of commercial sEMG sensors worn both on the wrist and forearm simultaneously. The results show that the FMG band achieved classification accuracies as good as the high quality, commercially available, sEMG system on both wrist and forearm positions; specifically, by only using 8 Force Sensitive Resisters (FSRs), the FMG band achieved accuracies of 91.2% and 83.5% in classifying the 48 hand gestures in cross-validation and cross-trial evaluations, which were higher than those of sEMG (84.6% and 79.1%). By using all 16 FSRs on the band, our device achieved high accuracies of 96.7% and 89.4% in cross-validation and cross-trial evaluations. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dental Implants - Perceiving Patients' Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khursheed Alam

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects. Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2% were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50 of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01 basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings.

  5. The practical use of surface electromyography during running: does the evidence support the hype? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbu, R; Weiler, R; Whyte, G

    2015-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is a commonly used technique to investigate muscle activation and fatigue, which is non-invasive and can allow for continuous measurement. Systematic research on the use of sEMG in the sporting environment has been on-going for many years and predominantly based on cycling and rowing activities. To date there have been no reviews assessing the validity and reliability in sEMG exclusively in running activities specifically during on-field testing. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the use of sEMG in the practical context and whether this be translated to on-field testing. Electronic literature searches were performed using the Cochrane Library, PUBMED, CINAHL and PeDro without restrictions on the study date to identify the relevant current English language literature. 10 studies were relevant after title and content review. All the studies identified were all level three evidence based. The general trends of the sEMG activity appear to correlate with running velocity and muscle fatigue seems almost always the consequence of prolonged, dynamic activity. However, these changes are not consistently measured or statistically significant throughout the studies raising the question of the accuracy and reliability when analysing sEMG measurements and making assumptions about the cause of fatigue. An agreed consensus when measuring and analysing sEMG data during running activities particularly in field testing with the most appropriate study design and reliable methodology is yet to be determined and further studies are required.

  6. The influence of digital filter type, amplitude normalisation method, and co-contraction algorithm on clinically relevant surface electromyography data during clinical movement assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaprakash, Daniel; Weir, Gillian J; Dunne, James J; Alderson, Jacqueline A; Donnelly, Cyril J

    2016-12-01

    There is a large and growing body of surface electromyography (sEMG) research using laboratory-specific signal processing procedures (i.e., digital filter type and amplitude normalisation protocols) and data analyses methods (i.e., co-contraction algorithms) to acquire practically meaningful information from these data. As a result, the ability to compare sEMG results between studies is, and continues to be challenging. The aim of this study was to determine if digital filter type, amplitude normalisation method, and co-contraction algorithm could influence the practical or clinical interpretation of processed sEMG data. Sixteen elite female athletes were recruited. During data collection, sEMG data was recorded from nine lower limb muscles while completing a series of calibration and clinical movement assessment trials (running and sidestepping). Three analyses were conducted: (1) signal processing with two different digital filter types (Butterworth or critically damped), (2) three amplitude normalisation methods, and (3) three co-contraction ratio algorithms. Results showed the choice of digital filter did not influence the clinical interpretation of sEMG; however, choice of amplitude normalisation method and co-contraction algorithm did influence the clinical interpretation of the running and sidestepping task. Care is recommended when choosing amplitude normalisation method and co-contraction algorithms if researchers/clinicians are interested in comparing sEMG data between studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of age on human-computer-interface control via neck electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Gabrielle L; Stepp, Cara E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on visuomotor tracking using submental and anterior neck surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess feasibility of computer control via neck musculature, which allows people with little remaining motor function to interact with computers. Thirty-two healthy adults participated: sixteen younger adults aged 18 - 29 years and sixteen older adults aged 69 - 85 years. Participants modulated sEMG to achieve targets presented at different amplitudes using real-time visual feedback. Root-mean-squared (RMS) error was used to quantify tracking performance. RMS error was increased for older adults relative to younger adults. Older adults demonstrated more RMS error than younger adults as a function of increasing target amplitude. The differential effects of age found on static tracking performance in anterior neck musculature suggest more difficult translation of human-computer-interfaces controlled using anterior neck musculature for static tasks to older populations.

  8. Evaluation of muscle fatigue of wheelchair basketball players with spinal cord injury using recurrence quantification analysis of surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, S; Pourmoghaddam, A; Hieronymus, M; Thrasher, T A

    2012-11-01

    Wheelchair basketball is the most popular exercise activity among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular endurance and fatigue in wheelchair basketball athletes with SCI using surface electromyography (SEMG) and maximal torque values. SEMG characteristics of 10 wheelchair basketball players (WBP) were compared to 13 able-bodied basketball players and 12 sedentary able-bodied subjects. Participants performed sustained isometric elbow flexion at 50% maximal voluntary contraction until exhaustion. Elbow flexion torque and SEMG signals were recorded from three elbow flexor muscles: biceps brachii longus, biceps brachii brevis and brachioradialis. SEMG signals were clustered into 0.5-s epochs with 50% overlap. Root mean square (RMS) and median frequency (MDF) of SEMG signals were calculated for each muscle and epoch as traditional fatigue monitoring. Recurrence quantification analysis was used to extract the percentage of determinism (%DET) of SEMG signals. The slope of the %DET for basketball players and WBP showed slower increase with time than the sedentary able-bodied control group for three different elbow flexor muscles, while no difference was observed for the slope of the %DET between basketball and WBP. This result indicated that the athletes are less fatigable during the task effort than the nonathletes. Normalized MDF slope decay exhibited similar results between the groups as %DET, while the slope of the normalized RMS failed to show any significant differences among the groups (p > 0.05). MDF and %DET could be useful for the evaluation of muscle fatigue in wheelchair basketball training. No conclusions about special training for WBP could be determined.

  9. Paralyzed subject controls telepresence mobile robot using novel sEMG brain-computer interface: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kenneth R; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2013-06-01

    Here we demonstrate the use of a new singlesignal surface electromyography (sEMG) brain-computer interface (BCI) to control a mobile robot in a remote location. Previous work on this BCI has shown that users are able to perform cursor-to-target tasks in two-dimensional space using only a single sEMG signal by continuously modulating the signal power in two frequency bands. Using the cursor-to-target paradigm, targets are shown on the screen of a tablet computer so that the user can select them, commanding the robot to move in different directions for a fixed distance/angle. A Wifi-enabled camera transmits video from the robot's perspective, giving the user feedback about robot motion. Current results show a case study with a C3-C4 spinal cord injury (SCI) subject using a single auricularis posterior muscle site to navigate a simple obstacle course. Performance metrics for operation of the BCI as well as completion of the telerobotic command task are developed. It is anticipated that this noninvasive and mobile system will open communication opportunities for the severely paralyzed, possibly using only a single sensor.

  10. Nerve Conduction Studies and Electromyography

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies and electromyography can aid in the diagnosis of peripheral nervous system disease. The author reviews various techniques used during electromyography and nerve conduction studies. He reviews briefly peripheral nerve and muscle neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. The author defines terms used in nerve conduction studies and electromyography and relates terminology to the underlying pathophysiology and histopathology. He also reviews briefly typical nerve conduction and ...

  11. Sex differences in variances of multi-channel surface electromyography distribution of the vastus lateralis muscle during isometric knee extension in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Kohei; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hosomi, Naohisa; Orita, Naoya; Mikami, Yukio; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare spatial electromyographic potential distribution during force production between healthy young female and male using multi-channel surface electromyography (multi-SEMG). Thirty healthy subjects (15 females) performed sustained isometric knee extension at 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) task for 120 s. Multi-SEMG signals from the vastus lateralis muscle were detected and the modified entropy, coefficient of variation (CV), and correlation coefficient determined. The modified entropy and CV showed significant interaction and difference between females and males at all time points during the 10% MVC task. The correlation coefficient in females was significantly lower at 90 and 120 s than that of males. The multi-SEMG potential distribution pattern in females showed more varied motor unit recruitment during sustained low-intensity isometric contraction than that of males. Variations in motor unit recruitment may result from recruitment and/or de-recruitment of motor units.

  12. Learning to modulate the partial powers of a single sEMG power spectrum through a novel human-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skavhaug, Ida-Maria; Lyons, Kenneth R; Nemchuk, Anna; Muroff, Shira D; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2016-06-01

    New human-computer interfaces that use bioelectrical signals as input are allowing study of the flexibility of the human neuromuscular system. We have developed a myoelectric human-computer interface which enables users to navigate a cursor to targets through manipulations of partial powers within a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. Users obtain two-dimensional control through simultaneous adjustments of powers in two frequency bands within the sEMG spectrum, creating power profiles corresponding to cursor positions. It is unlikely that these types of bioelectrical manipulations are required during routine muscle contractions. Here, we formally establish the neuromuscular ability to voluntarily modulate single-site sEMG power profiles in a group of naïve subjects under restricted and controlled conditions using a wrist muscle. All subjects used the same pre-selected frequency bands for control and underwent the same training, allowing a description of the average learning progress throughout eight sessions. We show that subjects steadily increased target hit rates from 48% to 71% and exhibited greater control of the cursor's trajectories following practice. Our results point towards an adaptable neuromuscular skill, which may allow humans to utilize single muscle sites as limited general-purpose signal generators. Ultimately, the goal is to translate this neuromuscular ability to practical interfaces for the disabled by using a spared muscle to control external machines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A MATLAB-based graphical user interface for the identification of muscular activations from surface electromyography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, Alessandro; Cardarelli, Stefano; Verdini, Federica; Burattini, Laura; Fioretti, Sandro; Di Nardo, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In this paper a graphical user interface (GUI) built in MATLAB® environment is presented. This interactive tool has been developed for the analysis of superficial electromyography (sEMG) signals and in particular for the assessment of the muscle activation time intervals. After the signal import, the tool performs a first analysis in a totally user independent way, providing a reliable computation of the muscular activation sequences. Furthermore, the user has the opportunity to modify each parameter of the on/off identification algorithm implemented in the presented tool. The presence of an user-friendly GUI allows the immediate evaluation of the effects that the modification of every single parameter has on the activation intervals recognition, through the real-time updating and visualization of the muscular activation/deactivation sequences. The possibility to accept the initial signal analysis or to modify the on/off identification with respect to each considered signal, with a real-time visual feedback, makes this GUI-based tool a valuable instrument in clinical, research applications and also in an educational perspective.

  14. The use of electromyography interference pattern analysis to determine muscle force of the deep digital flexor muscle in healthy and laminitic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeman, L C; van der Meij, B R; Back, W; van der Kolk, J H; Wijnberg, I D

    2016-01-01

    In equine laminitis, the deep digital flexor muscle (DDFM) appears to have increased muscle force, but evidence-based confirmation is lacking. The purpose of this study was to test if the DDFM of laminitic equines has an increased muscle force detectable by needle electromyography interference pattern analysis (IPA). The control group included six Royal Dutch Sport horses, three Shetland ponies and one Welsh pony [10 healthy, sound adults weighing 411 ± 217 kg (mean ± SD) and aged 10 ± 5 years]. The laminitic group included three Royal Dutch Sport horses, one Friesian, one Haflinger, one Icelandic horse, one Welsh pony, one miniature Appaloosa and six Shetland ponies (14 adults, weight 310 ± 178 kg, aged 13 ± 6 years) with acute/chronic laminitis. The electromyography IPA measurements included firing rate, turns/second (T), amplitude/turn (M) and M/T ratio. Statistical analysis used a general linear model with outcomes transformed to geometric means. The firing rate of the total laminitic group was higher than the total control group. This difference was smaller for the ponies compared to the horses; in the horses, the geometric mean difference of the laminitic group was 1.73 [geometric 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-2.32], and in the ponies this value was 1.09 (geometric 95% CI 0.82-1.45). In human medicine, an increased firing rate is characteristic of increased muscle force. Thus, the increased firing rate of the DDFM in the context of laminitis suggests an elevated muscle force. However, this seems to be only a partial effect as in this study, the unchanged turns/second and amplitude/turn failed to prove the recruitment of larger motor units with larger amplitude motor unit potentials in laminitic equids.

  15. Analysis of applied forces and electromyography of back and shoulders muscles when performing a simulated hand scaling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William; Gallagher, Sean; Torma-Krajewski, Janet

    2010-05-01

    Hand scaling is a physically demanding task responsible for numerous overexertion injuries in underground mining. Scaling requires the miner to use a long pry bar to remove loose rock, reducing the likelihood of rock fall injuries. The experiments described in this article simulated "rib" scaling (scaling a mine wall) from an elevated bucket to examine force generation and electromyographic responses using two types of scaling bars (steel and fiberglass-reinforced aluminum) at five target heights ranging from floor level to 176 cm. Ten male and six female subjects were tested in separate experiments. Peak and average force applied at the scaling bar tip and normalized electromyography (EMG) of the left and right pairs of the deltoid and erectores spinae muscles were obtained. Work height significantly affected peak prying force during scaling activities with highest force capacity at the lower levels. Bar type did not affect force generation. However, use of the lighter fiberglass bar required significantly more muscle activity to achieve the same force. Results of these studies suggest that miners scale points on the rock face that are below their knees, and reposition the bucket as often as necessary to do so. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Automated Detection of Tonic-Clonic Seizures Using 3-D Accelerometry and Surface Electromyography in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Milica; Van de Vel, Anouk; Bonroy, Bert; Ceulemans, Berten; Lagae, Lieven; Vanrumste, Bart; Huffel, Sabine Van

    2016-09-01

    Epileptic seizure detection is traditionally done using video/electroencephalography monitoring, which is not applicable for long-term home monitoring. In recent years, attempts have been made to detect the seizures using other modalities. In this study, we investigated the application of four accelerometers (ACM) attached to the limbs and surface electromyography (sEMG) electrodes attached to upper arms for the detection of tonic-clonic seizures. sEMG can identify the tension during the tonic phase of tonic-clonic seizure, while ACM is able to detect rhythmic patterns of the clonic phase of tonic-clonic seizures. Machine learning techniques, including feature selection and least-squares support vector machine classification, were employed for detection of tonic-clonic seizures from ACM and sEMG signals. In addition, the outputs of ACM and sEMG-based classifiers were combined using a late integration approach. The algorithms were evaluated on 1998.3 h of data recorded nocturnally in 56 patients of which seven had 22 tonic-clonic seizures. A multimodal approach resulted in a more robust detection of short and nonstereotypical seizures (91%), while the number of false alarms increased significantly compared with the use of single sEMG modality (0.28-0.5/12h). This study also showed that the choice of the recording system should be made depending on the prevailing pediatric patient-specific seizure characteristics and nonepileptic behavior.

  17. Comparison between sEMG and force as control interfaces to support planar arm movements in adults with Duchenne: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-Prat, Joan; Nizamis, Kostas; Janssen, Mariska M H P; Keemink, Arvid Q L; Veltink, Peter H; Koopman, Bart F J M; Stienen, Arno H A

    2017-07-12

    Adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can benefit from devices that actively support their arm function. A critical component of such devices is the control interface as it is responsible for the human-machine interaction. Our previous work indicated that surface electromyography (sEMG) and force-based control with active gravity and joint-stiffness compensation were feasible solutions for the support of elbow movements (one degree of freedom). In this paper, we extend the evaluation of sEMG- and force-based control interfaces to simultaneous and proportional control of planar arm movements (two degrees of freedom). Three men with DMD (18-23 years-old) with different levels of arm function (i.e. Brooke scores of 4, 5 and 6) performed a series of line-tracing tasks over a tabletop surface using an experimental active arm support. The arm movements were controlled using three control methods: sEMG-based control, force-based control with stiffness compensation (FSC), and force-based control with no compensation (FNC). The movement performance was evaluated in terms of percentage of task completion, tracing error, smoothness and speed. For subject S1 (Brooke 4) FNC was the preferred method and performed better than FSC and sEMG. FNC was not usable for subject S2 (Brooke 5) and S3 (Brooke 6). Subject S2 presented significantly lower movement speed with sEMG than with FSC, yet he preferred sEMG since FSC was perceived to be too fatiguing. Subject S3 could not successfully use neither of the two force-based control methods, while with sEMG he could reach almost his entire workspace. Movement performance and subjective preference of the three control methods differed with the level of arm function of the participants. Our results indicate that all three control methods have to be considered in real applications, as they present complementary advantages and disadvantages. The fact that the two weaker subjects (S2 and S3) experienced the force-based control

  18. Support vectors machine classification of surface electromyography for non-invasive naturally controlled hand prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    The scientific researches in human rehabilitation techniques have continually evolved to offer again the mobility and freedom lost to disability. Many systems managed by myoelectric signals intended to mimic the movement of the human arm still have results considered partial, which makes it subject of many researches. The use of Natural Interfaces Signal Processing methods makes possible to design systems capable of offering prosthesis in a more natural and intuitive way. This paper presents a study investigating the use of forearm surface electromyography (sEMG) signals for classification of specific movements of hand using 12 sEMG channels and support vector machine (SVM). The system acquired the sEMG signal using a virtual model as a visual stimulus in order to demonstrate to the volunteer the hand movements which must be replicated by them. The Root Mean Square (RMS) value feature is extracted of the signal and it serves as input data for the classification with SVM. The classification stage used three types of kernel functions (linear, polynomial, radial basis) for comparison of the results. The average accuracy reached for the classification of seventeen distinct movements of 83.7% was achieved using the SVM linear classifier, 80.8% was achieved using the SVM polynomial classifier and 85.1% was achieved using the SVM radial basis classifier.

  19. Non-invasive 3D facial analysis and surface electromyography during functional pre-orthodontic therapy: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca M. Tartaglia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Functional orthodontic devices can modify oral function thus permitting more adequate growth processes. The assessment of their effects should include both facial morphology and muscle function. This preliminary study investigated whether a preformed functional orthodontic device could induce variations in facial morphology and function along with correction of oral dysfunction in a group of orthodontic patients in the mixed and early permanent dentitions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 facial landmarks (forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, jaw and ears were collected in 10 orthodontic male patients aged 8-13 years, and in 89 healthy reference boys of the same age. Soft tissue facial angles, distances, and ratios were computed. Surface electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscles was performed, and standardized symmetry, muscular torque and activity were calculated. Soft-tissue facial modifications were analyzed non-invasively before and after a 6-month treatment with a functional device. Comparisons were made with z-scores and paired Student's t-tests. RESULTS: The 6-month treatment stimulated mandibular growth in the anterior and inferior directions, with significant variations in three-dimensional facial divergence and facial convexity. The modifications were larger in the patients than in reference children. In several occasions, the discrepancies relative to the norm became not significant after treatment. No significant variations in standardized muscular activity were found. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary results showed that the continuous and correct use of the functional device induced measurable intraoral (dental arches and extraoral (face morphological modifications. The device did not modify the functional equilibrium of the masticatory muscles.

  20. NON-INVASIVE 3D FACIAL ANALYSIS AND SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY DURING FUNCTIONAL PRE-ORTHODONTIC THERAPY: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Grandi, Gaia; Mian, Fabrizio; Sforza, Chiarella; Ferrario, Virgilio F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Functional orthodontic devices can modify oral function thus permitting more adequate growth processes. The assessment of their effects should include both facial morphology and muscle function. This preliminary study investigated whether a preformed functional orthodontic device could induce variations in facial morphology and function along with correction of oral dysfunction in a group of orthodontic patients in the mixed and early permanent dentitions. Material and Methods: The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 facial landmarks (forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, jaw and ears) were collected in 10 orthodontic male patients aged 8-13 years, and in 89 healthy reference boys of the same age. Soft tissue facial angles, distances, and ratios were computed. Surface electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscles was performed, and standardized symmetry, muscular torque and activity were calculated. Soft-tissue facial modifications were analyzed non-invasively before and after a 6-month treatment with a functional device. Comparisons were made with z-scores and paired Student's t-tests. Results: The 6-month treatment stimulated mandibular growth in the anterior and inferior directions, with significant variations in three-dimensional facial divergence and facial convexity. The modifications were larger in the patients than in reference children. In several occasions, the discrepancies relative to the norm became not significant after treatment. No significant variations in standardized muscular activity were found. Conclusions: Preliminary results showed that the continuous and correct use of the functional device induced measurable intraoral (dental arches) and extraoral (face) morphological modifications. The device did not modify the functional equilibrium of the masticatory muscles. PMID:19936531

  1. The correlation between surface electromyography and bite force of mastication muscles in Asian young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-I; Mao, Shih-Hsuan; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chien-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Yih

    2015-05-01

    Mastication function is related to mandible movement, muscle strength, and bite force. No standard device for measuring bite force has been developed. A linear relationship between electromyographic activity and bite force has been reported by several investigators, but data on the reliability of this relationship remain limited in Asian young adults. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically applicable, reliable, quantitative, and noninvasive system to measure the kinetic mastication function and observe the correlation between surface electromyography (sEMG) and bite force. The study group consisted of 41 young healthy adults (24 men and 17 women). Surface electromyography was used to evaluate bilateral temporalis and masseter muscle activities, and an occlusal bite force system was used concurrently to measure the bite force during maximal voluntary biting. Bilateral symmetry was compared, and the correlation between EMG and bite force was calculated. The sEMG signals were 107.7±55.0 μV and 106.0±56.0 μV (P=0.699) on right and left temporalis muscles and 183.7±86.2 μV and 194.8±94.3 μV (P=0.121) on right and left masseter muscles, respectively. The bite force was 5.0±3.2 kg on the right side and 5.7±4.0 kg on the left side (P=0.974). A positive correlation between sEMG and bite force was observed. The correlation coefficient between the temporalis muscle and bite force was 0.512, and that between the masseter muscle and bite force was 0.360. No significant difference between the bilateral electromyographic activities of the temporalis and masseter muscles and bilateral bite force was observed in young healthy adults in Taiwan. A positive correlation between sEMG signals and bite force was noted. By combining sEMG and bite force, we developed a clinically applicable, quantitative, reliable, and noninvasive system for evaluating mastication function by using characteristics of biofeedback.

  2. [CHARACTERISTICS OF SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY AND ACID-BASE BALANCE IN PATIENTS WITH INTENSIVE CARE UNIT-ACQUIRED WEAKNESS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejgal, A Yu; Tret'jakova, O G; Spasova, A P

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to search for correlation between parameters of surface electromyography and acid-base balance (ABB) in patients with intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW, n = 29, duration 7-180 days). The linear and nonlinear parameters of sEMG (mean frequency of spectrum, fractal and correlation dimension, correlation entropy) and ABB and their correlation coefficient with bed rest (BR) and duration of mechanical ventilation (MT) were computed. Here we report that in first 40 days sEMG parameters were indicative of the neurogenic process in the skeletal muscle, while within 41-100 days signs of the myogenic pathology were documented. The ABB parameters statistically signIficantly correlated with BR and MV duration. ICUAW exerts effect on the skeletal muscle. Within first 40 days this effect is actuated in a form of neuropathy, while further it has signs of myopathy. We argue that MV duration appear to be a pathogenic factor in these modifications.

  3. Evaluation of normal swallowing functions by using dynamic high-density surface electromyography maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingxing; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wanzhang; Jiang, Yanbing; Lu, Lin; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Shixiong; Li, Guanglin

    2017-11-21

    Swallowing is a continuous process with substantive interdependencies among different muscles, and it plays a significant role in our daily life. The aim of this study was to propose a novel technique based on high-density surface electromyography (HD sEMG) for the evaluation of normal swallowing functions. A total of 96 electrodes were placed on the front neck to acquire myoelectric signals from 12 healthy subjects while they were performing different swallowing tasks. HD sEMG energy maps were constructed based on the root mean square values to visualize muscular activities during swallowing. The effects of different volumes, viscosities, and head postures on the normal swallowing process were systemically investigated by using the energy maps. The results showed that the HD sEMG energy maps could provide detailed spatial and temporal properties of the muscle electrical activity, and visualize the muscle contractions that closely related to the swallowing function. The energy maps also showed that the swallowing time and effort was also explicitly affected by the volume and viscosity of the bolus. The concentration of the muscular activities shifted to the opposite side when the subjects turned their head to either side. The proposed method could provide an alternative method to physiologically evaluate the dynamic characteristics of normal swallowing and had the advantage of providing a full picture of how different muscle activities cooperate in time and location. The findings from this study suggested that the HD sEMG technique might be a useful tool for fast screening and objective assessment of swallowing disorders or dysphagia.

  4. Surface electromyography physiology, engineering and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    The book presents a quantitative approach to the study and use of noninvasively detected electromyographic (EMG) signals, as well as their numerous applications in various aspects of the life sciences. Surface Electromyography: Physiology, Engineering, and Applications is an update of Electromyography: Physiology, Engineering, and Noninvasive Applications (Wiley-IEEE Press, 2004) and focuses on the developments that have taken place over the last decade. The first nine chapters deal with the generation, detection, understanding, interpretation, and modeling of EMG signals. Detection technology, with particular focus on EMG imaging techniques that are based on two-dimensional electrode arrays are also included in the first half of the book. The latter 11 chapters deal with applications, which range fro monitoring muscle fatigue, electrically elicited contractions, posture analysis, prevention of work-related and child-delivery-related neuromuscular disorders, ergonomics, movement analysis, physical therapy, ex...

  5. Simplifying the diagnosis of 4 common voiding conditions using uroflow/electromyography, electromyography lag time and voiding history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Batavia, Jason P; Combs, Andrew J; Hyun, Grace; Bayer, Agnes; Medina-Kreppein, Daisy; Schlussel, Richard N; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2011-10-01

    Noninvasive uroflowmetry with simultaneous electromyography is useful to triage cases of lower urinary tract symptoms into 4 urodynamically defined conditions, especially when incorporating short and long electromyography lag times in the analysis. We determined the prevalence of these 4 conditions at a single referral institution and the usefulness of uroflowmetry with simultaneous electromyography and electromyography lag time to confirm the diagnosis, guide treatment and monitor response. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 100 consecutive normal children who presented with persistent lower urinary tract symptoms, underwent uroflowmetry with electromyography as part of the initial evaluation and were diagnosed with 1 of 4 conditions based on certain uroflowmetry/electromyography features. The conditions included 1) dysfunctional voiding--active pelvic floor electromyography during voiding with or without staccato flow, 2a) idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder-A--a quiet pelvic floor during voiding and shortened lag time (less than 2 seconds), 2b) idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder-B--a quiet pelvic floor with a normal lag time, 3) detrusor underutilization disorder--volitionally deferred voiding with expanded bladder capacity but a quiet pelvic floor, and 4) primary bladder neck dysfunction--prolonged lag time (greater than 6 seconds) and a depressed, right shifted uroflowmetry curve with a quiet pelvic floor during voiding. Treatment was tailored to the underlying condition in each patient. The group consisted of 50 males and 50 females with a mean age of 8 years (range 3 to 18). Dysfunctional voiding was more common in females (p Electromyography lag time increased in idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder-A cases and decreased in primary bladder neck dysfunction cases. Noninvasive uroflowmetry with simultaneous electromyography offers an excellent alternative to invasive urodynamics to diagnose 4 urodynamically defined conditions. It

  6. Electromyography-based seizure detector: Preliminary results comparing a generalized tonic-clonic seizure detection algorithm to video-EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Charles Ákos; Morgan, Lola C; Karkar, Kameel M; Leary, Linda D; Lie, Octavian V; Girouard, Michael; Cavazos, José E

    2015-09-01

    Automatic detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) will facilitate patient monitoring and early intervention to prevent comorbidities, recurrent seizures, or death. Brain Sentinel (San Antonio, Texas, USA) developed a seizure-detection algorithm evaluating surface electromyography (sEMG) signals during GTCS. This study aims to validate the seizure-detection algorithm using inpatient video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring. sEMG was recorded unilaterally from the biceps/triceps muscles in 33 patients (17white/16 male) with a mean age of 40 (range 14-64) years who were admitted for video-EEG monitoring. Maximum voluntary biceps contraction was measured in each patient to set up the baseline physiologic muscle threshold. The raw EMG signal was recorded using conventional amplifiers, sampling at 1,024 Hz and filtered with a 60 Hz noise detection algorithm before it was processed with three band-pass filters at pass frequencies of 3-40, 130-240, and 300-400 Hz. A seizure-detection algorithm utilizing Hotelling's T-squared power analysis of compound muscle action potentials was used to identify GTCS and correlated with video-EEG recordings. In 1,399 h of continuous recording, there were 196 epileptic seizures (21 GTCS, 96 myoclonic, 28 tonic, 12 absence, and 42 focal seizures with or without loss of awareness) and 4 nonepileptic spells. During retrospective, offline evaluation of sEMG from the biceps alone, the algorithm detected 20 GTCS (95%) in 11 patients, averaging within 20 s of electroclinical onset of generalized tonic activity, as identified by video-EEG monitoring. Only one false-positive detection occurred during the postictal period following a GTCS, but false alarms were not triggered by other seizure types or spells. Brain Sentinel's seizure detection algorithm demonstrated excellent sensitivity and specificity for identifying GTCS recorded in an epilepsy monitoring unit. Further studies are needed in larger patient groups, including

  7. Surface Electromyography Signal Processing and Classification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rubana H.; Reaz, Mamun B. I.; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Bin Mohd; Bakar, Ashrif A. A.; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Chang, Tae. G.

    2013-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals are becoming increasingly important in many applications, including clinical/biomedical, prosthesis or rehabilitation devices, human machine interactions, and more. However, noisy EMG signals are the major hurdles to be overcome in order to achieve improved performance in the above applications. Detection, processing and classification analysis in electromyography (EMG) is very desirable because it allows a more standardized and precise evaluation of the neurophysiological, rehabitational and assistive technological findings. This paper reviews two prominent areas; first: the pre-processing method for eliminating possible artifacts via appropriate preparation at the time of recording EMG signals, and second: a brief explanation of the different methods for processing and classifying EMG signals. This study then compares the numerous methods of analyzing EMG signals, in terms of their performance. The crux of this paper is to review the most recent developments and research studies related to the issues mentioned above. PMID:24048337

  8. Relationship between lower limb position and pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography activity in menopausal women: a prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Dymarek, Robert; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In physiotherapeutic practice, special attention is being given to the reciprocal anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical relationship of the pelvis and the structures connected to it. However, the scientific literature shows mainly the theoretical information about their mutual connections. The lack of information about these relations from a practical aspect coupled with the paucity of scientific papers on the impact of posture changes on the pelvic floor led the authors to conduct this study. The primary aim of this study was to compare the resting and functional bioelectrical activities of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) depending on three different positions of the lower limbs (positions A, B, and C) in the supine position. Materials and methods This was a prospective observational study evaluating resting and functional activities of the PFM depending on the position of the lower limbs. The study was carried out at the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland and the target group were women in the menopausal period. Bioelectrical activity of PFM was recorded using a surface electromyographic instrument in the supine position. Results of the values obtained in A, B, and C positions were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. Results In position A, the average resting surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of PFM was 6.9±2.6 µV; in position B, the result was 6.9±2.5 µV and in position C, the resting sEMG activity was 5.7±1.8 µV (P=0.0102). The results of the functional bioelectrical activity of PFM were as follows: position A – 20.3±11.8 µV, position B – 19.9±10.6 µV, and position C – 25.3±10.9 µV (P=0.0104). Conclusion The results showed that in the supine position, the PFM achieved the lowest resting activity and the highest functional activity. Therefore, the supine position can be recommended for the diagnosis and therapy of weakened PFM. PMID:28115836

  9. A multichannel sEMG method for myoelectric control of a forearm prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baal, D.W.; van Baal, D.W.; Muijzer-Witteveen, Heintje Johanna Berendina; Kallenberg, L.A.C.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Veltink, P.H.; Eberle, W.

    2009-01-01

    A large number of amputee patients doesn't use their myoelectric prosthesis, mainly due to the limited functionality of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to investigate if it is possible to distinguish 8 different contractions by using multi-electrode sEMG. We analysed sEMG signals of a grid

  10. Power spectral analysis of surface electromyography (EMG) at matched contraction levels of the first dorsal interosseous muscle in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Shin, Henry; Zhou, Ping; Niu, Xun; Liu, Jie; Rymer, William Zev

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to help assess complex neural and muscular changes induced by stroke using power spectral analysis of surface electromyogram (EMG) signals. Fourteen stroke subjects participated in the study. They were instructed to perform isometric voluntary contractions by abducting the index finger. Surface EMG signals were collected from the paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles with forces ranging from 30% to 70% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the paretic muscle. Power spectral analysis was performed to characterize features of the surface EMG in paretic and contralateral muscles at matched forces. A Linear Mixed Model was applied to identify the spectral changes in the hemiparetic muscle and to examine the relation between spectral parameters and contraction levels. Regression analysis was performed to examine the correlations between spectral characteristics and clinical features. Differences in power spectrum distribution patterns were observed in paretic muscles when compared with their contralateral pairs. Nine subjects showed increased mean power frequency (MPF) in the contralateral side (>15 Hz). No evident spectrum difference was observed in 3 subjects. Only 2 subjects had higher MPF in the paretic muscle than the contralateral muscle. Pooling all subjects' data, there was a significant reduction of MPF in the paretic muscle compared with the contralateral muscle (paretic: 168.7 ± 7.6 Hz, contralateral: 186.1 ± 8.7 Hz, mean ± standard error, F=36.56, pEMG power spectrum did not confirm a significant correlation between the MPF and contraction force in either hand (F=0.7, p>0.5). There was no correlation between spectrum difference and Fugl-Meyer or Chedoke scores, or ratio of paretic and contralateral MVC (p>0.2). There appears to be complex muscular and neural processes at work post stroke that may impact the surface EMG power spectrum. The majority of the tested stroke subjects had lower MPF in

  11. Design, Development and Testing of a Low-Cost sEMG System and Its Use in Recording Muscle Activity in Human Gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Grujic Supuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface electromyography (sEMG is an important measurement technique used in biomechanical, rehabilitation and sport environments. In this article the design, development and testing of a low-cost wearable sEMG system are described. The hardware architecture consists of a two-cascade small-sized bioamplifier with a total gain of 2,000 and band-pass of 3 to 500 Hz. The sampling frequency of the system is 1,000 Hz. Since real measured EMG signals are usually corrupted by various types of noises (motion artifacts, white noise and electromagnetic noise present at 50 Hz and higher harmonics, we have tested several denoising techniques, both on artificial and measured EMG signals. Results showed that a wavelet—based technique implementing Daubechies5 wavelet and soft sqtwolog thresholding is the most appropriate for EMG signals denoising. To test the system performance, EMG activities of six dominant muscles of ten healthy subjects during gait were measured (gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, sartorius, rectus femoris, tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius. The obtained EMG envelopes presented against the duration of gait cycle were compared favourably with the EMG data available in the literature, suggesting that the proposed system is suitable for a wide range of applications in biomechanics.

  12. Design, Development and Testing of a Low-Cost sEMG System and Its Use in Recording Muscle Activity in Human Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuk, Tamara Grujic; Skelin, Ana Kuzmanic; Cic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is an important measurement technique used in biomechanical, rehabilitation and sport environments. In this article the design, development and testing of a low-cost wearable sEMG system are described. The hardware architecture consists of a two-cascade small-sized bioamplifier with a total gain of 2,000 and band-pass of 3 to 500 Hz. The sampling frequency of the system is 1,000 Hz. Since real measured EMG signals are usually corrupted by various types of noises (motion artifacts, white noise and electromagnetic noise present at 50 Hz and higher harmonics), we have tested several denoising techniques, both on artificial and measured EMG signals. Results showed that a wavelet—based technique implementing Daubechies5 wavelet and soft sqtwolog thresholding is the most appropriate for EMG signals denoising. To test the system performance, EMG activities of six dominant muscles of ten healthy subjects during gait were measured (gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, sartorius, rectus femoris, tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius). The obtained EMG envelopes presented against the duration of gait cycle were compared favourably with the EMG data available in the literature, suggesting that the proposed system is suitable for a wide range of applications in biomechanics. PMID:24811078

  13. A more precise, repeatable and diagnostic alternative to surface electromyography - an appraisal of the clinical utility of acoustic myography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Adrian P

    2017-03-02

    Acoustic myography (AMG) enables a detailed and accurate measurement of those muscles involved in a particular movement and is independent of electrical signals between the nerve and muscle, measuring solely muscle contractions, unlike surface electromyography (sEMG). With modern amplifiers and digital sound recording systems, measurements during physical activity both inside and outside a laboratory setting are now possible and accurate. Muscle sound gives a representation of the work of each muscle group during a complex movement, and under certain forms of movement even reveals both concentric and eccentric activity, something that sEMG is incapable of. Recent findings suggest that AMG has a number of advantages over sEMG, being simple to use, accurate and repeatable as well as being intuitive to interpret. The AMG signal comprises three physiological parameters, namely efficiency/coordination (E-score), spatial summation (S-score) and temporal summation (T-score). It is concluded that modern AMG units have the potential to accurately assess patients with neuromuscular and musculoskeletal complaints in hospital clinics, home monitoring situations as well as sports settings. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2 values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times.

  15. Experiences in the creation of an electromyography database to help hand amputated persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Heynen, Simone; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Castellimi, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Müller, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Currently, trans-radial amputees can only perform a few simple movements with prosthetic hands. This is mainly due to low control capabilities and the long training time that is required to learn controlling them with surface electromyography (sEMG). This is in contrast with recent advances in mechatronics, thanks to which mechanical hands have multiple degrees of freedom and in some cases force control. To help improve the situation, we are building the NinaPro (Non-Invasive Adaptive Prosthetics) database, a database of about 50 hand and wrist movements recorded from several healthy and currently very few amputated persons that will help the community to test and improve sEMG-based natural control systems for prosthetic hands. In this paper we describe the experimental experiences and practical aspects related to the data acquisition.

  16. Combining Electromyography and Tactile Myography to Improve Hand and Wrist Activity Detection in Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noémie Jaquier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in prosthetics and assistive robotics in general, robust simultaneous and proportional control of dexterous prosthetic devices remains an unsolved problem, mainly because of inadequate sensorization. In this paper, we study the application of regression to muscle activity, detected using a flexible tactile sensor recording muscle bulging in the forearm (tactile myography—TMG. The sensor is made of 320 highly sensitive cells organized in an array forming a bracelet. We propose the use of Gaussian process regression to improve the prediction of wrist, hand and single-finger activation, using TMG, surface electromyography (sEMG; the traditional approach in the field, and a combination of the two. We prove the effectiveness of the approach for different levels of activations in a real-time goal-reaching experiment using tactile data. Furthermore, we performed a batch comparison between the different forms of sensorization, using a Gaussian process with different kernel distances.

  17. Reliability of surface electromyography timing parameters in gait in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malone, Ailish

    2012-02-01

    The aims of this study were to validate a computerised method to detect muscle activity from surface electromyography (SEMG) signals in gait in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), and to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the activation times designated by this method. SEMG signals were recorded from rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG), during gait in 12 participants with CSM on two separate test days. Four computerised activity detection methods, based on the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator (TKEO), were applied to a subset of signals and compared to visual interpretation of muscle activation. The most accurate method was then applied to all signals for evaluation of test-retest reliability. A detection method based on a combined slope and amplitude threshold showed the highest agreement (87.5%) with visual interpretation. With respect to reliability, the standard error of measurement (SEM) of the timing of RF, TA and MG between test days was 5.5% stride duration or less, while the SEM of BF was 9.4%. The timing parameters of RF, TA and MG designated by this method were considered sufficiently reliable for use in clinical practice, however the reliability of BF was questionable.

  18. Critical appraisal and hazards of surface electromyography data acquisition in sport and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieter Clarys, Jan; Scafoglieri, Aldo; Tresignie, Jonathan; Reilly, Thomas; Van Roy, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this critical appraisal and hazards of surface electromyography (SEMG) is to enhance the data acquisition quality in voluntary but complex movements, sport and exercise in particular. The methodological and technical registration strategies deal with telemetry and online data acquisition, the placement of the detection electrodes and the choice of the most adequate normalization mode.Findings compared with the literature suggest detection quality differences between registration methods and between water and air data acquisition allowing for output differences up to 30% between registration methods and up to 25% decrease in water, considering identical measures in air and in water. Various hazards deal with erroneous choices of muscles or electrode placement and the continuous confusion created by static normalization for dynamic motion. Peak dynamic intensities ranged from 111% (in archery) to 283% (in giant slalom) of a static 100% reference. In addition, the linear relationship between integrated EMG (IEMG) as a reference for muscle intensity and muscle force is not likely to exist in dynamic conditions since it is muscle - joint angle - and fatigue dependent. Contrary to expectations, the literature shows 30% of non linear relations in isometric conditions also.SEMG in sport and exercise is highly variable and different from clinical (e.g. neurological) EMG. Choices of electrodes, registration methods, muscles, joint angles and normalization techniques may lead to confusing and erroneous or incomparable results.

  19. Can surface electromyography improve surgery planning? Electromyographic assessment and intraoperative verification of the nerve bundle entry point location of the gracilis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniszyn, Michal; Walega, Piotr; Nowakowski, Michal; Nowak, Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    To verify the precision of surface electromyography (sEMG) in locating the innervation zone of the gracilis muscle, by comparing the location of the IZ estimated by means of sEMG with in vivo location of the nerve bundle entry point in patients before graciloplasty procedure due to fecal incontinence. Nine patients who qualified for the graciloplasty procedure underwent sEMG on both gracilis muscle before their operations. During surgery the nerve bundle was identified by means of electrical stimulation. The distance between the proximal attachment and the nerve entry point into the muscle's body was measured. Both measurements (sEMG and in vivo identification) were compared for each subject. On average, the IZ was located 65.5mm from the proximal attachment. The mean difference in location of the innervation zones in each individual was 10±9.7mm, maximal - 30mm, the difference being statistically significant (p=0.017). It was intraoperatively confirmed, that the nerve entered the muscle an average of 62mm from the proximal attachment. The largest difference between the EMG IZ estimation and nerve bundle entry point was 5mm (mean difference 2.8mm, p=0.767). Preoperative surface electromyography of both gracilis muscles is a safe, precise and reliable method of assessing the location of the innervation zones of the gracilis muscles. The asymmetry of the IZ location in left and right muscles may be important in context of technical aspects of the graciloplasty procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interpreting sign components from accelerometer and sEMG data for automatic sign language recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Kongqiao; Yang, Jihai

    2011-01-01

    The identification of constituent components of each sign gesture is a practical way of establishing large-vocabulary sign language recognition (SLR) system. Aiming at developing such a system using portable accelerometer (ACC) and surface electromyographic (sEMG) sensors, this work proposes a method for automatic SLR at the component level. The preliminary experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and the feasibility of interpreting sign components from ACC and sEMG data. Our study improves the performance of SLR based on ACC and sEMG sensors and will promote the realization of a large-vocabulary portable SLR system.

  1. Real-time controller for foot-drop correction by using surface electromyography sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mashhadany, Yousif I; Abd Rahim, Nasrudin

    2013-04-01

    Foot drop is a disease caused mainly by muscle paralysis, which incapacitates the nerves generating the impulses that control feet in a heel strike. The incapacity may stem from lesions that affect the brain, the spinal cord, or peripheral nerves. The foot becomes dorsiflexed, affecting normal walking. A design and analysis of a controller for such legs is the subject of this article. Surface electromyography electrodes are connected to the skin surface of the human muscle and work on the mechanics of human muscle contraction. The design uses real surface electromyography signals for estimation of the joint angles. Various-speed flexions and extensions of the leg were analyzed. The two phases of the design began with surface electromyography of real human leg electromyography signal, which was subsequently filtered, amplified, and normalized to the maximum amplitude. Parameters extracted from the surface electromyography signal were then used to train an artificial neural network for prediction of the joint angle. The artificial neural network design included various-speed identification of the electromyography signal and estimation of the angles of the knee and ankle joints by a recognition process that depended on the parameters of the real surface electromyography signal measured through real movements. The second phase used artificial neural network estimation of the control signal, for calculation of the electromyography signal to be stimulated for the leg muscle to move the ankle joint. Satisfactory simulation (MATLAB/Simulink version 2012a) and implementation results verified the design feasibility.

  2. Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that controls shoulder movement and sensation) Becker muscular dystrophy (muscle weakness of the legs and pelvis) Brachial plexopathy ( ... the median nerve in the arm) Duchenne muscular dystrophy (inherited disease that involves muscle ... muscular dystrophy (Landouzy-Dejerine; disease of ...

  3. Mechanomyography versus Electromyography, in monitoring the muscular fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarata Mihai T

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of the mechanomyogram (MMG which detects muscular vibrations generated by fused individual fiber twitches has been refined. The study addresses a comparison of the MMG and surface electromyogram (SEMG in monitoring muscle fatigue. Methods The SEMG and MMG were recorded simultaneously from the same territory of motor units in two muscles (Biceps, Brachioradialis of the human (n = 18, during sustained contraction at 25 % MVC (maximal voluntary contraction. Results The RMS (root mean square of the SEMG and MMG increased with advancing fatigue; MF (median frequency of the PSD (power density spectra progressively decreased from the onset of the contraction. These findings (both muscles, all subjects, demonstrate both through the SEMG and MMG a central component of the fatigue. The MF regression slopes of MMG were closer to each other between men and women (Biceps 1.55%; Brachialis 13.2% than were the SEMG MF slopes (Biceps 25.32%; Brachialis 17.72%, which shows a smaller inter-sex variability for the MMG vs. SEMG. Conclusion The study presents another quantitative comparison (MF, RMS of MMG and SEMG, showing that MMG signal can be used for indication of the degree of muscle activation and for monitoring the muscle fatigue when the application of SEMG is not feasible (chronical implants, adverse environments contaminated by electrical noise.

  4. Evaluating the Training Effects of Two Swallowing Rehabilitation Therapies Using Surface Electromyography--Chin Tuck Against Resistance (CTAR) Exercise and the Shaker Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Wei Ping; Yoon, Wai Lam; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rickard Liow, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of two dysphagia interventions, the Chin Tuck against Resistance (CTAR) and Shaker exercises, were evaluated based on two principles in exercise science-muscle-specificity and training intensity. Both exercises were developed to strengthen the suprahyoid muscles, whose contractions facilitate the opening of the upper esophageal sphincter, thereby improving bolus transfer. Thirty-nine healthy adults performed two trials of both exercises in counter-balanced order. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings were simultaneously collected from suprahyoid muscle group and sternocleidomastoid muscle during the exercises. Converging results using sEMG amplitude analyses suggested that the CTAR was more specific in targeting the suprahyoid muscles than the Shaker exercise. Fatigue analyses on sEMG signals further indicated that the suprahyoid muscle group were equally or significantly fatigued (depending on metric), when participants carried out CTAR compared to the Shaker exercise. Importantly, unlike during Shaker exercise, the sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly less activated and fatigued during CTAR. Lowering the chin against resistance is therefore sufficiently specific and intense to fatigue the suprahyoid muscles.

  5. Using gastrocnemius sEMG and plasma α-synuclein for the prediction of freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Freezing of gait (FOG is a complicated gait disturbance in Parkinson's disease (PD and a relevant subclinical predictor algorithm is lacking. The main purpose of this study is to explore the potential value of surface electromyograph (sEMG and plasma α-synuclein levels as predictors of the FOG seen in PD. 21 PD patients and 15 normal controls were recruited. Motor function was evaluated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS and Freezing of gait questionnaire (FOG-Q. Simultaneously, gait analysis was also performed using VICON capture system in PD patients and sEMG data was recorded as well. Total plasma α-synuclein was quantitatively assessed by Luminex assay in all participants. Recruited PD patients were classified into two groups: PD patients with FOG (PD+FOG and without FOG (PD-FOG, based on clinical manifestation, the results of the FOG-Q and VICON capture system. PD+FOG patients displayed higher FOG-Q scores, decreased walking speed, smaller step length, smaller stride length and prolonged double support time compared to the PD-FOG in the gait trial. sEMG data indicated that gastrocnemius activity in PD+FOG patients was significantly reduced compared to PD-FOG patients. In addition, plasma α-synuclein levels were significantly decreased in the PD+FOG group compared to control group; however, no significant difference was found between the PD+FOG and PD-FOG groups. Our study revealed that gastrocnemius sEMG could be used to evaluate freezing gait in PD patients, while plasma α-synuclein might discriminate freezing of gait in PD patients from normal control, though no difference was found between the PD+FOG and PD-FOG groups.

  6. Application of advanced biomechanical methods in studying low back pain – recent development in estimation of lower back loads and large-array surface electromyography and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazrgari B

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Babak Bazrgari,1 Ting Xia2 1F. Joseph Halcomb III, M.D. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, Palmer College of Chiropractic, Davenport, IA, USA Abstract: Low back pain (LBP is a major public health problem and the leading disabling musculoskeletal disorder globally. A number of biomechanical methods using kinematic, kinetic and/or neuromuscular approaches have been used to study LBP. In this narrative review, we report recent developments in two biomechanical methods: estimation of lower back loads and large-array surface electromyography (LA-SEMG and the findings associated with LBP. The ability to estimate lower back loads is very important for the prevention and the management of work-related low back injuries based on the mechanical loading model as one category of LBP classification. The methods used for estimation of lower back loads vary from simple rigid link-segment models to sophisticated, optimization-based finite element models. In general, reviewed reports of differences in mechanical loads experienced in lower back tissues between patients with LBP and asymptomatic individuals are not consistent. Such lack of consistency is primarily due to differences in activities under which lower back mechanical loads were investigated as well as heterogeneity of patient populations. The ability to examine trunk neuromuscular behavior is particularly relevant to the motor control model, another category of LBP classification. LA-SEMG not only is noninvasive but also provides spatial resolution within and across muscle groups. Studies using LA-SEMG showed that healthy individuals exhibit highly organized, symmetric back muscle activity patterns, suggesting an orderly recruitment of muscle fibers. In contrast, back muscle activity patterns in LBP patients are asymmetric or multifocal, suggesting lack of orderly muscle recruitment. LA-SEMG was also shown capable of

  7. Laryngeal Electromyography Techniques and Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimaid, Paulo Andre Teixeira; Crespo, Agrício Nubiato; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Wolf, Aline Epiphanio; França-Jr, Marcondes Cavalcante

    2015-08-01

    Laryngeal electromyography is considered a valuable diagnostic tool for voice disorders. The technique, described almost 70 years ago, evolved 3 decades later, mainly because of the growing interest of laryngologists and speech pathologists. In the authors' opinion, the reduced number of neurophysiologists involved in laryngeal electromyography groups is, at some instance, related to the difficulty to start the learning process and the multidisciplinary approach the field requires. This review highlights the anatomy and physiology needed to perform laryngeal electromyography and its clinical usefulness in the new field known as neurolaryngology.

  8. Leg surface electromyography patterns in children with neuro-orthopedic disorders walking on a treadmill unassisted and assisted by a robot with and without encouragement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Robot-assisted gait training and treadmill training can complement conventional physical therapy in children with neuro-orthopedic movement disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate surface electromyography (sEMG) activity patterns during robot-assisted gait training (with and without motivating instructions from a therapist) and unassisted treadmill walking and to compare these with physiological sEMG patterns. Methods Nine children with motor impairments and eight healthy children walked in various conditions: (a) on a treadmill in the driven gait orthosis Lokomat®, (b) same condition, with additional motivational instructions from a therapist, and (c) on the treadmill without assistance. sEMG recordings were made of the tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius lateralis, vastus medialis, and biceps femoris muscles. Differences in sEMG amplitudes between the three conditions were analyzed for the duration of stance and swing phase (for each group and muscle separately) using non-parametric tests. Spearman’s correlation coefficients illustrated similarity of muscle activation patterns between conditions, between groups, and with published reference trajectories. Results The relative duration of stance and swing phase differed between patients and controls, and between driven gait orthosis conditions and treadmill walking. While sEMG amplitudes were higher when being encouraged by a therapist compared to robot-assisted gait training without instructions (0.008 ≤ p-value ≤ 0.015), muscle activation patterns were highly comparable (0.648 ≤ Spearman correlation coefficients ≤ 0.969). In general, comparisons of the sEMG patterns with published reference data of over-ground walking revealed that walking in the driven gait orthosis could induce more physiological muscle activation patterns compared to unsupported treadmill walking. Conclusions Our results suggest that robotic-assisted gait training with therapeutic encouragement

  9. Objective analysis of surgeons' ergonomy during laparoendoscopic single-site surgery through the use of surface electromyography and a motion capture data glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Duarte, F J; Lucas-Hernández, M; Matos-Azevedo, A; Sánchez-Margallo, J A; Díaz-Güemes, I; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2014-04-01

    Adding to the ergonomic inconveniences already presented by traditional laparoscopy (LAP), laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery has been found to entail other more specific problems, including greater reduction in movement freedom, in-line vision with loss of triangulation, and greater proximity of instruments. The objective of this study was to evaluate surgeons' ergonomy during LESS surgery, through the study of muscular activity, wrist angle, and hand movements, and compare it with conventional laparoscopy. The study group was composed by 14 experienced laparoscopic surgeons, all right-handed. Each one performed dissection tasks on a physical simulator through LAP and LESS approaches. For LAP, straight laparoscopic scissors and dissector were used, whilst for LESS articulating tip scissors and dissector were chosen. During both tasks, muscular activity of biceps brachii, triceps brachii, forearm flexors and extensors, and trapezius muscles was registered through surface electromyography. Simultaneously right-hand movements and wrist angles were obtained through a motion capture data glove (CyberGlove(®)), which allowed for the use of a modified RULA test applied to the recorded angles with subsequent establishment of risk levels for the wrist joint. Muscular activity for trapezius (LAP 6.94 ± 4.12 vs. LESS 11.32 ± 4.68; p ≤ 0.05) and forearm extensor muscles (LAP 9.2 ± 2.45 vs. LESS 37.07 ≤ 16.05; p ≤ 0.001) was significantly lower in conventional laparoscopy compared with LESS approach. No statistical significance was obtained between the different sensors, except in 3 of the 11 analyzed CyberGlove(®) sensors. The modified RULA test showed a score of 3 for laparoscopy (unacceptable), whereas for LESS a score of 2 was obtained (acceptable), with statistically significant differences between them (p ≤ 0.05). The LESS approach entails greater level of muscular activity in the trapezius and forearm extensor muscles, but we have found evidences

  10. A Combined sEMG and Accelerometer System for Monitoring Functional Activity in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Serge H.; Cheng, M. Samuel; Chang, Shey-Sheen; Moore, John; De Luca, Gianluca; Nawab, S. Hamid; De Luca, Carlo J.

    2010-01-01

    Remote monitoring of physical activity using body-worn sensors provides an alternative to assessment of functional independence by subjective, paper-based questionnaires. This study investigated the classification accuracy of a combined surface electromyographic (sEMG) and accelerometer (ACC) sensor system for monitoring activities of daily living in patients with stroke. sEMG and ACC data (eight channels each) were recorded from 10 hemiparetic patients while they carried out a sequence of 11 activities of daily living (identification tasks), and 10 activities used to evaluate misclassification errors (nonidentification tasks). The sEMG and ACC sensor data were analyzed using a multilayered neural network and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system to identify the minimal sensor configuration needed to accurately classify the identification tasks, with a minimal number of misclassifications from the nonidentification tasks. The results demonstrated that the highest sensitivity and specificity for the identification tasks was achieved using a subset of four ACC sensors and adjacent sEMG sensors located on both upper arms, one forearm, and one thigh, respectively. This configuration resulted in a mean sensitivity of 95.0%, and a mean specificity of 99.7% for the identification tasks, and a mean misclassification error of system for automatic recognition of motor tasks used to assess functional independence in patients with stroke. PMID:20051332

  11. Robust functional statistics applied to Probability Density Function shape screening of sEMG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, S; Rix, H; Al Harrach, M; Marin, F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies pointed out possible shape modifications of the Probability Density Function (PDF) of surface electromyographical (sEMG) data according to several contexts like fatigue and muscle force increase. Following this idea, criteria have been proposed to monitor these shape modifications mainly using High Order Statistics (HOS) parameters like skewness and kurtosis. In experimental conditions, these parameters are confronted with small sample size in the estimation process. This small sample size induces errors in the estimated HOS parameters restraining real-time and precise sEMG PDF shape monitoring. Recently, a functional formalism, the Core Shape Model (CSM), has been used to analyse shape modifications of PDF curves. In this work, taking inspiration from CSM method, robust functional statistics are proposed to emulate both skewness and kurtosis behaviors. These functional statistics combine both kernel density estimation and PDF shape distances to evaluate shape modifications even in presence of small sample size. Then, the proposed statistics are tested, using Monte Carlo simulations, on both normal and Log-normal PDFs that mimic observed sEMG PDF shape behavior during muscle contraction. According to the obtained results, the functional statistics seem to be more robust than HOS parameters to small sample size effect and more accurate in sEMG PDF shape screening applications.

  12. Surface EMG-based sketching recognition using two analysis windows and gene expression programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sketching is one of the most important processes in the conceptual stage of design. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of sketching process and outcomes; whereas surface electromyographic (sEMG signals associated with sketching have received little attention. In this study, we propose a method in which 11 basic one-stroke sketching shapes are identified from the sEMG signals generated by the forearm and upper arm muscles from 4 subjects. Time domain features such as integrated electromyography, root mean square and mean absolute value were extracted with analysis windows of two length conditions for pattern recognition. After reducing data dimensionality using principal component analysis, the shapes were classified using Gene Expression Programming (GEP. The performance of the GEP classifier was compared to the Back Propagation neural network (BPNN and the Elman neural network (ENN. Feature extraction with the short analysis window (250 ms with a 250 ms increment improved the recognition rate by around 6.4% averagely compared with the long analysis window (2500 ms with a 2500 ms increment. The average recognition rate for the eleven basic one-stroke sketching patterns achieved by the GEP classifier was 96.26% in the training set and 95.62% in the test set, which was superior to the performance of the BPNN and ENN classifiers. The results show that the GEP classifier is able to perform well with either length of the analysis window. Thus, the proposed GEP model show promise for recognizing sketching based on sEMG signals.

  13. Eletromiografia laríngea e análise vocal em pacientes com Mal de Parkinson: estudo comparativo Laryngeal electromyography and acoustic voice analysis in Parkinson's disease: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Zarzur

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A doença ou Mal de Parkinson se deve à deficiência dopaminérgica nos núcleos da base que geram alterações motoras. Comprometimento da comunicação verbal ocorre em 70 a 90% dos doentes. Existem poucas referências da aplicação da eletromiografia no estudo dos músculos laríngeos em pacientes com a doença de Parkinson. OBJETIVOS: Definir o padrão contrátil da musculatura intrínseca da laringe e sua correlação com a análise acústica vocal nos parkinsonianos. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo onde 26 adultos com o diagnóstico de Mal de Parkinson foram submetidos à eletromiografia laríngea e análise acústica vocal. Foram coletados potenciais de ação, tanto em repouso vocal quanto em fonação. Para a análise acústica da voz foram utilizados os programas VOXMETRIA® e GRAM 5.1.6®. RESULTADOS: O padrão eletromiográfico predominante no grupo estudo foi o de hipercontratibilidade (ou recrutamento aumentado durante repouso vocal que ocorreu em 73% dos indivíduos, sem que houvesse registro eletromiográfico de tremor. Quanto às características vocais, detectou-se a presença de tremor vocal no traçado do espectrograma (VOXMETRIA E GRAM e na avaliação perceptivo-auditiva em 69,5 % e 61 % dos sujeitos, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: O tremor vocal foi a característica acústica predominante no grupo estudado, sem que houvesse correlação eletromiográfica.Parkinson's disease (PD involves a progressive depletion of dopamine in the basal ganglia leading to motor alterations. Oral communication impairment occurs in 75% to 90% of patients and has been poorly studied. AIM: to asses laryngeal electromyography (LEMG patterns and correlate them to vocal analysis in patients with Parkinson's disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective study. Twenty six adults with PD underwent laryngeal electromyography. Rest and phonation potentials were analyzed. VOXMETRIA® and GRAM 5.1.6. ® were used in acoustic analysis

  14. Central motor control failure in fibromyalgia: a surface electromyography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Roberto; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola; Gazzoni, Marco; Buskila, Dan; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterised by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and stiffness at multiple sites, tender points in characteristic locations, and the frequent presence of symptoms such as fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess whether the myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in patients affected by FM are central or peripheral in origin. Methods Eight female patients aged 55.6 ± 13.6 years (FM group) and eight healthy female volunteers aged 50.3 ± 9.3 years (MCG) were studied by means of non-invasive surface electromyography (s-EMG) involving a linear array of 16 electrodes placed on the skin overlying the biceps brachii muscle, with muscle fatigue being evoked by means of voluntary and involuntary (electrically elicited) contractions. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), motor unit action potential conduction velocity distributions (mean ± SD and skewness), and the mean power frequency of the spectrum (MNF) were estimated in order to assess whether there were any significant differences between the two groups and contraction types. Results The motor pattern of recruitment during voluntary contractions was altered in the FM patients, who also showed fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue (normalised conduction velocity rate of changes: -0.074 ± 0.052%/s in FM vs -0.196 ± 0.133%/s in MCG; normalised MNF rate of changes: -0.29 ± 0.16%/s in FM vs -0.66 ± 0.34%/s in MCG). Mean conduction velocity distribution and skewnesses values were higher (p < 0.01) in the FM group. There were no between-group differences in the results obtained from the electrically elicited contractions. Conclusion The apparent paradox of fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in FM is the electrophysiological expression of muscle remodelling in terms of the prevalence of slow conducting fatigue-resistant type I fibres. As the only between-group differences concerned voluntary contractions, they are probably more related to central motor control failure

  15. Laryngeal Electromyography: Are the Results Reproducible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Agrício N; Kimaid, Paulo A T; Machado Júnior, Almiro José; Wolf, Aline E

    2015-07-01

    Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) is an auxiliary diagnostic technique that is used to study neurologic diseases that affect the larynx. This study aimed to verify the reproducibility and accordance of LEMG findings obtained by different approaches applied to the same intrinsic laryngeal muscle in patients with neurologic disorders of the larynx. This study is prospective, blind, randomized, and controlled. Forty subjects (20 males and 20 females) aged between 21 and 78 years underwent LEMG of the thyroarytenoid muscles by different techniques, with a total of 120 insertion sites for analysis. The electrophysiological findings were grouped as follows: (1) equal LEMG findings; (2) different LEMG findings but in agreement on the same electromyographic pattern; and (3) different LEMG findings and in discord on the same electromyographic pattern. We found 5% discordance in the LEMG findings between the sites analyzed. LEMG is an important and useful technique, but caution must be taken to avoid misinterpretation and the wrong muscle approach. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identificação do lado de preferência mastigatória através de exame eletromiográfico comparado ao visual Masticatory preference side detection using electromyography exam compared to the visual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godofredo Pignataro Neto

    2004-08-01

    aged 18 to 25 years, of both sexes, from Araras School of Dentistry-UNIARARAS, Brazil, selected following approach: complete permanent dentition, except third molars, with no clinical signs of the temporomandibular dysfunction or periodontal disease. The electromyography analysis was accomplished in the right and left masseter muscles during habitual mastication of carrot and Parafilm. It was considered as presence on a masticatory preferential side and unilateral mastication when the muscular contraction width values obtained in RMS (Root Mean Square has had at least 20% as a difference between the right and left masseter muscles. The visual inspection was carried out during the electromyography data acquisitions by only one observer. He determined the masticatory preferential side taking account the number of masticatory cycles developed by each side. The masticatory preferential side was considered when 30% of the cycles were developed in only one side after the registration of 20 consecutive masticatory cycles. Of the total sample, 82.8% (24/29 and 72.4% (21/29 exhibited a preferential masticatory side during habitual carrot and Parafilm mastication, respectively. The concordance level between the electromyography and visual inspection exams was 83% of the total observations. It could be concluded that most of the subjects examined in this study exhibited a masticatory preferential side and that the electromyography can be used as a parameter for the masticatory side detection.

  17. Laryngeal electromyography in movement disorders: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimaid Paulo A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes preliminary laryngeal electromyography (LEMG data and botulinum toxin treatment in patients with dysphonia due to movement disorders. Twenty-five patients who had been clinically selected for botulinum toxin administration were examined, 19 with suspected laryngeal dystonia or spasmodic dysphonia (SD, 5 with vocal tremor, and 1 with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. LEMG evaluations were performed before botulinum toxin administration using monopolar electrodes. Electromyography was consistent with dystonia in 14 patients and normal in 5, and differences in frequency suggesting essential tremor in 3 and Parkinson tremors in 2. The different LEMG patterns and significant improvement in our patients from botulinum toxin therapy has led us to perform laryngeal electromyography as a routine in UNICAMP movement disorders ambulatory.

  18. Laryngeal Electromyography is Helpful for Cardiovocal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Sevtap; Inan, Rahsan; Demir, Mehmet Gökhan; Cakan, Dogan

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal electromyography is used in the evaluation of vocal cord paralysis to confirm the diagnosis, to guide the diagnostic work-up for etiology, to provide prognostic information and to help choose the correct treatment for the patient. Cardiovocal syndrome is characterised by vocal cord paralysis due to a cardiovascular disease. A wide spectrum of conditions can result in this syndrome. Here we present a case of cardiovocal syndrome in association with primary pulmonary hypertension. Laryngeal electromyography was used to guide the work-up of differential diagnosis and also for further intervention with respect to vocal cord paralysis in this patient.

  19. The methodology of corpus cavernosum electromyography revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X. G.; Wijkstra, H.; Meuleman, E. J. H.; Wagner, G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The methodology of corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG) was revisited, in order to overcome current methodological difficulties that hinder its clinical application. Materials and methods: Using an 8-channel device, CC-EMG was performed in 12 healthy volunteers. Surface electrodes

  20. Virtual Control of Prosthetic Hand Based on Grasping Patterns and Estimated Force from Semg

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    Zhu Gao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoelectric prosthetic hands aim to serve upper limb amputees. The myoelectric control of the hand grasp action is a kind of real-time or online method. Thus it is of great necessity to carry on a study of online prosthetic hand electrical control. In this paper, the strategy of simultaneous EMG decoding of grasping patterns and grasping force was realized by controlling a virtual multi-degree-freedom prosthetic hand and a real one-degree-freedom prosthetic hand simultaneously. The former realized the grasping patterns from the recognition of the sEMG pattern. The other implemented the grasping force from sEMG force decoding. The results show that the control method is effective and feasible.

  1. Recognizing hand movements from a single SEMG sensor using guided under-determined source signal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, L A; DeSouza, G N

    2011-01-01

    Rehabilitation devices, prosthesis and human machine interfaces are among many applications for which surface electromyographic signals (sEMG) can be employed. Systems reliant on these muscle-generated electrical signals require various forms of machine learning algorithms for specific signature recognition. Those systems vary in terms of the signal detection methods, the feature selection and the classification algorithm used. However, in all those cases, the use of multiple sensors is a constant. In this paper, we present a new technique for source signal separation that relies on a single sEMG sensor. This proposed technique was employed in a classification framework for hand movements that achieved comparable results to other approaches in the literature, but yet, it relied on a much simpler classifier and used a very small number of features. © 2011 IEEE

  2. Computational Intelligence Based Data Fusion Algorithm for Dynamic sEMG and Skeletal Muscle Force Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekhar Potluri,; Madhavi Anugolu; Marco P. Schoen; D. Subbaram Naidu

    2013-08-01

    In this work, an array of three surface Electrography (sEMG) sensors are used to acquired muscle extension and contraction signals for 18 healthy test subjects. The skeletal muscle force is estimated using the acquired sEMG signals and a Non-linear Wiener Hammerstein model, relating the two signals in a dynamic fashion. The model is obtained from using System Identification (SI) algorithm. The obtained force models for each sensor are fused using a proposed fuzzy logic concept with the intent to improve the force estimation accuracy and resilience to sensor failure or misalignment. For the fuzzy logic inference system, the sEMG entropy, the relative error, and the correlation of the force signals are considered for defining the membership functions. The proposed fusion algorithm yields an average of 92.49% correlation between the actual force and the overall estimated force output. In addition, the proposed fusionbased approach is implemented on a test platform. Experiments indicate an improvement in finger/hand force estimation.

  3. Optimal Elbow Angle for Extracting sEMG Signals During Fatiguing Dynamic Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Al-Mulla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface electromyographic (sEMG activity of the biceps muscle was recorded from 13 subjects. Data was recorded while subjects performed dynamic contraction until fatigue and the signals were segmented into two parts (Non-Fatigue and Fatigue. An evolutionary algorithm was used to determine the elbow angles that best separate (using Davies-Bouldin Index, DBI both Non-Fatigue and Fatigue segments of the sEMG signal. Establishing the optimal elbow angle for feature extraction used in the evolutionary process was based on 70% of the conducted sEMG trials. After completing 26 independent evolution runs, the best run containing the optimal elbow angles for separation (Non-Fatigue and Fatigue was selected and then tested on the remaining 30% of the data to measure the classification performance. Testing the performance of the optimal angle was undertaken on nine features extracted from each of the two classes (Non-Fatigue and Fatigue to quantify the performance. Results showed that the optimal elbow angles can be used for fatigue classification, showing 87.90% highest correct classification for one of the features and on average of all eight features (including worst performing features giving 78.45%.

  4. A Novel Phonology- and Radical-Coded Chinese Sign Language Recognition Framework Using Accelerometer and Surface Electromyography Sensors

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    Juan Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sign language recognition (SLR is an important communication tool between the deaf and the external world. It is highly necessary to develop a worldwide continuous and large-vocabulary-scale SLR system for practical usage. In this paper, we propose a novel phonology- and radical-coded Chinese SLR framework to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous SLR using accelerometer (ACC and surface electromyography (sEMG sensors. The continuous Chinese characters, consisting of coded sign gestures, are first segmented into active segments using EMG signals by means of moving average algorithm. Then, features of each component are extracted from both ACC and sEMG signals of active segments (i.e., palm orientation represented by the mean and variance of ACC signals, hand movement represented by the fixed-point ACC sequence, and hand shape represented by both the mean absolute value (MAV and autoregressive model coefficients (ARs. Afterwards, palm orientation is first classified, distinguishing “Palm Downward” sign gestures from “Palm Inward” ones. Only the “Palm Inward” gestures are sent for further hand movement and hand shape recognition by dynamic time warping (DTW algorithm and hidden Markov models (HMM respectively. Finally, component recognition results are integrated to identify one certain coded gesture. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SLR framework with a vocabulary scale of 223 characters can achieve an averaged recognition accuracy of 96.01% ± 0.83% for coded gesture recognition tasks and 92.73% ± 1.47% for character recognition tasks. Besides, it demonstrats that sEMG signals are rather consistent for a given hand shape independent of hand movements. Hence, the number of training samples will not be significantly increased when the vocabulary scale increases, since not only the number of the completely new proposed coded gestures is constant and limited, but also the transition movement which connects

  5. A Novel Phonology- and Radical-Coded Chinese Sign Language Recognition Framework Using Accelerometer and Surface Electromyography Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Juan; Chen, Xun; Liu, Aiping; Peng, Hu

    2015-09-15

    Sign language recognition (SLR) is an important communication tool between the deaf and the external world. It is highly necessary to develop a worldwide continuous and large-vocabulary-scale SLR system for practical usage. In this paper, we propose a novel phonology- and radical-coded Chinese SLR framework to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous SLR using accelerometer (ACC) and surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors. The continuous Chinese characters, consisting of coded sign gestures, are first segmented into active segments using EMG signals by means of moving average algorithm. Then, features of each component are extracted from both ACC and sEMG signals of active segments (i.e., palm orientation represented by the mean and variance of ACC signals, hand movement represented by the fixed-point ACC sequence, and hand shape represented by both the mean absolute value (MAV) and autoregressive model coefficients (ARs)). Afterwards, palm orientation is first classified, distinguishing "Palm Downward" sign gestures from "Palm Inward" ones. Only the "Palm Inward" gestures are sent for further hand movement and hand shape recognition by dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm and hidden Markov models (HMM) respectively. Finally, component recognition results are integrated to identify one certain coded gesture. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SLR framework with a vocabulary scale of 223 characters can achieve an averaged recognition accuracy of 96.01% ± 0.83% for coded gesture recognition tasks and 92.73% ± 1.47% for character recognition tasks. Besides, it demonstrats that sEMG signals are rather consistent for a given hand shape independent of hand movements. Hence, the number of training samples will not be significantly increased when the vocabulary scale increases, since not only the number of the completely new proposed coded gestures is constant and limited, but also the transition movement which connects successive signs needs no

  6. Recognition of handwriting from electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Linderman

    Full Text Available Handwriting--one of the most important developments in human culture--is also a methodological tool in several scientific disciplines, most importantly handwriting recognition methods, graphology and medical diagnostics. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of handwritten traces or kinematic analysis of handwriting; whereas electromyographic (EMG signals associated with handwriting have received little attention. Here we show for the first time, a method in which EMG signals generated by hand and forearm muscles during handwriting activity are reliably translated into both algorithm-generated handwriting traces and font characters using decoding algorithms. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of recreating handwriting solely from EMG signals - the finding that can be utilized in computer peripherals and myoelectric prosthetic devices. Moreover, this approach may provide a rapid and sensitive method for diagnosing a variety of neurogenerative diseases before other symptoms become clear.

  7. Recognition of handwriting from electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, Michael; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Erlichman, Joseph S

    2009-08-26

    Handwriting--one of the most important developments in human culture--is also a methodological tool in several scientific disciplines, most importantly handwriting recognition methods, graphology and medical diagnostics. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of handwritten traces or kinematic analysis of handwriting; whereas electromyographic (EMG) signals associated with handwriting have received little attention. Here we show for the first time, a method in which EMG signals generated by hand and forearm muscles during handwriting activity are reliably translated into both algorithm-generated handwriting traces and font characters using decoding algorithms. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of recreating handwriting solely from EMG signals - the finding that can be utilized in computer peripherals and myoelectric prosthetic devices. Moreover, this approach may provide a rapid and sensitive method for diagnosing a variety of neurogenerative diseases before other symptoms become clear.

  8. Inter-day reliability of surface electromyography recordings of the lumbar part of erector spinae longissimus and trapezius descendens during box lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Mikkel; Andersen, Lars Louis; Samani, Afshin; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Madeleine, Pascal

    2017-12-11

    Low back pain and neck-shoulder pain are the most reported types of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, and performing heavy lifting at work and working with trunk rotation increase the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Surface electromyography (sEMG) provides information about the electrical activity of muscles. Thus it has the potential to retrieve indirect information about the physical exposure of specific muscles of workers during their actual work. This study aimed to investigate the inter-day reliability of absolute and normalized amplitude of sEMG measurements obtained during repeated standardized reference lifts. The inter-day reliability of sEMG of the erector spinae longissimus and trapezius descendens muscles was tested during standardized box lifts. The lifts were performed with loads of 3, 15 and 30 kg from floor to table and from table to table in three conditions, i.e., forearm length (short reaching distance), ¾ arm length (long reaching distance) and forearm length with trunk rotation. Absolute and normalized root mean square (absRMS and normRMS) values were extracted. In line with the guidelines for reporting reliability and agreement studies, we reported relative and absolute reliability estimated by intra class correlation (ICC 3,K ), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change in percent (MDC). The ICC 3,K was higher for absRMS compared with normRMS while SEM and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were similar. A total of 50 out of 56, i.e., 89%, and 41 out of 56, i.e., 73%, of the lifting situations were in the range from moderate to almost perfect for absRMS and normRMS, respectively. The SEM and MDC shoved more variation in the lifting situations performed from floor to table and in the trapezius descendens muscle than in the erector spinae longissimus muscle. This reliability study showed that maximum absRMS and normRMS were found to have a fair to substantial relative inter

  9. Sleep/wake estimation using only anterior tibialis electromyography data

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    Hwang SuHwan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sleep efficiency monitoring system, actigraphy is the simplest and most commonly used device. However, low specificity to wakefulness of actigraphy was revealed in previous studies. In this study, we assumed that sleep/wake estimation using actigraphy and electromyography (EMG signals would show different patterns. Furthermore, each EMG pattern in two states (sleep, wake during sleep was analysed. Finally, we proposed two types of method for the estimation of sleep/wake patterns using only EMG signals from anterior tibialis muscles and the results were compared with PSG data. Methods Seven healthy subjects and five patients (2 obstructive sleep apnea, 3 periodic limb movement disorder participated in this study. Night time polysomnography (PSG recordings were conducted, and electrooculogram, EMG, electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram, and respiration data were collected. Time domain analysis and frequency domain analysis were applied to estimate the sleep/wake patterns. Each method was based on changes in amplitude or spectrum (total power of anterior tibialis electromyography signals during the transition from the sleep state to the wake state. To obtain the results, leave-one-out-cross-validation technique was adopted. Results Total sleep time of the each group was about 8 hours. For healthy subjects, the mean epoch-by-epoch results between time domain analysis and PSG data were 99%, 71%, 80% and 0.64 (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and kappa value, respectively. For frequency domain analysis, the corresponding values were 99%, 73%, 81% and 0.67, respectively. Absolute and relative differences between sleep efficiency index from PSG and our methods were 0.8 and 0.8% (for frequency domain analysis. In patients with sleep-related disorder, our proposed methods revealed the substantial agreement (kappa > 0.61 for OSA patients and moderate or fair agreement for PLMD patients. Conclusions The results of our proposed

  10. Leg extension test, sEMG and vibratory stimuli to assess functional recovery following knee joint surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Calogero; Laurini, Alessandro; Tiberti, Simone; Carli, Giancarlo; Tsarpela, Olga; Adamidis, Kostas; Bonifazi, Marco; Giombini, Arrigo; Tihanyi, Joszef; von Duvillard, Serge; De Vita, Marilena; Bosco, Carmelo

    2012-04-01

    the purpose of this study was to introduce new procedure to determine the magnitude of functional recovery after knee surgery. we compared the performance in the leg extension test and the response in the sEMG activity to vibration in the operated to the non-operated leg. Thirty-eight patients with knee operation and 14 healthy subjects participated in these experiments. during leg extension test, the mechanical power of the operated leg showed a lower value (Ptest. results of our study suggest that combination of vibration and sEMG recordings may detect the impairment as well as monitoring progress of the rehabilitation programs.

  11. Sphincter electromyography in diabetes mellitus and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Fan; Pan, Hua; Zhang, Zaiqiang; Lin, Jinxi; Chen, Na; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qing; Wang, Han; Wang, Yongjun; Cui, Liying; Tang, Xiaofu

    2015-09-01

    Abnormalities of external anal sphincter electromyography (EAS-EMG) characterize multiple system atrophy (MSA) and focal cauda equina or conus medullaris lesions. This study is designed to determine whether and how diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) affects EAS as compared to the abnormalities seen in MSA. We conducted multi-motor unit potential (MUP) analysis of EAS in 22 healthy controls, 32 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients without neuropathy, 38 DPN patients, and 68 MSA patients. DPN patients had a significant (P < 0.01) increase in MUP mean duration, mean amplitude, percentage of long duration MUPs, and satellite rate, but to a lesser extent than MSA. Mean duration and satellite rate showed the least overlap among different groups in individual value distributions. Compared with MSA, DPN affects EAS to a lesser degree as judged by neurogenic MUP abnormalities in EMG. Mean duration and satellite rate may serve as the most discriminating aspects in MUP analysis of EAS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Electromyography assessment in zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed El-Anwar, Mohammad; Elsheikh, Ezzeddin; Sweed, Ahmed Hassan; Ezzeldin, Nillie

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) in patients with zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) fractures. This prospective study was carried out on 25 patients who had ZMC fractures. Fifteen patients were managed by open reduction and rigid fixation (ORIF) using titanium miniplates. This study, using surface electromyography, analyzed the activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles of 25 patients with ZMC fractures; 15 of them were surgically treated under general anesthesia (GA). Evaluations were made before surgery and 6 weeks after surgery by recording the mean of muscle contraction of 20 motor unit action potential (MUAP) against resistance, and statistical analyses were performed. A significant EMG difference between the normal and ZMC fracture sides was found (P < 0.0001) for both masseter and temporalis muscles and was significantly improved after ORIF. However, postoperative EMV values of the repaired side was significantly less than measured postoperatively in the normal side (P < 0.0001) for both muscles. ZMC fractures significantly diminish muscular activity of the masseter and temporalis and even though significant recovery of muscle activity was revealed after 6 weeks, it is still less than normal activity, highlighting the importance of postoperative rehabilitation.

  13. Use of electromyography measurement in human body modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdmanová L.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test the use of the human body model for the muscle activity computation. This paper shows the comparison of measured and simulated muscle activities. Muscle active states of biceps brachia muscle are monitored by method called electromyography (EMG in a given position and for given subsequently increasing loads. The same conditions are used for simulation using a human body model (Hynčík, L., Rigid Body Based Human Model for Crash Test Purposes, EngineeringMechanics, 5 (8 (2001 1–6. This model consists of rigid body segments connected by kinematic joints and involves all major muscle bunches. Biceps brachia active states are evaluated by a special muscle balance solver. Obtained simulation results show the acceptable correlation with the experimental results. The analysis shows that the validation procedure of muscle activities determination is usable.

  14. An Overview of Laryngeal Muscle Single Fiber Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Sharaf, Aboubakar G

    2015-08-01

    Needle electromyography is an important tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases and has also been applied successfully in the evaluation of the vocal cord paralysis. Laryngeal electromyography, initially described by Weddell, is used to determine the cause of vocal cord paralysis and to differentiate organic from nonorganic causes of speech disorders. This test allows the diagnosis of lower motor neuron and nerve paralysis as well as myopathies. Laryngeal electromyography also helps to determine the prognosis of paralysis caused by traumatic injury of the laryngeal nerves and is used for guidance during botulinum toxin injection in spasmodic dysphonias. Single fiber electromyography is used to diagnose abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission and is applied in the study the architecture of the motor unit in muscles. This article reviews the techniques of laryngeal muscles single fiber electromyography, provides limited informative data, and discusses its potential value in the evaluation of patients with dysphonia.

  15. Towards Whole Body Fatigue Assessment of Human Movement: A Fatigue-Tracking System Based on Combined sEMG and Accelerometer Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwei Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to assess the overall fatigue of human body movement. First of all, according to previous research regarding localized muscular fatigue, a linear relation is assumed between the mean frequency and the muscular working time when the muscle is experiencing fatigue. This assumption is verified with a rigorous statistical analysis. Based on this proven linearity, localized muscular fatigue is simplified as a linear model. Furthermore, localized muscular fatigue is considered a dynamic process and, hence, the localized fatigue levels are tracked by updating the parameters with the most current surface electromyogram (sEMG measurements. Finally, an overall fatigue level is computed by fusing localized muscular fatigue levels. The developed fatigue-tracking system is evaluated with two fatigue experiments (in which 10 male subjects and seven female subjects participated, including holding self-weight (dip start position training and lifting weight with one arm (arm curl training.

  16. Endomicroscopy and electromyography of neuromuscular junctions in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rosalind; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Skehel, Paul A; Ribchester, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electromyography (EMG) is used routinely to diagnose neuromuscular dysfunction in a wide range of peripheral neuropathies, myopathies, and neuromuscular degenerative diseases including motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Definitive neurological diagnosis may also be indicated by the analysis of pathological neuromuscular innervation in motor-point biopsies. Our objective in this study was to preempt motor-point biopsy by combining live imaging with electrophysiological analysis of slow degeneration of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in vivo. Methods We combined conventional needle electromyography with fiber-optic confocal endomicroscopy (CEM), using an integrated hand-held, 1.5-mm-diameter probe. We utilized as a test bed, various axotomized muscles in the hind limbs of anaesthetized, double-homozygous thy1.2YFP16: WldS mice, which coexpress the Wallerian-degeneration Slow (WldS) protein and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in motor neurons. We also tested exogenous vital stains, including Alexa488-α-bungarotoxin; the styryl pyridinium dye 4-Di-2-Asp; and a GFP conjugate of botulinum toxin Type A heavy chain (GFP-HcBoNT/A). Results We show that an integrated EMG/CEM probe is effective in longitudinal evaluation of functional and morphological changes that take place over a 7-day period during axotomy-induced, slow neuromuscular synaptic degeneration. EMG amplitude declined in parallel with overt degeneration of motor nerve terminals. EMG/CEM was safe and effective when nerve terminals and motor endplates were selectively stained with vital dyes. Interpretation Our findings constitute proof-of-concept, based on live imaging in an animal model, that combining EMG/CEM may be useful as a minimally invasive precursor or alternative to motor-point biopsy in neurological diagnosis and for monitoring local administration of potential therapeutics. PMID:25540801

  17. Generating Human-Like Velocity-Adapted Jumping Gait from sEMG Signals for Bionic Leg’s Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the case of dynamic motion such as jumping, an important fact in sEMG (surface Electromyogram signal based control on exoskeletons, myoelectric prostheses, and rehabilitation gait is that multichannel sEMG signals contain mass data and vary greatly with time, which makes it difficult to generate compliant gait. Inspired by the fact that muscle synergies leading to dimensionality reduction may simplify motor control and learning, this paper proposes a new approach to generate flexible gait based on muscle synergies extracted from sEMG signal. Two questions were discussed and solved, the first one concerning whether the same set of muscle synergies can explain the different phases of hopping movement with various velocities. The second one is about how to generate self-adapted gait with muscle synergies while alleviating model sensitivity to sEMG transient changes. From the experimental results, the proposed method shows good performance both in accuracy and in robustness for producing velocity-adapted vertical jumping gait. The method discussed in this paper provides a valuable reference for the sEMG-based control of bionic robot leg to generate human-like dynamic gait.

  18. Low-cost assistive device for hand gesture recognition using sEMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Ondrej; Cymbalák, Dávid; Kardoš, Slavomír.; Fecil'ak, Peter; Jakab, František

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a low-cost solution for surface EMG (sEMG) signal retrieval is presented. The principal goal is to enable reading the temporal parameters of muscles activity by a computer device, with its further processing. Paper integrates design and deployment of surface electrodes and amplifier following the prior researches. Bearing in mind the goal of creating low-cost solution, the Arduino micro-controller was utilized for analog-to-digital conversion and communication. The software part of the system employs support vector machine (SVM) to classify the EMG signal, as acquired from sensors. Accuracy of the proposed solution achieves over 90 percent for six hand movements. Proposed solution is to be tested as an assistive device for several cases, involving people with motor disabilities and amputees.

  19. Internet based gripper teleoperation with random time delay by using haptic feedback and SEMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaonong; Song, Aiguo; Zhang, Huatao; Ji, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Random time delay may cause instability in the internet based teleoperation system. Transparency and intuitiveness are also very important for operator to control the system to accurately perform the desired action, especially for the gripper teleoperation system. This paper presents a new grip force control method of gripper teleoperation system with haptic feedback. The system employs the SEMG signal as the control parameter in order to enhance the intuitive control experience for operator. In order to eliminate the impacts on the system stability caused by random time delay, a non-time based teleoperation method is applied to the control process. Besides, neural network and designed fuzzy logic controller is also utilized to improve this control method. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by experiment results.

  20. [Laryngeal electromyography in diagnosis and treatment of voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Isabel; Santiago-Pérez, Susana; Peñarrocha-Teres, Julio; del Palacio, Antonio J; Gavilan, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Laryngeal electromyography, together with clinical evaluation, is a valuable tool in voice disorder management. It assesses the integrity of laryngeal nerves and muscles, contributing to the diagnosis of many diseases, especially laryngeal movement disorders. Our purpose was to describe the experience of the first Spanish series with laryngeal electromyography in evaluating voice disorders. A prospective study was designed to evaluate laryngeal movement disorders with laryngeal electromyography. Both the cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles were tested routinely and, in some cases, the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle. The laryngeal electromyography technique and result interpretation were performed by a laryngologist and a neurophysiologist. We included 110 patients, with the most common symptom being dysphonia. Laryngeal electromyography was performed in 85% of cases. Primary diagnosis before electromyography was laryngeal immobility. Positive predictive value for diagnosis in cases of paralysis was 88%. Laryngeal electromyography is a useful adjunct, together with clinical evaluation, for diagnosis and management of motion abnormalities in the larynx in patients who present with dysphonia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Laryngeal electromyography as a diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzur, Ana P; Duprat, André de Campos; Cataldo, Berenice O; Ciampi, Daniel; Fonoff, Erich

    2014-03-01

    To study the laryngeal electromyography pattern in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and vocal complaints at different stages of the disease. Cross-sectional cohort study. Ninety-four adults with PD and vocal complaints at different stages of the disease (according to the Hoehn and Yahr scale) underwent laryngeal electromyography. Tremors were not detected on laryngeal electromyography of the cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles even in patients with clinical tremor. Laryngeal electromyography hypercontractility during voice rest was the typical result observed in 91.5% of patients regardless of disease severity. Gender and age of subjects did not correlate with laryngeal electromyography results. Patients with PD presented spontaneous intrinsic laryngeal muscle activity during voice rest, regardless of disease severity. This study was significant because it reported on the use of laryngeal electromyography in a large number of patients with PD and vocal complaints grouped according to PD severity. The patterns observed suggest that laryngeal electromyography is a valuable diagnostic tool for PD even at early phases of the disease. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. A neural network-based electromyography motion classifier for upper limb activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Veer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work is to investigate the classification of different movements based on the surface electromyogram (SEMG pattern recognition method. The testing was conducted for four arm movements using several experiments with artificial neural network classification scheme. Six time domain features were extracted and consequently classification was implemented using back propagation neural classifier (BPNC. Further, the realization of projected network was verified using cross validation (CV process; hence ANOVA algorithm was carried out. Performance of the network is analyzed by considering mean square error (MSE value. A comparison was performed between the extracted features and back propagation network results reported in the literature. The concurrent result indicates the significance of proposed network with classification accuracy (CA of 100% recorded from two channels, while analysis of variance technique helps in investigating the effectiveness of classified signal for recognition tasks.

  3. The management of lactose intolerance among primary care physicians and its correlation with management by gastroenterologists: the SEPD-SEMG national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Argüelles-Arias; Pilar Rodríguez-Ledo; José María Tenías; Mercedes Otero; Francesc Casellas; Guadalupe Blay-Cortés; Alfredo Lucendo; José Luis Domínguez-Jiménez; Fernando Carballo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and aims: The understanding of lactose intolerance (LI) is limited in some professional settings. Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva (SEPD) and Sociedad Española de Medicina General (SEMG) have developed a survey in order to: a) Analyze primary care physicians (PCPs) knowledge and clinical management; and b) to compare results with those of a previous survey of Spanish gastroenterologists (GEs). Material and methods: An online questionnaire was sent to SEMG members with 27 ...

  4. Monitorando a deglutição através da eletromiografia de superfície Monitoring swallowing with surface electromyography

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    Maria das Graças Wanderley de Sales Coriolano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever o método de registro da eletromiografia de superfície através da utilização de um protocolo desenvolvido para o estudo da deglutição e demonstrar a deglutição de um paciente com doença de Parkinson e de um sujeito normal através do registro da eletromiografia de superfície (EMGs. MÉTODOS: para ilustrar os parâmetros eletrofisiológicos registrados após execução do protocolo foram utilizados dois voluntários do sexo feminino, sendo um sem doença e outro apresentando doença de Parkinson (DP no estágio III de acordo com a escala de Hoehn e Yahr. Os parâmetros analisados pelo foram: a duração da atividade elétrica durante a deglutição, a amplitude (rms e o limite de disfagia. RESULTADOS: os resultados mostram diferenças entre os eletromiogramas ilustrativos. CONCLUSÃO: a EMGs pode ser utilizada como método de avaliação e monitorização da deglutição de sujeitos sem doença e com DP.PURPOSE: to describe the registering method of the surface electromyography (sEMG through the use of a protocol developed for swallowing study and to demonstrate the swallowing pattern of a patient with Parkinson’s disease and of normal individuals through the sEMG registering. METHODS: to illustrate the registered electrophysiologic parameters execution of the protocol we used two volunteers of the feminine gender, being one without disease and the other one with Parkinson’s disease (PD in III period of training in accordance with the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. The analyzed parameters had been the duration of the electric activity during swallowing, the amplitude (rms and the dysphagia limit. RESULTS: the results show differences amongst the illustrative electromyograms. CONCLUSION: sEMG can be used as method for evaluating and monitoring the swallowing pattern of citizens with no disease and with PD.

  5. Inter-Gender sEMG Evaluation of Central and Peripheral Fatigue in Biceps Brachii of Young Healthy Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Meduri

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate inter-arm and inter-gender differences in fractal dimension (FD and conduction velocity (CV obtained from multichannel surface electromyographic (sEMG recordings during sustained fatiguing contractions of the biceps brachii.A total of 20 recreationally active males (24±6 years and 18 recreationally active females (22±9 years performed two isometric contractions at 120 degrees elbow joint angle: (1 at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC for 90 s, and (2 at 60% MVC until exhaustion the time to perform the task has been measured. Signals from sEMG were detected from the biceps brachii using bidimensional arrays of 64 electrodes and initial values and rate of change of CV and FD of the sEMG signal were calculated.No difference between left and right sides and no statistically significant interaction effect of sides with gender were found for all parameters measured. A significant inter-gender difference was found for MVC (p0.05. During the sustained 60% MVC no statistical correlation was found between MVC and CV or FD initial estimates nor between MVC and CV or FD slopes both in males and females whereas. A significant positive correlation between CV and FD slopes was found in both genders (males: r = 0,61; females: r = 0,55.Fatigue determines changes in FD and CV values in biceps brachii during sustained contractions at 60% MVC. In particular males show greater increase in the rate of change of CV and FD than females whereas no difference in percentage change of these sEMG descriptors of fatigue was found. A significant correlation between FD and CV slopes found in both genders highlights that central and peripheral myoelectric components of fatigue may interact during submaximal isometric contractions.

  6. A sign-component-based framework for Chinese sign language recognition using accelerometer and sEMG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Kongqiao; Wang, Z Jane

    2012-10-01

    Identification of constituent components of each sign gesture can be beneficial to the improved performance of sign language recognition (SLR), especially for large-vocabulary SLR systems. Aiming at developing such a system using portable accelerometer (ACC) and surface electromyographic (sEMG) sensors, we propose a framework for automatic Chinese SLR at the component level. In the proposed framework, data segmentation, as an important preprocessing operation, is performed to divide a continuous sign language sentence into subword segments. Based on the features extracted from ACC and sEMG data, three basic components of sign subwords, namely the hand shape, orientation, and movement, are further modeled and the corresponding component classifiers are learned. At the decision level, a sequence of subwords can be recognized by fusing the likelihoods at the component level. The overall classification accuracy of 96.5% for a vocabulary of 120 signs and 86.7% for 200 sentences demonstrate the feasibility of interpreting sign components from ACC and sEMG data and clearly show the superior recognition performance of the proposed method when compared with the previous SLR method at the subword level. The proposed method seems promising for implementing large-vocabulary portable SLR systems.

  7. Electromyography function, disability degree, and pain in leprosy patients undergoing neural mobilization treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Sales Téles Véras

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the neural mobilization technique on electromyography function, disability degree, and pain in patients with leprosy. METHODS: A sample of 56 individuals with leprosy was randomized into an experimental group, composed of 29 individuals undergoing treatment with neural mobilization, and a control group of 27 individuals who underwent conventional treatment. In both groups, the lesions in the lower limbs were treated. In the treatment with neural mobilization, the procedure used was mobilization of the lumbosacral roots and sciatic nerve biased to the peroneal nerve that innervates the anterior tibial muscle, which was evaluated in the electromyography. RESULTS: Analysis of the electromyography function showed a significant increase (p<0.05 in the experimental group in both the right (Δ%=22.1, p=0.013 and the left anterior tibial muscles (Δ%=27.7, p=0.009, compared with the control group pre- and post-test. Analysis of the strength both in the movement of horizontal extension (Δ%right=11.7, p=0.003/Δ%left=27.4, p=0.002 and in the movement of back flexion (Δ%right=31.1; p=0.000/Δ%left=34.7, p=0.000 showed a significant increase (p<0.05 in both the right and the left segments when comparing the experimental group pre- and post-test. The experimental group showed a significant reduction (p=0.000 in pain perception and disability degree when the pre- and post-test were compared and when compared with the control group in the post-test. CONCLUSIONS: Leprosy patients undergoing the technique of neural mobilization had an improvement in electromyography function and muscle strength, reducing disability degree and pain.

  8. Detection of changes in SEMG signals with myofascial pain using the pattern-classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ching-Fen; Huang, Pao-Tieh

    2013-10-01

    Myofascial pain on the upper back (MFPUB) has been a common occupational hazard associated with consistent computer use. Investigations into any sort neuromuscular functional changes due to myofascial pain are rare. This study aims to differentiate the wavelet energy patterns of the surface electromyography signals measured from 30 normal and 26 patient subjects using the K-means clustering process. The results show that the wavelet energy pattern of patient subjects was different to that of normal subject and reveals a sensitivity of 57.69% at a specificity of 76.67% in the identification of myofascial pain. Therefore, this model could provide a reliable feature for clinical diagnosis of myofascial pain.

  9. Study of the SEMG probability distribution of the paretic tibialis anterior muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniz, Analía S.; Bonell, Claudia E.; Tabernig, Carolina B.

    2007-11-01

    The surface electromyographic signal is a stochastic signal that has been modeled as a Gaussian process, with a zero mean. It has been experimentally proved that this probability distribution can be adjusted with less error to a Laplacian type distribution. The selection of estimators for the detection of changes in the amplitude of the muscular signal depends, among other things, on the type of distribution. In the case of subjects with lesions to the superior motor neuron, the lack of central control affects the muscular tone, the force and the patterns of muscular movement involved in activities such as the gait cycle. In this work, the distribution types of the SEMG signal amplitudes of the tibialis anterior muscle are evaluated during gait, both in two healthy subjects and in two hemiparetic ones in order to select the estimators that best characterize them. It was observed that the Laplacian distribution function would be the one that best adjusts to the experimental data in the studied subjects, although this largely depends on the subject and on the data segment analyzed.

  10. CAN BE SPHINCTER ELECTROMYOGRAPHY REFERENCE VALUES SHARED BETWEEN LABORATORIES?1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podnar, Simon; Gregory, W. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Sphincter electromyography (EMG) is an important method in diagnosis of neuropathic sacral lesions. Quantitative EMG analysis increases utility of the test, but requires valid reference values. Although commonly employed, validity of sharing reference data between electrodiagnostic laboratories has not been confirmed. In this study, this approach was assessed by comparing the reproducibility of data sets obtained by the same and different laboratories. Methods: Confidence intervals and sensitivity of motor unit potential (MUP) parameters in the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscles were calculated using data obtained from 3 different control groups of women (number of women: 41, 48 and 66), examined by the same (the first two groups) and another investigator (the third group). Sensitivities to diagnose neuropathic changes in a known patient group were compared. Results: When compared to the first reference group, the MUP parameter means of 2/7 (same investigator) vs. 3/7 (different investigator) were significantly different. Similarly, 3/14 vs. 4/14 MUP parameter outliers were different. Finally, 6/14 vs. 7/14 sensitivities (using a combination of MUP parameter means and outliers) were different. Conclusions: This study demonstrated somewhat larger differences between confidence intervals obtained by different investigators, as compared to those obtained by a single investigator. However, most of these differences can be explained by differences in recruited groups of women, and slight inconsistencies in applied techniques. Presented data suggest that confidence intervals from other laboratories can be used, but only if exact protocols from original normative studies are strictly followed. PMID:20976812

  11. Noninvasive Uterine Electromyography For Prediction of Preterm Delivery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    UCOVNIK, Miha L; MANER, William L.; CHAMBLISS, Linda R.; BLUMRICK, Richard; BALDUCCI, James; NOVAK-ANTOLIC, Ziva; GARFIELD, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Power spectrum (PS) of uterine electromyography (EMG) can identify true labor. EMG propagation velocity (PV) to diagnose labor has not been reported. The objective was to compare uterine EMG against current methods to predict preterm delivery. Study design EMG was recorded in 116 patients (preterm labor, n=20; preterm non-labor, n=68; term labor, n=22; term non-labor, n=6). Student’s t-test was used to compare EMG values for labor vs. non-labor (P<0.05 significant). Predictive values of EMG, Bishop-score, contractions on tocogram, and transvaginal cervical length were calculated using receiver-operator-characteristics analysis. Results PV was higher in preterm and term labor compared with non-labor (P<0.001). Combined PV and PS peak frequency predicted preterm delivery within 7 days with area-under-the-curve (AUC) = 0.96. Bishop score, contractions, and cervical length had AUC of 0.72, 0.67, and 0.54. Conclusions Uterine EMG PV and PS peak frequency more accurately identify true preterm labor than clinical methods. PMID:21145033

  12. Quantitative anal sphincter electromyography in primiparous women with anal incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, W. Thomas; Lou, Jau-Shin; Simmons, Kimberly; Clark, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether evidence of denervation/reinnervation of the external anal sphincter is associated with anal incontinence symptoms immediately after delivery. STUDY DESIGN After a first vaginal delivery, 42 women completed an anal incontinence questionnaire. They also underwent concentric needle electromyography of the external anal sphincter. For each subject, motor unit action potential and interference pattern parameters were determined. RESULTS For the motor unit action potential, no difference was observed between patients with and without anal incontinence symptoms (t-test). For the interference pattern, the amplitude/turn was greater in subjects with fecal urgency (318 ± 48 [SD] μV) and fecal incontinence (332 ± 48 μV), compared with those without fecal urgency (282 ± 38 μV) and fecal incontinence (286 ± 41 μV; P = .02, t-test). CONCLUSION In this group of postpartum women with mild anal incontinence symptoms, interference pattern analysis shows evidence of denervation and subsequent reinnervation. PMID:18455531

  13. Relevance of motion artifact in electromyography recordings during vibration treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, Antonio; Cesarelli, Mario; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria

    2009-08-01

    Electromyography readings (EMGs) from quadriceps of fifteen subjects were recorded during whole body vibration treatment at different frequencies (10-50 Hz). Additional electrodes were placed on the patella to monitor the occurrence of motion artifact, triaxial accelerometers were placed onto quadriceps to monitor motion. Signal spectra revealed sharp peaks corresponding to vibration frequency and its harmonics, in accordance with the accelerometer data. EMG total power was compared to that associated with vibration harmonics narrow bands, before and during vibration. On average, vibration associated power resulted in only 3% (+/-0.9%) of the total power prior to vibration and 29% (+/-13.4%) during vibration. Often, studies employ surface EMG to quantitatively evaluate vibration evoked muscular activity and to set stimulation frequency. However, previous research has not accounted for motion artifacts. The data presented in this study emphasize the need for the removal of motion artifacts, as they consistently affect RMS estimation, which is often used as a concise muscle activity index during vibrations. Such artifacts, rather unpredictable in amplitude, might be the cause of large inter-study differences and must be eliminated before analysis. Motion artifact filtering will contribute to thorough and precise interpretation of neuromuscular response to vibration treatment.

  14. Quantitative electromyography in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sumit; Lin, Jenny; Travers, Curtis; McCracken, Courtney; Shah, Durga

    2017-12-01

    This study's objective was to evaluate quantitative electromyography (QEMG) using multiple-motor-unit (multi-MUP) analysis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Ambulatory DMD boys, aged 5-15 years, were evaluated with QEMG at 6-month intervals over 14 months. EMG was performed in the right biceps brachii (BB) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Normative QEMG data were obtained from age-matched healthy boys. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed. Eighteen DMD subjects were enrolled, with a median age of 7 (interquartile range 7-10) years. Six-month evaluations were performed on 14 subjects. QEMG showed significantly abnormal mean MUP duration in BB and TA muscles, with no significant change over 6 months. QEMG is a sensitive electrophysiological marker of myopathy in DMD. Preliminary data do not reflect a significant change in MUP parameters over a 6-month interval; long-term follow-up QEMG studies are needed to understand its role as a biomarker for disease progression. Muscle Nerve 56: 1361-1364, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of peripheral vocal cord paralysis by electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosheva, Maria; Wittekindt, Claus; Pototschnig, Claus; Lindenthaler, Werner; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2008-06-01

    To analyze the predictive value of electromyography (EMG) after peripheral vocal cord paralysis and to estimate regeneration time. Retrospective study based on electromyographic data and medical chart review of university based ENT hospitals. EMG results of 448 patients were classified into neuropraxia, axonotmesis/neurotmesis, or not classifiable and followed until final outcome. Final outcome was classified electromyographically into restitutio ad integrum, defective healing, or not classifiable. The etiology of the paralysis was thyroid gland surgery in 42.9% and other iatrogenic lesions in 11.8%. Idiopathic paralysis was found in 20.3%. Mean follow-up time was 4.8 months. Initial EMG findings were neuropraxia in 31.0%, axonotmesis/neurotmesis in 40.8%, and not classifiable in 28.1%. Restitutio ad integrum was detected by EMG in 17.6% and defective healing in 43.3%. In 39.1%, the outcome could not be classified. The positive predictive value of EMG was 97% and the negative predictive value 60%. The outcome depended significantly on the initial EMG result (P neuropraxia was 4.0 months and after axonotmesis/neurotmesis 5.6 months. Laryngeal EMG has a high predictive value for acute peripheral vocal cord paralysis. The outcome can be predicted more reliably by means of EMG than by analysis of the etiology of the lesion.

  16. Comparison of frequency and time domain electromyography parameters in women with patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Silva, Danilo de Oliveira; Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; Albuquerque, Carlos Eduardo de; Ferrari, Deisi; Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis de

    2015-03-01

    Despite its high incidence, patellofemoral pain etiology remains unclear. No prior study has compared surface electromyography frequency domain parameters and surface electromyography time domain variables, which have been used as a classic analysis of patellofemoral pain. Thirty one women with patellofemoral pain and twenty eight pain-free women were recruited. Each participant was asked to descend a seven step staircase and data from five successful trials were collected. During the task, the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscle activities were monitored by surface electromyography. The data were processed and analyzed in four variables of the frequency domain (median frequency, low, medium and high frequency bands) and three time domain variables (Automatic, Cross-correlation and Visual Onset between the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles). Reliability, Receiver Operating Characteristic curves and regression models were performed. The medium frequency band was the most reliable variable and different between the groups for both muscles, also demonstrated the best values of sensitivity and sensibility, 72% and 69% for the vastus medialis and 68% and 62% for the vastus lateralis, respectively. The frequency variables predicted the pain of individuals with patellofemoral pain, 26% for the vastus medialis and 20% for the vastus lateralis, being better than the time variables, which achieved only 7%. The frequency domain parameters presented greater reliability, diagnostic accuracy and capacity to predict pain than the time domain variables during stair descent and might be a useful tool to diagnose individuals with patellofemoral pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Guiding Intramuscular Diaphragm Injections Using Real-time Ultrasound & Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwal, Aarti; Cartwright, Michael S.; Mitchell, Erin; Williams, Koudy; Walker, Francis O.; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We describe a unique method that combines ultrasound and electromyography to guide intramuscular diaphragm injections in anesthetized large animals. Methods Ultrasound was used to visualize the diaphragm on each side of spontaneously breathing, anesthetized beagle dogs and cynomolgus macaques. An electromyography needle was introduced and directed by ultrasound to confirm that the needle entered the muscular portion of the diaphragm, and methylene blue was injected. Injection accuracy was confirmed upon necropsy by tracking the spread of methylene blue. Results All methylene blue injections were confirmed to have been placed appropriately into the diaphragm. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of using ultrasound and EMG to guide injections and to reduce complications associated with conventional blind techniques. Ultrasound guidance can be used for clinical electromyography of the diaphragm. Future applications may include targeted diaphragm injections with gene replacement therapy in neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25354257

  18. Corpus cavernosum electromyography revisited: defining the origin of the signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Laura S; Jiang, Xiaogang; Gottsch, Henry P; Yang, Claire C

    2012-02-01

    We performed this study to identify the source of complexes recorded during corpus cavernosum electromyography. A total of 10 healthy male volunteers 19 to 54 years old (mean age 36) with normal erectile function, participated in the study. A Porti electrodiagnostic system (TMS International, Enschede, The Netherlands) connected to a notebook computer recorded low frequency corpus cavernosum electromyography complexes via penile surface electrodes in 3 phases. In phase 1 baseline corpus cavernosum electromyography was recorded for 30 minutes. In phase 2 penile skin block was performed followed by 30 minutes of corpus cavernosum electromyography recording. Phase 3 consisted of intracavernous block followed by corpus cavernosum electromyography recording for 30 minutes. During all 3 phases startling auditory stimuli and median nerve stimulation were used at random intervals to evoke a sympathetic nervous system response. A suprapubic electrode was used as a control to record sympathetic electrodermal activity. In phase 1 all subjects had spontaneous and evoked corpus cavernosum complexes. The penile skin block used in phase 2 did not affect the presence of these complexes, which remained present in all subjects. During phase 3 no spontaneous or evoked corpus cavernosum complexes were recorded in any subjects, indicating that the intracavernous block eliminated the corporally generated signal. All subjects in all 3 phases demonstrated a sympathetic electrodermal response in the suprapubic electrode in response to evoking stimuli. This study confirms the penile cavernous tissue, and not the penile skin or surrounding tissue, as the origin of the corpus cavernosum electromyography complex. Further refinement of this technique may render it useful in the evaluation of neurogenic and myogenic erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Grip Force and 3D Push-Pull Force Estimation Based on sEMG and GRNN

    OpenAIRE

    Changcheng Wu; Hong Zeng; Aiguo Song; Baoguo Xu

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of the grip force and the 3D push-pull force (push and pull force in the three dimension space) from the electromyogram (EMG) signal is of great importance in the dexterous control of the EMG prosthetic hand. In this paper, an action force estimation method which is based on the eight channels of the surface EMG (sEMG) and the Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) is proposed to meet the requirements of the force control of the intelligent EMG prosthetic hand. Firstly, t...

  20. Reproducibility of corpus cavernosum electromyography in healthy young man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X.; Frantzen, J.; Holsheimer, J.; Meuleman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Research on reproducibility of corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG) is relevant because reproducible signals indicate a biological phenomenon and not an artefact. Reproducible signals are also required to use CC-EMG as a diagnostic tool for erectile dysfunction. The aim of this study was to

  1. Laryngeal Electromyography for Prognosis of Vocal Fold Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Maza, Adriana; García-Lopez, Isabel; Santiago-Pérez, Susana; Gavilán, Javier

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of laryngeal electromyography in the prognosis of vocal fold paralysis. This is a retrospective descriptive study. This study included 80 patients diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral vocal fold paralysis on flexible laryngoscopy between 2002 and 2014 in a tertiary medical center. Laryngeal electromyography using a standardized protocol was performed; the outcome measures were classified and analyzed into two groups according to the degree of injury. Group 1 included patients with mild to moderate injury, and group 2 included patients with severe to complete injury. Prognosis was correlated with vocal fold motion recovery status with a minimum of 6 months of follow-up since the symptoms onset using positive and negative predictive values. Sixty patients showed acute or chronic recurrent laryngeal neuropathy in laryngeal electromyography. Twelve of 41 patients included in group 1 recovered motion, and 30 of 35 patients included in group 2 did not recover, resulting in 88.2% of positive predictive value and 35.7% of negative predictive value. Our data confirm that laryngeal electromyography is a useful clinical tool in predicting poor recovery in patients with vocal fold paralysis. It allows identification of candidates for early intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Laryngeal Electromyography to Differentiate Presbylarynges from Paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stager, Sheila V.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Differential diagnosis of patients over 64 years of age reporting hoarseness is challenging. Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) was used to determine the status of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves. The authors hypothesized that individuals with hoarseness but normal LEMG would have measures similar to those of patients from…

  3. Measurement of tendon reflexes by surface electromyography in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the tendon reflexes was developed. A manually operated, electronic reflex hammer was applied that enabled measurement of the strength of tendon taps. Reflex responses were recorded by surface electromyography. Stimulus-response relations and latencies of tendon reflexes

  4. Investigation of Physiological Properties of Nerves and Muscles Using Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Seán M.; Johnson, Christopher D.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement and representation of the electrical activity of muscles [electromyography (EMG)] have a long history from the Victorian Era until today. Currently, EMG has uses both as a research tool, in noninvasively recording muscle activation, and clinically in the diagnosis and assessment of nerve and muscle disease and injury as well as in…

  5. Evaluation of neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea using chin surface electromyography of polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guo-ping; Ye, Jing-ying; Han, De-min; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhang, Yu-huan; Li, Yan-ru

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that defects in upper airway neuromuscular control play a role in sleep apnea pathogenesis. Currently, there is no simple and non-invasive method for evaluating neuromuscular activity for the purpose of screening in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. This study was designed to assess the validity of chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography in evaluating the neuromuscular activity of obstructive sleep apnea subjects and probe the neuromuscular contribution in the pathogenesis of the condition. The chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography during normal breathing and obstructive apnea were quantified in 36 male patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The change of chin surface electromyography from normal breathing to obstructive apnea was expressed as the percent compensated electromyography value, where the percent compensated electromyography value = (normal breath surface electromyography - apnea surface electromyography)/normal breath surface electromyography, and the percent compensated electromyography values among subjects were compared. The relationship between sleep apnea related parameters and the percent compensated electromyography value was examined. The percent compensated electromyography value of the subjects varied from 1% to 90% and had a significant positive correlation with apnea hypopnea index (R(2) = 0.382, P electromyography by routine polysomnography is a valid way of screening the neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The neuromuscular contribution is different among subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

  6. Electromyography Exposes Heterogeneity in Muscle Co-Contraction following Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L. Banks

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Walking after stroke is often described as requiring excessive muscle co-contraction, yet, evidence that co-contraction is a ubiquitous motor control strategy for this population remains inconclusive. Co-contraction, the simultaneous activation of agonist and antagonist muscles, can be assessed with electromyography (EMG but is often described qualitatively. Here, our goal is to determine if co-contraction is associated with gait impairments following stroke. Fifteen individuals with chronic stroke and nine healthy controls walked on an instrumented treadmill at self-selected speed. Surface EMGs were collected from the medial gastrocnemius (MG, soleus (SOL, and tibialis anterior (TA of each leg. EMG envelope amplitudes were assessed in three ways: (1 no normalization, (2 normalization to the maximum value across the gait cycle, or (3 normalization to maximal M-wave. Three co-contraction indices were calculated across each agonist/antagonist muscle pair (MG/TA and SOL/TA to assess the effect of using various metrics to quantify co-contraction. Two factor ANOVAs were used to compare effects of group and normalization for each metric. Co-contraction during the terminal stance (TSt phase of gait is not different between healthy controls and the paretic leg of individuals post-stroke, regardless of the metric used to quantify co-contraction. Interestingly, co-contraction was similar between M-max and non-normalized EMG; however, normalization does not impact the ability to resolve group differences. While a modest correlation is revealed between the amount of TSt co-contraction and walking speed, the relationship is not sufficiently strong to motivate further exploration of a causal link between co-contraction and walking function after stroke. Co-contraction does not appear to be a common strategy employed by individuals after stroke. We recommend exploration of alternative EMG analysis approaches in an effort to learn more about the causal

  7. Is there correlation between electromyography and digital palpation as means of measuring pelvic floor muscle contractility in nulliparous, pregnant, and postpartum women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Simone; Pereira, Larissa Carvalho; Marques, Joseane; Lanza, Ana Helena; Amorim, Cesar Ferreira; Palma, Paulo; Riccetto, Cassio

    2013-06-01

    The continence mechanisms depend on the integrity of the pelvic floor muscles. It is therefore important to find simple, reliable, and safe methods to assess its contractility in a clinical setting. This study aims to investigate if digital palpation of the pelvic floor muscles presents correlation with its electromyographic activity. The sample consisted of 307 women with mean age of 23.93 years, including 39 nulliparous, 117 primigravid pregnant, 64 primiparous, in post-vaginal delivery, and 87 primiparous women, in post-cesarean section delivery. The assessment consisted of both digital palpation and surface electromyography. One, and the same, highly skilled and experienced physiotherapist, who was able to classify the different grades of contractility accurately, performed digital palpation using the Modified Oxford Grading Scale. Surface electromyography was performed using an intravaginal probe. For electromyography evaluation, three contractions of 5 sec each were recorded, and an average of three Root Mean squares was considered for analysis. Spearman's Coefficient, Jonckheere-Terpstra Test, Kruskal-Wallis as well as Dunn Test were used for statistical analysis. The strong correlation found between the two methods (P electromyography can be used in everyday practice, both for clinical use and scientific research, although both have their specific limitations and requirements to avoid the risk of biases. There was a correlation between pelvic floor muscle contractility measured by surface electromyography and by digital palpation. Both methods can be used to validate data in research and clinical setting. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Quantification of functional hand grip using electromyography and inertial sensor-derived accelerations: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Martin, Jaime; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2014-12-11

    Assessing hand injury is of great interest given the level of involvement of the hand with the environment. Knowing different assessment systems and their limitations generates new perspectives. The integration of digital systems (accelerometry and electromyography) as a tool to supplement functional assessment allows the clinician to know more about the motor component and its relation to movement. Therefore, the purpose of this study was the kinematic and electromyography analysis during functional hand movements. Ten subjects carried out six functional movements (terminal pinch, termino-lateral pinch, tripod pinch, power grip, extension grip and ball grip). Muscle activity (hand and forearm) was measured in real time using electromyograms, acquired with the Mega ME 6000, whilst acceleration was measured using the AcceleGlove. Electrical activity and acceleration variables were recorded simultaneously during the carrying out of the functional movements. The acceleration outcome variables were the modular vectors of each finger of the hand and the palm. In the electromyography, the main variables were normalized by the mean and by the maximum muscle activity of the thenar region, hypothenar, first interosseous dorsal, wrist flexors, carpal flexors and wrist extensors. Knowing muscle behavior allows the clinician to take a more direct approach in the treatment. Based on the results, the tripod grip shows greater kinetic activity and the middle finger is the most relevant in this regard. Ball grip involves most muscle activity, with the thenar region playing a fundamental role in hand activity. Relating muscle activation, movements, individual load and displacement offers the possibility to proceed with rehabilitation by individual component.

  9. Tibial and fibular nerves evaluation using intraoperative electromyography in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno, André Coelho; Politani, Elisa Landucci; Silva, Eduardo Guandelini da; Salomone, Raquel; Longo, Marco Vinicius Losso; Salles, Alessandra Grassi; Faria, José Carlos Marques de; Gemperli, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate a new model of intraoperative electromyographic (EMG) assessment of the tibial and fibular nerves, and its respectives motor units in rats. Eight Wistar rats underwent intraoperative EMG on both hind limbs at two different moments: week 0 and week 12. Supramaximal electrical stimulation applied on sciatic nerve, and compound muscle action potential recorded on the gastrocnemius muscle (GM) and the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDLM) through electrodes at specifics points. Motor function assessment was performaced through Walking Track Test. Exposing the muscles and nerves for examination did not alter tibial (p=0.918) or fibular (p=0.877) function between the evaluation moments. Electromyography of the GM, innervated by the tibial nerve, revealed similar amplitude (p=0.069) and latency (p=0.256) at week 0 and at 12 weeks, creating a standard of normality. Meanwhile, electromyography of the EDLM, innervated by the fibular nerve, showed significant differences between the amplitudes (p=0.003) and latencies (p=0.021) at the two different moments of observation. Intraoperative electromyography determined and quantified gastrocnemius muscle motor unit integrity, innervated by tibial nerve. Although this study was not useful to, objectively, assess extensor digitorum longus muscle motor unit, innervated by fibular nerve.

  10. Simulation of facial expressions using person-specific sEMG signals controlling a biomechanical face model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Merijn; Balm, Alfons J M; van Alphen, Maarten J A; Smeele, Ludi E; Stavness, Ian; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2018-01-01

    Functional inoperability in advanced oral cancer is difficult to assess preoperatively. To assess functions of lips and tongue, biomechanical models are required. Apart from adjusting generic models to individual anatomy, muscle activation patterns (MAPs) driving patient-specific functional movements are necessary to predict remaining functional outcome. We aim to evaluate how volunteer-specific MAPs derived from surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals control a biomechanical face model. Muscle activity of seven facial muscles in six volunteers was measured bilaterally with sEMG. A triple camera set-up recorded 3D lip movement. The generic face model in ArtiSynth was adapted to our needs. We controlled the model using the volunteer-specific MAPs. Three activation strategies were tested: activating all muscles [Formula: see text], selecting the three muscles showing highest muscle activity bilaterally [Formula: see text]-this was calculated by taking the mean of left and right muscles and then selecting the three with highest variance-and activating the muscles considered most relevant per instruction [Formula: see text], bilaterally. The model's lip movement was compared to the actual lip movement performed by the volunteers, using 3D correlation coefficients [Formula: see text]. The correlation coefficient between simulations and measurements with [Formula: see text] resulted in a median [Formula: see text] of 0.77. [Formula: see text] had a median [Formula: see text] of 0.78, whereas with [Formula: see text] the median [Formula: see text] decreased to 0.45. We demonstrated that MAPs derived from noninvasive sEMG measurements can control movement of the lips in a generic finite element face model with a median [Formula: see text] of 0.78. Ultimately, this is important to show the patient-specific residual movement using the patient's own MAPs. When the required treatment tools and personalisation techniques for geometry and anatomy become available, this may

  11. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sigge N.; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design an algorithm for detection of tonic seizures based on surface electromyography signals from the deltoids. A successful algorithm has a future prospect of being implemented in a wearable device as part of an alarm system. This has already been done......, median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain...

  12. Reliability of a combined biomechanical and surface electromyographical analysis system during dynamic barbell squat exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Raphael; Howatson, Glyn; Hunter, Angus

    2011-10-01

    An analysis system for barbell weightlifting exercises is proposed to record reliable performance and neuromuscular responses. The system consists of surface electromyography (sEMG) synchronized with electrogoniometry and a barbell position transducer. The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability of the three components of the system. Nine males (age 28.9 ± 4.8 years, mass 85.7 ± 15.1 kg) performed squat exercise at three loads on three separate trial days. A data acquisition and software system processed maximal knee angle (flexion), mean power for the concentric phase of squat exercise, and normalized root mean square of the vastus lateralis. Inter-trial coefficients of variation for each variable were calculated as 5.3%, 7.8%, and 7.5% respectively. In addition, knee joint motion and barbell displacement were significantly related to each other (bar displacement (m) = 1.39-0.0057 × knee angle (degress), with goodness-of-fit value, r² = 0.817), suggesting knee goniometry alone can represent the kinematics of a multi-joint squat exercise. The proven reliability of the three components of this system allows for real-time monitoring of resistance exercise using the preferred training methods of athletes, which could be valuable in the understanding of the neuromuscular response of elite strength training methods.

  13. Electromyographic and discomfort analysis of confined-space shipyard welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, B D; Wurzelbacher, S J; Shulman, S A; Hudock, S D

    2001-06-01

    This study examined muscle fatigue and discomfort in a confined-space welding operation at a shipyard. Surface electromyography (SEMG) was recorded from seven upper extremity and torso muscles of welders welding in a mock-up of the work environment. Following spectral transform of the SEMG data the percentage of the total signal power in the 10-30 Hz frequency band was compared over time during welding. For the conventional stick electrode welding process (SMAW) several muscles exhibited an increase in the percent of the total signal power in the low-frequency band. Fewer muscles exhibited this fatigue-related spectral density shift with a wire welding process (FCAW) the shipyard has considered adopting. This finding suggests that localized muscle fatigue may be reduced by a change to the wire welding process. Subjectively reported discomfort was generally low for both processes, but confirmed the finding that discomfort in the low back and shoulder regions is experienced in this welding operation.

  14. Prospective evaluation of the clinical utility of laryngeal electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, John W; Young, VyVy N; Smith, Libby J; Munin, Micheal C; Rosen, Clark A

    2014-12-01

    To prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) STUDY DESIGN: Prospective observational study. The study involved 50 consecutive patients referred for LEMG. Laryngologists initially indicated diagnoses and treatment plans under the assumption of no access to LEMG. Patients then underwent LEMG by blinded examiners. LEMG results were reviewed by each patient's laryngologist. Diagnoses and treatment plans were either maintained or altered based on the LEMG results. The diagnosis changed 10% (5/50) of the time and treatment plans were altered 36% (18/50) of the time based on information provided by LEMG. Observational periods were eliminated in 13/50 patients based on LEMG, moving them to permanent treatment. LEMG allowed the differentiation between joint fixation and bilateral paralysis in three patients. Previously unrecognized superior laryngeal neuropathies were identified in three patients. Laryngeal electromyography often provides clinically useful information that typically leads to a more accurate diagnosis and a more appropriate, expedited treatment plan. 2b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Online Bimanual Manipulation Using Surface Electromyography and Incremental Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazzulla, Ilaria; Nowak, Markus; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian; Castellini, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    The paradigm of simultaneous and proportional myocontrol of hand prostheses is gaining momentum in the rehabilitation robotics community. As opposed to the traditional surface electromyography classification schema, in simultaneous and proportional control the desired force/torque at each degree of freedom of the hand/wrist is predicted in real-time, giving to the individual a more natural experience, reducing the cognitive effort and improving his dexterity in daily-life activities. In this study we apply such an approach in a realistic manipulation scenario, using 10 non-linear incremental regression machines to predict the desired torques for each motor of two robotic hands. The prediction is enforced using two sets of surface electromyography electrodes and an incremental, non-linear machine learning technique called Incremental Ridge Regression with Random Fourier Features. Nine able-bodied subjects were engaged in a functional test with the aim to evaluate the performance of the system. The robotic hands were mounted on two hand/wrist orthopedic splints worn by healthy subjects and controlled online. An average completion rate of more than 95% was achieved in single-handed tasks and 84% in bimanual tasks. On average, 5 min of retraining were necessary on a total session duration of about 1 h and 40 min. This work sets a beginning in the study of bimanual manipulation with prostheses and will be carried on through experiments in unilateral and bilateral upper limb amputees thus increasing its scientific value.

  16. [Single fibre electromyography in 18 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca-Avarvarei, L; Patrignani-Ochoa, J H; Castilla-Garrido, J M; Jiménez-Castellano Ballesteros, R; Ugarte-Monasterio, J

    Single fibre electromyography (SFEMG) is a method that complements conventional electromyography and studies the activity of individual muscle fibres and of the neuromuscular junction. AIMS. We attempt to demonstrate the presence of reinnervation disorders by studying Jitter, fibre density (FD) and the presence of neurogenic blocks in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). SFEMG was carried out on 18 patients diagnosed with ALS. All the patients were submitted to a voluntary SFEMG in the extensor digitorum communis muscle of the fingers on the most affected side. The SFEMG in the extensor digitorum communis muscle of the fingers showed alterations in 13 out of the 18 patients studied (72%). FD was the most reliable parameter for translation of the motor neuron instability and increased in all cases. This was followed by the mean and the maximum individual (62%) Jitter and, lastly, the percentage of blocks (38%). In ALS, the parameters studied with SFEMG were modified in 72% of the cases studied. There is an overall correlation between the length of time the patient has had the disease and the modifications in the SFEMG (21.5 versus 13.7 months). The degree of clinical involvement is higher (6.5/13) in those who present an altered SFEMG compared to those who present a normal SFEMG (5.3/13).

  17. A simple test of muscle coactivation estimation using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.F. Ervilha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In numerous motor tasks, muscles around a joint act coactively to generate opposite torques. A variety of indexes based on electromyography signals have been presented in the literature to quantify muscle coactivation. However, it is not known how to estimate it reliably using such indexes. The goal of this study was to test the reliability of the estimation of muscle coactivation using electromyography. Isometric coactivation was obtained at various muscle activation levels. For this task, any coactivation measurement/index should present the maximal score (100% of coactivation. Two coactivation indexes were applied. In the first, the antagonistic muscle activity (the lower electromyographic signal between two muscles that generate opposite joint torques is divided by the mean between the agonistic and antagonistic muscle activations. In the second, the ratio between antagonistic and agonistic muscle activation is calculated. Moreover, we computed these indexes considering different electromyographic amplitude normalization procedures. It was found that the first algorithm, with all signals normalized by their respective maximal voluntary coactivation, generates the index closest to the true value (100%, reaching 92 ± 6%. In contrast, the coactivation index value was 82 ± 12% when the second algorithm was applied and the electromyographic signal was not normalized (P < 0.04. The new finding of the present study is that muscle coactivation is more reliably estimated if the EMG signals are normalized by their respective maximal voluntary contraction obtained during maximal coactivation prior to dividing the antagonistic muscle activity by the mean between the agonistic and antagonistic muscle activations.

  18. Spontaneous mechanical and electrical activities of human calf musculature at rest assessed by repetitive single-shot diffusion-weighted MRI and simultaneous surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Martin; Steidle, Günter; Martirosian, Petros; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Preißl, Hubert; Stemmer, Alto; Yang, Bin; Schick, Fritz

    2018-05-01

    Assessment of temporal and spatial relations between spontaneous mechanical activities in musculature (SMAM) at rest as revealed by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and electrical muscular activities in surface EMG (sEMG). Potential influences of static and radiofrequency magnetic fields on muscular activity on sEMG measurements at rest were examined systematically. Series of diffusion-weighted stimulated echo planar imaging were recorded with concurrent sEMG measurements. Electrical activities in sEMG were analyzed by non-parametric Friedman and two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Direct correlation of both modalities was investigated by temporal mapping of electrical activity in sEMG to DWI repetition interval. Electrical activities in sEMG and number of visible SMAMs in DWI showed a strong correlation (ρ = 0.9718). High accordance between sEMG activities and visible SMAMs in DWI in a near-surface region around sEMG electrodes was achieved. Characteristics of sEMG activities were almost similar under varying magnetic field conditions. Visible SMAMs in DWI have shown a close and direct relation to concurrent signals recorded by sEMG. MR-related magnetic fields had no significant effects on findings in sEMG. Hence, appearance of SMAMs in DWI should not be considered as imaging artifact or as effects originating from the special conditions of MR examinations. Spatial and temporal distributions of SMAMs indicate characteristics of spontaneous (microscopic) mechanical muscular action at rest. Therefore, DWI techniques should be considered as non-invasive tools for studying physiology and pathophysiology of spontaneous activities in resting muscle. Magn Reson Med 79:2784-2794, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Patellofemoral pain syndrome: electromyography in a frequency domain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelli, D. S.; Kuriki, H. U.; Polito, L. F.; Azevedo, F. M.; Negrão Filho, R. F.; Alves, N.

    2011-09-01

    The Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), has a multifactorial etiology and affects approximately 7 to 15% of the population, mostly women, youth, adults and active persons. PFPS causes anterior or retropatelar pain that is exacerbated during functional motor gestures, such as up and down stairs or spending long periods of time sitting, squatting or kneeling. As the diagnostic evaluation of this syndrome is still indirect, different mechanisms and methodologies try to make a classification that distinguishes patients with PFPS in relation to asymptomatic. Thereby, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of the electromyographic (EMG) signal in the frequency domain of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) in patients with PFPS, during the ascent of stairs. 33 young women (22 control group and 11 PFPS group), were evaluated by EMG during ascent of stairs. The VMO mean power frequency (MPF) and the VL frequency 95% (F95) were lower in symptomatic individuals. This may be related to the difference in muscle recruitment strategy exerted by each muscle in the PFPS group compared to the control group.

  20. Identification of contaminant type in surface electromyography (EMG) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Paul; Fraser, Graham D; Chan, Adrian D C; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Soraghan, John J

    2014-07-01

    The ability to recognize various forms of contaminants in surface electromyography (EMG) signals and to ascertain the overall quality of such signals is important in many EMG-enabled rehabilitation systems. In this paper, new methods for the automatic identification of commonly occurring contaminant types in surface EMG signals are presented. Such methods are advantageous because the contaminant type is typically not known in advance. The presented approach uses support vector machines as the main classification system. Both simulated and real EMG signals are used to assess the performance of the methods. The contaminants considered include: 1) electrocardiogram interference; 2) motion artifact; 3) power line interference; 4) amplifier saturation; and 5) additive white Gaussian noise. Results show that the contaminants can readily be distinguished at lower signal to noise ratios, with a growing degree of confusion at higher signal to noise ratios, where their effects on signal quality are less significant.

  1. Lower arm electromyography (EMG) activity detection using local binary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Paul; Chatlani, Navin; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Soraghan, John J; Menon, Radhika; Lakany, Heba

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new electromyography activity detection technique in which 1-D local binary pattern histograms are used to distinguish between periods of activity and inactivity in myoelectric signals. The algorithm is tested on forearm surface myoelectric signals occurring due to hand gestures. The novel features of the presented method are that: 1) activity detection is performed across multiple channels using few parameters and without the need for majority vote mechanisms, 2) there are no per-channel thresholds to be tuned, which makes the process of activity detection easier and simpler to implement and less prone to errors, 3) it is not necessary to measure the properties of the signal during a quiescent period before using the algorithm. The algorithm is compared to other offline single- and double-threshold activity detection methods and, for the data sets tested, it is shown to have a better overall performance with greater tolerance to the noise in the real data set used.

  2. Use of uterine electromyography to diagnose term and preterm labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    LUCOVNIK, MIHA; KUON, RUBEN J.; CHAMBLISS, LINDA R.; MANER, WILLIAM L.; SHI, SHAO-QING; SHI, LEILI; BALDUCCI, JAMES; GARFIELD, ROBERT E.

    2011-01-01

    Current methodologies to assess the process of labor, such as tocodynamometry or intrauterine pressure catheters, fetal fibronectin, cervical length measurement and digital cervical examination, have several major drawbacks. They only measure the onset of labor indirectly and do not detect cellular changes characteristic of true labor. Consequently, their predictive values for term or preterm delivery are poor. Uterine contractions are a result of the electrical activity within the myometrium. Measurement of uterine electromyography (EMG) has been shown to detect contractions as accurately as the currently used methods. In addition, changes in cell excitability and coupling required for effective contractions that lead to delivery are reflected in changes of several EMG parameters. Use of uterine EMG can help to identify patients in true labor better than any other method presently employed in the clinic. PMID:21241260

  3. Optimizing muscle selection for electromyography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Suma; Pioro, Erik P; Li, Jianbo; Li, Yuebing

    2017-07-01

    We compared the yield of limb and thoracic paraspinal muscle examination for revealing lower motor neuron (LMN) dysfunction on electromyography (EMG) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A retrospective review of 354 patients with clinically definite or probable ALS was performed. Seventeen limb muscles and thoracic paraspinal muscles were evaluated for the presence of both active and chronic denervation. Distal limb muscles showed the highest electrodiagnostic sensitivities of LMN dysfunction in ALS regardless of onset region and diagnostic certainty at the time of diagnosis. Electrodiagnostic yield is higher in muscles from the onset limb. Noncontiguous spread of lower motor neuron degeneration is present in ALS. Optimally selected 6 upper and 5 lower extremity muscles yielded >98% of potential positive cervical or lumbosacral segments. An algorithmic approach to needle EMG in ALS based on pretest probability of individual muscles optimizes electrodiagnostic yield, thus possibly minimizing test duration and patient discomfort. Muscle Nerve 56: 36-44, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Congenital multiple cranial neuropathies: Relevance of orofacial electromyography in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Francis; Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Baudon, Jean-Jacques; Vazquez, Marie-Paule

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess diagnoses and outcomes of infants with 2 or more cranial neuropathies identified using orofacial electromyography (EMG). This retrospective study involved 90 patients. Diagnoses took into account clinical, radiological, and genetic data. EMG examined the orbicularis oculi, genioglossus, and levator veli palatini muscles, and blink responses. To evaluate outcome, neurological disability, respiratory complications, and feeding difficulties were recorded. The patients had malformation syndromes (59), encephalopathies (29), or no underlying disorders (2). Neurogenic EMG signs were detected in a mean of 4 muscles, reflecting a mean of 3 affected nerves. EMG identified a higher number of neuropathies than clinical examination alone (82 vs. 31, facial; 56 vs. 2, pharyngeal; 25 vs. 3, hypoglossal). Poor outcome and death were more frequent when EMG identified ≥4 affected nerves (P = 0.02). EMG highlights multiple cranial neuropathies that can be clinically silent in infants with malformation syndromes or encephalopathies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Requests for electromyography in Rome: a critical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Castagnoli, Claudio; Madrigale, Andrea; Barrella, Massimo; Serrao, Mariano; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary To date, there exist no data reporting the level of suitability of requests for electromyography examinations (EMGs) in Rome. The records of 1,220 consecutive patients (age: 57.6±15.0 years; 400 M, 820 F) in two neurophysiology laboratories were collected and analyzed. In total, 1,317 EMGs were requested, mainly by general practitioners (GPs) (57%) and orthopedic specialists (18%). The most common diagnoses were L4-L5 radiculopathy (22%) and carpal tunnel syndrome (21%); 332 examinations (25%) were normal. 68% of requests were not accompanied by any specific query. The concordance between initial hypothesis/final post-EMG diagnosis was low (0.05). In 17% of cases, the EMG was deemed diagnostically useless by the neurophysiologist, which seems to indicate potentially suboptimal prescription of EMGs. PMID:24598396

  6. A wearable headset for monitoring electromyography responses within spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golab, M R; Breedon, P J; Vloeberghs, M

    2016-10-01

    This research examines an approach for enhancing the efficiency of spinal surgery utilising the technological capabilities and design functionalities of wearable headsets, in this case Google Glass. The aim was to improve the efficiency of the selective dorsal rhizotomy neurosurgical procedure initially through the use of Glass via an innovative approach to information design for an intraoperative monitoring display. Utilising primary and secondary research methods the development of a new electromyography response display for a wearable headset was undertaken. Testing proved that Glass was fit for purpose and that the new intraoperative monitor design provided an example platform for the innovative intraoperative monitoring display; however, alternative wearable headsets such as the Microsoft HoloLens could also be equally viable. The new display design combined with the appropriate wearable technology could greatly benefit the selective dorsal rhizotomy procedure.

  7. Requests for electromyography in Rome: a critical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Castagnoli, Claudio; Madrigale, Andrea; Barella, Massimo; Serrao, Mariano; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    To date, there exist no data reporting the level of suitability of requests for electromyography examinations (EMGs) in Rome. The records of 1,220 consecutive patients (age: 57.6±15.0 years; 400 M, 820 F) in two neurophysiology laboratories were collected and analyzed. In total, 1,317 EMGs were requested, mainly by general practitioners (GPs) (57%) and orthopedic specialists (18%). The most common diagnoses were L4-L5 radiculopathy (22%) and carpal tunnel syndrome (21%); 332 examinations (25%) were normal. 68% of requests were not accompanied by any specific query. The concordance between initial hypothesis/final post-EMG diagnosis was low (requests and 64% of requests by specialists (p=0.03). No difference in diagnostic ability was found between specialists (p>0.05). In 17% of cases, the EMG was deemed diagnostically useless by the neurophysiologist, which seems to indicate potentially suboptimal prescription of EMGs.

  8. Effect of diathermy on muscle temperature, electromyography, and mechanomyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah M; Trowbridge, Cynthia A; Fincher, A Louise; Cramer, Joel T

    2008-08-01

    This study examined the effects of pulsed shortwave diathermy on intramuscular temperature, surface electromyography (EMG), and mechanomyography (MMG) of the vastus lateralis. Thirty-five men were assigned to diathermy (n = 13), sham-diathermy (n = 12), or control (n = 10) groups. Each subject performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and incremental ramp contractions (10%-90% MVC) before and after treatment. Torque, intramuscular temperature, EMG, and MMG were recorded. Temperature for the diathermy group increased (P diathermy group. During ramp contractions, MMG amplitude and IMF increased at all percentages of MVC (10%-90%) for the diathermy group only (P Diathermy treatments may decrease musculotendinous stiffness, but not absolute strength or motor control strategies that influence force production.

  9. Is electromyography a predictive test of patient response to biofeedback in the treatment of fecal incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacima, Gloria; Pera, Miguel; González-Argenté, Xavier; Torrents, Abiguei; Valls-Solé, Josep; Espuña-Pons, Montserrat

    2016-03-01

    Biofeedback is effective in more than 70% of patients with fecal incontinence. However, reliable predictors of successful treatment have not been identified. The aim was to identify clinical variables and diagnostic tests, particularly electromyography, that could predict a successful outcome. We included 135 consecutive women with fecal incontinence treated with biofeedback. Clinical evaluation, manometry, ultrasonography, electromyography, and pudendal nerve terminal motor latency were performed before therapy. Treatment outcome was assessed using a symptoms diary, Wexner incontinence score and the patient's subjective perception. According to the symptoms diaries, 106 (78.5%) women had a good clinical result and 29 (21.5%) had a poor result. There were no differences in age, severity and type of fecal incontinence. Maximum resting pressure (39.3 ± 19.1 mmHg vs. 33.7 ± 20.2 mmHg; P = 0.156) and maximum squeeze pressure (91.8 ± 33.2 mmHg vs. 79.8 ± 31.2 mmHg; P = 0.127) were higher in patients having good clinical outcome although the difference was not significant. There were no differences in the presence of sphincter defects or abnormalities in electromyographic recordings. Logistic regression analysis found no independent predictive factor for good clinical outcome. Biofeedback is effective in more than 75% of patients with fecal incontinence. Clinical characteristics of patients and results of baseline tests have no predictive value of response to therapy. Specifically, we found no association between severity of electromyographic deficit and clinical response. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Surface electromyography features in manual workers affected by carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Botter, Alberto; Calabrese, Monica; Mussoni, Patrizia; Violante, Francesco S; Merletti, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Alterations in surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were evaluated in 24 non-manual workers and 40 manual workers (25 asymptomatic and 15 reporting CTS symptoms). The initial value (IV) and the normalized rate of change (NRC) of average rectified value (ARV), mean frequency of the power spectrum (MNF), and muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) were calculated during contractions at 20% and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) and kurtosis of the sEMG amplitude distribution were estimated. With respect to controls, manual workers showed higher NME, lower ARV IV, and reduced myoelectric manifestations of fatigue (lower MNF NRC for both contraction levels, and lower MFCV NRC at 50% MVC). Kurtosis at 20% MVC showed higher values in symptomatic manual workers than in the other two groups. Kurtosis seems to be a promising parameter for use in monitoring individuals who develop CTS. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Turning Electromyography Reports Upside Down: A Pilot Study Surveying Referring Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Anant M.; Baquis, Kate G.; Baquis, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Providers are expressing a desire for more efficient ways to retrieve relevant clinical data from the Electronic Health Record. In an effort to improve our Electromyography and Nerve Conduction Study reports, we surveyed referring providers on the effects of having the IMPRESSION at the start of the report. Our survey respondents felt that using this format for an Electromyography and Nerve Conduction Study report significantly improved the quality of the report while saving them time and/or mouse clicks when interpreting the report. Electro diagnosticians might consider using this format for their Electromyography and Nerve Conduction Study reports to improve referring provider satisfaction. PMID:27708744

  12. Deep learning with convolutional neural networks: a resource for the control of robotic prosthetic hands via electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredo Atzori

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Natural control methods based on surface electromyography and pattern recognition are promising for hand prosthetics. However, the control robustness offered by scientific research is still not sufficient for many real life applications and commercial prostheses are in the best case capable to offer natural control for only a few movements. Objective: In recent years deep learning revolutionized several fields of machine learning, including computer vision and speech recognition. Our objective is to test its capabilities for the natural control of robotic hands via surface electromyography by providing a baseline on a large number of intact and amputated subjects. Methods: We tested convolutional networks for the classification of an average of 50 hand movements in 67 intact subjects and 11 hand amputated subjects. The simple architecture of the neural network allowed to make several tests in order to evaluate the effect of pre-processing, layer architecture, data augmentation and optimization. The classification results are compared with a set of classical classification methods applied on the same datasets.Results: The classification accuracy obtained with convolutional neural networks using the proposed architecture is higher than the average results obtained with the classical classification methods but lower than the results obtained with the best reference methods in our tests. Significance: The results show that convolutional neural networks with a very simple architecture can produce accuracy comparable to the average classical classification methods. They show that several factors (including pre-processing, the architecture of the net and the optimization parameters can be fundamental for the analysis of surface electromyography data. Finally, the results suggest that deeper and more complex networks may increase dexterous control robustness, thus contributing to bridge the gap between the market and scientific research

  13. Usefulness of electromyography of the cavernous corpora (CC EMG) in the diagnosis of arterial erectile dysfunction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Virseda-Chamorro, M; Lopez-Garcia-Moreno, A M; Salinas-Casado, J; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2012-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) of the corpora cavernosa (CC-EMG) is able to record the activity of the erectile tissue during erection, and thus has been used as a diagnostic technique in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED...

  14. Sign language recognition using intrinsic-mode sample entropy on sEMG and accelerometer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2009-12-01

    Sign language forms a communication channel among the deaf; however, automated gesture recognition could further expand their communication with the hearers. In this work, data from five-channel surface electromyogram and 3-D accelerometer from the signer's dominant hand were analyzed using intrinsic-mode entropy (IMEn) for the automated recognition of Greek sign language (GSL) isolated signs. Discriminant analysis was used to identify the effective scales of the intrinsic-mode functions and the window length for the calculation of the IMEn that contributes to the efficient classification of the GSL signs. Experimental results from the IMEn analysis applied to GSL signs corresponding to 60-word lexicon repeated ten times by three native signers have shown more than 93% mean classification accuracy using IMEn as the only source of the classification feature set. This provides a promising bed-set toward the automated GSL gesture recognition.

  15. Combined cystometrography and electromyography of the external urethral sphincter following complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Joseph G; Strakosha, Ruth; Bauer, Stuart B; Diamond, David A; Pennison, Melanie; Rosoklija, Ilina; Khoshbin, Shahram

    2014-05-01

    Concern in patients with bladder exstrophy after reconstruction regarding potential injury to pelvic neurourological anatomy and a resultant functional deficit prompted combined (simultaneous) cystometrography and electromyography after complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy. We determined whether complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy would adversely affect the innervation controlling bladder and external urethral sphincter function. Complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy was performed via a modified Mitchell technique in newborns without osteotomy. Postoperative evaluation included combined cystometrography and needle electrode electromyography via the perineum, approximating the external urethral sphincter muscle complex. Electromyography was done to evaluate the external urethral sphincter response to sacral reflex stimulation and during voiding. Nine boys and 4 girls underwent combined cystometrography/electromyography after complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy. Age at study and time after complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy was 3 months to 10 years (median 11.5 months). Cystometrography revealed absent detrusor overactivity and the presence of a sustained detrusor voiding contraction in all cases. Electromyography showed universally normal individual motor unit action potentials of biphasic pattern, amplitude and duration. The external urethral sphincter sacral reflex response was intact with a normal caliber with respect to Valsalva, Credé, bulbocavernosus and anocutaneous (bilateral) stimulation. Synergy was documented by abrupt silencing of external urethral sphincter electromyography activity during voiding. After complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy combined cystometrography/electromyography in patients with bladder exstrophy showed normal neurourological findings, including sacral reflex responses, sustained detrusor voiding contraction and synergic voiding, in all patients postoperatively. These findings

  16. Surface electromyography recording of spontaneous eyeblinks: applications in neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Alice; Brenna, Stefano; Cavallari, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    We are designing an implantable neuroprosthesis for the treatment of unilateral facial paralysis. The envisioned biomimetic device paces artificial blinks in the paretic eyelid when activity in the healthy orbicularis oculi (orbicularis) muscle is detected. The present article focuses on electromyography (EMG)-based eyeblink detection. A pilot clinical study was performed in healthy volunteers who were intended to represent individuals with facial paralysis. Spontaneous eyeblinks were detected by a surface EMG recording. Blink detection accuracy was tested at rest and during voluntary smiling and chewing. Fifteen participants were asked to wear surface recording electrodes on the left side of their face, detecting the orbicularis oculi, the masseter, and the zygomatic muscle EMG activity. Participants were asked to look ahead, voluntarily smile, and chew according to an experimental protocol. Custom software was designed with the purpose of selectively filtering the multichannel EMG recordings and triggering a digital output. The software filter allowed elimination of spurious artificial eyeblinks and thus increased the accuracy of the EMG recording apparatus for the spontaneous blinking. Orbicularis oculi EMG recording worked as a real-time eyeblink-detecting system. Moreover, the multichannel EMG recording coupled to a proper digital signal processing was very effective in specifically detecting the spontaneous blinking during other facial muscle activities. With regard to closed-loop biomimetic devices for the pacing of the eyeblink, the EMG signal represents a valid option for the recording side.

  17. Can muscle coordination be precisely studied by surface electromyography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, François

    2011-02-01

    Despite the many reviews and research papers on the limitations of surface electromyography (EMG), there are relatively few that address this issue by considering dynamic contractions and specifically from the point of view of muscle coordination. Nevertheless, whether muscle coordination can be precisely studied using surface EMG signals is still a matter of discussion in the scientific community. In other words, it is uncertain whether neural control strategies of movement can be inferred from EMG. This review article discusses the appropriateness of using EMG recordings for studying muscle coordination. First, the main uses of surface EMG for studying muscle coordination are depicted. Then, the main intrinsic drawbacks of the EMG technique (i.e., amplitude cancellation, crosstalk and spatial variability of muscle activity) and of EMG processing (i.e., smoothing of the linear envelope, normalization of the time scale and the amplitude and timing of muscle activation) are described and discussed. Finally, three other factors (i.e., variability, electromechanical delay and neuromuscular fatigue), which can affect the interpretation of EMG and have received little attention in the literature, are presented and discussed. All of this information is crucial to the proper interpretation of muscle coordination from EMG signals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing EMG examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, Mauro; Aretini, Alessandro; Greco, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing the procedure. In one year, 1,586 consecutive patients (mean age 56 years; 58.8% women) were admitted to two EMG labs to undergo EMG for the first time. The patients found to be "informed" about the how an EMG examination is performed and about the purpose of EMG numbered 448 (28.2%), while those found to be "informed" only about the manner of its execution or only about its purpose numbered 161 (10.2%) and 151 (9.5%), respectively. The remaining 826 (52.1%) patients had either no information, or the information they had was very poor or incorrect (this was particularly true if they had been consulting websites). Being "informed" was associated with level of education (high), type of referring physician (specialist) and with an appropriate referral diagnosis specified in the EMG request. The quality of patient information on EMG was found to be very poor and could be improved. Physicians referring patients for EMG examinations, especially general practitioners, should assume primary responsibility for patient education and counseling in this field.

  19. Knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing EMG examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, Mauro; Aretini, Alessandro; Greco, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge of electromyography (EMG) in patients undergoing the procedure. In one year, 1,586 consecutive patients (mean age 56 years; 58.8% women) were admitted to two EMG labs to undergo EMG for the first time. The patients found to be “informed” about the how an EMG examination is performed and about the purpose of EMG numbered 448 (28.2%), while those found to be “informed” only about the manner of its execution or only about its purpose numbered 161 (10.2%) and 151 (9.5%), respectively. The remaining 826 (52.1%) patients had either no information, or the information they had was very poor or incorrect (this was particularly true if they had been consulting websites). Being “informed” was associated with level of education (high), type of referring physician (specialist) and with an appropriate referral diagnosis specified in the EMG request. The quality of patient information on EMG was found to be very poor and could be improved. Physicians referring patients for EMG examinations, especially general practitioners, should assume primary responsibility for patient education and counseling in this field. PMID:25473740

  20. Electromyography in the four competitive swimming strokes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonas; Figueiredo, Pedro; Daly, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview on 50 years of research in electromyography in the four competitive swimming strokes (crawl, breaststroke, butterfly, and backstroke). A systematic search of the existing literature was conducted using the combined keywords "swimming" and "EMG" on studies published before August 2013, in the electronic databases PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SPORT discus, Academic Search Elite, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane Library. The quality of each publication was assessed by two independent reviewers using a custom made checklist. Frequency of topics, muscles studied, swimming activities, populations, types of equipment and data treatment were determined from all selected papers and, when possible, results were compared and contrasted. In the first 20 years of EMG studies in swimming, most papers were published as congress proceedings. The methodological quality was low. Crawl stroke was most often studied. There was no standardized manner of defining swimming phases, normalizing the data or of presenting the results. Furthermore, the variability around the mean muscle activation patterns is large which makes it difficult to define a single pattern applicable to all swimmers in any activity examined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Value of Laryngeal Electromyography in Spasmodic Dysphonia Diagnosis and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingwen; Xu, Wen; Li, Yun; Cheng, Liyu

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the role of laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) in the diagnosis and treatment of spasmodic dysphonia (SD). The clinical manifestations, characteristics of motor unit potentials (MUPs), recruitment potentials, and laryngeal nerve evoked potentials (EPs) in LEMG, as well as the changes after botulinum toxin (BTX) treatment, were analyzed in 39 patients with adductor SD. The main clinical manifestations were a strained voice and phonation interruptions; in addition, the patients displayed hyper-adducted vocal folds during phonation. LEMG revealed significantly increased amplitudes of the thyroarytenoid muscle MUPs. The recruitment potentials were in a dense bunch, discharging full interference patterns with significantly increased amplitudes; the mean and maximum amplitude of recruitment potentials were 3090 μV and 5000 μV, respectively. The amplitude of EPs of thyroarytenoid muscle increased significantly; the mean and maximum amplitudes were 10.3 mV and 26.3 mV, respectively. After BTX was injected, the LEMG revealed denervation changes, and the EPs weakened or disappeared in the injected muscle. SD could be diagnosed, and the therapeutic efficacy of SD treatments could be evaluated based on clinical characteristics combined with LEMG characteristics. The increased amplitudes of the recruitment potentials and EPs of the thyroarytenoid muscle were the characteristic indexes. After BTX was injected, denervated potential characteristics appeared in the muscles. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Positioning of pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moreira Gavassi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of poor positioning of pedicle screws inserted with the aid of intraoperative electromyographic stimulation in the treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS.METHODS: This is a prospective observational study including all patients undergoing surgical treatment for AIS, between March and December 2013 at a single institution. All procedures were monitored by electromyography of the inserted pedicle screws. The position of the screws was evaluated by assessment of postoperative CT and classified according to the specific AIS classification system.RESULTS: Sixteen patients were included in the study, totalizing 281 instrumented pedicles (17.5 per patient. No patient had any neurological deficit or complaint after surgery. In the axial plane, 195 screws were found in ideal position (69.4% while in the sagittal plane, 226 screws were found in ideal position (80.4%. Considering both the axial and the sagittal planes, it was observed that 59.1% (166/281 of the screws did not violate any cortical wall.CONCLUSION: The use of pedicle screws proved to be a safe technique without causing neurological damage in AIS surgeries, even with the occurrence of poor positioning of some implants.

  3. Effects of ethyl chloride spray on pain and parameters of needle electromyography in the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Young-Eun; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of ethyl chloride and placebo sprays for reducing pain induced by needle electromyography and changes in parameters of the motor unit action potential during needle electromyography of the upper extremity. Sixty patients were randomized into the ethyl chloride or placebo spray groups. In both groups, spray was applied just before needle electromyography of the flexor carpi radialis, and a visual analog scale to evaluate the pain of needle electromyography and a five-point Likert scale for patient satisfaction and preference for reexamination were compared between the two groups. Then, changes in the amplitude, phases, turns, and duration of the motor unit action potential during needle electromyography of the biceps brachii were compared before and after spraying in each group. The visual analog scale was significantly lower, and patient satisfaction and preference for reexamination were significantly higher in the ethyl chloride spray group. Among the parameters of the motor unit action potential, there were no significant changes except for an increased duration after spraying with ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride spray can effectively reduce pain, but it must be used with caution because it may affect parameters of the motor unit action potential during needle electromyography.

  4. Linear- and nonlinear-electromyographic analysis of supracutaneous vibration stimuli of the forearm using diverse frequencies and considering skin physiological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chang-Yong; Chang, Yunhee; Kim, Sol-Bi; Kim, Shinki; Kim, Gyoosuk; Ryu, Jeicheong; Mun, Musung

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the efficacy of vibration in sensory feedback or substitution devices for users of myoelectric hand prostheses. Although most myoelectric hand prostheses are presently manipulated by a surface electromyogram (sEMG), only a few studies have been conducted on the effect of vibration on an sEMG. This study aimed to determine whether vibration stimulation affects the linear and nonlinear properties of surface electromyography (sEMG) considering the skin properties. The vibration stimuli, with frequencies ranging from 37 to 258 Hz, were applied to the proximal part of the arms of the eight female and seven male subjects. The skinfold thickness, hardness, and vibration threshold at the stimuli loci were measured. The root mean square (rms) and fractal dimension (DF) of the sEMG were measured at a distance of 1 cm in the upward direction from the stimuli loci. Above 223 Hz there were no differences between the rms of the genders in between the vibration stimuli (p > 0.05). Moreover, no differences were observed between the DF of the genders for any frequency (p > 0.05). Above 149 Hz, there were correlations between the rms and the skin hardness in the females. Otherwise, no correlations were observed between the rms and DF and the skin properties in both genders for most of the frequencies (all p > 0.05). These results suggest that vibration stimuli affect the linear properties of the sEMG, but not the nonlinear properties.

  5. Effects of Patient-Controlled Epidural Analgesia on Uterine Electromyography During Spontaneous Onset of Labor in Term Nulliparous Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuanjuan; Song, Xingrong; Liu, Lei; Shi, Shao-Qing; Garfield, Robert E; Zhang, Guozheng; Liu, Huishu

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) on uterine electromyography (EMG) activity in term pregnant women during labor. Nulliparous pregnant women in spontaneous term labor (N = 30) were enrolled (PCEA group, n = 20 and control group, n = 10). Five time periods (30 minutes each) were defined for noninvasive abdominal recordings and analysis of uterine EMG activity, that is, period I: before PCEA treatment with 2-cm cervical dilation; periods II to IV: each period successively at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after PCEA; and period V: second stage of labor with cervix at 10 cm dilation. Control patients without PCEA were monitored during the same times. The number of bursts/30 min, power density spectrum peak frequency, mean amplitude, and duration of uterine EMG bursts were measured to assess uterine EMG activity. Maternal, fetal, and labor characteristics were also recorded. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by other tests. Electromyography parameters are significantly lower (P .05). Also, patients with PCEA have a slower rate of cervical dilation (P .05) positive labor outcomes. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia initially suppresses uterine EMG and slows cervical dilation thereby prolonging labor. However, the EMG activity recovers with labor progress with no effects on delivery outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography assessment of cricothyroid function in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tuan-Jen; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Lee, Li-Ang; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Wong, Alice M K

    2015-11-01

    Determination of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) involvement in addition to recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paralysis in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) relies on traditional, qualitative laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) examination. It is necessary to develop a quantitative measurement that reflects the degree of denervation of the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The present study aimed to establish a standard quantitative assessment of CT function in patients with UVFP by measuring the turn frequency. Case series study performed in an otolaryngology outpatient clinic. Twenty healthy subjects and 103 patients with UVFP were recruited. The main outcome measures for the patients included acoustic analysis using traditional LEMG examination, quantitative LEMG analysis, and acoustic analysis based on fundamental frequency contours. Acoustic reliability was examined in the healthy subjects, and the peak fundamental frequency in an upward glissando showed good test-retest reliability, especially for the offset fundamental frequency. LEMG indicated that 33 patients had RLN and SLN lesions (RLN+SLN group) and 70 had only RLN lesions (RLN group). When patients produced a standard upward glissando sound, the peak turn frequency reflecting the recruitment of the CT muscle was significantly lower in the RLN+SLN group compared with the RLN group (406±256 vs. 778±238 Hz; P<.001). We conclude that quantitative measurement of the interference pattern when voicing a standard upward glissando sound may provide a feasible reflection of the degree of a SLN injury. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Freitas

    Full Text Available Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI, collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  8. Recurrent laryngeal nerve recovery patterns assessed by serial electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniello, Randal C; Park, Andrea M; Bhatt, Neel K; Al-Lozi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Following acute injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) is increasingly being used to determine prognosis for recovery. The LEMG findings change during the recovery process, but the timing of these changes is not well described. In this canine study, LEMGs were obtained serially following model RLN injuries. Animal Study. Thirty-six canine RLNs underwent crush (n = 6), complete transection with reanastomosis (n = 6), half-transection half-crush (n = 5), cautery (n = 5), stretch (n = 5), inferior crush (n = 4), or inferior transection with reanastomosis (n = 5) injuries. Injuries were performed 5 cm from cricoid or were 5 cm further inferior. Under light sedation, LEMG of thyroarytenoid muscles was performed monthly for 6 months following injury. At 6 months, spontaneous and induced vocal fold motion was assessed. Except for the stretch injury, the remaining groups showed very similar recovery patterns. Fibrillation potentials (FPs) and/or positive sharp waves (PSWs; signs of bad prognosis) were seen in all cases at 1 month and lasted on average for 2.26 months (range = 1-4 months). Motor unit potentials of at least 2+ (scale = 0-4+; signs of good prognosis) were seen beginning at 3.61 months (range = 2-6 months). The stretch injury was less severe, with 3 of 5 showing no FPs/PSWs at 1 month; all recovered full mobility. Ten of the 36 thyroarytenoid muscles (27.8%) had 1 electromyograph showing both bad prognosis and good prognosis signs simultaneously at 2 to 4 months postinjury. LEMG can be used to predict RNL recovery, but timing is important and LEMG results earlier than 3 months may overestimate a negative prognosis. NA Laryngoscope, 126:651-656, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. How changing the focus of attention affects performance, kinematics, and electromyography in dart throwing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Keith R; Sherwood, David E; Healy, Alice F

    2010-08-01

    Research has found an advantage for an external focus of attention in motor control and learning; instructing subjects to focus on the effects of their actions, rather than on body movements, can improve performance during training and retention testing. Previous research has mostly concentrated on movement outcomes, not on the quality of the movement itself. Thus, this study combined surface electromyography (EMG) with motion analysis and outcome measures in a dart throwing task, making this the first study that includes a comprehensive analysis of changes in motor performance as a function of attentional focus. An external focus of attention led to better performance (less absolute error), decreased preparation time between throws, and reduced EMG activity in the triceps brachii. There was also some evidence of increased variability for kinematic measures of the shoulder joint under an external focus relative to an internal focus. These results suggest improved movement economy with an external focus of attention. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Improving Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Motor Studies Through Simultaneous Electromyography Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Baker, S. Nicole; Mraz, Richard; Ives, John R.; Martel, Anne L.; McIlroy, William E.; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Specially designed optoelectronic and data postprocessing methods are described that permit electromyography (EMG) of muscle activity simultaneous with functional MRI (fMRI). Hardware characterization and validation included simultaneous EMG and event-related fMRI in 17 healthy participants during either ankle (n = 12), index finger (n = 3), or wrist (n = 2) contractions cued by visual stimuli. Principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) were evaluated for their ability to remove residual fMRI gradient-induced signal contamination in EMG data. Contractions of ankle tibialis anterior and index finger abductor were clearly distinguishable, although observing contractions from the wrist flexors proved more challenging. To demonstrate the potential utility of simultaneous EMG and fMRI, data from the ankle experiments were analyzed using two approaches: 1) assuming contractions coincided precisely with visual cues, and 2) using EMG to time the onset and offset of muscle contraction precisely for each participant. Both methods produced complementary activation maps, although the EMG-guided approach recovered more active brain voxels and revealed activity better in the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Furthermore, numerical simulations confirmed that precise knowledge of behavioral responses, such as those provided by EMG, are much more important for event-related experimental designs compared to block designs. This simultaneous EMG and fMRI methodology has important applications where the amplitude or timing of motor output is impaired, such as after stroke. PMID:17133382

  11. The management of lactose intolerance among primary care physicians and its correlation with management by gastroenterologists: the SEPD-SEMG national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Argüelles-Arias

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aims: The understanding of lactose intolerance (LI is limited in some professional settings. Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva (SEPD and Sociedad Española de Medicina General (SEMG have developed a survey in order to: a Analyze primary care physicians (PCPs knowledge and clinical management; and b to compare results with those of a previous survey of Spanish gastroenterologists (GEs. Material and methods: An online questionnaire was sent to SEMG members with 27 items on various issues: Demographics, occupational characteristics, outlook on LI, diagnostic tests, treatment, and follow-up. Results were compared to those from a survey of GEs. Results: A total of 456 PCPs responded, versus 477 GEs. PCPs had an older mean age and longer professional experience. Level of understanding of LI was similar, albeit a higher proportion of PCPs lacked epidemiological awareness (p 0.001, and LI symptoms as overlapping those of irritable bowel syndrome (93.5 vs. 88.2%; p = 0.005, although symptoms perceived as suspicious of LI were similar in both groups. Dietary recommendations were recognized as the primary therapeutic approach. Conclusion: This study reveals the outlook of PCPs on LI, and allows comparison with that of GEs, as a basis for the development of strategies aimed at improving LI understanding, approach and management in our setting.

  12. The management of lactose intolerance among primary care physicians and its correlation with management by gastroenterologists: the SEPD-SEMG national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles-Arias, Federico; Rodríguez Ledo, Pilar; Tenías, José María; Otero, Mercedes; Casellas, Francesc; Blay Cortés, Guadalupe; Lucendo, Alfredo; Domínguez-Jiménez, José Luis; Carballo, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    The understanding of lactose intolerance (LI) is limited in some professional settings. Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva (SEPD) and Sociedad Española de Medicina General (SEMG) have developed a survey in order to: a) Analyze primary care physicians (PCPs) knowledge and clinical management; and b) to compare results with those of a previous survey of Spanish gastroenterologists (GEs). An online questionnaire was sent to SEMG members with 27 items on various issues: Demographics, occupational characteristics, outlook on LI, diagnostic tests, treatment, and follow-up. Results were compared to those from a survey of GEs. A total of 456 PCPs responded, versus 477 GEs. PCPs had an older mean age and longer professional experience. Level of understanding of LI was similar, albeit a higher proportion of PCPs lacked epidemiological awareness (p 0.001), and LI symptoms as overlapping those of irritable bowel syndrome (93.5 vs. 88.2%; p = 0.005), although symptoms perceived as suspicious of LI were similar in both groups. Dietary recommendations were recognized as the primary therapeutic approach. This study reveals the outlook of PCPs on LI, and allows comparison with that of GEs, as a basis for the development of strategies aimed at improving LI understanding, approach and management in our setting.

  13. Tracking motor units longitudinally across experimental sessions with high‐density surface electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez‐Valdes, E.; Negro, F.; Laine, C. M.; Falla, D.; Mayer, F.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Classic motor unit (MU) recording and analysis methods do not allow the same MUs to be tracked across different experimental sessions, and therefore, there is limited experimental evidence on the adjustments in MU properties following training or during the progression of neuromuscular disorders.We propose a new processing method to track the same MUs across experimental sessions (separated by weeks) by using high‐density surface electromyography.The application of the proposed method in two experiments showed that individual MUs can be identified reliably in measurements separated by weeks and that changes in properties of the tracked MUs across experimental sessions can be identified with high sensitivity.These results indicate that the behaviour and properties of the same MUs can be monitored across multiple testing sessions.The proposed method opens new possibilities in the understanding of adjustments in motor unit properties due to training interventions or the progression of pathologies. Abstract A new method is proposed for tracking individual motor units (MUs) across multiple experimental sessions on different days. The technique is based on a novel decomposition approach for high‐density surface electromyography and was tested with two experimental studies for reliability and sensitivity. Experiment I (reliability): ten participants performed isometric knee extensions at 10, 30, 50 and 70% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force in three sessions, each separated by 1 week. Experiment II (sensitivity): seven participants performed 2 weeks of endurance training (cycling) and were tested pre–post intervention during isometric knee extensions at 10 and 30% MVC. The reliability (Experiment I) and sensitivity (Experiment II) of the measured MU properties were compared for the MUs tracked across sessions, with respect to all MUs identified in each session. In Experiment I, on average 38.3% and 40.1% of the identified MUs could be

  14. High-density surface electromyography improves the identification of oscillatory synaptic inputs to motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeg, Chiel van de; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Stegeman, Dick F; Boonstra, Tjeerd W

    2014-05-15

    Many studies have addressed corticomuscular coherence (CMC), but broad applications are limited by low coherence values and the variability across subjects and recordings. Here, we investigated how the use of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) can improve the detection of CMC. Sixteen healthy subjects performed isometric contractions at six low-force levels using a pinch-grip, while HDsEMG of the adductor pollicis transversus and flexor and abductor pollicis brevis and whole-head magnetoencephalography were recorded. Different configurations were constructed from the HDsEMG grid, such as a bipolar and Laplacian montage, as well as a montage based on principal component analysis (PCA). CMC was estimated for each configuration, and the strength of coherence was compared across configurations. As expected, performance of the precision-grip task resulted in significant CMC in the β-frequency band (16-26 Hz). Compared with a bipolar EMG montage, all multichannel configurations obtained from the HDsEMG grid revealed a significant increase in CMC. The configuration, based on PCA, showed the largest (37%) increase. HDsEMG did not reduce the between-subject variability; rather, many configurations showed an increased coefficient of variation. Increased CMC presumably reflects the ability of HDsEMG to counteract inherent EMG signal factors-such as amplitude cancellation-which impact the detection of oscillatory inputs. In contrast, the between-subject variability of CMC most likely has a cortical origin. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Vocal fold motion outcome based on excellent prognosis with laryngeal electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Libby J; Rosen, Clark A; Munin, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    As laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) becomes more refined, accurate predictions of vocal fold motion recovery are possible. Focus has been on outcomes for patients with poor prognosis for vocal fold motion recovery. Limited information is available regarding the expected rate of purposeful vocal fold motion recovery when there is good to normal motor recruitment, no signs of denervation, and no signs of synkinetic activity with LEMG, termed excellent prognosis. The objective of this study is to determine the rate of vocal fold motion recovery with excellent prognosis findings on LEMG after acute recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Retrospective review. Patients undergoing a standardized LEMG protocol, consisting of qualitative (evaluation of motor recruitment, motor unit configuration, detection of fibrillations, presence of synkinesis) and quantitative (turns analysis) measurements were evaluated for purposeful vocal-fold motion recovery, calculated after at least 6 months since onset of injury. Twenty-three patients who underwent LEMG for acute vocal fold paralysis met the inclusion criteria of excellent prognosis. Eighteen patients (78.3%) recovered vocal fold motion, as determined by flexible laryngoscopy. Nearly 80% of patients determined to have excellent prognosis for vocal fold motion recovery experienced return of vocal fold motion. This information will help clinicians not only counsel their patients on expectations but will also help guide treatment. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:2310-2314, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Signal features of surface electromyography in advanced Parkinson's disease during different settings of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Saara M; Ruonala, Verneri; Pekkonen, Eero; Kankaanpää, Markku; Airaksinen, Olavi; Karjalainen, Pasi A

    2015-12-01

    Electromyography (EMG) and acceleration (ACC) measurements are potential methods for quantifying efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD). The treatment efficacy depends on the settings of DBS parameters (pulse amplitude, frequency and width). This study quantified, if EMG and ACC signal features differ between different DBS settings and if DBS effect is unequal between different muscles. EMGs were measured from biceps brachii (BB) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of 13 PD patients. ACCs were measured from wrists. Measurements were performed during seven different settings of DBS and analyzed using methods based on spectral analysis, signal morphology and nonlinear dynamics. The results showed significant within-subject differences in the EMG signal kurtosis, correlation dimension, recurrence rate and EMG-ACC coherence between different DBS settings for BB but not for TA muscles. Correlations between EMG feature values and clinical rest tremor and rigidity scores were weak but significant. Surface EMG features differed between different DBS settings and DBS effect was unequal between upper and lower limb muscles. EMG changes pointed to previously defined optimal settings in most of patients, which should be quantified even more deeply in the upcoming studies. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of electrocardiography contamination and comparison of ECG removal methods on upper trapezius electromyography recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Ryan J; Maluf, Katrina S

    2014-12-01

    Electromyography (EMG) recordings from the trapezius are often contaminated by the electrocardiography (ECG) signal, making it difficult to distinguish low-level muscle activity from muscular rest. This study investigates the influence of ECG contamination on EMG amplitude and frequency estimations in the upper trapezius during muscular rest and low-level contractions. A new method of ECG contamination removal, filtered template subtraction (FTS), is described and compared to 30 Hz high-pass filter (HPF) and averaged template subtraction (ATS) methods. FTS creates a unique template of each ECG artifact using a low-pass filtered copy of the contaminated signal, which is subtracted from contaminated periods in the original signal. ECG contamination results in an over-estimation of EMG amplitude during rest in the upper trapezius, with negligible effects on amplitude and frequency estimations during low-intensity isometric contractions. FTS and HPF successfully removed ECG contamination from periods of muscular rest, yet introduced errors during muscle contraction. Conversely, ATS failed to fully remove ECG contamination during muscular rest, yet did not introduce errors during muscle contraction. The relative advantages and disadvantages of different ECG contamination removal methods should be considered in the context of the specific motor tasks that require analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cross-platform data integration of paratubal electromyography and sonotubometry for eustachian tube: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Li, Yanning; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Shaohua; Tang, Anzhou; Nong, Dongxiao

    2016-11-01

    The sensitive sonotubometry and MATLAB provide a new tool to study the eustachian tube (ET) function and contribute more to reliable data and precise analysis. The levator veli palatini muscle (mLVP) and the salpingopharyngeus muscle (mSP) may, respectively, be the most important and least important muscle for ET function. The ET lumen dilation is a result of the contraction of the paratubal muscles, the tensor veli palatini muscle (mTVP), mLVP and mSP. To trace the dynamic ET muscle/lumen activities, the present study aimed to optimize sonotubometry and achieve cross-platform data integration of electromyography (EMG) and sonotubometry using MATLAB (matrix laboratory). Seventeen healthy volunteers (34 ears) were chosen for the concurrent recordings of the paratubal EMG and sonotubogram under dry and water swallowing. The optimized sonotubometry based on computer sound card showed satisfied sensitivity. For both EMGs and sonotubogram, dry swallowing generated significantly greater amplitude and longer duration compared to water swallowing. Moreover, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were detected in the comparison of the amplitude, duration, and latency for the mTVP, mLVP, and mSP. The mSP activity was the weakest and even inactive in some cases, the mLVP presented the most powerful and long lasting activity during ET-opening.

  19. Classification of ankle joint movements based on surface electromyography signals for rehabilitation robot applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quraishi, Maged S; Ishak, Asnor J; Ahmad, Siti A; Hasan, Mohd K; Al-Qurishi, Muhammad; Ghapanchizadeh, Hossein; Alamri, Atif

    2017-05-01

    Electromyography (EMG)-based control is the core of prostheses, orthoses, and other rehabilitation devices in recent research. Nonetheless, EMG is difficult to use as a control signal given the complex nature of the signal. To overcome this problem, the researchers employed a pattern recognition technique. EMG pattern recognition mainly involves four stages: signal detection, preprocessing feature extraction, dimensionality reduction, and classification. In particular, the success of any pattern recognition technique depends on the feature extraction stage. In this study, a modified time-domain features set and logarithmic transferred time-domain features (LTD) were evaluated and compared with other traditional time-domain features set (TTD). Three classifiers were employed to assess the two feature sets, namely linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k nearest neighborhood, and Naïve Bayes. Results indicated the superiority of the new time-domain feature set LTD, on conventional time-domain features TTD with the average classification accuracy of 97.23 %. In addition, the LDA classifier outperformed the other two classifiers considered in this study.

  20. Detection of Periodic Leg Movements by Machine Learning Methods Using Polysomnographic Parameters Other Than Leg Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Umut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of channels used for polysomnographic recording frequently causes difficulties for patients because of the many cables connected. Also, it increases the risk of having troubles during recording process and increases the storage volume. In this study, it is intended to detect periodic leg movement (PLM in sleep with the use of the channels except leg electromyography (EMG by analysing polysomnography (PSG data with digital signal processing (DSP and machine learning methods. PSG records of 153 patients of different ages and genders with PLM disorder diagnosis were examined retrospectively. A novel software was developed for the analysis of PSG records. The software utilizes the machine learning algorithms, statistical methods, and DSP methods. In order to classify PLM, popular machine learning methods (multilayer perceptron, K-nearest neighbour, and random forests and logistic regression were used. Comparison of classified results showed that while K-nearest neighbour classification algorithm had higher average classification rate (91.87% and lower average classification error value (RMSE = 0.2850, multilayer perceptron algorithm had the lowest average classification rate (83.29% and the highest average classification error value (RMSE = 0.3705. Results showed that PLM can be classified with high accuracy (91.87% without leg EMG record being present.

  1. Design and development of an automated, portable and handheld tablet personal computer-based data acquisition system for monitoring electromyography signals during rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Nizam U; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Poo, Tarn S

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the design of a robust, inexpensive, easy-to-use, small, and portable online electromyography acquisition system for monitoring electromyography signals during rehabilitation. This single-channel (one-muscle) system was connected via the universal serial bus port to a programmable Windows operating system handheld tablet personal computer for storage and analysis of the data by the end user. The raw electromyography signals were amplified in order to convert them to an observable scale. The inherent noise of 50 Hz (Malaysia) from power lines electromagnetic interference was then eliminated using a single-hybrid IC notch filter. These signals were sampled by a signal processing module and converted into 24-bit digital data. An algorithm was developed and programmed to transmit the digital data to the computer, where it was reassembled and displayed in the computer using software. Finally, the following device was furnished with the graphical user interface to display the online muscle strength streaming signal in a handheld tablet personal computer. This battery-operated system was tested on the biceps brachii muscles of 20 healthy subjects, and the results were compared to those obtained with a commercial single-channel (one-muscle) electromyography acquisition system. The results obtained using the developed device when compared to those obtained from a commercially available physiological signal monitoring system for activities involving muscle contractions were found to be comparable (the comparison of various statistical parameters) between male and female subjects. In addition, the key advantage of this developed system over the conventional desktop personal computer-based acquisition systems is its portability due to the use of a tablet personal computer in which the results are accessible graphically as well as stored in text (comma-separated value) form.

  2. Abdominal electromyography may predict the response to tocolysis in preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mohamed A; Abdel-Sattar, Mehany M; Abdel-Salam, Sherif M; Saleh, Saida; Khalafallah, Mohamed M

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether abdominal electromyography can predict the response to tocolysis in pregnant women in preterm labor. This study was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Menofyia University Hospital in Egypt. Fifty pregnant women in preterm labor who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Baseline abdominal electromyography was performed. Tocolysis in the form of hexoprenaline sulphate infusion was started for all women and electromyography was repeated after 24h in responders but only after 6h in non responders. The receiver operating characteristics curve was drawn to calculate specificity of the electromyography at 100% sensitivity. Results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Forty women responded to tocolysis by delaying delivery for more than 48 h. There was a significant reduction in the frequency of uterine contractions after tocolysis (3.76 ± 0.92 versus 2.32 ± 2.05 contractions per 10 min; Pelectromyography of amplitude of 82 mV lasting for 30s or more had a specificity of 90%, positive and negative predictive values of 67% and 95%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 88% in predicting preterm labor. Abdominal electromyography may predict the response to tocolysis in preterm labor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electromyography (EMG) accuracy compared to muscle biopsy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, Malcolm; Jossiphov, Joseph; Nevo, Yoram

    2007-07-01

    Reports show wide variability of electromyography (EMG) in detecting pediatric neuromuscular disorders. The study's aim was to determine EMG/nerve conduction study accuracy compared to muscle biopsy and final clinical diagnosis, and sensitivity for myopathic motor unit potential detection in childhood. Of 550 EMG/nerve conduction studies performed by the same examiner from a pediatric neuromuscular service, 27 children (ages 6 days to 16 years [10 boys; M:F, 1:1.7]) with muscle biopsies and final clinical diagnoses were compared retrospectively. Final clinical diagnoses were congenital myopathies (5 of 27,18%), nonspecific myopathies (biopsy myopathic, final diagnosis uncertain; 6 of 27, 22%), congenital myasthenic syndrome (3 of 27, 11%), juvenile myasthenia gravis (1 of 27, 4%), arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (2 of 27, 7%), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (1 of 27, 4%), bilateral peroneal neuropathies (1 of 27, 4%), and normal (8 of 27, 30%). There were no muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy patients. EMG/nerve conduction studies had a 74% agreement with final clinical diagnoses and 100% agreement in neurogenic, neuromuscular junction, and normal categories. Muscle biopsies concurred with final diagnoses in 87%, and 100% in myopathic and normal categories. In congenital myasthenic syndrome, muscle biopsies showed mild variation in fiber size in 2 of 3 children and were normal in 1 of 3. EMG sensitivity for detecting myopathic motor unit potentials in myopathies was 4 of 11 (36%), greater over 2 years of age (3 of 4, 75%), compared to infants less than 2 years (1 of 7, 14%), not statistically significant (P = .0879). EMGs false-negative for myopathy in infants EMG detected myopathic motor unit potentials in 40%, with false-negative results neurogenic (20%) or normal (40%). Because our study has no additional tests for active myopathies, for example Duchenne muscular dystrophy genetic testing, our sensitivity for myopathies is lower than if we

  4. Tensor veli palatini electromyography for monitoring Eustachian tube rehabilitation in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciotti, P M; Della Marca, G; D'Alatri, L; Lucidi, D; Rigante, M; Scarano, E

    2017-05-01

    The pathogenesis of otitis media is related to Eustachian tube dysfunction. The tensor veli palatini muscle actively opens the Eustachian tube and promotes middle-ear ventilation. This study describes a technique for paratubal electromyography that uses a surface, non-invasive electrode able to record tensor veli palatini muscle activity during swallowing. Twenty otitis media patients and 10 healthy patients underwent tensor veli palatini electromyography. Activity of this muscle before and after Eustachian tube rehabilitation was also assessed. In 78.5 per cent of patients, the electromyography duration phase and/or amplitude were reduced in the affected side. The muscle action potential was impaired in all patients who underwent Eustachian tube rehabilitation. This study confirmed that Eustachian tube muscle dysfunction has a role in otitis media pathogenesis and showed that muscle activity increases after Eustachian tube rehabilitation therapy.

  5. Assessing altered motor unit recruitment patterns in paretic muscles of stroke survivors using surface electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Suresh, Aneesha K.; Rymer, William Z.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The advancement of surface electromyogram (sEMG) recording and signal processing techniques has allowed us to characterize the recruitment properties of a substantial population of motor units (MUs) non-invasively. Here we seek to determine whether MU recruitment properties are modified in paretic muscles of hemispheric stroke survivors. Approach. Using an advanced EMG sensor array, we recorded sEMG during isometric contractions of the first dorsal interosseous muscle over a range of contraction levels, from 20% to 60% of maximum, in both paretic and contralateral muscles of stroke survivors. Using MU decomposition techniques, MU action potential amplitudes and recruitment thresholds were derived for simultaneously activated MUs in each isometric contraction. Main results. Our results show a significant disruption of recruitment organization in paretic muscles, in that the size principle describing recruitment rank order was materially distorted. MUs were recruited over a very narrow force range with increasing force output, generating a strong clustering effect, when referenced to recruitment force magnitude. Such disturbances in MU properties also correlated well with the impairment of voluntary force generation. Significance. Our findings provide direct evidence regarding MU recruitment modifications in paretic muscles of stroke survivors, and suggest that these modifications may contribute to weakness for voluntary contractions.

  6. Effects of Hydrotherapy on postural control and electromyography parameters in men with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mahjur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of hydrotherapy on postural control and electromyography parameters in men with chronic non-specific low back pain. Thirty men with chronic non-specific LBP divided into two hydrotherapy and control groups, randomly and equally. Electromyographic activity of erector spinae muscles and balance measured for both of groups before and after intervention. Hydrotherapy program was consisted of 24 sessions. Subjects in control group didn’t have any special activity. Two-way variance was used to interpret the data and correlated and independent T-tests were used for analysis of data at the significance level of (P0.05. However, a significant difference observed between two groups in balance index (P<0.05.

  7. Uterine electromyography during active phase compared with latent phase of labor at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojner Bregar, Andreja; Lucovnik, Miha; Verdenik, Ivan; Jager, Franc; Gersak, Ksenija; Garfield, Robert E

    2016-02-01

    In a prospective study in a tertiary university hospital we wanted to determine whether uterine electromyography (EMG) can differentiate between the active and latent phase of labor. Thirty women presenting at ≥37(0/7) weeks of gestation with regular uterine contractions, intact membranes, and a Bishop score <6. EMG was recorded from the abdominal surface for 30 min. Latent phase was defined as no cervical change within at least 4 h. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis (p ≤ 0.05 significant). Diagnostic accuracy of EMG was determined by receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis. The integral of the amplitudes of the power density spectrum (PDS) corresponding to the PDS energy within the "bursts" of uterine EMG activity was compared between the active and latent labor groups. Seventeen (57%) women were found to be in the active phase of labor and 13 (43%) were in the latent phase. The EMG PDS integral was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in the active (mean 3.40 ± 0.82 μV) compared with the latent (mean 1.17 ± 0.33 μV) phase of labor. The PDS integral had an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.80 to distinguish between active and latent phases of labor, compared with number of contractions on tocodynamometry (AUC = 0.79), and Bishop score (AUC = 0.78). The combination (sum) of PDS integral, tocodynamometry, and Bishop score predicted active phase of labor with an AUC of 0.90. Adding uterine EMG measurements to the methods currently used in the clinics could improve the accuracy of diagnosing active labor. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Recent Observations in Surface Electromyography Recording of Triceps Brachii Muscle in Patients and Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asraf Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe and analyse the literature on the use of surface electromyography electrodes, including the shape, size, and metal composition of the electrodes used, the interelectrode distance, and the anatomical locations on the muscle at which the electrodes are placed, for the observation of the triceps brachii muscle activity in patients and athletes.

  9. High-density surface electromyography improves the identification of oscillatory synaptic inputs to motor neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Steeg, C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Stegeman, D.F.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have addressed corticomuscular coherence (CMC), but broad applications are limited by low coherence values and the variability across subjects and recordings. Here, we investigated how the use of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) can improve the detection of CMC. Sixteen

  10. High-density surface electromyography improves the identification of oscillatory synaptic inputs to motoneurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, C.V.; Daffertshofer, A.; Stegeman, D.F.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have addressed corticomuscular coherence (CMC), but broad applications are limited by low coherence values and the variability across subjects and recordings. Here, we investigated how the use of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) can improve the detection of CMC. Sixteen

  11. The Relationship between Submental Surface Electromyography and Hyo-Laryngeal Kinematic Measures of Mendelsohn Maneuver Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azola, Alba M.; Greene, Lindsey R.; Taylor-Kamara, Isha; Macrae, Phoebe; Anderson, Cheryl; Humbert, Ianessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Mendelsohn Maneuver (MM) is a commonly prescribed technique that is taught to individuals with dysphagia to improve swallowing ability. Due to cost and safety concerns associated with videofluoroscopy (VFS) use, submental surface electromyography (ssEMG) is commonly used in place of VFS to train the MM in clinical and research…

  12. Lower motor neuron involvement examined by quantitative electromyography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) includes demonstration of lower motor neuron (LMN) and upper motor neuron (UMN) involvement of bulbar and spinal muscles. Electromyography (EMG) is essential to confirm LMN affection in weak muscles, and to demonstrate changes...

  13. The value of corpus cavernosum electromyography in erectile dysfunction: current status and future prospect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X. G.; Speel, T. G. W.; Wagner, G.; Meuleman, E. J. H.; Wijkstra, H.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade, several investigators have tried to develop corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG) as a direct clinical method to evaluate the state of the penile autonomic innervation and the cavernous smooth muscle. Both basic and clinical studies have shown promising results. However,

  14. Assessment of a wearable force- and electromyography device and comparison of the related signals for myocontrol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Connan, Mathilde; Ramirez, Eduardo Ruiz; Vodermayer, Bernhard; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    ... life activities. In this work, we first describe and test a novel wireless, wearable force- and electromyography device; through an experiment conducted on ten intact subjects, we then compare the obtained signals both qualitatively and quantitatively, highlighting their advantages and disadvantages. Our results indicate that force-myography yi...

  15. Fitts' Law Evaluation of a Passive Rotation Paradigm for Two-Dimensional Cursor Control with a Single sEMG Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Skavhaug, Ida-Maria; Lyons, Kenneth R.; Muroff, Shira D.; Chen, Huanchun; Barry, Lauran; Korte, Bryce; Joshi, Sanjay S.

    2016-01-01

    Human-computer interfaces aim to restore some lost independence for individuals with disabilities by allowing them to act on the environment through alternative means. Here, we report performance by four able-bodied pilot subjects on a human-computer interface, which is based on a single surface electromyography signal recorded from the temporalis muscle on the head. The experimental task was 'Center Out' model, where a cursor was directed from the center of a screen to targets of varying siz...

  16. Electromyography Data Processing Impacts Muscle Synergies during Gait for Unimpaired Children and Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Benjamin R; Schwartz, Michael H; Steele, Katherine M

    2017-01-01

    Muscle synergies calculated from electromyography (EMG) data identify weighted groups of muscles activated together during functional tasks. Research has shown that fewer synergies are required to describe EMG data of individuals with neurologic impairments. When considering potential clinical applications of synergies, understanding how EMG data processing impacts results and clinical interpretation is important. The aim of this study was to evaluate how EMG signal processing impacts synergy outputs during gait. We evaluated the impacts of two common processing steps for synergy analyses: low pass (LP) filtering and unit variance scaling. We evaluated EMG data collected during barefoot walking from five muscles of 113 children with cerebral palsy (CP) and 73 typically-developing (TD) children. We applied LP filters to the EMG data with cutoff frequencies ranging from 4 to 40 Hz (reflecting the range reported in prior synergy research). We also evaluated the impact of normalizing EMG amplitude by unit variance. We found that the total variance accounted for (tVAF) by a given number of synergies was sensitive to LP filter choice and decreased in both TD and CP groups with increasing LP cutoff frequency (e.g., 9.3 percentage points change for one synergy between 4 and 40 Hz). This change in tVAF can alter the number of synergies selected for further analyses. Normalizing tVAF to a z-score (e.g., dynamic motor control index during walking, walk-DMC) reduced sensitivity to LP cutoff. Unit variance scaling caused comparatively small changes in tVAF. Synergy weights and activations were impacted less than tVAF by LP filter choice and unit variance normalization. These results demonstrate that EMG signal processing methods impact outputs of synergy analysis and z-score based measures can assist in reporting and comparing results across studies and clinical centers.

  17. Electromyography Data Processing Impacts Muscle Synergies during Gait for Unimpaired Children and Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Shuman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle synergies calculated from electromyography (EMG data identify weighted groups of muscles activated together during functional tasks. Research has shown that fewer synergies are required to describe EMG data of individuals with neurologic impairments. When considering potential clinical applications of synergies, understanding how EMG data processing impacts results and clinical interpretation is important. The aim of this study was to evaluate how EMG signal processing impacts synergy outputs during gait. We evaluated the impacts of two common processing steps for synergy analyses: low pass (LP filtering and unit variance scaling. We evaluated EMG data collected during barefoot walking from five muscles of 113 children with cerebral palsy (CP and 73 typically-developing (TD children. We applied LP filters to the EMG data with cutoff frequencies ranging from 4 to 40 Hz (reflecting the range reported in prior synergy research. We also evaluated the impact of normalizing EMG amplitude by unit variance. We found that the total variance accounted for (tVAF by a given number of synergies was sensitive to LP filter choice and decreased in both TD and CP groups with increasing LP cutoff frequency (e.g., 9.3 percentage points change for one synergy between 4 and 40 Hz. This change in tVAF can alter the number of synergies selected for further analyses. Normalizing tVAF to a z-score (e.g., dynamic motor control index during walking, walk-DMC reduced sensitivity to LP cutoff. Unit variance scaling caused comparatively small changes in tVAF. Synergy weights and activations were impacted less than tVAF by LP filter choice and unit variance normalization. These results demonstrate that EMG signal processing methods impact outputs of synergy analysis and z-score based measures can assist in reporting and comparing results across studies and clinical centers.

  18. The Comparing the Leg Muscles Electromyography during Single Leg Drop Landing in Pesplanus and Normal Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mostafa bazvand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: pesplanus is one of the changes that brings about changes in muscle activation patterns. Being aware of muscles activity changes in various standing positions among pesplanus patients provides insights into preventing lower extremity injuries in this population. The aim of this study was to compare leg muscles electromyography during various standing positions in pesplanus and normal subjects. Methods: 60 healthy male university students, 30 subjects with pesplanus deformity (with average age 23/54±3/57 year, average height 175/34±7/62 cm, average weight 74/87±10/72 kg and 30 normal subjects (with average age 22/97±2/38 year, average height 176/6±5/59 cm, average weight 73/58±8/36 kg participated in this comparative study. Deformity of pesplanus was assessed with navicular drop test. Each subject performed single-leg landing dropping from 30cm height onto a force platform where muscles activity was recorded with EMG device. For data analysis, Matlab and Spss softwares were used and independent sample t-test was used to compare the dependent variables at a significance level of P &le 0/05. Results: Significant differences were observed between the two groups for the activities of the longus peroneus and anterior tibialis muscles ( p&le0/05 while no significant differences were observed in other muscles. Conclusion: The changes in the normal structure of the foot might affect muscle activities during standing, which can cause changes in the injury patterns. Therefore, it is proposed that focusing on corrective exercises and therapy plan can reduce these risks.

  19. Single-fiber electromyography of facial and limb muscles in diabetic patients with or without neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Rousseff, Rossen T; Khuraibet, Adnan J; Tzvetanov, Plamen

    2014-10-01

    In diabetic patients, single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) is often abnormal in the limb muscles and is considered unreliable in diagnosis of synaptic disorders. We aimed to compare SFEMG abnormalities of frontalis muscle (FM) and extensor digitorum communis muscle in diabetic patients with neuropathy and without neuropathy. Stimulation SFEMG of FM and extensor digitorum communis muscle was performed in matched groups of 30 diabetic patients with neuropathy and 20 diabetic patients without neuropathy. Single-fiber electromyography in the FM was abnormal in four diabetic patients with neuropathy and in one diabetic patient without neuropathy. Changes were rather mild. Extensor digitorum communis abnormalities were significantly more frequent-in 20 diabetic patients with neuropathy and in 7 diabetic patients without neuropathy (P diabetes, FM exhibits rare and quite mild SFEMG changes. This muscle may be suitable for SFEMG in diabetic patients with clinical suspicion for synaptic disorder.

  20. Guiding intramuscular diaphragm injections using real-time ultrasound and electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwal, Aarti; Cartwright, Michael S; Mitchell, Erin; Williams, Koudy; Walker, Francis O; Childers, Martin K

    2015-02-01

    We describe a unique method that combines ultrasound and electromyography to guide intramuscular diaphragm injections in anesthetized large animals. Ultrasound was used to visualize the diaphragm on each side of spontaneously breathing, anesthetized beagle dogs and cynomolgus macaques. An electromyography (EMG) needle was introduced and directed by ultrasound to confirm that the needle entered the muscular portion of the diaphragm, and methylene blue was injected. Injection accuracy was confirmed upon necropsy by tracking the spread of methylene blue. All methylene blue injections were confirmed to have been placed appropriately into the diaphragm. This study demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of using ultrasound and EMG to guide injections and to reduce complications associated with conventional blind techniques. Ultrasound guidance can be used for clinical EMG of the diaphragm. Future applications may include targeted diaphragm injections with gene replacement therapy in neuromuscular diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Electromyography in the assessment and therapy of lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krhut, Jan; Zachoval, Roman; Rosier, Peter F W M

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To present the teaching module "Electromyography in the assessment and therapy of lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults." This teaching module embodies a presentation, in combination with this manuscript. This manuscript serves as a scientific background review; the evidence base made...... available on ICS website to summarize current knowledge and recommendations. METHODS: This review has been prepared by a Working Group of The ICS Urodynamics Committee. The methodology used included comprehensive literature review, consensus formation by the members of the Working Group, and review...... by members of the ICS Urodynamics Committee core panel. RESULTS: Electromyography (EMG) is a method to record spontaneous or artificially induced electrical activity of the nerve-muscle unit or to test nerve conductivity. EMG of the anal sphincter using surface electrode is most widely used screening...

  2. Surface Facial Electromyography Reactions to Light-Relevant and Season-Relevant Stimuli in Seasonal Affective Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lindsey, Kathryn T

    2005-01-01

    Facial electromyography (EMG) activity was recorded from the zygomaticus major and corrugator supercilii muscle regions to examine emotion-specific reactivity in 24 currently depressed individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria...

  3. High-density surface electromyography improves the identification of oscillatory synaptic inputs to motor neurons

    OpenAIRE

    van de Steeg, C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Stegeman, D.F.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have addressed corticomuscular coherence (CMC), but broad applications are limited by low coherence values and the variability across subjects and recordings. Here, we investigated how the use of high-density surface electromyography (HDsEMG) can improve the detection of CMC. Sixteen healthy subjects performed isometric contractions at six low-force levels using a pinch-grip, while HDsEMG of the adductor pollicis transversus and flexor and abductor pollicis brevis and whole-head ...

  4. Electromyography and asymmetry index of masticatory muscles in undergraduate students with temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hotta, Gisele Harumi; Oliveira, Ana Izabela Sobral de; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Pedroni, Cristiane Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Aim:To compare the electromyographic activity and the asymmetry index among degrees of severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD).Methods:Surface electromyography (EMG) of the right and left masseter and temporalis muscles was performed in 126 undergraduate students at rest and at maximal voluntary contraction. Three measurements were performed for five seconds of maximal contraction and mandibular rest. The degree of temporomandibular dysfunction was identified according to the Fonseca an...

  5. Low-power system for the acquisition of the respiratory signal of neonates using diaphragmatic electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Róbinson Torres,1,2 Sergio López-Isaza,1,2 Elisa Mejía-Mejía,1,2 Viviana Paniagua,1,2 Víctor González3 1Biomedical Engineering Department, Universidad EIA, Envigado, 2Biomedical Engineering Department, Universidad CES, 3Neonathology Department, Hospital General de Medellín Luz Castro de Gutiérrez, Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia Introduction: An apnea episode is defined as the cessation of breathing for ≥15 seconds or as any suspension of breathing accompanied by hypoxia and bradycardia. Obtaining information about the respiratory system in a neonate can be accomplished using electromyography signals from the diaphragm muscle.Objective: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a method by which the respiratory and electrocardiographic signals from neonates can be obtained using diaphragmatic electromyography.Materials and methods: The system was developed using single-supply, micropower components, which deliver a low-power consumption system appropriate for the development of portable devices. The stages of the system were tested in both adult and neonate patients.Results: The system delivers signals as those expected in both patients and allows the acquisition of respiratory signals directly from the diaphragmatic electromyography.Conclusion: This low-power system may present a good alternative for monitoring the cardiac and respiratory activity in newborn babies, both in the hospital and at home.Significance: The system delivers good signals but needs to be validated for its use in neonates. It is being used in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital General de Medellín Luz Castro de Gutiérrez. Keywords: apnea, diaphragm, electromyography, neonates, respiratory signal

  6. Recurrent intractable hiccups treated by cervical phrenic nerve block under electromyography: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Young Jo; Song, Dae Heon; Kim, Jae Jun; Kim, Young Du; Kim, Chi Kyung; Moon, Seok Whan

    2015-11-01

    Intractable or persistent hiccups require intensive or invasive treatments. The use of a phrenic nerve block or destructive treatment for intractable hiccups has been reported to be a useful and discrete method that might be valuable to patients with this distressing problem and for whom diverse management efforts have failed. We herein report a successful treatment using a removable and adjustable ligature for the phrenic nerve in a patient with recurrent and intractable hiccups, which was employed under the guidance of electromyography.

  7. [Automated assessment of cranial nerve paralyses using computerized electromyography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumfart, W F; Pototschnig, C; Simandi, T

    1988-05-01

    Until the formulae of Lindstrom et al. the automatic analysis of electromyograms had no empirical basis in the differentiation of neurapraxia and degenerative paralysis. The EMG-analysis computer program modified by Berg et al. was used for the evaluation of average power spectra derived with a Fast Fourier transformation on 37 patients with known neurapraxia and 54 with proven degeneration. In order to work out a characteristic function we calculated average power spectra separately for each type of paralysis (facial or laryngeal muscles). The resulting spectrum configurations and their absolute values (root-mean-square and central frequency) were compared, and their value in automated EMG analysis was analysed. The results provide a basis for the routine use of the computer program in routine clinical diagnosis.

  8. Handgrip Strength Related to Long-Term Electromyography: Application for Assessing Functional Decline in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth R; Roland, Kaitlyn P; Neubauer, Noelannah A; Jakobi, Jennifer M

    2017-02-01

    To determine which clinical measures of physical function (ie, gait, balance, and grip strength) best represent long-term electromyography in persons with Parkinson disease (PD) compared with those without PD. Cross-sectional study. Local community. A sample (N=37) of men and women with PD (n=23) and those without PD (n=14), living independently at home, older than 50 years of age, from the local community. Not applicable. Measures of gait, balance, and grip strength were completed, and electromyography was examined in biceps brachii, triceps brachii, vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris during a 6.5-hour day. Muscle activity was quantified through burst in electromyography (>2% of the normalized maximum voluntary exertion with a continuous activity period of >0.1s). Stepwise multiple regression models were used to determine the proportion of variance in burst characteristics explained by clinical measures of physical function in PD. Grip strength was the best predictor of muscle activity in persons with PD (R(2)=.17-.33; P<.04), whereas gait characteristics explained muscle activity in healthy controls (R(2)=.40-.82; P<.04). Grip strength could serve as an effective clinical assessment tool to determine changes in muscle activity, which is a precursor to functional loss in persons with PD. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing the validity of surface electromyography for recording muscle activation patterns from serratus anterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Lucien; Reed, Darren; Halaki, Mark; Ginn, Karen A

    2014-04-01

    No direct evidence exists to support the validity of using surface electrodes to record muscle activity from serratus anterior, an important and commonly investigated shoulder muscle. The aims of this study were to determine the validity of examining muscle activation patterns in serratus anterior using surface electromyography and to determine whether intramuscular electromyography is representative of serratus anterior muscle activity. Seven asymptomatic subjects performed dynamic and isometric shoulder flexion, extension, abduction, adduction and dynamic bench press plus tests. Surface electrodes were placed over serratus anterior and around intramuscular electrodes in serratus anterior. Load was ramped during isometric tests from 0% to 100% maximum load and dynamic tests were performed at 70% maximum load. EMG signals were normalised using five standard maximum voluntary contraction tests. Surface electrodes significantly underestimated serratus anterior muscle activity compared with the intramuscular electrodes during dynamic flexion, dynamic abduction, isometric flexion, isometric abduction and bench press plus tests. All other test conditions showed no significant differences including the flexion normalisation test where maximum activation was recorded from both electrode types. Low correlation between signals was recorded using surface and intramuscular electrodes during concentric phases of dynamic abduction and flexion. It is not valid to use surface electromyography to assess muscle activation levels in serratus anterior during isometric exercises where the electrodes are not placed at the angle of testing and dynamic exercises. Intramuscular electrodes are as representative of the serratus anterior muscle activity as surface electrodes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the effects of vapocoolant spray and topical anesthetic cream on pain during needle electromyography in the medial gastrocnemius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Young-Eun; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Won-Hyeok

    2013-05-01

    To compare the effects of a vapocoolant spray and an eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) cream in reducing pain during needle electromyography examination. Randomized controlled trial. Physical medicine and rehabilitation department of a university hospital. Adults who underwent needle electromyography (N=99) were randomized to 1 of 2 experimental groups or the control group. Two patients dropped out during the study. In the experimental groups, vapocoolant spray or EMLA cream were applied before needle electromyography. In the control group, needle electromyography was performed without pretreatment. Intensity of pain associated with needle electromyography was assessed using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction and preference for repeated use were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. VAS score for pain intensity was significantly lower in the spray group (31.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 22.0-41.7) compared with the control group (52.9; 95% CI, 45.9-60.0; P=.002), whereas there was no significant difference between the EMLA cream group (42.4; 95% CI, 34.2-50.7) and the control group. Patient satisfaction and preference for repeated use were higher in the spray group than the EMLA group. Vapocoolant spray was more effective than EMLA cream in reducing pain during needle electromyography. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Longitudinal Electromyography Study of Complex Movements in Poststroke Therapy. 2: Changes in Coordinated Muscle Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesam-Shariati, Negin; Trinh, Terry; Thompson-Butel, Angelica G; Shiner, Christine T; McNulty, Penelope A

    2017-01-01

    Fine motor control is achieved through the coordinated activation of groups of muscles, or "muscle synergies." Muscle synergies change after stroke as a consequence of the motor deficit. We investigated the pattern and longitudinal changes in upper limb muscle synergies during therapy in a largely unconstrained movement in patients with a broad spectrum of poststroke residual voluntary motor capacity. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded using wireless telemetry from 6 muscles acting on the more-affected upper body in 24 stroke patients at early and late therapy during formal Wii-based Movement Therapy (WMT) sessions, and in a subset of 13 patients at 6-month follow-up. Patients were classified with low, moderate, or high motor-function. The Wii-baseball swing was analyzed using a non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm to extract muscle synergies from EMG recordings based on the temporal activation of each synergy and the contribution of each muscle to a synergy. Motor-function was clinically assessed immediately pre- and post-therapy and at 6-month follow-up using the Wolf Motor Function Test, upper limb motor Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and Motor Activity Log Quality of Movement scale. Clinical assessments and game performance demonstrated improved motor-function for all patients at post-therapy (p follow-up (p > 0.05). NMF analysis revealed fewer muscle synergies (mean ± SE) for patients with low motor-function (3.38 ± 0.2) than those with high motor-function (4.00 ± 0.3) at early therapy (p = 0.036) with an association trend between the number of synergies and the level of motor-function. By late therapy, there was no significant change between groups, although there was a pattern of increase for those with low motor-function over time. The variability accounted for demonstrated differences with motor-function level (p muscle activation. Muscle synergies could be identified for all patients during therapy activities. These

  12. Validation of the balloon evacuation test: reproducibility and agreement with findings from anorectal manometry and electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Kim, Sung Min; Vantini, Italo; Whitehead, William E

    2014-12-01

    The balloon evacuation test (BET) measures the time required to evacuate a balloon filled with 50 mL water; it has been incorporated into many algorithms for diagnosis of pelvic floor dyssynergia. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the BET, determine the upper limit of normal, and assess its concordance with evaluation of pelvic floor dyssynergia by anorectal manometry (ARM) and pelvic floor surface electromyography (EMG). The BET was tested in 286 consecutive patients with chronic constipation (mean age, 44 years; 91% female) before and after 30 days of conservative treatment at a tertiary gastroenterology clinic in Italy from March 2010 through May 2012. The BET was tested twice, 7 days apart, in 40 healthy individuals (controls: mean age, 38 years; 92% female). The 238 constipated patients who responded incompletely to conservative therapy were examined by ARM, EMG, and digital rectal examination. Forty-seven patients with conflicting ARM and BET results underwent defecography. The balloon was evacuated within 1 minute by 37 controls (93%; 3 individuals required 1-2 minutes). Among patients with constipation, 148 (52%) passed the balloon within 5 minutes (110 passed the balloon in 1 minute, 35 passed it in 1-2 minutes, and 3 passed it in 2-5 minutes). The BET showed perfect reproducibility in 280 of the patients with constipation (98%) when a time less than 2 minutes was set as abnormal. The level of agreement between BET and ARM for dyssynergia was 78%, and between BET and EMG it was 83%. Thirty-two patients had abnormal results from the BET but normal results from ARM; 31 cases had inadequate straining (n = 11) or anatomic defects (n = 20), which could account for the abnormal findings from BET. The BET is reliable for analysis of pelvic floor dyssynergia; the optimal upper limit of normal is 2 minutes. Findings from the BET have a high level of agreement with those from ARM and EMG. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Efeitos da eletroestimulação do músculo vasto medial oblíquo em portadores de síndrome da dor patelofemoral: uma análise eletromiográfica Effects of electrical stimulation of vastus medialis obliquus muscle in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome: an electromyographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana R. Garcia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O uso da eletromiografia de superfície (EMG-S tem sido considerado como instrumento de avaliação quantitativa na síndrome da dor patelofemoral (SDPF. Tratamentos conservadores objetivam melhorar o alinhamento patelar, e a estimulação elétrica do músculo vasto medial oblíquo (VMO tem sido considerada por ser seletiva e não causar irritação articular. OBJETIVO: Verificar o efeito de um programa de fortalecimento muscular com estimulação elétrica do VMO na SDPF por meio da capacidade de avaliação da EMG-S. MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo 10 mulheres jovens (idade: 23,1±4,9 anos; massa corporal: 66,8±14,0 kg; estatura: 1,63±6,9 cm; IMC: 25,1±5,6 kg/m² com SDPF unilateral, as quais realizaram o teste funcional de subir degrau para captação da atividade eletromiográfica dos músculos VMO e vasto lateral (VL, antes e após um programa de estimulação elétrica do VMO. A eletroestimulação foi realizada três vezes por semana, durante seis semanas. Foram consideradas, para análise entre VMO e VL, as variáveis razão do tempo do início até o pico de ativação, razão da integral do sinal (teste t para amostras dependentes e diferença de início de ativação (teste de Wilcoxon, com n��vel de significância de pBACKGROUND: The use of surface electromyography (SEMG has been considered a tool for quantitative assessment of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. Conservative treatments aim to improve patellar alignment, and electrical stimulation of the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO muscle has been considered effective because it is selective and does not cause joint irritation. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the efficiency of a muscle strengthening program with electrical stimulation of the VMO muscle in PFPS by SEMG. METHODS: A group of ten young women (age: 23.1±4.9 years; body mass: 66.8±14.0 kg; height: 1.63±6.9 cm; BMI: 25.1±5.6 kg/m² with unilateral PFPS participated in the

  14. Electromyography of muscles involved in feeding premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Camila Dantas; Furlan, Renata Maria Moreira Moraes; Motta, Andréa Rodrigues; Viana, Maria Cândida Ferrarez Bouzada

    2015-01-01

    To measure and compare the electrical activity of masseter, temporal, and suprahyoid muscles in premature newborn infants during breast-feeding and cup-feeding. This cross-sectional observational study was carried out by the electromyographic assessment of 36 preterm infants, 53% of whom were male, with mean gestational age of 32 weeks and birth weight of 1,719 g, fed via oral route, by full breast-feeding and supplementation of diet, through cup with expressed breast milk, until 15 days after hospital discharge. Children with neurological disorders, genetic syndromes, oral-motor, and/or congenital malformations were excluded. The different methods of feeding and the variables gestational age at birth, corrected gestational age, chronological age, birth weight and size, head circumference, and Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes were analyzed and compared by appropriate statistical analysis. No difference was observed between breast-feeding and cup-feeding in the analysis of the temporal and masseter muscles. However, higher activity of suprahyoid musculature was observed during cup-feeding (p=0.001). The other variables were not correlated with the electrical activity of the muscles during the different feeding methods. There may be a balance between the activity of the temporal and masseter muscles during breast-feeding and cup-feeding. There was higher activity of suprahyoid musculature during cup-feeding. This can be explained by the greater range of tongue movement, as premature infants usually perform tongue protrusion to get the milk from the cup.

  15. Valores referenciais da eletromiografia de músculos envolvidos na deglutição: uma revisão sistemática Reference values for the electromyography of muscles involved in swallowing: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rodrigues Belo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: normalidade da eletromiografia de superfície de músculos envolvidos na deglutição. OBJETIVO: investigar se a literatura aponta valores referenciais de normalidade para a duração, amplitude e características dos eletromiogramas dos músculos envolvidos na deglutição (orbicular da boca, masseter, músculos da região supra-hióidea e músculos da região infra-hióidea cobertos pelo músculo platisma. CONCLUSÃO: a busca resultou em 33 referências, das quais somente cinco enquadraram-se nos critérios de inclusão. Apenas uma referência foi classificada com um bom nível de qualidade pela escala de Jadad com modificações. Os artigos selecionados podem não apontar valores referenciais confiáveis principalmente para a amplitude e morfologia da eletromiografia de superfície, pois utilizaram uma freqüência de amostragem inadequada para os registros eletromiográficos o que potencializa a obtenção de dados distorcidos da atividade muscular. Tendo em vista a variabilidade inter e entre os sujeitos, a literatura sugere a realização de técnicas de normalização do sinal eletromiográfico.BACKGROUND: normal surface electromyography (sEMG of muscles involved in swallowing. PURPOSE: to investigate if the literature indicates normal parameters for duration, amplitude and characteristics of the electromyograms of the muscles involved in swallowing (orbicularis oris, masseter, muscles of the suprahyoid muscles and the infra-hyoid region covered by the platysma muscle. CONCLUSION: the search resulted in 33 references, of which only five were within the inclusion criteria. Only one reference was classified with good level of quality by the Jadad scale with modifications. The selected articles cannot point reliable reference values mainly for EMG amplitude and morphology, because they used a inappropriate sampling rate for the EMG recordings that maximizes the achievement of distorted data for the muscle activity. Literature suggests

  16. A method for a categorized and probabilistic analysis of the surface electromyogram in dynamic contractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Charlotte Frieda Anneliese von Werder

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The human motor system permits a wide variety of complex movements. Thereby, the inter- individual variability as well as the biomechanical aspects of the performed movement itself contribute to the challenge of the interpretation of sEMG signals in dynamic contractions. A procedure for the systematic analysis of sEMG recordings during dynamic contraction was introduced, which includes categorization of the data in combination with the analysis of frequency distributions of the sEMG with a probabilistic approach. Using the example of elbow flexion and extension the procedure was evaluated with 10 healthy subjects. The recorded sEMG signals of brachioradialis were categorized into a combination of constant and variable movement factors, which originate from the performed movement. Subsequently, for each combination of movement factors cumulative frequency distributions were computed for each subject separately. Finally, the probability of the difference of muscular activation in varying movement conditions was assessed. The probabilistic approach was compared to a deterministic analysis of the same data. Both approaches observed a significant change of muscular activation of brachioradialis during concentric and eccentric contractions exclusively for flexion and extension angles exceeding 30°. However, with the probabilistic approach additional information on the likelihood that the tested effect occurs can be provided.Especially for movements under uncontrollable boundary conditions, this information to assess the confidence of the detected results is of high relevance. Thus, the procedure provides new insights into the quantification and interpretation of muscular activity.

  17. Optimization of the Motion Trajectory for Standing from a Seated Position by Considering Muscular Load Based on Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Daisuke; Asakura, Yuki; Kitamura, Akira

    Standing from a chair is an important task of daily living for physically handicapped people. In a rehabilitation center, a health care professional is planning motion based on the experience and knowledge so that a patient may stand up with few loads. Therefore, there is a problem that the plan is different occasionally as each health care professional. In this paper, a generation method of motion trajectory to stand from a seated position with few loads by using Genetic Algorithm (GA) was proposed. The human body was expressed as three-rigid-link model. In the model, the ankle, the knee, and the waist were set to the joint. Moreover, Electromyography (EMG) generated from the muscle to drive each joint was measured, and the model between each joint torque and EMG was constructed with the ARX model. The motion trajectory to stand from the seated position was generated by using GA with the evaluation function based on the constructed ARX model. The generated motion trajectory was evaluated by the experimental work with eight healthy subjects. As a result, the effect of the proposed method was objectively verified by subject's EMG. In addition, subjective effect of the proposed method was verified by analysis of variance about subject's impression.

  18. Bayesian aggregation versus majority vote in the characterization of non-specific arm pain based on quantitative needle electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Methods for the calculation and application of quantitative electromyographic (EMG) statistics for the characterization of EMG data detected from forearm muscles of individuals with and without pain associated with repetitive strain injury are presented. Methods A classification procedure using a multi-stage application of Bayesian inference is presented that characterizes a set of motor unit potentials acquired using needle electromyography. The utility of this technique in characterizing EMG data obtained from both normal individuals and those presenting with symptoms of "non-specific arm pain" is explored and validated. The efficacy of the Bayesian technique is compared with simple voting methods. Results The aggregate Bayesian classifier presented is found to perform with accuracy equivalent to that of majority voting on the test data, with an overall accuracy greater than 0.85. Theoretical foundations of the technique are discussed, and are related to the observations found. Conclusions Aggregation of motor unit potential conditional probability distributions estimated using quantitative electromyographic analysis, may be successfully used to perform electrodiagnostic characterization of "non-specific arm pain." It is expected that these techniques will also be able to be applied to other types of electrodiagnostic data. PMID:20156353

  19. On non-negative matrix factorization algorithms for signal-dependent noise with application to electromyography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Karthik; Cheung, Vincent C.K.

    2017-01-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) by the multiplicative updates algorithm is a powerful machine learning method for decomposing a high-dimensional nonnegative matrix V into two nonnegative matrices, W and H where V ~ WH. It has been successfully applied in the analysis and interpretation of large-scale data arising in neuroscience, computational biology and natural language processing, among other areas. A distinctive feature of NMF is its nonnegativity constraints that allow only additive linear combinations of the data, thus enabling it to learn parts that have distinct physical representations in reality. In this paper, we describe an information-theoretic approach to NMF for signal-dependent noise based on the generalized inverse Gaussian model. Specifically, we propose three novel algorithms in this setting, each based on multiplicative updates and prove monotonicity of updates using the EM algorithm. In addition, we develop algorithm-specific measures to evaluate their goodness-of-fit on data. Our methods are demonstrated using experimental data from electromyography studies as well as simulated data in the extraction of muscle synergies, and compared with existing algorithms for signal-dependent noise. PMID:24684448

  20. Bayesian aggregation versus majority vote in the characterization of non-specific arm pain based on quantitative needle electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Linda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods for the calculation and application of quantitative electromyographic (EMG statistics for the characterization of EMG data detected from forearm muscles of individuals with and without pain associated with repetitive strain injury are presented. Methods A classification procedure using a multi-stage application of Bayesian inference is presented that characterizes a set of motor unit potentials acquired using needle electromyography. The utility of this technique in characterizing EMG data obtained from both normal individuals and those presenting with symptoms of "non-specific arm pain" is explored and validated. The efficacy of the Bayesian technique is compared with simple voting methods. Results The aggregate Bayesian classifier presented is found to perform with accuracy equivalent to that of majority voting on the test data, with an overall accuracy greater than 0.85. Theoretical foundations of the technique are discussed, and are related to the observations found. Conclusions Aggregation of motor unit potential conditional probability distributions estimated using quantitative electromyographic analysis, may be successfully used to perform electrodiagnostic characterization of "non-specific arm pain." It is expected that these techniques will also be able to be applied to other types of electrodiagnostic data.

  1. Cross-Correlation of Motor Activity Signals from dc-Magnetoencephalography, Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilmann H. Sander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal and vascular responses due to finger movements were synchronously measured using dc-magnetoencephalography (dcMEG and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (trNIRS. The finger movements were monitored with electromyography (EMG. Cortical responses related to the finger movement sequence were extracted by independent component analysis from both the dcMEG and the trNIRS data. The temporal relations between EMG rate, dcMEG, and trNIRS responses were assessed pairwise using the cross-correlation function (CCF, which does not require epoch averaging. A positive lag on a scale of seconds was found for the maximum of the CCF between dcMEG and trNIRS. A zero lag is observed for the CCF between dcMEG and EMG. Additionally this CCF exhibits oscillations at the frequency of individual finger movements. These findings show that the dcMEG with a bandwidth up to 8 Hz records both slow and faster neuronal responses, whereas the vascular response is confirmed to change on a scale of seconds.

  2. Electromyography (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Each muscle fiber that contracts will produce an action potential. The presence, size, and shape of the wave form of the action potential produced on the oscilloscope, provides information about the ...

  3. The effectiveness of neuromuscular facial retraining combined with electromyography in facial paralysis rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Gaye W; Steenerson, Ronald Leif

    2003-04-01

    The study goal was to present the effectiveness of neuromuscular facial retraining techniques used in combination with electromyography for improving facial function even in cases of longstanding paralysis. We conducted a retrospective case review in a tertiary neurotology clinic. Twenty-four patients with facial paralysis received neuromuscular facial retraining between April 1999 and April 2001. The patient sample included 6 males and 18 females, with an average age of 44 years. A control group consisted of 6 patients (4 females and 2 males). All patient groups made significant improvements in function with improved symmetry in dual-channel electromyographic readings and increased facial movement percentages. Some of the percentages of posttreatment facial function were as follows: acoustic neuromas, 93%; Bell's palsy/Ramsay Hunt syndrome, 80%; and facial nerve anastomosis, 71%. Synkinesis was reduced by at least 2 levels in patients who initially demonstrated synkinesis. Neuromuscular facial retraining exercises and electromyography are effective for improving facial movements. Facial retraining is an excellent example of the plasticity of the central nervous system to reorganize, even in cases of longstanding paralysis.

  4. Impact of Functional Appliances on Muscle Activity: A Surface Electromyography Study in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Piątkowska, Dagmara; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Background Electromyography (EMG) is the most objective tool for assessing changes in the electrical activity of the masticatory muscles. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the tone of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles in growing children before and after 6 months of treatment with functional removable orthodontic appliances. Material/Methods The sample conisted of 51 patients with a mean age 10.7 years with Class II malocclusion. EMG recordings were performed by using a DAB-Bluetooth instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Recordings were performed in mandibular rest position, during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and during maximum effort. Results The results of the study indicated that the electrical activity of the muscles in each of the clinical situations was the same in the group of girls and boys. The factor that determined the activity of the muscles was their type. In mandibular rest position and in MVC, the activity of the temporalis muscles was significantly higher that that of the masseter muscels. The maximum effort test indicated a higher fatigue in masseter than in temporalis muscles. Conclusions Surface electromyography is a useful tool for monitoring muscle activity. A 6-month period of functional therapy resulted in changes in the activity of the masticatory muscles. PMID:25600247

  5. Reliability of surface electromyography in the assessment of paraspinal muscle fatigue: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad A; Rahmani, Nahid; Majdoleslam, Basir; Abdollahi, Iraj; Ali, Shabnam Shah; Ahmad, Ashfaq

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the literature to determine whether surface electromyography (EMG) is a reliable tool to assess paraspinal muscle fatigue in healthy subjects and in patients with low back pain (LBP). A literature search for the period of 2000 to 2012 was performed, using PubMed, ProQuest, Science Direct, EMBASE, OVID, CINAHL, and MEDLINE databases. Electromyography, reliability, median frequency, paraspinal muscle, endurance, low back pain, and muscle fatigue were used as keywords. The literature search yielded 178 studies using the above keywords. Twelve articles were selected according to the inclusion criteria of the study. In 7 of the 12 studies, the surface EMG was only applied in healthy subjects, and in 5 studies, the reliability of surface EMG was investigated in patients with LBP or a comparison with a control group. In all of these studies, median frequency was shown to be a reliable EMG parameter to assess paraspinal muscles fatigue. There was a wide variation among studies in terms of methodology, surface EMG parameters, electrode location, procedure, and homogeneity of the study population. The results suggest that there seems to be a convincing body of evidence to support the merit of surface EMG in the assessment of paraspinal muscle fatigue in healthy subject and in patients with LBP. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Toward modeling locomotion using electromyography-informed 3D models: application to cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, M; Fernandez, J W; Modenese, L; Carty, C P; Barber, L A; Oberhofer, K; Zhang, J; Handsfield, G G; Stott, N S; Besier, T F; Farina, D; Lloyd, D G

    2017-03-01

    This position paper proposes a modeling pipeline to develop clinically relevant neuromusculoskeletal models to understand and treat complex neurological disorders. Although applicable to a variety of neurological conditions, we provide direct pipeline applicative examples in the context of cerebral palsy (CP). This paper highlights technologies in: (1) patient-specific segmental rigid body models developed from magnetic resonance imaging for use in inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics pipelines; (2) efficient population-based approaches to derive skeletal models and muscle origins/insertions that are useful for population statistics and consistent creation of continuum models; (3) continuum muscle descriptions to account for complex muscle architecture including spatially varying material properties with muscle wrapping; (4) muscle and tendon properties specific to CP; and (5) neural-based electromyography-informed methods for muscle force prediction. This represents a novel modeling pipeline that couples for the first time electromyography extracted features of disrupted neuromuscular behavior with advanced numerical methods for modeling CP-specific musculoskeletal morphology and function. The translation of such pipeline to the clinical level will provide a new class of biomarkers that objectively describe the neuromusculoskeletal determinants of pathological locomotion and complement current clinical assessment techniques, which often rely on subjective judgment. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1368. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1368 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Assessment of a wearable force- and electromyography device and comparison of the related signals for myocontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Connan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of assistive robotics, multi-finger prosthetic hand/wrists have recently appeared,offering an increasing level of dexterity; however, in practice their control is limited to a few handgrips and still unreliable, with the effect that pattern recognition has not yet appeared in the clinicalenvironment. According to the scientific community, one of the keys to improve the situation ismulti-modal sensing, i.e., using diverse sensor modalities to interpret the subject’s intent andimprove the reliability and safety of the control system in daily life activities. In this work, wefirst describe and test a novel wireless, wearable force- and electromyography device; throughan experiment conducted on ten intact subjects, we then compare the obtained signals bothqualitatively and quantitatively, highlighting their advantages and disadvantages. Our resultsindicate that force-myography yields signals which are more stable across time during whenevera pattern is held, than those obtained by electromyography. We speculate that fusion of the twomodalities might be advantageous to improve the reliability of myocontrol in the near future.

  8. Myoelectric manifestation of muscle fatigue in repetitive work detected by means of miniaturized sEMG sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranavolo, Alberto; Chini, Giorgia; Silvetti, Alessio; Mari, Silvia; Serrao, Mariano; Draicchio, Francesco

    2017-09-25

    Upper limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders have a 12-month prevalence ranging from 12 to 41% worldwide and can be partly caused by handling low loads at high frequency. The association between the myoelectric manifestation of elbow flexor muscle fatigue and occupational physical demand has never been investigated. It was hypothesized that an elbow flexor muscle fatigue index could be a valid risk indicator in handling low loads at high frequency. This study aims to measure the myoelectric manifestation of muscle fatigue of the three elbow flexor muscles during the execution of the work tasks in different risk conditions. Fifteen right-handed healthy adults were screened using a movement analysis laboratory consisting of optoelectronic, dynamometer and surface electromyographic systems. The main result indicates that the fatigue index calculated from the brachioradialis is sensitive to the interaction among risk classes, session and gender, and above all it is sensitive to the risk classes.

  9. Electromyographic Analysis of the Hip Extension Pattern in Visually Impaired Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halski Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the order of muscle recruitment during the active hip joint extension in particular positions in young visually impaired athletes. The average recruitment time (ART of the gluteus maximus (GM and the hamstring muscle group (HMG was assessed by the means of surface electromyography (sEMG. The sequence of muscle recruitment in the female and male group was also taken into consideration. This study followed a prospective, cross – sectional, randomised design, where 76 visually impaired athletes between the age of 18–25 years were enrolled into the research and selected on chosen inclusion and exclusion criteria. Finally, 64 young subjects (32 men and 32 women were included in the study (age: 21.1 ± 1.05 years; body mass: 68.4 ± 12.4 kg; body height: 1.74 ± 0.09 m; BMI: 22.20 ± 2.25 kg/m2. All subjects were analysed for the ART of the GM and HMG during the active hip extension performed in two different positions, as well as resting and functional sEMG activity of each muscle. Between gender differences were comprised and the correlations between the ART of the GM and HMG with their functional sEMG activity during hip extension in both positions were shown. No significant differences between the ART of the GM and HMG were found (p>0.05. Furthermore, there was no significant difference of ART among both tested positions, as well in male as female subjects (p>0.05.

  10. Proportional estimation of finger movements from high-density surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celadon, Nicolò; Došen, Strahinja; Binder, Iris; Ariano, Paolo; Farina, Dario

    2016-08-04

    The importance to restore the hand function following an injury/disease of the nervous system led to the development of novel rehabilitation interventions. Surface electromyography can be used to create a user-driven control of a rehabilitation robot, in which the subject needs to engage actively, by using spared voluntary activation to trigger the assistance of the robot. The study investigated methods for the selective estimation of individual finger movements from high-density surface electromyographic signals (HD-sEMG) with minimal interference between movements of other fingers. Regression was evaluated in online and offline control tests with nine healthy subjects (per test) using a linear discriminant analysis classifier (LDA), a common spatial patterns proportional estimator (CSP-PE), and a thresholding (THR) algorithm. In all tests, the subjects performed an isometric force tracking task guided by a moving visual marker indicating the contraction type (flexion/extension), desired activation level and the finger that should be moved. The outcome measures were mean square error (nMSE) between the reference and generated trajectories normalized to the peak-to-peak value of the reference, the classification accuracy (CA), the mean amplitude of the false activations (MAFA) and, in the offline tests only, the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCORR). The offline tests demonstrated that, for the reduced number of electrodes (≤24), the CSP-PE outperformed the LDA with higher precision of proportional estimation and less crosstalk between the movement classes (e.g., 8 electrodes, median MAFA ~ 0.6 vs. 1.1 %, median nMSE ~ 4.3 vs. 5.5 %). The LDA and the CSP-PE performed similarly in the online tests (median nMSE < 3.6 %, median MAFA < 0.7 %), but the CSP-PE provided a more stable performance across the tested conditions (less improvement between different sessions). Furthermore, THR, exploiting topographical information about the single finger

  11. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy logic analysis based on myoelectric signals for multifunction prosthesis control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The myoelectric signal is a sign of control of the human body that contains the information of the user's intent to contract a muscle and, therefore, make a move. Studies shows that the Amputees are able to generate standardized myoelectric signals repeatedly before of the intention to perform a certain movement. This paper presents a study that investigates the use of forearm surface electromyography (sEMG) signals for classification of five distinguish movements of the arm using just three pairs of surface electrodes located in strategic places. The classification is done by an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to process signal features to recognize performed movements. The average accuracy reached for the classification of five motion classes was 86-98% for three subjects.

  12. Voluntary low-force contraction elicits prolonged low-frequency fatigue and changes in surface electromyography and mechanomyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Madeleine, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Controversies exist regarding objective documentation of fatigue development with low-force contractions. We hypothesized that non-exhaustive, low-force muscle contraction may induce prolonged low-frequency fatigue (LFF) that in the subsequent recovery period is detectable by electromyography (EM...

  13. Using State-Space Model with Regime Switching to Represent the Dynamics of Facial Electromyography (EMG) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Manshu; Chow, Sy-Miin

    2010-01-01

    Facial electromyography (EMG) is a useful physiological measure for detecting subtle affective changes in real time. A time series of EMG data contains bursts of electrical activity that increase in magnitude when the pertinent facial muscles are activated. Whereas previous methods for detecting EMG activation are often based on deterministic or…

  14. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy in adolescence : Interrelations between facial electromyography and self-reported trait and state measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Graaff, Jolien; Meeus, Wim; de Wied, Minet; van Boxtel, Anton; van Lier, Pol A C; Koot, Hans M.; Branje, Susan J. T.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined interrelations of trait and state empathy in an adolescent sample. Self-reported affective trait empathy and cognitive trait empathy were assessed during a home visit. During a test session at the university, motor empathy (facial electromyography), and self-reported affective

  15. Undifferentiated Facial Electromyography Responses to Dynamic, Audio-Visual Emotion Displays in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozga, Agata; King, Tricia Z.; Vuduc, Richard W.; Robins, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined facial electromyography (fEMG) activity to dynamic, audio-visual emotional displays in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and typically developing (TD) individuals. Participants viewed clips of happy, angry, and fearful displays that contained both facial expression and affective prosody while surface electrodes measured…

  16. Corpus cavernosum electromyography during morning naps in healthy volunteers: further evidence that corpus cavernosum potentials reflect sympathetically mediated activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X.; Meuleman, E.J.H.; Wijkstra, H.; Wagner, G.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed the practicability of corpus cavernosum (CC) electromyography (EMG) in volunteers during morning naps in the laboratory and further validated this method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 11 healthy volunteers with a mean age of 23.8 years (range 19 to 31) were included. CC-EMG

  17. Corpus cavernosum electromyography during morning naps in healthy volunteers: further evidence that corpus cavernosum potentials reflect sympathetically mediated activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Xiaogang; Meuleman, Eric J. H.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Wagner, Gorm

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed the practicability of corpus cavernosum (CC) electromyography (EMG) in volunteers during morning naps in the laboratory and further validated this method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 11 healthy volunteers with a mean age of 23.8 years (range 19 to 31) were included. CC-EMG

  18. Utilization and yield of nerve conduction studies and electromyography in older adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mello, S

    2016-02-01

    Older adults are at increased risk of both central and peripheral neurological disorders. Impaired nerve and muscle deficits contribute to morbidity and reduced quality of life. Our aim was to define the utilization and yield of nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG) in older adults. We reviewed NCS and EMG records for all patients older than age 65 in the year 2012. Of 1,530 NCS and EMGs performed, 352 (23%) were in patients older than 65 (mean age 73.7, 52% male). Two hundred and eighty-eight (83.7%) of NCS were abnormal as were 102 (71.8%) of EMGs. The likelihood of having an abnormal test result increased with increasing age. The most common diagnosis was peripheral neuropathy 231 (65.4%). The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is particularly high in this age group, and detection is vital to prevent morbidity and improve quality of life.

  19. Coordinated upper limb training assisted with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-01-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training on muscular coordination was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5 times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Improvements were found in the muscle co-ordination between the antagonist muscle pair (flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) as measured by muscle co-contractions in EMG signals; and also in the reduction of excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii. Reduced spasticity in the fingers was also observed as measured by the Modified Ashworth Score.

  20. Listening to music during electromyography does not influence the examinee's anxiety and pain levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alon; Drory, Vivian E

    2014-09-01

    Listening to music is a low-cost intervention that has demonstrated ability to reduce pain and anxiety levels in various medical procedures. Subjects undergoing electrophysiological examinations were randomized into a music-listening group and a control group. Visual analog scales were used to measure anxiety and pain levels during the procedure. Thirty subjects were randomized to each group. No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or pain levels during the procedure between groups. However, most subjects in the music-listening group reported anxiety and pain reduction and would prefer to hear music in a future examination. Although listening to music during electrophysiological examinations did not reduce anxiety or pain significantly, most subjects felt a positive effect and would prefer to hear music; therefore, we suggest that music may be offered optionally in the electromyography laboratory setting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Safety of needle electromyography of the diaphragm: Anterior lung margins in quietly breathing healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podnar, Simon; Doorduin, Jonne

    2016-06-01

    Controversy persists as to whether the lung interposes on the needle electrode insertion path during diaphragm electromyography (EMG). Using high-resolution ultrasonography, we measured the distances between the medial recess of the intercostal spaces (ICSs) around the mid-clavicular line (MCL) and the lung margin. We performed measurements bilaterally during quiet breathing in the seated and supine positions. We studied 10 young healthy men and found that, in the first ICS with the medial recess clearly (i.e., several cm) lateral to MCL (usually the eighth ICS), the distance between the recommended insertion site and the lung margin varied from 7.5 to 17 cm. The distance was slightly larger on the right side and in the supine position. This study confirms that properly conducted "trans-intercostal" needle EMG of the diaphragm is generally safe in healthy subjects. Muscle Nerve 54: 54-57, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Single fiber electromyography. A method for the evaluation of motor axonopathy during toxicity studies in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeppi, U; Teste, M; Siegenthaler, U

    1981-11-01

    In man, single fiber electromyography is used as a very sensitive indicator for the assessment of functional changes in motor nerves. The purpose of the present study was to adapt the above testing procedure to allow repeated investigations of dogs used in subchronic toxicity tests. Experiments were performed on anesthetized pure-bred beagle dogs. Action potentials from single muscle fibers in response to electrical stimulation of motor nerves were recorded with Medelec microelectrodes, amplified with a Medelec system and monitored on a Tektronic oscilloscope. Repeated electrical stimulation with pulses of 0.03 msec and 1 p.p.s. produced characteristic action potentials of single muscle fibers consisting of a positive, followed by a negative, deflection having a duration of from 500 to 800 microseconds altogether. Successive potentials occurred with a variable latency (the jitter) ranging from +/- 5 to 15 microseconds. Quantitative evaluation of the jitter will allow the clinical evaluation of motor axonopathies in dogs.

  3. Use of surface electromyography (EMG) in the diagnosis of childhood hypertonia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Terence D

    2008-06-01

    In children, increased tone in a joint can be caused by spasticity, dystonia, rigidity, or mechanical limitations such as contracture. Determination of the cause of hypertonia is important for selection of appropriate therapy, but distinction between the types of hypertonia is difficult in a clinical setting. We present results of a pilot test of the use of a portable surface electromyography (EMG) device for the evaluation of hypertonia. Seven children 5-17 years of age with hypertonia due to cerebral palsy were each examined by 6 clinicians, both with and without the use of surface EMG. The use of surface EMG resulted in an increase in interrater agreement as well as an increase in the self-reported confidence of the clinicians in their assessment. These results support the importance of further testing of surface EMG as an adjunct to the clinical examination of childhood hypertonia.

  4. Immediate effects of positioning devices on the normal and spastic hand measured by electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiowetz, V; Bolding, D J; Trombly, C A

    1983-04-01

    There is a continuing controversy in the literature and in clinical practice about whether positioning devices are effective in decreasing spasticity and, if so, which type is most effective. In this study, the immediate effects of a volar resting splint, a finger spreader, a firm cone, and no device were compared on eight normal and four hemiplegic subjects. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure flexor muscle activity of the tested forearm while the subjects squeezed a grasp meter with the contralateral hand and during the following relaxation period. Results showed significantly greater EMG activity for the finger spreader compared to no device in the flexor carpi radialis of normal subjects during the grasping period. Hemiplegic subjects did not show significantly less EMG activity when using positioning devices compared to no device. In fact, the volar splint appeared to increase the EMG activity while the subjects were grasping.

  5. Reconstructing four joint angles on the shoulder and elbow from noninvasive electroencephalographic signals through electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyuwan eChoi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, first the cortical activities over 2240 vertexes on the brain were estimated from 64 channels electroencephalography (EEG signals using the Hierarchical Bayesian estimation while 5 subjects did continuous arm reaching movements. From the estimated cortical activities, a sparse linear regression method selected only useful features in reconstructing the electromyography (EMG signals and estimated the EMG signals of 9 arm muscles. Then, a modular artificial neural network was used to estimate four joint angles from the estimated EMG signals of 9 muscles: one for movement control and the other for posture control. The estimated joint angles using this method have the correlation coefficient of 0.807 (±0.10 and the normalized root-mean-square error (nRMSE of 0.176 (±0.29 with the actual joint angles.

  6. Predicting 3D lip shapes using facial surface EMG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, Merijn; van Alphen, Maarten J. A.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Smeele, Ludi E.; Brandsma, Dieta; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to prove that facial surface electromyography (sEMG) conveys sufficient information to predict 3D lip shapes. High sEMG predictive accuracy implies we could train a neural control model for activation of biomechanical models by simultaneously recording sEMG signals and

  7. Predicting 3D lip shapes using facial surface EMG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merijn Eskes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prove that facial surface electromyography (sEMG conveys sufficient information to predict 3D lip shapes. High sEMG predictive accuracy implies we could train a neural control model for activation of biomechanical models by simultaneously recording sEMG signals and their associated motions.With a stereo camera set-up, we recorded 3D lip shapes and simultaneously performed sEMG measurements of the facial muscles, applying principal component analysis (PCA and a modified general regression neural network (GRNN to link the sEMG measurements to 3D lip shapes. To test reproducibility, we conducted our experiment on five volunteers, evaluating several sEMG features and window lengths in unipolar and bipolar configurations in search of the optimal settings for facial sEMG.The errors of the two methods were comparable. We managed to predict 3D lip shapes with a mean accuracy of 2.76 mm when using the PCA method and 2.78 mm when using modified GRNN. Whereas performance improved with shorter window lengths, feature type and configuration had little influence.

  8. Motor unit potentials of the erector spinae muscle by concentric needle electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posa, Andreas; Niśkiewicz, Izabela; Emmer, Alexander; Kluge, Yorck; Kornhuber, Malte E

    2017-03-01

    The needle electromyography (EMG) serves to supply additional information in patients with suspected neuromuscular disorders. We aimed to provide motor unit potential (MUP) data by concentric needle EMG in the erector spinae (ES) in comparison with biceps brachii (BB) and lateral vastus (LV). Electromyography MUP data (n) were obtained in ES (517), BB (539), and LV (627) in 32 healthy volunteers (16f). Motor unit potential data: amplitude (μV) 393 ± 174 (ES), 375 ± 162 (BB), and 577 ± 304 (LV); duration (ms) 10.4 ± 2.4 (ES), 10.1 ± 2.1 (BB), and 11.1 ± 2.3 (LV), area (μV × ms) 585 ± 327 (ES), 538 ± 267 (BB), and 881 ± 492 (LV); phase number 3.23 ± 0.94 (ES), 2.98 ± 0.76 (BB), and 3.19 ± 0.81 (LV); size index 0.60 ± 0.56 (ES), 0.51 ± 0.53 (BB), and 0.96 ± 0.55 (LV). LV displayed higher values (p at least <.001) for MUP amplitude, duration, area, and size index as compared to both, BB and ES. Concentric needle EMG investigations in healthy adult human subjects revealed similar MUP parameters in the ES and BB muscles, while in the LV muscle MUP amplitude, duration, area, and size index were significantly larger. Different neuromuscular disorders display a predominant involvement of proximally located muscles such as truncal muscles. The present results given here may facilitate the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders.

  9. Differences between acceleromyography and electromyography during neuromuscular function monitoring in anesthetized Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Daniel M; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Tomak, Emily A; Martin, Matthew J; Campoy, Luis; Gleed, Robin D

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative neuromuscular monitoring is essential for studies of potency and duration of neuromuscular blocking agents, and for detecting residual paralysis in anesthetized patients. This investigation evaluates whether there are systematic differences between acceleromyography (AMG) and electromyography (EMG); two quantitative methods for monitoring neuromuscular block. Prospective. Ten healthy Beagle dogs. Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and dexmedetomidine. Both ulnar nerves were stimulated with a train-of-four (TOF) pattern every 15 seconds. The magnitude of the first twitch (T1) and the TOF ratio (magnitude of T4/T1; TOFR) were quantified simultaneously with AMG and EMG, applied randomly to each extremity. The extent of maximal block (T1 depression) and onset time were measured by AMG and EMG during TOF monitoring after the administration of cisatracurium (0.05 mg kg(-1)). In addition, recovery of T1 to 25% and 75%, the recovery index (time between T1 of 25% and 75%), and recovery of the TOFR to 0.9 were used to characterize recovery from cisatracurium and were compared between monitors. Regression and Bland-Altman plots for T1 and TOFR were also created. Maximal block and onset time were not different between monitors. Time to recovery of T1 to 25% and 75%, and time to TOF ratio 0.9 was significantly shorter with AMG. The recovery index was not different between monitors. When the TOFR returned to 0.9 with AMG, EMG still measured considerable residual block (TOFR 0.47). Electromyography consistently detected residual NMB when recovery from NMB was complete as assessed by AMG. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  10. Invited Article: Recommendations of the Neurolaryngology Study Group on Laryngeal Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitzer, Andrew; Crumley, Roger L.; Dailey, Seth H.; Ford, Charles N.; Floeter, Mary Kay; Hillel, Allen D.; Hoffman, Henry T.; Ludlow, Christy L.; Merati, Albert; Munin, Michael C.; Robinson, Lawrence R.; Rosen, Clark; Saxon, Keith G.; Sulica, Lucian; Thibeault, Susan L.; Titze, Ingo; Woo, Peak; Woodson, Gayle E.

    2009-01-01

    The Neurolaryngology Study Group convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts in neuromuscular physiology, electromyography, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, and laryngology to meet with interested members from the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, the Neurolaryngology Subcommittee and the Neurolaryngology Study Group to address the use of laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) for electrodiagnosis of laryngeal disorders. The panel addressed the use of LEMG for: 1) diagnosis of vocal fold paresis, 2) best practice application of equipment and techniques for LEMG, 3) estimation of time of injury and prediction of recovery of neural injuries, 4) diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases of the laryngeal muscles, and, 5) differentiation between central nervous system and behaviorally based laryngeal disorders. The panel also addressed establishing standardized techniques and methods for future assessment of LEMG sensitivity, specificity and reliability for identification, assessment and prognosis of neurolaryngeal disorders. Previously an evidence-based review of the clinical utility of LEMG published in 2004 only found evidence supported that LEMG was possibly useful for guiding injections of botulinum toxin into the laryngeal muscles. An updated traditional/narrative literature review and expert opinions were used to direct discussion and format conclusions. In current clinical practice, LEMG is a qualitative and not a quantitative examination. Specific recommendations were made to standardize electrode types, muscles to be sampled, sampling techniques, and reporting requirements. Prospective studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of LEMG. Use of the standardized methods and reporting will support future studies correlating electro-diagnostic findings with voice and upper airway function. PMID:19467391

  11. Evaluating the Tongue-Hold Maneuver Using High-Resolution Manometry and Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Michael J.; Jones, Corinne A.; Mielens, Jason D.; Kim, Chloe H.; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    The tongue-hold maneuver is a widely used clinical technique designed to increase posterior pharyngeal wall movement in individuals with dysphagia. It is hypothesized that the tongue-hold maneuver results in increased contraction of the superior pharyngeal constrictor. However, an electromyographic study of the pharynx and tongue during the tongue-hold is still needed to understand whether and how swallow muscle activity and pressure may change with this maneuver. We tested eight healthy young participants using simultaneous intramuscular electromyography with high-resolution manometry during three task conditions including (a) saliva swallow without maneuver, (b) saliva swallow with the tongue tip at the lip, and (c) saliva swallow during the tongue-hold maneuver. We tested the hypothesis that tongue and pharyngeal muscle activity would increase during the experimental tasks, but that pharyngeal pressure would remain relatively unchanged. We found that the pre-swallow magnitude of tongue, pharyngeal constrictor, and cricopharyngeus muscle activity increased. During the swallow, the magnitude and duration of tongue and pharyngeal constrictor muscle activity each increased. However, manometric pressures and durations remained unchanged. These results suggest that increased superior pharyngeal constrictor activity may serve to maintain relatively stable pharyngeal pressures in the absence of posterior tongue movement. Thus, the tongue-hold maneuver may be a relatively simple but robust example of how the medullary swallow center is equipped to dynamically coordinate actions between tongue and pharynx. Our findings emphasize the need for combined modality swallow assessment to include high-resolution manometry and intramuscular electromyography to evaluate the potential benefit of the tongue-hold maneuver for clinical populations. PMID:24969727

  12. Mandibular Movements As Accurate Reporters of Respiratory Effort during Sleep: Validation against Diaphragmatic Electromyography

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    Jean-Benoît Martinot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ContextMandibular movements (MM are considered as reliable reporters of respiratory effort (RE during sleep and sleep disordered breathing (SDB, but MM accuracy has never been validated against the gold standard diaphragmatic electromyography (EMG-d.ObjectivesTo assess the degree of agreement between MM and EMG-d signals during different sleep stages and abnormal respiratory events.MethodsTwenty-five consecutive adult patients with SDB were studied by polysomnography (PSG that also included multipair esophageal diaphragm electromyography and a magnetometer to record MM. EMG-d activity (microvolt and MM (millimeter amplitudes were extracted by envelope processing. Agreement between signals amplitudes was evaluated by mixed linear regression and cross-correlation function and in segments of PSG including event-free and SDB periods.ResultsThe average total sleep time was 370 ± 18 min and the apnea hypopnea index was 24.8 ± 5.2 events/h. MM and EMG-d amplitudes were significantly cross-correlated: median r (95% CI: 0.67 (0.23–0.96. A mixed linear model showed that for each 10 µV of increase in EMG-d activity, MM amplitude increased by 0.28 mm. The variations in MM amplitudes (median range: 0.11–0.84 mm between normal breathing, respiratory effort-related arousal, obstructive, mixed, and central apnea periods closely corresponded to those observed with EMG-d activity (median range: 2.11–8.23 µV.ConclusionMM amplitudes change proportionally to diaphragmatic EMG activity and accurately identify variations of RE during normal sleep and SDB.

  13. Ultrasound and Electromyography Guidance for Injection of the Longus Colli With Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Cervical Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen K; Odderson, Ib R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is a painful condition in which neck muscles contract involuntarily, and may cause abnormal head position or movements. The primary (or first line of) treatment of cervical dystonia is chemodenervation with injection of botulinum toxin into the affected muscles. We report a case of a young man with idiopathic cervical dystonia who developed anterocollis (forward flexion of the neck) not responsive to prior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscle injections. To safely access the deeper cervical musculature, ultrasound (US) was used in conjunction with electromyography, to inject the longus colli muscles bilaterally. The patient responded well and had no complications. The longus colli has been reported to be injected using electromyography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and, less frequently, US. We propose that US guidance is an excellent technique for botulinum toxin injection, especially for deep cervical muscles such as the longus colli.

  14. Surface electromyography of myopotential oversensing provoked by simultaneous straining and leftward twisting in a patient with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, Yoichi; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Shoda, Morio; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2017-03-01

    An important step in diagnosing myopotential oversensing is to confirm its reproducibility using specific provocation maneuvers. Although most maneuvers involve the co-contraction of many muscles, no attempt has been made to assess relevant muscle activities by electromyography. We describe a case with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) whose myopotential oversensing was provoked by simultaneous straining and leftward twisting. Simultaneous recordings from real-time ICD telemetry and myopotentials of the rectus abdominis, oblique abdominis, and diaphragm on electromyography during the provocation maneuvers were conducted. It was shown that all three muscles contracted simultaneously during the provocation maneuvers; the diaphragm activity was the main source of noise oversensing, and the twist itself caused oversensing possibly due to the change in the position of the lead. In conclusion, the electromyographic assessment of relevant muscle activities may be useful in assessing each muscle's role and its contribution to myopotential oversensing, especially in a patient whose myopotential oversensing requires complex maneuvers to be provoked.

  15. Effects of Hydrotherapy on postural control and electromyography parameters in men with chronic non-specific low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Mahjur; Seyed Ali Akbar Hashemi Javaheri; Hossein Soltani; Nahid KHoshraftar Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of hydrotherapy on postural control and electromyography parameters in men with chronic non-specific low back pain. Thirty men with chronic non-specific LBP divided into two hydrotherapy and control groups, randomly and equally. Electromyographic activity of erector spinae muscles and balance measured for both of groups before and after intervention. Hydrotherapy program was consisted of 24 sessions. Subjects in control group didn’t ha...

  16. A quantitative approach to measure women?s sexual function using electromyography: A preliminary study of the Kegel exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Mohktar, Mas Sahidayana; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Rozi, Nur Farahana Mohd; Yusof, Juhaida Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Yen, Khong Su; Omar, Siti Zawiah

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the reference standard used to clinically assess sexual function among women is a qualitative questionnaire. Hence, a generalised and quantitative measurement tool needs to be available as an alternative. This study investigated whether an electromyography (EMG) measurement tecnique could be used to help quantify women?s sexual function. Material/Methods A preliminary intervention study was conducted on 12 female subjects, who were randomised into a control (n=6) and an ...

  17. Deglutição de respiradores orais e nasais: avaliação clínica fonoaudiológica e eletromiográfica Swallowing of oral and nose breathers: speech-language and electromyography assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tais Regina Hennig

    2009-12-01

    action and tongue projection, that were analyzed in a descriptive form. The statistical analysis of the electromyography results was done through the t test in order to compare the groups. The statistical considered significance was 5% (p<0.05. RESULTS: in the clinical evaluation it was verified that any of the nose breathers showed atypical swallowing characteristics while 7 (87.5% of the mouth breathers showed labial action, 6 (75% showed mentalis action and 6 (75% showed tongue projection. In the electromyography evaluation, a higher muscular activity was verified, in the mouth breathers, when comparing to the nose breathers, in both lips, with a statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: in this study it was verified that mouth breathers showed significant alterations in the swallowing functions when compared to the nose breathers that were observed through a clinical examination and electromyography evaluation.

  18. Evoked electromyography-based closed-loop torque control in functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Azevedo-Coste, Christine

    2013-08-01

    This paper proposed a closed-loop torque control strategy of functional electrical stimulation (FES) with the aim of obtaining an accurate, safe, and robust FES system. Generally, FES control systems are faced with the challenge of how to deal with time-variant muscle dynamics due to physiological and biochemical factors (such as fatigue). The degraded muscle force needs to be compensated in order to ensure the accuracy of the motion restored by FES. Another challenge concerns the fact that implantable sensors are unavailable to feedback torque information for FES in humans. As FES-evoked electromyography (EMG) represents the activity of stimulated muscles, and also enables joint torque prediction as presented in our previous studies, here we propose an EMG-feedback predictive controller of FES to control joint torque adaptively. EMG feedback contributes to taking the activated muscle state in the FES torque control system into account. The nature of the predictive controller facilitates prediction of the muscle mechanical response and the system can therefore control joint torque from EMG feedback and also respond to time-variant muscle state changes. The control performance, fatigue compensation and aggressive control suppression capabilities of the proposed controller were evaluated and discussed through experimental and simulation studies.

  19. Changes in neck muscle electromyography and forward head posture of children when carrying schoolbags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M H; Yi, C H; Kwon, O Y; Cho, S H; Yoo, W G

    2008-06-01

    This study tested the effects of three alternative types of backpack on head posture and neck muscle electromyography (EMG) in children. Four loading conditions were tested: no pack; a backpack; a double pack; a modified double pack (designed with a backpack and a front pack weighing 10% and 5% of body weight, respectively). Dependent variables were neck muscle activity, forward head angle and forward head distance (the perpendicular distance from C7 to a vertical line through the tragus of the ear). Fifteen children were asked to walk at a speed of 0.8 m/s on a treadmill. The EMG activity of upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid and midcervical paraspinals muscles and the forward head angle and forward head distance were all significantly higher when carrying a backpack than for the other conditions. When carrying a double pack, there was a backward head posture characterised by an increased negative forward head angle, decreased forward head distance, increased sternocleidomastoid EMG signal and decreased midcervical paraspinals EMG signal, compared to carrying no pack. When carrying a modified double pack, the forward head angle and forward head distance decreased when compared to carrying a backpack. These findings indicate that the modified double pack minimises postural deviation.

  20. Pseudomyopathic Changes in Needle Electromyography in Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome

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    Teppei Komatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS is a rare presynaptic disorder of the neuromuscular junction in association with cancer and subsequently in cases in which no neoplasm has been detected (O’Neill et al., 1988. The diagnosis of LEMS is based on the combination of fluctuating muscle weakness, diminished or absent reflexes, and a more than 60% increment of compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude after brief exercise or 50 Hz stimulation for 1 s in a repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS test (Oh et al., 2005. On the other hand, needle electromyography (EMG findings related to LEMS have not been well described. Here, we report a case of LEMS, which showed apparent myopathic changes in needle EMG findings. Furthermore, we retrospectively examined the needle EMG findings in 8 patients with LEMS. In six of the 8 patients, the EMG findings showed myopathy-like findings. Although the findings of needle EMG indicated myopathic changes at a glance, the motor unit potential (MUP returned to normal after a sustained strong muscle contraction. We propose the name “pseudomyopathic changes” for this phenomenon.

  1. Changes in kinematics and trunk electromyography during a 2000 m race simulation in elite female rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, C L; Jones, I C; Jenkyn, T R; Ivanova, T D; Garland, S J

    2012-08-01

    Achieving excellence in rowing requires optimization of technique to maximize efficiency and force production. Investigation of the kinematics of the trunk, upper and lower extremity, together with muscle activity of the trunk, provides an insight into the motor control strategies utilized over a typical race. Nine elite female rowers performed a 2000 m race simulation. Kinematic data of the trunk and extremities, together with electromyography (EMG) activity of spinal and pelvic extensor and flexor muscles, were compared at 250 and 1500 m. At 1500 m, there was greater dissociation in the timing of leg extension and arm flexion and delayed trunk extension. Also at 1500 m, the spine demonstrated a delayed peak extension angular velocity of the T4-T7 and L3-S1 spinal segments in the early drive along with delayed and increased peak extension angular velocity of T10-L1 and L1-L3 spinal segments during the late drive. Trunk muscle fatigue was not evident; however, the abdominals demonstrated larger EMG burst areas at 1500 m. Alterations in trunk kinematics suggest that the trunk acts as a less stiff lever on which to transfer the forces of the legs to the arms and handle. Increased abdominal activity may reflect increased demand to control the trunk, given the altered coordination between the legs, trunk and arms. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle activity during cycling as measured with intramuscular electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Julio Cézar Lima; Tarassova, O; Ekblom, M M; Andersson, E; Rönquist, G; Arndt, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe thigh muscle activation during cycling using intramuscular electromyographic recordings of eight thigh muscles, including the biceps femoris short head (BFS) and the vastus intermedius (Vint). Nine experienced cyclists performed an incremental test (start at 170 W and increased by 20 W every 2 min) on a bicycle ergometer either for a maximum of 20 min or to fatigue. Intramuscular electromyography (EMG) of eight muscles and kinematic data of the right lower limb were recorded during the last 20 s in the second workload (190 W). EMG data were normalized to the peak activity occurring during this workload. Statistical significance was assumed at p ≤ 0.05. The vastii showed a greater activation during the 1st quadrant compared to other quadrants. The rectus femoris (RF) showed a similar activation, but with two bursts in the 1st and 4th quadrants in three subjects. This behavior may be explained by the bi-articular function during the cycling movement. Both the BFS and Vint were activated longer than, but in synergy with their respective agonistic superficial muscles. Intramuscular EMG was used to verify muscle activation during cycling. The activation pattern of deep muscles (Vint and BFS) could, therefore, be described and compared to that of the more superficial muscles. The complex coordination of quadriceps and hamstring muscles during cycling was described in detail.

  3. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  4. Evaluation of sonomyography (SMG) for control compared with electromyography (EMG) in a discrete target tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Kenney, Laurence P; Xie, Hong-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Most of the commercial upper-limb externally powered prosthetic devices are controlled by electromyography (EMG) signals. We previously proposed using the real-time change of muscle thickness detected using ultrasound, namely sonomyography (SMG), for the control of prostheses. In this study, we compared the performance of subjects using 1-D SMG signal and surface EMG signal, using a discrete target tracking protocol involving a series of letter cancellation tasks. Each task involved using grip force, EMG or SMG from a wrist extensor muscle to move a cursor to one of 5 locations on a computer screen, at the first four of which were located a letter and last of which was a word of "NEXT". The target was defined by the location showing the letter "E" and, once the subject reached this target, they were instructed to "cancel" the E from the screen, using a button operated by the contralateral hand. A paired t-test revealed that the percentage of letters correctly cancelled with force/angle and SMG signal in isometric force control, and with SMG in wrist extension were significantly higher than with EMG (PEMG for prosthetic control.

  5. Can continuous physical training counteract aging effect on myoelectric fatigue? A surface electromyography study application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Roberto; Rainoldi, Alberto; Nilsson, Jan; Bellotti, Pasquale

    2003-04-01

    To compare the myoelectric onset of muscle fatigue in physically active trained young skiers with respect to elderly skiers and to test whether continuous training can counteract the selective loss of type II muscle fibers usually observed with aging. An observational, cross-sectional study of the myoelectric onset of muscle fatigue in the left tibialis anterior muscles. Surface electromyography recorded with portable devices at a downhill ski rescue lodge in the Italian Alps. Fifty-four physically trained, active skiers (43 men, 11 women; age range, 24-85y). Questionnaire on physical activity and 2 sustained isometric voluntary contractions at 20% and 2 at 80% of the maximal voluntary contraction level. Isometric contractions and mean and median spectral frequencies calculated to monitor the myoelectric manifestations of muscle fatigue. Fatigue indices did not differ significantly between younger and older subjects and, thus, did not show a correlation between myoelectric manifestations of muscle fatigue and age in physically active subjects. It appears possible that aging skeletal muscles subjected to continuous exercise develop an adaptive response that counteracts the selective loss of type II muscle fibers usually observed in the muscles of elderly sedentary subjects. Our results suggest that physical activity could be considered in the elderly within a broad rehabilitative framework in which appropriate and even tailored physical training could be planned to counteract the physiologic effects of aging on muscle fiber distribution.

  6. Expiratory Muscle Strength Training Evaluated With Simultaneous High Resolution Manometry and Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Hammer, Michael J.; Rosen, Sarah P.; Jones, Corinne A.; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine feasibility of a simultaneous high-resolution pharyngeal manometry (HRM) and electromyography (EMG) experimental paradigm to detect swallowing-related patterns of palatal, laryngeal, and pharyngeal muscle activity during expiratory training. Study Design Technical report. Methods Simultaneous HRM, surface submental, and intramuscular EMG were acquired in two healthy participants during five tasks: 10-cc water swallow, maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) testing, and expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) at three pressure levels (sham, 50%, and 75% MEP). Results Experimental conditions were feasible. Velopharyngeal closing pressure, palate EMG activity, and pharyngeal EMG activity increased as expiratory load increased. In contrast, thyroarytenoid EMG activity was low during the expiratory task, consistent with glottic opening during exhalation. Submental EMG patterns were more variable during expiratory tasks. Intraluminal air pressures recorded with HRM were correlated with measured expiratory pressures and target valve-opening pressures of the EMST device. Conclusion Results suggest that a simultaneous HRM/EMG/EMST paradigm may be used to detect previously unquantified swallowing-related muscle activity during EMST, particularly in the palate and pharynx. Our approach and initial findings will be helpful to guide future hypothesis-driven studies and may enable investigators to evaluate other muscle groups active during these tasks. Defining mechanisms of action is a critical next step toward refining therapeutic algorithms using EMST and other targeted treatments for populations with dysphagia and airway disorders. PMID:28083946

  7. High-density surface electromyography provides reliable estimates of motor unit behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Valdes, E; Laine, C M; Falla, D; Mayer, F; Farina, D

    2016-06-01

    To assess the intra- and inter-session reliability of estimates of motor unit behavior and muscle fiber properties derived from high-density surface electromyography (HDEMG). Ten healthy subjects performed submaximal isometric knee extensions during three recording sessions (separate days) at 10%, 30%, 50% and 70% of their maximum voluntary effort. The discharge timings of motor units of the vastus lateralis and medialis muscles were automatically identified from HDEMG by a decomposition algorithm. We characterized the number of detected motor units, their discharge rates, the coefficient of variation of their inter-spike intervals (CoVisi), the action potential conduction velocity and peak-to-peak amplitude. Reliability was assessed for each motor unit characteristics by intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Additionally, a pulse-to-noise ratio (PNR) was calculated, to verify the accuracy of the decomposition. Good to excellent reliability within and between sessions was found for all motor unit characteristics at all force levels (ICCs>0.8), with the exception of CoVisi that presented poor reliability (ICC95%). Motor unit features can be assessed non-invasively and reliably within and across sessions over a wide range of force levels. These results suggest that it is possible to characterize motor units in longitudinal intervention studies. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of window length on performance of the elbow-joint angle prediction based on electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triwiyanto; Wahyunggoro, Oyas; Adi Nugroho, Hanung; Herianto

    2017-05-01

    The high performance of the elbow joint angle prediction is essential on the development of the devices based on electromyography (EMG) control. The performance of the prediction depends on the feature of extraction parameters such as window length. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of the window length on the performance of the elbow-joint angle prediction. The prediction algorithm consists of zero-crossing feature extraction and second order of Butterworth low pass filter. The feature was used to extract the EMG signal by varying window length. The EMG signal was collected from the biceps muscle while the elbow was moved in the flexion and extension motion. The subject performed the elbow motion by holding a 1-kg load and moved the elbow in different periods (12 seconds, 8 seconds and 6 seconds). The results indicated that the window length affected the performance of the prediction. The 250 window lengths yielded the best performance of the prediction algorithm of (mean±SD) root mean square error = 5.68%±1.53% and Person’s correlation = 0.99±0.0059.

  9. Motor unit number estimation and quantitative needle electromyography in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzi, Ioanna; Trachani, Eftichia; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Rapidi, Christina-Anastasia; Ellul, John; Sakellaropoulos, George C; Chroni, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of upper motor neuron damage upon motor units' function by means of two separate and supplementary electrophysiological methods. The abductor digiti minimi muscle of the non-paretic and the paretic side was studied in forty-six stroke patients with (a) motor unit number estimation (MUNE) - adapted multiple point stimulation method and (b) computerized quantitative needle electromyography (EMG) assessing the configuration of voluntary recruited motor unit potentials. Main outcome comparisons were focused on differences between non-paretic and paretic side. On the affected hands mean MUNE value was significantly lower and mean area of the surface recorded single motor unit potentials was significantly larger than the corresponding ones on the non-paretic hands. EMG findings did not reveal remarkable differences between the two sides. Neither severity nor chronicity of stroke was related to MUNE or EMG parameters. MUNE results, which suggested reduced motor unit numbers in stroke patients, in conjunction with the normal EMG features in these same muscles has given rise to different interpretations. In a clinical setting, reinnervation type changes in the EMG similar to that occurring in neuronopathies or axonal neuropathies should not be expected in muscles with central neurogenic lesion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. State of the art review: Intravaginal probes for recording electromyography from the pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshwani, Nadia; McLean, Linda

    2015-02-01

    To survey commercially available intravaginal probes designed to record electromyography (EMG) from the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs), and to discuss the strengths and limitations of current technology. The MEDLINE EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDRO, and Cochrane databases were searched for articles in which intravaginal probes were described as having been used to record EMG from the PFMs. The World Wide Web was also searched using the Google search engine to find devices used to record EMG from the PFMs. Finally, a Canadian distributer of intravaginal probes was contacted to identify intravaginal EMG probes not identified through other methods. The specifications of each probe were determined through the manufacturer or their website, and each device was acquired by the investigators to verify the specifications and electrode configuration. The devices were evaluated against international standards for recording EMG data. Sixteen different models of commercially available intravaginal probes were identified: seven from published research papers, seven using the World Wide Web, and two through communication with a distributer. The probes vary in shape, dimensions, electrode positioning, and electrode configuration, with many designs prone to recording motion artifact, crosstalk, and/or inappropriate EMG signals. All commercially available intravaginal probes had deficiencies in their design such as problems with probe geometry, electrode size, location, and/or configuration. Improved intravaginal EMG probes should be developed for use in research and clinical practice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Motor unit number estimation based on high-density surface electromyography decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; He, Jinbao; Yao, Bo; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-09-01

    To advance the motor unit number estimation (MUNE) technique using high density surface electromyography (EMG) decomposition. The K-means clustering convolution kernel compensation algorithm was employed to detect the single motor unit potentials (SMUPs) from high-density surface EMG recordings of the biceps brachii muscles in eight healthy subjects. Contraction forces were controlled at 10%, 20% and 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Achieved MUNE results and the representativeness of the SMUP pools were evaluated using a high-density weighted-average method. Mean numbers of motor units were estimated as 288±132, 155±87, 107±99 and 132±61 by using the developed new MUNE at 10%, 20%, 30% and 10-30% MVCs, respectively. Over 20 SMUPs were obtained at each contraction level, and the mean residual variances were lower than 10%. The new MUNE method allows a convenient and non-invasive collection of a large size of SMUP pool with great representativeness. It provides a useful tool for estimating the motor unit number of proximal muscles. The present new MUNE method successfully avoids the use of intramuscular electrodes or multiple electrical stimuli which is required in currently available MUNE techniques; as such the new MUNE method can minimize patient discomfort for MUNE tests. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electromyography data for non-invasive naturally-controlled robotic hand prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Castellini, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Elsig, Simone; Giatsidis, Giorgio; Bassetto, Franco; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that it may be possible for hand-amputated subjects to recover at least a significant part of the lost hand functionality. The control of robotic prosthetic hands using non-invasive techniques is still a challenge in real life: myoelectric prostheses give limited control capabilities, the control is often unnatural and must be learned through long training times. Meanwhile, scientific literature results are promising but they are still far from fulfilling real-life needs. This work aims to close this gap by allowing worldwide research groups to develop and test movement recognition and force control algorithms on a benchmark scientific database. The database is targeted at studying the relationship between surface electromyography, hand kinematics and hand forces, with the final goal of developing non-invasive, naturally controlled, robotic hand prostheses. The validation section verifies that the data are similar to data acquired in real-life conditions, and that recognition of different hand tasks by applying state-of-the-art signal features and machine-learning algorithms is possible. PMID:25977804

  13. Test-retest reliability of trunk motor variability measured by large-array surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Nougarou, François; Loranger, Michel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the trunk muscle activity distribution in asymptomatic participants during muscle fatigue using large-array surface electromyography (EMG). Trunk muscle activity distribution was evaluated twice, with 3 to 4 days between them, in 27 asymptomatic volunteers using large-array surface EMG. Motor variability, assessed with 2 different variables (the centroid coordinates of the root mean square map and the dispersion variable), was evaluated during a low back muscle fatigue task. Test-retest reliability of muscle activity distribution was obtained using Pearson correlation coefficients. A shift in the distribution of EMG amplitude toward the lateral-caudal region of the lumbar erector spinae induced by muscle fatigue was observed. Moderate to very strong correlations were found between both sessions in the last 3 phases of the fatigue task for both motor variability variables, whereas weak to moderate correlations were found in the first phases of the fatigue task only for the dispersion variable. These findings show that, in asymptomatic participants, patterns of EMG activity are less reliable in initial stages of muscle fatigue, whereas later stages are characterized by highly reliable patterns of EMG activity. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between function, strength and electromyography of upper extremities of persons with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vargas Ferreira, V M; Varoto, R; Azevedo Cacho, Ê W; Cliquet, A

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional. To analyze the relationships between functional tests, arm strength and root mean square of surface electromyography (EMG). Sao Paulo, Brazil. Twenty-four individuals with chronic tetraplegia participated. Upper extremity motor score (UEMS), functional independence measure (FIM) motor score, spinal cord independence measure III and capabilities of upper extremity (CUE) were performed. Muscle strength of the right elbow flexors-extensors was assessed using dynamometry and manual muscle test (MMT) and EMG of right biceps and triceps brachii were performed. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and Mann-Whitney's U-test were used. Functional tests and UEMS correlated strongly among them. UEMS highly correlated with triceps dynamometry and EMG. The dynamometry showed a very high correlation with MMT on the extensor group and a moderate correlation with flexor group. Triceps EMG showed moderate correlation with FIM and CUE. High correlations between triceps EMG and elbow extensors dynamometry and MMT were observed. A significant better performance on functional tests was observed on lower ASIA motor levels. The low-tetraplegia group showed a significant higher score on triceps EMG and dynamometry. Arm strength and EMG seem to be related to functional capabilities and independence in chronic tetraplegia.

  15. Expiratory muscle strength training evaluated with simultaneous high-resolution manometry and electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Katherine A; Hammer, Michael J; Rosen, Sarah P; Jones, Corinne A; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2017-04-01

    To examine feasibility of a simultaneous high-resolution pharyngeal manometry (HRM) and electromyography (EMG) experimental paradigm to detect swallowing-related patterns of palatal, laryngeal, and pharyngeal muscle activity during expiratory training. Technical report. Simultaneous HRM, surface submental, and intramuscular EMG were acquired in two healthy participants during five tasks: 10-cc water swallow, maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) testing, and expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) at three pressure levels (sham, 50%, and 75% MEP). Experimental conditions were feasible. Velopharyngeal closing pressure, palate EMG activity, and pharyngeal EMG activity increased as expiratory load increased. In contrast, thyroarytenoid EMG activity was low during the expiratory task, consistent with glottic opening during exhalation. Submental EMG patterns were more variable during expiratory tasks. Intraluminal air pressures recorded with HRM were correlated with measured expiratory pressures and target valve-opening pressures of the EMST device. Results suggest that a simultaneous HRM/EMG/EMST paradigm may be used to detect previously unquantified swallowing-related muscle activity during EMST, particularly in the palate and pharynx. Our approach and initial findings will be helpful to guide future hypothesis-driven studies and may enable investigators to evaluate other muscle groups active during these tasks. Defining mechanisms of action is a critical next step toward refining therapeutic algorithms using EMST and other targeted treatments for populations with dysphagia and airway disorders. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:797-804, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. A comparative evaluation of sonomyography, electromyography, force, and wrist angle in a discrete tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Kenney, Laurence P J; Bowen, Audrey; Howard, David; Canderle, Jiri J

    2011-06-01

    We have previously used the real-time change of muscle thickness detected using ultrasound, namely sonomyography (SMG), for prosthesis motor control purposes. In the present study, we further compared subjects' performance using SMG and surface electromyography (EMG) in a series of discrete tracking tasks, both with and without a concurrent auditory attention task. Sixteen healthy subjects used different signals in a random order to control the cursor on a personal computer screen to cancel the letter "E" in a sequence of vertically arranged letters. Subjects' performance was evaluated under isometric contraction and wrist extension using the extensor carpi radiali muscle. The percentage of successfully cancelled Es using SMG decreased by 21 ± 16% and 17 ± 11% in isometric contraction and wrist extension tests, respectively, compared with the corresponding performances using force and angle signals. The corresponding reduction recorded by using EMG was 40 ± 29% and 41 ± 25%. In addition, there was a significant decrease by using EMG compared with that by SMG (p 0.99). Furthermore, the SMG control provided more consistent performances under the single and dual tasks compared with EMG control. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Wrist Rehabilitation Assisted by an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Robot After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ling; Tong, Raymond Kai-yu; Ho, Newmen S K; Xue, Jing-jing; Rong, Wei; Li, Leonard S W

    2015-09-01

    Augmented physical training with assistance from robot and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may introduce intensive motor improvement in chronic stroke. To compare the rehabilitation effectiveness achieved by NMES robot-assisted wrist training and that by robot-assisted training. This study was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Twenty-six hemiplegic subjects with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to receive 20-session wrist training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven NMES robot (NMES robot group, n = 11) and with an EMG-driven robot (robot group, n = 15), completed within 7 consecutive weeks. Clinical scores, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Score (MAS), and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were used to evaluate the training effects before and after the training, as well as 3 months later. An EMG parameter, muscle co-contraction index, was also applied to investigate the session-by-session variation in muscular coordination patterns during the training. The improvement in FMA (shoulder/elbow, wrist/hand) obtained in the NMES robot group was more significant than the robot group (P robot group (P robot group. NMES robot-assisted training showed better performance in releasing muscle co-contraction than the robot-assisted across the training sessions (P robot-assisted wrist training was more effective than the pure robot. The additional NMES application in the treatment could bring more improvements in the distal motor functions and faster rehabilitation progress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Electromyography data for non-invasive naturally-controlled robotic hand prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Castellini, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Elsig, Simone; Giatsidis, Giorgio; Bassetto, Franco; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that it may be possible for hand-amputated subjects to recover at least a significant part of the lost hand functionality. The control of robotic prosthetic hands using non-invasive techniques is still a challenge in real life: myoelectric prostheses give limited control capabilities, the control is often unnatural and must be learned through long training times. Meanwhile, scientific literature results are promising but they are still far from fulfilling real-life needs. This work aims to close this gap by allowing worldwide research groups to develop and test movement recognition and force control algorithms on a benchmark scientific database. The database is targeted at studying the relationship between surface electromyography, hand kinematics and hand forces, with the final goal of developing non-invasive, naturally controlled, robotic hand prostheses. The validation section verifies that the data are similar to data acquired in real-life conditions, and that recognition of different hand tasks by applying state-of-the-art signal features and machine-learning algorithms is possible.

  19. [The value of electromyography in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongfen; Chen, Zhaohui; Ling, Li; Shang, Aijia; Qiao, Guangyu; Cui, Fang; Yang, Fei; Huang, Xusheng

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the value of needle electromyography (EMG) in differentiating intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region. Patients hospitalized in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from March 2008 to June 2013 with abnormalities on MRI of cervical vertebra and preliminary diagnosed as intramedullary tumor or inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical region were enrolled in the study. Electrophysiological examination was performed before any treatment. Pathological findings were analyzed and prognosis was evaluated in all the subjects. A total of fifty-five patients were enrolled in the study with 33 cases of inflammatory demyelinating disease and 22 cases of intramedullary tumor defined by the postoperative pathological findings. In all the 33 cases with demyelinating disease, only one case (3.03%) presented as neurogenic damage by needle EMG. While in all the 22 cases with intramedullary tumor, needle EMG revealed neurogenic damage in 15 cases (68.18%) and the spinal segments of muscles with neurogenic damage were all within the spinal lesions demonstrated by MRI. The diagnostic sensitivity of EMG for intramedullary tumor was 68.18% and the diagnostic specificity was 96.97%, while the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for intramedullary tumor by the medical history, symptoms and signs were 59.09% and 75.76% respectively. Needle EMG might play an important role in distinguishing intramedullary tumor from inflammatory demyelinating disease of cervical spinal cord.

  20. Perineal Surface Electromyography Does Not Typically Demonstrate Expected Relaxation During Normal Voiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Anna C.; Nager, Charles W.; Litman, Heather J.; FitzGerald, Mary P.; Kraus, Stephen; Norton, Peggy; Sirls, Larry; Rickey, Leslie; Wilson, Tracey; Dandreo, Kimberly J.; Shepherd, Jonathan; Zimmern, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Aims To describe perineal surface patch electromyography (EMG) activity during urodynamics (UDS) and compare activity between filling and voiding phases and to assess for a relationship between preoperative EMG activity and postoperative voiding symptoms. Methods 655 women underwent standardized preoperative UDS that included perineal surface EMG prior to undergoing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. Pressure-flow studies were evaluated for abdominal straining and interrupted flow. Quantitative EMG values were extracted from 10 predetermined time-points and compared between fill and void. Qualitative EMG activity was assessed for the percent of time EMG was active during fill and void and for the average amplitude of EMG during fill compared to void. Postoperative voiding dysfunction was defined as surgical revision or catheterization more than 6 weeks after surgery. Fisher’s exact test with a 5% two-sided significance level was used to assess differences in EMG activity and postoperative voiding dysfunction. Results 321 UDS had interpretable EMG studies, of which 131 (41%) had EMG values at all 10 predetermined and annotated time-points. Quantitative and qualitative EMG signals during flow were usually greater than during fill. The prevalence of postoperative voiding dysfunction in subjects with higher preoperative EMG activity during void was not significantly different. Results were similar in the 42 subjects who had neither abdominal straining during void nor interrupted flow. Conclusions Perineal surface patch EMG did not measure expected pelvic floor and urethral sphincter relaxation during voiding. Preoperative EMG did not predict patients at risk for postoperative voiding dysfunction. PMID:21560157

  1. Reliability of telemetric electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy during high-intensity resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brendan R; Slattery, Katie M; Sculley, Dean V; Lockie, Robert G; Dascombe, Ben J

    2014-10-01

    This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve well-trained young men performed high-intensity back squat exercise (12 sets at 70-90% 1-repetition maximum) on two occasions, during which EMG and NIRS continuously monitored muscle activation and oxygenation of the thigh muscles. Intra-test reliability for EMG and NIRS variables was generally higher than inter-test reliability. EMG median frequency variables were generally more reliable than amplitude-based variables. The reliability of EMG measures was not related to the intensity or number of repetitions performed during the set. No notable differences were evident in the reliability of EMG between different agonist muscles. NIRS-derived measures of oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and tissue saturation index were generally more reliable during single-repetition sets than multiple-repetition sets at the same intensity. Tissue saturation index was the most reliable NIRS variable. Although the reliability of the EMG and NIRS measures varied across the exercise protocol, the precise causes of this variability are not yet understood. However, it is likely that biological variation during multi-joint isotonic resistance exercise may account for some of the variation in the observed results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of masseter muscle electromyography after surgical extraction of third molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Woo; Kim, Seong-Gon; Park, Sung-Wook; Chee, Young-Joon

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the results of electromyographies (EMGs) of the masseter muscle after mandibular third molar surgery and to determine the relationships between clinical variables and EMG results. Seventy patients were included in the study. The parameters of the patients' masseter muscles were measured using EMG prior to operation and 7 and 21 days post-operation. Clinical variables were also recorded before and after the third molar surgeries. When the masseter muscle EMG results from the tooth-extracted side were compared with those from the non-extracted (control) side, significant differences in the areas of voltage, power spectral densities and median frequencies (p = 0.011, 0.017 and 0.041, respectively) were found 7 days postoperatively. Additionally, there were significant associations between some clinical variables (i.e. postoperative swelling, bone reduction and pericoronitis) and the EMG results 7 days postoperatively, (p evaluate postoperative changes in masseter muscle activity.

  3. Novel augmented ADIM training using ultrasound imaging and electromyography in adults with core instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Gi; Jung, Ji-Hee; You, Joshua Sung-H; Kang, Sung-Kouk; Lee, Dong-Ryul; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jeon, Hye-Seon

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of novel augmented abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) training using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) and electromyography (EMG) in adults with core instability. A convenience sample of 20 young adults with core instability (female =4; mean age ± standard deviation=24.4 ± 2.9 years) was recruited. Core instability was determined by the formal test. All subjects underwent an intensive ADIM that was augmented by comprehensive visual feedback via a pressure biofeedback unit, RUSI, and EMG. The intervention was provided for 20 minutes a day, 7 days a week, over a two-week period. The paired t-test showed that both transverse abdominal (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscle thickness during ADIM were significantly greater than at rest (p= 0.000). However, external oblique (EO) muscle thickness remained relatively unchanged. The mean EMG amplitudes of the EO and erector spinae (ES) muscles were significantly decreased after the intervention (p=0.001, p=0.008). The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC(1,2)) showed the excellent test-retest reliability for muscle thickness (ranging from 0.90 to 0.98 in the prone position). This is the first evidence to demonstrate that the novel augmented ADIM training can effectively improve the lumbo-pelvic stabilization in adults with core instability.

  4. An electromyography study of wrist extension orthoses and upper-extremity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulthaup, S; Cipriani, D J; Thomas, J J

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the effect of commonly used long and short styles of commercially produced wrist extension orthoses on the activity of the proximal muscles of the shoulder and elbow and on wrist flexor and extensor muscle activity. While 17 women between 22 and 40 years of age (M = 26.6) performed a specified movement wearing each of the two styles of orthosis and without an orthosis, their motor unit recruitment of five proximal joint muscle groups, wrist extensors, and wrist flexors was measured by surface electromyography. Motor unit recruitment was significantly greater in both orthosis conditions for four of five proximal muscles and for wrist flexors. There were no significant differences between the short and long orthosis conditions for proximal muscle groups. Wearing a wrist extension orthosis appears to place additional stress on the proximal joint musculature beyond that found without splint use. The study has implications for the prescription of wrist extension orthoses, especially for patients whose proximal joints are already compromised.

  5. The Advantages of Normalizing Electromyography to Ballistic Rather than Isometric or Isokinetic Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suydam, Stephen M; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2017-07-01

    Isometric tasks have been a standard for electromyography (EMG) normalization stemming from anatomic and physiologic stability observed during contraction. Ballistic dynamic tasks have the benefit of eliciting maximum EMG signals for normalization, despite having the potential for greater signal variability. It is the purpose of this study to compare maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) to nonisometric tasks with increasing degrees of extrinsic variability, ie, joint range of motion, velocity, rate of contraction, etc., to determine if the ballistic tasks, which elicit larger peak EMG signals, are more reliable than the constrained MVIC. Fifteen subjects performed MVIC, isokinetic, maximum countermovement jump, and sprint tasks while EMG was collected from 9 muscles in the quadriceps, hamstrings, and lower leg. The results revealed the unconstrained ballistic tasks were more reliable compared to the constrained MVIC and isokinetic tasks for all triceps surae muscles. The EMG from sprinting was more reliable than the constrained cases for both the hamstrings and vasti. The most reliable EMG signals occurred when the body was permitted its natural, unconstrained motion. These results suggest that EMG is best normalized using ballistic tasks to provide the greatest within-subject reliability, which beneficially yield maximum EMG values.

  6. The role of laryngeal electromyography in vagus nerve stimulation-related vocal fold dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibene, Alberto M; Zambrelli, Elena; Pipolo, Carlotta; Maccari, Alberto; Felisati, Giovanni; Felisati, Elena; Furia, Francesca; Vignoli, Aglaia; Canevini, Maria Paola; Alfonsi, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a useful tool for drug-resistant epilepsy, but it induces known laryngeal side effects, with a significant role on patients' quality of life. VNS patients may show persistent left vocal fold (LVF) palsy at rest and/or recurrent LVF adduction during stimulation. This study aims at electromyographically evaluating laryngeal muscles abnormalities in VNS patients. We compared endoscopic laryngeal evaluation data in six VNS patients with laryngeal muscle electromyography (LMEMG) carried out on the thyroarytenoid, cricothyroid, posterior cricoarytenoid, and cricopharyngeal muscles. Endoscopy showed LVF palsy at rest in 3/6 patients in whom LMEMG documented a tonic spastic activity with reduced phasic modulation. In four out of six patients with recurrent LVF adduction during VNS activation, LMEMG showed a compound muscle action potential persisting for the whole stimulation. This is the first LMEMG report of VNS-induced motor unit activation via recurrent laryngeal nerve and upper laryngeal nerve stimulation. LMEMG data were could, therefore, be considered consistent with the endoscopic laryngeal examination in all patient.

  7. Corpus cavernosum electromyography, a usable clinical diagnostic method for erectile dysfunction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorm Wagner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG has been intensively studied as a potential clinical tool for evaluating the function of the cavernous smooth muscle and its autonomic innervations since 1989. Both basic and clinical studies have shown promising results. However, its application as a diagnostic tool with clinical relevance was hindered by insufficient knowledge of cavernous smooth muscle electrophysiology and a series of technical and practical difficulties. Recently, major progress has been made to overcome these difficulties. Multichannel monopolar recording method has been proved to be superior to traditional one or two-channel bipolar recording. Correlation techniques have been applied as a comprehensive, objective and easy-to-use method to analyze CC-EMG recordings. Using these newly developed techniques, CC-EMG has been demonstrated to be discriminative in erectile dysfunction patients with conditions that are associated with cavernous smooth muscle degeneration and/or autonomic neuropathy from men with normal erectile function. However, before CC-EMG can be used as a robust method for erectile dysfunction-diagnostics, some basic and clinical issues are still to be solved. This review presents an overview of the latest advances in CC-EMG studies, mainly focusing on the clinical application of this method as a diagnostic tool. Furthermore, the background knowledge of cavernous electrophysiology, the problems to be overcome and future perspectives are also discussed.

  8. Development of Hand Grip Assistive Device Control System for Old People through Electromyography (EMG Signal Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamis Herman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hand grip assistive device is a glove to assist old people who suffer from hand weakness in their daily life activities. The device earlier control system only use simple on and off switch. This required old people to use both hand to activate the device. The new control system of the hand grip assistive device was developed to allow single hand operation for old people. New control system take advantages of electromyography (EMG and flex sensor which was implemented to the device. It was programmed into active and semi-active mode operation. EMG sensors were placed on the forearm to capture EMG signal of Flexor Digitorum Profundus muscle to activate the device. Flex sensor was used to indicate the finger position and placed on top of the finger. The signal from both sensors then used to control the device. The new control system allowed single hand operation and designed to prevent user from over depended on the device by activating it through moving their fingers.

  9. A comparison of electromyography and stroke kinematics during ergometer and on-water rowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Neil; Donne, Bernard; Mahony, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed muscle recruitment patterns and stroke kinematics during ergometer and on-water rowing to validate the accuracy of rowing ergometry. Male rowers (n = 10; age 21 ± 2 years, height 1.90 ± 0.05 m and body mass 83.3 ± 4.8 kg) performed 3 × 3 min exercise bouts, at heart and stroke rates equivalent to 75, 85 and 95% VO2peak, on both dynamic and stationary rowing ergometers, and on water. During exercise, synchronised data for surface electromyography (EMG) and 2D kinematics were recorded. Overall muscle activity was quantified by the integration of rmsEMG and averaged for each 10% interval of the stroke cycle. Muscle activity significantly increased in rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM) (P rowing at discrete 10% intervals of stroke cycle. In addition, the drive/recovery ratio was significantly lower during dynamic ergometry compared to on-water (40 ± 1 vs. 44 ± 1% at 95%, P rowing. These differences may be due to altered acceleration and deceleration of moving masses on-ergometer not perfectly simulating the on-water scenario.

  10. Intramuscular pressure and electromyography as indexes of force during isokinetic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aratow, M.; Ballard, R. E.; Grenshaw, A. G.; Styf, J.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    A direct method for measuring force production of specific muscles during dynamic exercise is presently unavailable. Previous studies indicate that both intramuscular pressure (IMP) and electromyography (EMG) correlate linearly with muscle contraction force during isometric exercise. The objective of this study was to compare IMP and EMG as linear assessors of muscle contraction force during dynamic exercise. IMP and surface EMG activity were recorded during concentric and eccentric isokinetic plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles of nine male volunteers. Ankle torque was measured using a dynamometer, and IMP was measured via catheterization. IMP exhibited better linear correlation than EMG with ankle joint torque during concentric contractions of the SOL and the TA, as well as during eccentric contractions. IMP provides a better index of muscle contraction force than EMG during concentric and eccentric exercise through the entire range of torque. IMP reflects intrinsic mechanical properties of individual muscles, such as length-tension relationships, which EMG is unable to assess.

  11. A novel estimating method for steering efficiency of the driver with electromyography signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahui; Ji, Xuewu; Hayama, Ryouhei; Mizuno, Takahiro

    2014-05-01

    The existing research of steering efficiency mainly focuses on the mechanism efficiency of steering system, aiming at designing and optimizing the mechanism of steering system. In the development of assist steering system especially the evaluation of its comfort, the steering efficiency of driver physiological output usually are not considered, because this physiological output is difficult to measure or to estimate, and the objective evaluation of steering comfort therefore cannot be conducted with movement efficiency perspective. In order to take a further step to the objective evaluation of steering comfort, an estimating method for the steering efficiency of the driver was developed based on the research of the relationship between the steering force and muscle activity. First, the steering forces in the steering wheel plane and the electromyography (EMG) signals of the primary muscles were measured. These primary muscles are the muscles in shoulder and upper arm which mainly produced the steering torque, and their functions in steering maneuver were identified previously. Next, based on the multiple regressions of the steering force and EMG signals, both the effective steering force and the total force capacity of driver in steering maneuver were calculated. Finally, the steering efficiency of driver was estimated by means of the estimated effective force and the total force capacity, which represented the information of driver physiological output of the primary muscles. This research develops a novel estimating method for driver steering efficiency of driver physiological output, including the estimation of both steering force and the force capacity of primary muscles with EMG signals, and will benefit to evaluate the steering comfort with an objective perspective.

  12. The Effect of Split Nerve on Electromyography Signal Pattern in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslivia, Maria Florencia; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Zulkarnain, Rizki Fajar; Zhu, Bin; Adikrishna, Arnold; Jeon, In-Ho; Kim, Keehoon

    2018-02-01

     Recent developments of prosthetic arm are based on the use of electromyography (EMG) signals. To provide improvements, such as coordinated movement of multiple joints and greater control intuitiveness, higher variability of EMG signals is needed. By splitting a nerve lengthwise, connecting each half to new target muscles, and employing a program to assign each biosignal pattern to a specific movement, we hope to enrich the number of biosignal sites on amputees' stump.  We split the gastrocnemius muscle of 12 Sprague-Dawley rats into two muscle heads, searched for the peroneal nerve, divided them lengthwise, and connected one half of the nerve to the tibial nerve innervating both muscle heads (SN_50, n = 8). In another group, we connected the undivided peroneal nerve to the nerve of a single muscle head (non-SN_100, n = 6), while the other muscle head received different innervation (non-SN_0, n = 6). After 10 weeks, we stimulated the peroneal nerve and measured the EMG amplitude.  Mean EMG amplitude of the muscle head innervated by one half of the nerve (SN_50; 1.77 [range: 0.71-3.24] mV) and by the undivided nerve (non-SN_100; 3.45 mV [range: 1.13-5.34]) was not significantly different. However, the mean EMG amplitude produced by SN_50 was significantly different from that of the other innervation (i.e., non-SN_0; 0.76 mV [range: 0.41-1.35]), indicating the presence of noise.  Split nerve in combination with split-muscle procedure can yield a meaningful EMG signal that might be used to convey the intention of living organism to a machine. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Usefulness of electromyography of the cavernous corpora (CC EMG) in the diagnosis of arterial erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virseda-Chamorro, M; Lopez-Garcia-Moreno, A M; Salinas-Casado, J; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2012-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) of the corpora cavernosa (CC-EMG) is able to record the activity of the erectile tissue during erection, and thus has been used as a diagnostic technique in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). The present study examines the usefulness of the technique in the diagnosis of arterial ED. A cross-sectional study was made of 35 males with a mean age of 48.5 years (s.d. 11.34), referred to our center with ED for >1 year. The patients were subjected to CC-EMG and a penile Doppler ultrasound study following the injection of 20 μg of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). The patients were divided into three groups according to their response to the intracavernous injection of PGE1: Group 1 (adequate erection and reduction/suppression of EMG activity); Group 2 (insufficient erection and persistence of EMG activity); and Group 3 (insufficient erection and reduction/suppression of EMG activity). Patient classification according to response to the intracavernous injection of PGE1 was as follows: Group 1: six patients (17%), Group 2: 18 patients (51%), and Group 3: 11 patients (31%). Patients diagnosed with arterial insufficiency according to Doppler ultrasound (systolic arterial peak velocity EMG activity showed a sensitivity of 66.7% (confidence interval between 50 and 84%) and a specificity of 92.9% (confidence interval between 84 and 100%) in the diagnosis of arterial ED. Owing to the high specificity of CC-EMG response to the injection of PGE1, this test is considered useful as a screening technique in the diagnosis of arterial ED.

  14. An experimental investigation into electromyography, constitutive relationship and morphology of crucian carp for biomechanical "digital fish"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meng; Yin, Xiezhen; Tong, Binggang

    2011-05-01

    Currently, the integrated biomechanical studies on fish locomotion come into focus, so it is urgent to provide reliable and systematic experimental results, and to establish a biomechanical "digital fish" database for some typical fish species. Accordingly, based on the control framework of "Neural Control — Active Contraction of Muscle — Passive Deformation", the electromyography (EMG) signals, the mechanical properties and the constitutive relationship of skin, muscle, and body trunk, as well as morphological parameters of crucian carp, are investigated with experiments, from which a simplified database of biomechanical "digital fish" is established. First, the EMG signals from three lateral superficial red muscles of crucian carp, which was evolving in the C-start movement, were acquired with a self-designing amplifier. The modes of muscle activity were also investigated. Secondly, the Young's modulus and the reduced relaxation function of crucian carp's skin and muscle were determined by failure tests and relaxation tests in uniaxial tensile ways, respectively. Viscoelastic models were adopted to deduce the constitutive relationship. The mechanical properties and the angular stiffness of different sites on the crucian carp's body trunk were obtained with dynamic bending experiments, where a self-designing dynamic bending test machine was employed. The conclusion was drawn regarding the body trunk of crucian carp under dynamic bending deformation as an approximate elastomer. According to the above experimental results, a possible benefit of body effective stiffness increasing with a little energy dissipation was discussed. Thirdly, the distribution of geometric parameters and weight parameters for a single experimental individual and multiple individuals of crucian carp was studied with experiments. Finally, considering all the above results, generic experimental data were obtained by normalization, and a preliminary biomechanical "digital fish" database for

  15. New method of neck surface electromyography for the evaluation of tongue-lifting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Y; Maeda, N; Pan, Q; Sugimoto, K; Hashimoto, Y; Tanaka, Y; Kodama, N; Minagi, S

    2016-06-01

    Elevation of the posterior part of the tongue is important for normal deglutition and speech. The purpose of this study was to develop a new surface electromyography (EMG) method to non-invasively and objectively evaluate activity in the muscles that control lifting movement in the posterior tongue. Neck surface EMG (N-EMG) was recorded using differential surface electrodes placed on the neck, 1 cm posterior to the posterior border of the mylohyoid muscle on a line orthogonal to the lower border of the mandible. Experiment 1: Three healthy volunteers (three men, mean age 37·7 years) participated in an evaluation of detection method of the posterior tongue lifting up movement. EMG recordings from the masseter, temporalis and submental muscles and N-EMG revealed that i) N-EMG was not affected by masseter muscle EMG and ii) N-EMG activity was not observed during simple jaw opening and tongue protrusion, revealing the functional difference between submental surface EMG and N-EMG. Experiment 2: Seven healthy volunteers (six men and one woman, mean age 27·9 years) participated in a quantitative evaluation of muscle activity. Tongue-lifting tasks were perfor-med, exerting a prescribed force of 20, 50, 100 and 150 gf with visual feedback. For all subjects, a significant linear relationship was observed bet-ween the tongue-lifting force and N-EMG activity (P < 0·01). These findings indicate that N-EMG can be used to quantify the force of posterior tongue lifting and could be useful to evaluate the effect of tongue rehabilitation in future studies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of Electrodes for External Urethral Sphincter Electromyography during Bladder-to-Urethral Guarding Reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, James E.; Clemons, Jessica D.; Zaszczurynski, Paul J.; Butler, Robert S.; Damaser, Margot S.; Jiang, Hai-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Accuracy in the recording of external urethral sphincter (EUS) electromyography (EMG) is an important goal in the quantitative evaluation of urethral function. This study aim was to quantitatively compare electrode recordings taken during tonic activity and leak point pressure (LPP) testing. Methods Several electrodes, including the surface electrode (SE), concentric electrode (CE), and wire electrode (WE), were placed on the EUS singly and simultaneously in six female Sprague-Dawley rats under urethane anesthesia. The bladder was filled via a retropubic catheter while LPP testing and EUS EMG recording were done. Quantitative baseline correction of the EUS EMG signal was performed to reduce baseline variation. Amplitude and frequency of one-second samples of the EUS EMG signal were measured before LPP (tonic activity) and during peak LPP activity. Results The SE, CE, and WE signals demonstrated tonic activity before LPP and an increase in activity during LPP, suggesting that the electrodes accurately recorded EUS activity during tonic activity and during the bladder-to-EUS guarding reflex, regardless of the size or location of detection areas. SE recordings required significantly less baseline correction than both CE and WE recordings. The activity in CE-recorded EMG was significantly higher than that of the SE and WE both in single and simultaneous recordings. Conclusions These electrodes may be suitable for testing EUS EMG activity. The SE signal had significantly less baseline variation and the CE detected local activity more sensitively than the other electrodes, which may provide insight into choosing an appropriate electrode for EUS EMG recording. PMID:19680661

  17. Effect of obesity on preterm delivery prediction by transabdominal recording of uterine electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucovnik, Miha; Chambliss, Linda R; Blumrick, Richard; Balducci, James; Gersak, Ksenija; Garfield, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    It has been shown that noninvasive uterine electromyography (EMG) can identify true preterm labor more accurately than methods available to clinicians today. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the accuracy of uterine EMG in predicting preterm delivery. Predictive values of uterine EMG for preterm delivery were compared in obese versus overweight/normal BMI patients. Hanley-McNeil test was used to compare receiver operator characteristics curves in these groups. Previously reported EMG cutoffs were used to determine groups with false positive/false negative and true positive/true negative EMG results. BMI in these groups was compared with Student t test (p < 0.05 significant). A total of 88 patients were included: 20 obese, 64 overweight, and four with normal BMI. EMG predicted preterm delivery within 7 days with area under the curve = 0.95 in the normal/overweight group, and with area under the curve = 1.00 in the obese group (p = 0.08). Six patients in true preterm labor (delivering within 7 days from EMG measurement) had low EMG values (false negative group). There were no false positive results. No significant differences in patient's BMI were noted between false negative group patients and preterm labor patients with high EMG values (true positive group) and nonlabor patients with low EMG values (true negative group; p = 0.32). Accuracy of noninvasive uterine EMG monitoring and its predictive value for preterm delivery are not affected by obesity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Evaluation of palpation, pressure algometry, and electromyography for monitoring trigger points in young participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wytrążek, Marcin; Huber, Juliusz; Lipiec, Joanna; Kulczyk, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess trigger points (TrPs), their pain threshold, and the activity of motor units in the neck and shoulder girdle muscles of young volunteers and to assess palpation, algometry, and surface electromyography (EMG) for their detection. Seventy participants aged from 19 to 26 years (20.6 ± 1.4 years [mean ± SD]) were examined to identify TrPs through palpation, an algometer test for pressure pain threshold (PPT), a test for the activity of muscle motor units at rest (rEMG) and at maximal contraction (mcEMG) with surface EMG recordings. Palpation studies revealed numerous symmetrical nonreferring latent TrPs (379/560 performed tests), referring latent TrPs (91/560), and few active TrPs (4/560). Algometry confirmed the lowest PPT in active TrPs and the highest PPT in participants with no TrPs (86/560). Pressure pain thresholds were lower in nonpregnant women than in men, especially in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles with nonreferring and referring latent TrPs. Trigger points evoked a moderate increase of rEMG amplitude but with no evident changes in mcEMG. This study showed that the preliminary algometry and rEMG recordings monitored a decrease in PPT and an increase in muscle tension in all cases of TrPs in each of the 3 types detected in people younger than 30 years. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intra-session test-retest reliability of pelvic floor muscle electromyography during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginbuehl, H; Greter, C; Gruenenfelder, D; Baeyens, J-P; Kuhn, A; Radlinger, L

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of female stress urinary incontinence is high, and young adults are also affected, including athletes, especially those involved in "high-impact" sports. To date there have been almost no studies testing pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activity during dynamic functional whole body movements. The aim of this study was the description and reliability test of PFM activity and time variables during running. A prospective cross-sectional study including ten healthy female subjects was designed with the focus on the intra-session test-retest reliability of PFM activity and time variables during running derived from electromyography (EMG) and accelerometry. Thirteen variables were identified based on ten steps of each subject: Six EMG variables showed good reliability (ICC 0.906-0.942) and seven time variables did not show good reliability (ICC 0.113-0.731). Time variables (e.g. time difference between heel strike and maximal acceleration of vaginal accelerator) showed low reliability. However, relevant PFM EMG variables during running (e.g., pre-activation, minimal and maximal activity) could be identified and showed good reliability. Further adaptations regarding measurement methods should be tested to gain better control of the kinetics and kinematics of the EMG probe and accelerometers. To our knowledge this is the first study to test the reliability of PFM activity and time variables during dynamic functional whole body movements. More knowledge of PFM activity and time variables may help to provide a deeper insight into physical strain with high force impacts and important functional reflexive contraction patterns of PFM to maintain or to restore continence.

  20. A systematic review of surface electromyography analyses of the bench press movement task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastny, Petr; Gołaś, Artur; Blazek, Dusan; Maszczyk, Adam; Wilk, Michał; Pietraszewski, Przemysław; Petr, Miroslav; Uhlir, Petr; Zając, Adam

    2017-01-01

    The bench press exercise (BP) plays an important role in recreational and professional training, in which muscle activity is an important multifactorial phenomenon. The objective of this paper is to systematically review electromyography (EMG) studies performed on the barbell BP exercise to answer the following research questions: Which muscles show the greatest activity during the flat BP? Which changes in muscle activity are related to specific conditions under which the BP movement is performed? PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library were searched through June 10, 2016. A combination of the following search terms was used: bench press, chest press, board press, test, measure, assessment, dynamometer, kinematics and biomechanics. Only original, full-text articles were considered. The search process resulted in 14 relevant studies that were included in the discussion. The triceps brachii (TB) and pectoralis major (PM) muscles were found to have similar activity during the BP, which was significantly higher than the activity of the anterior deltoid. During the BP movement, muscle activity changes with exercise intensity, velocity of movement, fatigue, mental focus, movement phase and stability conditions, such as bar vibration or unstable surfaces. Under these circumstances, TB is the most common object of activity change. PM and TB EMG activity is more dominant and shows greater EMG amplitude than anterior deltoid during the BP. There are six factors that can influence muscle activity during the BP; however, the most important factor is exercise intensity, which interacts with all other factors. The research on muscle activity in the BP has several unresolved areas, such as clearly and strongly defined guidelines to perform EMG measurements (e.g., how to elaborate with surface EMG limits) or guidelines for the use of exact muscle models.

  1. Evaluation of surgeon's muscle fatigue during thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy using interoperative surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Myung-Chul; Park, Seong Yong

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to document the physical stress experienced by a surgeon during thoracoscopic pulmonary lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection for lung cancer by measuring the intraoperative electromyography (EMG). Surface EMG was recorded during 12 cases of thoracoscopic lobectomy. During the operation, 16 channels of a wireless EMG were used to measure muscle activity and fatigue from the bilateral muscles of the splenius capitis (SC), upper trapezius (UT), middle deltoid (MD), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), lumbar erector spinae (LES), rectus femoralis (RF), and tibialis anterior (TA). The EMG signals were processed to collect the values of the root mean square for muscle activity and median frequency (MF) for muscle fatigue. All operations were completed without adverse events. The mean operating time was 99.16±35.15 minutes. During the operation, the mean muscle activity of all muscles was 21.91±12.85 mV. High muscle activity was observed in the bilateral FCR and ECR, whereas low muscle activity was observed in the bilateral SC and LES. The final MFs in the bilateral SC and LES were found to be decreased from the initial status, which implied increased muscle fatigue. The muscles of the right and left LES were significantly fatigued by up to 29% and 37% compared to their initial status (P=0.021 and P=0.007, respectively). The MFs of the bilateral LES decreased with time (an average decreases of 0.008/5 minutes, P=0.002 in right LES and 0.004/5 minutes, P=0.018 in left LES). During thoracoscopic lobectomy, muscle fatigue was observed in muscles related to a static posture, such as the bilateral SC, UT, and ES. Further studies are required to investigate the ergonomic adjustments needed to reduce muscle fatigue in these static muscles.

  2. Intraoperative pelvic nerve stimulation performed under continuous electromyography of the internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Werner; Kauff, Daniel W; Rahimi Nedjat, Roman K; Rink, Andreas D; Heimann, Axel; Somerlik, Karin; Koch, Klaus P; Doerge, Thomas; Lang, Hauke

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this animal study was to investigate the effect of intraoperative pelvic nerve stimulation on internal anal sphincter electromyographic signals in order to evaluate its possible use for neuromonitoring during nerve-sparing pelvic surgery. Eight pigs underwent low anterior rectal resection. The intersphincteric space was exposed, and the internal (IAS) and external anal sphincter (EAS) were identified. Electromyography of both sphincters was performed with bipolar needle electrodes. Intermittent bipolar electric stimulation of the inferior hypogastric plexus and the pelvic splanchnic nerves was carried out bilaterally. The recorded signals were analyzed in its frequency spectrum. In all animals, electromyographic recordings of IAS and EAS were successful. Intraoperative nerve stimulation resulted in a sudden amplitude increase in the time-based electromyographic signals of IAS (1.0 (0.5-9.0) μV vs. 4.0 (1.0-113.0) μV) and EAS (p < 0.001). The frequency spectrum of IAS in the resting state ranged from 0.15 to 5 Hz with highest activity in median at 0.77 Hz (46 cycles/min). Pelvic nerve stimulation resulted in an extended spectrum ranging from 0.15 to 20 Hz. EAS signals showed higher frequencies mainly in a range of 50 to 350 Hz. However, after muscle relaxation with pancuronium bromide, only the low frequency spectrum of the IAS signals was still present. Intraoperative verification of IAS function by stimulation of pelvic autonomic nerves is possible. The IAS electromyographic response could be used to monitor pelvic autonomic nerve preservation.

  3. Masticatory muscle activity evaluation by electromyography in subjects with zygomatic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rossi, Moara; Lucas, Bárbara; Santos, Carla; Semprini, Marisa; Oliveira, Ligia; Regalo, Isabela; Bersani, Edmilson; Migliorança, Reginaldo; Siéssere, Selma; Regalo, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Background Zygomatic implants are an alternative treatment in the rehabilitation of atrophic maxilla to promote stability in the stomatognathic system. The aim of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masseter and temporalis muscles in controls and in individuals with complete implant-supported dentures anchored in the zygomatic bone. Material and Methods Fifty-four volunteers of both genders (mean age 52.5 years) were selected and distributed into two groups: Individuals with zygomatic implant (ZIG; n=27) and fully dentate patients (CG; n=27). MyoSystem-BR1 was used to assess masseter and temporalis muscles EMG activity in different mandibular movements: protrusion, clenching, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with Parafilm M®, right and left laterality and chewing (peanuts and raisins). Data was processed, normalized (MVC) and analyzed using the SPSS 21.0. Student t-test (P ≤ 0.05) was used for group comparison. Results The results were statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) for protrusion, clenching, right and left laterality and raisin chewing. For the mandibular posture conditions, the ZIG obtained higher EMG activity patterns when compared to CG. For the masticatory performance during chewing of peanuts and raisins, the ZIG showed higher EMG mean values when compared to CG. Conclusions The zygomatic implant promoted an active response of the muscle fibers (hyperactivity) during both mandibular posture and chewing conditions, probably due to the absence of periodontal receptors, which play a significant role for preparing a bolus for swallowing. Key words:Zygomatic implant, electromyography, masseter muscle, temporal muscle. PMID:28390128

  4. Motion tracking and electromyography assist the removal of mirror hand contributions to fNIRS images acquired during a finger tapping task performed by children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervey, Nathan; Khan, Bilal; Shagman, Laura; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Clegg, Nancy J.; Liu, Hanli; MacFarlane, Duncan; Alexandrakis, George

    2013-03-01

    Functional neurological imaging has been shown to be valuable in evaluating brain plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). In recent studies it has been demonstrated that functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a viable and sensitive method for imaging motor cortex activities in children with CP. However, during unilateral finger tapping tasks children with CP often exhibit mirror motions (unintended motions in the non-tapping hand), and current fNIRS image formation techniques do not account for this. Therefore, the resulting fNIRS images contain activation from intended and unintended motions. In this study, cortical activity was mapped with fNIRS on four children with CP and five controls during a finger tapping task. Finger motion and arm muscle activation were concurrently measured using motion tracking cameras and electromyography (EMG). Subject-specific regressors were created from motion capture and EMG data and used in a general linear model (GLM) analysis in an attempt to create fNIRS images representative of different motions. The analysis provided an fNIRS image representing activation due to motion and muscle activity for each hand. This method could prove to be valuable in monitoring brain plasticity in children with CP by providing more consistent images between measurements. Additionally, muscle effort versus cortical effort was compared between control and CP subjects. More cortical effort was required to produce similar muscle effort in children with CP. It is possible this metric could be a valuable diagnostic tool in determining response to treatment.

  5. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-09-17

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies.

  6. Surface EMG signals based motion intent recognition using multi-layer ELM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhui; Qi, Lin; Wang, Xiao

    2017-11-01

    The upper-limb rehabilitation robot is regard as a useful tool to help patients with hemiplegic to do repetitive exercise. The surface electromyography (sEMG) contains motion information as the electric signals are generated and related to nerve-muscle motion. These sEMG signals, representing human's intentions of active motions, are introduced into the rehabilitation robot system to recognize upper-limb movements. Traditionally, the feature extraction is an indispensable part of drawing significant information from original signals, which is a tedious task requiring rich and related experience. This paper employs a deep learning scheme to extract the internal features of the sEMG signals using an advanced Extreme Learning Machine based auto-encoder (ELMAE). The mathematical information contained in the multi-layer structure of the ELM-AE is used as the high-level representation of the internal features of the sEMG signals, and thus a simple ELM can post-process the extracted features, formulating the entire multi-layer ELM (ML-ELM) algorithm. The method is employed for the sEMG based neural intentions recognition afterwards. The case studies show the adopted deep learning algorithm (ELM-AE) is capable of yielding higher classification accuracy compared to the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) scheme in 5 different types of upper-limb motions. This indicates the effectiveness and the learning capability of the ML-ELM in such motion intent recognition applications.

  7. Long-term surface EMG monitoring using K-means clustering and compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present an advanced K-means clustering algorithm based on Compressed Sensing theory (CS) in combination with the K-Singular Value Decomposition (K-SVD) method for Clustering of long-term recording of surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The long-term monitoring of sEMG signals aims at recording of the electrical activity produced by muscles which are very useful procedure for treatment and diagnostic purposes as well as for detection of various pathologies. The proposed algorithm is examined for three scenarios of sEMG signals including healthy person (sEMG-Healthy), a patient with myopathy (sEMG-Myopathy), and a patient with neuropathy (sEMG-Neuropathr), respectively. The proposed algorithm can easily scan large sEMG datasets of long-term sEMG recording. We test the proposed algorithm with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Correlation Coefficient (LCC) dimensionality reduction methods. Then, the output of the proposed algorithm is fed to K-Nearest Neighbours (K-NN) and Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) classifiers in order to calclute the clustering performance. The proposed algorithm achieves a classification accuracy of 99.22%. This ability allows reducing 17% of Average Classification Error (ACE), 9% of Training Error (TE), and 18% of Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). The proposed algorithm also reduces 14% clustering energy consumption compared to the existing K-Means clustering algorithm.

  8. The effects of electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation on shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain, and function in persons with stroke: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Somyung; Kim, Young; Jung, Kyoungsim; Chung, Yijung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of task-oriented electromyography-triggered stimulation for shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain and upper extremity function in hemiparetic stroke patients. Twenty participants with subacute hemiparetic stroke were recruited for this study and were randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (n = 10) and control group (n = 10). Subjects in the experimental group participated in task-oriented electromyography triggered stimulation for 30 minutes, five times a week for four weeks, whereas the control group received cyclic functional electrical stimulation for 30 minutes, five times a week for four weeks. Subjects in both groups received conventional physical therapy for four weeks (30 min/day, five times/week). Data collected included the degree of shoulder subluxation which had been confirmed by X-ray, muscle activation of the supraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles by electromyography, pain by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and hand function by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) before and after the four week exercise period. The results showed significant improvement in shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, and VAS results in the experimental group, compared with the control group(p electromyography-triggered stimulation improved shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain and upper extremity function. These results suggest that task-oriented electromyography-triggered stimulation is effective and beneficial for individuals with subacute stroke, and that further studies should be conducted on multivarious anatomical regions.

  9. A Biomechanical Comparison of Proportional Electromyography Control to Biological Torque Control Using a Powered Hip Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Young

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite a large increase in robotic exoskeleton research, there are few studies that have examined human performance with different control strategies on the same exoskeleton device. Direct comparison studies are needed to determine how users respond to different types of control. The purpose of this study was to compare user performance using a robotic hip exoskeleton with two different controllers: a controller that targeted a biological hip torque profile and a proportional myoelectric controller.MethodsWe tested both control approaches on 10 able-bodied subjects using a pneumatically powered hip exoskeleton. The state machine controller targeted a biological hip torque profile. The myoelectric controller used electromyography (EMG of lower limb muscles to produce a proportional control signal for the hip exoskeleton. Each subject performed two 30-min exoskeleton walking trials (1.0 m/s using each controller and a 10-min trial with the exoskeleton unpowered. During each trial, we measured subjects’ metabolic cost of walking, lower limb EMG profiles, and joint kinematics and kinetics (torques and powers using a force treadmill and motion capture.ResultsCompared to unassisted walking in the exoskeleton, myoelectric control significantly reduced metabolic cost by 13% (p = 0.005 and biological hip torque control reduced metabolic cost by 7% (p = 0.261. Subjects reduced muscle activity relative to the unpowered condition for a greater number of lower limb muscles using myoelectric control compared to the biological hip torque control. More subjects subjectively preferred the myoelectric controller to the biological hip torque control.ConclusionMyoelectric control had more advantages (metabolic cost and muscle activity reduction compared to a controller that targeted a biological torque profile for walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton. However, these results were obtained with a single exoskeleton device with specific

  10. External urethral sphincter electromyography in asymptomatic women and the influence of the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawadros, Cecile; Burnett, Katherine; Derbyshire, Laura F; Tawadros, Thomas; Clarke, Noel W; Betts, Christopher D

    2015-09-01

    To investigate by electromyography (EMG), the presence of complex repetitive discharges (CRDs) and decelerating bursts (DBs) in the striated external urethral sphincter during the menstrual cycle in female volunteers with no urinary symptoms and complete bladder emptying. Healthy female volunteers aged 20-40 years, with regular menstrual cycles and no urinary symptoms were recruited. Volunteers completed a menstruation chart, urinary symptom questionnaires, pregnancy test, urine dipstick, urinary free flow and post-void ultrasound bladder scan. Exclusion criteria included current pregnancy, use of hormonal medication or contraception, body mass index of >35 kg/m(2) , incomplete voiding and a history of pelvic surgery. Eligible participants underwent an external urethral sphincter EMG, using a needle electrode in the early follicular phase and the mid-luteal phase of their menstrual cycles. Serum oestradiol and progesterone were measured at each EMG test. In all, 119 women enquired about the research and following screening, 18 were eligible to enter the study phase. Complete results were obtained in 15 women. In all, 30 EMG tests were undertaken in the 15 asymptomatic women. Sphincter EMG was positive for CRDs and DBs at one or both phases of the menstrual cycle in eight (53%) of the women. Three had CRDs and DBs in both early follicular and mid-luteal phases. Five had normal EMG activity in the early follicular phase and CRDs and DBs in the mid-luteal phase. No woman had abnormal EMG activity in the early follicular phase and normal activity in the luteal phase. There was no relationship between EMG activity and age, parity or serum levels of oestradiol and progesterone. CRDs and DB activity in the external striated urethral sphincter is present in a high proportion of asymptomatic young women. This abnormal EMG activity has been shown for the first time to change during the menstrual cycle in individual women. CRDs and DBs are more commonly found in the luteal

  11. A Biomechanical Comparison of Proportional Electromyography Control to Biological Torque Control Using a Powered Hip Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    Despite a large increase in robotic exoskeleton research, there are few studies that have examined human performance with different control strategies on the same exoskeleton device. Direct comparison studies are needed to determine how users respond to different types of control. The purpose of this study was to compare user performance using a robotic hip exoskeleton with two different controllers: a controller that targeted a biological hip torque profile and a proportional myoelectric controller. We tested both control approaches on 10 able-bodied subjects using a pneumatically powered hip exoskeleton. The state machine controller targeted a biological hip torque profile. The myoelectric controller used electromyography (EMG) of lower limb muscles to produce a proportional control signal for the hip exoskeleton. Each subject performed two 30-min exoskeleton walking trials (1.0 m/s) using each controller and a 10-min trial with the exoskeleton unpowered. During each trial, we measured subjects' metabolic cost of walking, lower limb EMG profiles, and joint kinematics and kinetics (torques and powers) using a force treadmill and motion capture. Compared to unassisted walking in the exoskeleton, myoelectric control significantly reduced metabolic cost by 13% (p = 0.005) and biological hip torque control reduced metabolic cost by 7% (p = 0.261). Subjects reduced muscle activity relative to the unpowered condition for a greater number of lower limb muscles using myoelectric control compared to the biological hip torque control. More subjects subjectively preferred the myoelectric controller to the biological hip torque control. Myoelectric control had more advantages (metabolic cost and muscle activity reduction) compared to a controller that targeted a biological torque profile for walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton. However, these results were obtained with a single exoskeleton device with specific control configurations while level walking at a

  12. Electromyography in the detection of mechanically induced spinal motor tract injury: observations in diverse porcine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stanley A; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2009-09-01

    Porcine spinal cords were mechanically injured at the thoracic level while recording muscle-derived electrically stimulated transcranial motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs) and electromyography (EMG) readings from the same electrode derivations. The authors postulated that midthoracic spinal cord injury caused by diverse methods can trigger hindlimb EMG activity. Early detection of hindlimb EMG activity may permit avoidance of motor conduction block (TcMEP loss). Twelve pigs underwent midthoracic spinal cord exposure. Spinal cord sectioning was performed to define dorsal column versus lateral spinal cord contribution to muscle-derived electrically stimulated spinal cord motor evoked potentials (SC MEPs) and TcMEPs (in 2 pigs). A bipolar needle stimulator was placed within intramedullary sites to 1) acquire electrically stimulated motor evoked potentials in the hindlimbs, and 2) induce mechanically stimulated hindlimb EMG activity at sites responsive to electrical stimulation (in 2 pigs). Transcranial MEPs and EMG recordings were observed during spinal cord distraction (in 3 pigs), slow and rapid extradural spinal cord compression with a metal caliper (in 3 pigs), and rapid extradural spinal cord compression with a spring-loaded clip (in 2 pigs). Lateral cord (but not dorsal column) sectioning abolished both SC MEPs and TcMEPs. Intramedullary electrical and mechanical stimulation within the lateral (but not dorsal) cord elicited ipsilateral hindlimb MEPs and EMG activity ("EMG injury discharge"), respectively. Distraction inconsistently produced EMG injury discharges concomitant with TcMEP loss. Rapid extradural spinal cord compression with a metal caliper or spring-loaded clip consistently induced EMG injury discharges (in 4 of 4 pigs); slow compression did not elicit EMG activity. Brief extradural spring-loaded clip compressions (1-2 seconds) elicited EMG injury discharges without TcMEP loss; 14-second clip compression effected EMG injury discharges and TcMEP loss

  13. Quantitative surface electromyography (qEMG): applications in anaesthesiology and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloheimo, M

    1990-01-01

    suppressing effect on spontaneous EMG activity, they did not abolish the ability of facial muscles to react to noxious stimuli. Also abdominal muscles retained this capability, though presumably through a different motor mechanism. Depolarizing and non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs had disparate effects on spontaneous EMG activity; succinylcholine seemed to facilitate the qEMG amplitude during recovery of the block. Quantitative surface electromyography revealed impending arousals during lightening anaesthesia, although this was not a consistent phenomenon. Inadequate anaesthesia was always reflected by an increase in facial qEMG, albeit this often was also evident to the naked eye. The arousal at the end of anaesthesia was always associated with an abrupt increase in facial qEMG activity, which often was preceded by a more gradual, predictive rise. Auditory stimulation was also effective in increasing qEMG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  14. SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY OF MASSETER AND TEMPORAL MUSCLES WITH USE PERCENTAGE WHILE CHEWING ON CANDIDATES FOR GASTROPLASTY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andréa Cavalcante Dos; Silva, Carlos Antonio Bruno da

    Surface electromyography identifies changes in the electrical potential of the muscles during each contraction. The percentage of use is a way to treat values enabling comparison between groups. To analyze the electrical activity and the percentage of use of masseter and temporal muscles during chewing in candidates for gastric bypass. It was used Surface Electromyography Miotool 200,400 (Miotec (r), Porto Alegre/RS, Brazil) integrated with Miograph 2.0 software, involving patients between 20-40 years old. Were included data on electrical activity simultaneously and in pairs of temporal muscle groups and masseter at rest, maximum intercuspation and during the chewing of food previously classified. Were enrolled 39 patients (59 women), mean age 27.1+/-5.7. The percentage of use focused on temporal muscle, in a range of 11-20, female literacy (n=11; 47.82) on the left side and 15 (65.21) on the right-hand side. In the male, nine (56.25) at left and 12 (75.00) on the right-hand side. In masseter, also in the range of 11 to 20, female literacy (n=10; 43.48) on the left side and 11 (47.83) on the right-hand side. In the male, nine (56.25) at left and eight (50.00) on the right-hand side. 40-50% of the sample showed electrical activity in muscles (masseter and temporal) with variable values, and after processing into percentage value, facilitating the comparison of load of used electrical activity between the group, as well as usage percentage was obtained of muscle fibers 11-20% values involving, representing a range that is considered as a reference to the group studied. The gender was not a variable. A eletromiografia de superfície identifica variações dos potenciais elétricos dos músculos durante cada contração realizada. O percentual de uso é uma forma de tratar valores possibilitando comparação entre grupos. Analisar a atividade elétrica e o percentual de uso dos músculos masséteres e temporais durante a mastigação em candidatos à gastroplastia

  15. Identification of first-stage labor arrest by electromyography in term nulliparous women after induction of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasak, Blanka; Graatsma, Elisabeth M; Hekman-Drost, Elske; Eijkemans, Marinus J; Schagen van Leeuwen, Jules H; Visser, Gerard H A; Jacod, Benoit C

    2017-07-01

    Worldwide induction and cesarean delivery rates have increased rapidly, with consequences for subsequent pregnancies. The majority of intrapartum cesarean deliveries are performed for failure to progress, typically in nulliparous women at term. Current uterine registration techniques fail to identify inefficient contractions leading to first-stage labor arrest. An alternative technique, uterine electromyography has been shown to identify inefficient contractions leading to first-stage arrest of labor in nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor at term. The objective of this study was to determine whether this finding can be reproduced in induction of labor. Uterine activity was measured in 141 nulliparous women with singleton term pregnancies and a fetus in cephalic position during induced labor. Electrical activity of the myometrium during contractions was characterized by its power density spectrum. No significant differences were found in contraction characteristics between women with induced labor delivering vaginally with or without oxytocin and women with arrested labor with subsequent cesarean delivery. Uterine electromyography shows no correlation with progression of labor in induced labor, which is in contrast to spontaneous labor. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. Real-time and wearable functional electrical stimulation system for volitional hand motor function control using the electromyography bridge method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-peng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary participation of hemiplegic patients is crucial for functional electrical stimulation therapy. A wearable functional electrical stimulation system has been proposed for real-time volitional hand motor function control using the electromyography bridge method. Through a series of novel design concepts, including the integration of a detecting circuit and an analog-to-digital converter, a miniaturized functional electrical stimulation circuit technique, a low-power super-regeneration chip for wireless receiving, and two wearable armbands, a prototype system has been established with reduced size, power, and overall cost. Based on wrist joint torque reproduction and classification experiments performed on six healthy subjects, the optimized surface electromyography thresholds and trained logistic regression classifier parameters were statistically chosen to establish wrist and hand motion control with high accuracy. Test results showed that wrist flexion/extension, hand grasp, and finger extension could be reproduced with high accuracy and low latency. This system can build a bridge of information transmission between healthy limbs and paralyzed limbs, effectively improve voluntary participation of hemiplegic patients, and elevate efficiency of rehabilitation training.

  17. Real-time and wearable functional electrical stimulation system for volitional hand motor function control using the electromyography bridge method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Peng; Bi, Zheng-Yang; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Wang, Zhi-Gong; Lv, Xiao-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary participation of hemiplegic patients is crucial for functional electrical stimulation therapy. A wearable functional electrical stimulation system has been proposed for real-time volitional hand motor function control using the electromyography bridge method. Through a series of novel design concepts, including the integration of a detecting circuit and an analog-to-digital converter, a miniaturized functional electrical stimulation circuit technique, a low-power super-regeneration chip for wireless receiving, and two wearable armbands, a prototype system has been established with reduced size, power, and overall cost. Based on wrist joint torque reproduction and classification experiments performed on six healthy subjects, the optimized surface electromyography thresholds and trained logistic regression classifier parameters were statistically chosen to establish wrist and hand motion control with high accuracy. Test results showed that wrist flexion/extension, hand grasp, and finger extension could be reproduced with high accuracy and low latency. This system can build a bridge of information transmission between healthy limbs and paralyzed limbs, effectively improve voluntary participation of hemiplegic patients, and elevate efficiency of rehabilitation training.

  18. Real-time and wearable functional electrical stimulation system for volitional hand motor function control using the electromyography bridge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-peng; Bi, Zheng-yang; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Yu-xuan; Wang, Zhi-gong; Lv, Xiao-ying

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary participation of hemiplegic patients is crucial for functional electrical stimulation therapy. A wearable functional electrical stimulation system has been proposed for real-time volitional hand motor function control using the electromyography bridge method. Through a series of novel design concepts, including the integration of a detecting circuit and an analog-to-digital converter, a miniaturized functional electrical stimulation circuit technique, a low-power super-regeneration chip for wireless receiving, and two wearable armbands, a prototype system has been established with reduced size, power, and overall cost. Based on wrist joint torque reproduction and classification experiments performed on six healthy subjects, the optimized surface electromyography thresholds and trained logistic regression classifier parameters were statistically chosen to establish wrist and hand motion control with high accuracy. Test results showed that wrist flexion/extension, hand grasp, and finger extension could be reproduced with high accuracy and low latency. This system can build a bridge of information transmission between healthy limbs and paralyzed limbs, effectively improve voluntary participation of hemiplegic patients, and elevate efficiency of rehabilitation training. PMID:28250759

  19. Occlusal splint versus modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint in bruxism therapy: a randomized, controlled trial using surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalewski, B; Chruściel-Nogalska, M; Frączak, B

    2015-12-01

    An occlusal splint and a modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint (AMPS, anterior deprogrammer, Kois deprogrammer, Lucia jig, etc.) are commonly and quite frequently used in the treatment of masticatory muscle disorders, although their sustainable and long-lasting effect on these muscles' function is still not very well known. Results of scant surface electromyography studies in patients with temporomandibular disorders have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to evaluate both devices in bruxism therapy; EMG activity levels during postural activity and maximum voluntary contraction of the superficial temporal and masseter muscles were compared before and after 30 days of treatment. Surface electromyography of the examined muscles was performed in two groups of bruxers (15 patients each). Patients in the first group used occlusal splints, while those in the second used modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splints. The trial was randomized, controlled and semi-blind. Neither device affected the asymmetry index or postural activity/maximum voluntary contraction ratio after 1 month of treatment. Neither the occlusal nor the nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint showed any significant influence on the examined muscles. Different scientific methods should be considered in clinical applications that require either direct influence on the muscles' bioelectrical activity or a quantitative measurement of the treatment quality. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Eletromiografia aplicada aos músculos da mastigação Electromyography applied to chewing muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Malta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A eletromiografia tem se mostrado um método eficaz no auxilio de diagnósticos e tratamentos de desordens musculares. Na odontologia sua principal aplicação é no tratamento das Disfunções Temporomandibulares. Os profissionais de odontologia não utilizam esta técnica por desconhecerem seus benefícios ou mesmo não terem conhecimento sobre o assunto. Um dos principais objetivos do tratamento utilizando eletromiografia é mostrar ao paciente o estado atual do músculo analisado e sua evolução durante o tratamento, até chegar a uma função satisfatória.The electromyography has if shown an effective method in the aid of diagnoses and treatments of muscular disorders. In dentistry your main application it is in Dysfunction Temporomandibular treatment. The dentistry professionals don't use this technique for they ignore their benefits or even they have not knowledge on the subject. One of the main objectives of the treatment using electromyography is to show to the patient the current state of the analyzed muscle and your evolution during the treatment, until arriving to a satisfactory function.

  1. A motion-classification strategy based on sEMG-EEG signal combination for upper-limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangxin; Samuel, Oluwarotimi Williams; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Hui; Fang, Peng; Li, Guanglin

    2017-01-07

    Most of the modern motorized prostheses are controlled with the surface electromyography (sEMG) recorded on the residual muscles of amputated limbs. However, the residual muscles are usually limited, especially after above-elbow amputations, which would not provide enough sEMG for the control of prostheses with multiple degrees of freedom. Signal fusion is a possible approach to solve the problem of insufficient control commands, where some non-EMG signals are combined with sEMG signals to provide sufficient information for motion intension decoding. In this study, a motion-classification method that combines sEMG and electroencephalography (EEG) signals were proposed and investigated, in order to improve the control performance of upper-limb prostheses. Four transhumeral amputees without any form of neurological disease were recruited in the experiments. Five motion classes including hand-open, hand-close, wrist-pronation, wrist-supination, and no-movement were specified. During the motion performances, sEMG and EEG signals were simultaneously acquired from the skin surface and scalp of the amputees, respectively. The two types of signals were independently preprocessed and then combined as a parallel control input. Four time-domain features were extracted and fed into a classifier trained by the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) algorithm for motion recognition. In addition, channel selections were performed by using the Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) algorithm to optimize the performance of the proposed method. The classification performance achieved by the fusion of sEMG and EEG signals was significantly better than that obtained by single signal source of either sEMG or EEG. An increment of more than 14% in classification accuracy was achieved when using a combination of 32-channel sEMG and 64-channel EEG. Furthermore, based on the SFS algorithm, two optimized electrode arrangements (10-channel sEMG + 10-channel EEG, 10-channel sEMG + 20-channel

  2. Masseter electromyography during chewing in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, Christopher J; Wall, Christine E; Williams, Susan H; Johnson, Kirk R; Hylander, William L

    2006-05-01

    We examined masseter recruitment and firing patterns during chewing in four adult ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), using electromyography (EMG). During chewing of tougher foods, the working-side superficial masseter tends to show, on average, 1.7 times more scaled EMG activity than the balancing-side superficial masseter. The working-side deep masseter exhibits, on average, 2.4 times the scaled EMG activity of the balancing-side deep masseter. The relatively larger activity in the working-side muscles suggests that ring-tailed lemurs recruit relatively less force from their balancing-side muscles during chewing. The superficial masseter working-to-balancing-side (W/B) ratio for lemurs overlaps with W/B ratios from anthropoid primates. In contrast, the lemur W/B ratio for the deep masseter is more similar to that of greater galagos, while both are significantly larger than W/B ratios of anthropoids. Because ring-tailed lemurs have unfused and hence presumably weaker symphyses, these data are consistent with the symphyseal fusion-muscle recruitment hypothesis stating that symphyseal fusion in anthropoids provides increased strength for resisting forces created by the balancing-side jaw muscles during chewing. Among the masseter muscles of ring-tailed lemurs, the working-side deep masseter peaks first on average, followed in succession by the balancing-side deep masseter, balancing-side superficial masseter, and finally the working-side superficial masseter. Ring-tailed lemurs are similar to greater galagos in that their balancing-side deep masseter peaks well before their working-side superficial masseter. We see the opposite pattern in anthropoids, where the balancing-side deep masseter peaks, on average, after the working-side superficial masseter. This late activity of the balancing-side deep masseter in anthropoids is linked to lateral-transverse bending, or wishboning, of their mandibular symphyses. Subsequently, the stresses incurred during wishboning are

  3. The Efficacy of Two Treatment Techniques for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy as Measured by Electromyography and Thermal Information. [Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, David Michael

    Two techniques to normalize muscle tone were evaluated with nine infants and young children with cerebral palsy who were enrolled in the Rural Infant Stimulation Environment (RISE) Program, near Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Electromyography (EMG) and skin temperature data were used to assess the effects of trunk rotation and slow rolling on a ball. EMG…

  4. Corpus cavernosum electromyography with revised methodology: an explorative study in patients with erectile dysfunction and men with reported normal erectile function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, E.; Jiang, X.; Holsheimer, J.; Wagner, G.; Knipscheer, B.; Wijkstra, H.

    Introduction. A lack of standardization of the recording techniques of corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG) and objective criteria to characterize the recorded signals (CC-potentials) are the main difficulties hindering the clinical application of this method. These difficulties have been

  5. Corpus cavernosum electromyography with revised methodology: an explorative study in patients with erectile dysfunction and men with reported normal erectile function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Eric; Jiang, Xiaogang; Holsheimer, January; Wagner, Gorm; Knipscheer, Ben; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A lack of standardization of the recording techniques of corpus cavernosum electromyography (CC-EMG) and objective criteria to characterize the recorded signals (CC-potentials) are the main difficulties hindering the clinical application of this method. These difficulties have been

  6. The effects of post-stroke upper-limb training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Wei, X J; Rong, W; Susanto, E A; Ho, S K

    2013-10-01

    Loss of hand function and finger dexterity are main disabilities in the upper limb after stroke. An electromyography (EMG)-driven hand robot had been developed for post-stroke rehabilitation training. The effectiveness of the hand robot assisted whole upper limb training was investigated on persons with chronic stroke (n=10) in this work. All subjects attended a 20-session training (3-5times/week) by using the hand robot to practice object grasp/release and arm transportation tasks. Significant motor improvements were observed in the Fugl-Meyer hand/wrist and shoulder/elbow scores (pEMG level (p<0.05) and a significant decrease of ED and FD co-contraction during the training (p<0.05); the excessive muscle activities in the biceps brachii were also reduced significantly after the training (p<0.05). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy in adolescence: Interrelations between facial electromyography and self-reported trait and state measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Graaff, Jolien; Meeus, Wim; de Wied, Minet; van Boxtel, Anton; van Lier, Pol A C; Koot, Hans M; Branje, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined interrelations of trait and state empathy in an adolescent sample. Self-reported affective trait empathy and cognitive trait empathy were assessed during a home visit. During a test session at the university, motor empathy (facial electromyography), and self-reported affective and cognitive state empathy were assessed in response to empathy-inducing film clips portraying happiness and sadness. Adolescents who responded with stronger motor empathy consistently reported higher affective state empathy. Adolescents' motor empathy was also positively related to cognitive state empathy, either directly or indirectly via affective state empathy. Whereas trait empathy was consistently, but modestly, related to state empathy with sadness, for state empathy with happiness few trait-state associations were found. Together, the findings provide support for the notion that empathy is a multi-faceted phenomenon. Motor, affective and cognitive empathy seem to be related processes, each playing a different role in the ability to understand and share others' feelings.

  8. Effect of a Short Time Concentric Versus Eccentric Training Program on Electromyography Activity and Peak Torque of Quadriceps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Alberto; Caserotti, Paolo; Carvalho, C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an 8-week concentric (CON) versus eccentric (ECC) isokinetic training program on the electromyography (EMG) signal amplitude of vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF). Also, the isometric (ISO) and dynamic maximum...... strength of the knee extensors were assessed. Eighteen physically healthy male subjects (age 22 +/- 1 years, body height 177 +/- 4 cm, body mass 73 +/- 7 kg) performed four weeks of unilateral CON isokinetic training for the quadriceps of the dominant leg on a REV9000 dynamometer. At the end of the fourth....... The results showed that CON and ECC groups improved the peak torque in all types of contractions. Also, both groups presented increases in the avgEMG for VL, VM and RF. The present investigation showed that CON training elicited increases of the ISO peak torque and VM avgEMG in the CON contraction...

  9. Electromyography needle breaks within the perineum: a rare complication of urodynamics not reported earlier and lesson learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kawaljit; Sokhal, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Bansal, Ankur

    2016-11-11

    The urodynamic study (UDS) is nowadays frequently used by the urologist worldwide to aid in the diagnosis of various urological disorders and electromyography (EMG) is an integral part of it. EMG is performed either by using surface electrodes or concentric needle electrodes. We report an unusual case in which the concentric EMG needle was accidentally broken within the perineum of a man aged 60 years undergoing urodynamics. The needle was removed urgently in a minimally invasive manner under the C-arm guidance without any associated morbidity. This case report highlights the need of urgent intervention in such rare scenarios to help prevent any associated infectious complications. Also, vigilant behaviour during the procedure (and after) to detect such incidents along with detailed patient counselling should be included in the patient management protocol of patients undergoing UDS. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Computation of fractal features based on the fractal analysis of surface electromyogram to estimate force of contraction of different muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosapadi Arjunan, Sridhar; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2014-01-01

    This research study investigates the fractal properties of surface Electromyogram (sEMG) to estimate the force levels of contraction of three muscles with different cross-sectional areas (CSA): m. quadriceps--vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, andm. flexor digitorum superficialis. The fractal features were computed based on the fractal analysis of sEMG, signal recorded while performing sustained muscle contraction at different force levels. A comparison was performed between the fractal features and five other features reported in the literature. Linear regression analysis was carried out to determine the relationship between the force of contraction (20-100%) and features of sEMG. The results from the coefficients of regression r² show that the new fractal feature, maximum fractal length of the signal has highest correlation (range 0.88-0.90) when compared with other features which ranges from 0.34 to 0.74 for the three different muscles. This study suggests that the estimation of various levels of sustained contraction of muscles with varied CSA will provide a better insight into the biomechanics model that involves muscle properties and muscle activation.

  11. Surface electromyography and plantar pressure changes with novel gait training device in participants with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feger, Mark A; Hertel, Jay

    2016-08-01

    Rehabilitation is ineffective at restoring normal gait in chronic ankle instability patients. Our purpose was to determine if a novel gait-training device could decrease plantar pressure on the lateral column of the foot in chronic ankle instability patients. Ten chronic ankle instability patients completed 30s trials of baseline and gait-training walking at a self-selected pace while in-shoe plantar pressure and surface electromyography were recorded from their anterior tibialis, peroneus longus, medial gastrocnemius, and gluteus medius. The gait-training device applied a medially-directed force to the lower leg via elastic bands during the entire gait cycle. Plantar pressure measures of the entire foot and 9 specific regions of the foot as well as surface electromyography root mean square areas were compared between the baseline and gait-training conditions using paired t-tests with a priori level of significance of p≤0.05. The gait-training device decreased pressure time integrals and peak pressures in the lateral midfoot (p=0.003 and p=0.003) and lateral forefoot (p=0.023 and p=0.005), and increased pressure time integrals and peak pressures for the total foot (p=0.030 and p=0.017) and hallux (p=0.005 and p=0.002). The center of pressure was shifted medially during the entire stance phase (p<0.003 for all comparisons) due to increased peroneus longus activity prior to (p=0.002) and following initial contact (p=0.002). The gait-training device decreased pressure on the lateral column of the foot and increased peroneus longus muscle activity. Future research should analyze the efficacy of the gait-training device during gait retraining for chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Incremental ability of needle electromyography to detect radiculopathy in patients with radiating low back pain using different diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Henry C

    2012-06-01

    To determine the incremental ability of different needle electromyography diagnostic criteria to detect lumbar radiculopathy. Blinded cross-sectional study. University hospital. Subjects aged 55 to 80 years with radiating low back pain (n=48; mean age ± SD, 67.9±7.3y) and who were asymptomatic (n=30; mean age ± SD, 65.4±8y). Electrodiagnostic evaluation by a blinded electromyographer. A monopolar needle was used to evaluate 5 leg muscles and the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Presence or absence of radiculopathy using different electrodiagnostic criteria. When only positive sharp waves or fibrillations were considered, and at least 2 muscles innervated by the same root level and different peripheral nerves were counted as abnormal, 27.1% (13/48) of participants had positive results for radiculopathy. When at least 30% motor unit action potential changes in the limb muscles were also considered, participants with positive results increased to 45.8% (22/48), which was significant when compared with the first criterion (P=.002). When the mini-paraspinal mapping (MiniPM) test as well as at least a 30% motor unit cutoff was used, participants with positive results increased to 50% (24/48), which was significant when compared with the first criterion (P=.001). In addition to the presence of positive sharp waves or fibrillations, considering greater than or equal to 30% motor unit action unit potential changes as well as the MiniPM score maintains good specificity and improves the ability of the needle electromyography study to detect lumbar radiculopathy in subjects with radiating low back pain. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electromyography of the upper limbs during computer work: a comparison of 2 wrist orthoses in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Iracema Serrat Vergotti; Cliquet, Alberto; Magna, Luis Alberto; Zoppi Filho, Américo

    2009-07-01

    To examine the effect of wrist orthoses on the electromyography activities of the extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis, and fibers of the upper trapezius muscles during computer work. A randomized, 3 x 2 factorial design: orthoses (no orthosis, wearing a custom-made orthosis, wearing a commercial orthosis) and tasks (typing, using the mouse). Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Healthy university students (N=23), ranging from 18 to 26 years of age. Study volunteers performed standardized tasks such as typing and using the mouse while wearing 1 of 2 types of wrist orthoses or no orthosis. We used surface electromyography and considered 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity. We observed a significant increase in the electromyographic activity of the trapezius (Porthoses. No significant difference was observed in the activities of the flexor digitorum superficialis or extensor carpi ulnaris in participants who typed with or without orthoses (P>.05). However, when the participants used the mouse, the extensor muscle presented an increase in activity with both orthoses, and the same pattern was observed in the flexor muscle when the volunteers used the custom-made orthosis. Wrist orthoses affected the muscle activities in the upper limbs of healthy adults who were using a computer. Electromyographic activity increased in the trapezius when the subjects used either type of orthosis, and the same pattern was observed in the extensor carpi ulnaris when the subjects used the mouse. The flexor digitorum superficialis presented an increase in activity only when the subjects worked with the mouse and used a custom-made splint.

  14. Insight into the function of the obturator internus muscle in humans: observations with development and validation of an electromyography recording technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Paul W; McLean, Linda; Hodder, Joanne

    2014-08-01

    There are no direct recordings of obturator internus muscle activity in humans because of difficult access for electromyography (EMG) electrodes. Functions attributed to this muscle are based on speculation and include hip external rotation/abduction, and a role in stabilization as an "adjustable ligament" of the hip. Here we present (1) a technique to insert intramuscular EMG electrodes into obturator internus plus (2) the results of an investigation of obturator internus activity relative to that of nearby hip muscles during voluntary hip efforts in two hip positions and a weight-bearing task. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted with ultrasound guidance into obturator internus, gluteus maximus, piriformis and quadratus femoris in ten participants. Participants performed ramped and maximal isometric hip efforts (open kinetic chain) into flexion/extension, abduction/adduction, and internal/external rotation, and hip rotation to end range in standing. Analysis of the relationship between activity of the obturator internus and the other hip muscles provided evidence of limited contamination of the recordings with crosstalk. Obturator internus EMG amplitude was greatest during hip extension, then external rotation then abduction, with minimal to no activation in other directions. Obturator internus EMG was more commonly the first muscle active during abduction and external rotation than other muscles. This study describes a viable and valid technique to record obturator internus EMG and provides the first evidence of its activation during simple functions. The observation of specificity of activation to certain force directions questions the hypothesis of a general role in hip stabilisation regardless of force direction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of extreme learning machine for classification of individual and combined finger movements using electromyography on amputees and non-amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anam, Khairul; Al-Jumaily, Adel

    2017-01-01

    The success of myoelectric pattern recognition (M-PR) mostly relies on the features extracted and classifier employed. This paper proposes and evaluates a fast classifier, extreme learning machine (ELM), to classify individual and combined finger movements on amputees and non-amputees. ELM is a single hidden layer feed-forward network (SLFN) that avoids iterative learning by determining input weights randomly and output weights analytically. Therefore, it can accelerate the training time of SLFNs. In addition to the classifier evaluation, this paper evaluates various feature combinations to improve the performance of M-PR and investigate some feature projections to improve the class separability of the features. Different from other studies on the implementation of ELM in the myoelectric controller, this paper presents a complete and thorough investigation of various types of ELMs including the node-based and kernel-based ELM. Furthermore, this paper provides comparisons of ELMs and other well-known classifiers such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k-nearest neighbour (kNN), support vector machine (SVM) and least-square SVM (LS-SVM). The experimental results show the most accurate ELM classifier is radial basis function ELM (RBF-ELM). The comparison of RBF-ELM and other well-known classifiers shows that RBF-ELM is as accurate as SVM and LS-SVM but faster than the SVM family; it is superior to LDA and kNN. The experimental results also indicate that the accuracy gap of the M-PR on the amputees and non-amputees is not too much with the accuracy of 98.55% on amputees and 99.5% on the non-amputees using six electromyography (EMG) channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Muscle synergy analysis in transtibial amputee during ramp ascending activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehryar, P; Shourijeh, M S; Maqbool, H F; Torabi, M; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2016-08-01

    In developed countries, the highest number of amputees are elderly with transtibial amputation. Walking on inclined surfaces is difficult for amputees due to loss of muscle volume and strength thereby transtibial amputees (TA) rely on the intact limb to maintain stability. The aim of this study was to use the concatenated non-negative matrix factorization (CNMF) technique to calculate muscle synergy components and compare the difference in muscle synergies and their associated activation profiles in the healthy and amputee groups during ramp ascending (RA) activity. Healthy subjects' dominant leg and amputee's intact leg (IL) were considered for recording surface electromyography (sEMG). The muscle synergies comparison showed a reasonable correlation between the healthy and amputee groups. This suggests the central nervous system (CNS) activates the same group of muscles synergistically. However, the activation coefficient profile (C) results indicated statistically significant difference (p amputee groups. The difference exhibited in activation profiles of amputee's IL could be due to the instability of the prosthetic leg during the GC which resulted in alteration of the IL muscles activations. This information will be useful in rehabilitation and in the future development of prosthetic devices by using the IL muscles information to control the prostheses.

  17. Development of a 3D workspace shoulder assessment tool incorporating electromyography and an inertial measurement unit-a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Navid; Noroozi, Siamak; Davenport, Philip; Hartley, Richard; Dupac, Mihai; Sewell, Philip

    2017-11-11

    Traditional shoulder range of movement (ROM) measurement tools suffer from inaccuracy or from long experimental setup times. Recently, it has been demonstrated that relatively low-cost wearable inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensors can overcome many of the limitations of traditional motion tracking systems. The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a single IMU combined with an electromyography (EMG) sensor to monitor the 3D reachable workspace with simultaneous measurement of deltoid muscle activity across the shoulder ROM. Six volunteer subjects with healthy shoulders and one participant with a 'frozen' shoulder were recruited to the study. Arm movement in 3D space was plotted in spherical coordinates while the relative EMG intensity of any arm position is presented graphically. The results showed that there was an average ROM surface area of 27291 ± 538 deg2 among all six healthy individuals and a ROM surface area of 13571 ± 308 deg2 for the subject with frozen shoulder. All three sections of the deltoid show greater EMG activity at higher elevation angles. Using such tools enables individuals, surgeons and physiotherapists to measure the maximum envelope of motion in conjunction with muscle activity in order to provide an objective assessment of shoulder performance in the voluntary 3D workspace. Graphical abstract The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a single IMU combined with an electromyography (EMG) sensor to monitor the 3D reachable workspace with simultaneous measurement of deltoid muscle activity across the shoulder ROM. The assessment tool consists of an IMU sensor, an EMG sensor, a microcontroller and a Bluetooth module. The assessment tool was attached to subjects arm. Individuals were instructed to move their arms with the elbow fully extended. They were then asked to provide the maximal voluntary elevation envelope of the arm in 3D space in multiple attempts starting from a small movement envelope going to the biggest

  18. Surface EMG pattern recognition for real-time control of a wrist exoskeleton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khokhar, Zeeshan O; Xiao, Zhen G; Menon, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals have been used in numerous studies for the classification of hand gestures and movements and successfully implemented in the position control of different prosthetic hands for amputees...

  19. Neuromuscular functions in sportsmen and fibromyalgia patients : a surface EMG study in static and dynamic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents two studies, one involving sportsmen (sprinters versus endurance athletes) and one fibromyalgia patients (patients versus healthy controls). The studies have investigated muscular functions using a non-invasive method: surface electromyography (sEMG). In the sportsmen,

  20. Simultaneous 31P NMR spectroscopy and EMG in exercising and recovering human skeletal muscle: technical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1994-01-01

    The bioenergetics of human skeletal muscle can be studied by 31P NMR spectroscopy (31P-MRS) and by surface electromyography (SEMG). Simultaneous 31P-MRS and SEMG permit accurate and noninvasive studies of the correlation between metabolic and electrical changes in exercising and recovering human ...

  1. Single-fiber Electromyography in the Extensor Digitorum Communis for the Predictive Prognosis of Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Retrospective Study of 102 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yu-Zhou; Cui, Li-Ying; Liu, Ming-Sheng; Niu, Jing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) abnormality in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) was reported in ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG), which indicated subclinical involvement beyond extraocular muscles in OMG patients. The relationship between the abnormal findings of SFEMG in EDC and the probability for OMG to develop generalized myasthenia gravis (GMG) is unknown. This retrospective study aimed to determine the predictive value of abnormality of SFEMG in EDC of OMG patients. Methods: One-hundred and two OMG patients underwent standard clinical diagnosis process and SFEMG test in EDC muscle when diagnosed and were clinically followed up for 5 years. The SFEMG data were compared between different clinical groups according to thymus status, onset age, and different outcome of OMG developing. Chances of progressing to GMG were compared between two different groups according to SFEMG and repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) results, acetylcholine receptor antibody (AchRAb) titer, thymus status, and onset age. Results: Abnormal SFEMG results were observed in 84 (82.4%) patients. The mean jitter, percentage of jitter >55 μs (%), and blocking were higher in OMG patients than in healthy volunteers. There were no statistical differences in jitter analysis between thymoma group and non-thymoma group (P = 0.65), or between the later OMG group and the later GMG group (P = 0.31), including mean jitter, percentage of jitter >55 μs (%), and blocking. Elderly group (≥45 years old) had a higher mean jitter than younger group (t = 2.235, P = 0.028). Total 55 OMG developed GMG, including 47 in abnormal SFEMG group while 8 in normal SFEMG group. There was no statistical difference in the conversion rates between the two groups (χ2 = 0.790, P = 0.140). RNS abnormality, AchRab titer, or onset age had no correlation with OMG prognosis (P = 0.150, 0.070, 0.120, respectively) while thymoma did (χ2 = 0.510, P = 0.020). Conclusion: SFEMG test in the EDC showed high

  2. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group. Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD, who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P>0.05. There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable.

  3. Electromyography (EMG) signal recognition using combined discrete wavelet transform based adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arozi, Moh; Putri, Farika T.; Ariyanto, Mochammad; Khusnul Ari, M.; Munadi, Setiawan, Joga D.

    2017-01-01

    People with disabilities are increasing from year to year either due to congenital factors, sickness, accident factors and war. One form of disability is the case of interruptions of hand function. The condition requires and encourages the search for solutions in the form of creating an artificial hand with the ability as a human hand. The development of science in the field of neuroscience currently allows the use of electromyography (EMG) to control the motion of artificial prosthetic hand into the necessary use of EMG as an input signal to control artificial prosthetic hand. This study is the beginning of a significant research planned in the development of artificial prosthetic hand with EMG signal input. This initial research focused on the study of EMG signal recognition. Preliminary results show that the EMG signal recognition using combined discrete wavelet transform and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) produces accuracy 98.3 % for training and 98.51% for testing. Thus the results can be used as an input signal for Simulink block diagram of a prosthetic hand that will be developed on next study. The research will proceed with the construction of artificial prosthetic hand along with Simulink program controlling and integrating everything into one system.

  4. Simultaneous scalp electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and whole-body segmental inertial recording for multi-modal neural decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulea, Thomas C; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Ozdemir, Recep; Paloski, William H; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2013-07-26

    Recent studies support the involvement of supraspinal networks in control of bipedal human walking. Part of this evidence encompasses studies, including our previous work, demonstrating that gait kinematics and limb coordination during treadmill walking can be inferred from the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) with reasonably high decoding accuracies. These results provide impetus for development of non-invasive brain-machine-interface (BMI) systems for use in restoration and/or augmentation of gait- a primary goal of rehabilitation research. To date, studies examining EEG decoding of activity during gait have been limited to treadmill walking in a controlled environment. However, to be practically viable a BMI system must be applicable for use in everyday locomotor tasks such as over ground walking and turning. Here, we present a novel protocol for non-invasive collection of brain activity (EEG), muscle activity (electromyography (EMG)), and whole-body kinematic data (head, torso, and limb trajectories) during both treadmill and over ground walking tasks. By collecting these data in the uncontrolled environment insight can be gained regarding the feasibility of decoding unconstrained gait and surface EMG from scalp EEG.

  5. Selectivity of conventional electrodes for recording motor evoked potentials: An investigation with high-density surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Alessio; Peters, Sue; Neva, Jason L; Boyd, Lara A; Garland, S Jayne

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited with transcranial magnetic stimulation and measured with conventional bipolar electromyography (EMG) are influenced by crosstalk from non-target muscles. MEPs were recorded in healthy participants using conventional EMG electrodes placed over the extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) and high-density surface EMG (HDsEMG). Fifty MEPs at 120% resting and active motor threshold were recorded. To determine the contribution of ECR to the MEPs, the amplitude distribution across HDsEMG channels was correlated with EMG activity recorded during a wrist extension task. Whereas the conventional EMG identified MEPs from ECR in >90% of the stimulations, HDsEMG revealed that spatial amplitude distribution representative of ECR activation was observed less frequently at rest than while holding a contraction (P < 0.001). MEPs recorded with conventional EMG may contain crosstalk from non-target muscles, especially when the stimulation is applied at rest. Muscle Nerve 55: 828-834, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Using facial electromyography to detect preserved emotional processing in disorders of consciousness: A proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Chris M; Owen, Adrian M

    2016-09-01

    To examine whether emotional functioning can be observed in patients who are behaviourally non-responsive using peripheral markers of emotional functioning. We tested two patients, both diagnosed as being in a vegetative state (VS) following hypoxia secondary to cardiac arrest. Thirty-seven healthy participants with no history of neurological illness served as a control group. The activity of two facial muscles (zygomaticus major, corrugator supercilii) was measured using facial electromyography (EMG) to probe for patterned responses that differentiate between auditorily presented joke and non-joke stimuli in VS patients. One of the two VS patients we tested demonstrated greater zygomatic and reduced corrugator activity in response to jokes compared with non-jokes. Critically, these responses followed the pattern and temporal profile of muscle activity observed in our healthy control sample. Despite their behaviorally non-responsive profile, some patients diagnosed as VS appear to retain some aspects of emotional experience. Our findings represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that a patient diagnosed as VS can exhibit intact emotional responses to humor as assessed by facial EMG. Therefore, our approach may constitute a feasible bedside tool capable of providing novel insight into the mental and emotional lives of patients who are behaviourally non-responsive. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro Testing of an Implantable Wireless Telemetry System for Long-Term Electromyography Recordings in Large Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneisz, Lukas; Unger, Ewald; Lanmüller, Hermann; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    Multichannel bio-signal recording in undisturbed in vivo conditions is a frequent demand in experimental work for development of methodology and associated equipment for functional electrical stimulation (FES) application, limb prosthesis, and diagnostic tools in contemporary rehabilitation efforts. Intramuscular electromyogram (EMG) recordings can provide comprehensive insight in complex interactions of agonistic and antagonistic muscles during movement tasks and in contrast act as reliable control signals for both neuroprosthesis and mechanical prosthesis. We fabricated a fully implantable device, which is capable of recording electromyography signals from inside a body and transmit these signals wirelessly to an external receiver. The developed analog front end uses only two electrodes per channel, provides a gain of 60 dB, and incorporates a band pass filter with lower cut-off frequency of 4 Hz and upper cut-off frequency of 480 Hz. The bidirectional wireless data link, which operates in the 2.4 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band, is designed for transmission distances of 10 m using an application data rate of 1 kSps for each of the two channels. Performed in vitro tests with the devices coated in epoxy resin and inserted into a phantom with tissue-equivalent characteristics confirmed the functionality of our concept and the measurement results are consistent with those from preceding simulations. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Simultaneous Scalp Electroencephalography (EEG), Electromyography (EMG), and Whole-body Segmental Inertial Recording for Multi-modal Neural Decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Ozdemir, Recep; Paloski, William H.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies support the involvement of supraspinal networks in control of bipedal human walking. Part of this evidence encompasses studies, including our previous work, demonstrating that gait kinematics and limb coordination during treadmill walking can be inferred from the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) with reasonably high decoding accuracies. These results provide impetus for development of non-invasive brain-machine-interface (BMI) systems for use in restoration and/or augmentation of gait- a primary goal of rehabilitation research. To date, studies examining EEG decoding of activity during gait have been limited to treadmill walking in a controlled environment. However, to be practically viable a BMI system must be applicable for use in everyday locomotor tasks such as over ground walking and turning. Here, we present a novel protocol for non-invasive collection of brain activity (EEG), muscle activity (electromyography (EMG)), and whole-body kinematic data (head, torso, and limb trajectories) during both treadmill and over ground walking tasks. By collecting these data in the uncontrolled environment insight can be gained regarding the feasibility of decoding unconstrained gait and surface EMG from scalp EEG. PMID:23912203

  9. History, mechanisms and clinical value of fibrillation analyses in muscle denervation and reinnervation by Single Fiber Electromyography and Dynamic Echomyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Pond

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews history, current clinical relevance and future of fibrillation, a functional marker of skeletal muscle denervated fibers. Fibrillations, i.e., spontaneous contraction, in denervated muscle were first described during the nineteenth century. It is known that alterations in membrane potential are responsible for the phenomenon and that they are related to changes in electrophysiological factors, cellular metabolism, cell turnover and gene expression. They are known to inhibit muscle atrophy to some degree and are used to diagnose neural injury and reinnervation that are occurring in patients. Electromyography (EMG is useful in determining progress, prognosis and efficacy of therapeutic interventions and their eventual change. For patients with peripheral nerve injury, and thus without the option of volitional contractions, electrical muscle stimulation may be helpful in preserving the contractility and extensibility of denervated muscle tissue and in retarding/counteracting muscle atrophy. It is obvious from the paucity of recent literature that research in this area has declined over the years. This is likely a consequence of the decrease in funding available for research and the fact that the fibrillations do not appear to cause serious health issues. Nonetheless, further exploration of them as diagnostic tools in long-term denervation is merited, in particular if Single Fiber EMG (SFEMG is combined with Dynamic Echomyography (DyEM, an Ultra Sound muscle approach we recently designed and developed to explore denervated and reinnervating muscles.

  10. Electromyography and Fos immunostaining study establish a possible functional link between trigeminal proprioception and the oculomotor system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Houcheng; Zhang, Jingdong; Luo, Pifu; Zhu, Hongna; Qiao, Ying; Su, Anle; Zhang, Ting

    2017-01-19

    The objective of this study was to explore whether there was a functional link between trigeminal proprioception and the oculomotor system mediated through jaw muscle afferents. Electromyography (EMG) was undertaken of the levator palpebrae (LP) and superior rectus (SR), and Fos expression was detected in the brainstem following consecutive down-stretching of the lower jaw at 2-4 Hz in rats. Retrograde tracing was undertaken of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal and Darkschewitsch nucleus (INC/DN) pre-oculomotor neurons. EMG-like responses were recorded from the LP/SR during down-stretching of the lower jaw at 2-4 Hz in 3 out of 11 rats. Fos expression was induced by consecutive down-stretching of the lower jaw at 2-4 Hz for 20-30 seconds. Interestingly, Fos expression was distributed mainly in the bilateral INC/DN area. We also examined Fos-like immunoreactivity in central mesencephalic and paramedian pontine reticular formation that harbors premotor neurons controlling horizontal eye movement, but no Fos-like staining was observed therein. By injection of retrograde tracers into the oculomotor nucleus combined with Fos immunostaining, double labeled pre-oculomotor neurons were visualized to distribute in the INC/DN. In conclusions, there may exist a trigeminal proprioceptive - oculomotor system neural circuit through jaw muscle afferents in rats. Judging from Fos distribution pattern, this pathway might be related to vertical and torsional eye movements.

  11. Office-based Electromyography-guided Botulinum Toxin Injection to the Cricopharyngeus Muscle: Optimal Patient Selection and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Go-Woon; Rho, Young-Soo; Kwon, Kee-Hwan; Chung, Eun-Jae

    2017-05-01

    This retrospective study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness and safety of office-based electromyography-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the cricopharyngeus muscle of patients who did not show upper esophageal sphincter passage in a swallowing study in spite of maximal swallowing rehabilitation. Thirty-six patients who showed no or limited ability to oral feed after maximum swallowing rehabilitation were enrolled. Video fluoroscopic swallowing study, flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, disability rating scale, penetration aspiration score, and National Institutes of Health swallowing safety scale were used in the evaluation of dysphagia. Success was defined as nondependence on gastrostomy for patients who previously were dependent on gastrostomy and improvement in disability rating scale score after botulinum toxin injections. The total success rate was 63.9%. The complication rate was very low, with only 1 patient showing temporary unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Botulinum toxin injection was more effective in patients with cranial nerve IX or X palsy than in those without it ( P = .006). This procedure can be a simple, safe, and effective tool in patients with cricopharyngeal dysfunction after swallowing rehabilitation, especially for cranial nerve IX or X palsy.

  12. Can triggered electromyography monitoring throughout retraction predict postoperative symptomatic neuropraxia after XLIF? Results from a prospective multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Isaacs, Robert E; Youssef, Jim A; Khajavi, Kaveh; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Kanter, Adam S; Küelling, Fabrice A; Peterson, Mark D

    2015-04-01

    This multicenter study aims to evaluate the utility of triggered electromyography (t-EMG) recorded throughout psoas retraction during lateral transpsoas interbody fusion to predict postoperative changes in motor function. Three hundred and twenty-three patients undergoing L4-5 minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion from 21 sites were enrolled. Intraoperative data collection included initial t-EMG thresholds in response to posterior retractor blade stimulation and subsequent t-EMG threshold values collected every 5 min throughout retraction. Additional data collection included dimensions/duration of retraction as well as pre-and postoperative lower extremity neurologic exams. Prior to expanding the retractor, the lowestt-EMG threshold was identified posterior to the retractor in 94 % of cases. Postoperatively, 13 (4.5 %) patients had a new motor weakness that was consistent with symptomatic neuropraxia (SN) of lumbar plexus nerves on the approach side. There were no significant differences between patients with or without a corresponding postoperative SN with respect to initial posterior blade reading (p = 0.600), or retraction dimensions (p > 0.05). Retraction time was significantly longer in those patients with SN vs. those without (p = 0.031). Stepwise logistic regression showed a significant positive relationship between the presence of new postoperative SN and total retraction time (p neuropraxia may be reduced by limiting retraction time and utilizing t-EMG throughout retraction, while understanding that the specificity of this monitoring technique is low during initial retraction and increases with longer retraction duration.

  13. Development of practical functional electrical stimulation cycling systems based on an electromyography study of the Cybathlon 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnin, Jetsada; Yamsa-Ard, Traisak; Triponyuwasin, Preechapawan; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2017-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to develop a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system based on the motor driving concept for use by spinal cord injury patients participating in the FES Cycling competition at the Cybathlon 2016. The proposed FES system consists of a low-power control system, a precise processor unit, and a 4-channel stimulation unit. Self-adhesive carbon conductive electrodes were utilized for stimulation. A 26-year-old SCI patient was qualified to participate in the competition. The pilot patient underwent training for 16 months, which included experience with FES stimulation, performing FES cycling, and reducing spasticity, to practice using the FES system. In addition, using surface electromyography (EMG) during cycling, the muscle activation pattern for generating the stimulation profile was applied and resulted in good performance. The best FES cycling performance the pilot achieved was 1000 meters translation with the cycling system during twelve minutes of using the FES system. The pilot achieved an 1000 meters translation mobility within an average of 16 minutes of cycling. Nevertheless, the system must be further investigated regarding muscle fatigue and other factors that may affect the stimulation conditions.

  14. Iterative Assessment of Statistically-Oriented and Standard Algorithms for Determining Muscle Onset with Intramuscular Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    EMG), is a commonly applied metric in biomechanics. Intramuscular EMG is often used to examine deep musculature and there are currently no studies...assessment of deep musculature or small superficial muscles.4 The onset timing of intramuscular EMG has been used exten- sively to examine the “core muscles...this work , no more than 3 parameters were systematically modified for each algorithm. Statistical Analysis In total, 605 standard and novel algorithm

  15. Classification of finger extension and flexion of EMG and Cyberglove data with modified ICA weight matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ganesh R; Acharyya, Amit; Nguyen, Hung T

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the classification of finger flexion and extension of surface Electromyography (EMG) and Cyberglove data using the modified Independent Component Analysis (ICA) weight matrix. The finger flexion and extension data are processed through Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and next separated using modified ICA for each individual with customized weight matrix. The extension and flexion features of sEMG and Cyberglove (extracted from modified ICA) were classified using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) with near 90% classification accuracy. The applications of this study include Human Computer Interface (HCI), virtual reality and neural prosthetics.

  16. Surface electromyography assessment of muscle activation patterns while sitting down in young healthy women and patients with ankylosing spondylitis [Povrchové elektromyografické hodnocení svalové aktivity ve zkoušce posazení u zdravých mladých žen a u pacientů s ankylozující spondylitidou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Uhlíř

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscle activation patterns depend on many factors. Surface electromyography (SEMG can reveal these patterns in subjects of different ages and health states. We studied patterns of muscle activation in two groups of subjects - healthy young women (as a control group and patients with ankylosing spondylitis. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to register and compare muscle activation patterns while sitting down in these two groups in four situations with different positions of the lower and upper limbs. METHODS: Muscle activity was registered with the use of 8 channel surface polyelectromyography (Noraxon-Myosystem 1400A. We tested the following muscles bilaterally while the subjects were sitting down (tibialis anterior muscle, medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle, gluteus maximus muscle, erectores spinae muscles. The onset of each individual muscle's activity was determined by calculating the sum of the mean value of the SEMG baseline plus 10% of the maximum value of amplitude (peak. RESULTS: It was registered that the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle and/or erectores spinae muscles were activated as the first ones in both groups of the subjects under study in most of the studied postural situations. We registered differences in timing (sequence of muscle activation among various studied body and limb positions (P–, P+, PD–, and PN–. A great degree of variability in the sequence of muscle activation was revealed, depending on the positions of the upper and lower limbs. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find any unique patterns of muscle activation in either of the two groups under study.[VÝCHODISKA: Časové zapojování (aktivace svalů je závislé na mnoha faktorech. Povrchová polyelektromyografie zachycuje vzorce zapojování svalů u probandů rozdílného věku a zdravotního stavu v různých podmínkách. CÍLE: Cílem studie byla registrace a hodnocení pořadí zapojování svalů v průběhu sedání u t

  17. Experimental pain leads to reorganisation of trapezius electromyography during computer work with active and passive pauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samani, Afshin; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2009-01-01

    in one day, with passive (relax) and active (30% maximum voluntary contraction of shoulder elevation) pauses given every 40 s without and with presence of experimental pain. Surface EMG signals were recorded from four parts of the trapezius. The centroid of exposure variation analysis along the time axis...... was lower during computer work with active pauses when compared with passive one in all muscle parts (P rest time decreased in ascending part. The results of this study showed a more variable...... trapezius activity pattern and increased activity with active compared with passive pauses, a lowered trapezius rest with presence of experimental pain, and increased activity in the transverse and ascending parts of trapezius due to experimental pain during computer work. Acute pain led to muscle...

  18. De electricitatis catholici musculari - concerning the electrical properties of muscles, with emphasis on meat quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, L.S.; Andersen, Ninette Kieme; Rasmussen, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    correlated negatively in LD and BF. Negative significant correlations between CMAP parameters and shear force were found in LD at day 153 after birth, which might, in the range of the recording electrodes, reflect the combined effect of large cross-sectional area fibres and reduced perimysium content per......This study aims to explore the potential of evoked non-invasive surface electromyography (SEMG) analysis, in predicting meat quality traits in livestock. Evoked SEMG is a system that records, transdermally, electrical signals generated in muscle fibres upon external stimulation. These signals...... are reported as compound muscle action potentials (CMAP). CMAP parameters of LD correlated negatively and significantly to ultimate pH (pH 24 h) at day 61, but not at day 153 after birth, and a similar albeit positive correlation was observed for muscle glycogen content. Muscle glycogen content and pH 24 h...

  19. A Systematic Review of Electromyography Studies in Normal Shoulders to Inform Postoperative Rehabilitation Following Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Peter K; Ebert, Jay R; Littlewood, Chris; Ackland, Tim; Wang, Allan

    2017-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Background Electromyography (EMG) has previously been used to guide postoperative rehabilitation progression following rotator cuff repair to prevent deleterious loading of early surgical repair. Objective To review the current literature investigating EMG during rehabilitation exercises in normal shoulders, and to identify exercises that meet a cut point of 15% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) or less and are unlikely to result in excessive loading in the early postoperative stages. Methods An electronic search of MEDLINE via Ovid, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for all years up to June 2016 was performed. Studies were selected in relation to predefined selection criteria. Pooled mean MVICs were reported and classified as low (0%-15% MVIC), low to moderate (16%-20% MVIC), moderate (21%-40% MVIC), high (41%-60% MVIC), and very high (greater than 60% MVIC). Results A search identified 2159 studies. After applying the selection criteria, 20 studies were included for quality assessment, data extraction, and data synthesis. In total, 43 exercises spanning passive range of motion, active-assisted range of motion, and strengthening exercises were evaluated. Out of 13 active-assisted exercises, 9 were identified as suitable (15% MVIC or less) to load the supraspinatus and 10 as suitable to load the infraspinatus early after surgery. All exercises were placed in a theoretical-continuum model, by which general recommendations could be made for prescription in patients post rotator cuff repair. Conclusion This review identified passive and active-assisted exercises that may be appropriate in the early stages after rotator cuff repair. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):931-944. Epub 13 Jul 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7271.

  20. Application of surface electromyography in assessing muscle recruitment patterns in a six-minute continuous rowing effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Raymond C H; Tse, Michael A; Wong, Sam C W

    2007-08-01

    Specific sequences of muscle coordination exist in movements of every sport. In particular, sports involving repetitive movement patterns such as rowing may rely more heavily on coordinated muscle contraction sequencing in order to produce optimal performance. The aim of this study was to monitor the fatigue patterns of the major muscles engaged during the rowing stroke in rowers of varying abilities during a 6-minute continuous maximal rowing effort on a Concept II rowing ergometer. Sixteen male rowers were categorized into 5 groups based on years of training and their average pace of the 6-minute continuous maximal rowing effort. Continuous surface electromyography signals, recorded from brachioradialis, biceps brachii, middeltoid, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and medial gastrocnemius, were used to investigate the influence of local muscle fatigue on optimal muscle coordination sequences during the rowing exercise. Rowers who performed better on the ergometer test and had more rowing experience tended to portray muscle recruitment patterning, which alternately emphasized different major muscle groups in a form of sharing of workload. This sharing allowed mean peak frequency restitution to take place in some muscles, while others took on more of the workload. The muscles of rowers with less experience and lower levels of performance did not appear to exhibit this same phenomenon known as biodynamic compensation. If coaches have a clearer picture of the fatigue patterns and recruitment strategies occurring in their athletes during a maximal effort row, strength training program adaptations could be made to compensate for weaker areas, which may assist rowers in attaining and sustaining more optimal patterns and strategies throughout the exercise effort.

  1. Textile Electrodes Embedded in Clothing: A Practical Alternative to Traditional Surface Electromyography when Assessing Muscle Excitation during Functional Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffi L. Colyer, Polly M. McGuigan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile electromyography (EMG electrodes embedded in clothing allow muscle excitation to be recorded in previously inaccessible settings; however, their ability to accurately and reliably measure EMG during dynamic tasks remains largely unexplored. To quantify the validity and reliability of textile electrodes, 16 recreationally active males completed two identical testing sessions, within which three functional movements (run, cycle and squat were performed twice: once wearing EMG shorts (measuring quadriceps, hamstrings and gluteals myoelectric activity and once with surface EMG electrodes attached to the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus. EMG signals were identically processed to provide average rectified EMG (normalized to walking and excitation length. Results were compared across measurement systems and demonstrated good agreement between the magnitude of muscle excitation when EMG activity was lower, but agreement was poorer when excitation was higher. The length of excitation bursts was consistently longer when measured using textile vs. surface EMG electrodes. Comparable between-session (day-to-day repeatability was found for average rectified EMG (mean coefficient of variation, CV: 42.6 and 41.2% and excitation length (CV: 12.9 and 9.8% when using textile and surface EMG, respectively. Additionally, similar within-session repeatability (CV was recorded for average rectified EMG (13.8 and 14.1% and excitation length (13.0 and 12.7% for textile and surface electrodes, respectively. Generally, textile EMG electrodes appear to be capable of providing comparable muscle excitation information and reproducibility to surface EMG during dynamic tasks. Textile EMG shorts could therefore be a practical alternative to traditional laboratory-based methods allowing muscle excitation information to be collected in more externally-valid training environments.

  2. Relationships between neck muscle electromyography and three-dimensional head kinematics during centrally induced torsional head perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshadmanesh, Farshad; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Hongying; Corneil, Brian D; Crawford, J Douglas

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between neck muscle electromyography (EMG) and torsional head rotation (about the nasooccipital axis) is difficult to assess during normal gaze behaviors with the head upright. Here, we induced acute head tilts similar to cervical dystonia (torticollis) in two monkeys by electrically stimulating 20 interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) sites or inactivating 19 INC sites by injection of muscimol. Animals engaged in a simple gaze fixation task while we recorded three-dimensional head kinematics and intramuscular EMG from six bilateral neck muscle pairs. We used a cross-validation-based stepwise regression to quantitatively examine the relationships between neck EMG and torsional head kinematics under three conditions: 1) unilateral INC stimulation (where the head rotated torsionally toward the side of stimulation); 2) corrective poststimulation movements (where the head returned toward upright); and 3) unilateral INC inactivation (where the head tilted toward the opposite side of inactivation). Our cross-validated results of corrective movements were slightly better than those obtained during unperturbed gaze movements and showed many more torsional terms, mostly related to velocity, although some orientation and acceleration terms were retained. In addition, several simplifying principles were identified. First, bilateral muscle pairs showed similar, but opposite EMG-torsional coupling terms, i.e., a change in torsional kinematics was associated with increased muscle activity on one side and decreased activity on the other side. s, whenever torsional terms were retained in a given muscle, they were independent of the inputs we tested, i.e., INC stimulation vs. corrective motion vs. INC inactivation, and left vs. right INC data. These findings suggest that, despite the complexity of the head-neck system, the brain can use a single, bilaterally coupled inverse model for torsional head control that is valid across different behaviors and movement

  3. A quantitative approach to measure women's sexual function using electromyography: a preliminary study of the Kegel exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohktar, Mas Sahidayana; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Mohd Rozi, Nur Farahana; Mohd Yusof, Juhaida; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Su Yen, Khong; Omar, Siti Zawiah

    2013-12-13

    Currently, the reference standard used to clinically assess sexual function among women is a qualitative questionnaire. Hence, a generalised and quantitative measurement tool needs to be available as an alternative. This study investigated whether an electromyography (EMG) measurement technique could be used to help quantify women's sexual function. A preliminary intervention study was conducted on 12 female subjects, who were randomised into a control (n=6) and an intervention (n=6) group. Intervention involved a set regimen of pelvic floor muscle exercises (Kegel) and the control group did not have any treatment. All subjects were asked to answer a validated, self-rated Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ). EMG measurements of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and the abdominal muscles were taken from all women at recruitment and 8 weeks after study commencement. After 8 weeks, most of the subjects in the control group did not display any noted positive difference in either PISQ score (4/6) or in their muscle strength (4/6). However, a noted progressive difference were observed in subjects who were placed in the Kegel group; PISQ score (5/6) and muscles strength (4/6). The noted difference in the Kegel group subjects was that if progress is observed in the sexual function, improvement is also observed in the strength of at least 2 types of muscles (either abdominal or PFM muscles). Thus, EMG measurement is a potential technique to quantify the changes in female sexual function. Further work will be conducted to validate this assumption.

  4. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Voluntary low-force contraction elicits prolonged low-frequency fatigue and changes in surface electromyography and mechanomyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Madeleine, Pascal; Olsen, Henrik Baare; Søgaard, Karen

    2005-04-01

    Controversies exist regarding objective documentation of fatigue development with low-force contractions. We hypothesized that non-exhaustive, low-force muscle contraction may induce prolonged low-frequency fatigue (LFF) that in the subsequent recovery period is detectable by electromyography (EMG) and in particular mechanomyography (MMG) during low-force rather than high-force test contractions. Seven subjects performed static wrist extension at 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 10 min (10%MVC10 min). Wrist force response to electrical stimulation of extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) quantified LFF. EMG and MMG were recorded from ECR during static test contractions at 5% and 80% MVC. Electrical stimulation, MVC, and test contractions were performed before 10%MVC10 min and at 10, 30, 90 and 150 min recovery. In spite of no changes in MVC, LFF persisted up to 150 min recovery but did not develop in a control experiment omitting 10%MVC10 min. In 5% MVC tests significant increase was found in time domain of EMG from 0.067+/-0.028 mV before 10%MVC10 min to 0.107+/-0.049 and 0.087+/-0.05 mV at 10 and 30 min recovery, respectively, and of the MMG from 0.054+/-0.039 ms(-2) to 0.133+/-0.104 and 0.127+/-0.099 ms(-2), respectively. No consistent changes were found in 80% MVC tests. In conclusion, non-exhaustive low-force muscle contraction resulted in prolonged LFF that in part was identified by the EMG and MMG signals.

  6. A quantitative approach to measure women’s sexual function using electromyography: A preliminary study of the Kegel exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohktar, Mas Sahidayana; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Rozi, Nur Farahana Mohd; Yusof, Juhaida Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Yen, Khong Su; Omar, Siti Zawiah

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the reference standard used to clinically assess sexual function among women is a qualitative questionnaire. Hence, a generalised and quantitative measurement tool needs to be available as an alternative. This study investigated whether an electromyography (EMG) measurement tecnique could be used to help quantify women’s sexual function. Material/Methods A preliminary intervention study was conducted on 12 female subjects, who were randomised into a control (n=6) and an intervention (n=6) group. Intervention involved a set regimen of pelvic floor muscle exercises (Kegel) and the control group did not have any treatment. All subjects were asked to answer a validated, self-rated Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ). EMG measurements of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and the abdominal muscles were taken from all women at recruitment and 8 weeks after study commencement. Results After 8 weeks, most of the subjects in the control group did not display any noted positive difference in either PISQ score (4/6) or in their muscle strength (4/6). However, a noted progressive difference were observed in subjects who were placed in the Kegel group; PISQ score (5/6) and muscles strength (4/6). Conclusions The noted difference in the Kegel group subjects was that if progress is observed in the sexual function, improvement is also observed in the strength of at least 2 types of muscles (either abdominal or PFM muscles). Thus, EMG measurement is a potential technique to quantify the changes in female sexual function. Further work will be conducted to validate this assumption. PMID:24335927

  7. Inter-individual variability and pattern recognition of surface electromyography in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonas; Daly, Daniel; Deschamps, Kevin; Staes, Filip; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2016-12-01

    Variability of electromyographic (EMG) recordings is a complex phenomenon rarely examined in swimming. Our purposes were to investigate inter-individual variability in muscle activation patterns during front crawl swimming and assess if there were clusters of sub patterns present. Bilateral muscle activity of rectus abdominis (RA) and deltoideus medialis (DM) was recorded using wireless surface EMG in 15 adult male competitive swimmers. The amplitude of the median EMG trial of six upper arm movement cycles was used for the inter-individual variability assessment, quantified with the coefficient of variation, coefficient of quartile variation, the variance ratio and mean deviation. Key features were selected based on qualitative and quantitative classification strategies to enter in a k-means cluster analysis to examine the presence of strong sub patterns. Such strong sub patterns were found when clustering in two, three and four clusters. Inter-individual variability in a group of highly skilled swimmers was higher compared to other cyclic movements which is in contrast to what has been reported in the previous 50years of EMG research in swimming. This leads to the conclusion that coaches should be careful in using overall reference EMG information to enhance the individual swimming technique of their athletes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting 3D lip shapes using facial surface EMG

    OpenAIRE

    Eskes, Merijn; van Alphen, Maarten J. A.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Smeele, Ludi E.; Brandsma, Dieta; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to prove that facial surface electromyography (sEMG) conveys sufficient information to predict 3D lip shapes. High sEMG predictive accuracy implies we could train a neural control model for activation of biomechanical models by simultaneously recording sEMG signals and their associated motions. Materials and methods With a stereo camera set-up, we recorded 3D lip shapes and simultaneously performed sEMG measurements of the facial muscles, applying principal compon...

  9. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity for the evaluation of the infraspinatus muscle and the suprascapular nerve in professional beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajtai, Georg; Wieser, Karl; Ofner, Michael; Raimann, Gustav; Aitzetmüller, Gernot; Jost, Bernhard

    2012-10-01

    Beach volleyball is an overhead sport with a high prevalence of infraspinatus muscle atrophy of the hitting shoulder. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy seems to be caused by a repetitive traction injury of the suprascapular nerve. Early pathological findings might be assessed with surface electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measurements. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fully competitive professional beach volleyball players were assessed with a structured interview, shoulder examination, strength measurements (external rotation and elevation), and neurophysiological examination (surface EMG and NCV of the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles and the suprascapular nerve, respectively) during the Beach Volleyball Grand Slam tournament 2010 in Klagenfurt, Austria. Thirty-five men with an average age of 28 years were examined. Visible infraspinatus atrophy was found in 12 players (34%), of which 8 (23%) had slight atrophy and 4 (11%) had severe atrophy. External rotation (90%; P strength (93%; P = .03) were significantly lower in the hitting shoulder. Electromyography revealed a higher activation pattern in the infraspinatus muscle of the hitting arm in players with no or slight atrophy (P = .001) but a significantly lower activation pattern in players with severe atrophy (P = .013). Nerve conduction velocity measurements showed a significant higher latency and lower amplitude in the hitting shoulder of the total study group and the subgroup with infraspinatus atrophy. Professional beach volleyball players have a high frequency of infraspinatus atrophy (34%) and significantly reduced shoulder strength of the hitting shoulder. These findings are not associated with demographic factors. Electromyography and NCV measurements suggest a suprascapular nerve involvement caused by repetitive strain injuries of the nerve. External rotation strength measurements and NCV measurements can detect a side-to-side difference early, while EMG may show

  10. Early Stroke Rehabilitation of the Upper Limb Assisted with an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation-Robotic Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qiuyang; Hu, Xiaoling; Lai, Qian; Ng, Stephanie C; Zheng, Yongping; Poon, Waisang

    2017-01-01

    Effective poststroke motor rehabilitation depends on repeated limb practice with voluntary efforts. An electromyography (EMG)-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-robot arm was designed for the multi-joint physical training on the elbow, the wrist, and the fingers. To investigate the training effects of the device-assisted approach on subacute stroke patients and to compare the effects with those achieved by the traditional physical treatments. This study was a pilot randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Subacute stroke participants were randomly assigned into two groups, and then received 20-session upper limb training with the EMG-driven NMES-robotic arm (NMES-robot group, n = 14) or the time-matched traditional therapy (the control, n = 10). For the evaluation of the training effects, clinical assessments including Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Score (MAS), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and Function Independence Measurement (FIM) were conducted before, after the rehabilitation training, and 3 months later. Session-by-session EMG parameters in the NMES-robot group, including normalized co-contraction Indexes (CI) and EMG activation level of target muscles, were used to monitor the progress in muscular coordination patterns. Significant improvements were obtained in FMA (full score and shoulder/elbow), ARAT, and FIM [P  0.279] for both groups. Significant improvement in FMA wrist/hand was only observed in the NMES-robot group (P robot group after the training (P  0.24), and remained at an elevated level when assessed 3 months later. The EMG parameters indicated a release of muscle co-contraction in the muscle pairs of biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis and biceps brachii and triceps brachii, as well as a reduction of muscle activation level in the wrist flexor in the NMES-robot group. The NMES-robot-assisted training was effective for early stroke upper limb rehabilitation and promoted

  11. EMG (Electromyography) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias EMG (Electromyogram) KidsHealth > For Parents > EMG (Electromyogram) Print A ... muscular dystrophy and nerve disorders. How Is an EMG Done? Muscles are stimulated by signals from nerve ...

  12. Repetitive nerve stimulation and single-fiber electromyography in the evaluation of patients with suspected myasthenia gravis or Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome: Review of recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou-Tan, Faye Y; Gilchrist, James M

    2015-09-01

    Our aim in this study was to provide an updated literature review of electrodiagnostic testing in myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. A systematic review of the recent literature was performed using the following key words: myasthenia gravis (MG); Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS); electromyography (EMG); repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS); single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG); nerve conduction study; and normative values. Several articles supported testing of facial, bulbar, and respiratory muscles in the diagnosis of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) disorders, including muscle-specific kinase antibody (MuSK)-seropositive MG. Several articles supported use of concentric needle EMG as an alternative to SFEMG jitter in disorders of neuromuscular transmission. A limited number of articles addressed measurement of area (vs. amplitude) decrement in RNS and decreasing the threshold of post-exercise facilitation. Electrodiagnostic testing continues to be useful for diagnosis of MG and LEMS, although the quality of the evidence is not great. This literature review summarizes RNS and jitter measurement of facial and respiratory muscles and use of concentric needle EMG for SFEMG. © 2015 American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

  13. An investigation into the onset, pattern, and effects of pain relief on lumbar extensor electromyography in people with acute and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan M; Haq, Inam; Lee, Raymond Y

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use an experimental pain relief model to determine the effect of pain relief on lumbar muscle function in people with low back pain. A test-retest design was used with all data collection being completed within a therapy setting. Twenty people with acute and 20 with chronic low back pain were recruited from general practitioner and therapist referrals. Participants completed spinal movements and lifting. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure the pattern of muscle activity, onset of muscle activation, and peak activation of bilateral lumbar multifidus and iliocostalis. Movements were investigated before and after pain relief, through the self-administration of oral analgesia. Electromyography profiles and peak values were reliable across 3 trials, and EMG profiles correlated well with kinematic profiles. Specific EMG profiles were commonly associated with specific kinematic values, and on the whole, the EMG profiles were unaffected by pain relief. Muscle onset times and peak muscle amplitudes were not affected by pain relief in either acute or chronic low back pain. This study showed that the EMG activities from the lumbar region, including lumbar multifidus and iliocostalis, are reliable, and specific EMG profiles are identifiable. Pain relief as achieved in this study did not affect the pattern of EMG activity, onset of muscle activation, or peak activation values. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Psychophysiology of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Nnamdi

    2007-01-01

    This meta-analysis of 58 resting baseline studies, 25 startle studies, 17 standardized trauma cue studies, and 22 idiographic trauma cue studies compared adults with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on psychophysiological variables: facial electromyography (EMG), heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and blood pressure.…

  15. A Longitudinal Electromyography Study of Complex Movements in Poststroke Therapy. 1: Heterogeneous Changes Despite Consistent Improvements in Clinical Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Hesam-Shariati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Poststroke weakness on the more-affected side may arise from reduced corticospinal drive, disuse muscle atrophy, spasticity, and abnormal coordination. This study investigated changes in muscle activation patterns to understand therapy-induced improvements in motor-function in chronic stroke compared to clinical assessments and to identify the effect of motor-function level on muscle activation changes. Electromyography (EMG was recorded from five upper limb muscles on the more-affected side of 24 patients during early and late therapy sessions of an intensive 14-day program of Wii-based Movement Therapy (WMT and for a subset of 13 patients at 6-month follow-up. Patients were classified according to residual voluntary motor capacity with low, moderate, or high motor-function levels. The area under the curve was calculated from EMG amplitude and movement duration. Clinical assessments of upper limb motor-function pre- and post-therapy included the Wolf Motor Function Test, Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Motor Activity Log Quality of Movement scale. Clinical assessments improved over time (p < 0.01 with an effect of motor-function level (p < 0.001. The pattern of EMG change by late therapy was complex and variable, with differences between patients with low compared to moderate or high motor-function levels. The area under the curve (p = 0.028 and peak amplitude (p = 0.043 during Wii-tennis backhand increased for patients with low motor-function, whereas EMG decreased for patients with moderate and high motor-function levels. The reductions included movement duration during Wii-golf (p = 0.048, moderate; p = 0.026, high and Wii-tennis backhand (p = 0.046, moderate; p = 0.023, high and forehand (p = 0.009, high and the area under the curve during Wii-golf (p = 0.018, moderate and Wii-baseball (p = 0.036, moderate. For the pooled data over time, there was an effect of motor-function (p = 0.016 and an

  16. Early Stroke Rehabilitation of the Upper Limb Assisted with an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation-Robotic Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyang Qian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEffective poststroke motor rehabilitation depends on repeated limb practice with voluntary efforts. An electromyography (EMG-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES-robot arm was designed for the multi-joint physical training on the elbow, the wrist, and the fingers.ObjectivesTo investigate the training effects of the device-assisted approach on subacute stroke patients and to compare the effects with those achieved by the traditional physical treatments.MethodThis study was a pilot randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Subacute stroke participants were randomly assigned into two groups, and then received 20-session upper limb training with the EMG-driven NMES-robotic arm (NMES-robot group, n = 14 or the time-matched traditional therapy (the control, n = 10. For the evaluation of the training effects, clinical assessments including Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, Modified Ashworth Score (MAS, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT, and Function Independence Measurement (FIM were conducted before, after the rehabilitation training, and 3 months later. Session-by-session EMG parameters in the NMES-robot group, including normalized co-contraction Indexes (CI and EMG activation level of target muscles, were used to monitor the progress in muscular coordination patterns.ResultsSignificant improvements were obtained in FMA (full score and shoulder/elbow, ARAT, and FIM [P < 0.001, effect sizes (EFs > 0.279] for both groups. Significant improvement in FMA wrist/hand was only observed in the NMES-robot group (P < 0.001, EFs = 0.435 after the treatments. Significant reduction in MAS wrist was observed in the NMES-robot group after the training (P < 0.05, EFs = 0.145 and the effects were maintained for 3 months. MAS scores in the control group were elevated following training (P < 0.05, EFs > 0.24, and remained at an elevated level when assessed 3 months later. The EMG parameters

  17. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Yanjuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electromyography (EMG pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. Methods With five unilateral transradial (TR amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. Results With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9% as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for

  18. Electromyography response of the iliocostalis lumborum muscle during flexion, extension and rotation movements of the trunk in orthostatic and seated position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, A C; Bankoff, A D P

    2003-06-01

    The action of the column extensor muscles has been studied through in the electromyography in various corporal postures. We verified the electromyography responses of the iliocostalis lumborum muscle during various movements and positions. 12 individuals males, sedentary, between 36 and 52 years old (average 46.16), weighing an average of 79.66 kilos, and with an average height of 173.0 cm, all working as drivers were studied. Electromyography with six channels and surface electrodes was used. The electrodes were placed on the right side of the trunk in the direction of the third and fifth lumbar vertebrae ICL2 and ICL1 respectively). In orthostatic position, the flexion movement presented RMS 31.18 (+/- 5.73) in ICL1 and 58.10 (+/- 14.81) in ICL2; in extension the RMS 32.46 (+/- 9.17) in ICL1 and 55.31 (+/- 16.70) in ICL2; in homolateral rotation the RMS 30.05 (+/- 10.60) in ICL1 and 53.29 (+/- 19.70) in ICL2; in heterolateral rotation the RMS 24.76 (+/- 5.99) in ICL1 and 44.79 (+/- 15.26) in ICL2. In seated in a chair without a back, the flexion presented RMS 22.42 (+/- 2.89) in ICL1 and 43.39 (+/- 5.68) in ICL2; in extension the RMS 22.47 (+/- 1.95) in ICL1 and 41.28 (+/- 6.20) in ICL2; in homolateral rotation the RMS 24.10 (+/- 3.97) in ICL1 and 47.94 (+/- 5.80) in ICL2; in heterolateral rotation, the RMS 22.59 (+/- 1.95) in ICL1 and 43.15 (+/- 5.71) in ICL2. In the position seated on the ground, the flexion presented RMS 22.83 (+/- 3.00) in ICL1 and 50.99 (+/- 11.19) in ICL2; in extension the RMS 22.39 (+/- 3.22) in ICL1 and 46.44 (+/- 8.19) in ICL2. The results are expressed in RMS, indicating the participation of the iliocostalis lumborum muscle during the movements undertaken. The place identified as ICL2 presented action potential of greater amplitude than the place identified as ICL1 in all movements and positions.

  19. Measurement of muscle length-related electromyography activity of the hip flexor muscles to determine individual muscle contributions to the hip flexion torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiroumaru, Takumi; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Isaka, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate muscle length-related electromyography (EMG) of the iliopsoas (IL) and other hip flexor muscles to determine individual muscle contributions to the hip flexion torque. Ten healthy sedentary young men participated in the EMG experiment. A subgroup of six subjects underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement to confirm the region of the skin over the IL. Surface EMG signals were sampled from the IL, rectus femoris (RF), sartorius (SA), and tensor fasciae latae (TFL) using an active electrode. The subjects performed maximum voluntary isometric hip flexion with the right hip joint set at -10°, 0°, 30°, and 60°. The root mean square (RMS) value for the TFL at 30° (0.81 ± 0.19, p muscle length changes were significantly correlated in the IL (r =0.39, p muscles.

  20. Development of muscle fatigue as assessed by electromyography and mechanomyography during continuous and intermittent low-force contractions: effects of the feedback mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Jørgensen, Lars Vincents; Søgaard, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the significance of low-force continuous or intermittent static contraction and feedback mode (visual or proprioceptive) on the development of muscle fatigue as assessed by electromyography (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG). Visual (force control...... and MPF values versus time were observed with proprioceptive feedback compared with visual feedback. The findings suggest that (1) th