WorldWideScience

Sample records for electrolyzed water ice

  1. Compact Water Electrolyzer for Low-Gravity Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An improved electrolyzer is needed by NASA for generating propellants in low-gravity environments using water or ice as the reactant. It is desired to minimize the...

  2. USE OF ELECTROLYZED WATER IN ANIMAL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Jirotková

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the possibility to use the properties of electrolyzed water to disinfect breeding halls and to water animals. The aim of the research was to find out whether elektrolyzed water used for desinfication of breedings hall and watering of animals influences selected indicators of the meat quality. Electrolyzed water is produced in a patent-protected device Envirolyte that produces biocide solution using potable water with added NaCl. The technology of production guarantees the product is entirely ecological, biologically fully degradable, non-toxic that can replace traditional chemical agents. Possibilities of disinfection using this solution have been verified directly in stables at the interval of 20, 40, 60 min. after application. Staphylococci and streptococci and enterococci were inactive always after 60 minutes of effect. There was significant decrease in the number of total number of microorganisms. Further, the solution of electrolyzed water was used to water poultry; and the affect on some of the properties of poultry meat, changes in pH, colour and loss of water (dripping in particular, was observed. Testing was carried out under working conditions in two breeding halls at a time and the technology of electrolyzed water to disinfect premises and to water chickens was used in one of the halls. When the chickens were slaughter mature, the poultry was slaughtered at the standard slaughterhouse and samples (127 pieces were taken in order to measure pH, colour and loss of water (dripping. The values of pH, colour and loss of water (dripping ascertained, processed by the T-test did not confirm the hypothesis of the assumed possible differences in occurrence of critical values of these indicators in both groups observed.

  3. Development of device producing electrolyzed water for home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umimoto, K.; Nagata, S.; Yanagida, J.

    2013-06-01

    When water containing ionic substances is electrolyzed, electrolyzed water with strong bactericidal ability due to the available chlorine(AC) is generated on the anode side. Slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water (pH 6.5 to 7.5) is physiological pH and is suitable for biological applications. For producing slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water simply, a vertical-type electrolytic tank with an asymmetric structure was made. As a result, a small amount of strongly alkaline water was generated in the upper cathodic small chamber, and a large amount of weakly acidic water generated in the lower anodic large chamber. The pH and AC concentration in solutin mixed with both electrolyzed water were 6.3 and 39.5 ppm, respectively, This solution was slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water and had strong bactericidal activity. This device is useful for producing slightly acidic to neutral electrolyzed water as a disinfectant to employ at home care, when considering economic and environmental factors, since it returns to ordinary water after use.

  4. Water Management Membrane for Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an improved water management membrane for a static vapor feed electrolyzer that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This improved membrane...

  5. Static Water Vapor Feed Electrolyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an advanced bipolar plate that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This novel bipolar design can...

  6. Universal cell frame for high-pressure water electrolyzer and electrolyzer including the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Edwin W.; Norman, Timothy J.

    2013-01-08

    Universal cell frame generic for use as an anode frame and as a cathode frame in a water electrolyzer. According to one embodiment, the universal cell frame includes a unitary annular member having a central opening. Four trios of transverse openings are provided in the annular member, each trio being spaced apart by about 90 degrees. A plurality of internal radial passageways fluidly interconnect the central opening and each of the transverse openings of two diametrically-opposed trios of openings, the other two trios of openings lacking corresponding radial passageways. Sealing ribs are provided on the top and bottom surfaces of the annular member. The present invention is also directed at a water electrolyzer that includes two such cell frames, one being used as the anode frame and the other being used as the cathode frame, the cathode frame being rotated 90 degrees relative to the anode frame.

  7. BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY OF ELECTROLYZED OXIDIZING WATER ON MEAT AND POULTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Serraino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW has potential application as a residue free sanitizing agent for food of animal origin. Meat and poultry were contaminated with microorganism, pathogens or not, and different types of electrolyzed oxidizing water treatement were investigated to evaluate the activity of each of these method. In detail, this study is aiming at evaluating the effectiveness of EOW in reducing microbial count, including total bacterial count, Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli on meat and poultry. EOW has a very strong disinfectant activity which, along with its easy and safe use, makes a good alternative to many other more widely used disinfectants.

  8. Development of a pressurized bipolar alkaline water electrolyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves Junior, Newton Pimenta; Pinto, Edgar A. de Godoi Rodrigues; Silva, Ennio Peres da; Rapelli, Rubia; Pinto, Cristiano da Silva [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DFA/ IFGW/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada], Email: nevesjr@unicamp.br; Marin Neto, Antonio Jose; Lopes, Daniel Gabriel; Camargo, Joao Carlos; Ferreira, Paulo F.P. [Hydrogen Technology (HyTron), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Furlan, Andre Luis [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DE/FEC/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the actual development status of a bipolar alkaline water electrolyzer with maximum production capacity of 1 m3/h of hydrogen and controlled by a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller), which also interfaces the electrolytic system with operators and other equipment, such as gas storage tanks, fuel cells and photovoltaic panels. The project also includes the construction of an electrolysis test bench to record electrical parameters (cathode, anode, separator and electrolyte potentials), the amount of produced gases and gas quality determined by gas chromatography. (author)

  9. Efficacy of Neutral Electrolyzed Water for Inactivation of Human Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Eric; Montazeri, Naim; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-08-15

    Human norovirus (NoV) is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Persistence on surfaces and resistance to many conventional disinfectants contribute to widespread transmission of norovirus. We examined the efficacy of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW; pH 7) for inactivation of human NoV GII.4 Sydney in suspension (ASTM method 1052-11) and on stainless steel surfaces (ASTM method 1053-11) with and without an additional soil load. The impact of the disinfectant on viral capsid was assessed using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR; with an RNase pretreatment), SDS-PAGE, transmission electron microscopy, and a histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) receptor-binding assay. These studies were done in parallel with those using Tulane virus (TuV), a cultivable human NoV surrogate. Neutral electrolyzed water at 250 ppm free available chlorine produced a 4.8- and 0.4-log 10 reduction in NoV genome copy number after 1 min in suspension and on stainless steel, respectively. Increasing the contact time on surfaces to 5, 10, 15, and 30 min reduced human NoV genomic copies by 0.5, 1.6, 2.4, and 5.0 log 10 and TuV infectious titers by 2.4, 3.0, 3.8, and 4.1 log 10 PFU, respectively. Increased soil load effectively eliminated antiviral efficacy regardless of testing method and virus. Exposure to NEW induced a near complete loss of receptor binding (5 ppm, 30 s), degradation of VP1 major capsid protein (250 ppm, 5 min), and increased virus particle aggregation (150 ppm, 30 min). Neutral electrolyzed water at 250 ppm shows promise as an antinoroviral disinfectant when used on precleaned stainless steel surfaces. IMPORTANCE Norovirus is the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. Transmission occurs by fecal-oral or vomitus-oral routes. The persistence of norovirus on contaminated environmental surfaces exacerbates its spread, as does its resistance to many conventional disinfectants. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the antinoroviral

  10. Eradication of algae in ships' ballast water by electrolyzing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Kun; Sun, Pei-Ting; Xiao, Jing-Kun; Song, Yong-Xin

    2006-12-01

    In order to verify the effectiveness of electrolytic treatment on ships’ ballast water, experiments are carried out by a pilot system in laboratory. The raw seawater and seawater with different concentrations of different algae are simulated as ships’ ballast water. The algae in the raw seawater can be killed if it is treated by electrolysis with an initial residual chlorine concentration of 5 mg/L. If the seawater with one kind of algae (Nitzschia closterum, Dicrateria spp., or Pyramidomonnas sp.105cells/mL) is treated by electrolysis with an initial residual chlorine concentration of 5 mg/L, the alga can be sterilized. If the seawater with one kind of algae (Dunaliella sp., Platymonas or Chlorella spp.) is directly treated by electrolyzing with an initial residual chlorine concentration of 4 mg/L, the instant mortality changes with the concentration of different algae. However, after 72 hours, in all treated samples, there are no live algal cells found.

  11. Effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoo-Shyng Wang Hsu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmentally friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on the chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water (DOW. DOW was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum–plated titanium anode and cathode. The results showed that chlorine concentration reached maximal level in the batch process. Prolonged electrolysis reduced chlorine concentration in the electrolyte and was detrimental to electrolysis efficiency, especially under high electric potential conditions. Therefore, the optimal choice of electrolysis time depends on the electrolyzable chloride in DOW and cell potential adopted for electrolysis. The higher the electric potential, the faster the chlorine level reaches its maximum, but the lower the electric efficiency will be.

  12. Effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Guoo-Shyng Wang; Lu, Yi-Fa; Hsu, Shun-Yao

    2017-10-01

    Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmentally friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on the chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water (DOW). DOW was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum-plated titanium anode and cathode. The results showed that chlorine concentration reached maximal level in the batch process. Prolonged electrolysis reduced chlorine concentration in the electrolyte and was detrimental to electrolysis efficiency, especially under high electric potential conditions. Therefore, the optimal choice of electrolysis time depends on the electrolyzable chloride in DOW and cell potential adopted for electrolysis. The higher the electric potential, the faster the chlorine level reaches its maximum, but the lower the electric efficiency will be. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Effect of electrolyzed water for reduction of foodborne pathogens on lettuce and spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E J; Alexander, E; Taylor, G A; Costa, R; Kang, D H

    2008-08-01

    The ability of electrolyzed water (EW) to inactivate foodborne pathogens on the surfaces of lettuce and spinach was investigated. Lettuce and spinach leaves were inoculated with a cocktail of 3 strains each of Escherichia col O157:H7, Salmnonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes and treated with acidic electrolyzed water (AC-EW), alkaline electrolyzed water (AK-EW), alkaline electrolyzed water followed by acidic electrolyzed water (sequential treatment, AK-EW + AC-EW), deionized water followed by acidic electrolyzed water (sequential treatment, DW + AC-EW), and deionized water (control, DW) for 15, 30 s, and 1, 3, and 5 min at room temperature (22 +/- 2 degrees C). For all 3 pathogens, the same pattern of microbial reduction on lettuce and spinach were apparent. The relative efficacy of reduction was AC-EW > DW + AC-EW approximately = AK-EW + AC-EW > AK-EW > control. After a 3-min treatment of AC-EW, the 3 tested pathogens were reduced below the detection limit (0.7 log). DW + AC-EW and AK-EW + AC-EW produced the same levels of reduction after 5 min when compared to the control. AK-EW did not reduce levels of pathogens even after a 5-min treatment on lettuce and spinach. Results suggest that AC-EW treatment was able to significantly reduce populations of the 3 tested pathogens from the surfaces of lettuce and spinach with increasing time of exposure.

  14. Effect of water electrolysis temperature of hydrogen production system using direct coupling photovoltaic and water electrolyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuhiko Maeda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose control methods of a photovoltaic (PV-water electrolyzer (ELY system that generates hydrogen by controlling the number of ELY cells. The advantage of this direct coupling between PV and ELY is that the power loss of DC/DC converter is avoided. In this study, a total of 15 ELY cells are used. In the previous researches, the electrolyzer temperature was constantly controlled with a thermostat. Actually, the electrolyzer temperature is decided by the balance of the electrolysis loss and the heat loss to the outside. Here, the method to control the number of ELY cells was investigated. Maximum Power Point Tracking efficiency of more than 96% was achieved without ELY temperature control. Furthermore we construct a numerical model taking into account of ELY temperature. Using this model, we performed a numerical simulation of 1-year. Experimental data and the simulation results shows the validity of the proposed control method.

  15. Removal of Foodborne Pathogen Biofilms by Acidic Electrolyzed Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms, which are complex microbial communities embedded in the protective extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, are difficult to remove in food production facilities. In this study, the use of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW to remove foodborne pathogen biofilms was evaluated. We used a green fluorescent protein-tagged Escherichia coli for monitoring the efficiency of AEW for removing biofilms, where under the optimal treatment conditions, the fluorescent signal of cells in the biofilm disappeared rapidly and the population of biofilm cells was reduced by more than 67%. Additionally, AEW triggered EPS disruption, as indicated by the deformation of the carbohydrate C-O-C bond and deformation of the aromatic rings in the amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine. These deformations were identified by EPS chemical analysis and Raman spectroscopic analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images confirmed that the breakup and detachment of biofilm were enhanced after AEW treatment. Further, AEW also eradicated biofilms formed by both Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Gram-positive bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes and was observed to inactivate the detached cells which are a potential source of secondary pollution. This study demonstrates that AEW could be a reliable foodborne pathogen biofilm disrupter and an eco-friendly alternative to sanitizers traditionally used in the food industry.

  16. Thermal performance of a commercial alkaline water electrolyzer: Experimental study and mathematical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieguez, P.M.; Ursua, A.; Sanchis, P.; Sopena, C.; Gandia, L.M. [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales y de Telecomunicacion, Universidad Publica de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, E-31006 Pamplona (Spain); Guelbenzu, E. [Acciona Biocombustibles S.A. Avenida Ciudad de la Innovacion no. 5, E-31621 Sarriguren, Navarra (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    In this paper a study of the thermal performance of a commercial alkaline water electrolyzer (HySTAT from Hydrogenics) designed for a rated hydrogen production of 1 N m{sup 3} H{sub 2}/h at an overall power consumption of 4.90 kW h/N m{sup 3} H{sub 2} is presented. The thermal behaviour of the electrolyzer has been analyzed under different operating conditions with an IR camera and several thermocouples placed on the external surface of the main electrolyzer components. It has been found that the power dissipated as heat can be reduced by 50-67% replacing the commercial electric power supply unit provided together with the electrolyzer by an electronic converter capable of supplying the electrolyzer with a truly constant DC current. A lumped capacitance method has been adopted to mathematically describe the thermal performance of the electrolyzer, resulting in a thermal capacitance of 174 kJ C{sup -1}. The effect of the AC/DC converter characteristics on the power dissipated as heat has been considered. Heat losses to the ambient were governed by natural convection and have been modeled through an overall heat transfer coefficient that has been found to be 4.3 W m{sup -2} C{sup -1}. The model has been implemented using ANSYS {sup registered} V10.0 software code, reasonably describing the performance of the electrolyzer. A significant portion of the energy dissipated as heat allows the electrolyzer operating at temperatures suitable to reduce the cell overvoltages. (author)

  17. Modelling electrolyte conductivity in a water electrolyzer cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael; Kirkegaard, Julius Bier

    2012-01-01

    An analytical model describing the hydrogen gas evolution under natural convection in an electrolyzer cell is developed. Main purpose of the model is to investigate the electrolyte conductivity through the cell under various conditions. Cell conductivity is calculated from a parallel resistor...... for electrolyte conductivity from combinations of pressure, current density and electrolyte width among others....

  18. Effect of Strongly Alkaline Electrolyzed Water on Silk Degumming and the Physical Properties of the Fibroin Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yuan-Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Strongly alkaline electrolyzed water (SAEW) was prepared by electrolysis of tap water in a laboratory-made water electrolyzer. The pH of stored SAEW was stable for more than one month. The hardness of the electrolyzed water was 30% lower and the Na(+) concentration was 18% higher than those of the tap water. Silkworm cocoon shells were boiled in pH 11.50 SAEW at a ratio of 1∶40∼80 (W/V) for 20 min and the sericin layers around the silk fibroin fibers were removed completely. The tensile prope...

  19. Prevention of enzymatic browning of Chinese yam (Dioscorea spp.) using electrolyzed oxidizing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guo-Liang; Shi, Jing-Ying; Song, Zhan-Hua; Li, Fa-De

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) on the prevention of enzymatic browning of fresh-cut "Jiu Jinhuang" Chinese yam were investigated. The yams were immersed in the inhibitors for 25 min at 20 °C. Compared with the tap water (TW) treatment, the chromatic attributes were significantly different after 72 h of storage (P browning inhibitor. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Nakano

    Full Text Available Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9 with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7 without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a fungus (Candida albicans were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound.

  1. Physicochemical and Antibacterial Properties of Carrageenan and Gelatine Hydrosols and Hydrogels Incorporated with Acidic Electrolyzed Water

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Brychcy; Magdalena Malik; Piotr Drożdżewski; Żaneta Król; Andrzej Jarmoluk

    2015-01-01

    The article focuses on investigation of the effects of usage of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW) with different sodium chloride concentration (0.001%, 0.01%, and 0.1%) for the preparation of carrageenan and gelatine hydrosols and hydrogels. To determine physiochemical properties of hydrosols, the pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), available chloride concentration (ACC) and rheological parameters such us gelation and flow temperatures were measured. The samples were also characterized usi...

  2. Physicochemical Properties of Edible Chitosan/Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose/Lysozyme Films Incorporated with Acidic Electrolyzed Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Brychcy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment with acidic electrolyzed water (AEW is a promising disinfection method due to its effectiveness in reducing microbial population. The aim of the study was to evaluate physicochemical properties of chitosan/HPMC films incorporated with lysozyme and acidic electrolyzed water. In the composite films, decreasing film solubility and increasing concentration of sodium chloride solution and prolongation of electrolysis time were observed. Electrolysis process with sodium chloride induces spongy network of film structure. The use of AEW has not changed chemical composition of films which was proved by 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF, and FT-IR spectroscopy. The research confirmed that electrolysis significantly improved thermomechanical properties of the examined films. The contact angle values of the films were quite similar and ranged between 56° and 73°. The increase of salt concentration used in the electrolysis process had an impact on increasing flexibility of samples. Application of electrolyzed water in commonly used food processing systems is possible. Fusion of AEW and biopolymers may provide better integration with coated food product and multidirectional protecting effect.

  3. Physicochemical and Antibacterial Properties of Carrageenan and Gelatine Hydrosols and Hydrogels Incorporated with Acidic Electrolyzed Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Brychcy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on investigation of the effects of usage of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW with different sodium chloride concentration (0.001%, 0.01%, and 0.1% for the preparation of carrageenan and gelatine hydrosols and hydrogels. To determine physiochemical properties of hydrosols, the pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP, available chloride concentration (ACC and rheological parameters such us gelation and flow temperatures were measured. The samples were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT IR and texture profile analysis (TPA. Additionally, the article contains an analysis of antibacterial activity of carrageenan and gelatine hydrosols incorporated with acidic electrolyzed water, against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The FT IR spectra demonstrated that the structure of gelatine and carrageenan are not significantly affected by electrolyzed NaCl solution components. Furthermore, TPA analysis showed that the use of AEW did not cause undesirable changes in hydrogels layer. The microbiological analysis confirmed inhibition of bacterial growth by hydrosols to about 2.10 log reduction. The results showed that the range of reduction of microorganisms depends on the type AEW used. This might be explained by the fact that the lowest pH and the highest ACC values of hydrosols were obtained for samples with the longest period of exposure to electrolysis (10 min and the highest amount of NaCl (0.1% w/v. These results suggest that hydrogels and hydrosols incorporated with AEW may be used for food preservation.

  4. Benefits of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water as a drinking water additive for broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bügener, E; Kump, A Wilms-Schulze; Casteel, M; Klein, G

    2014-09-01

    In the wake of discussion about the use of drugs in food-producing farms, it seems to be more and more important to search for alternatives and supportive measures to improve health. In this field trial, the influence of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water on water quality, drug consumption, mortality, and performance parameters such as BW and feed conversion rate was investigated on 2 broiler farms. At each farm, 3 rearing periods were included in the study. With EO water as the water additive, the total viable cell count and the number of Escherichia coli in drinking water samples were reduced compared with the respective control group. The frequency of treatment days was represented by the number of used daily doses per population and showed lower values in EO-water-treated groups at both farms. Furthermore, the addition of EO water resulted in a lower mortality rate. In terms of analyzed performance parameters, no significant differences were determined. In this study, the use of EO water improved drinking water quality and seemed to reduce the drug use without showing negative effects on performance parameters and mortality rates. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  5. Effectiveness of electrolyzed oxidizing water treatment in removing pesticide residues and its effect on produce quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hang; Huang, Qingguo; Hung, Yen-Con

    2018-01-15

    This study evaluated the effects of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water treatment on the removal of pesticide residues (diazinon, cyprodinil and phosmet) from spinach, snap beans and grapes, and the effect on produce quality. High available chlorine content (ACC) and long treatment time of EO water resulted in high pesticide removals. Up to 59.2, 66.5 and 37.1% of diazinon; 43.8, 50.0 and 31.5% of cyprodinil; 85.7, 73.0 and 49.4% of phosmet; were removed from spinach, snap beans and grapes, respectively, after 15min EO water treatment at 120mg/l ACC. EO water was also more effective than electrolyzed reduced water, bleach, VegWash and DI water on pesticide removal. In addition, no significant colour or texture deterioration were found on produce samples treated with EO water. It was concluded, EO water can be very effective in pesticide residue removal from fresh produce without affecting the produce quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of water hardness on the production and microbicidal efficacy of slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Park, Joong-Hyun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) has been proved as an effective sanitizer against microorganisms attached to foods. However, its physical properties and inactivation efficacy are affected by several factors such as water hardness. Therefore, in this study the effect of water hardness on SAEW properties were studied. Pure cultures of foodborne bacteria were used in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the inactivation efficacy of the SAEWs produced. Results obtained showed water hardness to be an important factor in the production of SAEW. Low water hardness may result in the necessity of further optimization of production process. In this study the addition of 5% HCl and 2 M NaCl at 1.5 mL/min flow rate was found to be the best electrolyte concentration for the optimization of SAEW production from low hardness water (34 ± 2 mg/L). Furthermore, the results showed that pre-heating was a better approach compared to post-production heating of SAEW, resulting in higher ACC values and therefor better sanitization efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Compact Water Electrolyzer for Low-Gravity Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA uses a number of water electrolysis units for generating oxygen and hydrogen gas for space applications. These missions range from generating propellants to...

  8. Electrolyzed-water generator 'SaniBoy'; Eisei jokinsuik kyokyu sochi 'SaniBoy'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, M.; Kakiuchi, H.; Muto, K. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-10

    In the food industry, injuries due to food poisoning have been increasing. Especially the mass outbreak of food poisoning by Escherichia coli such as O-157 in 1996 gave warning on the importance of food sanitation management. Public efforts such as the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system have been made to prevent food poisoning. Recently, disinfection made by electrolyzing water with some salt added has attracted attention. Fuji Electric has developed the generator 'SaniBoy' that produces weak alkaline electrolyzed water without wasting water. The environment-friendly 'SaniBoy' will contribute to sanitation in various fields. (author)

  9. Effectiveness of low concentration electrolyzed water to inactivate foodborne pathogens under different environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S M E; Ding, Tian; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2010-05-15

    Strong acid electrolyzed water (SAEW) has a very limited application due to its low pH value (4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 9.0) and temperatures (4, 15, 23, 35 and 50 degrees C) were determined. Reductions of bacterial populations of 1.7 to 6.6 log(10) CFU/mL in various treated conditions in cell suspensions were observed after treatment with LcEW and SAEW, compared to the untreated control. Dip washing (1 min at 35 degrees C) of lettuce leaves in both electrolyzed water resulted in 2.5 to 4.0 log(10) CFU/g compared to the unwashed control. Strong inactivation effects were observed in LcEW, and no significant difference (p>0.05) was observed between LcEW and SAEW. The effective form of chlorine compounds in LcEW was almost exclusively hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which has strong antimicrobial activity and leaves no residuals due to the low concentration of residual chlorine. Thus, LcEW could be widely applied as a new sanitizer in the food industry. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water treatment on the reduction of nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jianxiong; Li, Huiying; Wan, Yangfang; Liu, Haijie

    2015-03-01

    Leafy vegetables are the major source of nitrite intake in the human diet, and technological processing to control nitrite levels in harvested vegetables is necessary. In the current work, the effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) on the nitrite and nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage was studied. EOW treatment, including slightly acidic electrolyzed water and acidic electrolyzed water, was found to effectively reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach during storage; levels in the late period were 30 to 40% lower than that of the control. However, the nitrate levels in fresh spinach during storage were not influenced by EOW treatment. The reduction of nitrite levels in EOW-treated fresh spinach during storage can be attributed to the inactivation of nitrate reductase directly and to the reduction of bacterial populations. Our results suggest that treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water may be a better choice to control nitrite levels in fresh vegetables during storage. This study provided a useful method to reduce nitrite levels in fresh spinach.

  11. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  12. Effects of electrolyzed oxidizing water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengchu; Duan, Jingyun; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2006-02-15

    The effects of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces were studied. Chips (5 x 5 cm(2)) of stainless steel sheet (SS), ceramic tile (CT), and floor tile (FT) with and without crabmeat residue on the surface were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and soaked in tap or EO water for 5 min. Viable cells of L. monocytogenes were detected on all chip surfaces with or without crabmeat residue after being held at room temperature for 1 h. Soaking contaminated chips in tap water resulted in small-degree reductions of the organism (0.40-0.66 log cfu/chip on clean surfaces and 0.78-1.33 log cfu/chip on dirty surfaces). Treatments of EO water significantly (peffectiveness of EO water on inactivating Listeria cells. However, treatments of EO water also resulted in significant reductions of L. monocytogenes on dirty surfaces (2.33 log on SS and CT and 1.52 log on FT) when compared with tap water treatments. The antimicrobial activity of EO water was positively correlated with its chlorine content. High oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of EO water also contributed significantly to its antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes. EO water was more effective than chlorine water on inactivating L. monocytogenes on surfaces and could be used as a chlorine alternative for sanitation purpose. Application of EO water following a thorough cleaning process could greatly reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in seafood processing environments.

  13. Effect of Strongly Alkaline Electrolyzed Water on Silk Degumming and the Physical Properties of the Fibroin Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yuan-Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Strongly alkaline electrolyzed water (SAEW) was prepared by electrolysis of tap water in a laboratory-made water electrolyzer. The pH of stored SAEW was stable for more than one month. The hardness of the electrolyzed water was 30% lower and the Na(+) concentration was 18% higher than those of the tap water. Silkworm cocoon shells were boiled in pH 11.50 SAEW at a ratio of 1∶40∼80 (W/V) for 20 min and the sericin layers around the silk fibroin fibers were removed completely. The tensile properties and thermal decomposition temperature of a single filament of silk fibroin obtained by the SAEW method were almost the same as those for the fiber obtained by the neutral soap, and much higher than those for the fiber obtained by Na2CO3 degumming. The results demonstrate that SAEW is an environmentally friendly and pollution-free silk degumming agent that allows highly efficient, low cost recovery of sericin.

  14. Effect of Strongly Alkaline Electrolyzed Water on Silk Degumming and the Physical Properties of the Fibroin Fiber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Cao

    Full Text Available Strongly alkaline electrolyzed water (SAEW was prepared by electrolysis of tap water in a laboratory-made water electrolyzer. The pH of stored SAEW was stable for more than one month. The hardness of the electrolyzed water was 30% lower and the Na(+ concentration was 18% higher than those of the tap water. Silkworm cocoon shells were boiled in pH 11.50 SAEW at a ratio of 1∶40∼80 (W/V for 20 min and the sericin layers around the silk fibroin fibers were removed completely. The tensile properties and thermal decomposition temperature of a single filament of silk fibroin obtained by the SAEW method were almost the same as those for the fiber obtained by the neutral soap, and much higher than those for the fiber obtained by Na2CO3 degumming. The results demonstrate that SAEW is an environmentally friendly and pollution-free silk degumming agent that allows highly efficient, low cost recovery of sericin.

  15. EFFECTIVENESS OF ELECTROLYZED OXIDIZING WATER FOR INACTIVATING Listeria monocytogenes IN LETTUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casadiego Laíd Paola

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO water for the inactivation of L. monocytogenes in suspension and when inoculated on lettuce leaves was evaluated. An electrolytic cell for the production of EO water was built and a solution of 5% NaCl was used. The EO water produced had a residual chlorine concentration of 29 parts per million (ppm and pH 2.83. Ten strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from processed chicken (109 CFU/ml were inoculated into 9 ml of EO water or 9 ml of deionized water (control and incubated at 15°C for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. The surviving population of each strain was determined on Columbia agar. An exposure time of 5 min reduced the populations by approximately 6.6 log CFU/ml. The most resistant strains to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl were selected and used in a strain mixture (9.56 log CFU/ml, 109UFC/ml approximately for the inoculation of 35 lettuce samples, by the dip inoculation method using distilled water as control. The population mean of L. monocytogenes after treatment with EO water and distilled water was reduced by 3.92 and 2.46 log CFU/ml respectively (p=0.00001. EO water and 6% acetic acid (vinegar were combined to improve the EO water effect on L. monocytogenes inoculated in lettuce; the effectiveness of this combination was examined. The results showed that there was a synergistic effect of both antimicrobial agents (population reduction by 5.49 log CFU/ml approximately on the viability of L. monocytogenes cells.

  16. Application of slightly acidic electrolyzed water for inactivating microbes in a layer breeding house.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, X X; Li, B M; Wang, C Y; Zhang, Q; Cao, W

    2013-10-01

    Lots of microorganisms exist in layer houses can cause bird diseases and worker health concerns. Spraying chemical disinfectants is an effective way to decontaminate pathogenic microorganisms in the air and on surfaces in poultry houses. Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW, pH 5.0-6.5) is an ideal, environmentally friendly broad-spectrum disinfectant to prevent and control bacterial or viral infection in layer farms. The purpose of this work was to investigate the cleaning effectiveness of SAEW for inactivating the microbes in layer houses. The effect of SAEW was evaluated by solid materials and surface disinfection in a hen house. Results indicate that SAEW with an available chlorine concentration of 250 mg/L, pH value of 6.19, and oxygen reduction potential of 974 mV inactivated 100% of bacteria and fungi in solid materials (dusts, feces, feather, and feed), which is more efficient than common chemical disinfectant such as benzalkonium chloride solution (1:1,000 vol/vol) and povidone-iodine solution (1:1,000 vol/vol). Also, it significantly reduced the microbes on the equipment or facility surfaces (P water pipe surfaces. Moreover, SAEW effectively decreased the survival rates of Salmonella and Escherichia coli by 21 and 16 percentage points. In addition, spraying the target with tap water before disinfection plays an important role in spray disinfection.

  17. Effects of slightly acidic low concentration electrolyzed water on microbiological, physicochemical, and sensory quality of fresh chicken breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S M E; Park, Jiyong; Song, Kyung Bin; Al-Harbi, Naif A; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Anticmicrobial effect of slightly acidic low concentration electrolyzed water (SlALcEW) and strong acidic electrolyzed water (StAEW) on fresh chicken breast meat was evaluated in this study. Meat samples each of 10 ± 0.2 g in weight and 2.5 × 2.5 cm² in size were experimentally inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 19115) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ATCC 14028) and subjected to dipping treatment (22 ± 2 °C for 10 min) with SlALcEW and StAEW. Shelf-life study was conducted for inoculated and noninoculated meat samples treated with SlALcEW and StAEW at storage temperatures of 5, 15, and 25 °C. Dipping treatment with electrolyzed water significantly (P 0.05) between the SlALcEW and StAEW treatments efficacy. Comparing treated samples to untreated controls showed that SlALcEW and StAEW treatments extended the shelf life of chicken meat at different temperatures with marginal changes of sensory quality. Although SlALcEW and StAEW treatments showed similar antimicrobial effects but SlALcEW was more beneficial in practical application for its semineutral pH and low chlorine content. Food safety issues have led to development of new sanitizers to eliminate spoilage and pathogenic organisms in food. This study provides the foundation for further application of slightly acidic low concentration electrolyzed water (SlALcEW) as a sanitizing agent in meat industry. SlALcEW can be produced on site on demand and no chemicals are necessary except NaCl solution. It does not leave any residue in food due to low chlorine concentration and it is safe to handle for its semineutral pH. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Control of spoiler Pseudomonas spp. on fresh cut vegetables by neutral electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Loris; Ippolito, Antonio; Baruzzi, Federico

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) against 14 strains of spoilage Pseudomonas of fresh cut vegetables under cold storage. The NEW, produced from solutions of potassium and sodium chloride, and sodium bicarbonate developed up to 4000 mg/L of free chlorine, depending on the salt and relative concentration used. The antimicrobial effect of the NEW was evaluated against different bacterial strains at 10(5) cells/ml, with different combinations of free chlorine concentration/contact time; all concentrations above 100 mg/L, regardless of the salt used, were found to be bactericidal already after 2 min. When catalogna chicory and lettuce leaves were dipped for 5 min in diluted NEW, microbial loads of mesophilic bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae were reduced on average of 1.7 log cfu/g. In addition, when lettuce leaves were dipped in a cellular suspension of the spoiler Pseudomonas chicorii I3C strain, diluted NEW was able to reduce Pseudomonas population of about 1.0 log cfu/g. Thanks to its high antimicrobial activity against spoilage microorganisms, and low cost of operation, the application of cycles of electrolysis to the washing water looks as an effective tool in controlling fresh cut vegetable microbial spoilage contamination occurring during washing steps. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detoxification of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Maize by Neutral Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jardon-Xicotencatl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins, a group of extremely toxic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius, can occur as natural contaminants of certain agricultural commodities, particularly maize. These toxins have been shown to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic and cause severe human and animal diseases. The effectiveness of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW on aflatoxin detoxification was investigated in HepG2 cells using several validation methodologies such as the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the induction of lipid peroxidation, the oxidative damage by means of glutathione modulation, the Ames test and the alkaline Comet assay. Our results showed that, after the aflatoxin-contaminated maize containing 360 ng/g was soaked in NEW (60 mg/L available chlorine, pH 7.01 during 15 min at room temperature, the aflatoxin content did not decrease as confirmed by the immunoaffinity column and ultra performance liquid chromatography methods. Aflatoxin fluorescence strength of detoxified samples was similar to untreated samples. However, aflatoxin-associated cytotoxicity and OPEN ACCESS Toxins 2015, 7 4295 genotoxicity effects were markedly reduced upon treatment. According to these results, NEW can be effectively used to detoxify aflatoxin-contaminated maize.

  20. Fumaric Acid and Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water Inactivate Gram Positive and Gram Negative Foodborne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Sanitizing effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and fumaric acid (FA) at different dipping temperatures (25–60 °C), times (1–5 min), and concentrations (5–30 ppm for SAEW and 0.125%–0.5% for FA) on pure cultures of two Gram positive pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and two Gram negative pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) was evaluated. FA (0.25%) showed the strongest sanitizing effect, demonstrating complete inactivation of EC, ST, and LM, while SA was reduced by 3.95–5.76 log CFU/mL at 25–60 °C, respectively, after 1 min of treatment. For SAEW, the complete inactivation was obtained when available chlorine concentration was increased to 20 ppm at 40 °C for 3 and 5 min. Moreover, Gram positive pathogens have been shown to resist to all treatment trends more than Gram negative pathogens throughout this experiment. Regardless of the different dipping temperatures, concentrations, and times, FA treatment was more effective than treatment with SAEW for reduction of foodborne pathogens. This study demonstrated that application of FA in food systems may be useful as a method for inactivation of foodborne pathogens. PMID:27682077

  1. Detoxification of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Maize by Neutral Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardon-Xicotencatl, Samantha; Díaz-Torres, Roberto; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Méndez-Albores, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins, a group of extremely toxic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius, can occur as natural contaminants of certain agricultural commodities, particularly maize. These toxins have been shown to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic and cause severe human and animal diseases. The effectiveness of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW) on aflatoxin detoxification was investigated in HepG2 cells using several validation methodologies such as the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the induction of lipid peroxidation, the oxidative damage by means of glutathione modulation, the Ames test and the alkaline Comet assay. Our results showed that, after the aflatoxin-contaminated maize containing 360 ng/g was soaked in NEW (60 mg/L available chlorine, pH 7.01) during 15 min at room temperature, the aflatoxin content did not decrease as confirmed by the immunoaffinity column and ultra performance liquid chromatography methods. Aflatoxin fluorescence strength of detoxified samples was similar to untreated samples. However, aflatoxin-associated cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects were markedly reduced upon treatment. According to these results, NEW can be effectively used to detoxify aflatoxin-contaminated maize. PMID:26512692

  2. The use of ultrasound and slightly acidic electrolyzed water as alternative technologies in the meat industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores, D. R. M.,

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of meat from different animal species is defined by chemical, physical sensory and microbiological characteristics, which can be influenced by procedures during the slaughter of animals. Technologies such as ultrasound (US and slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW are being studied in order to assist in food processing and in developing methods that are economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between US and SAEW in relation to tenderness, microbiology, and oxidation of meat. The meat industry was a pioneer in the use of the ultrasound, which initially aimed to determine the layer of fat on carcasses and subsequently improve the tenderness of the meat. Recently studies mention that the ultrasound and SAEW can influence the microbiological parameters. The combination of both technologies should also be considered, with the possibility of enhancing the antimicrobial effects. However, there is little information regarding oxidative parameters promoted in meat for these two alternative technologies, where the individual or when interspersed use. Knowing the actions and consequences of ultrasound and SAEW in meat will enable the opening of new perspectives about the application of these technologies in the meat industry.

  3. Advanced Passive Liquid Feed PEM Electrolyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolyzers have undergone continuous development for the generation of oxygen and hydrogen for commercial, military and space...

  4. Slightly acidic electrolyzed water combined with chemical and physical treatments to decontaminate bacteria on fresh fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Khan, Imran; Ngnitcho Kounkeu, Paul-François; Momna, Rubab; Hussain, Mohammad Shakhawat; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2017-10-01

    Effect of sequential combination of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) with chemical and physical treatments on bacterial decontamination on fruits was investigated in this study. Effect of treatments on microbial and sensory quality was also analyzed after subsequent storage at 4 °C and room temperature (RT, 23 ± 0.15 °C). Whole apple and tomato fruits were inoculated with cocktail strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. Uninoculated and inoculated fruits were washed first with distilled water (DW), calcium oxide (CaO), fumaric acid (FA), and SAEW at RT for 3 min. Combinations were performed by adding treatment one at a time to SAEW as following FA + SAEW, CaO + FA + SAEW, and CaO + FA + SAEW + ultrasonication (US) or microbubbles (MB). All the sanitizer treatments resulted in significant (p < 0.05) bacterial reduction compared to DW used as control. Increasing the treatments in combination from FA + SAEW to CaO + FA + SAEW + US resulted in an increased bacterial decontamination. The cavitation induced by ultrasonication in FA + SAEW solution resulted in a higher additive effect in decontamination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes compare to the agitation generated by microbubble generator in FA + SAEW solution. CaO + FA + SAEW and CaO + FA + SAEW + US were effective in improving the microbial safety and quality of apple fruits. However, additional treatment of US impacted on the quality of tomato fruits during storage at RT. Therefore, a combination of SAEW with sanitizers (CaO and FA) and mechanical force (Ultrasonication) has the potential to be used in postharvest sanitation processing in the fresh fruit industry. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Effectiveness of Neutral Electrolyzed Water on Incidence of Fungal Rot on Tomato Fruits ( Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-López, Alfonso; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) on the incidence of rot on tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruits inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum , Galactomyces geotrichum , and Alternaria sp. at sites with lesions. The inoculated fruits were treated with NEW at 10, 30, and 60 mg liter(-1) active chlorine, with copper oxychloride fungicide, and with sterile distilled water (control) for 3, 5, and 10 min. In the experiment with F. oxysporum , 50 to 80% of the control fruits and 50 to 60% of the fruits treated with the fungicide exhibited symptoms of rot at the inoculated sites. The lowest incidence recorded was 30% for fruits treated with NEW at 60 mg liter(-1) active chlorine with an immersion time of 5 min. In the experiment with G. geotrichum , incidence of rot on control fruits was 70 to 90%, and for treatment with fungicide rot incidence was 50 to 90%. NEW at 60 mg liter(-1) active chlorine significantly reduced incidence of symptomatic fruit: only 30% of the inoculated fruits washed for 5 min had damage from rot. In the experiment with Alternaria sp., 60 to 90% of the fruits in the control group and 60 to 70% of the fruits in the fungicide group were symptomatic. The lowest incidence was recorded for the treatment in which the fruits were submerged in NEW with 60 mg liter(-1) active chlorine for 3 min. In this group, 40 to 50% of the fruits exhibited symptoms of rot. These results were obtained 8 days after inoculation. NEW, with 60 mg liter(-1) active chlorine, significantly reduced incidence of rot symptoms on fruits inoculated with one of the experimental fungi relative to the control (P ≤ 0.05). NEW at 60 mg liter(-1) is effective in the control of fungal rot in tomatoes.

  6. Presence of hydrogen peroxide, a source of hydroxyl radicals, in acid electrolyzed water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mokudai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acid electrolyzed water (AEW, which is produced through the electrolysis of dilute sodium chloride (NaCl or potassium chloride solution, is used as a disinfectant in various fields because of its potent antimicrobial activity. The hydroxyl radical, an oxygen radical species, is often suggested as a putative active ingredient for AEW antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the present study is to detect hydroxyl radicals in AEW. The hydroxyl radicals in AEW prepared under different conditions were determined using an electron spin resonance (ESR technique. A signal from 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO-OH, an adduct of DMPO and the hydroxyl radical, was detected in AEW prepared by double or triple electrolyses of 1% NaCl but not of 0.1% NaCl solution. Then the presence of hydrogen peroxide as a proposed source of hydroxyl radicals was examined using a combination of ESR and a Fenton reaction. The DMPO-OH signal was clearly detected, even in AEW prepared by single electrolysis of 0.1% NaCl solution, when ferrous sulfate was added to induce a Fenton reaction, indicating the presence of hydrogen peroxide in the AEW. Since sodium formate, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, did not affect the bactericidal activity of AEW, it is concluded that the radical is unlikely to contribute to the antimicrobial activity of AEW, although a small amount of the radical is produced from hydrogen peroxide. Dimethyl sulfoxide, the other hydroxyl radical scavenger used in the present study, canceled the bactericidal activity of AEW, accompanied by complete depletion of free available chlorine, suggesting that hypochlorous acid is probably a major contributor to the antimicrobial activity. CONCLUSIONS: It is strongly suggested that although hydrogen peroxide is present in AEW as a source of hydroxyl radicals, the antimicrobial activity of AEW does not depend on these radicals.

  7. Gas/Water and Heat Management of PEM-Based Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Systems for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Ye, Fang; Guo, Hang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells were successfully utilized in the field of space applications to provide electric energy and potable water in human-rated space mission since the 1960s. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) based fuel cells, which provide high power/energy densities, were reconsidered as a promising space power equipment for future space exploration. PEM-based water electrolyzers were employed to provide life support for crews or as major components of regenerative fuel cells for energy storage. Gas/water and heat are some of the key challenges in PEM-based fuel cells and electrolytic cells, especially when applied to space scenarios. In the past decades, efforts related to gas/water and thermal control have been reported to effectively improve cell performance, stability lifespan, and reduce mass, volume and costs of those space cell systems. This study aimed to present a primary review of research on gas/water and waste thermal management for PEM-based electrochemical cell systems applied to future space explorations. In the fuel cell system, technologies related to reactant supplement, gas humidification, water removal and active/passive water separation were summarized in detail. Experimental studies were discussed to provide a direct understanding of the effect of the gas-liquid two-phase flow on product removal and mass transfer for PEM-based fuel cell operating in a short-term microgravity environment. In the electrolyzer system, several active and static passive phaseseparation methods based on diverse water supplement approaches were discussed. A summary of two advanced passive thermal management approaches, which are available for various sizes of space cell stacks, was specifically provided

  8. Benefits of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water as a drinking water additive for broiler chickens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bügener, E; Kump, A. Wilms-Schulze; Casteel, M; Klein, G

    2014-01-01

    .... At each farm, 3 rearing periods were included in the study. With EO water as the water additive, the total viable cell count and the number of Escherichia coli in drinking water samples were reduced compared with the respective control group...

  9. Viability of sublethally injured coliform bacteria on fresh-cut cabbage stored in high CO2atmospheres following rinsing with electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hidemi; Inoue, Ayano

    2018-02-02

    The extent of sublethally injured coliform bacteria on shredded cabbage, either rinsed or not rinsed with electrolyzed water, was evaluated during storage in air and high CO 2 controlled atmospheres (5%, 10%, and 15%) at 5°C and 10°C using the thin agar layer (TAL) method. Sublethally injured coliform bacteria on nonrinsed shredded cabbage were either absent or they were injured at a 64-65% level when present. Rinsing of shredded cabbage with electrolyzed water containing 25ppm available chlorine reduced the coliform counts by 0.4 to 1.1 log and caused sublethal injury ranging from 42 to 77%. Pantoea ananatis was one of the species injured by chlorine stress. When shredded cabbage, nonrinsed or rinsed with electrolyzed water, was stored in air and high CO 2 atmospheres at 5°C for 7days and 10°C for 5days, coliform counts on TAL plates increased from 3.3-4.5 to 6.5-9.0 log CFU/g during storage, with the increase being greater at 10°C than at 5°C. High CO 2 of 10% and 15% reduced the bacterial growth on shredded cabbage during storage at 5°C. Although injured coliform bacteria were not found on nonrinsed shredded cabbage on the initial day, injured coliforms at a range of 49-84% were detected on samples stored in air and high CO 2 atmospheres at 5°C and 10°C. Injured cells were detected more frequently during storage at both temperatures irrespective of the CO 2 atmosphere when shredded cabbage was rinsed with electrolyzed water. These results indicated that injured coliform bacteria on shredded cabbage, either rinsed or not rinsed with electrolyzed water, exhibited different degrees of injury during storage regardless of the CO 2 atmosphere and temperature tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Differences in the binding of human norovirus to and from romaine lettuce and raspberries by water and electrolyzed waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Yang, David; Mandrell, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Food contamination by human norovirus (hNoV) is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease. We evaluated the effectiveness of removing inoculated hNoV from the surfaces of raspberries and romaine lettuce by a simple wash in tap water and in different forms of electrolyzed water (EW), including acidic EW (AEW), neutral EW (NEW), and basic EW (BEW). A simple rinsing or soaking in water was able to remove >95% of hNoV from surface-inoculated raspberries. In contrast, only 75% of hNoV was removed from surface-inoculated romaine lettuce by rinsing in tap water. An AEW wash enhanced the binding of hNoV to raspberries and lettuce. Only 7.5% (±10%) and 4% (±3.1%) of hNoV were removed by AEW wash from surface-inoculated raspberries and lettuce, respectively. When raspberries and lettuce were prewashed with NEW or BEW prior to surface inoculation, an AEW wash likewise resulted in significantly less removal of hNoV compared with untreated samples. A prewash with AEW significantly decreased the removal of hNoV from raspberries and lettuce when they were washed with NEW, from 90.6 to 51% and from 76 to 51.3% , respectively. There are minimal or no improvements gained by use of any of the EWs instead of a regular tap water wash in removal of hNoV from produce. However, use of AEW shows a significant decrease in the removal of hNoV from contaminated produce compared with other water rinses. The ability to remove hNoV from different types of produce varies, possibly due to differences among types of ligand-like molecules that bind hNoV. The distribution of hNoV on raspberries and lettuce was studied using recombinant Norwalk-like particles (rNVLP). By immunofluorescence microscopy, we were able to observe binding of rNVLP only to vein areas of romaine lettuce, suggesting that the virus was binding to specific molecules in these areas. Random binding of rNVLP occurred only with raspberries prewashed with AEW or washed with AEW.

  11. Effects of Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water on Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus Spores in Suspension and on Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunling; Li, Baoming; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh; Hung, Yen-Con

    2016-01-01

    Spores of some Bacillus species are responsible for food spoilage and foodborne disease. These spores are highly resistant to various interventions and cooking processes. In this study, the sporicidal efficacy of acidic electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water (AEW) and slightly acidic EO water (SAEW) with available chlorine concentration (ACC) of 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 mg/L and treatment time for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 min were tested on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus spores in suspension and on carrier with or without organics. The reduction of spore significantly increased with increasing ACC and treatment time (P 6 log reductions of B. subtilis spore. Both types of EO water with ACC of 60 mg/L and 6 min treatment achieved a reduction of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores to nondetectable level. EO water with ACC of 80 mg/L and treatment time of 3 min on carrier test without organics addition resulted in reductions of B. subtilis spore to nondetectable level. But, addition of 0.3% organics on carrier decreased the inactivation effect of EO water. This study indicated that EO water was highly effective in inactivation of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores in suspension or on carrier, and therefore, rendered it as a promising disinfectant to be applied in food industry. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Reduction of bacteria on spinach, lettuce, and surfaces in food service areas using neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guentzel, Jane L; Liang Lam, Kang; Callan, Michael A; Emmons, Stuart A; Dunham, Valgene L

    2008-02-01

    Food safety issues and increases in food borne illnesses have promulgated the development of new sanitation methods to eliminate pathogenic organisms on foods and surfaces in food service areas. Electrolyzed oxidizing water (EO water) shows promise as an environmentally friendly broad spectrum microbial decontamination agent. EO water is generated by the passage of a dilute salt solution ( approximately 1% NaCl) through an electrochemical cell. This electrolytic process converts chloride ions and water molecules into chlorine oxidants (Cl(2), HOCl/ClO(-)). At a near-neutral pH (pH 6.3-6.5), the predominant chemical species is the highly biocidal hypochlorous acid species (HOCl) with the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of the solution ranging from 800 to 900mV. The biocidal activity of near-neutral EO water was evaluated at 25 degrees C using pure cultures of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis. Treatment of these organisms, in pure culture, with EO water at concentrations of 20, 50, 100, and 120ppm total residual chlorine (TRC) and 10min of contact time resulted in 100% inactivation of all five organisms (reduction of 6.1-6.7log(10)CFU/mL). Spray treatment of surfaces in food service areas with EO water containing 278-310ppm TRC (pH 6.38) resulted in a 79-100% reduction of microbial growth. Dip (10min) treatment of spinach at 100 and 120ppm TRC resulted in a 4.0-5.0log(10)CFU/mL reduction of bacterial counts for all organisms tested. Dipping (10min) of lettuce at 100 and 120ppm TRC reduced bacterial counts of E. coli by 0.24-0.25log(10)CFU/mL and reduced all other organisms by 2.43-3.81log(10)CFU/mL.

  13. Amelioration of cardio-renal injury with aging in dahl salt-sensitive rats by H2-enriched electrolyzed water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have revealed the biological effects of H2 in suppressing organ injuries due to acute inflammation and oxidative stress. Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats naturally develop elevated blood pressure (BP) and kidney injury with aging. The present study examined the effect of long-term supplementation of H2 in drinking water on age-related changes. Four-week-old male Dahl SS rats were fed 3 types of water (n = 30 each) for up to 48 weeks: filtered water (FW), water with a high H2 content (492.5 ppb) obtained with water electrolysis (EW), or dehydrogenated EW (DW). Animals were subjected to histological analysis at 16, 24, and 48 weeks. The FW group showed progressive BP elevation and increases in albuminuria and cardiac remodeling during the course of treatment. Histologically, there were significant changes as a function of aging, i.e., glomerular sclerosis with tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the kidney, and increased cardiomyocyte diameter with interstitial fibrosis in the heart at 48 weeks. These changes were related to the enhanced inflammation and oxidative stress in the respective organs. However, there were no striking differences in BP among the groups, despite histological alterations in the EW group being significantly decreased when compared to FW and DW in both organs, with concurrently lower oxidative stress and inflammatory markers at 48 weeks. Conclusion Long-term ad libitum consumption of H2-enriched electrolyzed water can ameliorate the processes of kidney injury and cardiac remodeling with aging in Dahl SS rats by suppressing, at least partly, elevated inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:24289332

  14. Acidic electrolyzed water as a novel transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure reduction of bacterial loads on shelled fresh shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping eDu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW, a novel non-thermal sterilization technology, is widely used in the food industry. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of AEW as a new pressure transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure (AEW-HHP processing on microorganisms inactivation on shelled fresh shrimp. The optimal conditions of AEW-HHP for Vibrio parahaemolyticus inactivation on sterile shelled fresh shrimp were obtained using response surface methodology: NaCl concentration to electrolysis 1.5 g/L, treatment pressure 400 MPa, treatment time 10 min. Under the optimal conditions mentioned above, AEW dramatically enhanced the efficiency of HHP for inactivating V. parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes on artificially contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, and the log reductions were up to 6.08 and 5.71 log10 CFU/g respectively, while the common HHP could only inactivate the two pathogens up to 4.74 and 4.31 log10 CFU/g respectively. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the same phenomenon. For the naturally contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, AEW-HHP could also significantly reduce the micro flora when examined using plate count and PCR-DGGE. There were also no significant changes, histologically, in the muscle tissues of shrimps undergoing the AEW-HHP treatment. In summary, using AEW as a new transmitting medium for HHP processing is an innovative non thermal technology for improving the food safety of shrimp and other aquatic products.

  15. 21 CFR 135.160 - Water ices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water ices. 135.160 Section 135.160 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION FROZEN DESSERTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Desserts § 135.160 Water ices. (a) Description. Water ices are the foods each of which is prepared from the same ingredients and in the same...

  16. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showing structural changes to bacterial cells treated with electrolyzed water and an acidic sanitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Lizanel; Lee, Jaesung; Pascall, Melvin A

    2012-04-01

    The effects of various sanitizers on the viability and cellular injury to structures of Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua were investigated. A food grade organic acidic formulation (pH 2.5) and acidic, neutral, and basic electrolyzed water [AEW (pH 2.7, oxidation reduction potential; ORP: 1100 mV, free available chlorine; FAC: 150 ppm), NEW (pH 6.9, ORP: 840 mV, FAC: 150 ppm), BEW (pH 11.6, ORP: -810 mV)] were used to treat E. coli and L. innocua cells. After 10 min of exposure to the sanitizers, changes to the bacterial numbers and cell structures were evaluated by plate counting and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. It was concluded from the results that the sanitizers reduced the E. coli cells between 2 and 3 log CFU/mL. Except for the BEW treatment, reductions in L. innocua population were greater (>1 log CFU/mL) than that of E. coli for all treatments. Data from the TEM showed that all sanitizers caused changes to the cell envelope and cytoplasm of both organisms. However, smaller changes were observed for L. innocua cells. Decrease in the integrity of the cell envelope and aggregation of the cytoplasmic components appeared to be mainly because of exposure to the sanitizers. The organic acid formulation and AEW were the most effective sanitizers against bacterial cells, indicating that penetration of acidic substances effectively caused the cell inactivation. An understanding of the method in which E-water and an acidic sanitizer cause injury to E. coli and L. innocua would be helpful in selecting an effective chemical agent as a food safety tool. This will allow a scientist to target similar microorganisms such as food borne bacteria with structures that are vulnerable to the sanitizer. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Electrolyzing synthesis of boron-doped graphene quantum dots for fluorescence determination of Fe3+ions in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Wu, Chuanli; Du, Pan; Feng, Xiaowei; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2017-03-01

    This work reports a facile electrolyzing method to synthesize boron-doped graphene quantum dots (BGQDs) and uses the BGQDs as a fluorescent probe to determine Fe 3+ ion levels in water samples. The BGQDs were produced by oxidizing graphite in an aqueous borax solution at pH 7; then, the borate solution was filtered with BGQDs, and the borate was dialyzed from the filtrate, leaving a solution of BGQDs in water. The amount of the B in the BGQDs can be adjusted by changing the concentration of borax used for the electrolyte. The excitation wavelength- and B amount-dependent fluorescence characteristics of BQGDs were studied. The fluorescence intensity of the BGQDs is measurable in real time, and its quenching is very sensitive to the concentration of Fe 3+ ions in the system but not to other possible coexisting metal ions. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of Fe 3+ ions to BGQDs is studied and explained based on electrochemical voltammetry and DFT simulations. The analytical signal, which is defined as F 0 /F, where F 0 and F are the fluorescence intensities of the BGQDs before and after interaction with Fe 3+ ions, respectively, displays a good linear relationship in the Fe 3+ ion concentration range of 0.01-100µm with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 and a limit of detection (LOD) of ~(0.005±0.001) μM. The LOD value is much lower than the water quality standards for Fe 3+ ions (0.3ppm, ~5.36µm) in drinking water suggested by the WHO (World Health Organization) and EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), implying that this method has great potential for applications in real sample assays. For example, the determination of the Fe 3+ ion levels in three water samples (tap water, groundwater, and lake water) gives approximately the same results as those determined by the EPA-recommended AAS (atomic adsorption spectroscopy) method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of acidic electrolyzed water-induced bacterial inhibition and injury in live clam (Venerupis philippinarum) and mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah M; Al-Holy, Murad A; Shiroodi, Setareh Ghorban; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Govindan, Byju N; Al-Alami, Nivin; Sablani, Shyam S; Rasco, Barbara

    2016-08-16

    The effect of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW) on inactivating Escherichia coli O104:H4, Listeria monocytogenes, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Campylobacter jejuni in laboratory contaminated live clam (Venerupis philippinarum) and mussel (Mytilus edulis) was investigated. The initial levels of bacterial contamination were: in clam 4.9 to 5.7log10CFU/g, and in mussel 5.1 to 5.5log10CFU/g. Two types of AEW were used for treatment time intervals of 1 and 2h: strong (SAEW) with an available chlorine concentration (ACC) of 20mg/L, pH=3.1, and an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of 1150mV, and weak (WAEW) at ACC of 10mg/L, pH=3.55 and ORP of 950mV. SAEW and WAEW exhibited significant inhibitory activity against inoculated bacteria in both shellfish species with significant differences compared to saline solutions treatments (1-2% NaCl) and untreated controls (0h). SAEW showed the largest inhibitory activity, the extent of reduction (log10CFU/g) ranged from 1.4-1.7 for E. coli O104:H4; 1.0-1.6 for L. monocytogenes; 1.3-1.6 for A. hydrophila; 1.0-1.5 for V. parahaemolyticus; and 1.5-2.2 for C. jejuni in both types of shellfish. In comparison, significantly (Pmussel, which may help control possible unhygienic practices during production and processing of shellfish without apparent changes in the quality of the shellfish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. THE CHANGES OF CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PORK WHOLE MUSCLE MEAT PRODUCTS WHILE USING THE ELECTROLYZED WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Vinnikova,

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the influence of electrolysed water on yield and organoleptic properties of the pigwhole muscle meat products. The relation of desiccation during the thermal treatment depending on type of binary mixture ofelectrolysed water fractions in brine was established. The changes of organoleptic properties (taste, flavour, color, appearance,sectional view of the exploratory prototypes of the whole muscle meat products were indicated. The practical importance ofthe salt solutions usage based on electrolysed water for producing of gourmet whole muscle meat products was noted. It wasexperimentally proved that the electrolysed water usage for brine allows to increase the product yield from 3.8 to 7.3% incomparison with the control samples. The recommendations according to the usage of binary mixtures of electroactive waterfractions for salt solutions preparation were provided.

  20. Inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on blueberries by electrolyzed water, ultraviolet light, and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chyer; Hung, Yen-Con

    2012-04-01

    Increased interest in blueberries due to their nutritional and health benefits has led to an increase in consumption. However, blueberries are consumed mostly raw or minimally processed and are susceptible to microbial contamination like other type of fresh produce. This study was, therefore, undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of electrostatic spray of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water, UV light, ozone, and a combination of ozone and UV light in killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 on blueberries. A 5-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 were inoculated on the calyx and skin of blueberries and then subjected to the treatments. Electrostatic EO water spray reduced initial populations of E. coli O157:H7 by only 0.13 to 0.24 log CFU/g and 0.88 to 1.10 log CFU/g on calyx and skin of blueberries, respectively. Ozone treatment with 4000 mg/L reduced E. coli O157:H7 by only 0.66 and 0.72 log CFU/g on calyx and skin of blueberries, respectively. UV light at 20 mW/cm² for 10 min was the most promising single technology and achieved 2.14 and greater than 4.05 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7 on the calyx and skin of blueberries, respectively. The combination treatment of 1 min ozone and followed by a 2 min UV achieved more than 1 and 2 log additional reductions on blueberry calyx than UV or ozone alone, respectively. Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses have been associated with consumption of fresh produce. Many methods for removing pathogens as well as minimizing their effect on quality of treated produce have been investigated. UV technology and its combination with ozone used in this study to inactive E. coli O157:H7 on blueberries was found effective. Results from this study may help producers and processors in developing hurdle technologies for the delivery of safer blueberries to consumers. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Structure and dynamics of amorphous water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, D.; Kochavi, E.; Bar-Nun, A.; Owen, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Further insight into the structure and dynamics of amorphous water ice, at low temperatures, was obtained by trapping in it Ar, Ne, H2, and D2. Ballistic water-vapor deposition results in the growth of smooth, approximately 1 x 0.2 micrometer2, ice needles. The amorphous ice seems to exist in at least two separate forms, at T water hexagons in the ice are wide enough to allow the free penetration of H2 and D2 into the ice matrix even in the relatively compact cubic ice, resulting in H2-(D2-) to-ice ratios (by number) as high as 0.63. The larger Ar atoms can penetrate only into the wider channels of amorphous ice, and Ne is an intermediate case. Dynamic percolation behavior explains the emergence of Ar and Ne (but not H2 and D2) for the ice, upon warming, in small and big gas jets. The big jets, each containing approximately 5 x 10(10) atoms, break and propel the ice needles. Dynamic percolation also explains the collapse of the ice matrix under bombardment by Ar , at a pressure exceeding 2.6 dyn cm-2, and the burial of huge amounts of gas inside the collapsed matrix, up to an Ar-to-ice of 3.3 (by number). The experimental results could be relevant to comets, icy satellites, and icy grain mantles in dense interstellar clouds.

  2. Physico-Chemical, Biological and Therapeutic Characteristics of Electrolyzed Reduced Alkaline Water (ERAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Henry

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of alkaline reduced water produced by domestic electrolysis devices was approved in Japan in 1965 by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the cure of gastro-intestinal disorders. Today, these devices are freely available in several countries and can be easily purchased without reserve. The commercial information included with the device recommends the consumption of 1–1.5 L of water per day, not only for gastro-intestinal disorders but also for numerous other illnesses such as diabetes, cancer, inflammation, etc. Academic research in Japan on this subject has been undergoing since 1990 only but has established that the active ingredient is dissolved dihydrogen that eliminates the free radical HO• in vivo. In addition, it was demonstrated that degradation of the electrodes during functioning of the device releases very reactive nanoparticles of platinum, the toxicity of which has not yet been clearly proven. This report recommends alerting health authorities of the uncontrolled availability of these devices used as health products, but which generate drug substances and should therefore be sold according to regulatory requirements.

  3. Experimental provocation of 'ice-cream headache' by ice cubes and ice water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mages, Stephan; Hensel, Ole; Zierz, Antonia Maria; Kraya, Torsten; Zierz, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Background There are various studies on experimentally provoked 'ice-cream headache' or 'headache attributed to ingestion or inhalation of a cold stimulus' (HICS) using different provocation protocols. The aim of this study was to compare two provocation protocols. Methods Ice cubes pressed to the palate and fast ingestion of ice water were used to provoke HICS and clinical features were compared. Results The ice-water stimulus provoked HICS significantly more often than the ice-cube stimulus (9/77 vs. 39/77). Ice-water-provoked HICS had a significantly shorter latency (median 15 s, range 4-97 s vs. median 68 s, range 27-96 s). There was no difference in pain localisation. Character after ice-cube stimulation was predominantly described as pressing and after ice-water stimulation as stabbing. A second HICS followed in 10/39 (26%) of the headaches provoked by ice water. Lacrimation occurred significantly more often in volunteers with than in those without HICS. Discussion HICS provoked by ice water was more frequent, had a shorter latency, different pain character and higher pain intensity than HICS provoked by ice cubes. The finding of two subsequent HICS attacks in the same volunteers supports the notion that two types of HICS exist. Lacrimation during HICS indicates involvement of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex.

  4. Hurdle enhancement of slightly acidic electrolyzed water antimicrobial efficacy on Chinese cabbage, lettuce, sesame leaf and spinach using ultrasonication and water wash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2013-10-01

    Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) is well known as a good sanitizer against foodborne pathogens on fresh vegetables. However, microbial reductions from SAEW treatment are not enough to ensure produce safety. Therefore, it is necessary to improve its antimicrobial efficiency by combining it with other appropriate approaches. This study examined the microbicidal activity of SAEW (pH 5.2-5.5, oxidation reduction potential 500-600 mV, available chlorine concentration 21-22 mg/l) on Chinese cabbage, lettuce, sesame leaf and spinach, four common fresh vegetables in Korea under same laboratory conditions. Subsequently, effects of ultrasonication and water wash to enhance the sanitizing efficacy of SAEW were studied, separately. Finally, an optimized simple and easy approach consisting of simultaneous SAEW treatment with ultrasonication (3 min) followed by water wash (150 rpm, 1 min) was developed (SAEW + US-WW). This newly developed hurdle treatment significantly enhanced the microbial reductions compared to SAEW treatment alone, SAEW treatment with ultrasonication (SAEW + US) and SAEW treatment followed by water wash (SAEW-WW) at room temperature (23 ± 2 °C). Microbial reductions of yeasts and molds, total bacteria count and inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes were in the range of 1.76-2.8 log cfu/g on different samples using the new hurdle approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrocatalysts for oxygen electrodes in fuel cells and water electrolyzers for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jai; Tryk, Donald; Yeager, Ernest

    1989-01-01

    In most instances separate electrocatalysts are needed to promote the reduction of O2 in the fuel cell mode and to generate O2 in the energy storage-water electrolysis mode in aqueous electrochemical systems operating at low and moderate temperatures (T greater than or equal to 200 C). Interesting exceptions are the lead and bismuth ruthenate pyrochlores in alkaline electrolytes. These catalysts on high area carbon supports have high catalytic activity for both O2 reduction and generation (1,2). Rotating ring-disk electrode measurements provide evidence that the O2 reduction proceeds by a parallel four-electron pathway. The ruthenates can also be used as self-supported catalysts to avoid the problems associated with carbon oxidation, but the electrode performance so far achieved in the research at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) is considerably less. At the potentials involved in the anodic mode the ruthenate pyrochlores have substantial equilibrium solubility in concentrated alkaline electrolyte. This results in the loss of catalyst into the bulk solution and a decline in catalytic activity. Furthermore, the hydrogen generation counter electrode may become contaminated with reduction products from the pyrochlores (lead, ruthenium). A possible approach to this problem is to immobilize the pyrochlore catalyst within an ionic-conducting solid polymer, which would replace the fluid electrolyte within the porous gas diffusion O2 electrode. For bulk alkaline electrolyte, an anion-exchange polymer is needed with a transference number close to unity for the Oh(-) ion. Preliminary short-term measurements with lead ruthenates using a commercially available partially-fluorinated anion-exchange membrane as an overlayer on the porous gas-fed electrode indicate lower anodic polarization and virtually unchanged cathodic polarization.

  6. Cold compaction of water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; McKinnon, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrostatic compaction of granulated water ice was measured in laboratory experiments at temperatures 77 K to 120 K. We performed step-wise hydrostatic pressurization tests on 5 samples to maximum pressures P of 150 MPa, using relatively tight (0.18-0.25 mm) and broad (0.25-2.0 mm) starting grain-size distributions. Compaction change of volume is highly nonlinear in P, typical for brittle, granular materials. No time-dependent creep occurred on the lab time scale. Significant residual porosity (???0.10) remains even at highest P. Examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals a random configuration of fractures and broad distribution of grain sizes, again consistent with brittle behavior. Residual porosity appears as smaller, well-supported micropores between ice fragments. Over the interior pressures found in smaller midsize icy satellites and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), substantial porosity can be sustained over solar system history in the absence of significant heating and resultant sintering. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Efficacy of chlorine, acidic electrolyzed water and aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions to decontaminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from lettuce leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, Lindsey A; Burke, Angela; Annous, Bassam A

    2009-06-30

    This study compared the efficacy of chlorine (20-200 ppm), acidic electrolyzed water (50 ppm chlorine, pH 2.6), acidified sodium chlorite (20-200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, Sanova), and aqueous chlorine dioxide (20-200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, TriNova) washes in reducing populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on artificially inoculated lettuce. Fresh-cut leaves of Romaine or Iceberg lettuce were inoculated by immersion in water containing E. coli O157:H7 (8 log CFU/ml) for 5 min and dried in a salad spinner. Leaves (25 g) were then washed for 2 min, immediately or following 24 h of storage at 4 degrees C. The washing treatments containing chlorite ion concentrations of 100 and 200 ppm were the most effective against E. coli O157:H7 populations on Iceberg lettuce, with log reductions as high as 1.25 log CFU/g and 1.05 log CFU/g for TriNova and Sanova wash treatments, respectively. All other wash treatments resulted in population reductions of less than 1 log CFU/g. Chlorine (200 ppm), TriNova, Sanova, and acidic electrolyzed water were all equally effective against E. coli O157:H7 on Romaine, with log reductions of approximately 1 log CFU/g. The 20 ppm chlorine wash was as effective as the deionized water wash in reducing populations of E. coli O157:H7 on Romaine and Iceberg lettuce. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that E. coli O157:H7 that was incorporated into biofilms or located in damage lettuce tissue remained on the lettuce leaf, while individual cells on undamaged leaf surfaces were more likely to be washed away.

  8. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun, E-mail: wangj220@iccas.ac.cn; Song, Yanlin [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  9. Electrolyzer for NASA Lunar Regenerative Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Water electrolyzer stacks are a key component of regenerative fuel cells, designed to replace batteries as a means of storing electric energy on the lunar surface....

  10. Advanced Oxygen Evolution Catalysts for PEM Electrolyzers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions require high efficiency, lightweight, long life, and maintenance-free water electrolyzer technologies to generate oxygen and/or hydrogen for...

  11. Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteway, J A; Komguem, L; Dickinson, C; Cook, C; Illnicki, M; Seabrook, J; Popovici, V; Duck, T J; Davy, R; Taylor, P A; Pathak, J; Fisher, D; Carswell, A I; Daly, M; Hipkin, V; Zent, A P; Hecht, M H; Wood, S E; Tamppari, L K; Renno, N; Moores, J E; Lemmon, M T; Daerden, F; Smith, P H

    2009-07-03

    The light detection and ranging instrument on the Phoenix mission observed water-ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars that were similar to cirrus clouds on Earth. Fall streaks in the cloud structure traced the precipitation of ice crystals toward the ground. Measurements of atmospheric dust indicated that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars was well mixed, up to heights of around 4 kilometers, by the summer daytime turbulence and convection. The water-ice clouds were detected at the top of the PBL and near the ground each night in late summer after the air temperature started decreasing. The interpretation is that water vapor mixed upward by daytime turbulence and convection forms ice crystal clouds at night that precipitate back toward the surface.

  12. Thermodynamics of ice nucleation in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Shui; Xu, Qinzhi; Mi, Jianguo

    2015-01-29

    We present a density functional theory approach to investigate the thermodynamics of ice nucleation in supercooled water. Within the theoretical framework, the free-energy functional is constructed by the direct correlation function of oxygen-oxygen of the equilibrium water, and the function is derived from the reference interaction site model in consideration of the interactions of hydrogen-hydrogen, hydrogen-oxygen, and oxygen-oxygen. The equilibrium properties, including vapor-liquid and liquid-solid phase equilibria, local structure of hexagonal ice crystal, and interfacial structure and tension of water-ice are calculated in advance to examine the basis for the theory. The predicted phase equilibria and the water-ice surface tension are in good agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the critical nucleus radius and free-energy barrier during ice nucleation are predicted. The critical radius is similar to the simulation value, suggesting that the current theoretical approach is suitable in describing the thermodynamic properties of ice crystallization.

  13. Standing Water Depth on Larsen B Ice Shelf, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set addresses why surface melt water lakes on ice shelves and ice sheets are notably influential in triggering ice-shelf break-up and modulating seasonal...

  14. New Approach in Translational Medicine: Effects of Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW on NF-κB/iNOS Pathway in U937 Cell Line under Altered Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Franceschelli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS can exert harmful effects, altering the cellular redox state. Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW produced near the cathode during water electrolysis exhibits high pH, high concentration of dissolved hydrogen and an extremely negative redox potential. Several findings indicate that ERW had the ability of a scavenger free radical, which results from hydrogen molecules with a high reducing ability and may participate in the redox regulation of cellular function. We investigated the effect of ERW on H2O2-induced U937 damage by evaluating the modulation of redox cellular state. Western blotting and spectrophotometrical analysis showed that ERW inhibited oxidative stress by restoring the antioxidant capacity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Consequently, ERW restores the ability of the glutathione reductase to supply the cell of an important endogenous antioxidant, such as GSH, reversing the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on redox balance of U937 cells. Therefore, this means a reduction of cytotoxicity induced by peroxynitrite via a downregulation of the NF-κB/iNOS pathway and could be used as an antioxidant for preventive and therapeutic application. In conclusion, ERW can protect the cellular redox balance, reducing the risk of several diseases with altered cellular homeostasis such as inflammation.

  15. Modeling growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in fresh-cut lettuce treated with neutral electrolyzed water and under modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Izquierdo, Guiomar D; Pérez-Rodríguez, Fernando; López-Gálvez, Francisco; Allende, Ana; Gil, María I; Zurera, Gonzalo

    2014-05-02

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and model the growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in fresh-cut lettuce submitted to a neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) treatment, packaged in passive modified atmosphere and subsequently stored at different temperatures (4, 8, 13, 16°C) for a maximum of 27 days. Results indicated that E. coli O157:H7 was able to grow at 8, 13, and 16°C, and declined at 4°C. However at 8°C, the lag time lasted 19 days, above the typical shelf-life time for this type of products. A secondary model predicting growth rate as a function of temperature was developed based on a square-root function. A comparison with literature data indicated that the growth predicted by the model for E. coli O157:H7 was again lower than those observed with other disinfection treatments or packaging conditions (chlorinated water, untreated product, NEW, etc.). The specific models here developed might be applied to predict growth in products treated with NEW and to improve existing quantitative risk assessments. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Advanced Approaches to Greatly Reduce Hydrogen Gas Crossover Losses in PEM Electrolyzers Operating at High Pressures and Low Current Densities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ElectroChem proposes technology advances in its unique PEM IFF water electrolyzer design to meet the NASA requirement for an electrolyzer that will operate very...

  17. Efficacy of Neutral Electrolyzed Water, Quaternary Ammonium and Lactic Acid-Based Solutions in Controlling Microbial Contamination of Food Cutting Boards Using a Manual Spraying Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah M; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Al-Alami, Nivin; Govindan, Byju N; Shiroodi, Setareh Ghorban; Rasco, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Bactericidal activity of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW), quaternary ammonium (QUAT), and lactic acid-based solutions was investigated using a manual spraying technique against Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus that were inoculated onto the surface of scarred polypropylene and wooden food cutting boards. Antimicrobial activity was also examined when using cutting boards in preparation of raw chopped beef, chicken tenders or salmon fillets. Viable counts of survivors were determined as log10 CFU/100 cm(2) within 0 (untreated control), 1, 3, and 5 min of treatment at ambient temperature. Within the first minute of treatment, NEW and QUAT solutions caused more than 3 log10 bacterial reductions on polypropylene surfaces whereas less than 3 log10 reductions were achieved on wooden surfaces. After 5 min of treatment, more than 5 log10 reductions were achieved for all bacterial strains inoculated onto polypropylene surfaces. Using NEW and QUAT solutions within 5 min reduced Gram-negative bacteria by 4.58 to 4.85 log10 compared to more than 5 log10 reductions in Gram-positive bacteria inoculated onto wooden surfaces. Lactic acid treatment was significantly less effective (P Food Technologists®

  18. Sensitivity of open-water ice growth and ice concentration evolution in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoxu; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2017-09-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice model is applied to investigate to what degree the area-thickness distribution of new ice formed in open water affects the ice and ocean properties. Two sensitivity experiments are performed which modify the horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio of open-water ice growth. The resulting changes in the Arctic sea-ice concentration strongly affect the surface albedo, the ocean heat release to the atmosphere, and the sea-ice production. The changes are further amplified through a positive feedback mechanism among the Arctic sea ice, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and the surface air temperature in the Arctic, as the Fram Strait sea ice import influences the freshwater budget in the North Atlantic Ocean. Anomalies in sea-ice transport lead to changes in sea surface properties of the North Atlantic and the strength of AMOC. For the Southern Ocean, the most pronounced change is a warming along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), owing to the interhemispheric bipolar seasaw linked to AMOC weakening. Another insight of this study lies on the improvement of our climate model. The ocean component FESOM is a newly developed ocean-sea ice model with an unstructured mesh and multi-resolution. We find that the subpolar sea-ice boundary in the Northern Hemisphere can be improved by tuning the process of open-water ice growth, which strongly influences the sea ice concentration in the marginal ice zone, the North Atlantic circulation, salinity and Arctic sea ice volume. Since the distribution of new ice on open water relies on many uncertain parameters and the knowledge of the detailed processes is currently too crude, it is a challenge to implement the processes realistically into models. Based on our sensitivity experiments, we conclude a pronounced uncertainty related to open-water sea ice growth which could significantly affect the climate system sensitivity.

  19. Turbulent heat exchange between water and ice at an evolving ice-water interface

    CERN Document Server

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    We conduct laboratory experiments on the time evolution of an ice layer cooled from below and subjected to a turbulent shear flow of warm water from above. Our study is motivated by observations of warm water intrusion into the ocean cavity under Antarctic ice shelves, accelerating the melting of their basal surfaces. The strength of the applied turbulent shear flow in our experiments is represented in terms of its Reynolds number $\\textit{Re}$, which is varied over the range $2.0\\times10^3 \\le \\textit{Re} \\le 1.0\\times10^4$. Depending on the water temperature, partial transient melting of the ice occurs at the lower end of this range of $\\textit{Re}$ and complete transient melting of the ice occurs at the higher end. Following these episodes of transient melting, the ice reforms at a rate that is independent of $\\textit{Re}$. We fit our experimental measurements of ice thickness and temperature to a one-dimensional model for the evolution of the ice thickness in which the turbulent heat transfer is parameter...

  20. Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a static, cathode-fed, 2000 psi, balanced-pressure Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) based on PEM electrolysis technology. It...

  1. Combined effects of thermosonication and slightly acidic electrolyzed water on the microbial quality and shelf life extension of fresh-cut kale during refrigeration storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of thermosonication combined with slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAcEW) on the shelf life extension of fresh-cut kale during storage at 4 and 7 °C. Each kale (10 ± 0.2 g) was inoculated to contain approximately 6 log CFU/g of Listeria monocytogenes. Each inoculated or uninoculated samples was dip treated at 40 °C for 3 min with deionized water, thermosonication (400 W/L), SAcEW (5 mg/L), sodium chlorite (SC; 100 mg/L), sodium hypochlorite (SH; 100 mg/L), and thermosonication combined with SAcEW, SC, and SH (TS + SAcEW, TS + SC, and TS + SH, respectively). Growths of L. monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms and changes in sensory (overall visual quality, browning, and off-odour) were evaluated. The results show that lag time and specific growth rate of each microorganism were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by treatment and storage temperature. Exceeding the unacceptable counts of spoilage microorganisms did not always result in adverse effects on sensory attributes. This study suggests that TS + SAcEW was the most effective method to prolong the shelf life of kale with an extension of around 4 and 6 days at 4 and 7 °C, respectively, and seems to be a promising method for the shelf life extension of fresh produce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combined Effect of Thermosonication and Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water to Reduce Foodborne Pathogens and Spoilage Microorganisms on Fresh-cut Kale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of individual treatments (thermosonication [TS+DW] and slightly acidic electrolyzed water [SAcEW]) and their combination on reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and spoilage microorganisms (total bacterial counts [TBC], Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp., and yeast and mold counts [YMC]) on fresh-cut kale. For comparison, the antimicrobial efficacies of sodium chlorite (SC; 100 mg/L) and sodium hypochlorite (SH; 100 mg/L) were also evaluated. Each 10 g sample of kale leaves was inoculated to contain approximately 6 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 or L. monocytogenes. Each inoculated or uninoculated samples was then dip treated with deionized water (DW; control), TS+DW, and SAcEW at various treatment conditions (temperature, physicochemical properties, and time) to assess the efficacy of each individual treatment. The efficacy of TS+DW or SAcEW was enhanced at 40 °C for 3 min, with an acoustic energy density of 400 W/L for TS+DW and available chlorine concentration of 5 mg/L for SAcEW. At 40 °C for 3 min, combined treatment of thermosonication 400 W/L and SAcEW 5 mg/L (TS+SAcEW) was more effective in reducing microorganisms compared to the individual treatments (SAcEW, SC, SH, and TS+DW) and combined treatments (TS+SC and TS+SH), which significantly (P 3.24 log CFU/g, respectively. The results suggest that the combined treatment of TS+SAcEW has the potential as a decontamination process in fresh-cut industry. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Water Gas and Ice in Protostellar Envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzl, Markus; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Mottram, Joseph; Visser, Ruud; Kristensen, Lars; Albertsson, Tobias; Walsh, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Infrared-bright protostars form a unique class of sources for which both water gas and ice can be observed. We introduce a Simplified Water Network (SWaN) to model the data and test it against full gas-grain models as well as Herschel-HIFI spectra of a Class 0 protostar. The combined Herschel-HIFI and Spitzer/VLT data on nine sources are then compared and analysed using SWaN, giving typical ice/gas ratios of 1e3 at the core edge and up to 1e7 deeper into the core. A quantification of the oxygen budget reveals that a large fraction of the oxygen is still unidentified.

  4. Eutectic phase in water-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Ziock, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Information and catalytic polymers play an essential role in contemporary cellular life and their emergence must have been crucial during the complex processes that led to the assembly of the first living systems. Polymerization reactions producing these molecules would have had to occur in aqueous...... medium, which is known to disfavor such reactions. Thus, it was proposed early on that these polymerizations had to be supported by particular environments, such as mineral surfaces and eutectic phases in water-ice, which would have led to the concentration of the monomers out of the bulk aqueous medium...... and their condensation. This review presents the work conducted to understand how the eutectic phases in water-ice might have promoted RNA polymerization, thereby presumably contributing to the emergence of the ancient information and catalytic system envisioned by the RNA World hypothesis....

  5. A Stability Study of Alkali Doped PBI Membranes for Alkaline Electrolyzer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Aili, David; Hansen, Martin Kalmar

    2014-01-01

    conductivity was similar to a commercial Zirfon membrane and suitable for a water electrolyzer. Some chemical degradation was seen during the aging period, but the crosslinked and the cured materials were both integral after 176 days of aging. A simplified electrolyzer test cell was operated successfully....

  6. Conditions for Sublimating Water Ice to Supply Ceres' Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, M. E.; Byrne, S.; Schörghofer, N.; Schmidt, B. E.; Hayne, P. O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Sykes, M. V.; Combe, J.-P.; Ermakov, A. I.; Prettyman, T.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-09-01

    We explore the conditions for sublimating water ice on Ceres to explain the observed water vapor output from telescopic observations. We find that while a buried ice table cannot produce enough vapor via sublimation to explain the exosphere, exposed surface ice (given it is exposed at the right time during the Ceres day and year, and at the right location) can.

  7. Growth model of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at various storage temperatures on kale treated by thermosonication combined with slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Wang, Jun; Park, Myeong-Su; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the disinfection efficacy of hurdle treatments (thermosonication plus slightly acidic electrolyzed water [SAcEW]) and to develop a model for describing the effect of storage temperatures (4, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35°C) on the growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on fresh-cut kale treated with or without (control) thermosonication combined with SAcEW. The hurdle treatments of thermosonication plus SAcEW had strong bactericidal effects against E. coli O157:H7 on kale, with approximately 3.3-log reductions. A modified Gompertz model was used to describe growth parameters such as specific growth rate (SGR) and lag time (LT) as a function of storage temperature, with high coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.98). SGR increased and LT declined with rising temperatures in all samples. A significant difference was found between the SGR values obtained from treated and untreated samples. Secondary models were established for SGR and LT to evaluate the effects of storage temperature on the growth kinetics of E. coli O157:H7 in treated and untreated kale. Statistical evaluation was carried out to validate the performance of the developed models, based on the additional experimental data not used for the model development. The validation step indicated that the overall predictions were inside the acceptable prediction zone and had lower standard errors, indicating that this new growth model can be used to assess the risk of E. coli O157:H7 contamination on kale.

  8. Evaluation of North Water spring ice cover from satellite photographs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aber, P.G; Vowinckel, E

    1971-01-01

    Satellite photographs for two years (March-September) have been used to study ice cover in the polynya called "North Water", and to determine whether reliable ice maps can be made from satellite data without computer analysis...

  9. Reduction of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes with electrolyzed oxidizing water on inoculated hass avocados (Persea americana var. Hass).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Garcia, O; González-Romero, V M; Fernández-Escartín, E

    2011-09-01

    This study was intended to evaluate the bactericidal effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) and chlorinated water on populations of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on avocados (Persea americana var. Hass). In the first experiment, inoculated avocados were treated with a water wash applied by spraying tap water containing 1 mg/liter free chlorine for 15 s (WW); WW treatment and then spraying sodium hypochlorite in water containing 75 mg/liter free chlorine for 15 s (Cl75); WW treatment and then spraying alkaline EOW for 30 s (AkEW) and then spraying acid EOW (AcEW) for 15 s; and spraying AkEW and then AcEW. In another experiment, the inoculated avocados were treated by spraying AkEW and then AcEW for 15, 30, 60, or 90 s. All three pathogen populations were lowered between 3.6 and 3.8 log cycles after WW treatment. The application of Cl75 did not produce any further reduction in counts, whereas AkEW and then AcEW treatment resulted in significantly lower bacterial counts for L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 but not for Salmonella. Treatments with AkEW and then AcEW produced a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes, Salmonella, and E. coli O157:H7 populations, with estimated log reductions of 3.9 to 5.2, 5.1 to 5.9, and 4.2 to 4.9 log CFU/cm², respectively. Spraying AcEW for more than 15 s did not produce any further decrease in counts of Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7, whereas L. monocytogenes counts were significantly lower after spraying AcEW for 60 s. Applying AkEW and then AcEW for 15 or 30 s seems to be an effective alternative to reduce bacterial pathogens on avocado surfaces.

  10. Experimental study on the influence of clamping pressure on proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer (PEMWE) cell’s characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Cui, Xiaoti; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    at lower clamping pressure values at the same temperature and current density. Furthermore, early results have not shown any significant change in the amount of hydrogen crossing-over from cathode to anode and water from anode to cathode. This might be attributed to the membrane properties which might....... PEMWE cell splits water into hydrogen and oxygen when an electric current is passed through it. Electrical current forces the positively charged ions to migrate to negatively charged cathode, where hydrogen is reduced. Meanwhile, oxygen is produced at the anode side electrode and escapes as a gas...... with the circulating water. In the recent few years, PEMWE’s R&D has inched towards; operating conditions; such as increased operating temperature and cathode-anode high differential pressure operation, flow field design, stack development, and numerical modelling [2,3]. In this work the effect of clamping pressure...

  11. Thermal aspects of ice abrasive water jet technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Jerman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, different research groups have been developing systems for the transition of abrasive water jet into ice abrasive water jet. The aim of this new technology is to make the technology cleaner from both practical and ecological points of view. Mineral abrasive is replaced with ice grains that melt away after the machining process, leaving the workpiece uncontaminated. Several different approaches to this technology were studied. Thermal aspects of integrating the ice abrasive water jet technology into commercially available machines were considered. The results and analyses of water temperature measurements on the ice abrasive water jet machine are presented in this article.

  12. Louth crater: Evolution of a layered water ice mound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Byrne, Shane; Tornabene, Livio L.; Roush, Ted

    2008-08-01

    We report on observations made of the ˜36 km diameter crater, Louth, in the north polar region of Mars (at 70° N, 103.2° E). High-resolution imagery from the instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft has been used to map a 15 km diameter water ice deposit in the center of the crater. The water ice mound has surface features that include roughened ice textures and layering similar to that found in the North Polar Layered Deposits. Features we interpret as sastrugi and sand dunes show consistent wind patterns within Louth over recent time. CRISM spectra of the ice mound were modeled to derive quantitative estimates of water ice and contaminant abundance, and associated ice grain size information. These morphologic and spectral results are used to propose a stratigraphy for this deposit and adjoining sand dunes. Our results suggest the edge of the water ice mound is currently in retreat.

  13. Positron Lifetimes in Pure and Doped Ice and in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Mogensen, O.; Trumpy, Georg

    1972-01-01

    Positron lifetime spectra were measured in mono- and polycrystalline light ice, polycrystalline heavy ice, doped light ice, as well as in light and heavy water. All spectra were resolved into three components. At temperatures between −196° and −100°C the lifetimes and relative intensities are vir...

  14. The cool state of water: Infrared insights into ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Water is an extraordinary substance. It owes its characteristic anomalous properties to a network of strong hydrogen bonds present between water molecules. In ice, water molecules hold regular positions in the crystal. Nevertheless, the behaviour of ice can be dynamic and exciting, especially at the

  15. Free chlorine loss during spraying of membraneless acidic electrolyzed water and its antimicrobial effect on airborne bacteria from poultry house

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction. Spray-application of membraneless acidic electrolyzed water (MLAEW is a novel technique for disinfection in livestock houses. This study investigated the loss of free chlorine (FC – the major germicidal component in MLAEW over distance during spraying, as affected by air temperature and initial FC concentration. The anti-microbial effect of MLAEW on airborne bacteria from an aviary laying-hen house was examined. materials and methods. MLAEW was prepared at two FC concentrations: app. 15 and 60 mg L -1 , and sprayed at three air temperatures (18, 25, 32 °C. The original MLAEW solution and MLAEW aerosols collected at 0, 25, and 50 cm from the spray nozzle were analyzed for FC concentrations. Bacteria were immersed into these MLAEW samples and numerated for viable count after 0.5, 2 and 5-min treatments. results. MLAEW aerosols collected at 0 cm lost 11.7–13.2% FC, compared with the original MLAEW solution. This initial loss was affected neither by the initial FC concentration (P = 0.13 nor by air temperature (P = 0.57. The rate of FC loss during travelling was 0.79–0.87 % per cm of aerosol travel distance (% cm -1 at 18 °C, 1.08–1.15 % cm -1 at 25 °C, and 1.35–1.49% cm -1 at 32 °C. This travelling loss was affected by air temperature (P = 0.02, but not by initial FC concentration (P = 0.38. Bacteria were completely inactivated at 0.5 min when treated with MLAEW samples with FC > 16.8 mg L -1 , in 2 min when FC > 13.8 mg L -1 , and in 5 min when FC > 7.2 mg L -1 . conclusion. Airborne bacteria from aviary hen house can be effectively inactivated by MLAEW with adequate FC concentration and contact time. During spraying, the anti-microbial efficacy of MLAEW aerosols decreased over distance due to FC loss which exacerbated at higher air temperatures.

  16. Water, ice and mud: Lahars and lahar hazards at ice- and snow-clad volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Large-volume lahars are significant hazards at ice and snow covered volcanoes. Hot eruptive products produced during explosive eruptions can generate a substantial volume of melt water that quickly evolves into highly mobile flows of ice, sediment and water. At present it is difficult to predict the size of lahars that can form at ice and snow covered volcanoes due to their complex flow character and behaviour. However, advances in experiments and numerical approaches are producing new conceptual models and new methods for hazard assessment. Eruption triggered lahars that are ice-dominated leave behind thin, almost unrecognizable sedimentary deposits, making them likely to be under-represented in the geological record.

  17. PEM Electrolyzer Incorporating an Advanced Low-Cost Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdan, Monjid [Giner, Inc.

    2013-08-29

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified hydrogen production by electrolysis of water at forecourt stations as a critical technology for transition to the hydrogen economy; however, the cost of hydrogen produced by present commercially available electrolysis systems is considerably higher than the DOE 2015 and 2020 cost targets. Analyses of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer systems indicate that reductions in electricity consumption and electrolyzer stack and system capital cost are required to meet the DOE cost targets. The primary objective is to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective energy-based system for electrolytic generation of hydrogen. The goal is to increase PEM electrolyzer efficiency and to reduce electrolyzer stack and system capital cost to meet the DOE cost targets for distributed electrolysis. To accomplish this objective, work was conducted by a team consisting of Giner, Inc. (Giner), Virginia Polytechnic Institute & University (VT), and domnick hunter group, a subsidiary of Parker Hannifin (Parker). The project focused on four (4) key areas: (1) development of a high-efficiency, high-strength membrane; (2) development of a long-life cell-separator; (3) scale-up of cell active area to 290 cm2 (from 160 cm²); and (4) development of a prototype commercial electrolyzer system. In each of the key stack development areas Giner and our team members conducted focused development in laboratory-scale hardware, with analytical support as necessary, followed by life-testing of the most promising candidate materials. Selected components were then scaled up and incorporated into low-cost scaled-up stack hardware. The project culminated in the fabrication and testing of a highly efficient electrolyzer system for production of 0.5 kg/hr hydrogen and validation of the stack and system in testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  18. Structure of Water Ice in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David; Jenniskens, Peter; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Nearly all of the properties of solar system ices (chemical reaction rates, volatile retention and release, vaporization behavior, thermal conductivity, infrared spectral characteristics and the like) are a direct consequence of ice structure. However, the characterization of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs has typically utilized indirect measurements which yield phenomenological interpretations. When water ice is vapor-deposited at 14 K and warmed until it volatilizes in moderate vacuum, the ice undergoes a series of amorphous to amorphous and amorphous to crystalline structural transitions which we have characterized by diffraction methods. These structural transitions correlate with and underlie many phenomena observed in laboratory infrared and gas release experiments. The elucidation of the dynamic structural changes which occur in vapor-deposited water ice as a function of time, temperature and radiation history allows for the more complete interpretation of remote observations of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs.

  19. Ice crystallization in water's "no-man's land".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Emily B; Molinero, Valeria

    2010-06-28

    The crystallization of water at 180 K is studied through large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with the monatomic water model mW. This temperature is in the middle of water's "no-man's land," where rapid ice crystallization prevents the elucidation of the structure of liquid water and its transformation into ice with state of the art experimental methods. We find that critical ice nuclei (that contain less than ten water molecules) form in a time scale shorter than the time required for the relaxation of the liquid, suggesting that supercooled liquid water cannot be properly equilibrated in this region. We distinguish three stages in the crystallization of water at 180 K: concurrent nucleation and growth of ice, followed by consolidation that decreases the number density of ice nuclei, and finally, slow growth of the crystallites without change in their number density. The kinetics of the transformation along the three stages is well described by a single compacted exponential Avrami equation with n approximately 1.7. This work confirms the coexistence of ice and liquid after water is crystallized in "no-man's land": the formation of ice plateaus when there is still 15%-20% of liquid water in the systems, thinly dispersed between ice I crystals with linear dimensions ranging from 3 to 10 nm. We speculate that the nanoscopic size of the crystallites decreases their melting point and slows their evolution toward the thermodynamically most stable fully crystalline state.

  20. Development of nanomaterials for URFC and SPE electrolyzer applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonucci, V.; Baglio, V.; Di Blasi, A.; D' Urso, C.; Arico, A.S. [CNR-ITAE, Messina (Italy); Ornelas, R. [Tozzi Apparecchiature Elettriche SpA, Mezzano (Italy); Arriaga, L.G. [CIDETEQ, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed a promising method for producing pure hydrogen. The Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC) system involves the use of an electrochemical cell that can work both as a water electrolyzer and fuel cell. With URFC, hydrogen production can occur by a renewable energy source, such solar or wind. The electrolyzer cell provides enough energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The gases are either stored or used directly in the fuel cell. In this paper different in-house catalyst formulations with different atomic concentrations (7 per cent IrO2/Pt, 11 per cent IrO2/Pt and 14 per cent IrO2/Pt) were prepared to evaluate their electrochemical behaviour for water electrolysis and fuel cell applications in a single cell URFC system. In addition, composite membranes containing hygroscopic ceramic oxide fillers (SiO2 and TiO2) were developed for high temperature operations in order to extend the operating conditions and enhance reaction kinetics for oxygen evolution, notably the rate determining step of this process. This concept is also useful in the development of high pressure SPE electrolyzers. A composite membrane (Nafion-SiO2) was investigated for operation in an SPE water electrolyzer from 80 to 120 degrees C. The study showed that the composite membrane performed better than the Nafion 115 membrane, particularly at high temperature. At high pressure, the performance of the composite membrane was essentially the same at 100 and 120 degrees C. However, in the case of the commercial Nafion 115, the performance decreased significantly from 100 to 120 degrees C because it occurs at low pressure. It was concluded that the water retention properties of the inorganic filler in the composite membranes play a key role in increasing the range of operating temperature for the water electrolyzer. 2 figs.

  1. Transmission and Trapping of Cold Electrons in Water Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Cicman, Peter; Field, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiments are reported that show currents of low energy (“cold”) electrons pass unattenuated through crystalline ice at 135 K for energies between zero and 650 meV, up to the maximum studied film thickness of 430 bilayers, showing negligible apparent trapping. By contrast, both porous amorphous...... ice and compact crystalline ice at 40 K show efficient electron trapping. Ice at intermediate temperatures reveals metastable trapping that decays within a few hundred seconds at 110 K. Our results are the first to demonstrate full transmission of cold electrons in high temperature water ice...

  2. Comparative studies of laser action on ice water and some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laser action on ice, water and some selected hydrocarbons such as engine oil, diesel and kerosene is investigated in this study. The aim is to determine the Doppler shift in wavelength (Δ λ) of a He-Ne laser beam when passed through ice water and the hydrocarbons. Using the method earlier adopted by Igboekwe and ...

  3. Sea ice control of water isotope transport to Antarctica and implications for ice core interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noone, David; Simmonds, Ian

    2004-04-01

    Sea ice in the Southern Ocean is important for Antarctic climate and hydrology. The dependence of water isotope abundance (δ18O and deuterium excess) on the winter sea ice state is examined with the isotopic version of the Melbourne University general circulation model. Reductions in the ice concentration provide warmer temperatures in winter and allow higher precipitation totals further south, while the reverse occurs with increased ice extent. The model shows clear demarcation between the changes in the isotopic conditions over the sea ice pack, where local changes in surface exchange dominate, and those of the continent interior, which depend on the long-ranged transport aloft. While less sensitive to the forcing, the interior response is influenced by changes in turbulent mixing over the ice pack and modification of the vertical transport associated with diabatic heating. The interior deuterium excess response is more strongly affected by sea ice as it captures changes in temperature over the ice rather than just the final vapor mass. Traditional reconstruction of temperature from a single isotopic nuclide would give erroneous interpretation of change in the global mean temperature unless the sea ice changes in parallel; instead, the spatial structure of the sea ice response gives some hope for extracting past sea ice conditions from multicore analysis. This study begins to explore the role of entropy production during transport such that the isotopic interpretation is more closely tied to the dynamics of the atmosphere than is expressed by idealized parcel analysis.

  4. Advanced Oxygen Evolution Catalyst for Electrolyzer Energy Storage for Lunar Surface Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA lunar missions will require a high efficiency, lightweight, long life, maintenance-free water electrolyzer for energy storage. Anodic oxygen evolution...

  5. Electrolyzer assembly method and system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swala, Dana Ray; Bourgeois, Richard Scott; Paraszczak, Steven; Buckley, Donald Joseph

    2017-05-23

    The present techniques provide a novel electrolyzer and methods for welding components of such electrolyzers. The techniques may use conductors, such as resistance wires, placed in paths around the internal structural features and edges of the components. The conductors may be incorporated into the components during manufacture by injection molding, or other molding techniques, or may be tacked or otherwise applied to the surface of the components after manufacture. When current, a field or other excitation is applied to the conductors, the plastic surrounding the wire is melted. If this plastic is in direct contact with an adjoining component, a strong, hermetic seal may be formed between the two components, including the internal structural features.

  6. Compression Freezing Kinetics of Water to Ice VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, A. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Galtier, E.; Lee, H. J.; Granados, E.; Dolan, D. H.; Seagle, C. T.; Ao, T.; Ali, S.; Lazicki, A.; Swift, D.; Celliers, P.; Mao, W. L.

    2017-07-01

    Time-resolved x-ray diffraction (XRD) of compressed liquid water shows transformation to ice VII in 6 nsec, revealing crystallization rather than amorphous solidification during compression freezing. Application of classical nucleation theory indicates heterogeneous nucleation and one-dimensional (e.g., needlelike) growth. These first XRD data demonstrate rapid growth kinetics of ice VII with implications for fundamental physics of diffusion-mediated crystallization and thermodynamic modeling of collision or impact events on ice-rich planetary bodies.

  7. Conditions for Sublimating Water Ice to Supply Ceres' Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, M. E.; Byrne, S.; Schörghofer, N.; Schmidt, B. E.; Hayne, P. O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Sykes, M. V.; Combe, J.-P.; Ermakov, A. I.; Prettyman, T. H.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-10-01

    Observations of a water vapor exosphere around Ceres suggest that the dwarf planet may be episodically outgassing at a rate of 6 kg s-1 from unknown sources. With data from the Dawn mission as constraints, we use a coupled thermal and vapor diffusion model to explore three different configurations of water ice (global buried pore-filling ice, global buried excess ice, and local exposed surface ice) that could be present on Ceres. We conclude that a buried ice table cannot alone explain the vapor production rates previously measured, but newly exposed surface ice, given the right conditions, can exceed that vapor production rate. Sublimation lag deposits form that bury and darken this surface ice over a large range of timescales (from <1 year to approximately hundreds of kyr) that depend on latitude and ice regolith content. Sublimating water vapor can loft regolith particles from the surface of exposed ice, possibly prolonging the visible lifespan of those areas. We find that this process is only effective for regolith grains smaller than approximately ones of microns.

  8. The modelled liquid water balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steger, Christian R.; Reijmer, Carleen H.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the surface mass balance will dominate the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GrIS) contribution to 21st century sea level rise. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the liquid water balance (LWB) of the ice sheet and its response to increasing surface melt. We therefore

  9. Efficacy of Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water and UV-Ozonated Water Combination for Inactivating Escherichia Coli O157:H7 on Romaine and Iceberg Lettuce during Spray Washing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu-Hsin; Hung, Yen-Con

    2016-07-01

    Spray washing is a common sanitizing method for the fresh produce industry. The purpose of this research was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of spraying slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and a combination of ozonated water with ultraviolet (UV) in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 on romaine and iceberg lettuces. Both romaine and iceberg lettuces were spot inoculated with 100 μL of a 3 strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 to achieve an inoculum of 6 log CFU/g on lettuce. A strong antimicrobial effect was observed for the UV-ozonated water combination, which reduced the population of E. coli by 5 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 on both lettuces. SAEW achieved about 5 log CFU/g reductions in the bacterial counts on romaine lettuce. However, less than 2.5 log CFU/g in the population of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced on iceberg lettuce. The difference may be due to bacteria aggregation near and within stomata for iceberg lettuce but not for romaine lettuce. The UV light treatment may stimulate the opening of the stomata for the UV-ozonated water treatment and hence achieve better bacterial inactivation than the SAEW treatment for iceberg lettuce. Our results demonstrated that the combined treatment of SAEW and UV-ozonated water in the spray washing process could more effectively reduce E. coli O157:H7 on lettuce, which in turn may help reduce incidences of E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Arctic cyclone water vapor isotopes support past sea ice retreat recorded in Greenland ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eric S; Cherry, J E; Young, J; Noone, D; Leffler, A J; Welker, J M

    2015-05-29

    Rapid Arctic warming is associated with important water cycle changes: sea ice loss, increasing atmospheric humidity, permafrost thaw, and water-induced ecosystem changes. Understanding these complex modern processes is critical to interpreting past hydrologic changes preserved in paleoclimate records and predicting future Arctic changes. Cyclones are a prevalent Arctic feature and water vapor isotope ratios during these events provide insights into modern hydrologic processes that help explain past changes to the Arctic water cycle. Here we present continuous measurements of water vapor isotope ratios (δ(18)O, δ(2)H, d-excess) in Arctic Alaska from a 2013 cyclone. This cyclone resulted in a sharp d-excess decrease and disproportional δ(18)O enrichment, indicative of a higher humidity open Arctic Ocean water vapor source. Past transitions to warmer climates inferred from Greenland ice core records also reveal sharp decreases in d-excess, hypothesized to represent reduced sea ice extent and an increase in oceanic moisture source to Greenland Ice Sheet precipitation. Thus, measurements of water vapor isotope ratios during an Arctic cyclone provide a critical processed-based explanation, and the first direct confirmation, of relationships previously assumed to govern water isotope ratios during sea ice retreat and increased input of northern ocean moisture into the Arctic water cycle.

  11. Premelting and the Water Budget in Polycrystalline Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, E. S.; Wilen, L. A.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    A number of mechanisms, generally classified as premelting are responsible for the presence of liquid water at ice interfaces at temperatures well below 0°C . Premelting includes the familiar colligative effects of ions and other impurities, which lower the chemical potential of the liquid solvent, and the Gibbs-Thomson effect which describes the lowering of the melting point for a solid convex into its melt. Such phenomena are known to influence the amount of water in natural and laboratory polycrystalline ice and to control the thermal, chemical, and material transport properties. Thus, liquid water within the solid ice matrix influences the behavior of terrestrial ice over a wide range of length and time scales, from the macroscopic behavior of temperate glacier ice to the distribution of climate proxies within polar ice sheets. Using optical microscopy observations of ice near its melting temperature, rough bounds have been put on the length scales and dihedral angle associated with the liquid network in ice. However, these techniques cannot resolve whether the boundary between any two grains is wet or dry. For this, a more refined light scattering method has been developed. This method and the results are described both in the context of the basic physics and the application to the geophysical setting. The importance of this approach is broad, with implications ranging from the understanding of the role of intermolecular forces in the wetting properties of the ice/ice interface to constructing a budget for the total amount of water in an ice sheet. Additionally, basic applications of grain boundary melting are important in fields from metallurgy and materials science to mineral physics and geoengineering.

  12. Profiles of electrostatic potential across the water-vapor, ice-vapor and ice-water interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bryk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ice-water, water-vapor interfaces and ice surface are studied by molecular dynamics simulations with the SPC/E model of water molecules having the purpose to estimate the profiles of electrostatic potential across the interfaces. We have proposed a methodology for calculating the profiles of electrostatic potential based on a trial particle, which showed good agreement for the case of electrostatic potential profile of the water-vapor interface of TIP4P model calculated in another way. The measured profile of electrostatic potential for the pure ice-water interface decreases towards the liquid bulk region, which is in agreement with simulations of preferential direction of motion of Li^{+} and F^{-} solute ions at the liquid side of the ice-water interface. These results are discussed in connection with the Workman-Reynolds effect.

  13. Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K.; Braff, William

    2009-01-01

    In a substantial improvement over present alkaline systems, an advanced hybrid bipolar plate for a unitized fuel cell/electrolyzer has been developed. This design, which operates on pure feed streams (H2/O2 and water, respectively) consists of a porous metallic foil filled with a polymer that has very high water transport properties. Combined with a second metallic plate, the pore-filled metallic plates form a bipolar plate with an empty cavity in the center.

  14. Water ice grains in comet C/2013 US10 (Catalina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapa, Silvia; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Yang, Bin; Woodward, Charles E.; Sunshine, Jessica M.

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the the physical properties of water ice in cometary nuclei is critical in determining how the Solar System was formed. While it is difficult to directly study the properties of water ice in comet nuclei, we can study comet interiors through their comae. Cometary activity makes the interiors of these objects available for characterization. However, the properties (grain size, abundance, purity, chemical state) of water-ice grains detected in the coma do not necessarily represent the characteristics of the water ice on the surface and/or in the interior of the nucleus. This is due to the potential physical and chemical evolution of the emitted material. Once in the coma, water-ice grains are heated by sunlight, and if temperatures are warm enough, they sublime. In this case, their sizes and potentially their ice-to-dust fractions are reduced.We present IRTF/SpeX measurements of the Oort cloud comet C/2013 US10 (Catalina), which reached perihelion in Nov 2015 at a heliocentric distance Rh=0.822 AU. Observations of US10 were acquired on UT 2014-08-13, 2016-01-12, and 2016-08-13 (Rh=5.9, 1.3, and 3.9 AU). This set of measurements, spanning a broad range in Rh, are rare and fundamental for estimating how ice grains evolve in the coma. The spectrum obtained close to perihelion is featureless and red sloped, which is consistent with a dust-dominated coma. Conversely, the spectra acquired on August 2014 and 2016 display neutral slopes and absorption bands at 1.5 and 2.0 μm, consistent with the presence of water-ice grains. These variations in water ice with heliocentric distance are correlated with sublimation rates. Additionally, the measurements obtained at 5.8 AU and 3.9 AU are nearly identical, suggesting that water-ice grains, once in the coma, do not sublime significantly. Therefore, the properties of these long-lived water-ice grains may represent their state in the nucleus or immediately after insertion into the coma. We will present radiative

  15. Effects of Water Source, Dilution, Storage, and Bacterial and Fecal Loads on the Efficacy of Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water for the Control of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S.M.L. Stevenson; S.R. Cook; S.J. Bach; T.A. McAllister

    2004-01-01

    ...) and bactericidal activity of EO water were investigated. Anode and combined (7:3 anode:cathode, vol/vol) EO waters reduced the pH and increased the ORP of deionized water, whereas cathode EO water increased pH and lowered ORP...

  16. High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandfield, Joshua L

    2007-05-03

    Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of Mars at high latitudes. These models have been mainly supported by the observed presence of large concentrations of hydrogen detected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The models and measurements are consistent with a water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has predicted that the depth at which water ice is stable can be highly variable, owing to local surface heterogeneities such as rocks and slopes, and the thermal inertia of the ground cover. Measurements have, however, been limited to the footprint (several hundred kilometres) of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite, preventing the observations from documenting more detailed water-ice distributions. Here I show that by observing the seasonal temperature response of the martian surface with the Thermal Emission Imaging System on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, it is possible to observe such heterogeneities at subkilometre scale. These observations show significant regional and local water-ice depth variability, and, in some cases, support distributions in the subsurface predicted by atmospheric exchange and vapour diffusion models. The presence of water ice where it follows the depth of stability under current climatic conditions implies an active martian water cycle that responds to orbit-driven climate cycles. Several regions also have apparent deviations from the theoretical stability level, indicating that additional factors influence the ice-table depth. The high-resolution measurements show that the depth to the water-ice table is highly variable within the potential Phoenix spacecraft landing ellipses, and is likely to be variable at scales that may be sampled by the spacecraft.

  17. Hexagonal ice in pure water and biological NMR samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Thomas; Gath, Julia; Hunkeler, Andreas; Ernst, Matthias, E-mail: maer@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Böckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS, Université de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2017-01-15

    Ice, in addition to “liquid” water and protein, is an important component of protein samples for NMR spectroscopy at subfreezing temperatures but it has rarely been observed spectroscopically in this context. We characterize its spectroscopic behavior in the temperature range from 100 to 273 K, and find that it behaves like pure water ice. The interference of magic-angle spinning (MAS) as well as rf multiple-pulse sequences with Bjerrum-defect motion greatly influences the ice spectra.

  18. External Sources of Water for Mercury's Putative Ice Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Rawlins, Katherine; Zahnle, Kevin; Dones, Luke

    1999-01-01

    Radar images have revealed the possible presence of ice deposits in Mercury's polar regions. Although thermal models indicate that water ice can be stable in permanently shaded regions near Mercury's poles, the ultimate source of the water remains unclear. We use stochastic models and other theoretical methods to investigate the role of external sources in supplying Mercury with the requisite amount of water. By extrapolating the current terrestrial influx of interplanetary dust particles to that at Mercury, we find that continual micrometeoritic bombardment of Mercury over the last 3.5 byr could have resulted in the delivery of (3-60) x 10(exp 16) grams of water ice to the permanently shaded regions at Mercury's poles (equivalent to an average ice thickness of 0.8-20 m). Erosion by micrometeoritic impact on exposed ice deposits could reduce the above value by about a half. For comparison, the current ice deposits on Mercury are believed to be somewhere between approx. 2 and 20 m thick. Using a Monte Carlo model to simulate the impact history of Mercury, we find that asteroids and comets can also deliver an amount of water consistent with the observations. Impacts from Jupiter-family comets over the last 3.5 billion years can supply (0.1-200) x 10(exp 16) grams of water to Mercury's polar regions (corresponding to ice deposits 0.05-60 m thick), Halley-type comets can supply (0.2-20) x 10(exp 16) grams of water to the poles (0.07-7 m of ice), and asteroids can provide (0.4-20) x 10(exp 16) grams of water to the poles (0.1-8 m of ice). Although all these external sources are nominally sufficient to explain the estimated amount of ice currently at Mercury's poles, impacts by a few large comets and/or asteroids seem to provide the best explanation for both the amount and cleanliness of the ice deposits on Mercury. Despite their low population estimates in the inner solar system, Jupiter-family comets are particularly promising candidates for delivering water to Mercury

  19. Thin Water and Ice Films at Mineral Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Mineral-water and ice interactions play important roles in atmospheric cloud formation. They also affect soil biogeochemistry as well as outer-space processes. In this study, thin water and ice films formed on minerals of varied bulk and surface structure, shape, size and surface roughness were probed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and by Dynamic Vapor Adsorption (DVA). Measurements on several types of iron (oxyhydr)oxides, phyllosilicates, orthosilicates, tectosilicates as well as Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and Icelandic volcanic ash constrained our understanding of the molecular-level nature of mineral surface-water and ice interactions. DVA experiments showed that particle size is the key feature controlling water loadings at 25 ° C. Under this condition, nano-sized particles stabilized the equivalence of no more than ˜6 monolayers of water at the near saturation of water vapor while sub-micron sized particles stabilized several thousand layers. This result can be explained by the greater ability of larger sized particles at driving water condensation reactions. Cryogenic FTIR measurements at -10 and -50 ° C revealed that most minerals acquired the thin ice films with similar hydrogen bonding environments as those formed at room temperature.[1,2] These thin ice films have weaker hydrogen bond environments than hexagonal ice (νOH ≈ 3130 cm-1), a result seen by FTIR through predominant O-H stretching modes at νOH ≈ 3408-3425 cm-1. The water bending region (˜1630 cm-1) also reveals that most thin ice films are rather supercooled forms of water. Only the materials with greatest levels of heterogeneity, namely ATD and volcanic ash, stabilized solid forms of water reminiscent to hexagonal ice. This work thus constrains further our understanding of how interfacial ice is stabilized at mineral surfaces, and opens possibilities for future studies focused on atmospheric gas uptake on mineral- water and ice admixtures. [1] Song, X. and Boily, J

  20. River ice implications related to water power production in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asvall, R.P. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate, Oslo (Norway). Hydrology Dept.

    2009-07-01

    Nearly 99 per cent of the electricity produced in Norway is based on water power. While the period of large power development is over, the current focus lies in developing small hydroelectric power plants. A new market based energy law was implemented in Norway in 1991 to achieve more efficient use of electricity production by means of market forces. Since water regulation influences ice conditions in lakes and rivers, this paper focused on the implications of changes in ice conditions. In Norway, the expected changes in ice conditions are taken into account when issuing permits for water regulations and schemes for water discharge because some waterways are used as winter roads. Follow-up includes both close and long term observations and measurements. The impact of variable price on power was also discussed, with particular reference to ice conditions in cases where water discharge occurs on rivers. This paper summarized selected ice problems and how they have been handled. The paper also included a summary of anticipated climatic changes relevant to ice conditions.

  1. Permittivity of ice and water at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of reflectivity of water and ice at 100 GHz, 140 GHz, and 180 GHz are reported. Measurements on water covered the temperature range 0 C to 50 C. No anomalies in the dielectric properties of water due to the presence of either salts or organic matter were found. The reflectivity of water and its temperature dependence are consistent with recent dielectric property models derived from data at other wavelengths. The index of refraction of fresh ice is constant at 1.78 throughout this regions.

  2. Oxygen exchange and ice melt measured at the ice-water interface by eddy correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, M.H.; Koopmans, D.; Berg, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined fluxes across the ice-water interface utilizing the eddy correlation technique. Temperature eddy correlation systems were used to determine rates of ice melting and freezing, and O2 eddy correlation systems were used to examine O2 exchange rates driven by biological and physical...... processes. The study was conducted below 0.7 m thick sea-ice in mid-March 2010 in a southwest Greenland fjord and revealed low rates of ice melt at a maximum of 0.80 mm dĝ̂'1. The O2 flux associated with release of O2 depleted melt water was less than 13 % of the average daily O2 respiration rate. Ice melt...... heterotrophic with a daily gross primary production of 0.69 mmol O2 mĝ̂'2 dĝ̂'1 and a respiration rate of ĝ̂'2.13 mmol O2 mĝ̂'2 dĝ̂'1 leading to a net ecosystem metabolism of ĝ̂'1.45 mmol O2 mĝ̂'2 dĝ̂'1. This application of the eddy correlation technique produced high temporal resolution O2 fluxes and ice melt...

  3. Electrolyzers Enhancing Flexibility in Electric Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Mohanpurkar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a real-time simulation with a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL-based approach for verifying the performance of electrolyzer systems in providing grid support. Hydrogen refueling stations may use electrolyzer systems to generate hydrogen and are proposed to have the potential of becoming smarter loads that can proactively provide grid services. On the basis of experimental findings, electrolyzer systems with balance of plant are observed to have a high level of controllability and hence can add flexibility to the grid from the demand side. A generic front end controller (FEC is proposed, which enables an optimal operation of the load on the basis of market and grid conditions. This controller has been simulated and tested in a real-time environment with electrolyzer hardware for a performance assessment. It can optimize the operation of electrolyzer systems on the basis of the information collected by a communication module. Real-time simulation tests are performed to verify the performance of the FEC-driven electrolyzers to provide grid support that enables flexibility, greater economic revenue, and grid support for hydrogen producers under dynamic conditions. The FEC proposed in this paper is tested with electrolyzers, however, it is proposed as a generic control topology that is applicable to any load.

  4. Liquid water in the domain of cubic crystalline ice Ic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, P.; Banham, S. F.; Blake, D. F.; McCoustra, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Vapor-deposited amorphous water ice when warmed above the glass transition temperature (120-140 K), is a viscous liquid which exhibits a viscosity vs temperature relationship different from that of liquid water at room temperature. New studies of thin water ice films now demonstrate that viscous liquid water persists in the temperature range 140-210 K. where it coexists with cubic crystalline ice. The liquid character of amorphous water above the glass transition is demonstrated by (1) changes in the morphology of water ice films on a nonwetting surface observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at around 175 K during slow warming, (2) changes in the binding energy of water molecules measured in temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies, and (3) changes in the shape of the 3.07 micrometers absorption band observed in grazing angle reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) during annealing at high temperature. whereby the decreased roughness of the water surface is thought to cause changes in the selection rules for the excitation of O-H stretch vibrations. Because it is present over such a wide range of temperatures, we propose that this form of liquid water is a common material in nature. where it is expected to exist in the subsurface layers of comets and on the surfaces of some planets and satellites.

  5. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Ionization Energy Lowering in Water Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    In studying various interstellar and solar system ice analogs, we have recently found that upon vacuum ultraviolet photolysis, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) frozen in water ice at low temperatures are easily ionized and indefinitely stabilized as trapped ions (Gudipati; Gudipati & Allamandola). Here we report the first experimental study that shows that PAH ionization energy is significantly lowered in PAH/H2O ices, in agreement with recent theoretical work (Woon & Park). The ionization energy (IE) of the PAH studied here, quaterrylene (C40H20, IE = 6.11 eV), is lowered by up to 2.11 eV in water ice. PAH ionization energy reduction in low-temperature water ice substantially expands the astronomical regions in which trapped ions and electrons may be important. This reduction in ionization energy should also hold for other types of trapped species in waterrich interstellar, circumstellar, and solar system ices. Subject headings: ISM: clouds - methods: laboratory - molecular processes - radiation mechanisms: nonthermal -ultraviolet: ISM - ultraviolet: solar system

  6. Surface water hydrology and the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. C.; Yang, K.; Pitcher, L. H.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Cooper, M. G.; Gleason, C. J.; Ryan, J.; Hubbard, A.; Tedesco, M.; Behar, A.

    2016-12-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet now exceeds 260 Gt/year, raising global sea level by >0.7 mm annually. Approximately two-thirds of this total mass loss is now driven by negative ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), attributed mainly to production and runoff of meltwater from the ice sheet surface. This new dominance of runoff as a driver of GrIS total mass loss will likely persist owing to anticipated further increases in surface melting, reduced meltwater storage in firn, and the waning importance of dynamical mass losses (ice calving) as the ice sheets retreat from their marine-terminating margins. It also creates the need and opportunity for integrative research pairing traditional surface water hydrology approaches with glaciology. As one example, we present a way to measure supraglacial "runoff" (i.e. specific discharge) at the supraglacial catchment scale ( 101-102 km2), using in situ measurements of supraglacial river discharge and high-resolution satellite/drone mapping of upstream catchment area. This approach, which is standard in terrestrial hydrology but novel for ice sheet science, enables independent verification and improvement of modeled SMB runoff estimates used to project sea level rise. Furthermore, because current SMB models do not consider the role of fluvial watershed processes operating on the ice surface, inclusion of even a simple surface routing model materially improves simulations of runoff delivered to moulins, the critical pathways for meltwater entry into the ice sheet. Incorporating principles of surface water hydrology and fluvial geomorphology and into glaciological models will thus aid estimates of Greenland meltwater runoff to the global ocean as well as connections to subglacial hydrology and ice sheet dynamics.

  7. Efficacy of Neutral pH Electrolyzed Water in Reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 on Fresh Produce Items using an Automated Washer at Simulated Food Service Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afari, George K; Hung, Yen-Con; King, Christopher H

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of neutral pH electrolyzed (NEO) water (155 mg/L free chlorine, pH 7.5) in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 on romaine lettuce, iceberg lettuce, and tomatoes washed in an automated produce washer for different times and washing speeds. Tomatoes and lettuce leaves were spot inoculated with 100 μL of a 5 strain cocktail mixture of either pathogen and washed with 10 or 8 L of NEO water, respectively. Washing lettuce for 30 min at 65 rpm led to the greatest reductions, with 4.2 and 5.9 log CFU/g reductions achieved for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium respectively on romaine, whereas iceberg lettuce reductions were 3.2 and 4.6 log CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium respectively. Washing tomatoes for 10 min at 65 rpm achieved reductions greater than 8 and 6 log CFU/tomato on S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 respectively. All pathogens were completely inactivated in NEO water wash solutions. No detrimental effects on the visual quality of the produce studied were observed under all treatment conditions. Results show the adoption of this washing procedure in food service operations could be useful in ensuring produce safety. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Thermal stability of water ice in Ceres' crater Oxo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Michelangelo; Federico, Costanzo; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Magni, Gianfranco; Tosi, Federico

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres, target of the NASA Dawn mission, exhibits evidences of ammoniated phyllosilicates on its surface [1], compatible with a likely outer Solar System origin. Considerable amounts of water ice have recently been detected in some craters by the Visible InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn in some small fresh crater, such as Oxo, located at about 40° N. The exposure mechanism of water ice is unknown: cryovolcanism, cometary type sublimation/recondensation [2]or impacts with other bodies are likely mechanisms. The evaluation of the time stability of the water ice is crucial to understand the plausible mechanism for its existence. For this purpose, we developed a 3D finite-elements model (FEM) by using the topography given by the shape model of Ceres derived on the basis of images acquired by the Framing Camera in the Survey mission phase. The illumination conditions are provided by the SPICE toolkit. We performed several simulations by analyzing the effect of thermal inertia and albedo on the temperature and rate of ice sublimation. The results of the simulations about the stability of water ice will be presented.[1] De Sanctis et al. NATURE, doi:10.1038/nature16172[2] Formisano et al. MNRAS, doi: 10.1093/mnras/stv2344

  9. Modelling water flow under glaciers and ice sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Gwenn E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of dynamic water systems beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have sparked renewed interest in modelling subglacial drainage. The foundations of today's models were laid decades ago, inspired by measurements from mountain glaciers, discovery of the modern ice streams and the study of landscapes evacuated by former ice sheets. Models have progressed from strict adherence to the principles of groundwater flow, to the incorporation of flow ‘elements’ specific to the subglacial environment, to sophisticated two-dimensional representations of interacting distributed and channelized drainage. Although presently in a state of rapid development, subglacial drainage models, when coupled to models of ice flow, are now able to reproduce many of the canonical phenomena that characterize this coupled system. Model calibration remains generally out of reach, whereas widespread application of these models to large problems and real geometries awaits the next level of development. PMID:27547082

  10. Solubility of sodium chloride in superionic water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jean-Alexis; Caracas, Razvan

    2017-04-01

    In icy planets, complex interactions are expected to occur at the interface between the rocky core and the icy mantle composed of mixtures based on water, methane, and ammonia [1, 2]. The hydration of the silicate layer produces salts (MgSO4, NaCl, KCl) that could mix with the ice, and change considerably its properties [3]. Here, we used first-principles molecular dynamics to investigate the stability and the properties of the binary system NaCl-H2O at the relevant thermodynamic conditions for planetary interiors up to ice giants. In these conditions, pure water ice undergoes several transitions that affect considerably its ionic conductivity and its elastic properties [4]. We calculated the Gibbs free energy of mixing along the NaCl-H2O binary by applying Boltzmann statistics to account for energy differences between configurations. We evaluated vibrational entropy from the vibrational spectra of the nuclei motion using the recently developed two phases thermodynamic memory function (2PT-MF) model for multicomponent systems [5, 6]. We show that the solubility of NaCl in water ice at 1600 K is less than 0.78 mol%. We find that salty ices present an extended superionic domain toward high pressures in comparison to pure water ice. Finally, we predict that the complete symmetrization of the hydrogen bonds (i.e. transition to ice X) occurs at higher pressure than in pure water ice, as observed in LiCl doped water ice at ambient temperature [7]. References: [1] M. R. Frank, C. E. Runge, H. P. Scott, S. J. Maglio, J. Olson, V. B. Prakapenka, G. Shen, PEPI 155 (2006) 152-162 [2] B. Journaux, I. Daniel, R. Caracas, G. Montagnac, H. Cardon, Icarus 226 (2013) 355-363 [3] S. Klotz, L. E. Bove, T. Strässle, T. C. Hansen, A. M. Saitta, Nature Materials 8 (2009) 405-409 [4] J. -A. Hernandez, R. Caracas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117 (2016) 135503 [5] M. P. Desjarlais, Phys. Rev. E 88 (2013) 062145 [6] M. French, M. P. Desjarlais, R. Redmer, Phys. Rev. E 93 (2016) 022140 [7] L. E. Bove

  11. Liquid water and ices: understanding the structure and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malenkov, George [AN Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leninskii Prospect, 31 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: egor38@mail.ru

    2009-07-15

    A review of the structure and some properties of condensed phases of water is given. Since the discovery of the polymorphism of crystalline ice (beginning of the twentieth century), 15 ice modifications have been found and their structures have been determined. If we do not take into consideration proton ordering or disordering, nine distinct crystalline ice modifications in which water molecules retain their individuality are known. In the tenth, ice X, there are no H{sub 2}O molecules. It contains ions (or atoms) of oxygen and hydrogen. The structure of all these modifications is described and information about their fields of stability and about the transition between them is given. It is emphasized that there are ice modifications which are metastable at any temperature and pressure (ices Ic, IV and XII), and many modifications can exist as metastable phases beyond their fields of stability. The ability of water to exist in metastable states is one of its remarkable properties. Several amorphous ice modifications (all of them are metastable) are known. Brief information about their properties and transitions between them is given. At the end of the 1960s the conception of the water structure as a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network was conclusively formed. Discovery of the polymorphism of amorphous ices awakened interest in the heterogeneity of the water network. Structural and dynamical heterogeneity of liquid water is discussed in detail. Computer simulation showed that the diffusion coefficient of water molecules in dense regions of the network is lower than in the loose regions, while an increase of density of the entire network gives rise to an increase of diffusion coefficient. This finding contradicts the conceptions associated with the primitive two-state models and can be explained from pressure dependences of melting temperature and of homogeneous nucleation temperature. A brief discussion of the picture of molecular motions in liquid water

  12. Water ice and sub-micron ice particles on Tethys and Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, Francesca; Nordheim, Tom; Clark, Roger Nelson; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Tosi, Federico; Schenk, Paul M.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.

    2017-10-01

    IntroductionWe present our ongoing work, mapping the variation of the main water ice absorption bands, and the distribution of the sub-micron particles, across Mimas and Tethys’ surfaces using Cassini-VIMS cubes acquired in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). We present our results in the form of maps of variation of selected spectral indicators (depth of absorption bands, reflectance peak height, spectral slopes).Data analysisVIMS acquires hyperspectral data in the 0.3-5.1 μm spectral range. We selected VIMS cubes of Tethys and Mimas in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). For all pixels in the selected cubes, we measured the band depths for water-ice absorptions at 1.25, 1.5 and 2.02 μm and the height of the 3.6 μm reflection peak. Moreover, we considered the spectral indictors for particles smaller than 1 µm [1]: (i) the 2 µm absorption band is asymmetric and (ii) it has the minimum shifted to longer λ (iii) the band depth ratio 1.5/2.0 µm decreases; (iv) the reflection peak at 2.6 µm decreases; (v) the Fresnel reflection peak is suppressed; (vi) the 5 µm reflectance is decreased relative to the 3.6 µm peak. To characterize the global variation of water-ice band depths, and of sub-micron particles spectral indicators, across Mimas and Tethys, we sampled the two satellites’ surfacees with a 1°x1° fixed-resolution grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell.3. ResultsFor both moons we find that large geologic features, such as the Odysseus and Herschel impact basins, do not correlate with water ice’s abundance variation. For Tethys, we found a quite uniform surface on both hemispheres. The only deviation from this pattern shows up on the trailing hemisphere, where we notice two north-oriented, dark areas around 225° and 315°. For Mimas, the leading and trailing hemispheres appear to be quite similar in water ice abundance, the trailing portion having water ice absorption bands lightly more suppressed than the leading side

  13. Oxygen exchange and ice melt measured at the ice-water interface by eddy correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Long

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined fluxes across the ice-water interface utilizing the eddy correlation technique. Temperature eddy correlation systems were used to determine rates of ice melting and freezing, and O2 eddy correlation systems were used to examine O2 exchange rates driven by biological and physical processes. The study was conducted below 0.7 m thick sea-ice in mid-March 2010 in a southwest Greenland fjord and revealed low rates of ice melt at a maximum of 0.80 mm d−1. The O2 flux associated with release of O2 depleted melt water was less than 13 % of the average daily O2 respiration rate. Ice melt and insufficient vertical turbulent mixing due to low current velocities caused periodic stratification immediately below the ice. This prevented the determination of fluxes 61 % of the deployment time. These time intervals were identified by examining the velocity and the linearity and stability of the cumulative flux. The examination of unstratified conditions through vertical velocity and O2 spectra and their cospectra revealed characteristic fingerprints of well-developed turbulence. From the measured O2 fluxes a photosynthesis/irradiance curve was established by least-squares fitting. This relation showed that light limitation of net photosynthesis began at 4.2 μmol photons m−2 s−1, and that algal communities were well-adapted to low-light conditions as they were light saturated for 75 % of the day during this early spring period. However, the sea-ice associated microbial and algal community was net heterotrophic with a daily gross primary production of 0.69 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 and a respiration rate of −2.13 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 leading to a net ecosystem metabolism of −1.45 mmol O2 m−2 d−1. This application of the eddy

  14. The Structure of Ice Nanoclusters and Thin-films of Water Ice: Implications for Icy Grains in Cold Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Blake, David; Uffindell, Christine; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in water ice (I(sub c) yields I(sub h)) is used to measure the extent to which surface structure and impurities control bulk properties. In pure crystalline (I(sub c)) water ice nanoclusters and in thin-films of impure water ice, I(sub c) yields I(sub h) occurs at lower temperatures than in thin-films of pure water ice. The disordered surface of the 20 nm diameter nanoclusters promotes transformations or reactions which would otherwise be kinetically hindered. Likewise, impurities such as methanol introduce defects into the ice network, thereby allowing sluggish structural transitions to proceed. Such surface-related phenomena play an important role in promoting chemical reactions on interstellar ice grains within cold molecular clouds, where the first organic compounds are formed.

  15. Proton conduction in water ices under an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Giaquinta, Paolo V; Saija, Franz; Saitta, A Marco

    2014-04-24

    We report on a first-principles study of the effects produced by a static electric field on proton conduction in ordinary hexagonal ice (phase Ih) and in its proton-ordered counterpart (phase XI). We performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of both phases and investigated the effects produced by the field on the structure of the material, with particular attention paid to the phenomenon of proton transfer. We observed that in ice Ih molecules start to dissociate for field intensities around 0.25 V/Å, as in liquid water, whereas fields stronger than 0.36 V/Å are needed to induce a permanent proton flow. In contrast, in ice XI, electric fields as intense as 0.22 V/Å are already able to induce and sustain, through correlated proton jumps, an ionic current; this behavior suggests, somewhat counterintuitively, that the ordering of protons favors the autoprotolysis phenomenon. However, the same is not true for static conductivities. In fact, both crystalline phases show an ohmic behavior in the conduction regime, but the conductivity of ice Ih turns out to be larger than that of ice XI. We finally discuss the qualitative and quantitative importance of the conspicuous concentration of ionic defects generated by intense electric fields in determining the value of the conductivity, also through a comparison with the experimental data available for saline ices.

  16. Lessons: Science: "Sinkholes." Students Observe What Happens When Ice-Cold Water Mingles with Warm Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanCleave, Janice

    2000-01-01

    This intermediate-level science activity has students observe the effect of ice-cold water mingling with warm water. Water's behavior and movement alters with shifts in temperature. Students must try to determine how temperature affects the movement of water. Necessary materials include a pencil, cup, glass jar, masking tape, warm water, ice…

  17. D/H fractionation during the sublimation of water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécuyer, Christophe; Royer, Aurélien; Fourel, François; Seris, Magali; Simon, Laurent; Robert, François

    2017-03-01

    Experiments of sublimation of pure water ice have been performed in the temperature range -105 °C to -30 °C and atmospheric partial pressures ranging from 10-6 to 10-1 mb. Sampling of both vapour and residual ice fractions has been performed with the use of a vacuum line designed for the extraction and purification of gases before the measurement of their D/H ratios. Sublimation was responsible for sizable isotopic fractionation factors in the range 0.969-1.123 for temperatures lying between -105 °C and -30 °C. The fractionation factor exhibits a cross-over at temperatures around -50 °C with the water vapour fraction being D-depleted relative to the residual ice fraction at T deuterium enrichment or depletion between ice and water vapour cannot explain the differences in the D/H ratios amongst Jupiter comets and long-period comets families nor those that have been documented between Earth's and cometary water.

  18. Zoosporic fungi in the ice of some water reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazyli Czeczuga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of 65 zoosporic fungi species was noted in the water obtained from melting ice from five water (3 ponds and 2 rivers. In the water of the all basins the number of zoosporic fungus species decreases along with the increasing chemical loading (more eutrophic water. Out of these 65 species, 18 are known as necrotrophs of fish. The following fungi were recorded for the first time from Poland: Achlya conspicua, Apodachlyella completa, Pythiomorpha undulata, Pythium butleri, Pythium carolinianum, Pythium gracile, Pythium imperfectum, Pythium indicum, Pythium irregulare, Pythium myriotylum, Pythium papillatum, Pythium pyrilobum and Pythium rostratum.

  19. Water ice in Juling crater on Ceres surface: method for properties retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ciarniello, M.; Ammannito, E.; Frigeri, A.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Magni, G.; Capria, M. T.; Formisano, M.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2017-09-01

    Spectral signatures diagnostic of water ice were detected in localized areas on the surface of Ceres usingthe Dawn/VIR instrument of the Dawn spacecraft. The current study analyzed water ice detected in a shadowed region of Juling crater. Water ice properties were derived by a Hapke radiative transfer model.

  20. Robust prototypical anti-icing coatings with a self-lubricating liquid water layer between ice and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dou, Renmei; Cui, Dapeng; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Fujian; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Jianjun; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2013-05-22

    A robust prototypical anti-icing coating with a self-lubricating liquid water layer (SLWL) is fabricated via grafting cross-linked hygroscopic polymers inside the micropores of silicon wafer surfaces. The ice adhesion on the surface with SLWL is 1 order of magnitude lower than that on the superhydrophobic surfaces and the ice formed atop of it can be blown off by an action of strong breeze. The surface with self-lubricating liquid water layer exhibits excellent capability of self-healing and abrasion resistance. The SLWL surface should also find applications in antifogging and self-cleaning by rainfall, in addition to anti-icing and antifrosting.

  1. Optimal Operation of Combined Photovoltaic Electrolyzer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Khalilnejad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the design and simulation of a combination of a photovoltaic (PV array with an alkaline electrolyzer is performed to maximize the production of hydrogen as a reliable power resource. Detailed electrical model of PV system, as long as thermal and electrochemical model of electrolyzer is used. Since an electrolyzer is a non-linear load, its coupling with PV systems to get the best power transfer is very important. Solar irradiation calculations were done for the region of Miami (FL, USA, giving an optimal surface slope of 25.7° for the PV array. The size of the PV array is optimized, considering maximum hydrogen production and minimum excess power production in a diurnal operation of a system using the imperialistic competitive algorithm (ICA. The results show that for a 10 kW alkaline electrolyzer, a PV array with a nominal power of 12.3 kW The results show that 12.3 kW photvoltaic system can be utilized for supplying a 10 kW electrolyzer. Hydrogen production and Faraday efficiency of the system are 697.21 mol and 0.3905 mol, respectively.

  2. Electrolyzer Performance Analysis of an Integrated Hydrogen Power System for Greenhouse Heating. A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pascuzzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse containing an integrated system of photovoltaic panels, a water electrolyzer, fuel cells and a geothermal heat pump was set up to investigate suitable solutions for a power system based on solar energy and hydrogen, feeding a self-sufficient, geothermal-heated greenhouse. The electricity produced by the photovoltaic source supplies the electrolyzer; the manufactured hydrogen gas is held in a pressure tank. In these systems, the electrolyzer is a crucial component; the technical challenge is to make it work regularly despite the irregularity of the solar source. The focus of this paper is to study the performance and the real energy efficiency of the electrolyzer, analyzing its operational data collected under different operating conditions affected by the changeable solar radiant energy characterizing the site where the experimental plant was located. The analysis of the measured values allowed evaluation of its suitability for the agricultural requirements such as greenhouse heating. On the strength of the obtained result, a new layout of the battery bank has been designed and exemplified to improve the performance of the electrolyzer. The evaluations resulting from this case study may have a genuine value, therefore assisting in further studies to better understand these devices and their associated technologies.

  3. [Study on spectrum of oil film in ice-infested waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Bing-Xin; Lan, Guo-Xin; Ma, Long; Gao, Chao

    2010-04-01

    Oil spills in ice-infested waters are a subject of great concern to corporations, local residents, and government agencies, which participate in oil exploration, production, and transportation in ice-infested regions recently. For developing a credible and effective response to oil spill in ice-infested waters, a field experiment was performed on the spectrum of oil film in ice-infested waters. In this experiment, four groups of spectrum samples were collected, including clean sea water, brash ice and even ice and sea water/brash ice/even ice contaminated by diesel and crude oil. The experiment results indicated that: the same sort of oil with different background had different reflectance at the same wavelength, and so did the same sort of oil with the same background but different distribution state; nevertheless there were some common characteristics within the same oil. For example, diesel had two apparent characteristics, no matter on the surface of sea water or brash ice or even ice, the first of which was that the reflectance curves of diesel film were first lower and then higher than that of clean sea water, brash ice or even ice according to the wavelength; the second was that the reflectance curves of diesel film were almost equaled to that of the background between 400 and 510 nm in sea water, 410 and 510 nm in brash ice and 490 and 510 nm in even ice. The spectrum curves of crude oil had a representative sphenoid reflectance-peak which appeared between 750 and 770 nm. These characteristics of oil film in terms of ice and oil type could be effectively used to distinct the oil with sea water and sea ice, meanwhile this experiment would improve and facilitate the detecting and monitoring proposal of oil which had been spilled in moving, broken pack ice and fast-ice environment in the ocean.

  4. Water/ice phase transition: The role of zirconium acetate, a compound with ice-shaping properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellini, Moreno; Fernandes, Francisco M.; Dedovets, Dmytro; Deville, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Few compounds feature ice-shaping properties. Zirconium acetate is one of the very few inorganic compounds reported so far to have ice-shaping properties similar to that of ice-shaping proteins, encountered in many organisms living at low temperature. When a zirconium acetate solution is frozen, oriented and perfectly hexagonal ice crystals can be formed and their growth follows the temperature gradient. To shed light on the water/ice phase transition while freezing zirconium acetate solution, we carried out differential scanning calorimetry measurements. From our results, we estimate how many water molecules do not freeze because of their interaction with Zr cations. We estimate the colligative properties of the Zr acetate on the apparent critical temperature. We further show that the phase transition is unaffected by the nature of the base which is used to adjust the pH. Our results provide thus new hints on the ice-shaping mechanism of zirconium acetate.

  5. Adsorption of glyoxal molecules on atmospheric water ice nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrems, O.; Ignatov, S. K.; Gadzhiev, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ice nanoparticles play an important role in physics and chemistry of the Earth atmosphere. Knowledge about the uptake and incorporation of atmospheric trace gases in ice particles as well as their interactions with water molecules is very important for the understanding of processes at the air/ice interface. The interaction of the atmospheric trace gases with atmospheric nanoparticles is also an important issue for the development of modern physicochemical models. Usually, the interactions between trace gases and small particles considered theoretically apply small-size model complexes or the surface models representing only fragments of the ideal surface. In this study we used modern quantum chemical methods to study the interaction of glyoxal molecules (HCOCHO) with the full-size particles of crystalline water ice of nanoscale size. Glyoxal, the simplest a-dicarbonyl, is an atmospheric relevant carbonyl compound and is formed as product in the photooxidation of simple volatile organic compounds in air in the presence of NOx. The ice particles consisting of 48, 72, and 216 water molecules with a distorted structure of hexagonal water ice Ih were studied using the new SCC-DFTBA method combining well the advantages of the DFT theory and semiempirical methods of quantum chemistry. Typical sizes of the ice particles were in the range 1.5-2.6 nm. The glyoxal molecules were coordinated on different sites of the nanoparticles corresponding to different ice Ih crystal planes: (0001), (10-10), (11-20). The structure of coordination complexes, their vibrational frequencies, the corresponding adsorption energies and thermodynamic parameters (the enthalpy and the Gibbs free energy of adsorption) were evaluated using the full optimization followed by the frequency calculations. Additionally, the different modes of incorporation of the glyoxal molecules into the ice particles were considered and the corresponding structural and energetic parameters were evaluated. The

  6. Corrosion behaviour of some conventional stainless steels in electrolyzing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal NASSAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to increase the amount of hydrogen generated from the water electrolysis process. Some conventional stainless steels (316; 409; 410 and 430 were used as anode and cathode in electrolysis process. Further study was carried out on the corrosion trend in all the investigated metals. It is observed that the electrode material can effect on the amount of hydrogen generate by electrolyzing process and metal composition of the stainless steels effects on the rate of corrosion.

  7. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, R.

    2012-12-01

    During the last ice age, several abrupt warming events took place, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events. Their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature increase. The leading hypothesis to explain their occurrence postulates that the warming was caused by abrupt disruptions of the North Atlantic Current due to meltwater discharge from destabilized ice sheets (Heinrich events). However, the number of warming events outnumber the those of ice-sheet collapse. Thus, the majority of D-O events are not attributed to surface freshwater anomalies, and the underlying mechanism behind their occurrence remain unexplained. Using a simple dynamical model of sea ice and an overturning circulation, I show the existence of self-sustained relaxation oscillations in the overturning circulation. The insulating effect of sea ice is shown to paradoxically lead to a net loss of heat from the top layer of the polar ocean when sea ice retreats. Repeated heat loss results in a denser top layer and a destabilized water column, which triggers convection. The convective state pulls the system out of its preferred mode of circulation, setting up relaxation oscillations. The period of oscillations in this case is linked to the geometry of the ocean basin, if solar forcing is assumed to remain constant. If appropriate glacial freshwater forcing is applied to the model, a pattern of oscillation is produced that bears remarkable similarity to the observed fluctuations in North Atlantic climate between 50,000 and 30,000 years before present.; Comparison of NGRIP δ 18-O (proxy for near surface air temperature) between 50,000 and 30,000 years before present, showing Bond cycles (left) with the model output when forced with appropriate glacial freshwater forcing (right).

  8. Optical Spectroscopy of Radiation Processed Cosmic Ices & PAH-doped Water-rich Ices (Facile Generation & Storage of PAH-Ions in H2O Ices)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-12-01

    Water-rich ices, which harbor a wide variety of organic and inorganic species, are common throughout the Solar System and interstellar molecular clouds. Chemical reactions induced within these cosmic ices by high-energy photons and cosmic rays, as well as thermal cycling, play a vital role in the chemical evolution of these icy objects. Recent laboratory studies show that complex organic molecules are generated in these simple cosmic ice analogs upon energetic processing, including amino acids amphiphillic molecules -- the fundamental building the blocks of life. We have discovered that energetic processing of cryogenic water-rich ices containing organic molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) below 50 K produce high-energy species such as radical ions. These ions absorb in the visible-near infrared region, resulting strong coloration. Upon thermal cycling these ions react with the water resulting in oxygenated organic molecules. Applications of our laboratory findings to Planetary Ices will be presented.

  9. Shedding of Water Drops from a Surface under Icing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Deepak Kumar; Criscione, Antonio; Tropea, C; Amirfazli, A

    2015-09-01

    A sessile water drop exposed to an air flow will shed if the adhesion is overcome by the external aerodynamic forces on the drop. In this study, shedding of water drops were investigated under icing conditions, on surfaces with different wettabilities, from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic. A wind tunnel was used for experiments in a temperature range between -8 and 24.5 °C. Results indicate that the temperature has a major influence on the incipient motion of drop shedding. The critical air velocity (U(c)) at which a drop first starts to shed generally increases under icing conditions, indicating an increase in the adhesion force. The contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and the drop base length (L(b)) are found to be the controlling factors for adhesion. A correlation was also developed to deduce the drag coefficient, C(D) for the drop. It was found that C(D) can decrease under icing conditions. In general, a lower C(D) and higher adhesion together lead to a higher critical air velocity. However, there are systems such as water on Teflon for which the critical air velocity remains practically unaffected by temperature because of similar adhesion and C(D) values, at all temperatures tested.

  10. Fire, ice, water, and dirt: A simple climate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, John

    2017-07-01

    A simple paleoclimate model was developed as a modeling exercise. The model is a lumped parameter system consisting of an ocean (water), land (dirt), glacier, and sea ice (ice) and driven by the sun (fire). In comparison with other such models, its uniqueness lies in its relative simplicity yet yielding good results. For nominal values of parameters, the system is very sensitive to small changes in the parameters, yielding equilibrium, steady oscillations, and catastrophes such as freezing or boiling oceans. However, stable solutions can be found, especially naturally oscillating solutions. For nominally realistic conditions, natural periods of order 100kyrs are obtained, and chaos ensues if the Milankovitch orbital forcing is applied. An analysis of a truncated system shows that the naturally oscillating solution is a limit cycle with the characteristics of a relaxation oscillation in the two major dependent variables, the ocean temperature and the glacier ice extent. The key to getting oscillations is having the effective emissivity decreasing with temperature and, at the same time, the effective ocean albedo decreases with increasing glacier extent. Results of the original model compare favorably to the proxy data for ice mass variation, but not for temperature variation. However, modifications to the effective emissivity and albedo can be made to yield much more realistic results. The primary conclusion is that the opinion of Saltzman [Clim. Dyn. 5, 67-78 (1990)] is plausible that the external Milankovitch orbital forcing is not sufficient to explain the dominant 100kyr period in the data.

  11. Tracing Atlantic Water Signature in the Arctic Sea Ice Cover East of Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the Arctic Ocean between Svalbard and Franz Joseph Land in order to elucidate the possible role of Atlantic water (AW inflow in shaping ice conditions. Ice conditions substantially affect the temperature regime of the Spitsbergen archipelago, particularly in winter. We test the hypothesis that intensive vertical mixing at the upper AW boundary releases substantial heat upwards that eventually reaches the under-ice water layer, thinning the ice cover. We examine spatial and temporal variation of ice concentration against time series of wind, air temperature, and AW temperature. Analysis of 1979–2011 ice properties revealed a general tendency of decreasing ice concentration that commenced after the mid-1990s. AW temperature time series in Fram Strait feature a monotonic increase after the mid-1990s, consistent with shrinking ice cover. Ice thins due to increased sensible heat flux from AW; ice erosion from below allows wind and local currents to more effectively break ice. The winter spatial pattern of sea ice concentration is collocated with patterns of surface heat flux anomalies. Winter minimum sea ice thickness occurs in the ice pack interior above the AW path, clearly indicating AW influence on ice thickness. Our study indicates that in the AW inflow region heat flux from the ocean reduces the ice thickness.

  12. Discovery of water ice nearly everywhere in the solar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuppero, A.

    1995-10-01

    During the last decade we have discovered sources of accessible water in some form nearly everywhere in the solar system. Water ice has been found on the planet Mercury; probably on the Earth`s Moon; on Mars; on near Earth objects; on comets whose orbits frequently come close to that of Earth`s orbit; probably on Ceres, the largest inner asteroid; and on comets previously and incorrectly considered to be out of practical reach. The comets also provide massive quantities of hydrocarbons, similar to oil shale. The masses of either water or hydrocarbons are measured in units of cubic kilometers. The water is key to space transportation because it can be used as a rocket propellant directly, and because thermal process alone can be used to convert it and hydrocarbons into hydrogen, the highest performing rocket propellant. This presentation outlines what is currently known about the locations of the water ice, and sketches the requirements and environments of missions to prospect for and assay the water sources.

  13. Biological Ice Nucleation Activity in Cloud Water (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delort, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice nucleation active (INA) biological particles, in particular microorganisms, were studied in cloud water. Twelve cloud samples were collected over a period of 16 months from the puy de Dôme summit (1465 m, France) using sterile cloud droplet impactors. The samples were characterized through biological (cultures, cell counts) and physico-chemical measurements (pH, ion concentrations, carbon content...), and biological ice nuclei were investigated by droplet-freezing assays from -3°C to -13°C. The concentration of total INA particles within this temperature range typically varied from ~1 to ~100 per mL of cloud water; the concentrations of biological IN were several orders of magnitude higher than the values previously reported for precipitations. At -12°C, at least 76% of the IN were biological in origin, i.e. they were inactivated by heating at 95°C, and at temperatures above -8°C only biological material could induce ice. By culture, 44 Pseudomonas-like strains of bacteria were isolated from cloud water samples; 16% of them were found INA at the temperature of -8°C and they were identified as Pseudomonas syringae, Xanthomonas sp. and Pseudoxanthomonas sp.. Two strains induced freezing at as warm as -2°C, positioning them among the most active ice nucleators described so far. We estimated that, in average, 0.18% and more than 1%.of the bacterial cells present in clouds (~104 mL-1) are INA at the temperatures of -8°C and -12°C, respectively.

  14. Freezing Temperatures, Ice Nanotubes Structures, and Proton Ordering of TIP4P/ICE Water inside Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, P; Conde, M M; Rovere, M; Gallo, P

    2017-11-16

    A very recent experimental paper importantly and unexpectedly showed that water in carbon nanotubes is already in the solid ordered phase at the temperature where bulk water boils. The water models used so far in literature for molecular dynamics simulations in carbon nanotubes show freezing temperatures lower than the experiments. We present here results from molecular dynamics simulations of water inside single walled carbon nanotubes using an extremely realistic model for both liquid and icy water, the TIP4P/ICE. The water behavior inside nanotubes of different diameters has been studied upon cooling along the isobars at ambient pressure starting from temperatures where water is in a liquid state. We studied the liquid/solid transition, and we observed freezing temperatures higher than in bulk water and that depend on the diameter of the nanotube. The maximum freezing temperature found is 390 K, which is in remarkable agreement with the recent experimental measurements. We have also analyzed the ice structure called "ice nanotube" that water forms inside the single walled carbon nanotubes when it freezes. The ice forms observed are in agreement with previous results obtained with different water models. A novel finding, a partial proton ordering, is evidenced in our ice nanotubes at finite temperature.

  15. HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT FY09 SECOND QUARTER REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D; David Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Timothy Steeper, T; John Steimke, J; Mark Elvington, M

    2009-04-15

    The primary objective of the DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) is to develop the nuclear hydrogen production technologies necessary to produce hydrogen at a cost competitive with other alternative transportation fuels. The focus of the NHI is on thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis that can be powered by heat from high temperature gas reactors. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been tasked with the primary responsibility to perform research and development in order to characterize, evaluate and develop the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) thermochemical process. This report documents work during the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, for the period between January 1, 2009 and March 31, 2009. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that is part of the 'Sulfur Family' of cycles. As a sulfur cycle, it uses high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and to regenerate the sulfur dioxide reactant. The second step of the process uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to split water and produce hydrogen by electrochemically reacting sulfur dioxide with H{sub 2}O. The SDE produces sulfuric acid, which is then sent to the acid decomposer to complete the cycle. The DOE NHI program is developing the acid decomposer at Sandia National Laboratory for application to both the HyS Process and the Sulfur Iodine Cycle. The SDE is being developed at SRNL. During FY05 and FY06, SRNL designed and conducted proof-of-concept testing for a SDE using a low temperature, PEM fuel cell-type design concept. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency, small footprint and potential for low capital cost, characteristics that are crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. During FY07, SRNL extended the range of testing of the SDE to higher temperature and pressure, conducted a 100-hour longevity test with a 60-cm{sup 2} single cell electrolyzer

  16. The ancient heritage of water ice in the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A; Alexander, Conel M O'D; Du, Fujun; Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I; Harries, Tim J

    2014-09-26

    Identifying the source of Earth's water is central to understanding the origins of life-fostering environments and to assessing the prevalence of such environments in space. Water throughout the solar system exhibits deuterium-to-hydrogen enrichments, a fossil relic of low-temperature, ion-derived chemistry within either (i) the parent molecular cloud or (ii) the solar nebula protoplanetary disk. Using a comprehensive treatment of disk ionization, we find that ion-driven deuterium pathways are inefficient, which curtails the disk's deuterated water formation and its viability as the sole source for the solar system's water. This finding implies that, if the solar system's formation was typical, abundant interstellar ices are available to all nascent planetary systems. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Present-day Exposures of Water Ice in the Northern Mid-latitudes of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Kanner, Lisa C.

    2007-01-01

    Water ice is exposed in the martian north polar cap, but is rarely exposed beyond the cap boundary. Orbital gamma ray spectrometry data strongly imply the presence of water ice within meters of the surface at latitudes north of approximately 60deg. We have examined mid-latitude areas of the northern plains displaying residual ice-rich layers, and report evidence of present-day surface exposures of water ice. These exposures, if confirmed, could con-strain the latitudinal and temporal stability of surface ice on Mars.

  18. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schüpbach, S.; Kettner, E.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-11-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW-SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present

  19. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW–SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to

  20. A Lightweight Vertical Rosette for Deployment in Ice Covered Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethie, W. M.; Chayes, D. N.; Perry, R. S.; Schlosser, P.

    2009-12-01

    Although remote sensing technology provides measurement capability for a number of water properties, there are important substances for which this technology does not currently exist and the only way to measure these substances is to collect water samples and return the samples to the lab. In the Arctic Ocean water samples are difficult to obtain from ships because of the extensive ice cover and thick pressure ridges. However, the ice provides a landing platform for aircraft, which can rapidly cover long distances. Aircraft have been used for sampling the Arctic Ocean for the past half-century using bottles and internally recording CTDs attached to a cable and lowered through leads or holes drilled in the ice. The routine CTD/rosette technology used for sampling from ships measures profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen as well as other substances in situ, displays the data in real time for choosing depths to obtain water samples and the water samples are then collected with the rosette. These systems are too heavy and bulky to deploy from aircraft. We have developed a lightweight modular CTD/rosette system that is deployed through a 12-inch diameter hole drilled in the ice. The modules are connected together physically and electrically with the water bottle modules, which contain four 4-liter bottles each, stacked on top of the CTD module. The CTD traces are displayed on a laptop computer and the bottles are tripped using modified Seabird controllers and a melt-lanyard tripping mechanism. We have used this system for several years with Twin Otter fixed wing aircraft as part of the Switchyard Project, sampling a line of stations annually in the heavily ice covered region between Alert and the North Pole. Casts are carried out in a tent connected to the airplane using a lightweight winch mounted in the airplane. At the completion of a cast, the water modules are placed in a cooler with bags of snow to provide thermal stability at about 0°C and the end caps

  1. Organochlorine compounds in ice melt water from Italian Alpine rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Sara; Negrelli, Christian; Finizio, Antonio; Flora, Onelio; Vighi, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Organochlorine chemicals (OCs) (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and hexachlorobenzene) were measured in ice melt water from five glaciers in the Italian Alps. Even though the data collected may not be sufficient for a precise description of persistent organic pollutant release patterns from glacier melting, they have, however, highlighted the potential for surface water contamination. Concentrations were of the same order of magnitude in all glacial streams, indicating comparable contamination levels in different glaciers of the alpine region. OC levels in nonglacial springs sampled in the same areas are usually lower. Even if differences during the melting season (from spring to autumn) have been identified, a regular seasonal pattern in OC concentrations was not observed. Risk for the aquatic environment is excluded through direct water exposure, but it is likely to occur through biomagnification and secondary poisoning exposure.

  2. The modelled liquid water balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Steger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the surface mass balance will dominate the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GrIS contribution to 21st century sea level rise. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the liquid water balance (LWB of the ice sheet and its response to increasing surface melt. We therefore analyse a firn simulation conducted with the SNOWPACK model for the GrIS and over the period 1960–2014 with a special focus on the LWB and refreezing. Evaluations of the simulated refreezing climate with GRACE and firn temperature observations indicate a good model–observation agreement. Results of the LWB analysis reveal a spatially uniform increase in surface melt (0.16 m w.e. a−1 during 1990–2014. As a response, refreezing and run-off also indicate positive changes during this period (0.05 and 0.11 m w.e. a−1, respectively, where refreezing increases at only half the rate of run-off, implying that the majority of the additional liquid input runs off the ice sheet. This pattern of refreeze and run-off is spatially variable. For instance, in the south-eastern part of the GrIS, most of the additional liquid input is buffered in the firn layer due to relatively high snowfall rates. Modelled increase in refreezing leads to a decrease in firn air content and to a substantial increase in near-surface firn temperature. On the western side of the ice sheet, modelled firn temperature increases are highest in the lower accumulation zone and are primarily caused by the exceptional melt season of 2012. On the eastern side, simulated firn temperature increases are more gradual and are associated with the migration of firn aquifers to higher elevations.

  3. The modelled liquid water balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christian R.; Reijmer, Carleen H.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that the surface mass balance will dominate the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GrIS) contribution to 21st century sea level rise. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the liquid water balance (LWB) of the ice sheet and its response to increasing surface melt. We therefore analyse a firn simulation conducted with the SNOWPACK model for the GrIS and over the period 1960-2014 with a special focus on the LWB and refreezing. Evaluations of the simulated refreezing climate with GRACE and firn temperature observations indicate a good model-observation agreement. Results of the LWB analysis reveal a spatially uniform increase in surface melt (0.16 m w.e. a-1) during 1990-2014. As a response, refreezing and run-off also indicate positive changes during this period (0.05 and 0.11 m w.e. a-1, respectively), where refreezing increases at only half the rate of run-off, implying that the majority of the additional liquid input runs off the ice sheet. This pattern of refreeze and run-off is spatially variable. For instance, in the south-eastern part of the GrIS, most of the additional liquid input is buffered in the firn layer due to relatively high snowfall rates. Modelled increase in refreezing leads to a decrease in firn air content and to a substantial increase in near-surface firn temperature. On the western side of the ice sheet, modelled firn temperature increases are highest in the lower accumulation zone and are primarily caused by the exceptional melt season of 2012. On the eastern side, simulated firn temperature increases are more gradual and are associated with the migration of firn aquifers to higher elevations.

  4. Surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in ice-free and ice-covered waters

    KAUST Repository

    Solberg, Ingrid

    2013-10-04

    Upward-facing echosounders that provided continuous, long-term measurements were applied to address the surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) throughout an entire winter in a 150-m-deep Norwegian fjord. During ice-free conditions, the sprat surfaced and released gas bubbles at night with an estimated surfacing rate of 3.5 times per fish day-1. The vertical swimming speeds during surfacing were considerably higher (~10 times) than during diel vertical migrations, especially when returning from the surface, and particularly when the fjord was not ice covered. The sprat released gas a few hours after surfacing, suggesting that the sprat gulped atmospheric air during its excursions to the surface. While the surface activity increased after the fjord became ice covered, the records of gas release decreased sharply. The under-ice fish then displayed a behavior interpreted as "searching for the surface" by repeatedly ascending toward the ice, apparently with limited success of filling the swim bladder. This interpretation was supported by lower acoustic target strength in ice-covered waters. The frequent surfacing behavior demonstrated in this study indicates that gulping of atmospheric air is an important element in the life of sprat. While at least part of the population endured overwintering in the ice-covered habitat, ice covering may constrain those physostome fishes that lack a gas-generating gland in ways that remain to be established. 2013 The Author(s).

  5. Exposure of Water Ice in the Northern Mid-lattitudes of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Kanner, Lisa C.

    2007-01-01

    Water ice is exposed in the martian north polar cap, and is occasionally exposed beyond the cap boundary. Orbital gamma ray spectrometry data strongly imply the presence of water ice within meters of the surface at latitudes north of approximately 60 deg. We have examined midlatitude areas of the northern plains displaying evidence of residual ice-rich layers, and report possible present-day exposures of ice. These exposures, if confirmed, could constrain the latitudinal and temporal stability of surface ice on Mars.

  6. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  7. Effects of electrode settings on chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzing seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoo-Shyng Wang Hsu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyzed water has significant disinfection effects, can comply with food safety regulations, and is environmental friendly. We investigated the effects of immersion depth of electrodes, stirring, electrode size, and electrode gap on the properties and chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzing seawater and its storage stability. Results indicated that temperature and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP of the seawater increased gradually, whereas electrical conductivity decreased steadily in electrolysis. During the electrolysis process, pH values and electric currents also decreased slightly within small ranges. Additional stirring or immersing the electrodes deep under the seawater significantly increased current density without affecting its electric efficiency and current efficiency. Decreasing electrode size or increasing electrode gap decreased chlorine production and electric current of the process without affecting its electric efficiency and current efficiency. Less than 35% of chlorine in the electrolyzed seawater was lost in a 3-week storage period. The decrement trend leveled off after the 1st week of storage. The electrolyzing system is a convenient and economical method for producing high-chlorine seawater, which will have high potential applications in agriculture, aquaculture, or food processing.

  8. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large-scale ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Goeller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no doubt about the existence of a widespread hydrological network under the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux–basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  9. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large scale ice sheet models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeller, S.; Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.; Miller, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is currently no doubt about the existence of a wide-spread hydrological network under the Antarctic ice sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain inspired by the Gamburtsev Mountains, Antarctica. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux-basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out, that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  10. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. G.; Charnely, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 micron, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 micron. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 micron found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 micron H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% +/- 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  11. Novel Electrolyzer Applications: Providing More Than Just Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, J.; Harrison, K.; Peters, M.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen can be used for many different applications and can be integrated into many different system architectures. One of the methods for producing the hydrogen is to use an electrolyzer. This work explores the flexibility of electrolyzers to behave as responsive loads. Experimental tests were performed for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) and an alkaline electrolyzer to assess the operational flexibility of electrolyzers to behave as responsive loads. The results are compared to the operational requirements to participate in end-user facility energy management, transmission and distribution system support, and wholesale electricity market services. Electrolyzers begin changing their electricity demand within milliseconds of a set-point change. The settling time after a set-point change is on the order of seconds. It took 6.5 minutes for the PEM unit to execute a cold start and 1 minute to turn off. In addition, a frequency disturbance correction test was performed and electrolyzers were able to accelerate the speed that the grid frequency can be restored. Electrolyzers acting as demand response devices can respond sufficiently fast and for a long enough duration to participate in all of the applications explored. Furthermore, electrolyzers can be operated to support a variety of applications while also providing hydrogen for industrial processes, transportation fuel, or heating fuel. Additionally, favorable operating properties and a variety of potential system architectures showcase the flexibility of electrolyzer systems.

  12. Of ice and water: Quaternary fluvial response to glacial forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Stéphane; Adamson, Kathryn; Delmas, Magali; Calvet, Marc; Harmand, Dominique

    2017-06-01

    Much research, especially within the framework of the Fluvial Archives Group, has focused on river response to climate change in mid-latitude non-glaciated areas, but research into the relationships between Quaternary glacial and fluvial dynamics remains sparse. Understanding glacial-fluvial interactions is important because glaciers are able to influence river behaviour significantly, especially during glacial and deglacial periods: (1) when they are located downstream of a pre-existing fluvial system and disrupt its activity, leading to hydrographical, hydrosedimentary and isostatic adjustments, and (2) when they are located upstream, which is a common scenario in mid-latitude mountains that were glaciated during Pleistocene cold periods. In these instances, glaciers are major water and sediment sources. Their role is particularly significant during deglaciation, when meltwater transfer towards the fluvial system is greatly increased while downstream sediment evacuation is influenced by changes to glacial-fluvial connectivity and basin-wide sediment storage. This means that discharge and sediment flux do not always respond simultaneously, which can lead to complex fluvial behaviour involving proglacial erosion and sedimentation and longer-term paraglacial reworking. These processes may vary spatially and temporally according to the position relative to the ice margin (ice-proximal versus ice-distal). With a focus on the catchments of Europe, this paper aims to review our understanding of glacial impacts on riversystem behaviour. We examine the methods used to unravel fluvial response to 'glacial forcing', and propose a synthesis of the behaviour of glacially-fed rivers, opening perspectives for further research.

  13. POLAR ICE: Integrating, Distributing and Visualising Ice Information Products for Operators in Polar Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nick; Fleming, Andrew; Cziferszky, Andreas; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Rasmussen, Till; Makynen, Marko; Berglund, Robin; Seitsonen, Lauri; Rudjord, Oystein; Solberg, Rune; Tangen, Helge; Axell, Lars; Saldo, Roberto; Melsheimer, Christian; Larsen, Hans Eilif; Puestow, Thomas; Arhturs, David; Flach, Dominie

    2016-08-01

    The POLAR ICE project has developed a system for integrating and delivering satellite derived ice information products to operators working in the economically and environmentally important Arctic and Antarctic regions. POLAR ICE has been supported by the European Commission's FP7 programme and undertaken by European and Canadian companies and institutes, who are all partners in the Polar View Earth Observation Limited (PVEO) company. It is the aim of PVEO to commercialise the service that has been developed and demonstrated as a part of POLAR ICE.Access to sea ice information derived from satellite earth observation data is critical to support the increasing numbers of Arctic and Antarctic shipping and off-shore operations and to protect the rapidly changing polar environment.To-date the development of sea ice information capabilities has addressed separate elements of complete service chains. In contrast POLAR ICE has linked these separate elements together, filled in known gaps and built a robust integrated service chain.

  14. Role of Water Solidification Concepts in Designing Nano-Textured Anti-Icing Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohari, Behnam; Russell, Kyle; Hejazi, Vahid; Rohatgi, Pradeep

    2017-08-17

    Creating anti-icing surfaces has proven to be a challenging task. With such a wide range of impacting parameters it is important to quantify ones with a large effect. Water solidification mechanisms play a fundamental role in designing anti-icing surfaces. In this Review Article, we will consider the effects of surface roughening on the mechanisms of nucleation and ice growth to show how surface roughening can be an alternative to overcome the limitations of icing of superhydrophobic coatings and surfaces. The results from various studies of anti-icing properties of superhydrophobic surfaces are reviewed and expanded to incorporate water solidification mechanisms to provide a more comprehensive approach to the design of anti-icing surfaces. The literature within this review shows that by applying the necessary roughness to either hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces and adjusting the surface topography, we can significantly suppress ice nucleation on various surfaces.

  15. New metastable form of ice and its role in the homogeneous crystallization of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, John; Romano, Flavio; Tanaka, Hajime

    2014-07-01

    The homogeneous crystallization of water at low temperature is believed to occur through the direct nucleation of cubic (Ic) and hexagonal (Ih) ices. Here, we provide evidence from molecular simulations that the nucleation of ice proceeds through the formation of a new metastable phase, which we name Ice 0. We find that Ice 0 is structurally similar to the supercooled liquid, and that on growth it gradually converts into a stacking of Ice Ic and Ih. We suggest that this mechanism provides a thermodynamic explanation for the location and pressure dependence of the homogeneous nucleation temperature, and that Ice 0 controls the homogeneous nucleation of low-pressure ices, acting as a precursor to crystallization in accordance with Ostwald's step rule of phases. Our findings show that metastable crystalline phases of water may play roles that have been largely overlooked.

  16. Evidence for subsurface water ice in Korolev crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J.C.; Titus, T.N.; Kieffer, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    Following the work of Kieffer and Titus (2001, Icarus 154, 162-180), we present results of thermal IR observations of Korolev crater, located at ???73?? latitude in the martian northern polar region. Similar to techniques employed by Titus et al. (2003, Science 299, 1048-1050), we use infrared images from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey to identify several regions within the crater basin with distinct thermal properties that correlate with topography. The THEMIS results show these regions exhibit temperature variations, spatially within the crater and throughout the martian year. In addition to the variations identified in the THEMIS observations, Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations show differences in albedo and temperature of these regions on both daily and seasonal cycles. Modeling annual temperature variations of the surface, we use TES observations to examine the thermal properties of these regions. This analysis reveals the crater interior deposits are likely thick layers (several meters) of high thermal inertia material (water ice, or extremely ice-rich regolith). Spatial variations of the physical properties of these regions are likely due to topography and possibly variations in the subsurface material itself. The nature of these deposits may help constrain polar processes, as well as provide context for the polar lander mission, Phoenix. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiative characteristics of ice-covered fresh- and brackish-water bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppäranta, Matti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and optics of ice and snow overlying bodies of water were studied in the years 2000–2003. The data were collected in the northern temperate region (nine Estonian and Finnish lakes and one brackish water site, Santala Bay, in the Gulf of Finland. In the present paper we describe the results concerning the radiative characteristics of the system “snow + ice cover on the water”: albedo, attenuation of light, and planar and scalar irradiances through the ice. The basic data consist of irradiance measurements above and below ice cover for the PAR band of the solar spectrum (400–700 nm. Albedo varied across wide limits (0.20–0.70 for ice, 0.63–0.94 for snow, depending on the optical and physical properties of ice/snow and weather conditions. The vertically averaged light attenuation coefficient of the ice layer in the brackish waters of Santala Bay was higher than that in the lakes. The ratio of irradiance beneath the ice to incident irradiance increased 2.5–20 times after removing the snow, depending on the albedo and the thickness of ice and snow as well as on their optical properties. In the upper layer of water beneath the ice the ratio of planar to scalar quantum irradiances increased with depth (according to our earlier results obtained in summer this ratio decreased with increasing depth.

  18. Possible significance of cubic water-ice, H2O-Ic, in the atmospheric water cycle of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, James L.

    1988-01-01

    The possible formation and potential significance of the cubic ice polymorph on Mars is discussed. When water-ice crystallizes on Earth, the ambient conditions of temperature and pressure result in the formation of the hexagonal ice polymorph; however, on Mars, the much lower termperature and pressures may permit the crystallization of the cubic polymorph. Cubic ice has two properties of possible importance on Mars: it is an excellant nucleator of other volatiles (such as CO2), and it undergoes an exothermic transition to hexagonal ice at temperatures above 170 K. These properties may have significant implications for both martian cloud formation and the development of the seasonal polar caps.

  19. Density and Compressibility of Liquid Water and Ice from First-Principles Simulations with Hybrid Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiduk, Alex P; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2015-08-06

    We determined the equilibrium density and compressibility of water and ice from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations using gradient-corrected (PBE) and hybrid (PBE0) functionals. Both functionals predicted the density of ice to be larger than that of water, by 15 (PBE) and 35% (PBE0). The PBE0 functional yielded a lower density of both ice and water with respect to PBE, leading to better agreement with experiment for ice but not for liquid water. Approximate inclusion of dispersion interactions on computed molecular-dynamics trajectories led to a substantial improvement of the PBE0 results for the density of liquid water, which, however, resulted to be slightly lower than that of ice.

  20. Detection of Sea Ice and Open Water from RADARSAT-2 Images for Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, A.; Buehner, M.

    2016-12-01

    Automated detection of sea ice and open water from SAR data is very important for further assimilation into coupled ocean-sea ice-atmosphere numerical models, such as the Regional Ice-Ocean Prediction System being implemented at the Environment and Climate Change Canada. Conventional classification approaches based on various learning techniques are found to be limited by the fact that they typically do not indicate the level of confidence for ice and water retrievals. Meanwhile, only ice/water retrievals with a very high level of confidence are allowed to be assimilated into the sea ice model to avoid propagating and magnifying errors into the numerical prediction system. In this study we developed a new technique for ice and water detection from dual-polarization RADARSAT-2 HH-HV images which provides the probability of ice/water at a given location. We collected many hundreds of thousands of SAR signatures over various sea ice types (i.e. new, grey, first-year, and multi-year ice) and open water from all available RADARSAT-2 images and the corresponding Canadian Ice Service Image Analysis products over the period from November 2010 to May 2016. Our analysis of the dataset revealed that ice/water separation can be effectively performed in the space of SAR-based variables independent of the incidence angle and noise floor (such as texture measures) and auxiliary Global Environmental Multiscale Model parameters (such as surface wind speed). Choice of the parameters will be specifically discussed in the presentation. An ice probability empirical model as a function of the selected predictors was built in a form of logistic regression, based on the training dataset from 2012 to 2016. The developed ice probability model showed very good performance on the independent testing subset (year 2011). With the ice/water probability threshold of 0.95 reflecting a very high level of confidence, 79% of the testing ice and water samples were classified with the accuracy of 99

  1. Winter Community Structure Changes in Frazil Ice and Open Water in Riverine Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, K

    2004-01-01

    ...) that examined dissolved oxygen (DO) levels and changes in river microbiology during winter, periods of low water temperature, and periods of ice-cover, with the objective of providing guidance for winter water-quality modeling...

  2. Topologically frustrated ionisation in a water-ammonia ice mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Mafety, A; Queyroux, J A; Wilson, C W; Zhang, H; Béneut, K; Le Marchand, G; Baptiste, B; Dumas, P; Garbarino, G; Finocchi, F; Loveday, J S; Pietrucci, F; Saitta, A M; Datchi, F; Ninet, S

    2017-10-20

    Water and ammonia are considered major components of the interiors of the giant icy planets and their satellites, which has motivated their exploration under high P-T conditions. Exotic forms of these pure ices have been revealed at extreme (~megabar) pressures, notably symmetric, ionic, and superionic phases. Here we report on an extensive experimental and computational study of the high-pressure properties of the ammonia monohydrate compound forming from an equimolar mixture of water and ammonia. Our experiments demonstrate that relatively mild pressure conditions (7.4 GPa at 300 K) are sufficient to transform ammonia monohydrate from a prototypical hydrogen-bonded crystal into a form where the standard molecular forms of water and ammonia coexist with their ionic counterparts, hydroxide (OH-) and ammonium [Formula: see text] ions. Using ab initio atomistic simulations, we explain this surprising coexistence of neutral/charged species as resulting from a topological frustration between local homonuclear and long-ranged heteronuclear ionisation mechanisms.

  3. Water Droplet Impingement on Simulated Glaze, Mixed, and Rime Ice Accretions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Rachman, Arief; Wong, See-Cheuk; Yeong, Hsiung-Wei; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2007-01-01

    Water droplet impingement data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for a 36-in. chord NACA 23012 airfoil with and without simulated ice using a dye-tracer method. The simulated ice shapes were defined with the NASA Glenn LEWICE 2.2 ice accretion program and including one rime, four mixed and five glaze ice shapes. The impingement experiments were performed with spray clouds having median volumetric diameters of 20, 52, 111, 154, and 236 micron. Comparisons to the experimental data were generated which showed good agreement for the rime and mixed shapes at lower drop sizes. For larger drops sizes LEWICE 2.2 over predicted the collection efficiencies due to droplet splashing effects which were not modeled in the program. Also for the more complex glaze ice shapes interpolation errors resulted in the over prediction of collection efficiencies in cove or shadow regions of ice shapes.

  4. Pressure Drop in Cold Water Flow in Beds Packed with Several Kinds of Crushed Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanadori, Michio; Ohira, Akiyoshi

    This paper deals with the pressure drop in cold water flow in the beds packed with crushed ice. 1n each case, ice-packed beds were filled with sevral kinds of crushed ice, and friction-loss coefficients were examined. The following results were obtained. (1) The friction factor of rectangular-type ice-packed beds is smaller than that of ideal sphere beds by about 1/4 to 1/2. (2) The friction factor of small-stone-type ice-packed beds is about twice as large as that of ideal sphere beds. (3) It is difficult to compare the flow model of water in restricted channel of particle-type ice-packed beds with that of ideal packed beds.

  5. Study on bouncing motion of a water drop collision on superhydrophobic surface under icing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tetsuro; Morita, Katsuaki; Kimura, Shigeo

    2017-11-01

    When micro droplets in the air are supercooled and collide with the object, they froze on the surface at the time of a collision and can be defined as icing. If supercooled water droplets collide with an airfoil of an aircraft in flight and shape changes, there is a danger of losing lift and falling. Recently, the ice protection system using a heater and Anti- / Deicing (superhydrophobic) coating is focused. In this system, colliding water droplets are melted by the heat of the heater at the tip of the blade, and the water droplet is bounced by the aerodynamic force on the rear superhydrophobic coating. Thus, it prevents the phenomenon of icing again at the back of the wing (runback ice). Therefore, it is possible to suppress power consumption of the electric heater. In that system, it is important to withdraw water droplets at an extremely superhydrophobic surface at an early stage. However, research on bouncing phenomenon on superhydrophobic surface under icing conditions are not done much now. Therefore, in our research, we focus on one drop supercooled water droplet that collides with the superhydrophobic surface in the icing phenomenon, and aim to follow that phenomenon. In this report, the contact time is defined as the time from collision of a water droplet to bouncing from the superhydrophobic surface, and various parameters (temperature, speed, and diameter) on water droplets under icing conditions are set as the water drop bouncing time (contact time) of the product.

  6. Ice haze, snow, and the Mars water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph

    1990-01-01

    Light curves and extinction profiles derived from Martian limb observations are used to constrain the atmospheric temperature structure in regions of the atmosphere with thin haze and to analyze the haze particle properties and atmospheric eddy mixing. Temperature between 170 and 190 K are obtained for three cases at levels in the atmosphere ranging from 20 to 50 km. Eddy diffusion coefficients around 100,000 sq cm/s, typical of a nonconvecting atmosphere, are derived in the haze regions at times when the atmosphere is relatively clear of dust. This parameter apparently changes by more than three orders of magnitude with season and local conditions. The derived particle size parameter varies systematically by more than an order of magnitude with condensation level, in such a way that the characteristic fall time is always about one Martian day. Ice hazes provide a mechanism for scavenging water vapor in the thin Mars atmosphere and may play a key role in the seasonal cycle of water on Mars.

  7. A mathematical model for atmospheric ice accretion and water flow on a cold surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, T.G.; Charpin, J.P.F. [University of Cape Town (South Africa). Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics

    2004-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe ice accretion and water flow on a cold substrate of arbitrary shape. It is shown how the model may be applied to practical substrate shapes, such as flat surface, cylinder and aerofoil. A numerical scheme to solve the governing equations is then described. Results are presented for an aerofoil under conditions appropriate to in-flight icing and for a cylinder in conditions for atmospheric icing. (author)

  8. The study of fresh-water lake ice using multiplexed imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Bryan M.; Larson, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The study of ice in the upper Great Lakes, both from the operational and the scientific points of view, is receiving continued attention. Quantitative and qualitative field work is being conducted to provide the needed background for accurate interpretation of remotely sensed data. The data under discussion in this paper were obtained by a side-looking multiplexed airborne radar (SLAR) supplemented with ground-truth data.Because of its ability to penetrate adverse weather, radar is an especially important instrument for monitoring ice in the upper Great Lakes. It has previously been shown that imaging radars can provide maps of ice cover in these areas. However, questions concerning both the nature of the surfaces reflecting radar energy and the interpretation of the radar imagery continually arise.Our analysis of ice in Whitefish Bay (Lake Superior) indicates that the combination of the ice/water interlace and the ice/air interface is the major contributor to the radar backscatter as seen on the imagery At these frequencies the ice has a very low relative dielectric permittivity (radar backscatter with data on the meteorological and sea-state history of the area, together with some basic ground truth, better estimates of the ice thickness may be provided. In addition, certain ice features (e.g. ridges, ice-foot formation, areas of brash ice) may be identified with reasonable confidence. There is a continued need for additional ground work to verify the validity of imaging radars for these types of interpretations.

  9. Fast crystalline ice formation at extremely low temperature through water/neon matrix sublimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Kimura, Yuki; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Sugimoto, Toshiki; Pirronello, Valerio

    2017-07-21

    Crystalline ice formation requires water molecules to be sufficiently mobile to find and settle on the thermodynamically most stable site. Upon cooling, however, diffusion and rearrangement become increasingly kinetically difficult. Water ice grown by the condensation of water vapor in laboratory is thus generally assumed to be in a metastable amorphous form below 100 K. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of crystalline ice formation at extremely low temperature using a water/neon matrix (1/1000, 30 000 monolayers) prepared at 6 K, which is subsequently warmed to 11-12 K. In situ infrared spectroscopy revealed the assembly of the dispersed water molecules, forming crystalline ice I during the sublimation of the neon matrix for 40-250 seconds. This finding indicates that the high mobility of the water molecules during matrix sublimation can overcome the kinetic barrier to form crystals even at extremely low temperature.

  10. Chlorine-containing salts as water ice nucleating particles on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Materese, D. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Clapham, M. E.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Water ice cloud formation on Mars largely is expected to occur on the most efficient ice nucleating particle available. Salts have been observed on the Martian surface and have been known to facilitate water cloud formation on Earth. We examined heterogeneous ice nucleation onto sodium chloride and sodium perchlorate substrates under Martian atmospheric conditions, in the range of 150 to 180 K and 10-7 to 10-5 Torr water partial pressure. Sub-155 K data for the critical saturation ratio (Scrit) suggests an exponential model best describes the temperature-dependence of nucleation onset of water ice for all substrates tested. While sodium chloride does not facilitate water ice nucleation more easily than bare silicon, sodium perchlorate does support depositional nucleation at lower saturation levels than other substrates shown and is comparable to smectite-rich clay in its ability to support cloud initiation. Perchlorates could nucleate water ice at partial pressures up to 40% lower than other substrates examined to date under Martian atmospheric conditions. These findings suggest air masses on Mars containing uplifted salts such as perchlorates could form water ice clouds at lower saturation ratios than in air masses absent similar particles.

  11. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice

    OpenAIRE

    Garnham, Christopher P; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, t...

  12. Nonlinear Spectral Mixture Modeling to Estimate Water-Ice Abundance of Martian Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalay, Szilard; Chu, Kathryn; Zeev Noe Dobrea, Eldar

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel technique to estimate the abundance of water-ice in the Martian permafrost using Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager multispectral data. In previous work, Cull et al. (2010) estimated the abundance of water-ice in trenches dug by the Mars Phoenix lander by modeling the spectra of the icy regolith using the radiative transfer methods described in Hapke (2008) with optical constants for Mauna Kea palagonite (Clancy et al., 1995) as a substitute for unknown Martian regolith optical constants. Our technique, which uses the radiative transfer methods described in Shkuratov et al. (1999), seeks to eliminate the uncertainty that stems from not knowing the composition of the Martian regolith by using observations of the Martian soil before and after the water-ice has sublimated away. We use observations of the desiccated regolith sample to estimate its complex index of refraction from its spectrum. This removes any a priori assumptions of Martian regolith composition, limiting our free parameters to the estimated real index of refraction of the dry regolith at one specific wavelength, ice grain size, and regolith porosity. We can then model mixtures of regolith and water-ice, fitting to the original icy spectrum to estimate the ice abundance. To constrain the uncertainties in this technique, we performed laboratory measurements of the spectra of known mixtures of water-ice and dry soils as well as those of soils after desiccation with controlled viewing geometries. Finally, we applied the technique to Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager observations and estimated water-ice abundances consistent with pore-fill in the near-surface ice. This abundance is consistent with atmospheric diffusion, which has implications to our understanding of the history of water-ice on Mars and the role of the regolith at high latitudes as a reservoir of atmospheric H2O.

  13. Circulation and water properties in the landfast ice zone of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartner, Thomas J.; Danielson, Seth L.; Potter, Rachel A.; Trefry, John H.; Mahoney, Andy; Savoie, Mark; Irvine, Cayman; Sousa, Leandra

    2017-09-01

    Moorings, hydrography, satellite-tracked drifters, and high-frequency radar data describe the annual cycle in circulation and water properties in the landfast ice zone (LIZ) of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea. Three seasons, whose duration and characteristics are controlled by landfast ice formation and ablation, define the LIZ: ;winter;, ;break-up;, and ;open-water;. Winter begins in October with ice formation and ends in June when rivers commence discharging. Winter LIZ ice velocities are zero, under-ice currents are weak ( 5 cm s-1), and poorly correlated with winds and local sea level. The along-shore momentum balance is between along-shore pressure gradients and bottom and ice-ocean friction. Currents at the landfast ice-edge are swift ( 35 cm s-1), wind-driven, with large horizontal shears, and potentially unstable. Weak cross-shore velocities ( 1 cm s-1) imply limited exchanges between the LIZ and the outer shelf in winter. The month-long break-up season (June) begins with the spring freshet and concludes when landfast ice detaches from the bottom. Cross-shore currents increase, and the LIZ hosts shallow ( 2 m), strongly-stratified, buoyant and sediment-laden, under-ice river plumes that overlie a sharp, 1 m thick, pycnocline across which salinity increases by 30. The plume salt balance is between entrainment and cross-shore advection. Break-up is followed by the 3-month long open-water season when currents are swift (≥20 cm s-1) and predominantly wind-driven. Winter water properties are initialized by fall advection and evolve slowly due to salt rejection from ice. Fall waters and ice within the LIZ derive from local rivers, the Mackenzie and/or Chukchi shelves, and the Arctic basin.

  14. Impact of sea-ice formation on the properties of Antarctic bottom water

    OpenAIRE

    Goosse, H.; Campin, J. M.; T. Fichefet; Deleersnijder, E.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that fresh-water fluxes due to ice accretion or melting profoundly influence the formation of Antarctic bottom water (AABW). This is investigated by means of a global, three-dimensional ice-ocean model. Two model runs were conducted. At the high southern latitudes, the control experiment exhibits positive (i.e. towards the ocean) fresh-water fluxes over the deep ocean, and large negative fluxes over the Antarctic continental shelf, because of the intense ice-productio...

  15. Bibliography of Ice Properties and Forecasting Related to Transportation in Ice-Covered Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    viscous constitutive laws to sea Cross Islands, two barrier islands located 16 and 21 ice on the geophysical scale recently has been ques - km offshore in...Theoretical assumptions and operational techni- optical method is apparently the most appropriate for ques for obtaining morphometric characteristics of...Glaciology and ice conditions in the Alaska, is mainly a series of braided channels that Weddell Sea, Servicio de Hydrografia Naval, Boetin freeze

  16. Quantification of unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zheyan; Hu, Hui

    2009-05-01

    We report progress made in our recent effort to develop and implement a novel, lifetime-based molecular tagging thermometry (MTT) technique to quantify unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets pertinent to wind turbine icing phenomena. The lifetime-based MTT technique was used to achieve temporally and spatially resolved temperature distribution measurements within small, convectively cooled water droplets to quantify unsteady heat transfer within the small water droplets in the course of convective cooling process. The transient behavior of phase changing process within small icing water droplets was also revealed clearly by using the MTT technique. Such measurements are highly desirable to elucidate underlying physics to improve our understanding about important microphysical phenomena pertinent to ice formation and accreting process as water droplets impinging onto wind turbine blades.

  17. Rubber friction on ice: investigation of frictional heating and melt water film thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Parkanyi, Tamas

    2016-01-01

    Friction on ice is important for many different fields such as winter sports and vehicle traction. In vehicle handling, maximising the friction coefficient between tyres and the ice surface is key to safety. The friction coefficient between tyre rubber and ice has been observed to be as high as unity at low temperatures and as little as 0.05 close to the ice melting temperature. The observed low friction is due to thin water films generated through frictional heating. Little is known about th...

  18. Perennial water ice identified in the south polar cap of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Poulet, François; Gendrin, Aline; Gondet, Brigitte; Berthé, Michel; Soufflot, Alain; Drossart, Pierre; Combes, Michel; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Moroz, Vassili; Mangold, Nicolas; Schmitt, Bernard

    2004-04-08

    The inventory of water and carbon dioxide reservoirs on Mars are important clues for understanding the geological, climatic and potentially exobiological evolution of the planet. From the early mapping observation of the permanent ice caps on the martian poles, the northern cap was believed to be mainly composed of water ice, whereas the southern cap was thought to be constituted of carbon dioxide ice. However, recent missions (NASA missions Mars Global Surveyor and Odyssey) have revealed surface structures, altimetry profiles, underlying buried hydrogen, and temperatures of the south polar regions that are thermodynamically consistent with a mixture of surface water ice and carbon dioxide. Here we present the first direct identification and mapping of both carbon dioxide and water ice in the martian high southern latitudes, at a resolution of 2 km, during the local summer, when the extent of the polar ice is at its minimum. We observe that this south polar cap contains perennial water ice in extended areas: as a small admixture to carbon dioxide in the bright regions; associated with dust, without carbon dioxide, at the edges of this bright cap; and, unexpectedly, in large areas tens of kilometres away from the bright cap.

  19. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  20. Heterogeneous ice nucleation in aqueous solutions: the role of water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobrist, B; Marcolli, C; Peter, T; Koop, T

    2008-05-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation experiments have been performed with four different ice nuclei (IN), namely nonadecanol, silica, silver iodide and Arizona test dust. All IN are either immersed in the droplets or located at the droplets surface. The IN were exposed to various aqueous solutions, which consist of (NH4)2SO4, H2SO4, MgCl2, NaCl, LiCl, Ca(NO3)2, K2CO3, CH3COONa, ethylene glycol, glycerol, malonic acid, PEG300 or a NaCl/malonic acid mixture. Freezing was studied using a differential scanning calorimeter and a cold finger cell. The results show that the heterogeneous ice freezing temperatures decrease with increasing solute concentration; however, the magnitude of this effect is solute dependent. In contrast, when the results are analyzed in terms of the solution water activity a very consistent behavior emerges: heterogeneous ice nucleation temperatures for all four IN converge each onto a single line, irrespective of the nature of the solute. We find that a constant offset with respect to the ice melting point curve, Deltaaw,het, can describe the observed freezing temperatures for each IN. Such a behavior is well-known for homogeneous ice nucleation from supercooled liquid droplets and has led to the development of water-activity-based ice nucleation theory. The large variety of investigated solutes together with different general types of ice nuclei studied (monolayers, ionic crystals, covalently bound network-forming compounds, and a mixture of chemically different crystallites) underlines the general applicability of water-activity-based ice nucleation theory also for heterogeneous ice nucleation in the immersion mode. Finally, the ice nucleation efficiencies of the various IN, as well as the atmospheric implication of the developed parametrization are discussed.

  1. Triple Isotope Water Measurements of Lake Untersee Ice using Off-Axis ICOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Andersen, D. T.; Gupta, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Untersee (71.348°S, 13.458°E) is the largest surface freshwater lake in the interior of the Gruber Mountains of central Queen Maud Land in East Antarctica. The lake is permanently covered with ice, is partly bounded by glacier ice and has a mean annual air temperature of -10°C. In contrast to other Antarctic lakes the dominating physical process controlling ice-cover dynamics is low summer temperatures and high wind speeds resulting in sublimation rather than melting as the main mass-loss process. The ice-cover of the lake is composed of lake-water ice formed during freeze-up and rafted glacial ice derived from the Anuchin Glacier. The mix of these two fractions impacts the energy balance of the lake, which directly affects ice-cover thickness. Ice-cover is important if one is to understand the physical, chemical, and biological linkages within these unique, physically driven ecosystems. We have analyzed δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O from samples of lake and glacier ice collected at Lake Untersee in Dec 2014. Using these data we seek to answer two specific questions: Are we able to determine the origin and history of the lake ice, discriminating between rafted glacial ice and lake water? Can isotopic gradients in the surface ice indicate the ablation (sublimation) rate of the surface ice? The triple isotope water analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR 912-0032) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O from water, as well as the calculated d-excess and 17O-excess. The laboratory precision in high performance mode for both δ17O and δ18O is 0.03 ‰, and for δ2H is 0.2 ‰. Methodology and isotope data from Lake Untersee samples are presented. Figure: Ice samples were collected across Lake Untersee from both glacial and lake ice regions for this study.

  2. Direct Calculation of Ice Homogeneous Nucleation Rate for a Molecular Model of Water

    CERN Document Server

    Haji-Akbari, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of systems and environments, including biological cells [1], soil [2], aircraft [3], transportation infrastructure [4] and atmospheric clouds [5,6]. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of water [7-9]. For the more realistic molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g.~by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory [10]. Here, we use a path sampling approach to perform the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice [11], the most accurate among the existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological order parameter for distinguishing different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing me...

  3. Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water-Xe system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I; Pulver, Alexander Yu; Peregudov, Alex; Artyuhov, Igor

    2014-07-21

    Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We follow the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a possible instability of clathrate at cryogenic temperatures and conversion to an amorphous phase comprised of "xenon + hydration shell" Xe·(H2O)21.5 clusters. Simulations of ice-xenon solution interface in equilibrium and during ice growth reveal the effects of xenon on the ice-liquid interface, where adsorbed xenon causes roughening of ice surface but does not preferentially form clathrate. These results provide evidence against the ice-blocker mechanism of xenon cryoprotection.

  4. Great Lakes Daily Ice Observations at NOAA Water Level Gauge Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains daily visual ice observations taken yearly from 1 November to 30 April at NOAA/National Ocean Service water level gauge sites in the Great...

  5. Antarctic Timing of Surface Water Changes off Chile and Patagonian Ice Sheet Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank Lamy; Jérôme Kaiser; Ulysses Ninnemann; Dierk Hebbeln; Helge W. Arz; Joseph Stoner

    2004-01-01

    Marine sediments from the Chilean continental margin are used to infer millennial-scale changes in southeast Pacific surface ocean water properties and Patagonian ice sheet extent since the last glacial period...

  6. Influence of Surface and Bulk Water Ice on the Reactivity of a Water-forming Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Thanja; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-09-01

    On the surface of icy dust grains in the dense regions of the interstellar medium, a rich chemistry can take place. Due to the low temperature, reactions that proceed via a barrier can only take place through tunneling. The reaction {{H}}+{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}2\\longrightarrow {{{H}}}2{{O}}+{OH} is such a case with a gas-phase barrier of ˜26.5 kJ mol-1. Still, the reaction is known to be involved in water formation on interstellar grains. Here, we investigate the influence of a water ice surface and of bulk ice on the reaction rate constant. Rate constants are calculated using instanton theory down to 74 K. The ice is taken into account via multiscale modeling, describing the reactants and the direct surrounding at the quantum mechanical level with density functional theory (DFT), while the rest of the ice is modeled on the molecular mechanical level with a force field. We find that H2O2 binding energies cannot be captured by a single value, but rather they depend on the number of hydrogen bonds with surface molecules. In highly amorphous surroundings, the binding site can block the routes of attack and impede the reaction. Furthermore, the activation energies do not correlate with the binding energies of the same sites. The unimolecular rate constants related to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism increase as the activation energy decreases. Thus, we provide a lower limit for the rate constant and argue that rate constants can have values up to two order of magnitude larger than this limit.

  7. First Detection of Water Ice and Organics on an Asteroid: A Possible Link to the Origin of Earth's Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Kelsey D.; Campins, H.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Howell, E. S.; Kelley, M. S.; Licandro, J.; Mothédiniz, T.; Fernández, Y.; Ziffer, J.

    2010-05-01

    We report the detection of water ice and organics on the surface of asteroid 24 Themis. Our rotationally-resolved infrared (2-4 µm) spectra of this asteroid indicate that the ice and organics are widespread on its surface. The spectral difference with other asteroids observed in the same manner, makes 24 Themis unique so far. Our identification of water ice and organic compounds on this asteroid agrees with independent results (Rivkin and Emery 2010). At first glance, the presence of any surface ice on 24 Themis, particularly over a significant fraction of its surface, is puzzling because of the instability for exposed water ice at Themis's heliocentric distance ( 3.2 AU). Nevertheless, there are several possible sources for this unstable ice and identifying them is likely to be diagnostic of other processes on primitive asteroids. The presence of water ice on 24 Themis supports the idea that ice sublimation drives the cometary activity in two small members of the Themis dynamical family, labeled "Main Belt comets” by Hsieh and Jewitt (2006). It also helps to address other relevant questions, such as, how abundant is water ice in the outer asteroid belt and where was the "snow” line when the solar system formed? The answers to these questions could transform current views of primitive asteroids, delivery of water and organic molecules to Earth, and models of Solar System formation. This research was published in the April 29, 2010 issue of the journal Nature. Hargrove and Campins are visiting astronomers at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), which is operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. Long-term survival of surface water ice on comet 67P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklay, N.; Mottola, S.; Vincent, J.-B.; Pajola, M.; Fornasier, S.; Hviid, S. F.; Kappel, D.; Kührt, E.; Keller, H. U.; Barucci, M. A.; Feller, C.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Hall, I.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B. J. R.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Deller, J.; Deshapriya, J. D. P.; Fulle, M.; Gicquel, A.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Güttler, C.; Hasselmann, P. H.; Hofmann, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. M.; Lazzarin, M.; Lin, Z.-Y.; Moreno, J. J. Lopez; Lucchetti, A.; Marzari, F.; Masoumzadeh, N.; Naletto, G.; Pommerol, A.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.

    2017-07-01

    Numerous water-ice-rich deposits surviving more than several months on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko were observed during the Rosetta mission. We announce the first-time detection of water-ice features surviving up to 2 yr since their first observation via OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) NAC (narrow angle camera). Their existence on the nucleus of comet 67P at the arrival of the Rosetta spacecraft suggests that they were exposed to the surface during the comet's previous orbit. We investigated the temporal variation of large water-ice patches to understand the long-term sustainability of water ice on cometary nuclei on time-scales of months and years. Large clusters are stable over typical periods of 0.5 yr and reduce their size significantly around the comet's perihelion passage, while small exposures disappear. We characterized the temporal variation of their multispectral signatures. In large clusters, dust jets were detected, whereas in large isolated ones no associated activity was detected. Our thermal analysis shows that the long-term sustainability of water-ice-rich features can be explained by the scarce energy input available at their locations over the first half year. However, the situation reverses for the period lasting several months around perihelion passage. Our two end-member mixing analysis estimates a pure water-ice equivalent thickness up to 15 cm within one isolated patch, and up to 2 m for the one still observable through the end of the mission. Our spectral modelling estimates up to 48 per cent water-ice content for one of the large isolated feature, and up to 25 per cent water ice on the large boulders located within clusters.

  9. Mechanism of Ice Crystal Growth Habit and Shape Instability Development Below Water Saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    of food he consumes is dependent upon water. For this basic reason, the obtainment of water has been the cardinal objective of the human race...and human error make an accurate determination of the ice crystal growth history difficult. For this reason, researchers 14 have attempted to...the emmissivity of ice, and Ti and Tj are the average temperatures in degrees Kelvin of the top and bottom plates. The last is the heat conductio

  10. Effects of an Arctic under-ice bloom on solar radiant heating of the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Granskog, Mats A.; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Hamre, Børge

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of solar energy in the upper Arctic Ocean depends, among other things, on the composition of the water column. During the N-ICE2015 expedition, a drift in the Arctic pack ice north of Svalbard, an under-ice phytoplankton bloom was encountered in May 2015. This bloom led to significant changes in the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of the upper ocean. Mean values of total water absorption in the upper 20 m of the water column were up to 4 times higher during the bloom than prior to it. The total water attenuation coefficient increased by a factor of up to around 7. Radiative transfer modeling, with measured IOPs as input, has been performed with a coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean model. Simulations are used to investigate the change in depth-dependent solar heating of the ocean after the onset of the bloom, for wavelengths in the region 350-700 nm. Effects of clouds, sea ice cover, solar zenith angle, as well as the average cosine for scattering of the ocean inclusions are evaluated. An increase in energy absorption in the upper 10 m of about 36% is found under 25 cm ice with 2 cm snow, for bloom conditions relative to prebloom conditions, which may have implications for ice melt and growth in spring. Thicker clouds and lower sun reduce the irradiance available, but lead to an increase in relative absorption.

  11. Detection of Water Ice on Saturn's Satellite Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; DalleOre, C. M.; Geballe, T. R.; Roush, T. L.; deBergh, C.

    1999-01-01

    The near-infrared reflectance spectrum of Saturn's satellite Phoebe shows a broad absorption band at 2.0 micrometers and absorption at lambda > 2.2 micrometers, both characteristic of H2O ice. We have successfully modeled the surface of Phoebe with an intimate (granular) mix of H2O ice (3% by weight, grain size 500 micrometers) mixed with fine grains of H2O ice (0.25%) with amorphous carbon (grain size 900 micrometers) as the dominant component. This model reproduces the shape of the measured spectrum and the observed albedo of 0.10 for Phoebe, but it is not unique. The presence of ice establishes Phoebe as an original member of the outer Solar System rather than a renegade asteroid.

  12. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  13. The Effect of Seasonal Variability of Atlantic Water on the Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Repina, I. A.

    2018-01-01

    Under the influence of global warming, the sea ice in the Arctic Ocean (AO) is expected to reduce with a transition toward a seasonal ice cover by the end of this century. A comparison of climate-model predictions with measurements shows that the actual rate of ice cover decay in the AO is higher than the predicted one. This paper argues that the rapid shrinking of the Arctic summer ice cover is due to its increased seasonality, while seasonal oscillations of the Atlantic origin water temperature create favorable conditions for the formation of negative anomalies in the ice-cover area in winter. The basis for this hypothesis is the fundamental possibility of the activation of positive feedback provided by a specific feature of the seasonal cycle of the inflowing Atlantic origin water and the peaking of temperature in the Nansen Basin in midwinter. The recently accelerated reduction in the summer ice cover in the AO leads to an increased accumulation of heat in the upper ocean layer during the summer season. The extra heat content of the upper ocean layer favors prerequisite conditions for winter thermohaline convection and the transfer of heat from the Atlantic water (AW) layer to the ice cover. This, in turn, contributes to further ice thinning and a decrease in ice concentration, accelerated melting in summer, and a greater accumulation of heat in the ocean by the end of the following summer. An important role is played by the seasonal variability of the temperature of AW, which forms on the border between the North European and Arctic basins. The phase of seasonal oscillation changes while the AW is moving through the Nansen Basin. As a result, the timing of temperature peak shifts from summer to winter, additionally contributing to enhanced ice melting in winter. The formulated theoretical concept is substantiated by a simplified mathematical model and comparison with observations.

  14. Water Ice Clouds and Dust in the Martian Atmosphere Observed by Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jennifer L.; Kass, David; Heavens, Nicholas; Kleinbohl, Armin

    2011-01-01

    The water ice clouds are primarily controlled by the temperature structure and form at the water condensation level. Clouds in all regions presented show day/night differences. Cloud altitude varies between night and day in the SPH and tropics: (1) NPH water ice opacity is greater at night than day at some seasons (2) The diurnal thermal tide controls the daily variability. (3) Strong day/night changes indicate that the amount of gas in the atmosphere varies significantly. See significant mixtures of dust and ice at the same altitude planet-wide (1) Points to a complex radiative and thermal balance between dust heating (in the visible) and ice heating or cooling in the infrared. Aerosol layering: (1) Early seasons reveal a zonally banded spatial distribution (2) Some localized longitudinal structure of aerosol layers (3) Later seasons show no consistent large scale organization

  15. ICE CUBES” IN THE CENTER OF THE MILKY WAY: WATER-ICE AND HYDROCARBONS IN THE CENTRAL PARSEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moultaka, J. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse, CNRS, IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Eckart, A. [I Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Muzic, K., E-mail: jihane.moultaka@irap.omp.eu, E-mail: eckart@ph1.uni-koeln.de [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago, 19001 (Chile)

    2015-06-20

    The close environment of the central supermassive black hole of our Galaxy has been studied thoroughly for decades in order to shed light on the behavior of the central regions of galaxies in general and of active galaxies in particular. The Galactic center (GC) has shown a wealth of structures on different scales with a complicated mixture of early- and late-type stars, ionized and molecular gas, dust, and winds. Here we aim to study the distribution of water-ices and hydrocarbons in the central parsec, as well as along the line of sight. This study is made possible thanks to L-band spectroscopy. This spectral band, from 2.8 to 4.2 μm, hosts important signatures of the circumstellar medium and interstellar dense and diffuse media among which deep absorption features are attributed to water-ices and hydrocarbons. We observed the GC in the L band of the ISAAC spectrograph located on the UT1/VLT ESO telescope. By mapping the central half parsec using 27 slit positions, we were able to build the first data cube of the region in this wavelength domain. Thanks to a calibrator spectrum of the foreground extinction in the L band derived in a previous paper, we corrected our data cube for the line-of-sight extinction and validated our calibrator spectrum. The data show that a residual absorption due to water-ices and hydrocarbons is present in the corrected data cube. This suggests that the features are produced in the local environment of the GC, implying very low temperatures well below 80 K. This is in agreement with our finding of local CO ices in the central parsec described in Moultaka et al.

  16. Air-sea flux of CO2 in arctic coastal waters influenced by glacial melt water and sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Rysgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    and thereby efficiently blocked air–sea CO2 exchange. During sea ice melt, dissolution of CaCO3 combined with primary production and strong stratification of the water column acted to lower surface-water pCO2 levels in the fjord. Also, a large input of glacial melt water containing geochemically reactive......Annual air–sea exchange ofCO2 inYoung Sound,NEGreenlandwas estimated using pCO2 surface-water measurements during summer (2006–2009) and during an ice-covered winter 2008. All surface pCO2 values were below atmospheric levels indicating an uptake of atmospheric CO2. During sea ice formation......, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) content is reduced causing sea ice to be under saturated in CO2. Approximately 1% of the DIC forced out of growing sea ice was released into the atmosphere while the remaining 99% was exported to the underlying water column. Sea ice covered the fjord 9 months a year...

  17. Satellite altimetry in sea ice regions - detecting open water for estimating sea surface heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Felix L.; Dettmering, Denise; Bosch, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    The Greenland Sea and the Farm Strait are transporting sea ice from the central Arctic ocean southwards. They are covered by a dynamic changing sea ice layer with significant influences on the Earth climate system. Between the sea ice there exist various sized open water areas known as leads, straight lined open water areas, and polynyas exhibiting a circular shape. Identifying these leads by satellite altimetry enables the extraction of sea surface height information. Analyzing the radar echoes, also called waveforms, provides information on the surface backscatter characteristics. For example waveforms reflected by calm water have a very narrow and single-peaked shape. Waveforms reflected by sea ice show more variability due to diffuse scattering. Here we analyze altimeter waveforms from different conventional pulse-limited satellite altimeters to separate open water and sea ice waveforms. An unsupervised classification approach employing partitional clustering algorithms such as K-medoids and memory-based classification methods such as K-nearest neighbor is used. The classification is based on six parameters derived from the waveform's shape, for example the maximum power or the peak's width. The open-water detection is quantitatively compared to SAR images processed while accounting for sea ice motion. The classification results are used to derive information about the temporal evolution of sea ice extent and sea surface heights. They allow to provide evidence on climate change relevant influences as for example Arctic sea level rise due to enhanced melting rates of Greenland's glaciers and an increasing fresh water influx into the Arctic ocean. Additionally, the sea ice cover extent analyzed over a long-time period provides an important indicator for a globally changing climate system.

  18. Patterns of ice nuclei from natural water sources in the mountains of Tirol, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloh, Philipp; Hanlon, Regina; Pietsch, Renee; Anderson, Christopher; Schmale, David G., III; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation—the process by which particles can nucleate ice between 0 and -35°C—is important for generating artificial snow. Though abiotic and biotic ice nuclei are present in many different natural and managed ecosystems, little is known about their nature, sources, and ecological roles. We collected samples of water and snow from the mountains of Tyrol, Austria in June, July, and November, 2016. The collected water was mostly from sources with minimal anthropogenic pollution, since most of the water from the sampled streams came from glacial melt. The samples were filtered through a 0.22μm filter, and microorganisms were cultured on different types of media. Resulting colonies were tested for their ice nucleation ability using a droplet freezing assay and identified to the level of the species. The unfiltered water and the filtered water will be subjected to additional assays using cryo microscopy and vibrational microscopy (IR and Raman- spectroscopy). Preliminary analyses suggested that the percentage of ice-nucleating microbes varied with season; greater percentages of ice nucleating microbes were present during colder months. The glacial melt also varies strongly over the year with the fraction of mineral dust suspended in it which serves as an inorganic ice nucleation agent. Further investigation of these samples may help to show the combined ice nuleation abilities of biological and non biological particles present in the mountains of Tirol, Austria. Future work may shed light on how the nucleation properties of the natural water changes with the time of the year and what may be responsible for these changes.

  19. Sea-ice cover in the Nordic Seas and the sensitivity to Atlantic water temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.; Spall, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the sea-ice cover of the Nordic Seas have been proposed to play a key role for the dramatic temperature excursions associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger events during the last glacial. However, with its proximity to the warm Atlantic water, how a sea-ice cover can persist in the Nordic Seas is not well understood. In this study, we apply an eddy-resolving configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model with an idealized topography to study the presence of sea ice in a Nordic Seas-like domain. We assume an infinite amount of warm Atlantic water present in the south by restoring the southern area to constant temperatures. The sea-surface temperatures are restored toward cold, atmospheric temperatures, and as a result, sea ice is present in the interior of the domain. However, the sea-ice cover in the margins of the Nordic Seas, an area with a warm, cyclonic boundary current, is sensitive to the amount of heat entering the domain, i.e., the restoring temperature in the south. When the temperature of the warm, cyclonic boundary current is high, the margins are free of sea ice and heat is released to the atmosphere. We show that with a small reduction in the temperature of the incoming Atlantic water, the Nordic Seas-like domain is fully covered in sea ice. Warm water is still entering the Nordic Seas, however, this happens at depths below a cold, fresh surface layer produced by melted sea ice. Consequently, the heat release to the atmosphere is reduced along with the eddy heat fluxes. Results suggest a threshold value in the amount of heat entering the Nordic Seas before the sea-ice cover disappears in the margins. We study the sensitivity of this threshold to changes in atmospheric temperatures and vertical diffusivity.

  20. Modeling photosynthesis in sea ice-covered waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Matthew C.; Lindsay, Keith; Holland, Marika M.

    2015-09-01

    The lower trophic levels of marine ecosystems play a critical role in the Earth System mediating fluxes of carbon to the ocean interior. Many of the functional relationships describing biological rate processes, such as primary productivity, in marine ecosystem models are nonlinear functions of environmental state variables. As a result of nonlinearity, rate processes computed from mean fields at coarse resolution will differ from similar computations that incorporate small-scale heterogeneity. Here we examine how subgrid-scale variability in sea ice thickness impacts simulated net primary productivity (NPP) in a 1°×1° configuration of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). CESM simulates a subgrid-scale ice thickness distribution and computes shortwave penetration independently for each ice thickness category. However, the default model formulation uses grid-cell mean irradiance to compute NPP. We demonstrate that accounting for subgrid-scale shortwave heterogeneity by computing light limitation terms under each ice category then averaging the result is a more accurate invocation of the photosynthesis equations. Moreover, this change delays seasonal bloom onset and increases interannual variability in NPP in the sea ice zone in the model. The new treatment reduces annual production by about 32% in the Arctic and 19% in the Antarctic. Our results highlight the importance of considering heterogeneity in physical fields when integrating nonlinear biogeochemical reactions.

  1. Water ice clouds on Mars: Exploring processes through modeling and laboratory work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Materese, Delia Liza

    Water ice clouds on Mars are an important component of the hydrologic cycle as well as the overall climate system of the planet. The goal of this research is to better understand water ice cloud formation and behavior on Mars. We use modeling and laboratory experiments to explore different processes related to water ice cloud formation and evolution. The first goal of this work is to examine how well the Martian water cycle is simulated by the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model. The simulation predicts atmospheric water vapor amounts approximately half of those observed, globally. We identify water ice clouds as being a major contributor to this discrepancy. The model closely reproduces the convective aphelion cloud belt at the equator, but deviates substantially from observations over the North Polar Cap region. Modifying the nucleation scheme within the cloud microphysical model brings model results closer to observations and affects the surface radiative balance, which affects the annual cycle of sublimation and deposition of water ice at the residual North Polar Cap. The most realistic global water vapor and cloud patterns come from limiting the nucleation rate of particles at the poles. Our simulations show that the North Polar Cap region exhibits atmospheric dynamics where stratiform clouds form. We hypothesize that the modified nucleation scheme compensates for biases in the radiative properties of the stratiform clouds expected over the North Polar Cap. More broadly, this study illustrates the strong sensitivity of the Martian global water cycle to clouds over the North Polar Cap region. The second goal of this work is to assess the ability of various salts to serve as water ice cloud condensation nuclei under Martian conditions. We use a vacuum chamber to simulate the cold, lower pressure atmospheric conditions on Mars and find the critical saturation ratios at which the substrates nucleate water ice. We find no significant difference between sodium

  2. Swift heavy ion modifications of astrophysical water ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dartois, E., E-mail: emmanuel.dartois@ias.u-psud.fr [CNRS-INSU, Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Université Paris Sud, Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, bât. 121, 91405 Orsay (France); Augé, B. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CEA, CNRS, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen-Basse Normandie), UMR 6252, CIMAP – CIRIL – Ganil, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); CNRS-INSU, Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Université Paris Sud, Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, bât. 121, 91405 Orsay (France); Rothard, H.; Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CEA, CNRS, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen-Basse Normandie), UMR 6252, CIMAP – CIRIL – Ganil, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Brunetto, R. [CNRS-INSU, Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Université Paris Sud, Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, bât. 121, 91405 Orsay (France); and others

    2015-12-15

    In the relatively shielded environments provided by interstellar dense clouds in our Galaxy, infrared astronomical observations have early revealed the presence of low temperature (10–100 K) ice mantles covering tiny grain “cores” composed of more refractory material. These ices are of specific interest because they constitute an interface between a solid phase under complex evolution triggered by energetic processes and surface reactions, with a rich chemistry taking place in the gas phase. The interstellar ice mantles present in these environments are immersed, in addition to other existing radiations fields, in a flux of cosmic ray particles that can produce new species via radiolysis processes, but first affects their structure, which may change and also induces desorption of molecules and radicals from these grains. Theses cosmic rays are simulated by swift ions in the laboratory for a better understanding of astrophysical processes.

  3. Thermodynamics of the formaldehyde-water and formaldehyde-ice systems for atmospheric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Manuel; Houdier, Stephan; Domine, Florent

    2011-01-27

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a species involved in numerous key atmospheric chemistry processes that can significantly impact the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Since gaseous HCHO is soluble in water, the water droplets of clouds and the ice crystals of snow exchange HCHO with the gas phase and the partitioning of HCHO between the air, water, and ice phases must be known to understand its chemistry. This study proposes thermodynamic formulations for the partitioning of HCHO between the gas phase and the ice and liquid water phases. A reanalysis of existing data on the vapor-liquid equilibrium has shown the inadequacy of the Henry's law formulation, and we instead propose the following equation to predict the mole fraction of HCHO in liquid water at equilibrium, X(HCHO,liq), as a function of the partial pressure P(HCHO) (Pa) and temperature T (K): X(HCHO,liq) = 1.700 × 10(-15) e((8014/T))(P(HCHO))(1.105). Given the paucity of data on the gas-ice equilibrium, the solubility of HCHO and the diffusion coefficient (D(HCHO)) in ice were measured by exposing large single ice crystals to low P(HCHO). Our recommended value for D(HCHO) over the temperature range 243-266 K is D(HCHO) = 6 × 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1). The solubility of HCHO in ice follows the relationship X(HCHO,ice) = 9.898 × 10(-13) e((4072/T))(P(HCHO))(0.803). Extrapolation of these data yields the P(HCHO) versus 1/T phase diagram for the H(2)O-HCHO system. The comparison of our results to existing data on the partitioning of HCHO between the snow and the atmosphere in the high arctic highlights the interplay between thermodynamic equilibrium and kinetics processes in natural systems.

  4. The design, construction, and observation of permanently installed safety booms in ice covered waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelnour, R.; Abdelnour, E.; Comfort, G. [BMT Fleet Technology Ltd., Kanata (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    In order to minimize potential accidents resulting from accidental intrusion, safety booms have been deployed near hydroelectric power plants to warn boaters of fast water currents. In cold regions, the booms are installed in early June and removed in October to avoid ice damage. However, in some years substantial delays caused by high river flow have meant that the booms were installed only after the summer boating season was underway. In addition, because the window of opportunity between the desired date of removal of these booms and the start of ice formation is sometimes quite short, it can be difficult to decide on a removal date. This paper described the design, construction, and observation of a typical safety boom that was installed in the summer of 2006 at the headpond of the Bark Lake flow control dam operated by Ontario Power Generation. The boom design considerations included prevailing ice conditions at the site; historical water discharge and associated currents; water level fluctuations; and the ice observed during the winter of 2007. Design challenges and improvements were also discussed. The boom has performed as expected and has remained in the water year-round for the past 2 years. It was concluded that the project has achieved success in providing river users with a warning system that remains in place until the beginning of the ice freeze up and is ready again in the spring as soon as the ice disappears. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 15 figs.

  5. Water ice in the dark dune spots of Richardson crater on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Kereszturi, A; Schmidt, F

    2010-01-01

    In this study we assess the presence, nature and properties of ices - in particular water ice - that occur within these spots using HIRISE and CRISM observations, as well as the LMD Global Climate Model. Our studies focus on Richardson crater (72{\\deg}S, 179{\\deg}E) and cover southern spring and summer (LS 175{\\deg} - 17 341{\\deg}). Three units have been identified of these spots: dark core, gray ring and bright halo. Each unit show characteristic changes as the season progress. In winter, the whole area is covered by CO2 ice with H2O ice contamination. Dark spots form during late winter and early spring. During spring, the dark spots are located in a 10 cm thick depression compared to the surrounding bright ice-rich layer. They are spectrally characterized by weak CO2 ice signatures that probably result from spatial mixing of CO2 ice rich and ice free regions within pixels, and from mixing of surface signatures due to aerosols scattering. The bright halo shaped by winds shows stronger CO2 absorptions than th...

  6. The formation of molecular hydrogen from water ice in the lunar regolith by energetic charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.

    2013-06-01

    On 9 October 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket into the permanently shadowed region (PSR) within Cabeus crater and detected water vapor and ice, as well as other volatiles, in the ejecta plume. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), a far ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), observed this plume as FUV emissions from the fluorescence of sunlight by molecular hydrogen (H2) and other constituents. Energetic charged particles, such as galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), can dissociate the molecules in water ice to form H2. We examine how much H2can be formed by these types of particle radiation interacting with water ice sequestered in the regolith within PSRs, and we assess whether it can account for the H2 observed by LAMP. To estimate H2formation, we use the GCR and SEP radiation dose rates measured by the LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER). The exposure time of the ice is calculated by considering meteoritic gardening and the penetration depth of the energetic particles. We find that GCRs and SEPs could convert at least 1-7% of the original water molecules into H2. Therefore, given the amount of water detected by LCROSS, such particle radiation‒induced dissociation of water ice could likely account for a significant percentage (10-100%) of the H2measured by LAMP.

  7. JAWS: Just Add Water System - A device for detection of nucleic acids in Martian ice caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, Eske; Mørk, Søren

    2002-01-01

    The design of a device for nucleic acid detection in the Martian ice caps is presented; the Just Add Water System (JAWS). It is based on fiber-optic PNA (peptide nucleic acid) light up probe random microsphere universal array technology. JAWS is designed to be part of a larger system...... with a regulation of pH and salt concentrations e.g. the MOD systems and could be installed on a planetary probe melting its way down the Martian ice caps e.g. the NASA Cryobot. JAWS can be used for detection of remains of ancient life preserved in the Martian ice as well as for detection of contamination brought...

  8. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  9. Antarctic timing of surface water changes off Chile and Patagonian ice sheet response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Frank; Kaiser, Jérôme; Ninnemann, Ulysses; Hebbeln, Dierk; Arz, Helge W; Stoner, Joseph

    2004-06-25

    Marine sediments from the Chilean continental margin are used to infer millennial-scale changes in southeast Pacific surface ocean water properties and Patagonian ice sheet extent since the last glacial period. Our data show a clear "Antarctic" timing of sea surface temperature changes, which appear systematically linked to meridional displacements in sea ice, westerly winds, and the circumpolar current system. Proxy data for ice sheet changes show a similar pattern as oceanographic variations offshore, but reveal a variable glacier-response time of up to approximately 1000 years, which may explain some of the current discrepancies among terrestrial records in southern South America.

  10. FORMATION AND ALIGNMENT OF ELONGATED, FRACTAL-LIKE WATER-ICE GRAINS IN EXTREMELY COLD, WEAKLY IONIZED PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M., E-mail: kbchai@caltech.edu, E-mail: pbellan@caltech.edu [Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Elongated, fractal-like water-ice grains are observed to form spontaneously when water vapor is injected into a weakly ionized laboratory plasma formed in a background gas cooled to an astrophysically relevant temperature. The water-ice grains form in 1–2 minutes, levitate with regular spacing, and are aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Water-ice grains formed in plasma where the neutrals and ions have low mass, such as hydrogen and helium, are larger, more elongated, and more fractal-like than water-ice grains formed in plasmas where the neutrals and ions have high mass such as argon and krypton. Typical aspect ratios (length to width ratio) are as great as 5 while typical fractal dimensions are ∼1.7. Water-ice grain lengths in plasmas with low neutral and ion masses can be several hundred microns long. Infrared absorption spectroscopy reveals that the water-ice grains are crystalline and so are similar in constitution to the water-ice grains in protoplanetary disks, Saturn’s rings, and mesospheric clouds. The properties and behavior of these laboratory water-ice grains may provide insights into morphology and alignment behavior of water-ice grains in astrophysical dusty plasmas.

  11. Ice nucleation at the nanoscale probes no man's land of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Galli, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    At a given thermodynamic condition, nucleation events occur at a frequency that scales with the volume of the system. Therefore at the nanoscale, one may expect to obtain supercooled liquids below the bulk homogeneous nucleation temperature. Here we report direct computational evidence that in supercooled water nano-droplets ice nucleation rates are strongly size dependent and at the nanoscale they are several orders of magnitude smaller than in bulk water. Using a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory, we show that the Laplace pressure is partially responsible for the suppression of ice crystallization. Our simulations show that the nucleation rates found for droplets are similar to those of liquid water subject to a pressure of the order of the Laplace pressure within droplets. Our findings aid the interpretation of molecular beam experiments and support the hypothesis of surface crystallization of ice in microscopic water droplets in clouds.

  12. Prebiotic water/ice as medium for peptide catlysis and RNA world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Rafal

    of RNA oligomers from imidazole derivatives of mononucleotides. The thermodynamic shift towards condensation was achieved using water/ice eutectic phase environment (Monnard and Ziock 2008). To obtain such an environment, a reaction solution is cooled below its freezing point, but above the eutectic...... point. Under these conditions, most of the water is in the form of ice crystals and the other reactants are upconcentrated in the remaining liquid micro-inclusions, hence creating an environment with low water activity in which condensation reactions can occur. In the above mentioned conditions we were...

  13. CO2 snow depth and subsurface water-ice abundance in the northern hemisphere of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, I G; Zuber, M T; Litvak, M L; Boynton, W V; Smith, D E; Drake, D; Hamara, D; Kozyrev, A S; Sanin, A B; Shinohara, C; Saunders, R S; Tretyakov, V

    2003-06-27

    Observations of seasonal variations of neutron flux from the high-energy neutron detector (HEND) on Mars Odyssey combined with direct measurements of the thickness of condensed carbon dioxide by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on Mars Global Surveyor show a latitudinal dependence of northern winter deposition of carbon dioxide. The observations are also consistent with a shallow substrate consisting of a layer with water ice overlain by a layer of drier soil. The lower ice-rich layer contains between 50 and 75 weight % water, indicating that the shallow subsurface at northern polar latitudes on Mars is even more water rich than that in the south.

  14. Pressure in a tank due to water-ice phase transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexcellent, C.; Vigoureux, D.; Vigoureux, J.-M.

    2017-11-01

    Our aim is to show the surprising force of hydrogen bonds in ice. When a tank completely filled with water is cooled, ice formation can generate a pressure which can cause its breaking. This phenomenon is due to the fact that water has a higher density in its liquid phase than in its solid state. Such a breaking is all the more surprising in that hydrogen bonds between water molecules are known as being weak chemical bonds. We show here that in the case of a total phase change, even the best steels or alloys could not prevent its breakage.

  15. Changing distributions of sea ice melt and meteoric water west of the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Stammerjohn, Sharon E.; Venables, Hugh J.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Martinson, Douglas G.; Iannuzzi, Richard A.; Leng, Melanie J.; van Wessem, Jan Melchior; Reijmer, Carleen H.; Barrand, Nicholas E.

    2017-05-01

    The Western Antarctic Peninsula has recently undergone rapid climatic warming, with associated decreases in sea ice extent and duration, and increases in precipitation and glacial discharge to the ocean. These shifts in the freshwater budget can have significant consequences on the functioning of the regional ecosystem, feedbacks on regional climate, and sea-level rise. Here we use shelf-wide oxygen isotope data from cruises in four consecutive Januaries (2011-2014) to distinguish the freshwater input from sea ice melt separately from that due to meteoric sources (precipitation plus glacial discharge). Sea ice melt distributions varied from minima in 2011 of around 0 % up to maxima in 2014 of around 4-5%. Meteoric water contribution to the marine environment is typically elevated inshore, due to local glacial discharge and orographic effects on precipitation, but this enhanced contribution was largely absent in January 2013 due to anomalously low precipitation in the last quarter of 2012. Both sea ice melt and meteoric water changes are seen to be strongly influenced by changes in regional wind forcing associated with the Southern Annular Mode and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon, which also impact on net sea ice motion as inferred from the isotope data. A near-coastal time series of isotope data collected from Rothera Research Station reproduces well the temporal pattern of changes in sea ice melt, but less well the meteoric water changes, due to local glacial inputs and precipitation effects.

  16. Indirect contact freeze water desalination for an ice maker machine - CFD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody, Harith; Al-Dadah, Raya; Mahmoud, Saad

    2017-11-01

    To offer for potable water shortages, sea water desalination is a potential solution for the global rising demand for fresh water. The latent heat of fusion is about one-seventh the latent heat of vaporisation, thus indicating the benefit of lower energy consumption for the freeze desalination process. Limited literature is reported on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on freeze desalination. Therefore, analysing and investigating thermodynamic processes are easily conducted by the powerful tool of CFD. A single unit of ice formation in an ice maker machine was modelled using ANSYS Fluent software three-dimensionally. Energy, species transport and solidification/melting modules were used in building the CFD model. Parametric analysis was conducted using the established CFD model to predict the effects of freezing temperature and the geometry of the ice maker machine; on ice production and the freezing time. Lower freezing temperatures allowed more ice production and faster freezing. Increasing the diameter and the length of the freezing tube enabled more ice to be produced.

  17. Design, integration and control of proton exchange membrane electrolyzer for wind based renewable energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kevin W.

    This research endeavor began with the design and construction of a new hydrogen test facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). To improve the electrical link of wind-based electrolysis the characterization of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer under varying input power was performed at NRELs new test facility. The commercially available electrolyzer from Proton Energy Systems (PES) was characterized using constant direct current (DC), sinusoidally varying DC, photovoltaics and variable magnitude and frequency energy from a 10 kW wind turbine. At rated stack current and ˜ 40°C the system efficiency of the commercial electrolyzer was measured to be 55%. At lower stack current it was shown that commercial electrolyzer system efficiency falls because of the continuous hydrogen purge (˜0.1 Nm3 hr-1) used to maintain the hydrogen desiccant drying system. A novel thermoelectric-based dew point controller is designed and modeled to reduce the penalty to renewable sources because they do not always operate at 100% of rated stack current. It is predicted that the thermoelectric design when operated 100% of the time at full current to the thermoelectric modules would consume 3.1 kWh kg -1 of hydrogen. Using the higher heating value of hydrogen and a stack efficiency of 60% to produce the hydrogen that is continuously vented, the desiccant system consumes about 5.7 kWh kg-1. Design of the UND electrolyzer sub-systems responsible for all aspects of water, power to the stack, and hydrogen conditioning enables more flexible and precise experimental data to be obtained than from an off-the-shelf system. Current-voltage (IV) characteristic curves were obtained on the UND system at temperatures between 7--70°C. The anode and cathode exchange current densities are fitted to 2.0 E-06 e0.043T and 0.12 e 0.026T A cm-2 respectively. Stack conductivity was fitted to 0.001T + 0.03 S cm-1. The three coefficients represent physical stack parameters and are

  18. Long-term survival of water-ice observed on comet 67P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklay, N.; Mottola, S.; Vincent, J.-B.; Pajola, M.; Fornasier, S.

    2017-09-01

    We announce the first-time detection of water ice features surviving up to two years since their first observation via OSIRIS NAC. Their existence on the nucleus of comet 67P at the arrival of the Rosetta spacecraft suggests that they were exposed to the surface during the comet's previous orbit. Large patches are stable over typical periods of 0.5 year and reduce their size significantly around the comet's perihelion passage, while small exposures disappear. Our thermal analysis shows that the long-term sustainability of water-ice-rich features can be explained by the scarce energy input available at their locations over the first half year. However, the situation reverses for the period lasting several months around perihelion passage. Our two end-member mixing analysis estimates a pure water-ice equivalent thickness up to 15 cm within one isolated patch, and up to 2 m for the one still observable through the end of the mission. Our spectral modelling estimates up to 48% water-ice content for one of the large isolated feature, and up to 25% water ice on the large boulders located within clusters.

  19. Vertical Distribution of Dust and Water Ice Aerosols from CRISM Limb-geometry Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael Doyle; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, Todd; Kleinbohl, Armin; Murchie, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb enables the vertical distribution of both dust and water ice aerosols to be retrieved. More than a dozen sets of CRISM limb observations have been taken so far providing pole-to-pole cross sections, spanning more than a full Martian year. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the spherical geometry of the limb observations. Both dust and water ice vertical profiles often show a significant vertical structure for nearly all seasons and latitudes that is not consistent with the well-mixed or Conrath-v assumptions that have often been used in the past for describing aerosol vertical profiles for retrieval and modeling purposes. Significant variations are seen in the retrieved vertical profiles of dust and water ice aerosol as a function of season. Dust typically extends to higher altitudes (approx. 40-50km) during the perihelion season than during the aphelion season (<20km), and the Hellas region consistently shows more dust mixed to higher altitudes than other locations. Detached water ice clouds are common, and water ice aerosols are observed to cap the dust layer in all seasons.

  20. Analysis of the effect of water activity on ice formation using a new thermodynamic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, D.

    2014-07-01

    In this work a new thermodynamic framework is developed and used to investigate the effect of water activity on the formation of ice within supercooled droplets. The new framework is based on a novel concept where the interface is assumed to be made of liquid molecules "trapped" by the solid matrix. It also accounts for the change in the composition of the liquid phase upon nucleation. Using this framework, new expressions are developed for the critical ice germ size and the nucleation work with explicit dependencies on temperature and water activity. However unlike previous approaches, the new model does not depend on the interfacial tension between liquid and ice. The thermodynamic framework is introduced within classical nucleation theory to study the effect of water activity on the ice nucleation rate. Comparison against experimental results shows that the new approach is able to reproduce the observed effect of water activity on the nucleation rate and the freezing temperature. It allows for the first time a phenomenological derivation of the constant shift in water activity between melting and nucleation. The new framework offers a consistent thermodynamic view of ice nucleation, simple enough to be applied in atmospheric models of cloud formation.

  1. Water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic SiO2 nanocomposite films during icing/deicing cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Guobiene, A.; Prosycevas, I.; Baltrusaitis, V.; Grigaliunas, V.; Narmontas, P.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic (water contact angle value of 162 ± 1°) SiO2 nanocomposite films subjected to repetitive icing/deicing treatments, changes in SiO2 nanocomposite film surface morphology and their non-wetting characteristics. During the experiment,

  2. A Molecular Explanation of How the Fog Is Produced When Dry Ice Is Placed in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Ford, Nathan; No, Jin-Hwan; Ott, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Everyone enjoys seeing the cloudy white fog generated when solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) is placed in water. Have you ever wondered what physical and chemical processes occur to produce this fog? When asked this question, many chemical educators suggest that the fog is produced when atmospheric water vapor condenses on cold carbon dioxide gas…

  3. A comparison of ice water content measurement techniques on the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Abel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison of ice water content (qi data from a variety of measurement techniques on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft. Data are presented from a range of cloud types measured during the PIKNMIX field experiment that include mixed-phase stratocumulus, cumulus congestus and cirrus clouds. These measurements cover a broad range of conditions in which atmospheric ice particles are found in nature, such as the low-ice-water-content environments typically found in midlatitude cirrus and the environments with much higher ice water content often observed in cold convective clouds. The techniques include bulk measurements from (i a Nevzorov hot-wire probe, (ii the difference between the measured total water content (condensed plus vapour and the water vapour content of the atmosphere and (iii a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI (only for cirrus measurements. We also estimate the qi from integration of the measured particle size distribution (PSD with assumptions on how the density of ice particles varies as a function of size. The results show that the only bulk ice water content technique capable of measuring high qi values (several g m−3 was the method of total water content minus water vapour. For low ice water contents we develop a new parametrisation of the Nevzorov baseline drift that enables the probe to be sensitive to qi ± 0.002 g m−3. In cirrus clouds the agreement between the Nevzorov and other bulk measurements was typically better than a factor of 2 for the CVI (qi > 0.008 g m−3 and the method of total water content minus water vapour (qi > 0.02 g m−3. Good agreement with the bulk measurements for all cases could be obtained with the estimate from the PSD provided that appropriate a priori assumptions on the mass–dimension relationship were made. This is problematic in the convective clouds sampled because pristine ice particles, heavily rimed particles and

  4. Improved methodologies for continuous-flow analysis of stable water isotopes in ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tyler R.; White, James W. C.; Steig, Eric J.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; Morris, Valerie; Gkinis, Vasileios; Markle, Bradley R.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.

    2017-02-01

    Water isotopes in ice cores are used as a climate proxy for local temperature and regional atmospheric circulation as well as evaporative conditions in moisture source regions. Traditional measurements of water isotopes have been achieved using magnetic sector isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, a number of recent studies have shown that laser absorption spectrometry (LAS) performs as well or better than IRMS. The new LAS technology has been combined with continuous-flow analysis (CFA) to improve data density and sample throughput in numerous prior ice coring projects. Here, we present a comparable semi-automated LAS-CFA system for measuring high-resolution water isotopes of ice cores. We outline new methods for partitioning both system precision and mixing length into liquid and vapor components - useful measures for defining and improving the overall performance of the system. Critically, these methods take into account the uncertainty of depth registration that is not present in IRMS nor fully accounted for in other CFA studies. These analyses are achieved using samples from a South Pole firn core, a Greenland ice core, and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. The measurement system utilizes a 16-position carousel contained in a freezer to consecutively deliver ˜ 1 m × 1.3 cm2 ice sticks to a temperature-controlled melt head, where the ice is converted to a continuous liquid stream and eventually vaporized using a concentric nebulizer for isotopic analysis. An integrated delivery system for water isotope standards is used for calibration to the Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) scale, and depth registration is achieved using a precise overhead laser distance device with an uncertainty of ±0.2 mm. As an added check on the system, we perform inter-lab LAS comparisons using WAIS Divide ice samples, a corroboratory step not taken in prior CFA studies. The overall results are important for substantiating data obtained from LAS

  5. Validation of a Compact Isokinetic Total Water Content Probe for Wind Tunnel Characterization at NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and at NRC Ice Crystal Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Craig R.; Landreville, Charles; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2017-01-01

    A new compact isokinetic probe to measure total water content in a wind tunnel environment has been developed. The probe has been previously tested under altitude conditions. This paper presents a comprehensive validation of the probe under a range of liquid water conditions at sea level in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and with ice crystals at sea level at the NRC wind tunnel. The compact isokinetic probe is compared to tunnel calibrations and other probes.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of water isotope fractionation during ice crystal growth in clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guoping; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for simulating water isotope fractionation during diffusion-limited ice crystal growth by vapor deposition from water-oversaturated air. These conditions apply to the growth of snow crystals in clouds where the vapor composition is controlled by the presence of both ice crystals and water droplets. Modeling of water condensation with the LB method has the advantage of allowing concentration fields to evolve based on local conditions so that the controls on grain shapes of the condensed phase can be studied simultaneously with the controls on isotopic composition and growth rate. Water isotope fractionation during snow crystal growth involves kinetic effects due to diffusion of water vapor in air, which requires careful consideration of the boundary conditions at the ice-vapor interface. The boundary condition is relatively simple for water isotopes because the molecular exchange rate for water at the interface is large compared to the crystal growth rate. Our results for the bulk crystal isotopic composition are consistent with simpler models using analytical solutions for radial geometry. However, the model results are sufficiently different for oxygen isotopes that they could affect the interpretation of D-excess values of snow and ice. The extent of vapor oversaturation plays a major role in determining the water isotope fractionation as well as the degree of dendritic growth. Departures from isotopic equilibrium increase at colder temperatures as diffusivity decreases. Dendritic crystals are isotopically heterogeneous. Isotopic variations within individual snow crystals could yield information on the microphysics of ice condensation as well as on the accommodation or sticking coefficient of water associated with vapor deposition. Our results are ultimately a first step in implementing LB models for kinetically controlled condensation or precipitation reactions, but needs to be extended also to cases where the

  7. Water ice and organics on the surface of the asteroid 24 Themis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Humberto; Hargrove, Kelsey; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Howell, Ellen S; Kelley, Michael S; Licandro, Javier; Mothé-Diniz, T; Fernández, Y; Ziffer, Julie

    2010-04-29

    It has been suggested that Earth's current supply of water was delivered by asteroids, some time after the collision that produced the Moon (which would have vaporized any of the pre-existing water). So far, no measurements of water ice on asteroids have been made, but its presence has been inferred from the comet-like activity of several small asteroids, including two members of the Themis dynamical family. Here we report infrared spectra of the asteroid 24 Themis which show that ice and organic compounds are not only present on its surface but also prevalent. Infrared spectral differences between it and other asteroids make 24 Themis unique so far, and our identification of ice and organics agrees with independent results that rule out other compounds as possible sources of the observed spectral structure. The widespread presence of surface ice on 24 Themis is somewhat unexpected because of the relatively short lifetime of exposed ice at this distance ( approximately 3.2 au) from the Sun. Nevertheless, there are several plausible sources, such as a subsurface reservoir that brings water to the surface through 'impact gardening' and/or sublimation.

  8. Modelling of destructive ability of water-ice-jet while machine processing of machine elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnashov Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the classification of the most common contaminants, appearing on the surfaces of machine elements after a long-term service.The existing well-known surface cleaning methods are described and analyzed in the framework of this paper. The article is intended to provide the reader with an understanding of the process of cleaning and removing contamination from machine elements surface by means of water-ice-jet with preprepared beforehand particles, as well as the process of water-ice-jet formation. The paper deals with the description of such advantages of this method as low costs, wastelessness, high quality of the surface, undergoing processing, minimization of harmful impact upon environment and eco-friendliness, which makes it differ radically from formerly known methods. The scheme of interection between the surface and ice particle is represented. A thermo-physical model of destruction of contaminants by means of a water-ice-jet cleaning technology was developed on its basis. The thermo-physical model allows us to make setting of processing mode and the parameters of water-ice-jet scientifically substantiated and well-grounded.

  9. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  10. Surface Water-Ice Deposits in the Northern Shadowed Regions of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Schorghofer, N.; Preusker, F.; Mazarico, E.; Schroeder, S. E.; Byrne, S.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Combe, J.-P.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Ceres, a dwarf planet located in the main asteroid belt, has a low bulk density, and models predict that a substantial amount of water ice is present in its mantle and outer shell. The Herschel telescope and the Dawn spacecraft have observed the release of water vapor from Ceres, and exposed water ice has been detected by Dawn on its surface at mid-latitudes. Water molecules from endogenic and exogenic sources can also be cold-trapped in permanent shadows at high latitudes, as happens on the Moon and Mercury. Here we present the first image-based survey of Ceres's northern permanent shadows and report the discovery of bright deposits in cold traps. We identify a minimum of 634 permanently shadowed craters. Bright deposits are detected on the floors of just 10 of these craters in multiscattered light. We spectroscopically identify one of the bright deposits as water ice. This detection strengthens the evidence that permanently shadowed areas have preserved water ice on airless planetary bodies.

  11. A common supersolid low-density skin sliperizing ice and toughening water surface

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xi; Ma, Zengsheng; Zhou, Yichun; Zheng, Weitao; Zhou, Ji; Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01

    Skins of water and ice share the same attribute of supersolidity characterized by the identical H-O vibration frequency of 3450 cm-1. Molecular undercoordination and inter-electron-pair repulsion shortens the H-O bond and lengthen the O:H nonbond, leading to a dual process of nonbonding electron polarization. This relaxation-polarization process enhances the dipole moment, elasticity,viscosity, thermal stability of these skins with 25% density loss, which is responsible for the hydrophobicity and toughness of water skin and for the slippery of ice.

  12. Sensitivity of radiative properties of persistent contrails to the ice water path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. De León

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the radiative properties of persistent linear contrails on the variability of their ice water path is assessed in a two-stream radiative transfer model. It is assumed that the ice water content and the effective size of ice crystals in aged contrails do not differ from those observed in natural cirrus; the parameterization of these two variables, based on a correlation with ambient temperature derived from in situ observations, allows a more realistic representation than the common assumption of fixed values for the contrail optical depth and ice crystal effective radius.

    The results show that the large variability in ice water content that aged contrails may share with natural cirrus, together with an assumed contrail vertical thickness between 220 and 1000 m, translate into a wider range of radiative forcings from linear contrails [1 to 66 m Wm−2] than that reported in previous studies, including IPCC's [3 to 30 m Wm−2]. Further field and modelling studies of the temporal evolution of contrail properties will thus be needed to reduce the uncertainties associated with the values assumed in large scale contrail studies.

  13. Best face forward: crystal-face competition at the ice-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick J; Brumberg, Alexandra

    2014-07-17

    The ice-water interface plays an important role in determining the outcome of both biological and environmental processes. Under ambient pressure, the most stable form of ice is hexagonal ice (Ih). Experimentally probing the surface free energy between each of the major faces of Ih ice and the liquid is both experimentally and theoretically challenging. The basis for the challenge is the near-equality of the surface free energy for the major faces along with the tendency of water to supercool. As a result, morphology from crystallization initiated below 0 °C is kinetically controlled. The reported work circumvents supercooling consequences by providing a polycrystalline seed, followed by isothermal, equilibrium growth. Natural selection among seeded faces results in a single crystal. A record of the growth front is preserved in the frozen boule. Crystal orientation at the front is revealed by examining the boule cross section with two techniques: (1) viewing between crossed polarizers to locate the optical axis and (2) etching to distinguish the primary-prism face from the secondary-prism face. Results suggest that the most stable ice-water interface at 0 °C is the secondary-prism face, followed by the primary-prism face. The basal face that imparts the characteristic hexagonal shape to snowflakes is a distant third. The results contrast with those from freezing the vapor where the basal and primary-prism faces have comparable free energy followed by the secondary-prism face.

  14. High Ice Water Concentrations in the 19 August 2015 Coastal Mesoconvective System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Harrah, Steven; Switzer, George F.; Strickland, Justin K.; Hunt, Patricia J.

    2017-01-01

    During August 2015, NASA's DC-8 research aircraft was flown into High Ice Water Content (HIWC) events as part of a three-week campaign to collect airborne radar data and to obtain measurements from microphysical probes. Goals for this flight campaign included improved characterization of HIWC events, especially from an airborne radar perspective. This paper focuses on one of the flight days, in which a coastal mesoscale convective system (MCS) was investigated for HIWC conditions. The system appears to have been maintained by bands of convection flowing in from the Gulf of Mexico. These convective bands were capped by a large cloud canopy, which masks the underlying structure if viewed from an infrared sensing satellite. The DC-8 was equipped with an IsoKinetic Probe that measured ice concentrations of up to 2.3 g m(exp -3) within the cloud canopy of this system. Sustained measurements of ice crystals with concentrations exceeding 1 g m(exp -3) were encountered for up to ten minutes of flight time. Airborne Radar reflectivity factors were found to be weak within these regions of high ice water concentrations, suggesting that Radar detection of HIWC would be a challenging endeavor. This case is then investigated using a three-dimensional numerical cloud model. Profiles of ice water concentrations and radar reflectivity factor demonstrate similar magnitudes and scales between the flight measurements and model simulation. Also discussed are recent modifications to the numerical model's ice-microphysics that are based on measurements during the flight campaign. The numerical model and its updated ice-microphysics are further validated with a simulation of a well-known case of a supercell hailstorm measured during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment. Differences in HIWC between the continental supercell and the coastal MCS are discussed.

  15. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Lienhard

    2015-12-01

    secondary organic aerosol (SOA material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA, levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  16. Light emission of sputtered particles induced by ion bombardment on water-enriched molecular ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Shuang; Ip, Wing; Liu, S. H.; Hsu, G. Y.; Lee, Shyong

    2007-03-01

    We had measured the light of sputtered particles in a visible region induced by various projectiles bombarding water-enriched molecular ices, like mixed ices of CH4 + NH3 + H2O (1:1:1). In this experiment, each constituent contained in this iced sample was found to emit a characteristic wavelength of light. We believe this characteristic is due to certain ion attached to parent molecule (constituent) that are dissociated with parent molecule in the collision process. Some of those ions, before emerging out the iced film, will become neutralized and develop into excited states due to electron capture. Then the characteristic wavelengths of light will decay from these excited sputtered particles; hence, from the light emission, one can analyze the constituents of an unknown ice. On the other hand, the intensity of the distribution of light emission during ion bombardment can be interpreted as an ion-ice interaction following the similar collision mechanism as ion-metal interaction, i.e. mainly the linear-cascade collision model.

  17. Benchmarking a first-principles thermal neutron scattering law for water ice with a diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jesse; Zerkle, Michael; Heinrichs, David

    2017-09-01

    The neutron scattering properties of water ice are of interest to the nuclear criticality safety community for the transport and storage of nuclear materials in cold environments. The common hexagonal phase ice Ih has locally ordered, but globally disordered, H2O molecular orientations. A 96-molecule supercell is modeled using the VASP ab initio density functional theory code and PHONON lattice dynamics code to calculate the phonon vibrational spectra of H and O in ice Ih. These spectra are supplied to the LEAPR module of the NJOY2012 nuclear data processing code to generate thermal neutron scattering laws for H and O in ice Ih in the incoherent approximation. The predicted vibrational spectra are optimized to be representative of the globally averaged ice Ih structure by comparing theoretically calculated and experimentally measured total cross sections and inelastic neutron scattering spectra. The resulting scattering kernel is then supplied to the MC21 Monte Carlo transport code to calculate time eigenvalues for the fundamental mode decay in ice cylinders at various temperatures. Results are compared to experimental flux decay measurements for a pulsed-neutron die-away diffusion benchmark.

  18. Effects of dispersed particulates on the rheology of water ice at planetary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, William B.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Stern, Laura A.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of the initial grain size and the hard particulate impurities on the transient and the steady state flows of water ice I were investigated under laboratory conditions selected as appropriate for simulating those of the surfaces and interiors of large moons. The samples were molded with particulate volume fraction, phi, of 0.001 to 0.56 and particle sizes of 1 to 150 microns; deformation experiments were conducted at constant shortening rates of 4.4 x 10 exp -7 to 4.9 x 10 exp -4 per sec at pressures of 50 and 100 MPa and temperatures 77 to 223 K. The results obtained suggest that viscous drag occurs in the ice as it flows around hard particulates. Mixed-phase ice was found to be tougher than pure ice, extending the range of bulk plastic deformation vs. faulting to lower temperatures and higher strain rates. It is suggested that bulk planetary compositions of ice + rock (phi = 0.4-0.5) are roughly 2 orders of magnitude more viscous than pure ice, leading to thermal instability inside giant icy moons and possibly explaining the retention of crater topography on icy planetary surfaces.

  19. PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN COSMIC WATER ICE: THE ROLE OF PAH IONIZATION AND CONCENTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Amanda M.; Mattioda, Andrew L.; Roser, Joseph; Bregman, Jonathan [NASA Ames Research Center, PO Box 1, M/S 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ricca, Alessandra; Allamandola, Louis J. [SETI Institute, 189 North Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Bouwman, Jordy [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Toernooiveld 5, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Linnartz, Harold [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, PO Box 9513, NL2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-01-20

    Infrared spectroscopic studies of ultraviolet (UV) irradiated, water-rich, cosmic ice analogs containing small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are described. The irradiation studies of anthracene:H{sub 2}O, pyrene:H{sub 2}O, and benzo[ghi]perylene:H{sub 2}O ices (14 K) at various concentrations reported by Bouwman et al. are extended. While aromatic alcohols and ketones have been reported in residues after irradiated PAH:H{sub 2}O ices were warmed to 270 K, it was not known if they formed during ice irradiation or during warm-up when reactants interact as H{sub 2}O sublimes. Recent work has shown that they form in low temperature ice. Using DFT computed IR spectra to identify photoproducts and PAH cations, we tentatively identify the production of specific alcohols [PAH(OH) {sub n} ] and quinones [PAH(O) {sub n} ] for all PAH:H{sub 2}O ices considered here. Little evidence is found for hydrogenation at 14 K, consistent with the findings of Gudipati and Yang. Addition of O and OH to the parent PAH is the dominant photochemical reaction, but PAH erosion to smaller PAHs (producing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO) is also important. DFT spectra are used to assess the contribution of PAH-related species to interstellar absorption features from 5 to 9 μm. The case is made that PAH cations are important contributors to the C2 component and PAH(OH) {sub n} and PAH(O) {sub n} to the C5 component described by Boogert et al. Thus, interstellar ices should contain neutral and ionized PAHs, alcohols, ketones and quinones at the ∼2%-4% level relative to H{sub 2}O. PAHs, their photoproducts, and ion-mediated processes should therefore be considered when modeling interstellar ice processes.

  20. Detecting High Ice Water Content Cloud Regions Using Airborne and Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyrollah Pour, H.; Korolev, A.; Barker, H.; Wolde, M.; Heckman, I.; Duguay, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCS) have significant impacts on local and global hydrological cycles and radiation budgets. Moreover, high ice water content (HIWC) found inside MCS clouds at altitudes above 7 km have been identified as hazardous for aviation safety. The environment inside HIWC cloud regions may cause icing of aircraft engines resulting in uncontrolled engine power loss or damage. This phenomenon is known as ice crystal icing (ICI). International aviation regulatory agencies are now attempting to define techniques that enable prediction and detection of potential ICI environments. Such techniques range from on-board HIWC detection to nowcasting of ice crystal weather using satellite data and numerical weather prediction models. The most practical way to monitor continuously for areas of HIWC is by remote sensing with passive radiometers on geostationary satellites. Establishing correlations between HIWC cloud regions and radiances is, however, a challenging problem. This is because regions of HIWC can occur several kilometers below cloud top, while passive satellite radiometers response mainly to the upper kilometers of MCS clouds. The High Altitude Ice Crystals - High Ice Water Content (HAIC-HIWC) field campaigns in Cayenne, French Guiana collected a rich dataset from aboard the Canadian NRC Convair-580 that was equipped with a suite of in-situ microphysical instruments and Dopplerized W- and X-band radars with vertically- and horizontally-directed antenna. This paper aims to describe an algorithm that has been developed to establish relationships between satellite radiances and locations of HIWC regions identified from in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, Doppler velocities, and vertical and horizontal radar reflectivity.

  1. Dielectric properties of water ice, the ice Ih/XI phase transition, and an assessment of density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Mandes; Slater, Ben; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2014-01-16

    The dielectric properties of the hydrogen disordered hexagonal phase (Ih) of water ice have been computed using density functional theory (DFT) based Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble. Temperature dependent data yield a fit for the Curie-Weiss law of the system and hence a prediction of the temperature of the phase transition from the Ih phase to the hydrogen ordered ice XI phase. Direct simulations around the phase transition temperature confirm and refine the predicted phase transition temperatures and provide data for further properties, such as the linear thermal expansion coefficient. Results have been obtained with both hybrid and semilocal density functionals, which yields insight in the performance of the electronic structure method. In particular, the hybrid functional yields significantly more realistic dielectric constants than the semilocal variant, namely ε ≈ 116 as opposed to ε ≈ 151 at 273 K (εexperiment = 95). This can be attributed to the tendency of semilocal functionals to be biased to configurations with a large dipole moment, and their overestimation of the dipole moments of these configurations. This is also reflected in the estimates of the Ih/XI transition temperature, which is 70-80 and 90-100 K for the hybrid and semilocal functional respectively. DFT based sampling of the millions of configurations necessary for this work has been enabled by a Tree Monte Carlo algorithm, designed for massively parallel computers.

  2. INWARD RADIAL MIXING OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICES IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacher, Lionel G.; Marrocchi, Yves; Villeneuve, Johan [CRPG, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, UMR 7358, Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy, F-54501 (France); Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J.; Gounelle, Matthieu, E-mail: lvacher@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr [IMPMC, MNHN, UPMC, UMR CNRS 7590, 61 rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-08-10

    The very wide diversity of asteroid compositions in the main belt suggests significant material transport in the solar protoplanetary disk and hints at the presence of interstellar ices in hydrated bodies. However, only a few quantitative estimations of the contribution of interstellar ice in the inner solar system have been reported, leading to considerable uncertainty about the extent of radial inward mixing in the solar protoplanetary disk 4.56 Ga ago. We show that the pristine CM chondrite Paris contains primary Ca-carbonates whose O-isotopic compositions require an 8%–35% contribution from interstellar water. The presence of interstellar water in Paris is confirmed by its bulk D/H isotopic composition that shows significant D enrichment (D/H = (167 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6}) relative to the mean D/H of CM chondrites ((145 ± 3) × 10{sup −6}) and the putative D/H of local CM water ((82 ± 1.5) × 10{sup −6}). These results imply that (i) efficient radial mixing of interstellar ices occurred from the outer zone of the solar protoplanetary disk inward and that (ii) chondrites accreted water ice grains from increasing heliocentric distances in the solar protoplanetary disk.

  3. UV/Vis spectroscopy of C60 embedded in water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuylle, Steven; Linnartz, Harold; Thrower, John

    2012-01-01

    Electronic solid state spectra are recorded for C60 embedded in 40 K water ice using broad band direct absorption spectroscopy, and assigned with reference to existing matrix data. The results are interesting in view of the recent gas phase detection of fullerenes in the interstellar medium...... and provide a realistic solid state signature to search for frozen C60 in space....

  4. Analysis of the Effect of Water Activity on Ice Formation Using a New Theory of Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2013-01-01

    In this work a new theory of nucleation is developed and used to investigate the effect of water activity on the formation of ice within super-cooled droplets. The new theory is based on a novel concept where the interface is assumed to be made of liquid molecules trapped by the solid matrix. Using this concept new expressions are developed for the critical ice germ size and the nucleation work, with explicit dependencies on temperature and water activity. However unlike previous approaches, the new theory does not depend on the interfacial tension between liquid and ice. Comparison against experimental results shows that the new theory is able to reproduce the observed effect of water activity on nucleation rate and freezing temperature. It allows for the first time a theoretical derivation of the constant shift in water activity between melting and nucleation. The new theory offers a consistent thermodynamic view of ice nucleation, simple enough to be applied in atmospheric models of cloud formation.

  5. Cryomicroscopic determination of ice crystal growth in the system 2,4-pentanediol/water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Patrick M.

    1996-01-01

    The system 2,4-pentanediol/water is studied using differential scanning calorimetry and cryomicroscopy. The phase diagram at low temperatures is presented. Ice crystal growth rates are calculated from direct cryomicroscopic observations. These rates are found to be proportional to the ratio of the supercooling to the viscosity of the solution.

  6. Oxo Crater on (1) Ceres: Geological History and the Role of Water-ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Hoffmann, M.; Thangjam, G.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Cloutis, E. A.; Applin, D. M. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9 (Canada); Mengel, K. [IELF, TU Clausthal, Adolph-Roemer-Straße 2A, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Protopapa, S. [University of Maryland, Department of Astronomy, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Takir, D. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Preusker, F. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Schmidt, B. E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Russell, C. T., E-mail: nathues@mps.mpg.de [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Dept. of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres (∅ ∼ 940 km) is the largest object in the main asteroid belt. Investigations suggest that Ceres is a thermally evolved, volatile-rich body with potential geological activity, a body that was never completely molten, but one that possibly partially differentiated into a rocky core and an ice-rich mantle, and may contain remnant internal liquid water. Thermal alteration and the infall of exogenic material contribute to producing a (dark) carbonaceous chondritic-like surface containing ammoniated phyllosilicates. Here we report imaging and spectroscopic analyses of data on the bright Oxo crater derived from the Framing Camera and the Visible and Infrared Spectrometer on board the Dawn spacecraft. We confirm that the transitional complex crater Oxo (∅ ∼ 9 km) exhibits exposed surface water-ice. We show that this water-ice-rich material is associated exclusively with two lobate deposits at pole-facing scarps, deposits that also contain carbonates and admixed phyllosilicates. Due to Oxo’s location at −4802 m below the cerean reference ellipsoid and its very young age of only 190 ka (1 σ : +100 ka, −70 ka), Oxo is predestined for ongoing water-ice sublimation.

  7. Chemical and environmental studies in ice and waters in and along Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SenGupta, R.

    During the First Indian Ocean Expedition to Antarctica in anstral summer of 1981-82, some chemical investigations were carried out on the ice and waters of the Antarctic continent and along NE-SW transect in the southwestern Indian Ocean from 32...

  8. Oxo Crater on (1) Ceres: Geological History and the Role of Water-ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Hoffmann, M.; Thangjam, G.; Cloutis, E. A.; Applin, D. M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Mengel, K.; Protopapa, S.; Takir, D.; Preusker, F.; Schmidt, B. E.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-09-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres (∅ ˜ 940 km) is the largest object in the main asteroid belt. Investigations suggest that Ceres is a thermally evolved, volatile-rich body with potential geological activity, a body that was never completely molten, but one that possibly partially differentiated into a rocky core and an ice-rich mantle, and may contain remnant internal liquid water. Thermal alteration and the infall of exogenic material contribute to producing a (dark) carbonaceous chondritic-like surface containing ammoniated phyllosilicates. Here we report imaging and spectroscopic analyses of data on the bright Oxo crater derived from the Framing Camera and the Visible and Infrared Spectrometer on board the Dawn spacecraft. We confirm that the transitional complex crater Oxo (∅ ˜ 9 km) exhibits exposed surface water-ice. We show that this water-ice-rich material is associated exclusively with two lobate deposits at pole-facing scarps, deposits that also contain carbonates and admixed phyllosilicates. Due to Oxo’s location at -4802 m below the cerean reference ellipsoid and its very young age of only 190 ka (1σ: +100 ka, -70 ka), Oxo is predestined for ongoing water-ice sublimation.

  9. Extremophilic fungi in arctic ice: a relationship between adaptation to low temperature and water activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Sonjak, S.; Zalar, P.

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about fungal diversity in extremely cold regions. Low temperatures induce the formation of ice crystals and therefore also the creation of low water activity (a(w)). These are the dominant factors in external chemistry that influence microbial biota in cold regions. Therefore, we ...

  10. The Ice-Vapor Interface and the Melting Point of Ice I-h for the Polarizable POL3 Water Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muchová, E.; Gladich, Ivan; Picaud, S.; Hoang, P. N. M.; Roeselová, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 23 (2011), s. 5973-5982 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/10/1724; GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk MEB020919; GA MŠk MEB020715 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : polarizable water force field * ice surface * melting point * ice slab Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2011

  11. Distribution of water masses and meltwater on the continental shelf near the Totten and Moscow University ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvano, Alessandro; Rintoul, Stephen R.; Peña-Molino, Beatriz; Williams, Guy D.

    2017-03-01

    Warm waters flood the continental shelf of the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas in West Antarctica, driving rapid basal melt of ice shelves. In contrast, waters on the continental shelf in East Antarctica are cooler and ice shelves experience relatively low rates of basal melt. An exception is provided by the Totten and Moscow University ice shelves on the Sabrina Coast, where satellite-derived basal melt rates are comparable to West Antarctica. Recent oceanographic observations have revealed that relatively warm (˜-0.4°C) modified Circumpolar Deep Water (mCDW) enters the cavity beneath the Totten Ice Shelf through a 1100 m deep trough, delivering sufficient heat to drive rapid basal melt. Here we use observations from a recent summer survey to show that mCDW is widespread on the continental shelf of the Sabrina Coast, forming a warm (up to 0.3°C) and saline (34.5-34.6) bottom layer overlaid by cold (˜freezing point) and fresh (salinity ˜34.3) Winter Water. Dense Shelf Water is not observed. A 1000 deep m trough allows water at -1.3°C to reach the Moscow University ice-shelf cavity to drive basal melt. Freshening by addition of glacial meltwater is widespread on the southern shelf at depths above 300-400 m, with maximum meltwater concentrations up to 4-5 ml L-1 observed in outflows from the ice-shelf cavities. Our observations indicate that the ocean properties on the Sabrina Coast more resemble those found on the continental shelf of the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas than those typical of East Antarctica.Plain Language SummaryThe Totten Glacier drains more ice from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet than any other glacier. The Totten holds a volume of ice equivalent to more than 3.5m of global sea level rise, so changes in the glacier could have significant consequences. East Antarctic ice shelves, including the Totten, were thought to be largely isolated from warm ocean waters and therefore stable. An Australian voyage in 2015 obtained the first oceanographic

  12. Reduced Near-Resonant Vibrational Coupling at the Surfaces of Liquid Water and Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Wilbert J; Versluis, Jan; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa; Bakker, Huib J

    2018-02-26

    We study the resonant interaction of the OH stretch vibrations of water molecules at the surfaces of liquid water and ice using heterodyne-detected sum-frequency generation (HD-SFG) spectroscopy. By studying different isotopic mixtures of H 2 O and D 2 O, we vary the strength of the interaction, and we monitor the resulting effect on the HD-SFG spectrum of the OH stretch vibrations. We observe that the near-resonant coupling effects are weaker at the surface than in the bulk, both for water and ice, indicating that for both phases of water the OH vibrations are less strongly delocalized at the surface than in the bulk.

  13. Absorption of crystalline water ice in the far infrared at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, C.; Mutschke, H.; Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.; Mohr, P.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of ice in the far infrared are important for models of protoplanetary and debris disks. In this report, we derive a new set of data for the absorption (represented by the imaginary part of the refractive index κ) of crystalline water ice in this spectral range. The study includes a detailed inspection of the temperature dependence, which has not been conducted in such detail before. We measured the transmission of three ice layers with different thicknesses at temperatures ϑ = 10...250 K and present data at wavelengths λ = 80...625 μm. We found a change in the spectral dependence of κ at a wavelength of 175 ± 6 μm. At shorter wavelengths, κ exhibits a constant flat slope and no significant temperature dependence. Long-ward of that wavelength, the slope gets steeper and has a clear, approximately linear temperature dependence. This change in behaviour is probably caused by a characteristic absorption band of water ice. The measured data were fitted by a power-law model that analytically describes the absorption behaviour at an arbitrary temperature. This model can readily be applied to any object of interest, for instance a protoplanetary or debris disk. To illustrate how the model works, we simulated the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the resolved, large debris disk around the nearby solar-type star HD 207129. Replacing our ice model by another, commonly used data set for water ice results in a different SED slope at longer wavelengths. This leads to changes in the characteristic model parameters of the disk, such as the inferred particle size distribution, and affects the interpretation of the underlying collisional physics of the disk.

  14. Continuous online field deployable high precision and high resolution water isotope analysis from ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, Vasileios; Popp, Trevor; Johnsen, Sigfus; Blunier, Thomas; Stowasser, Christopher; Kettner, Ernesto

    2010-05-01

    One of the most important features of ice cores as climate and atmospheric paleoarchives is their potential for high temporal resolution. The measurement of chemical impurities in ice cores that fully exploits this high resolution has become standard with the advent of Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) from continuously melted ice core segments, often performed in the field. Meanwhile, the measurement of water stable isotopic composition (deuterium and oxygen-18) continues, for the most part, to be performed offline via discrete sampling with traditional mass spectroscopy. These offline procedures are time consuming, expensive, and do not fully exploit the temporal resolution available in the ice core. Here we describe a new method and the first results for the determination of water isotopic content measured from a continuous melted rod with a commercially available near-infrared cavity ring down spectrometer (CRDS; http://www.picarro.com/) coupled to a CFA system both in the field on the Greenland ice sheet and in the laboratory. For the measurement of water isotopes a carefully controlled fraction of the CFA melt stream is evaporated directly into the laser cavity for simultaneous analysis of both deuterium and oxygen-18 content. The details of the system have been tested with a deployment to the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) coupled to the University of Bern CFA system and in the laboratory with NGRIP ice coupled to the University of Copenhagen CFA system. The results show that the system already produces the highest interpretable resolution records that are comparable or somewhat less precise than traditional mass spectroscopy discrete sample methods. The enormous potential of the system is being realized in the density and resolution of the produced records in connection with other highly resolved series (e.g. chemical impurities), and also in the efficiency by which the records can be produced. Among other things, time series from this type of

  15. Searching for Water Ice at the Lunar North Pole Using High-Resolution Images and Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Speyerer, E. J.; Denevi, B. W.

    2017-01-01

    Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) at the lunar poles are potential reservoirs of frozen volatiles, and are therefore high-priority exploration targets. PSRs trap water and other volatiles because their annual maximum temperatures (40-100K) are lower than the sublimation temperatures of these species (i.e. H2O approx.104K). Previous studies using various remote sensing techniques have not been able to definitively characterize the distribution or abundance of ice in lunar PSRs. The purpose of this study is to search for signs of ice in PSRs using two complimentary remote sensing techniques: radar and visible images.

  16. A physically constrained classical description of the homogeneous nucleation of ice in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Thomas; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-12-01

    Liquid water can persist in a supercooled state to below 238 K in the Earth's atmosphere, a temperature range where homogeneous nucleation becomes increasingly probable. However, the rate of homogeneous ice nucleation in supercooled water is poorly constrained, in part, because supercooled water eludes experimental scrutiny in the region of the homogeneous nucleation regime where it can exist only fleetingly. Here we present a new parameterization of the rate of homogeneous ice nucleation based on classical nucleation theory. In our approach, we constrain the key terms in classical theory, i.e., the diffusion activation energy and the ice-liquid interfacial energy, with physically consistent parameterizations of the pertinent quantities. The diffusion activation energy is related to the translational self-diffusion coefficient of water for which we assess a range of descriptions and conclude that the most physically consistent fit is provided by a power law. The other key term is the interfacial energy between the ice embryo and supercooled water whose temperature dependence we constrain using the Turnbull correlation, which relates the interfacial energy to the difference in enthalpy between the solid and liquid phases. The only adjustable parameter in our model is the absolute value of the interfacial energy at one reference temperature. That value is determined by fitting this classical model to a selection of laboratory homogeneous ice nucleation data sets between 233.6 K and 238.5 K. On extrapolation to temperatures below 233 K, into a range not accessible to standard techniques, we predict that the homogeneous nucleation rate peaks between about 227 and 231 K at a maximum nucleation rate many orders of magnitude lower than previous parameterizations suggest. This extrapolation to temperatures below 233 K is consistent with the most recent measurement of the ice nucleation rate in micrometer-sized droplets at temperatures of 227-232 K on very short time scales

  17. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N. F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kristensen, T. B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.

    2015-11-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs). The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid - viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL) analysis.

  18. Shock Melting of Permafrost on Mars: Water Ice Multiphase Equation of State for Numerical Modeling and Its Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, B. A.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of water/ice/brine in upper layers of Martian crust affects many processes of impact cratering. Modeling of these effects promises better understanding of Martian cratering records. We present here the new ANEOS-based multiphase equation of state for water/ice constructed for usage in hydrocodes and first numerical experiments on permafrost shock melting. Preliminary results show that due to multiple shock compression of ice inclusions in rocks the entropy jump in shocked ice is smaller than in pure ice for the same shock pressure. Hence previous estimates of ice melting during impact cratering on Mars should be re-evaluated. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Using polyatomic primary ions to probe an amino acid and a nucleic base in water ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlan, X.A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: x.conlan@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Biddulph, G.X. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: G.Biddulph@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Lockyer, N.P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, J.C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Vickerman@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-07-30

    In this study on pure water ice, we show that protonated water species [H{sub 2}O] {sub n}H{sup +} are more prevalent than (H{sub 2}O) {sub n} {sup +} ions after bombardment by Au{sup +} monoatomic and Au{sub 3} {sup +} and C{sub 60} {sup +} polyatomic projectiles. This data also reveals significant differences in water cluster yields under bombardment by these three projectiles. The amino acid alanine and the nucleic base adenine in solution have been studied and have been shown to have an effect on the water cluster ion yields observed using an Au{sub 3} {sup +} ion beam.

  20. Synoptic Traveling Weather Systems on Mars: Effects of Radiatively-Active Water Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Atsuki Urata, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosols on Mars are critical in determining the nature of its thermal structure, its large-scale circulation, and hence the overall climate of the planet. We conduct multi-annual simulations with the latest version of the NASA Ames Mars global climate model (GCM), gcm2.3+, that includes a modernized radiative-transfer package and complex water-ice cloud microphysics package which permit radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating. Results indicate that radiatively active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate. The mean thermal structure and balanced circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Warming of the subtropical atmosphere at altitude and cooling of the high latitude atmosphere at low levels takes place, which increases the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrast (i.e., "baroclinicity"). With radiatively active water ice clouds (RAC) compared to radiatively inert water ice clouds (nonRAC), significant changes in the intensity of the mean state and forced stationary Rossby modes occur, both of which affect the vigor and intensity of traveling, synoptic period weather systems. Such weather systems not only act as key agents in the transport of heat and momentum beyond the extent of the Hadley circulation, but also the transport of trace species such as water vapor, water ice-clouds, dust and others. The northern hemisphere (NH) forced Rossby waves and resultant wave train are augmented in the RAC case: the modes are more intense and the wave train is shifted equatorward. Significant changes also occur within the subtropics and tropics. The Rossby wave train sets up, combined with the traveling synoptic-period weather systems (i.e., cyclones and anticyclones), the geographic extent of storm zones (or storm tracks) within the NH. A variety of circulation

  1. Synoptic Traveling Weather Systems on Mars: Effects of Radiatively-Active Water Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery; Kahre, Melinda; Haberle, Robert; Urata, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols on Mars are critical in determining the nature of its thermal structure, its large-scale circulation, and hence the overall climate of the planet. We conduct multi-annual simulations with the latest version of the NASA Ames Mars global climate model (GCM), gcm2.3+, that includes a modernized radiative-transfer package and complex water-ice cloud microphysics package which permit radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating. Results indicate that radiatively active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate. The mean thermal structure and balanced circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Warming of the subtropical atmosphere at altitude and cooling of the high latitude atmosphere at low levels takes place, which increases the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrast (i.e., "baroclinicity"). With radiatively active water ice clouds (RAC) compared to radiatively inert water ice clouds (nonRAC), significant changes in the intensity of the mean state and forced stationary Rossby modes occur, both of which affect the vigor and intensity of traveling, synoptic period weather systems.Such weather systems not only act as key agents in the transport of heat and momentum beyond the extent of the Hadley circulation, but also the transport of trace species such as water vapor, water ice-clouds, dust and others. The northern hemisphere (NH) forced Rossby waves and resultant wave train are augmented in the RAC case: the modes are more intense and the wave train is shifted equatorward. Significant changes also occur within the subtropics and tropics. The Rossby wave train sets up, combined with the traveling synoptic period weather systems (i.e., cyclones and anticyclones), the geographic extent of storm zones (or storm tracks) within the NH. A variety of circulation

  2. Ice collapse over trapped water bodies on Enceladus and Europa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, C. C; Schmidt, B. E

    2015-01-01

    .... We find that for Europa's likely trapped water pockets below chaos terrains and a localized sea below Enceladus' South Polar Terrain, these models can reproduce observed geology of both features...

  3. JAWS: Just Add Water System - A device for detection of nucleic acids in Martian ice caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, Eske; Mørk, Søren

    2002-01-01

    with a regulation of pH and salt concentrations e.g. the MOD systems and could be installed on a planetary probe melting its way down the Martian ice caps e.g. the NASA Cryobot. JAWS can be used for detection of remains of ancient life preserved in the Martian ice as well as for detection of contamination brought......The design of a device for nucleic acid detection in the Martian ice caps is presented; the Just Add Water System (JAWS). It is based on fiber-optic PNA (peptide nucleic acid) light up probe random microsphere universal array technology. JAWS is designed to be part of a larger system...

  4. Consequences of long-distance swimming and travel over deep-water pack ice for a female polar bear during a year of extreme sea ice retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, G.M.; Whiteman, J.P.; Harlow, H.J.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Regehr, E.V.; Ben-David, M.

    2011-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) prefer to live on Arctic sea ice but may swim between ice floes or between sea ice and land. Although anecdotal observations suggest that polar bears are capable of swimming long distances, no data have been available to describe in detail long distance swimming events or the physiological and reproductive consequences of such behavior. Between an initial capture in late August and a recapture in late October 2008, a radio-collared adult female polar bear in the Beaufort Sea made a continuous swim of 687 km over 9 days and then intermittently swam and walked on the sea ice surface an additional 1,800 km. Measures of movement rate, hourly activity, and subcutaneous and external temperature revealed distinct profiles of swimming and walking. Between captures, this polar bear lost 22% of her body mass and her yearling cub. The extraordinary long distance swimming ability of polar bears, which we confirm here, may help them cope with reduced Arctic sea ice. Our observation, however, indicates that long distance swimming in Arctic waters, and travel over deep water pack ice, may result in high energetic costs and compromise reproductive fitness. ?? 2011 US Government.

  5. Laboratory Determination of the Infrared Band Strengths of Pyrene Frozen in Water Ice: Implications for the Composition of Interstellar Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.E.; Gudipati, M.S.; Boogert, A.C.A.; Lignell, H.; Allamandola, L.J.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Werner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometers) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10 to 20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H2O and deuterium oxide ices. The deuterium oxide mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H2O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 micrometers. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet (UV) band strengths, and we find that they are generally approximately 50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. (2011) based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. (2008) to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5 to 8 micrometer spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 micrometer CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5 to 9% of the cosmic carbon budget, and account for 2 to 9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5 to 8 micrometer region.

  6. Laboratory determination of the infrared band strengths of pyrene frozen in water ice: Implications for the composition of interstellar ices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E. E. [New York Center for Astrobiology and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Gudipati, M. S.; Werner, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Boogert, A. C. A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Mail Code 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lignell, H. [Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2025 (United States); Allamandola, L. J. [Space Science Division, Mail Stop 245-6, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Stapelfeldt, K. R., E-mail: hardee@rpi.edu, E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10%-20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O ices. The D{sub 2}O mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H{sub 2}O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 μm. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet band strengths, and we find that they are generally ∼50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5-8 μm spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 μm CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5%-9% of the cosmic carbon budget and account for 2%-9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5-8 μm region.

  7. Water/Ice Heat Sink With Quick-Connect Couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Report presents additional detailed information on apparatus described in "Direct-Interface, Fusible Heat Sink" (ARC-11920). Describes entire apparatus, with special emphasis on features of quick-disconnect couplings governing flow of water under various operating conditions and plumbing configuration.

  8. Spectroscopic Variation of Water Ice Abundance Across Mimas and Tethys' Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, Francesca; Schenk, Paul

    2014-11-01

    We present results from our ongoing work mapping the variation of the main water ice absorption bands across Mimas and Tethys’ surfaces using Cassini-VIMS cubes acquired in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). Mimas and Tethys are Enceladus’ orbital neighbours, lying inside and outside Enceladus’ orbit respectively. It is therefore likely that Mimas and Tethys surfaces interact with icy particles from the E-ring, resulting in a spectral, color modification. For all pixels in the selected VIMS cubes, we measured the band depths for water-ice absorptions at 1.25, 1.5 and 2.02 μm and the height of the 3.6 μm reflection peak, whose value relates to grain size. To characterize the global variation of water-ice band depths across Mimas and Tethys, we divided the surface into a 1°x1° grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell. The most prominent feature on Mimas surface is the crater Herschel with a diameter of 130 km, one-third of the satellite's one. Mimas has the most uniform surface among Saturn's principal satellites, with its trailing side just 10% brighter and redder than the leading one. The uniformity of Mimas extends on spectral appearance too. The 1.52 and 2.02 μm H2O-ice absorption bands are ˜10% deeper on trailing hemisphere.On Tethys' leading hemisphere a 400 km in diameter crater, Odysseus, is present. Its dimension represents ˜40% of Tethys diameter.For both moons we find that large geologic features, such as the Odysseus and Herschel impact basin, do not correlate with water ice’s abundance variation.For Tethys, we found a quite uniform surface on both hemispheres. The only deviation from this pattern shows up on the trailing hemisphere, where we notice two north-oriented, dark areas around 225° and 315°. For Mimas the selected dataset covers just the leading hemisphere and a portion of the trailing side. From the analysis, the two hemispheres appear to be quite similar in water ice abundance, the trailing

  9. Operational algorithm for ice-water classification on dual-polarized RADARSAT-2 images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhvatkina, Natalia; Korosov, Anton; Muckenhuber, Stefan; Sandven, Stein; Babiker, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from RADARSAT-2 (RS2) in dual-polarization mode provide additional information for discriminating sea ice and open water compared to single-polarization data. We have developed an automatic algorithm based on dual-polarized RS2 SAR images to distinguish open water (rough and calm) and sea ice. Several technical issues inherent in RS2 data were solved in the pre-processing stage, including thermal noise reduction in HV polarization and correction of angular backscatter dependency in HH polarization. Texture features were explored and used in addition to supervised image classification based on the support vector machines (SVM) approach. The study was conducted in the ice-covered area between Greenland and Franz Josef Land. The algorithm has been trained using 24 RS2 scenes acquired in winter months in 2011 and 2012, and the results were validated against manually derived ice charts of the Norwegian Meteorological Institute. The algorithm was applied on a total of 2705 RS2 scenes obtained from 2013 to 2015, and the validation results showed that the average classification accuracy was 91 ± 4 %.

  10. Photochemistry of Coronene in Cosmic Water Ice Analogs at Different Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; Mattioda, A. L.; Ricca, A.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents the photochemistry of ultraviolet (UV) irradiated coronene in water ices at 15 K studied using mid-infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) spectroscopy for C24H12:H2O at concentrations of (1:50), (1:150), (1:200), (1:300), and (1:400). Previous UV irradiation studies of anthracene:H2O, pyrene:H2O, and benzo[ghi]perylene:H2O ices at 15 K have shown that aromatic alcohols and ketones, as well as CO2 and H2CO, are formed at very low temperatures. Likewise, here, in addition to the coronene cation, hydroxy-, keto-, and protonated coronene (coronene H+) are formed. The rate constants for the decay of neutral coronene and for the formation of photoproducts have been derived. It is shown that Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their UV induced PAH:H2O photoproducts have mid-infrared spectroscopic signatures in the 5-8 μm region that can contribute to the interstellar ice components described by Boogert et al. as C1-C5. Our results suggest that oxygenated and hydrogenated PAHs could be in UV-irradiated regions of the interstellar medium where water-rich ices are important.

  11. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when entering clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes: rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  12. Vertical distribution and diel vertical migration of krill beneath snow-covered ice and in ice-free waters

    KAUST Repository

    Vestheim, Hege

    2013-11-11

    A bottom mounted upward looking Simrad EK60 120-kHz echo sounder was used to study scattering layers (SLs) and individuals of the krill Meganyctiphanes norvegica. The mooring was situated at 150-m depth in the Oslofjord, connected with an onshore cable for power and transmission of digitized data. Records spanned 5 months from late autumn to spring. A current meter and CTD was associated with the acoustic mooring and a shore-based webcam monitored ice conditions in the fjord. The continuous measurements were supplemented with intermittent krill sampling campaigns and their physical and biological environment.The krill carried out diel vertical migration (DVM) throughout the winter, regardless of the distribution of potential prey. The fjord froze over in mid-winter and the daytime distribution of a mid-water SL of krill immediately became shallower associated with snow fall after freezing, likely related to reduction of light intensities. Still, a fraction of the population always descended all the way to the bottom, so that the krill population by day seemed to inhabit waters with light levels spanning up to six orders of magnitude. Deep-living krill ascended in synchrony with the rest of the population in the afternoon, but individuals consistently reappeared in near-bottom waters already? 1 h after the ascent. Thereafter, the krill appeared to undertake asynchronous migrations, with some krill always being present in near-bottom waters even though the entire population appeared to undertake DVM. The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of magmatic water to reconstruct palaeo-ice thicknesses during subglacial rhyolitic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jacqueline; Tuffen, Hugh; McGarvie, Dave; Pinkerton, Harry; Wilson, Lionel

    2010-05-01

    Magma degassing patterns can potentially be used to reconstruct ice thicknesses during subglacial eruptions, as the pressure dependence of water solubility in silicate melts is reasonably well constrained. The amount of water remaining in the quenched bulk glasses should record the quenching pressure, which, in a subglacial setting, will be dependent on the pressure of overlying ice and/or meltwater that was present. This reconstruction technique has been applied to several basaltic volcanoes[1]. In one study the dissolved water contents was seen to vary as a function of altitude, consistent with the presence of an ice sheet[2]. Similar techniques have been applied to a rhyolitic volcano, as described below. Bláhnúkur is a small-volume rhyolitic, subglacial volcano at Torfajökull volcano, southern Iceland[3] that erupted at ~95 ka[4]. 45 glassy lava samples were collected from a variety of elevations and lithofacies types. These samples were analysed for water content using infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), and pressure-solubility relationships were calculated using VolatileCalc[5]. The results reveal a general decrease in water concentration with elevation, consistent with the presence of an ice sheet with a surface elevation of ~1,050 m a.s.l.. This corresponds with an ice thickness of ~450 m, consistent with the field evidence from tuyas of a similar age within the same region[6]. Furthermore, the results suggest an eruptive temperature of 850°C and 0 ppm CO2. However, not all samples agree with this overall trend. We suggest that samples with anomalously low water contents could have formed in regions where there was meltwater drainage which lowered the quenching pressure[7]. By contrast, water-rich samples could reflect intrusive formation resulting in loading by rock as well as ice[8]. Crucially though, the anomalous values are all from the same locations, suggesting that there are processes that are specifically affecting certain localities. In order to use

  14. Ice Generation and the Heat and Mass Transfer Phenomena of Introducing Water to a Cold Bath of Brine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xiao; Quarini, Giuseppe L

    2017-03-13

    We demonstrate a method for the study of the heat and mass transfer and of the freezing phenomena in a subcooled brine environment. Our experiment showed that, under the proper conditions, ice can be produced when water is introduced to a bath of cold brine. To make ice form, in addition to having the brine and water mix, the rate of heat transfer must bypass that of mass transfer. When water is introduced in the form of tiny droplets to the brine surface, the mode of heat and mass transfer is by diffusion. The buoyancy stops water from mixing with the brine underneath, but as the ice grows thicker, it slows down the rate of heat transfer, making ice more difficult to grow as a result. When water is introduced inside the brine in the form of a flow, a number of factors are found to influence how much ice can form. Brine temperature and concentration, which are the driving forces of heat and mass transfer, respectively, can affect the water-to-ice conversion ratio; lower bath temperatures and brine concentrations encourage more ice to form. The flow rheology, which can directly affect both the heat and mass transfer coefficients, is also a key factor. In addition, the flow rheology changes the area of contact of the flow with the bulk fluid.

  15. Influence of sea ice cover on evaporation and water vapour isotopic composition in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian

    2017-04-01

    Since July 2015, water stable isotopes (HDO and H218O) have been measured at two Arctic facilities: during the summer on board of the research vessel Polarstern, and year-round at the Siberian coastal site of Samoylov, situated in the Lena delta (N 72°22', E 126°29'), close to the Laptev Sea. In both places, the isotopic composition of water vapour is analysed continuously in surface air. Additional isotopic measurements are performed on a daily basis in ocean surface water samples taken on Polarstern and on an event basis from precipitation sampled in Samoylov. The two Polarstern summer campaigns cover a large region of the western Artic Ocean, including a one-month campaign in the central and eastern Arctic crossing the North Pole in September 2015, with very cold conditions (up to -20°C). Combining ocean and atmospheric observations from Polarstern allows an evaluation of local surface water evaporation and its isotopic fingerprint relative to the oceanic and meteorological conditions as well as the partial sea ice cover. In the central and eastern Arctic, a large area of complete sea ice cover also revealed a strong impact on the advected moisture above the ice cap under very cold conditions. A first year of Siberian observations at Samoylov depicted a large seasonal variability, with extremely dry and isotopically depleted winter values. Contrasted seasonal isotopic regimes might be utilized for identifying moisture sources changes in the region, such as ocean surface closure by sea ice, or freezing of the Lena River. Besides documenting the present meteorology and changes in the Arctic, our measurements will contribute to a better interpretation of regional paleoclimate records based on water isotopes and to the evaluation of climate models in the Arctic. A first model-data comparison of our measurements with simulation results by the isotope-enabled atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso have revealed relevant model biases in the Arctic realm.

  16. Short-term variability on the surface of (1) Ceres⋆. A changing amount of water ice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, D.; Kaňuchová, Z.; Ieva, S.; Fornasier, S.; Barucci, M. A.; Lantz, C.; Dotto, E.; Strazzulla, G.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The dwarf planet (1) Ceres - next target of the NASA Dawn mission - is the largest body in the asteroid main belt. Although several observations of this body have been performed so far, the presence of surface water ice is still questioned. Aims: Our goal is to better understand the surface composition of Ceres and to constrain the presence of exposed water ice. Methods: We acquired new visible and near-infrared spectra at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (La Palma, Spain), and reanalyzed literature spectra in the 3-μm region. Results: We obtained the first rotationally resolved spectroscopic observations of Ceres at visible wavelengths. Visible spectra taken one month apart at almost the same planetocentric coordinates show a significant slope variation (up to 3%/103Å). A faint absorption centered at 0.67 μm, possibly due to aqueous alteration, is detected in a subset of our spectra. The various explanations in the literature for the 3.06-μm feature can be interpreted as due to a variable amount of surface water ice at different epochs. Conclusions: The remarkable short-term temporal variability of the visible spectral slope and the changing shape of the 3.06-μm band can be hints of different amounts of water ice exposed on the surface of Ceres. This would agree with the recent detection by the Herschel Space Observatory of localized and transient sources of water vapor over this dwarf planet. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Seasonal and diurnal variability of Mars water-ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Zurek, Richard W.; Jaramillo, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    The diurnal and seasonal behavior of cloud opacity and frequency of occurrence was studied using an atlas of cloud occurrences compiled from the Viking IRTM (Infrared Thermal Mapper) data set. It was found that in some areas the behavior of water appeared to repeat in the zonal mean. However, this interpretation is complicated by both poor coverage and the variability of dust and clouds. As a result, the extent and nature of interannual variability remains unclear.

  18. High-temperature electrolysis of synthetic seawater using solid oxide electrolyzer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chee Kuan; Liu, Qinglin; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Qiang; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2017-02-01

    A Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSCF-GDC solid oxide electrolyzer cell (SOEC) is used to investigate the effects of seawater electrolysis for hydrogen production through electrolyzing steam produced from simulated seawater bath. Steam electrolysis using an SOEC with its fuel electrode contaminated by sea salt is also investigated. Steam produced from seawater is found to be free of contaminants, which are present in the seawater. Similar electrochemical performance is observed from the polarization curves and impedance spectra when using steam produced from pure water and seawater. Their short-term degradation rates are similar, which are registered at 15% 1000 h-1 for both cases. For the case of direct sea salt contamination in an SOEC's fuel electrode, both the uncontaminated and contaminated cells exhibit rather similar performance as observed from the polarization curves and impedance spectra. The difference in ASR values from the polarization curves and impedance spectra between the uncontaminated and contaminated cell are all within a 10% range. Rather similar short-term degradation rates of 15% 1000 h-1 and 16% 1000 h-1 are recorded for the uncontaminated and contaminated cells, respectively. Post-mortem analysis shows that the sea salt impregnated into the cell has been vaporized at a typical SOEC operating temperature of 800 °C over the period of operation.

  19. Global view of sea-ice production in polynyas and its linkage to dense/bottom water formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Kay I.; Nihashi, Sohey; Iwamoto, Katsushi

    2016-12-01

    Global overturning circulation is driven by density differences. Saline water rejected during sea-ice formation in polynyas is the main source of dense water, and thus sea-ice production is a key factor in the overturning circulation. Due to difficulties associated with in situ observation, sea-ice production and its interannual variability have not been well understood until recently. Methods to estimate sea-ice production on large scales have been developed using heat flux calculations based on satellite microwave radiometer data. Using these methods, we present the mapping of sea-ice production with the same definition and scale globally, and review the polynya ice production and its relationship with dense/bottom water. The mapping demonstrates that ice production rate is high in Antarctic coastal polynyas, in contrast to Arctic coastal polynyas. This is consistent with the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), the densest water mass which occupies the abyssal layer of the global ocean. The Ross Ice Shelf polynya has by far the highest ice production in the Southern Hemisphere. The Cape Darnley polynya (65°E-69°E) is found to be the second highest production area and recent observations revealed that this is the missing (fourth) source of AABW. In the region off the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT), the third source of AABW, sea-ice production decreased by as much as 40 %, due to the MGT calving in early 2010, resulting in a significant decrease in AABW production. The Okhotsk Northwestern polynya exhibits the highest ice production in the Northern Hemisphere, and the resultant dense water formation leads to overturning in the North Pacific, extending to the intermediate layer. Estimates of its ice production show a significant decrease over the past 30-50 years, likely causing the weakening of the North Pacific overturning. These regions demonstrate the strong linkage between variabilities of sea-ice production and bottom/intermediate water formation. The

  20. Atomistic and infrared study of CO-water amorphous ice onto olivine dust grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Roa, Elizabeth; Moreno, Fernando; López-Moreno, J. Juan; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    This work is a study of CO and H2O molecules as adsorbates that interact on the surface of olivine dust grains. Olivine (forsterite) is present on the Earth, planetary dust, in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in particular in comets. The composition of amorphous ice is very important for the interpretation of processes that occur in the solar system and the ISM. Dust particles in ISM are composed of a heterogeneous mixture of amorphous or crystalline silicates (e.g. olivine) organic material, carbon, and other minor constituents. These dust grains are embedded in a matrix of ices, such as H2O, CO, CO2, NH3, and CH4. We consider that any amorphous ice will interact and grow faster on dust grain surfaces. In this work we explore the adsorption of CO-H2O amorphous ice onto several (100) forsterite surfaces (dipolar and non-dipolar), by using first principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). These models are applied to two possible situations: i) adsorption of CO molecules mixed into an amorphous ice matrix (gas mixture) and adsorbed directly onto the forsterite surface. This interaction has lower adsorption energy than polar molecules (H2O and NH3) adsorbed on this surface; ii) adsorption of CO when the surface has previously been covered by amorphous water ice (onion model). In this case the calculations show that adsorption energy is low, indicating that this interaction is weak and therefore the CO can be desorbed with a small increase of temperature. Vibration spectroscopy for the most stable complex was also studied and the frequencies were in good agreement with experimental frequency values.

  1. Ice-wedge based permafrost chronologies and stable-water isotope records from Arctic Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Schwamborn, Georg; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Derevyagin, Alexander Yu

    2016-01-01

    Late Quaternary permafrost of northern latitudes contains large proportions of ground ice, including pore ice, segregation ice, massive ice, buried glacier ice and in particular ice wedges. Fossil ice-wedges are remnants of polygonal patterned ground in former tundra areas, which evolved over several tens of thousands of years in non-glaciated Beringia. Ice wedges originate from repeated frost cracking of the ground in winter and subsequent crack filling by snowmelt and re-freezing in the gro...

  2. Determination of Thermal Properties of Fresh Water and Sea Water Ice using Multiphysics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Rashid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to determine the thermal conductivity of ice using multiphysics analysis. This methodology used a combination of both experimentation and numerical simulation. In the experimental work, an ice block is observed using an infrared camera. The results reveal the variation in temperature over the surface. These results are dependent on two primary heat transfer parameters, namely, conductivity of ice within the ice cuboid and overall heat transfer coefficient. In addition to these two parameters, the surrounding temperature also affects the observed temperature profile. In the numerical simulation, the same behaviour is simulated using multiphysics tools. In this work, the finite difference method is used to discretize the heat equation and is solved using an FTCS (Forward-Time Central-Space method in MATLAB® software. The inputs to the simulation are the thermal properties of ice. These parameters are varied to match with the experimental results, hence revealing the real-time thermal properties of ice and surroundings.

  3. Heated Debates: Hot-Water Immersion or Ice Packs as First Aid for Cnidarian Envenomations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie L. Wilcox

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cnidarian envenomations are an important public health problem, responsible for more deaths than shark attacks annually. For this reason, optimization of first-aid care is essential. According to the published literature, cnidarian venoms and toxins are heat labile at temperatures safe for human application, which supports the use of hot-water immersion of the sting area(s. However, ice packs are often recommended and used by emergency personnel. After conducting a systematic review of the evidence for the use of heat or ice in the treatment of cnidarian envenomations, we conclude that the majority of studies to date support the use of hot-water immersion for pain relief and improved health outcomes.

  4. Water on Mars: Inventory, distribution, and possible sources of polar ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and various lines of morphologic evidence suggest that, in addition to the normal seasonal and climatic exchange of H2O that occurs between the Martian polar caps, atmosphere, and mid to high latitude regolith, large volumes of water have been introduced into the planet's long term hydrologic cycle by the sublimation of equatorial ground ice, impacts, catastrophic flooding, and volcanism. Under the climatic conditions that are thought to have prevailed on Mars throughout the past 3 to 4 b.y., much of this water is expected to have been cold trapped at the poles. The amount of polar ice contributed by each of the planet's potential crustal sources is discussed and estimated. The final analysis suggests that only 5 to 15 pct. of this potential inventory is now in residence at the poles.

  5. Metal-ion catalyzed polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Szostak, Jack W.

    2008-01-01

    the main issue preventing an efficient template-directed RNA polymerization. We report here the investigation of template-directed RNA polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice. In particular, it was found that activated Uridilate monomers in the presence of metal-ion catalysts could efficiently...... elongate RNA hairpins whose 5’-overhangs served as the templating sequence. The same applies for every other pyrimidine and purine nucleobase. Moreover, the initial elongation rates were always higher in the presence of a template complementary to the nucleotide than in systems without proper base......-pairing opportunities. These results suggest that a template-directed RNA polymerization catalyzed by metal-ions could be carried out under eutectic phase in water-ice conditions....

  6. The ice-like water monolayer near the wall makes inner water shells diffuse faster inside a charged nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunlei; Wu, Fengmin; Feng, Mei; Li, Jingyuan; Lu, Hangjun; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-05-28

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the impact of the ice-like water monolayer inside the tube and nearest to the tube wall on the diffusion properties of other inner water shells confined within a charged nanotube. We find that the axial diffusion coefficient of the first water monolayer near the wall monotonously decreases with the charge size on the nanotube, indicating a tighter control of the first monolayer from the larger sized charge. However, for the other water shells, the diffusion coefficients increase when the charge is larger than a critical value qc (~1.0 e). This unexpected phenomenon is attributed to the decreased number of hydrogen bonds between the first monolayer and other inner water shells caused by the very unique hydrogen-bond network patterns in the first ice-like monolayer, which makes it behave like a "hydrophobic water layer." Our findings may have implications for water treatment, non-fouling surfaces, catalysis engine, and biological sensor.

  7. Estimating Water Ice Abundance from Short-Wave Infrared Spectra of Drill Cuttings at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.; Colaprete, Anthony; Kleinhenz, Julie; Cook, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Resource Prospector (RP) mission intends to visit a lunar polar region to characterize the volatile distribution. Part of the RP payload, the Near-infrared Volatile Spectrometer System (NIRVSS) is a spectrometer operating from 1600-3400 nm that provides sensitivity to water ice, and other volatiles. For multiple years, the NIRVSS system has been incorporated into on-going RP payload testing in a cryogenic vacuum facility at Glenn Research Center. Soil tubes of lunar simulants, prepared with known amounts of water, are placed in the vacuum chamber and cooled to cryogenic temperatures (soil temperatures of 110-170 K) and placed under low vacuum (a few x 10(exp -6) Torr). During these tests NIRVSS continuously measures spectra of soil cuttings emplaced onto the surface by a drill. Real time processing of NIRVSS spectra produces two spectral parameters associated with water ice absorption features near 2000 and 3000 nm that can be used to inform decision making activities such as delivery of the soil to a sealable container. Post-test collection and analyses of the soils permit characterization the water content as a function of depth. These water content profiles exhibit the characteristics of a vacuum desiccation zone to depths of about 40 cm. Subsequent to completion of the tests, NIRVSS spectra are processed to produce two spectral parameters associated with water ice absorption features near 2000 and 3000 nm. These features can be evaluated as a function of time, and correlated with drill depth, and other measurements, throughout the drilling activities. Until now no effort was attempted to quantitatively relate these parameters to water abundance. This is the focus of our efforts to be presented.

  8. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATER ICE AND CHROMOPHORES ACROSS SATURN'S SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Ciarniello, M. [INAF-IAPS, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Ricerca di Tor Vergata, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, I-00133, Rome (Italy); Clark, R. N. [Federal Center, US Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80228 (United States); Nicholson, P. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Hedman, M. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 418 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States); Brown, R. H. [Lunar Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Kuiper Space Sciences 431A, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Buratti, B. J. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Flamini, E., E-mail: gianrico.filacchione@iaps.inaf.it [ASI, Italian Space Agency, viale Liegi 26, I-00198 Rome (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    Over the past eight years, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini orbiter has returned hyperspectral images in the 0.35-5.1 {mu}m range of the icy satellites and rings of Saturn. These very different objects show significant variations in surface composition, roughness, and regolith grain size as a result of their evolutionary histories, endogenic processes, and interactions with exogenic particles. The distributions of surface water ice and chromophores, i.e., organic and non-icy materials, across the Saturnian system, are traced using specific spectral indicators (spectral slopes and absorption band depths) obtained from rings mosaics and disk-integrated satellites observations by VIMS. Moving from the inner C ring to Iapetus, we found a marking uniformity in the distribution of abundance of water ice. On the other hand, the distribution of chromophores is much more concentrated in the rings particles and on the outermost satellites (Rhea, Hyperion, and Iapetus). A reduction of red material is observed on the satellites' surfaces orbiting within the E ring environment likely due to fine particles from Enceladus' plumes. Once the exogenous dark material covering the Iapetus' leading hemisphere is removed, the texture of the water ice-rich surfaces, inferred through the 2 {mu}m band depth, appears remarkably uniform across the entire system.

  9. Studies of thin water films and relevance to the heterogeneous nucleation of ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochshorn, Eli

    The research that I will present in this dissertation concerns qualitative factors relevant to thin water films and ice nucleation. The immediate goal is not to develop a precise quantitative theory of ice nucleation. Instead, the focus is on characterizing some molecular properties (e.g., bond strengths, bond orientations, range of surface effects, etc.) of freezing catalysts and interfacial water over a range of temperatures relevant to the ice nucleation process (i.e., 20 to -20 °C). From this, we can evaluate the plausibility of different mechanistic freezing hypotheses through comparison with experiment. In all studies, I use Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to study the intermolecular details of water and a surface species of interest. The dissertation is arranged with an introductory chapter, which primarily serves to place the research within the context of the field, then three chapters containing original research, each of which is a self-contained study that has either already been published or is currently under consideration for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Finally, an appendix at the end provides some additional details that have not been included in the articles.

  10. A Thermo-Physical Model Of Destruction Of Contaminants By Means Of A Water-Ice-Jet Cleaning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Yu; Burnashov, M.; Stepanova, E.

    2017-01-01

    The reader will achieve a benchmark understanding of the essence of cleaning for the removal of contaminants from machine elements by means of cryo jet water-ice jet with particles prepared beforehand. This paper represents the classification of the most common contaminants appearing on the surfaces of machine elements after a long-term service. The conceptual contribution of the paper is to represent a thermo-physical model of contaminant removal by means of a water ice jet. In conclusion, it is evident that this study has shown the dependencies between the friction force of an ice particle with an obstacle (contamination), a dimensional change of an ice particle in the cleaning process and the quantity of heat transmitted to an ice particle.

  11. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T P; Atkinson, J D; Neuberg, J W; O'Sullivan, D; Wilson, T W; Whale, T F; Neve, L; Umo, N S; Malkin, T L; Murray, B J

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  12. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T P Mangan

    Full Text Available Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  13. Comparison of the effects of cold water and ice ingestion on endurance cycling capacity in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Naito

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Crushed ice ingestion before and during exercise in a hot environment may be a preferred and effective approach for minimizing thermal strain, and for improving endurance performance as compared with cold water ingestion.

  14. AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE EFFECT OF PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE ELECTRIC PROPERTIES ON MAXIMUM POWER POINT TRAJECTORY WITH THE AIM OF ITS ALIGNMENT WITH ELECTROLYZER U-I CHARACTERISTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlo Firak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to combine a photovoltaic module and an electrolyzer to produce hydrogen from water, an intermediate DC/DC converter can be used to adapt output power features of the module to input power features of the electrolyzer. This can also be done without using electronics, which results in saving as much as 700 USD/kW, as previous investigation has shown. A more sophisticated investigation should be carried out with the aim of improving high system efficiency, resulting in matching the photovoltaic module maximum power point trajectory (the maximum power point path in the U-I plane as a result of solar irradiance change to the operating characteristic of the electrolyzer. This paper presents an analysis of the influences of photovoltaic module electric properties, such as series and parallel resistance and non-ideality factor, on the maximum power point trajectory at different levels of solar irradiance. The possibility of various inclinations (right - vertical - left in relation to an arbitrary chosen operating characteristic of the electrolyzer is also demonstrated. Simulated results are obtained by using Matlab/Simulink simulations of the well known one-diode model. Simulations have been confirmed with experiments on a real photovoltaic module where solar irradiance, solar cell temperature, electric current, and voltage in the circuit with variable ohmic resistance have been measured.

  15. Gradient Meshed and Toughened SOEC (Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell) Composite Seal with Self-Healing Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathy Lu; W. T. Reynolds, Jr.

    2010-06-08

    High-temperature electrolysis of water steam is a promising approach for hydrogen production. The potential is even more promising when abundant heat source from nuclear power reactors can be efficiently utilized. Hydrogen production through the above approach also allows for low electric consumption. Overall energy conversion efficiencies for high temperature electrolysis are in the 45-50% range compared to ~30% for the conventional electrolysis. Under such motivation, this research is focused on increasing the operation time and high temperature stability of solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC) for splitting water into hydrogen. Specifically, our focus is to improve the SOEC seal thermal stability and performances by alleviating thermal stress and seal cracking issues.

  16. Water ice cloud property retrievals at Mars with OMEGA:Spatial distribution and column mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kevin S.; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Szantai, Andre; Audouard, Joachim; Geminale, Anna; Altieri, Francesca; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Montabone, Luca; Wolff, Michael J.; Forget, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Spectral images of Mars recorded by OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité) on Mars Express can be used to deduce the mean effective radius (r_eff) and optical depth (τ_i) of water ice particles in clouds. Using new data sets for a priori surface temperature, vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, dust opacity, and multi-spectral surface albedo, we have analyzed over 40 OMEGA image cubes over the Tharsis, Arabia, and Syrtis Major quadrangles, and mapped the spatial distribution of r_eff, τ_i, and water ice column mass. We also explored the parameter space of r_eff and τ_i, which are inversely proportional, and the ice cloud index (ICI), which is the ratio of the reflectance at 3.4 and 3.52 μm, and indicates the thickness of water ice clouds. We found that the ICI, trivial to calculate for OMEGA image cubes, can be a proxy for column mass, which is very expensive to compute, requiring accurate retrievals of surface albedo, r_eff, and τ_i. Observing the spatial distribution, we find that within each cloud system, r_eff varies about a mean of 2.1 μm, that τi is closely related to r_eff, and that the values allowed for τ_i, given r_eff, are related to the ICI. We also observe areas where our retrieval detects very thin clouds made of very large particles (mean of 12.5 μm), which are still under investigation.

  17. Modeling of New Galileo/NIMS Europa Spectra Using Two Endmembers and Water Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, G. B.

    2013-12-01

    Europa is the second outward from Jupiter of the four Galilean satellites. It is similar in size to the Earth's moon, and has a young crater-free surface. The interior has a dense rocky/metallic core surrounded by a low density shell 80-170 km thick that is assumed to be primarily ice and/or water. The magnetic signature of Europa implies the presence of a conducting liquid subsurface ocean. Additionally, spectra from the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) showed the surface to be partly covered by heavily hydrated materials such as sulfate salts and/or sulfuric acid hydrate. The hydrated material is concentrated in the regions of darker brownish coloring that occur in some chaos regions and along linea, and may be linked to possible endogenic materials from the subsurface. We are modeling NIMS spectra of the first 6 Galileo orbits, which cover the anti-Jovian hemisphere to the trailing hemisphere (about 150-330 W longitude) at various spatial resolutions. The observations are newly calibrated with the correct calibration of the first two detectors and proper removal of radiation spikes. The modeling is linear mixture of reddish hydrate (MgSO4?), sulfuric acid hydrate, and water ice of various grain sizes. The model is fitted to the full NIMS wavelength range of 0.7-5.2 μm. The two global scale models we have completed (79 and 47 km/px spatial resolution) shows the hydrate concentrated on the trailing side. The sulfuric acid is distributed from 180 W to beyond the trailing apex, and from ×20 degrees at 180W and ×40 degrees at 270W, but it's highest concentrations are at the equator and 210-240W where there is more water ice. The water ice is least abundant near the equator from 230-270W, and higher at other equatorial regions and most abundant in the polar regions. The water ice grain sizes are largest (500 μm) at the poles and trailing side, and smallest (20 μm) at the leading side. The sulfuric acid hydrate distribution is consistent with the

  18. Structural Models of Water and Ice Regarding the Energy of Hydrogen Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Ignat Ignatov; Oleg Mosin

    2015-01-01

    In this review it is reported about the research on the structure of water and ice and intermolecular water cyclic associates (clusters) with general formula (Н2О)n and their charged ionic clusters [(Н2О)n]+ and [(Н2О)n]- by means of computer modelling and spectroscopy methods as 1Н-NMR, IR-spectroscopy, DNES, EXAFS-spectroscopy, X-Ray and neurons diffraction. The computer calculation of polyhedral nanoclusters (Н2О)n, where n = 3–20 are carried out. Based on this data the main structural mat...

  19. Eutectic phases in water-ice : an efficient medium for biopolymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Dörr, Mark; Löffler, Philipp M. G.

    2011-01-01

    , in the eutectic phase in water-ice, starting from dilute aqueous solutions of from imidazole-activated ribonucleotides. When an aqueous solution is cooled below its freezing point, but above the eutectic point, two aqueous phases co-exist and form the eutectic phase system: a solid (crystals made of pure water...... monomers or short oligomers to a solution over several freeze-thawing cycles. In template-directed RNA polymerization, the initial elongation rates clearly depended on the complementarity of the monomers with the templating nucleobases (Monnard and Szostak, 2008). The presence of templates further allows...

  20. The Impact of Deep Fjord Water Temperatures on the Ice Flow Velocities of Helheim Glacier, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Nanna B.; Lach, Katarzyna; Grinsted, Aslak; Herraiz-Borreguero, Laura; Messerli, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Increasing ice flow velocities of marine terminating glaciers are often linked to rising ocean temperatures. Unfortunately, direct comparisons between glacier velocity and ocean temperatures are impeded by the fact that few oceanographic datasets span multiple years or contain temperatures at depth. Here, we use an oceanographic dataset collected in Helheim Fjord over several years (described in Straneo et al., 2011, Nat. Geoscience) in both shallow and deep waters. We compare the water temperatures at different depths with ice flow velocities that have been calculated from feature-tracking of LandSAT 7 and 8 images. Our results cover the period 2009-2013 and show both seasonal and inter-annual variability. We find that the velocity of Helheim glacier is likely influenced by the deep ocean water temperatures, namely the influx of warm Atlantic water, whereas water temperature at shallower depths do not have a significant influence on glacier speed. This is in contrast with findings from, for example, Svalbard. Our study demonstrates the need for multiple-year ocean datasets at different depths, if we are to disentangle the complex interactions between glaciers and ocean.

  1. FT-IR Spectra of Antifreeze Glycoproteins in Heavy Water and D2O Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, N. M.; Crowe, J. H.; Feeney, R. H.; Fink, W. H.; Yeh, Yin

    2000-03-01

    This work presents FT-IR studies on the antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP)/heavy water (D2O) mixtures during freezing and melting. AFGP in the blood serum of polar fish are known to prevent ice crystal growth by a non-colligative mechanism. There are 8 known fractions of AFGP (1 8) that range in molecular mass from 33.7 to 2.6 kD respectively, each composed of alanine-alanine-threonine repeats, with a disaccharide attached to the threonine residue. The smallest peptide (AFGP-8) is structurally different from fractions 1-5 in that it contains proline substituting for alanine in certain positions. Substantial linewidth change of the D20 bending mode (ca. 1210 cm-1) was measured with solutions containing fractions 2-5 during both freezing and thawing cycles, suggesting significant coupling between protein and water molecules. At the same time, the Amide I band between 1620 and 1675 cm-1 shows that 310 helix and random coils are the main conformations of fractions 2-5 and fraction 8 in the presence of ice. In liquid state, b-sheet dominates the secondary structure of AFGP 8, whereas b-sheet and random coil are the main conformations of AFGP 2-5. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of AFGP 2-5 to affect the surface states of ice.

  2. Density and Phonon-Stiffness Anomalies of Water and Ice in the Full Temperature Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chang Q; Zhang, Xi; Fu, Xiaojian; Zheng, Weitao; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Zhou, Yichun; Shen, Zexiang; Zhou, Ji

    2013-10-03

    The specific-heat difference between the O:H van der Waals bond and the H-O polar-covalent bond and the Coulomb repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent oxygen atoms determine the angle-length-stiffness relaxation dynamics of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O), which is responsible for the density and phonon-stiffness oscillation of water ice over the full temperature range. Cooling shortens and stiffens the part of relatively lower specific-heat, and meanwhile lengthens and softens the other part of the O:H-O bond via repulsion. Length contraction/elongation of a specific part always stiffens/softens its corresponding phonon. In the liquid and in the solid phase, the O:H bond contracts more than the H-O elongates, hence, an O:H-O cooling contraction and the seemingly "regular" process of cooling densification take place. During freezing, the H-O contracts less than the O:H elongates, leading to an O:H-O elongation and volume expansion. At extremely low temperatures, the O:H-O angle stretching lowers the density slightly as the O:H and the H-O lengths change insignificantly. In ice, the O-O distance is longer than it is in water, resulting in a lower density, so that ice floats.

  3. Impeded ice nucleation in glassy and highly viscous aerosol particles: the role of water diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Zobrist, B.; Krieger, U. K.; Luo, B. P.; Soonsin, V.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2010-05-01

    In situ and remote observations in the upper troposphere have disclosed the existence of water vapor pressures up to and even above water saturation. Under such conditions ice particle formation by homogeneous nucleation is expected to set in followed by ice crystal growth until the supersaturation is consumed. While the highest measured water vapor values might not withstand rigorous quality checks, values up to water saturation seem to be occurring. Since air masses appear to contain sufficient numbers of aerosol particles for cloud formation, the question arises why these aerosols are not successful at nucleating ice. The atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of various inorganic and organic components, whereas the organic fraction can represent more than 50% of the total aerosol mass. The homogeneous ice nucleation threshold was established for atmospherically relevant salt solutions and sulfuric acid, but only for a few organic species. The organic aerosol fraction tends to remain liquid instead of crystallizing as the temperature is decreased and, thus, organic aerosol particles may form highly viscous liquids. When the viscosity of such liquids reaches values in the order of 1012 Pa s, the molecular motion becomes so slow, that the sample vitrifies at the glass transition temperature Tg. If aerosol particles were present as glasses, this would influence several physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere significantly: Water uptake from the gas phase would be drastically impeded and ice nucleation inhibited. We investigated the glass transition temperature of a series of aqueous organic solutions such as polyols, sugars and dicarboxylic acids as a function of the solute concentration using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These measurements show that the higher the molar mass of the organic solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. Aerosol particles containing larger (≥150 g mol-1) organic molecules

  4. Occurrence and Forms of Water and Ice on the Earth and Beyond, and the Origin(s) of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The natural history of the biogenic elements (H,C,O,N) from their first association within cold molecular clouds to their delivery to the Earth during the late bombardment of the inner solar system, is intimately linked to water ice. The earliest organic compounds are formed in cold interstellar molecular clouds as a result of UV and thermal processing of sub-micrometer ice grains which contain trapped carbon and nitrogen molecules. Structural changes in the water ice host underlie and fundamentally control important macroscopic phenomena such as the outgassing of volatiles, the rates of chemical reactions, and processing and retention of organic compounds. Prebiotic organic material was in all likelihood delivered the early Earth in a pristine state as a consequence of its sequestration within a protective water ice host.

  5. Water in low-mass star-forming regions with Herschel. The link between water gas and ice in protostellar envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzl, M.; Visser, R.; Walsh, C.; Albertsson, T.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Mottram, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Our aim is to determine the critical parameters in water chemistry and the contribution of water to the oxygen budget by observing and modelling water gas and ice for a sample of eleven low-mass protostars, for which both forms of water have been observed. Methods: A simplified chemistry network, which is benchmarked against more sophisticated chemical networks, is developed that includes the necessary ingredients to determine the water vapour and ice abundance profiles in the cold, outer envelope in which the temperature increases towards the protostar. Comparing the results from this chemical network to observations of water emission lines and previously published water ice column densities, allows us to probe the influence of various agents (e.g., far-ultraviolet (FUV) field, initial abundances, timescales, and kinematics). Results: The observed water ice abundances with respect to hydrogen nuclei in our sample are 30-80 ppm, and therefore contain only 10-30% of the volatile oxygen budget of 320 ppm. The keys to reproduce this result are a low initial water ice abundance after the pre-collapse phase together with the fact that atomic oxygen cannot freeze-out and form water ice in regions with Tdust ≳ 15 K. This requires short prestellar core lifetimes ≲0.1 Myr. The water vapour profile is shaped through the interplay of FUV photodesorption, photodissociation, and freeze-out. The water vapour line profiles are an invaluable tracer for the FUV photon flux and envelope kinematics. Conclusions: The finding that only a fraction of the oxygen budget is locked in water ice can be explained either by a short pre-collapse time of ≲0.1 Myr at densities of nH ~ 104 cm-3, or by some other process that resets the initial water ice abundance for the post-collapse phase. A key for the understanding of the water ice abundance is the binding energy of atomic oxygen on ice. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European

  6. A Compact, Backscattering Deplolarization Cloud Spectrometer for Ice and Water Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, David

    2014-05-15

    This project was to develop a compact optical particle spectrometer, small enough for operation on UAVS, that measures the optical diameter of cloud hydrometeors and differentiates their water phase (liquid or solid). To reach this goal, a work plan was laid out that would complete three objectives: 1) Evaluation of designs for an optical particle spectrometer that measures the component of light backscattered at two polarization angles. 2) Testing of selected designs on an optical bench. 3) Construction and preliminary testing of a prototype instrument based on the selected, optimum design. A protoype instrument was developed and tested in an icing wind tunnel where the results showed good measurement of cloud droplets and ice particles.

  7. Subglacial water drainage, storage, and piracy beneath the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbäck, K.; Pettersson, R.; Hubbard, A. L.; Doyle, S. H.; As, D.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Fitzpatrick, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Meltwater drainage across the surface of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is well constrained by measurements and modeling, yet despite its critical role, knowledge of its transit through the subglacial environment remains limited. Here we present a subglacial hydrological analysis of a land-terminating sector of the GrIS at unprecedented resolution that predicts the routing of surface-derived meltwater once it has entered the basal drainage system. Our analysis indicates the probable existence of small subglacial lakes that remain undetectable by methods using surface elevation change or radar techniques. Furthermore, the analysis suggests transient behavior with rapid switching of subglacial drainage between competing catchments driven by seasonal changes in the basal water pressure. Our findings provide a cautionary note that should be considered in studies that attempt to relate and infer future response from surface temperature, melt, and runoff from point measurements and/or modeling with measurements of proglacial discharge and ice dynamics.

  8. Applicability of ERTS to Antarctic iceberg resources. [harvesting sea ice for fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Ostrander, N. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This investigation explorers the applicability of ERTS to (1) determine the Antarctic sea ice and environmental behavior that may influence the harvesting of icebergs, and (2) monitor iceberg locations, characteristics, and evolution. Imagery has shown that the potential applicability of ERTS to the research, planning, and harvesting operations can contribute importantly to the glowing promise derived from broader scope studies for the use of Antarctic icebergs to relieve a growing global thirst for fresh water. Several years of comprehensive monitoring will be necessary to characterize sea ice and environmental behavior and iceberg evolution. Live ERTS services will assist harvesting control and claiming operations and offer a means of harmonizing entitlements of iceberg resources. The valuable ERTS services will be more cost effective than other means will be easily justified and borne by the iceberg harvesting operations.

  9. Modeling a close-up observation of Enceladus by Cassin/VIIMS with layered water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gary B.; Stephan, K.

    2013-10-01

    We have been working on layered water ice models that fit the measured spectra of Enceladus by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Our original inspection using two observations (equatorial and South Pole) showed that good fits could be made using fractional monolayers of 2-µm frost over 20 µm for the polar ice and about 1 monolayer of 1-µm frost over 7 µm for the equatorial ice. We then ran ~200 general models that could be used for any analysis. We found that with small misfits around 1.5 and 2.5 µm, that the whole infrared spectrum 0.8-5.2 µm could be adequately fit by single layer models. The mosaic studied was observed on 14 July 2006, and extended from just above the equator to the sunlit south pole, and from 140-150 W to 230 W longitudes, crossing the leading-trailing boundary. The observations are all in high resolution mode, with a finest resolution of 4 by 8 km, but more typically 6 by 12 km. The modeling shows that the trailing side observed is uniformly r=5-7 µm base grain size with ~one monolayer of r=1 µm ice. This grades gradually to r=20 or more µm and a fractional 0.1) monolayer of r=2 µm ice. The south polar terrains are similar to the leading side pattern, except in the center of the tiger stripes where there is no layering and unresolved (requiring mixing of two grain sizes) grain radii close to 500 µm. This layering is due to Enceladus orbit in the E-ring of micron sized water ice particles whose source is the geysers on Enceladus' south pole. The low latitude grain size patterns do not agree well with band-depth studies, which find the grain size related to geology (Jaumann et al., 2008, Icarus 193, 407). We do not observe the whole globe here, so the patterns could be semi-hemispherical similar to ring dynamics models show (Kempf et al., 2010, Icarus 206, 446).

  10. The catalytic role of water in the photochemistry of ammonia ice: from diluted to concentrated phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonusas, Mindaugas; Krim, Lahouari

    2017-10-01

    Using infrared spectroscopy as an in situ probe for reactions occurring in the solid phase, we investigated the influence of water molecules on the photochemistry of ammonia ices. Experiments were carried out in diluted and concentrated phases and between 3 and 130 K. We showed that the photolysis of NH3-H2O (2 per cent of H2O) ices using continuous radiation from 115 to 400 nm produces NH2OH as the main photoproduct, but also that such a photoinduced reaction strongly depends on both the initial ice temperature and the environment where the primary reactants NH3 and H2O are trapped. Our experimental results highlight the catalytic role played by H2O molecules in enhancing the formation yield of NH2 during the photolysis process through the NH3 + OH → NH2 + H2O hydrogen abstraction reaction, which is only favored at low temperatures in the range of 3-60 K. During heating of such irradiated ammonia-water ices, the amount of NH2OH keeps rising while that of NH2, is greatly reduced only from 70 K onwards. These behaviours are attributed to the competition that occurs between NH2 formation from the NH3 + OH reaction and its consumption from the NH2 + OH radical recombination. These results might explain the variable abundances of NH2 and NH3 provided by previous astronomical observations, where the NH2/NH3 ratio ranges from 0.02 to 0.5 depending on the regions of the interstellar medium that were analysed.

  11. Reassessment of the Upper Fremont Glacier ice-core chronologies by synchronizing of ice-core-water isotopes to a nearby tree-ring chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellman, Nathan J.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Arienzo, Monica; Pederson, Gregory T.; Aarons, Sarah; Csank, Adam

    2017-01-01

    The Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG), Wyoming, is one of the few continental glaciers in the contiguous United States known to preserve environmental and climate records spanning recent centuries. A pair of ice cores taken from UFG have been studied extensively to document changes in climate and industrial pollution (most notably, mid-19th century increases in mercury pollution). Fundamental to these studies is the chronology used to map ice-core depth to age. Here, we present a revised chronology for the UFG ice cores based on new measurements and using a novel dating approach of synchronizing continuous water isotope measurements to a nearby tree-ring chronology. While consistent with the few unambiguous age controls underpinning the previous UFG chronologies, the new interpretation suggests a very different time scale for the UFG cores with changes of up to 80 years. Mercury increases previously associated with the mid-19th century Gold Rush now coincide with early-20th century industrial emissions, aligning the UFG record with other North American mercury records from ice and lake sediment cores. Additionally, new UFG records of industrial pollutants parallel changes documented in ice cores from southern Greenland, further validating the new UFG chronologies while documenting the extent of late 19th and early 20th century pollution in remote North America.

  12. Reassessment of the Upper Fremont Glacier Ice-Core Chronologies by Synchronizing of Ice-Core-Water Isotopes to a Nearby Tree-Ring Chronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellman, Nathan; McConnell, Joseph R; Arienzo, Monica; Pederson, Gregory T; Aarons, Sarah M; Csank, Adam

    2017-04-18

    The Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG), Wyoming, is one of the few continental glaciers in the contiguous United States known to preserve environmental and climate records spanning recent centuries. A pair of ice cores taken from UFG have been studied extensively to document changes in climate and industrial pollution (most notably, mid-19th century increases in mercury pollution). Fundamental to these studies is the chronology used to map ice-core depth to age. Here, we present a revised chronology for the UFG ice cores based on new measurements and using a novel dating approach of synchronizing continuous water isotope measurements to a nearby tree-ring chronology. While consistent with the few unambiguous age controls underpinning the previous UFG chronologies, the new interpretation suggests a very different time scale for the UFG cores with changes of up to 80 years. Mercury increases previously associated with the mid-19th century Gold Rush now coincide with early-20th century industrial emissions, aligning the UFG record with other North American mercury records from ice and lake sediment cores. Additionally, new UFG records of industrial pollutants parallel changes documented in ice cores from southern Greenland, further validating the new UFG chronologies while documenting the extent of late 19th and early 20th century pollution in remote North America.

  13. Fungal spores as potential ice nuclei in fog/cloud water and snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Heidi; Goncalves, Fabio L. T.; Schueller, Elisabeth; Puxbaum, Hans

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In discussions about climate change and precipitation frequency biological ice nucleation has become an issue. While bacterial ice nucleation (IN) is already well characterized and even utilized in industrial processes such as the production of artificial snow or to improve freezing processes in food industry, less is known about the IN potential of fungal spores which are also ubiquitous in the atmosphere. A recent study performed at a mountain top in the Rocky Mountains suggests that fungal spores and/or pollen might play a role in increased IN abundance during periods of cloud cover (Bowers et al. 2009). In the present work concentrations of fungal spores in fog/cloud water and snow were determined. EXPERIMENTAL: Fog samples were taken with an active fog sampler in 2008 in a traffic dominated area and in a national park in São Paulo, Brazil. The number concentrations of fungal spores were determined by microscopic by direct enumeration by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with SYBR Gold nucleic acid gel stain (Bauer et al. 2008). RESULTS: In the fog water collected in the polluted area at a junction of two highly frequented highways around 22,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted. Fog in the national park contained 35,000 spores mL-1. These results were compared with cloud water and snow samples from Mt. Rax, situated at the eastern rim of the Austrian Alps. Clouds contained on average 5,900 fungal spores mL-1 cloud water (1,300 - 11,000) or 2,200 spores m-3 (304 - 5,000). In freshly fallen snow spore concentrations were lower than in cloud water, around 1,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted (Bauer et al. 2002). In both sets of samples representatives of the ice nucleating genus Fusarium could be observed. REFERENCES: Bauer, H., Kasper-Giebl, A., Löflund, M., Giebl, H., Hitzenberger, R., Zibuschka, F., Puxbaum, H. (2002). The contribution of bacteria and fungal spores to the organic carbon content of cloud water, precipitation and aerosols

  14. From Antarctic ice cores to Australia's water resources: Investigating an alternative streamflow proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, Carly; Kiem, Anthony; Vance, Tessa; Roberts, Jason; Curran, Mark; Moy, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Past research worldwide shows that streamflow reconstructions, developed from paleoclimate proxies, provide a broader view of the range of climate variability possible relative to the comparatively short instrumental flow records on which water resource management plans are currently based. Hence there is a clear need for the development of streamflow reconstructions to allow us to better manage our water resources into the future. In Australia, however, there is a dearth of local high resolution proxies, particularly in catchments of interest, from which to develop streamflow reconstructions. This has led researchers to look beyond catchment boundaries and also Australia's borders to explore the utility of remote proxies for reconstructing Australian streamflow. Here we investigate, for a case study catchment located on Australia's eastern seaboard, the development of a millennial-length, annual streamflow reconstruction based on 1013 years of summer sea salt deposition recorded in ice cores from East Antarctica. The streamflow reconstruction realistically captures interannual to decadal variability in the gauged streamflow over the 1929-2009 calibration period. For the pre-instrumental period (i.e. pre-1900), the streamflow reconstruction shows longer wet and dry epochs than those recorded in the instrumental period. Furthermore, the variation in the distribution of the duration of wet and dry epochs between centuries suggests that water resources management and planning based on the statistics of the last 100 years of data (or less) is problematic. This information can be utilised to generate more realistic flow scenarios that better capture the range of hydroclimatic variability that Australia has experienced. This work emphasises a novel combination of ice core science, paleoclimatology and catchment-scale hydrology that is now being used to develop more robust water resources planning and management. The continuing work to further develop ice core based

  15. GLERL Radiation Transfer Through Freshwater Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation transmittance (ratio of transmitted to incident radiation) through clear ice, refrozen slush ice and brash ice, from ice surface to ice-water interface in...

  16. Salt partitioning between water and high-pressure ices. Implication for the dynamics and habitability of icy moons and water-rich planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journaux, Baptiste; Daniel, Isabelle; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Cardon, Hervé; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Caracas, Razvan; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Water-rich planetary bodies including large icy moons and ocean exoplanets may host a deep liquid water ocean underlying a high-pressure icy mantle. The latter is often considered as a limitation to the habitability of the uppermost ocean because it would limit the availability of nutrients resulting from the hydrothermal alteration of the silicate mantle located beneath the deep ice layer. To assess the effects of salts on the physical properties of high-pressure ices and therefore the possible chemical exchanges and habitability inside H2O-rich planetary bodies, we measured partitioning coefficients and densities in the H2O-RbI system up to 450 K and 4 GPa; RbI standing as an experimentally amenable analog of NaCl in the H2O-salt solutions. We measured the partitioning coefficient of RbI between the aqueous fluid and ices VI and VII, using in-situ Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). With in-situ X-ray diffraction, we measured the unit-cell parameters and the densities of the high-pressure ice phases in equilibrium with the aqueous fluid, at pressures and temperatures relevant to the interior of planetary bodies. We conclude that RbI is strongly incompatible towards ice VI with a partitioning coefficient Kd(VI-L) = 5.0 (± 2.1) ṡ10-3 and moderately incompatible towards ice VII, Kd(VII-L) = 0.12 (± 0.05). RbI significantly increases the unit-cell volume of ice VI and VII by ca. 1%. This implies that RbI-poor ice VI is buoyant compared to H2O ice VI while RbI-enriched ice VII is denser than H2O ice VII. These new experimental results might profoundly impact the internal dynamics of water-rich planetary bodies. For instance, an icy mantle at moderate conditions of pressure and temperature will consist of buoyant ice VI with low concentration of salt, and would likely induce an upwelling current of solutes towards the above liquid ocean. In contrast, a deep and/or thick icy mantle of ice VII will be enriched in salt and hence would form a stable chemical boundary

  17. An Assessment of the Icing Blade and the SEA Multi-Element Sensor for Liquid Water Content Calibration of the NASA GRC Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Laura E.; Ide, Robert F.; Van Zante, Judith Foss

    2017-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn has recently switched to from using the Icing Blade to using the SEA Multi-Element Sensor (also known as the multi-wire) for its calibration of cloud liquid water content. In order to perform this transition, tests were completed to compare the Multi-Element Sensor to the Icing Blade, particularly with respect to liquid water content, airspeed, and drop size. The two instruments were found to compare well for the majority of Appendix C conditions. However, it was discovered that the Icing Blade under-measures when the conditions approach the Ludlam Limit. This paper also describes data processing procedures for the Multi-Element Sensor in the IRT, including collection efficiency corrections, mounting underneath a splitter plate, and correcting for a jump in the compensation wire power. Further data is presented to describe the repeatability of the IRT with the Multi-Element sensor, health-monitoring checks for the instrument, and a sensing-element configuration comparison.

  18. The Ice Cracks for Frozen Flow: Comprehending the Irony of Development through Metaphor of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water, one of the five elements, runs through the course of evolution as life line. Conceived as the source of origin, sustenance and annihilation, it is believed to be the crux of existence. Whether scientific or mythical, it serves as the foundation of cyclical nature of life that begins with Ice Age and ends in great Deluge. Water, being chiefly conceived as the life giving fluid, is mainly associated with the flow that designates existence. But interestingly, the flow of water does not remain restricted to single form or shape. Through its adaptability, malleability and transforming flamboyance, it narrates the beauty, splendour, exoticism, functionality, and dynamism inherent in nature. In literary and cultural discourses water emerges as a chief motif to communicate concrete as well as abstract realities of life. Envisaged in myriad forms such as haze, mist, fog, frost, ice, vapour, and so on it appears in various semblances and disguise to whisper some message in human ears. Its dripping sound echoes the essence of being. Creating a wondrous spectrum of variability, it extends from tiny dew drops to vast oceans. In fact, the metaphor of water serves one of the foundational artistic imagery of visualising life. Present paper studies how water is projected in our literary and cultural discourses to comprehend various experiential truths of human civilisation. It probes into the mystery of incredulous development of humankind that amazes with its incredible achievements. Human civilisation may boast of its consistent progress over the years, but literary delineations in the metaphorical renderings of water question how far do we agree with the progressive march of humankind. What are the ironies that constitute the dilemma of human rationality and the development of a civilisation across cultures?

  19. Correlation of Comet 67P/CG'S Morphology with the Occurrence of Exposed Water Ice Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, G.; Weller, D.; Zeilinger, G.; Kappel, D.; Hviid, S.; Kührt, E.; Moroz, L. V.; Markus, K.; Henckel, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Erard, S.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.

    2017-04-01

    Introduction: Comet 67P's surface is quite homogeneously covered by dark refractory materials rich in organics [1,2]. Rare water ice expo- sures on the surface, most likely originating from sub-surface layers, have recently been discovered [3,4]. Such H2O ice patches on 67P's Imhotep region in the pre-perihelion phase were ex- amined and related to the local morphology to understand the exposure mechanisms [5]. Methods: H2O ice was identified in two study areas using characteristic H2O spectral features observed by the VIRTIS-M instrument [1]: absorption bands at 1.04, 1.25, 1.52, 2.02, 2.96 μm, and the VIS spectral slope (0.5-0.8 μm). Corresponding normalized spectral indicators were projected onto a 3D digital shape model (DSM) of 67P [6], along with high spatial resolution images acquired by OSIRIS [7] for morphological context. Results and conclusions: The 2.0-μm absorption band proved to be the most sensitive H2O indicator in the IR. Flat (bluer) normalized VIS slopes correlate very well with depths of H2O ice absorption bands. The DSM projections show a significant spatial correlation between spectral H2O indicators and morphological features. H2O ice deposits were identified in two areas, each extending over hundreds of square meters. Both are located at the bases of steep-sloped (>60°) walls of Consolidated Cometary Material (CCM) on debris falls that came to rest on moderately inclined (20°-30°) terrain, pointing towards gravitational lows. Both deposits are located in poorly illuminated areas due to shadowing from close-by steep walls. The morphological and photometrical properties of these deposits appear to be stable over months. Spectral modeling [3,4] indicated the presence of large (mm-sized) H2O ice grains. Such grains form through vapor diffusion in ice-rich colder layers or by sintering and are exposed by erosion [3]. The CCM in both study areas was fractured and weakened by thermal fatigue and sublimation, leading to the collapse of

  20. The Longevity of Water Ice on Ganymedes and Europas around Migrated Giant Planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmer, Owen R.; Catling, David C. [Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences/Astrobiology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Zahnle, Kevin J., E-mail: olehmer@gmail.com [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The gas giant planets in the Solar System have a retinue of icy moons, and we expect giant exoplanets to have similar satellite systems. If a Jupiter-like planet were to migrate toward its parent star the icy moons orbiting it would evaporate, creating atmospheres and possible habitable surface oceans. Here, we examine how long the surface ice and possible oceans would last before being hydrodynamically lost to space. The hydrodynamic loss rate from the moons is determined, in large part, by the stellar flux available for absorption, which increases as the giant planet and icy moons migrate closer to the star. At some planet–star distance the stellar flux incident on the icy moons becomes so great that they enter a runaway greenhouse state. This runaway greenhouse state rapidly transfers all available surface water to the atmosphere as vapor, where it is easily lost from the small moons. However, for icy moons of Ganymede’s size around a Sun-like star we found that surface water (either ice or liquid) can persist indefinitely outside the runaway greenhouse orbital distance. In contrast, the surface water on smaller moons of Europa’s size will only persist on timescales greater than 1 Gyr at distances ranging 1.49–0.74 au around a Sun-like star for Bond albedos of 0.2 and 0.8, where the lower albedo becomes relevant if ice melts. Consequently, small moons can lose their icy shells, which would create a torus of H atoms around their host planet that might be detectable in future observations.

  1. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A View from MGS TES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Qu, Zheng; Pearl, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We use the method of Tamppari et al. to map water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere. This technique was originally developed to analyze the broadband Viking IRTM channels and we have now applied it to the TES data. To do this, the TES spectra are convolved to the IRTM bandshapes and spatial resolutions, enabling use of the same processing techniques as were used in Tamppari et al.. This retrieval technique relies on using the temperature difference recorded in the 20 micron and 11 micron IRTM bands (or IRTM convolved TES bands) to map cold water ice clouds above the warmer Martian surface. Careful removal of surface contributions to the observed radiance is therefore necessary, and we have used both older Viking-derived basemaps of the surface emissivity and albedo, and new MGS derived basemaps in order the explore any possible differences on cloud retrieval due to differences in surface contribution removal. These results will be presented in our poster. Our previous work has concentrated primarily on comparing MGS TES to Viking data; that work saw that large-scale cloud features, such as the aphelion cloud belt, are quite repeatable from year to year, though small scale behavior shows some variation. Comparison of Viking and MGS era cloud maps will be presented in our poster. In the current stage of our study, we have concentrated our efforts on close analysis of water ice cloud behavior in the northern summer of the three MGS mapping years on relatively small spatial scales, and present our results below. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  2. The Longevity of Water Ice on Ganymedes and Europas around Migrated Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, Owen R.; Catling, David C.; Zahnle, Kevin J.

    2017-04-01

    The gas giant planets in the Solar System have a retinue of icy moons, and we expect giant exoplanets to have similar satellite systems. If a Jupiter-like planet were to migrate toward its parent star the icy moons orbiting it would evaporate, creating atmospheres and possible habitable surface oceans. Here, we examine how long the surface ice and possible oceans would last before being hydrodynamically lost to space. The hydrodynamic loss rate from the moons is determined, in large part, by the stellar flux available for absorption, which increases as the giant planet and icy moons migrate closer to the star. At some planet-star distance the stellar flux incident on the icy moons becomes so great that they enter a runaway greenhouse state. This runaway greenhouse state rapidly transfers all available surface water to the atmosphere as vapor, where it is easily lost from the small moons. However, for icy moons of Ganymede’s size around a Sun-like star we found that surface water (either ice or liquid) can persist indefinitely outside the runaway greenhouse orbital distance. In contrast, the surface water on smaller moons of Europa’s size will only persist on timescales greater than 1 Gyr at distances ranging 1.49-0.74 au around a Sun-like star for Bond albedos of 0.2 and 0.8, where the lower albedo becomes relevant if ice melts. Consequently, small moons can lose their icy shells, which would create a torus of H atoms around their host planet that might be detectable in future observations.

  3. Differences in plankton community structure and carbon cycling along a climate gradient from the Greenland Ice Sheet to offshore waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, K.E.; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Rysgaard, S.

    . Protozooplankton accounts for 20-38% of the carbon turnover in the offshore and inland areas. However, protozooplankton like copepods has low ability to turn over the primary production close to the Ice Sheet. Increased run of from the Greenland Ice Sheet due to global warming could displace the existing climate......Huge differences in plankton community structures and biomasses are observed along a climate gradient from the Greenland Ice Sheet to offshore waters at the West Greenland coast. The offshore region has a high biomass of copepods dominated by Calanus spp., which are capable of consuming 55...

  4. The effect of solution nonideality on modeling transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited intracellular ice formation during cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; He, Xiaoming

    2014-04-01

    A new model was developed to predict transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited ice formation in cells during freezing without the ideal-solution assumption that has been used in previous models. The model was applied to predict cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) during cryopreservation of mouse oocytes and bovine carotid artery endothelial cells in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with glycerol as the cryoprotectant or cryoprotective agent. A comparison of the predictions between the present model and the previously reported models indicated that the ideal-solution assumption results in under-prediction of the amount of intracellular ice at slow cooling rates (cryopreservation for practical applications.

  5. The fountain effect of ice-like water across nanotubes at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2017-11-01

    The well-known fountain effect of superfluid helium can directly convert heat to mechanical work by the transport of the superfluid across narrow channels under a temperature difference. But it is regarded as a unique feature of superfluids, only occurring below the temperature of 2.17 K. Here we report a peculiar fountain effect of ice-like water across nanotubes at room temperature. Based on molecular simulations, we observed fascinating ultrafast fountain flow across nanotubes from the cold side to the hot side under a small temperature difference, due to the near-dissipationless nature of ice-like ordered water inside the nanotubes. Water molecules exhibit collective behavior and spontaneously convert thermal energy from the surrounding into directed motion without dissipation. A surprising pressure difference of up to 256 bar is generated from a temperature difference of 23 K, almost reaching the thermodynamic limit. This finding is anticipated to provide a new protocol for power harvesting devices, heat engines and nanomotors.

  6. Water droplet impingement on airfoils and aircraft engine inlets for icing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Elangovan, R.; Freund, George A., Jr.; Breer, Marlin D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper includes the results of a significant research program for verification of computer trajectory codes used in aircraft icing analysis. Experimental water droplet impingement data have been obtained in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel for a wide range of aircraft geometries and test conditions. The body whose impingement characteristics are required is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper and then exposed to an airstream containing a dyed-water spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips with an automated reflectometer. Impingement characteristics for all test geometries have also been calculated using two recently developed trajectory computer codes. Good agreement is obtained with experimental data. The experimental and analytical data show that maximum impingement efficiency and impingement limits increase with mean volumetric diameter for all geometries tested. For all inlet geometries tested, as the inlet mass flow is reduced, the maximum impingement efficiency is reduced and the location of the maximum impingement shifts toward the inlet inner cowl.

  7. Light absorption and partitioning in Arctic Ocean surface waters: impact of multiyear ice melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bélanger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice melting in the Arctic Ocean exposes the surface water to more radiative energy with poorly understood effects on photo-biogeochemical processes and heat deposition in the upper ocean. In August 2009, we documented the vertical variability of light absorbing components at 37 stations located in the southeastern Beaufort Sea including both Mackenzie River-influenced waters and polar mixed layer waters. We found that melting multiyear ice released significant amount of non-algal particulates (NAP near the sea surface relative to subsurface waters. NAP absorption coefficients at 440 nm (aNAP(440 immediately below the sea surface were on average 3-fold (up to 10-fold higher compared to subsurface values measured at 2–3 m depth. The impact of this unusual feature on the light transmission and remote sensing reflectance (Rrs was further examined using a radiative transfer model. A 10-fold particle enrichment homogeneously distributed in the first meter of the water column slightly reduced photosynthetically available and usable radiation (PAR and PUR by ∼6 and ∼8%, respectively, relative to a fully homogenous water column with low particle concentration. In terms of Rrs, the particle enrichment significantly flattered the spectrum by reducing the Rrs by up to 20% in the blue-green spectral region (400–550 nm. These results highlight the impact of meltwater on the concentration of particles at sea surface, and the need for considering non-uniform vertical distribution of particles in such systems when interpreting remotely sensed ocean color. Spectral slope of aNAP spectra calculated in the UV (ultraviolet domain decreased with depth suggesting that this parameter is sensitive to detritus composition and/or diagenesis state (e.g., POM (particulate organic matter photobleaching.

  8. Evidence for exposed water ice in the Moon's south polar regions from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter ultraviolet albedo and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Hendrix, Amanda; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Siegler, Matthew A.; Lucey, Paul G.; Retherford, Kurt D.; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Paige, David A.

    2015-07-01

    We utilize surface temperature measurements and ultraviolet albedo spectra from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to test the hypothesis that exposed water frost exists within the Moon's shadowed polar craters, and that temperature controls its concentration and spatial distribution. For locations with annual maximum temperatures Tmax greater than the H2O sublimation temperature of ∼110 K, we find no evidence for exposed water frost, based on the LAMP UV spectra. However, we observe a strong change in spectral behavior at locations perennially below ∼110 K, consistent with cold-trapped ice on the surface. In addition to the temperature association, spectral evidence for water frost comes from the following spectral features: (a) decreasing Lyman-α albedo, (b) decreasing "on-band" (129.57-155.57 nm) albedo, and (c) increasing "off-band" (155.57-189.57 nm) albedo. All of these features are consistent with the UV spectrum of water ice, and are expected for water ice layers >∼100 nm in thickness. High regolith porosity, which would darken the surface at all wavelengths, cannot alone explain the observed spectral changes at low temperatures. Given the observed LAMP off-band/on-band albedo ratios at a spatial scale of 250 m, the range of water ice concentrations within the cold traps with Tmax gardening and space weathering is spatially heterogeneous. We find a loosely bimodal distribution of apparent ice concentrations with temperature, possibly due to competition between vertical mixing by impact gardening and resupply of H2O by vapor diffusion at sites ∼110 K. Finally, we cannot rule out the possibility that the colder population of ice deposits is in fact primarily carbon dioxide ice, although peak temperatures of ∼65 K are slightly higher than the usual CO2 sublimation temperature of ∼60 K.

  9. Legal Ice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandsbjerg, Jeppe

    The idealised land|water dichotomy is most obviously challenged by ice when ‘land practice’ takes place on ice or when ‘maritime practice’ is obstructed by ice. Both instances represent disparity between the legal codification of space and its social practice. Logically, then, both instances call...... for alternative legal thought and practice; in the following I will emphasise the former and reflect upon the relationship between ice, law and politics. Prior to this workshop I had worked more on the relationship between cartography, geography and boundaries than specifically on ice. Listening to all...... the interesting conversations during the workshop, however, made me think that much of the concern with the Polar Regions in general, and the presence of ice in particular, reverberates around the question of how to accommodate various geographical presences and practices within the regulatory framework that we...

  10. Diazotroph diversity in the sea ice, melt ponds and surface waters of the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Fernández-Méndez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Eurasian basin of the Central Arctic Ocean is nitrogen limited, but little is known about the presence and role of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Recent studies have indicated the occurrence of diazotrophs in Arctic coastal waters potentially of riverine origin. Here, we investigated the presence of diazotrophs in ice and surface waters of the Central Arctic Ocean in the summer of 2012. We identified diverse communities of putative diazotrophs through targeted analysis of the nifH gene, which encodes the iron protein of the nitrogenase enzyme. We amplified 529 nifH sequences from 26 samples of Arctic melt ponds, sea ice and surface waters. These sequences resolved into 43 clusters at 92% amino acid sequence identity, most of which were non-cyanobacterial phylotypes from sea ice and water samples. One cyanobacterial phylotype related to Nodularia sp. was retrieved from sea ice, suggesting that this important functional group is rare in the Central Arctic Ocean. The diazotrophic community in sea-ice environments appear distinct from other cold-adapted diazotrophic communities, such as those present in the coastal Canadian Arctic, the Arctic tundra and glacial Antarctic lakes. Molecular fingerprinting of nifH and the intergenic spacer region of the rRNA operon revealed differences between the communities from river-influenced Laptev Sea waters and those from ice-related environments pointing towards a marine origin for sea-ice diazotrophs. Our results provide the first record of diazotrophs in the Central Arctic and suggest that microbial nitrogen fixation may occur north of 77ºN. To assess the significance of nitrogen fixation for the nitrogen budget of the Arctic Ocean and to identify the active nitrogen fixers, further biogeochemical and molecular biological studies are needed.

  11. The Moulin Explorer: A Novel Instrument to Study Greenland Ice Sheet Melt-Water Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Wang, H.; Elliott, A.; O'Hern, S.; Martin, S.; Lutz, C.; Steffen, K.; McGrath, D.; Phillips, T.

    2008-12-01

    Recent data shows that the Greenland ice sheet has been melting at an accelerated rate over the past decade. This melt water flows from the surface of the glacier to the bedrock below by draining into tubular crevasses known as moulins. Some believe these pathways eventually converge to nearby lakes and possibly the ocean. The Moulin Explorer Probe has been developed to traverse autonomously through these moulins. It uses in-situ pressure, temperature, and three-axis accelerometer sensors to log data. At the end of its journey, the probe will surface and send GPS coordinates using an Iridium satellite tracker so it may be retrieved via helicopter or boat. The information gathered when retrieved can be used to map the pathways and water flow rate through the moulins. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory- California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support was provided by the NASA Earth Science, Cryosphere program

  12. Comparisons of ice packs, hot water immersion, and analgesia injection for the treatment of centipede envenomations in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaou, Chung-Hsien; Chen, Chian-Kuang; Chen, Jih-Chang; Chiu, Te-Fa; Lin, Chih-Chuan

    2009-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of ice packs and hot water immersion for the treatment of centipede envenomations. Sixty patients envenomated by centipedes were randomized into three groups and were treated with ice packs, hot water immersion, or analgesia injection. The visual analog score (VAS) for pain was measured before the treatment and 15 min afterward. Demographic data and data on local and systemic effects after centipede bites were collected. The VAS scores and the pain decrease (DeltaVAS) were compared between the three groups. All patients suffered from pain at the affected sites; other local effects included redness (n = 49, 81.7%), swelling (n = 32, 53.3%), heat (n = 14, 23.3%), itchiness (n = 5, 8.3), and bullae formation (n = 3, 5.0%). Rare systemic effects were reported. All three groups had similar VAS scores before and after treatment. They also had similar effectiveness in reducing pain caused by centipedes bites (DeltaVAS = 2.55 +/- 1.88, 2.33 +/- 1.78, and 1.55 +/- 1.68, with ice packs, analgesia, and hot water immersion, respectively, p = 0.165). Ice packs, hot water immersion, and analgesics all improved the pain from centipede envenomation. Ice pack treatment is a safe, inexpensive, and non-invasive method for pre-hospital management in patients with centipede envenomation.

  13. Electric Properties of Water Ice doped with Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2): Implications for Icy Moons such as Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, C.; Freund, F. T.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Large floats of ice on Jupiter's moon Europa drift and collide. The float boundaries are marked by brownish-reddish colors. The origin of these colors is poorly understood. Maybe upwelling of water along the active float boundaries brings finely divided suspended matter or organic compounds from the ocean below to the surface, where the intense, high energy environment in Jupiter's radiation belt would lead to photochemical oxidation. At the same time it has been suggested that Europa's ice contains traces of H2O2, presumably due to micro-meteorite impacts and other processes. We measured the electric currents generated in pure and H2O2-doped water ice when we subjected one end of ice blocks to uniaxial stress. Ice samples with 0%, 0.3% and 0.03% H2O2 were formed in polyethylene troughs, 4.1 x 13.5 x 3.8 cm, with Cu contacts at both ends, at 263K (-10°C), 190K (-78°C, dry ice) and 77K (-196°C,liquid N2). At 77K the ice samples detached themselves from at least one of the Cu contacts, due to thermal contraction. At 190K, when stressing one end, essentially no currents were produced in the pure water ice. By contrast, H2O2-doped ices produced several hundred picoamperes (pA) of positive currents, indicating defect electrons (holes) flowing down the stress gradient. At 263K the results are ambiguous. These (as yet preliminary) results indicate that stresses might break the peroxy bonds of imbedded H2O2 molecules, releasing the same type of positive hole charge carriers as observed during stress experiments with silicate rocks. Since positive holes are defect electrons associated with O 2sp levels at the upper edge of the valence band, they seem to have the capability to spread through the ices. Chemically positive holes are equivalent to highly oxidizing oxygen radicals. They may be responsible for oxidation reactions along the boundaries of active ice floats on Europa.

  14. Air-sea flux of CO{sub 2} in arctic coastal waters influenced by glacial melt water and sea ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sejr, M.K.; Krause-Jensen, D.; Christensen, P.B. (National Environmental Research Inst., Aarhus Univ., Silkeborg (Denmark)), e-mail: mse@dmu.dk; Rysgaard, S. (Greenland Climate Research Centre (Co. Greenland Inst. of Natural Resources), Nuuk, Greenland (Denmark)); Soerensen, L.L. (National Environmental Research Inst., Aarhus Univ., Roskilde (Denmark)); Glud, R.N. (Greenland Climate Research Centre (Co. Greenland Inst. of Natural Resources), Nuuk, Greenland (Denmark); Southern Danish Univ., Inst. of Biology and Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCee), Odense M (Denmark); Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Dunbeg, Scotland (United Kingdom))

    2011-11-15

    Annual air-sea exchange of CO{sub 2} in Young Sound, NE Greenland was estimated using {sub p}CO{sub 2} surface-water measurements during summer (2006-2009) and during an ice-covered winter 2008. All surface {sub p}CO{sub 2} values were below atmospheric levels indicating an uptake of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. During sea ice formation, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) content is reduced causing sea ice to be under saturated in CO{sub 2}. Approximately 1% of the DIC forced out of growing sea ice was released into the atmosphere while the remaining 99% was exported to the underlying water column. Sea ice covered the fjord 9 months a year and thereby efficiently blocked air-sea CO{sub 2} exchange. During sea ice melt, dissolution of CaCO{sub 3} combined with primary production and strong stratification of the water column acted to lower surface-water {sub p}CO{sub 2} levels in the fjord. Also, a large input of glacial melt water containing geochemically reactive carbonate minerals may contribute to the low surface-water {sub p}CO{sub 2} levels. The average annual uptake of atmospheric CO{sub 2} was estimated at 2.7 mol CO{sub 2} m-2 yr-1 or 32 g C m-2 yr-1 for the study area, which is lower than estimates from the Greenland Sea. Variability in duration of sea ice cover caused significant year-to-year variation in annual gas exchange

  15. Correlation among Cirrus Ice Content, Water Vapor and Temperature in the TTL as Observed by CALIPSO and Aura-MLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, T.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) has a local radiative cooling effect. As a source for ice in cirrus clouds, however, it can also indirectly produce infrared heating. Using NASA A-Train satellite measurements of CALIPSO and Aura/MLS we calculated the correlation of water vapor, ice water content and temperature in the TTL. We find that temperature strongly controls water vapor (correlation r =0.94) and cirrus clouds at 100 hPa (r = -0.91). Moreover we observe that the cirrus seasonal cycle is highly (r =-0.9) anticorrelated with the water vapor variation in the TTL, showing higher cloud occurrence during December-January-February. We further investigate the anticorrelation on a regional scale and find that the strong anticorrelation occurs generally in the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). The seasonal cycle of the cirrus ice water content is also highly anticorrelated to water vapor (r = -0.91) and our results support the hypothesis that the total water at 100 hPa is roughly constant. Temperature acts as a main regulator for balancing the partition between water vapor and cirrus clouds. Thus, to a large extent, the depleting water vapor in the TTL during DJF is a manifestation of cirrus formation.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Water Isotope Fractionation During Growth of Ice Crystals in Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2006-12-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation, especially that of snow, plays a special role in the global hydrological cycle and in reconstruction of past climates using polar ice cores. The fractionation of the major water isotope species (HHO, HDO, HHO-18) during ice crystal formation is critical to understanding the global distribution of isotopes in precipitation. Ice crystal growth in clouds is traditionally treated with a spherically- symmetric steady state diffusion model, with semi-empirical modifications added to account for ventilation and for complex crystal morphology. Although it is known that crystal growth rate, which depends largely on the degree of vapor over-saturation, determines crystal morphology, there are no existing quantitative models that directly relate morphology to the vapor saturation factor. Since kinetic (vapor phase diffusion-controlled) isotopic fractionation also depends on growth rate, there should be a direct relationship between vapor saturation, crystal morphology, and crystal isotopic composition. We use a 2D Lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate diffusion-controlled ice crystal growth from vapor- oversaturated air. In the model, crystals grow solely according to the diffusive fluxes just above the crystal surfaces, and hence crystal morphology arises from the initial and boundary conditions in the model and does not need to be specified a priori. The input parameters needed are the isotope-dependent vapor deposition rate constant (k) and the water vapor diffusivity in air (D). The values of both k and D can be computed from kinetic theory, and there are also experimentally determined values of D. The deduced values of k are uncertain to the extent that the sticking coefficient (or accommodation coefficient) for ice is uncertain. The ratio D/k is a length that determines the minimum scale of dendritic growth features and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions using a dimensionless Damkohler number

  17. Ice Regelation: Hydrogen-bond extraordinary recoverability and water quasisolid-phase-boundary dispersivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Huang, Yongli; Sun, Peng; Liu, Xinjuan; Ma, Zengsheng; Zhou, Yichun; Zhou, Ji; Zheng, Weitao; Sun, Chang Q.

    2015-01-01

    Regelation, i.e., ice melts under compression and freezes again when the pressure is relieved, remains puzzling since its discovery in 1850’s by Faraday. Here we show that hydrogen bond (O:H-O) cooperativity and its extraordinary recoverability resolve this anomaly. The H-O bond and the O:H nonbond possesses each a specific heat ηx(T/ΘDx) whose Debye temperature ΘDx is proportional to its characteristic phonon frequency ωx according to Einstein’s relationship. A superposition of the ηx(T/ΘDx) curves for the H-O bond (x = H, ωH ~ 3200 cm−1) and the O:H nonbond (x = L, ωL ~ 200 cm−1, ΘDL = 198 K) yields two intersecting temperatures that define the liquid/quasisolid/solid phase boundaries. Compression shortens the O:H nonbond and stiffens its phonon but does the opposite to the H-O bond through O-O Coulomb repulsion, which closes up the intersection temperatures and hence depress the melting temperature of quasisolid ice. Reproduction of the Tm(P) profile clarifies that the H-O bond energy EH determines the Tm with derivative of EH = 3.97 eV for bulk water and ice. Oxygen atom always finds bonding partners to retain its sp3-orbital hybridization once the O:H breaks, which ensures O:H-O bond recoverability to its original state once the pressure is relieved. PMID:26351109

  18. The potential influence of Asian and African mineral dust on ice, mixed-phase and liquid water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiacek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This modelling study explores the availability of mineral dust particles as ice nuclei for interactions with ice, mixed-phase and liquid water clouds, also tracking the particles' history of cloud-processing. We performed 61 320 one-week forward trajectory calculations originating near the surface of major dust emitting regions in Africa and Asia using high-resolution meteorological analysis fields for the year 2007. Dust-bearing trajectories were assumed to be those coinciding with known dust emission seasons, without explicitly modelling dust emission and deposition processes. We found that dust emissions from Asian deserts lead to a higher potential for interactions with high ice clouds, despite being the climatologically much smaller dust emission source. This is due to Asian regions experiencing significantly more ascent than African regions, with strongest ascent in the Asian Taklimakan desert at ~25%, ~40% and 10% of trajectories ascending to 300 hPa in spring, summer and fall, respectively. The specific humidity at each trajectory's starting point was transported in a Lagrangian manner and relative humidities with respect to water and ice were calculated in 6-h steps downstream, allowing us to estimate the formation of liquid, mixed-phase and ice clouds. Downstream of the investigated dust sources, practically none of the simulated air parcels reached conditions of homogeneous ice nucleation (T≲−40 °C along trajectories that have not experienced water saturation first. By far the largest fraction of cloud forming trajectories entered conditions of mixed-phase clouds, where mineral dust will potentially exert the biggest influence. The majority of trajectories also passed through atmospheric regions supersaturated with respect to ice but subsaturated with respect to water, where so-called "warm ice clouds" (T≳−40 °C theoretically may form prior to supercooled water or mixed-phase clouds. The importance of "warm ice

  19. Significance analysis of the regional differences on icing time of water onto fire protective clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Jing, L. S.; Zhang, X. Z.; Xia, J. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Hu, C.; Bao, Z. M.; Fu, X. C.; Wang, R. J.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. J.

    2017-09-01

    The object of this work was to determine the icing temperature in icing experiment. Firstly, a questionnaire investigation was carried out on 38 fire detachments in different regions. These Statistical percentage results were divided into northern east group and northern west group. Secondly, a significance analysis between these two results was made using Mann-Whitney U test. Then the icing temperature was determined in different regions. Thirdly, the icing experiment was made in the environment of -20°C in Daxing’an Mountain. The anti-icing effect of new fire protective clothing was verified in this icing.

  20. An Assessment of the SEA Multi-Element Sensor for Liquid Water Content Calibration of the NASA GRC Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Laura E.; Ide, Robert F.; Van Zante, Judith F.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Icing Research tunnel has been using an Icing Blade technique to measure cloud liquid water content (LWC) since 1980. The IRT conducted tests with SEA Multi-Element sensors from 2009 to 2011 to assess their performance in measuring LWC. These tests revealed that the Multi-Element sensors showed some significant advantages over the Icing Blade, particularly at higher water contents, higher impingement rates, and large drop sizes. Results of these and other tests are presented here.

  1. Ice Lithography for Nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Kuan, A.; Wang, J.

    Water vapor is condensed onto a cold sample, coating it with a thin-film of ice. The ice is sensitive to electron beam lithography exposure. 10 nm ice patterns are transferred into metals by “melt-off”. Non-planar samples are coated with ice, and we pattern on cantilevers, AFM tips, and suspended...

  2. Surface studies of water isotopes in Antarctica for quantitative interpretation of deep ice core data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, Amaelle; Casado, Mathieu; Prié, Frédéric; Magand, Olivier; Arnaud, Laurent; Ekaykin, Alexey; Petit, Jean-Robert; Picard, Ghislain; Fily, Michel; Minster, Bénédicte; Touzeau, Alexandra; Goursaud, Sentia; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Jouzel, Jean; Orsi, Anaïs

    2017-07-01

    Polar ice cores are unique climate archives. Indeed, most of them have a continuous stratigraphy and present high temporal resolution of many climate variables in a single archive. While water isotopic records (δD or δ18O) in ice cores are often taken as references for past atmospheric temperature variations, their relationship to temperature is associated with a large uncertainty. Several reasons are invoked to explain the limitation of such an approach; in particular, post-deposition effects are important in East Antarctica because of the low accumulation rates. The strong influence of post-deposition processes highlights the need for surface polar research programs in addition to deep drilling programs. We present here new results on water isotopes from several recent surface programs, mostly over East Antarctica. Together with previously published data, the new data presented in this study have several implications for the climatic reconstructions based on ice core isotopic data: (1) The spatial relationship between surface mean temperature and mean snow isotopic composition over the first meters in depth can be explained quite straightforwardly using simple isotopic models tuned to d-excess vs. δ18O evolution in transects on the East Antarctic sector. The observed spatial slopes are significantly higher (∼ 0.7-0.8‰·°C-1 for δ18O vs. temperature) than seasonal slopes inferred from precipitation data at Vostok and Dome C (0.35 to 0.46‰·°C-1). We explain these differences by changes in condensation versus surface temperature between summer and winter in the central East Antarctic plateau, where the inversion layer vanishes in summer. (2) Post-deposition effects linked to exchanges between the snow surface and the atmospheric water vapor lead to an evolution of δ18O in the surface snow, even in the absence of any precipitation event. This evolution preserves the positive correlation between the δ18O of snow and surface temperature, but is

  3. Pain during ice water test distinguishes clinical bladder hypersensitivity from overactivity disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bountra Chas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bladder cooling reflex (BCR i.e. uninhibited detrusor contractions evoked by intravesical instillation of cold saline, is a segmental reflex believed to be triggered by menthol sensitive cold receptors in the bladder wall, with the afferent signals transmitted by C fibres. The BCR is a neonatal reflex that becomes suppressed by descending signals from higher centres at approximately the time when the child gains full voluntary control of voiding. It re-emerges in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity as a consequence of loss of central descending inhibition, resulting from conditions such as spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. We have recently shown an increase of nerve fibres expressing the cool and menthol receptor TRPM8 in both overactive (IDO and painful bladder syndrome (PBS, but its functional significance is unknown. We have therefore studied the bladder cooling reflex and associated sensory symptoms in patients with PBS and overactivity disorders. Methods The BCR, elicited by ice water test (IWT was performed in patients with painful bladder syndrome (PBS, n = 17, idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO, n = 22, neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, n = 4 and stress urinary incontinence (as controls, n = 21. The IWT was performed by intravesical instillation of cold saline (0 – 4°C. A positive IWT was defined as presence of uninhibited detrusor contraction evoked by cold saline, associated with urgency or with fluid expulsion. Patients were asked to report and rate any pain and cold sensation during the test. Results A positive IWT was observed in IDO (6/22, 27.3% and NDO (4/4, 100% patients, but was negative in all control and PBS patients. Thirteen (76.5% PBS patients reported pain during the IWT, with significantly higher pain scores during ice water instillation compared to the baseline (P = 0.0002, or equivalent amount of bladder filling (100 mls with saline at room temperature (P = 0.015. None

  4. Luminescence of water or ice as a new detection method for magnetic monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Anna Obertacke

    2017-12-01

    Cosmic ray detectors use air as a radiator for luminescence. In water and ice, Cherenkov light is the dominant light producing mechanism when the particle's velocity exceeds the Cherenkov threshold, approximately three quarters of the speed of light in vacuum. Luminescence is produced by highly ionizing particles passing through matter due to the electronic excitation of the surrounding molecules. The observables of luminescence, such as the wavelength spectrum and decay times, are highly dependent on the properties of the medium, in particular, temperature and purity. The results for the light yield of luminescence of previous measurements vary by two orders of magnitude. It will be shown that even for the lowest measured light yield, luminescence is an important signature of highly ionizing particles below the Cherenkov threshold. These could be magnetic monopoles or other massive and highly ionizing exotic particles. With the highest observed efficiencies, luminescence may even contribute significantly to the light output of standard model particles such as the PeV IceCube neutrinos. We present analysis techniques to use luminescence in neutrino telescopes and discuss experimental setups to measure the light yield of luminescence for the particular conditions in neutrino detectors.

  5. Brine network structural metamorphosis and sea ice bottom layer permeability change induced by sea water penetration under a surface pressure field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudier, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Sea ice presents two roughness scales: one in the millimetre range and the other up to several meters due to ridging. The larger roughness elements are the result of compression and sheer, causing ice blocks to pile up and down at the line of contact between converging ice floes. In terms of boundary limit dynamic, they create obstacles that induce, in their wake, a pressure gradient at the ice water interface. Sea ice is a porous medium and as such, is permeable when subject to pressure gradients. Models have shown that, at spring, when ice permeability increases, sea water can be forced through the ice water interface into the bottom ice layer while brine is pumped out of it under obstacle induced pressure gradients. These results suggest that ice ocean heat budgets have to include a porous flow component and its associated latent heat import/export caused by through volume melting/thawing inside the bottom ice layer subject to sea water infiltration. With the initiation of a melt/thaw dynamic within the porous bottom ice layer, the porous network restructures. Our research show an enlargement of the larger brine channels while smaller ones close due ice growth. Similarly, ice volume of smaller cross size tend to disappear while larger ones evolve slowly. As heat fluxes due to latent heat exchanges become several orders of magnitude larger than any other exterior forcing, such as radiation, heat budgets within ice individual volumes balance fluxes in and out caused by melting/thaw on channel walls. Our simulations were run from an early spring C shape temperature profile to an isothermal state showing that structural change becomes significant only after the temperature profile becomes positive upward.

  6. Continuous monitoring of summer surface water vapor isotopic composition above the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Steen-Larsen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present here surface water vapor isotopic measurements conducted from June to August 2010 at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Drilling Project camp, NW Greenland (77.45° N, 51.05° W, 2484 m a.s.l.. Measurements were conducted at 9 different heights from 0.1 m to 13.5 m above the snow surface using two different types of cavity-enhanced near-infrared absorption spectroscopy analyzers. For each instrument specific protocols were developed for calibration and drift corrections. The inter-comparison of corrected results from different instruments reveals excellent reproducibility, stability, and precision with a standard deviations of ~ 0.23‰ for δ18O and ~ 1.4‰ for δD. Diurnal and intraseasonal variations show strong relationships between changes in local surface humidity and water vapor isotopic composition, and with local and synoptic weather conditions. This variability probably results from the interplay between local moisture fluxes, linked with firn–air exchanges, boundary layer dynamics, and large-scale moisture advection. Particularly remarkable are several episodes characterized by high (> 40‰ surface water vapor deuterium excess. Air mass back-trajectory calculations from atmospheric analyses and water tagging in the LMDZiso (Laboratory of Meteorology Dynamics Zoom-isotopic atmospheric model reveal that these events are associated with predominant Arctic air mass origin. The analysis suggests that high deuterium excess levels are a result of strong kinetic fractionation during evaporation at the sea-ice margin.

  7. Assessing linkages between ice sheet calving, subpolar gyre density and deep water ventilation during the last glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledal, Sunniva; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Kleiven, Helga (Kikki) F.; Irvali, Nil

    2017-04-01

    Deep ocean circulation plays an important role in the Earth's climate system and is postulated to be closely linked to ice sheet dynamics and abrupt climate oscillations. However, the nature of this coupling remains unclear. Iceberg and freshwater pulses have been hypothesized as both the trigger for, and the response to, reduced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Differentiating between these two hypotheses requires high-resolution records constraining the relative timing of ice sheet, freshwater, and ocean circulation changes. Here we assess the relative timing and linkages between iceberg discharge, surface water physical properties in the subpolar gyre, and North Atlantic deep water ventilation using proxy records co-registered in the same sediment sequence. High-resolution stable isotope analysis (δ18O & δ13C ) of planktonic (N. pachyderma (s)) and benthic (C. wuellerstorfi) foraminifera and ice-rafted debris (IRD) records from the core GS15-196-02GC taken in the Irminger basin (59o37.1 N, 40o44.25 W, 2468 water depth) document a clear relationship between increasing freshwater fluxes (IRD and planktonic δ18O), decreasing deep water ventilation (benthic δ13C), and temperature and salinity changes in the subpolar gyre surface waters (planktonic δ18O). Our benthic (C. wuellerstorfi) carbon isotope record documents clear variability in deep ocean ventilation throughout the last glacial and deglacial periods. Notably, periods of high iceberg discharge and freshening of the subpolar gyre surface waters are preceded by decreases in deep water ventilation (benthic δ13C); consistent with the hypothesis that reduced AMOC is important for triggering ice sheet melting/collapse. However, ventilation decreases of similar scale occur without accompanying peaks in IRD, suggesting circulation changes do not always trigger ice sheet collapse. In addition, the periods of weakest ventilation (low benthic δ13C ) are clearly coincident with the largest IRD

  8. On-ice sweat rate, voluntary fluid intake, and sodium balance during practice in male junior ice hockey players drinking water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Matthew S; Logan, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated the repeatability of hydration and sweat measurements taken during on-ice hockey practices with players drinking only water, and determined whether having only a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) to drink during practices decreased fluid intake or affected other hydration and (or) sweat measures. All testing was conducted on elite players of an Ontario Hockey League team (+/-SE; mean age, 17.6 +/- 0.3 years; mean height, 182.9 +/- 1.4 cm; mean body mass, 83.0 +/- 1.7 kg). Players were studied 3 times over the course of 6 weekly on-ice practices (+/-SE; mean playing time, 1.58 +/- 0.07 h; mean temperature, 11.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C; mean relative humidity, 52% +/- 3%). There was strong repeatability of the measured hydration and sweat parameters between 2 similar on-ice practices when players drank only water. Limiting the players to drinking only a CES (as opposed to water) did not decrease fluid intake during practice (+/-SE; mean CES intake, 0.72 +/- 0.07 L.h-1 vs. mean water intake, 0.82 +/- 0.08 L.h-1) or affect sweat rate (1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1), sweat sodium concentration (72.4 +/- 5.6 mmol.L-1 vs. 73.0 +/- 4.4 mmol.L-1), or percent body mass loss (1.1% +/- 0.2% vs. 0.9% +/- 0.2%). Drinking a CES also improved sodium balance (-2.1 +/- 0.2 g.h-1 vs. -2.6 +/- 0.3 g.h-1) and provided the players with a significant carbohydrate (43 +/- 4 g.h-1 vs. 0 +/- 0 g.h-1) during practice. In summary, a single field sweat test during similar on-ice hockey practices in male junior hockey players is sufficient to evaluate fluid and electrolyte balance. Also, a CES does not affect voluntary fluid intake during practice, compared with water, in these players. The CES provided some salt to offset the salt lost in sweat, and carbohydrate, which may help maintain physical and mental performance in the later stages of practice.

  9. Illumination Conditions at the Asteroid 4 Vesta: Implications for the Presence of Water Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Timothy J.; Wang, Yongli

    2011-01-01

    The mean illumination conditions and surface temperatures over one orbital period are calculated for the Asteroid 4 Vesta using a coarse digital elevation model produced from Hubble Space Telescope images. Even with the anticipated effects of finer-scale topography taken into account, it is unlikely that any significant permanently shadowed regions currently exist on Vesta due to its large axial tilt (approx. = 27deg). However, under present day conditions, it is predicted that about half of Vesta's surface has an average temperature of less than 145 K, which, based on previous thermal modeling of main belt asteroids, suggests that water ice could survive in the top few meters of the vestal regolith on billion-year timescales.

  10. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    that the mass distribution of the deposited PEG is similar to that of the starting material. Optical pictures of the films show particle structures of PEG of a size up to 5-10 mu m. The deposition rate measured with a quartz crystal microbalance is typically of the order of 1 ng/ (cm(2) shot). (c) 2005 Elsevier......Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...... at 355 nm at a fluence of 2.5-12 J/cm(2). Even at this high fluence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicates a chemical structure of the deposit close to that of the un-irradiated PEG. Matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) show...

  11. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A Comparison of Two Methods and Eras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Pearl, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Similar cloud features are seen in maps generated with each method with no obvious outliers. The temperature differencing method appears to possibly be somewhat more sensitive to weaker water ice signatures. We have also generated correlation plots comparing the two methods. At strong delta-T signals, the correlation between the two methods is quite good, and therefore extraction of opacities from earlier Viking data may be possible for these stronger detection levels. Weaker detections do not, however, show such a good correlation. We are currently analyzing why the correlation becomes poor at weak signal levels, though it may be due to the fact that the differencing method may be more sensitive to thin cloud hazes. Results of this ongoing analysis will be presented. A comparison of the Viking and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) eras are also presented.

  12. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A Comparison of Two Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Pearl, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    To date, the only two data sets offer the potential to examine year-to-year changes in cloud features over an entire Martian year: the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data set and the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data set. We have examined the TES data in the same way in which we examined the Viking IRTM data. This provides water-ice cloud information separated in time by 12 Martian years. Since the data are analyzed with the same method, we obtain a very accurate 'apples to apples' comparison, and can generate a historical record of the subtleties of this annual event. Consequently, it is desirable to compare their results to ours to see what differences exist.

  13. Water-soluble elements in snow and ice on Mt. Yulong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hewen; Kang, Shichang; Shi, Xiaofei; He, Yuanqing; Lu, Xixi; Shi, Xiaoyi; Paudyal, Rukumesh; Du, Jiankuo; Wang, Shijin; Du, Jun; Chen, Jizu

    2017-01-01

    Melting of high-elevation glaciers can be accelerated by the deposition of light-absorbing aerosols (e.g., organic carbon, mineral dust), resulting in significant reductions of the surface albedo on glaciers. Organic carbon deposited in glaciers is of great significance to global carbon cycles, snow photochemistry, and air-snow exchange processes. In this work, various snow and ice samples were collected at high elevation sites (4300-4850masl) from Mt. Yulong on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau in 2015. These samples were analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIs) to elucidate the chemical species and compositions of the glaciers in the Mt. Yulong region. Generally, glacial meltwater had the lowest DOC content (0.39mgL-1), while fresh snow had the highest (2.03mgL-1) among various types of snow and ice samples. There were obvious spatial and temporal trends of DOC and WSIs in glaciers. The DOC and TN concentrations decreased in the order of fresh snow, snow meltwater, snowpit, and surface snow, resulting from the photolysis of DOC and snow's quick-melt effects. The surface snow had low DOC and TN depletion ratios in the melt season; specifically, the ratios were -0.79 and -0.19mgL-1d-1, respectively. In the winter season, the ratios of DOC and TN were remarkably higher, with values of -0.20mgL-1d-1 and -0.08mgL-1d-1, respectively. A reduction of the DOC and TN content in glaciers was due to snow's quick melt and sublimation. Deposition of these light-absorbing impurities (LAPs) in glaciers might accelerate snowmelt and even glacial retreat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Extratropical Weather Systems on Mars: Radiatively-Active Water Ice Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Urata, R. A.; Montmessin, F.

    2017-01-01

    Extratropical, large-scale weather disturbances, namely transient, synoptic-period,baroclinic barotropic eddies - or - low- (high-) pressure cyclones (anticyclones), are components fundamental to global circulation patterns for rapidly rotating, differentially heated, shallow atmospheres such as Earth and Mars. Such "wave-like" disturbances that arise via (geophysical) fluid shear instability develop, mature and decay, and travel west-to-east in the middle and high latitudes within terrestrial-like planetary atmospheres. These disturbances serve as critical agents in the transport of heat and momentum between low and high latitudes of the planet. Moreover, they transport trace species within the atmosphere (e.g., water vapor/ice, other aerosols (dust), chemical species, etc). Between early autumn through early spring, middle and high latitudes on Mars exhibit strong equator-to-pole mean temperature contrasts (i.e., "baroclinicity"). Data collected during the Viking era and observations from both the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) indicate that such strong baroclinicity supports vigorous, large-scale eastward traveling weather systems [Banfield et al., 2004; Barnes et al., 1993]. A good example of traveling weather systems, frontal wave activity and sequestered dust activity from MGS/MOC image analyses is provided in Figure 1 (cf. Wang et al. [2005]). Utilizing an upgraded and evolving version of the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Mars global climate model, investigated here are key dynamical and physical aspects of simulated northern hemisphere (NH) large-scale extratropica lweather systems,with and without radiatively-active water ice clouds. Mars Climate Model:

  15. Estimation and calibration of the water isotope differential diffusion length in ice core records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van der Wel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Palaeoclimatic information can be retrieved from the diffusion of the stable water isotope signal during firnification of snow. The diffusion length, a measure for the amount of diffusion a layer has experienced, depends on the firn temperature and the accumulation rate. We show that the estimation of the diffusion length using power spectral densities (PSDs of the record of a single isotope species can be biased by uncertainties in spectral properties of the isotope signal prior to diffusion. By using a second water isotope and calculating the difference in diffusion lengths between the two isotopes, this problem is circumvented. We study the PSD method applied to two isotopes in detail and additionally present a new forward diffusion method for retrieving the differential diffusion length based on the Pearson correlation between the two isotope signals. The two methods are discussed and extensively tested on synthetic data which are generated in a Monte Carlo manner. We show that calibration of the PSD method with this synthetic data is necessary to be able to objectively determine the differential diffusion length. The correlation-based method proves to be a good alternative for the PSD method as it yields precision equal to or somewhat higher than the PSD method. The use of synthetic data also allows us to estimate the accuracy and precision of the two methods and to choose the best sampling strategy to obtain past temperatures with the required precision. In addition to application to synthetic data the two methods are tested on stable-isotope records from the EPICA (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica ice core drilled in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, showing that reliable firn temperatures can be reconstructed with a typical uncertainty of 1.5 and 2 °C for the Holocene period and 2 and 2.5 °C for the last glacial period for the correlation and PSD method, respectively.

  16. Discovery of bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (PhaC)-encoding genes from seasonal Baltic Sea ice and cold estuarine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Virta, Marko; Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are macromolecules produced by bacteria as means for storing carbon and energy in intracellular granules. PHAs have physical properties similar to those of plastics and have become of interest to industry as materials for environmentally friendly bioplastic production. There is an ongoing search for new PHA-producing bacterial strains and PHA-synthesizing enzymes tolerating extreme conditions to find ways of producing PHAs at cold temperatures and high solute concentrations. Moreover, the study of PHA producers in the sea-ice biome can aid in understanding the microbial ecology of carbon cycling in ice-associated ecosystems. In this study, PHA producers and PHA synthase genes were examined under the extreme environmental conditions of sea ice and cold seawater to find evidence of PHA production in an environment requiring adaptation to high salinity and cold temperatures. Sea ice and cold estuarine water samples were collected from the northern Baltic Sea and evidence of PHA production was gathered, using microscopy with Nile Blue A staining of PHA-granules and PCR assays detecting PHA-synthesis genes. The PHA granules and PHA synthases were found at all sampling locations, in both sea ice and water, and throughout the sampling period spanning over 10 years. Our study shows, for the first time, that PHA synthesis occurs in Baltic Sea cold-adapted bacteria in their natural environment, which makes the Baltic Sea and its cold environments an interesting choice in the quest for PHA-synthesizing bacteria and synthesis genes.

  17. Temperature distribution of a water droplet moving on a heated super-hydrophobic surface under the icing condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masafumi; Sumino, Yutaka; Morita, Katsuaki

    2017-11-01

    In the aviation industry, ice accretion on the airfoil has been a hazardous issue since it greatly declines the aerodynamic performance. Electric heaters and bleed air, which utilizes a part of gas emissions from engines, are used to prevent the icing. Nowadays, a new de-icing system combining electric heaters and super hydrophobic coatings have been developed to reduce the energy consumption. In the system, the heating temperature and the coating area need to be adjusted. Otherwise, the heater excessively consumes energy when it is set too high and when the coating area is not properly located, water droplets which are once dissolved possibly adhere again to the rear part of the airfoil as runback ice In order to deal with these problems, the physical phenomena of water droplets on the hydrophobic surface demand to be figured out. However, not many investigations focused on the behavior of droplets under the icing condition have been conducted. In this research, the temperature profiling of the rolling droplet on a heated super-hydrophobic surface is experimentally observed by the dual luminescent imaging.

  18. Mars Water Ice and Carbon Dioxide Seasonal Polar Caps: GCM Modeling and Comparison with Mars Express Omega Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Levrard, B.; Montmessin, F.; Schmitt, B.; Doute, S.; Langevin, Y.; Bibring, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the behavior of the Mars CO2 ice seasonal polar caps, and in particular interpret the the Mars Express Omega observations of the recession of the northern seasonal cap, we present some simulations of the Martian Climate/CO2 cycle/ water cycle as modeled by the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) global climate model.

  19. Ab Initio Simulations of Water in the Interiors of Ice Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militzer, B.; Zhang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Water is one of the most prevalent substances in our solar system. Large quantities are assumed to be stored in the interiors of ice giant planets. Water has an unusually rich phase diagram with 15 solid phases that were determined experimentally and 5 additional ones that were predicted theoretically. At megabar pressures and elevated temperatures, water is predicted to assume a superionic state where the oxygen ions remain confined to lattice sites while the hydrogen ions move through the crystal like a fluid. In our recent article [Physical Review Letters 110 (2013) 151102], we predicted the oxygen sub-lattice to assume a face-centered cubic structure at pressures above 1 Mbar. In this presentation, we present results from additional density functional molecular dynamics simulations and predict the existence of new, not close packed phase. We employed a thermodynamics integration technique to derive the entropy and the Gibbs free energy. We discuss how a novel superionic state could be identified in high pressure experiments and talk about the implications for the interiors of Uranus and Neptune.

  20. High temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell power cycle: Preliminary design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    A model of a high temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell, hydrogen/oxygen, thermally regenerative power cycle is developed and used to simulate system performance for varying system parameters. Initial estimates of system efficiency, weight, and volume are provided for a one KWe module assuming specific electrolyzer and fuel cell characteristics, both current and future. Specific interest is placed on examining the system responses to changes in device voltage versus current density operating curves, and the associated optimum operating ranges. The performance of a solar-powered, space based system in low earth orbit is examined in terms of the light-dark periods requiring storage. The storage design tradeoffs between thermal energy, electrical energy, and hydrogen/oxygen mass storage are examined. The current technology module is based on the 1000 C solid oxide electrolyzer cell and the alkaline fuel cell. The Future Technology system examines benefits involved with developing a 1800K electrolyzer operating with an advanced fuel cell.

  1. Improving the gas productivity of the alkaline electrolyzer through the circulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitipong Tangphant

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study and improve the efficiency of a KOH electrolyzer through the gas productivity of the electrolyzer with different the circulation technique. In this work, the conceptual design of an electrolyzer falls into 2 categories; without pumping and with pumping. Direct current electricity at 5 different levels of 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 A are charged into the system and the gas flow rate generated from the electrolyzer is subsequently monitored. The results show that at 30 A the gas generated from the circulation with pumping and the circulation without pumping are 2.31 litre/min and 1.76 litre/min, respectively. It is also found that the energy consumed by both techniques is the same; however, the circulation with pumping design shows the better gas productivity than that of the circulation without pumping design.

  2. Advanced Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an advanced composite bipolar plate is proposed for a unitized regenerative fuel cell and electrolyzer system that operates on pure feed streams...

  3. Evaluation of Electrolytically-Generated Hypochlorous Acid (‘Electrolyzed Water’ for Sanitation of Meat and Meat-Contact Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawnna Veasey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ‘Electrolyzed water’ generators are readily available in the food industry as a renewable source of hypochlorous acid that eliminates the need for workers to handle hazardous hypochlorite concentrates. We applied electrolyzed water (EW directly to multi-strain cocktails of Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, and Salmonella sp. at 250 ppm free available chlorine (FAC and achieved greater than 6-log reductions in 2 min. Lower EW values were examined as antimicrobial interventions for fresh meat (beef carcasses, processed meats (frankfurters, and food contact surfaces (slicing blades. Little or no reduction relative to controls was observed when generic E. coli-inoculated beef carcasses or L. monocytogenes-inoculated frankfurters were showered with EW. Spray application of EW (25 and 250-ppm FAC onto L. monocytogenes-inoculated slicing blades showed that greater reductions were obtained with ‘clean’ (3.6 and 5.7-log reduction vs. ‘dirty’ (0.6 and 3.3-log reduction slicing blades, respectively. Trials with L. monocytogenes-inoculated protein-EW solutions demonstrated that protein content as low as 0.1% is capable of eliminating FAC, reducing antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes. EW appears better positioned as a surface sanitizer with minimal organic material that can otherwise act as an effective reducing agent to the oxidizing solution rendering it ineffective.

  4. Summary of Market Opportunities for Electric Vehicles and Dispatchable Load in Electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markel, Tony [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ma, Ookie [U.S Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-05-19

    Electric vehicles (EVs) and electrolyzers are potentially significant sources of new electric loads. Both are flexible in that the amount of electricity consumed can be varied in response to a variety of factors including the cost of electricity. Because both EVs and electrolyzers can control the timing of electricity purchases, they can minimize energy costs by timing the purchases of energy to periods of lowest costs.

  5. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Cloud particles containing ammonia and water ices indicate a deep convective origin. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Baines, K. H.; Fry, P.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 was first detected by amateur astronomers in early December 2010 and later found in Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images taken on 5 December, when it took the form of a 1000 km wide bright spot. Within a week the head of the storm grew by a factor of ten in width and within a few months created a wake that encircled the planet. This is the sixth Great Saturn Storm in recorded history, all having appeared in the northern hemisphere, and most near northern summer solstice at intervals of roughly 30 years (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 1991, Nature 353, 397-401). That the most recent storm appeared 10 years early proved fortunate because Cassini was still operating in orbit around Saturn and was able to provide unique observations from which we could learn much more about these rare and enormous events. Besides the dramatic dynamical effects displayed at the visible cloud level by high-resolution imaging observations (Sayanagi et al. 2013, Icarus 223, 460-478), dramatic thermal changes also occurred in the stratosphere above the storm (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413), and radio measurements of lightning (Fischer et al., 2011, Nature 475, 75-77) indicated strong convective activity at deeper levels. Numerical models of Saturn's Giant storms (Hueso and Sanchez-Lavega 2004, Icarus 172, 255-271) suggest that they are fueled by water vapor condensation beginning at the 10-12 bar level, some 250 km below the visible cloud tops. That idea is also supported by our detection of water ice near the cloud tops (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 402-418). From Cassini VIMS spectral imaging taken in February 2011, we learned that the storm's cloud particles are strong absorbers of sunlight at wavelengths from 2.8 to 3.1 microns. Such absorption is not seen on Saturn outside of storm regions, implying a different kind of cloud formation process as well as different cloud composition inside the storm region. We found compelling evidence

  6. Effectiveness of a chemical herder in association with in-situ burning of oil spills in ice-infested water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    The average herded slick thickness, surface distribution and burning efficiency of a light crude oil were studied in ice-infested water to determine the effectiveness of a chemical herder in facilitating the in-situ burning of oil. Experiments were performed in a small scale (1.0m2) and an interm......The average herded slick thickness, surface distribution and burning efficiency of a light crude oil were studied in ice-infested water to determine the effectiveness of a chemical herder in facilitating the in-situ burning of oil. Experiments were performed in a small scale (1.0m2......) and an intermediate scale (19m2) setup with open water and 3/10, 5/10 and 7/10 brash ice coverages. The herded slick thicknesses (3-8mm) were ignitable in each experiment. The presence of ice caused fracturing of the oil during the herding process, which reduced the size of the herded slicks and, as a consequence...

  7. Dazzled by ice and snow: improving medium ocean color images in Arctic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, M.; Goyens, C.; Belanger, S.

    2016-02-01

    The importance of phytoplankton blooms for the Arctic marine ecosystem is well recognized but studies disagree as the consequences of sea ice melt on the phytoplankton distribution and growth. This limited understanding in actual and future Arctic phytoplankton dynamics mostly results from a lack of accurate data at the receding ice-edges where phytoplankton blooms are known to occur. Ocean color sensors on-board satellites represent therefore a crucial tool providing a synoptic view of the ocean systems over broad spatio-temporal scales. However, today the use of ocean color data in Arctic environments remains strongly compromised due to, among others, sea ice contamination. Indeed, medium ocean color data along the receding ice edge are "dazzled" by nearby and/or sub-pixel highly reflective ice floes. Standard ocean color data methods ignore ice-contamination during data processing which deteriorates the quality of the radiometric data and subsequent satellite derived bio-geochemical products. Moreover, since Arctic phytoplankton spring blooms typically develop along the receding ice-edges, ignoring ice-contaminated pixels may lead to wrong interpretation of satellite data. The present study shows how adjacent and sub-pixel sea-ice floes affect the retrieved ocean color data. A correction approach is also suggested to improve the "dazzled" ocean color pixels along the receding ice edge in the aim to provide additional support to better understand current and future trends in phytoplankton dynamics.

  8. On thin ice/in hot water: Rapid drawdown of Wordie Ice Shelf glaciers in the decades after collapse in response to a changing ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. C.; Gardner, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past 50 years, several Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves have retreated or collapsed completely. One such collapse was the Wordie Ice Shelf (WIS), located in Marguerite Bay, which began to disintegrate around 1989. We use several observational datasets to show that the glaciers that used to maintain WIS have experienced a surprising acceleration in flow ( 500m/yr) that began 2008, nearly 20 years after the onset of WIS collapse. During the same period, airborne altimetry from NASA Operation IceBridge shows the glaciers experienced a drawdown at their calving fronts between 4 and 9 m/yr, a near-doubling in rate of elevation change from the 1990's and early-2000's. The time lag between WIS collapse and rapid glacier drawdown suggests that these recent changes are unrelated to loss of buttressing. We identify possible links to changes in ocean conditions using in-situ Palmer Station Long-Term Ecological Research (PAL LTER) ocean CTD-gridded observations (Martinson et al., 2008) taken along the continental shelf on the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) since 1993. We use ECCO2 simulations and atmospheric reanalysis data to characterize changes in atmospheric forcing. We also measure changes in ice shelf area using historic archives and Landsat imagery for 50 glacier systems along the WAP from 1945 to present. Surface structural changes in the WIS system, e.g., melt ponds, sea/fast ice presence, and crevasse density/orientation, are also examined. We conclude that recent changes in WIS tributaries likely resulted from a significant increase in upwelling of warm, salty Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) due to enhanced wind forcing following coincident global atmospheric oscillation events, namely a positive Southern Annular Mode and a moderate La Nina event. This enabled enhanced incursions of UCDW into Marguerite Bay between 2008-2014, in part due to the deep Marguerite Trough that connects the bay to the continental shelf break, along which the southern boundary

  9. Experimental study and numerical simulation of the salinity effect on water-freezing point and ice-melting rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, N.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H. W.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, based on the background of snowmelt de-icing tools, we studied the effect of salt on freezing point and melting rate of ice through laboratory test and FLUENT numerical simulation analysis. It was confirmed that the freezing point is inversely proportional to the salt solid content, and with the salt solid content increasing, the freezing process of salt water gradually accepts the curing rule of non-crystal solids. At the same temperature, an increase in the salt solid content, the ice melting rate increase by the empirical formula linking the melting time with temperature and salt content. The theoretical aspects of solid/fluid transformation are discussed in detail.

  10. Monolayer ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zangi, R; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    We report results from molecular dynamics simulations of water under confinement and at ambient conditions that predict a first-order freezing transition from a monolayer of liquid water to a monolayer of ice induced by increasing the distance between the confining parallel plates. Since a slab

  11. Does the homogeneous ice nucleation initiate at the surface or in the volume of super-cooled water droplets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, S.; Möhler, O.; Wagner, R.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2009-04-01

    The nucleation of ice in super-cooled water droplets affects many atmospheric processes as the initiation of precipitation and radiative transfer. Water droplets are freezing due to the formation of a critical germ initiating the freezing of the whole droplet. The common quantity to describe the creation of ice is the nucleation rate J, defined as the product of the number of critical germs and the rate at which additional molecules are incorporated into a critical germ. Nucleation of ice in a super-cooled liquid is a stochastic process and depends strongly on temperature. Recently there was a discussion whether the germs of the new phase are formed preferentially near the surface or in the interior of the droplet. Experiments at the aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe were performed to assess this question. We produced clouds of super-cooled water droplets and deduced the ice nucleation rate J from simultaneously measurements of the number density and size distribution of liquid droplets, the number density of ice particles, and the temperature in the range between -36 and -37 °C. With different number densities of seed aerosol particles (sulphuric acid aerosol) we were able to vary the size of the nucleating water droplets between 4 µm and 9 µm diameter. The comparison of the results - by assumption of a volume dependent process - showed very good agreement both with data from literature gained from considerably larger droplets and with classical nucleation theory. The nucleation rates disagree from each other when converting them to surface-proportional values. This contradicts the hypothesis that a critical germ is formed preferentially near the surface of a super-cooled liquid droplet.

  12. Growth rate of crystalline ice and the diffusivity of supercooled water from 126 to 262 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuntao; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-12-12

    Understanding deeply supercooled water is key to unraveling many of water’s anomalous properties. However, this has proven difficult due to rapid and uncontrolled crystallization. Using a pulsed laser heating technique, we measure the growth rate of crystalline ice, G(T), for 180 K < T < 262 K, i.e. deep within water’s “no man’s land.” The self-diffusion of supercooled liquid water, D(T), is obtained from G(T) using the Wilson-Frenkel model of crystal growth. For T > 237 K, G(T) and D(T) have super-Arrhenius (“fragile”) temperature dependences, but both crossover to Arrhenius (“strong”) behavior with a large activation energy in “no man’s land.” The fact that G(T) and D(T) are smoothly varying rules out the hypothesis that liquid water’s properties have a singularity at or near 228 K. However the results are consistent with a previous prediction for D(T) that assumed no thermodynamic transitions occur in “no man’s land.

  13. Numerical modeling for preliminary design of the hydrogen production electrolyzer in the Westinghouse hybrid cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jomard, F.; Feraud, J. P. [CEA Valrho, DTEC/SGCS/LGCI, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Caire, J. P. [ENSEEG, LEPMI, F-38402 St Martin Dheres, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Westinghouse sulfur process decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen in several steps. This process requires a high-temperature thermal source, which could ideally be a fourth-generation nuclear reactor for recycling compounds. The process consists of producing hydrogen in a specific electrolyzer where protons are reduced at the cathode while an oxidation reaction, in which sulfur dioxide forms sulfuric acid, takes place in the anode compartment. This type of reaction enables mass hydrogen production at a very low cell voltage because the thermodynamic oxidation potential of SO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is 0.17 V, compared with 1.23 V for the common electrolysis of water by H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} oxidation. This article describes the electrical/thermal coupling of an individual filter press electrolysis cell for the preliminary design of a future test pilot. Solving coupled equations describing heat transfer and electrokinetics in the presence of forced convective flow of a two-phase electrolyte allows charge and heat transfer to be predicted for different configurations. (authors)

  14. Analysis of geostationary satellite-derived cloud parameters associated with environments with high ice water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Adrianus; Defer, Eric; Delanoë, Julien; Dezitter, Fabien; Gounou, Amanda; Grandin, Alice; Guignard, Anthony; Fokke Meirink, Jan; Moisselin, Jean-Marc; Parol, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    We present an evaluation of the ability of passive broadband geostationary satellite measurements to detect high ice water content (IWC > 1 g m-3) as part of the European High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) project for detection of upper-atmospheric high IWC, which can be a hazard for aviation. We developed a high IWC mask based on measurements of cloud properties using the Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) algorithm applied to the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). Evaluation of the high IWC mask with satellite measurements of active remote sensors of cloud properties (CLOUDSAT/CALIPSO combined in the DARDAR (raDAR-liDAR) product) reveals that the high IWC mask is capable of detecting high IWC values > 1 g m-3 in the DARDAR profiles with a probability of detection of 60-80 %. The best CPP predictors of high IWC were the condensed water path, cloud optical thickness, cloud phase, and cloud top height. The evaluation of the high IWC mask against DARDAR provided indications that the MSG-CPP high IWC mask is more sensitive to cloud ice or cloud water in the upper part of the cloud, which is relevant for aviation purposes. Biases in the CPP results were also identified, in particular a solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence that reduces the performance of the high IWC mask for SZAs > 60°. Verification statistics show that for the detection of high IWC a trade-off has to be made between better detection of high IWC scenes and more false detections, i.e., scenes identified by the high IWC mask that do not contain IWC > 1 g m-3. However, the large majority of these detections still contain IWC values between 0.1 and 1 g m-3. Comparison of the high IWC mask against results from the Rapidly Developing Thunderstorm (RDT) algorithm applied to the same geostationary SEVIRI data showed that there are similarities and differences with the high IWC mask: the RDT algorithm is very capable of detecting young

  15. FISH GLYCOPEPTIDE AND PEPTIDE ANTIFREEZES : THEIR INTERACTION WITH ICE AND WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, P.; Devries, A.

    1987-01-01

    Glycopeptide and peptide antifreeze agents are present in the body fluids of polar fishes and allow them to avoid freezing in ice-laden seawater. These antifreezes lower the freezing point 200 times more than predicted by colligative relations, but have little effect on the melting point of ice. They bind to ice and appear to inhibit growth by increasing the curvature of growth steps on the ice crystal surface. Such a growth would result in a substantial increase in the roughness of the surfa...

  16. Dead-Ended Passive Electrolyzer with Elimination of Vapor/Liquid Separation for Life Support Oxygen Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Giner Electrochemical Systems, GES, has developed an advanced static vapor feed electrolyzer that has greatly simplified operation compared to traditional...

  17. The temporal evolution of exposed water ice-rich areas on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, A.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Tosi, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Barucci, M. A.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.; Mottola, S.; Rousseau, B.; Quirico, E.; Rinaldi, G.; Erard, S.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.

    2016-11-01

    Water ice-rich patches have been detected on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the VIRTIS (Visible InfraRed and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral imager on board the Rosetta spacecraft, since the orbital insertion in late 2014 August. Among these, three icy patches have been selected, and VIRTIS data are used to analyse their properties and their temporal evolution while the comet was moving towards the Sun. We performed an extensive analysis of the spectral parameters, and we applied the Hapke radiative transfer model to retrieve the abundance and grain size of water ice, as well as the mixing modalities of water ice and dark terrains on the three selected water ice-rich areas. Study of the spatial distribution of the spectral parameters within the ice-rich patches has revealed that water ice follows different patterns associated with a bimodal distribution of the grains: ˜50-μm sized and ˜2000-μm sized. In all three cases, after the first detections at about 3.5-au heliocentric distance, the spatial extension and intensity of the water ice spectral features increased, it reached a maximum after 60-100 d at about 3.0 au, and was followed by an approximately equally timed decrease and disappearance at about 2.2 au, before perihelion. The behaviour of the analysed patches can be assimilated to a seasonal cycle. In addition, we found evidence of short-term variability associated with a diurnal water cycle. The similar life cycle of the three icy regions indicates that water ice is uniformly distributed in the subsurface layers, and no large water ice reservoirs are present.

  18. Maximum Evaporation Rates of Water Droplets Approaching Obstacles in the Atmosphere Under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, H. H.

    1953-01-01

    When a closed body or a duct envelope moves through the atmosphere, air pressure and temperature rises occur ahead of the body or, under ram conditions, within the duct. If cloud water droplets are encountered, droplet evaporation will result because of the air-temperature rise and the relative velocity between the droplet and stagnating air. It is shown that the solution of the steady-state psychrometric equation provides evaporation rates which are the maximum possible when droplets are entrained in air moving along stagnation lines under such conditions. Calculations are made for a wide variety of water droplet diameters, ambient conditions, and flight Mach numbers. Droplet diameter, body size, and Mach number effects are found to predominate, whereas wide variation in ambient conditions are of relatively small significance in the determination of evaporation rates. The results are essentially exact for the case of movement of droplets having diameters smaller than about 30 microns along relatively long ducts (length at least several feet) or toward large obstacles (wings), since disequilibrium effects are then of little significance. Mass losses in the case of movement within ducts will often be significant fractions (one-fifth to one-half) of original droplet masses, while very small droplets within ducts will often disappear even though the entraining air is not fully stagnated. Wing-approach evaporation losses will usually be of the order of several percent of original droplet masses. Two numerical examples are given of the determination of local evaporation rates and total mass losses in cases involving cloud droplets approaching circular cylinders along stagnation lines. The cylinders chosen were of 3.95-inch (10.0+ cm) diameter and 39.5-inch 100+ cm) diameter. The smaller is representative of icing-rate measurement cylinders, while with the larger will be associated an air-flow field similar to that ahead of an airfoil having a leading-edge radius

  19. Ice for air cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, J.

    1987-04-09

    The first ice plant on an industrial scale came into service at Harmony goldmine in November 1985. This surface installation has a refrigeration output of about 5.2 MW, corresponding to 1000 t/d of ice. The ice melting tank is at a depth of 1088m. The planning and construction of this first industrial-scale ice plant were based on the result obtained from a research project which gave particular emphasis to investigating the problems related to the transport of ice in pipelines and to the ice-to-water heat transfer in ice-melting tanks. The particular advantage of ice as a coolant is that the mass circulation needed with ice is five times less than with water. It is claimed that, in the circumstances which are specific to Harmony mine, ice cooling is economically viable at a depth of only 1,100 m or thereabouts; however, calculations for very powerful cooling systems have shown that ice has a cost advantage over water + Pelton turbines only at depths of 3,000 m or more. Cost comparisons apart, this ice plant is useful for the testing of technology and safety in the production, transport and melting of the ice and prepares the way for a powerful ice cooling system which will work at great depths. 6 references.

  20. Large anomalies in lower stratospheric water vapour and ice during the 2015-2016 El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Melody A.; Davis, Sean M.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Ye, Hao; Dessler, Andrew E.

    2017-06-01

    The strong and unusual El Niño of 2015-2016 produced a remarkable perturbation to the hydrologic budget of the tropical tropopause layer (14-19 km). This region regulates stratospheric water vapour, which has a direct radiative impact on surface temperatures. To first order, the coldest tropical tropopause temperature regulates the amount of water vapour entering the stratosphere by controlling the amount of dehydration in the rising air. Here we show that tropical convective cloud ice and associated cirrus sublimating at unusually high altitudes might also have a role in stratospheric hydration. The 2015-2016 El Niño produced decadal record water vapour amounts in the tropical Western Pacific, coincident with warm tropopause temperature anomalies. In the Central Pacific, convective cloud ice was observed 2 km above the anomalously cold tropopause. A trajectory-based dehydration model based on two reanalysis temperature and wind fields can account for only about 0.5-0.6 ppmv of the ~0.9 ppmv tropical lower stratospheric moistening observed during this event. This suggests that unresolved convective dynamics and/or associated sublimation of lofted ice particles also contributed to lower stratospheric moistening. These observations suggest that convective moistening could contribute to future climate change-induced stratospheric water vapour increases.

  1. A Novel Concrete-Based Sensor for Detection of Ice and Water on Roads and Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, Habib; Aljuboori, Mohammed

    2017-12-14

    Hundreds of people are killed or injured annually in the United States in accidents related to ice formation on roadways and bridge decks. In this paper, a novel embedded sensor system is proposed for the detection of black ice as well as wet, dry, and frozen pavement conditions on roads, runways, and bridges. The proposed sensor works by detecting changes in electrical resistance between two sets of stainless steel poles embedded in the concrete sensor to assess surface and near-surface conditions. A preliminary decision algorithm is developed that utilizes sensor outputs indicating resistance changes and surface temperature. The sensor consists of a 102-mm-diameter, 38-mm-high, concrete cylinder. Laboratory results indicate that the proposed sensor can effectively detect surface ice and wet conditions even in the presence of deicing chlorides and rubber residue. This sensor can further distinguish black ice from ice that may exist within concrete pores.

  2. A Novel Concrete-Based Sensor for Detection of Ice and Water on Roads and Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Tabatabai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of people are killed or injured annually in the United States in accidents related to ice formation on roadways and bridge decks. In this paper, a novel embedded sensor system is proposed for the detection of black ice as well as wet, dry, and frozen pavement conditions on roads, runways, and bridges. The proposed sensor works by detecting changes in electrical resistance between two sets of stainless steel poles embedded in the concrete sensor to assess surface and near-surface conditions. A preliminary decision algorithm is developed that utilizes sensor outputs indicating resistance changes and surface temperature. The sensor consists of a 102-mm-diameter, 38-mm-high, concrete cylinder. Laboratory results indicate that the proposed sensor can effectively detect surface ice and wet conditions even in the presence of deicing chlorides and rubber residue. This sensor can further distinguish black ice from ice that may exist within concrete pores.

  3. Laboratory and modeling studies on the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on the properties of contrail ice particles in the jet regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and contrail-induced cirrus clouds are identified as the most uncertain components in determining aviation impacts on global climate change. Parameters affecting contrail ice particle formation immediately after the engine exit plane (< 5 s in plume age may be critical to ice particle properties used in large-scale models predicting contrail radiative forcing. Despite this, detailed understanding of these parametric effects is still limited. In this paper, we present results from recent laboratory and modeling studies conducted to investigate the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on near-field formation of contrail ice particles and ice particle properties. The Particle Aerosol Laboratory (PAL at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Aerodyne microphysical parcel model for contrail ice particle formation were employed. Our studies show that exhaust water concentration has a significant impact on contrail ice particle formation and properties. When soot particles were introduced, ice particle formation was observed only when exhaust water concentration was above a critical level. When no soot or sulfuric acid was introduced, no ice particle formation was observed, suggesting that ice particle formation from homogeneous nucleation followed by homogeneous freezing of liquid water was unfavorable. Soot particles were found to compete for water vapor condensation, and higher soot concentrations emitted into the chamber resulted in smaller ice particles being formed. Chamber conditions corresponding to higher cruising altitudes were found to favor ice particle formation. The microphysical model captures trends of particle extinction measurements well, but discrepancies between the model and the optical particle counter measurements exist as the model predicts narrower ice particle size distributions and ice particle sizes nearly a factor of two larger than measured. These discrepancies are likely due to particle

  4. Islands erased by snow and ice: approaching the spatial philosophy of cold water island imaginaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Riquet

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Representations of islands in Western fiction typically revolve around tropical islands. Critical discourse tends to reproduce this tendency and rarely addresses the specific spatial poetics of cold-water island fictions. This paper discusses three texts that poetically deploy the geographical inventory of northern snow- and icescapes to challenge essentialist assumptions about islands: D. H. Lawrence’s short story “The man who loved islands”, Georgina Harding’s novel The solitude of Thomas Cave, and Michel Serres’s treatise Le passage du Nord-Ouest. It is argued that these texts reflect on the importance of the horizontal and vertical components of material and textual topographies for the conception and experience of islands. In all three, the physical transformation of the islandscapes by snow and ice serves to put the island concept itself into question. Serres’s philosophical text geopoetically portrays the Arctic archipelago of the Northwest Passage to explore the reciprocal relations between language and the material world. In Lawrence and Harding, the snow-covered islands cease to function as economically productive spaces and turn into complex spatial figures offering a philosophical meditation on islandness as a contradictory and multifaceted condition.

  5. BET 2: Ice water immersion, other vagal manoeuvres or adenosine for SVT in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Marion; Buitrago, Silvia Ruiz

    2017-01-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether a vagal manoeuvre was better than or as good as adenosine at safely terminating supraventricular tachycardia in children. Forty unique papers were found in Medline and Embase using the reported searches, of which five were relevant. A hand search of the forty unique citations identified a further nine relevant papers. Thus, 14 papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. It is concluded that the evidence on the management of SVT in children is made up of poor-quality retrospective cohort studies or case series. This best evidence shows that ice water to the face appears to be a safe, quick, effective and non-invasive treatment for paediatric SVT. Adenosine also appears safe and effective, but is more invasive. Valsalva and carotid sinus massage are less effective. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Development of EarthCARE/MSI ice and water cloud properties products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, S.; Nagao, T. M.; Ishida, H.; Letu, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds and aerosols are the major uncertainty in the understanding of the Earth's climate system. An improvement of understanding and better modeling of the relationship of clouds, aerosols and radiation are therefore prominent part in climate research and weather prediction. It is important to obtain the global data of clouds and aerosols occurrence, structure and physical properties that are derived from measurements of solar and thermal radiation. EarthCARE (Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer) is one of the future earth observation mission of ESA and JAXA. The satellite will carry four instruments for observation of clouds and aerosols; Atmospheric Lidar (ATLID), Cloud Profiling Rader (CPR), Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI), and Broad-Band Radiometer (BBR). This mission aims at understanding of the role that clouds and aerosols play in reflecting incident solar radiation back into space and trapping infrared radiation emitted from Earth's surface. These observations are needed to improve the precision of climate variability prediction. MSI provides across-track information on cloud with channels in the visible, near infrared, shortwave and thermal infrared. Water cloud optical properties are derived in using EarthCARE/MSI standard product based on CLAUDIA [Ishida and Nakajima, 2009] and CAPCOM [Nakajima and Nakajima, 1995; Kawamoto et al., 2001]. Research product based on MWP method [M. Hashimoto, 2015. PhD Thesis] is advanced to obtain the ice cloud optical properties. In this presentation, development of the products and retrieved cloud properties will be introduced.

  7. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice - implications for pCO(2) and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, Ronnie N.; Lennert, Kunuk

    2012-01-01

    that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km(2) (0.5-1m thick) drifting ice floe......, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO(2) in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air-sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m(-2) sea ice d(-1) or to 3.3 ton km(-2) ice floe week(-1). This is markedly higher than the estimated...... primary production within the ice floe of 0.3-1.3 mmol m(-2) sea ice d(-1). Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO(2) uptake...

  8. Corrosion resistance and surface characterization of electrolyzed Ti-Ni alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Osamu; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Doi, Hisashi; Hanawa, Takao

    2006-03-01

    Ti-Ni alloy has been increasingly applied to medical and dental devices, such as coronary stents and orthodontic wires. This alloy contains nickel, which is known to give rise to cytotoxicity, metal allergy, and carcinogenicity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to improve the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ni alloy by electrolytic treatment, whereby investigation was carried out using different acidic electrolyte compositions. As a result, specimens electrolyzed with lactic acid, water, and glycerol were found to show higher corrosion potential and release lower amount of titanium and nickel ions than mechanical-polished specimens (ptreatment, nickel concentration in the surface oxide layer of Ti-Ni alloy decreased, and the thickness of the surface oxide layer increased. Based on the results of this study, it was shown that electrolytic treatment with suitable electrolyte could improve the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ni alloy, which is effective to produce medical and dental devices that utilize shape memory effect or superelasticity with better biocompatibility.

  9. Experimental determination of salt partition coefficients between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII: implication for the composition of the deep ocean and the geodynamics of large icy moons and water rich planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journaux, Baptiste; Daniel, Isabelle; Cardon, Hervé; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Caracas, Razvan; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    The potential habitability of extraterrestrial large aqueous reservoir in icy moons and exoplanets requires an input of nutrients and chemicals that may come from the rocky part of planetary body. Because of the presence of high pressure (HP) water ices (VI, VII, etc.) between the liquid ocean and the silicates, such interactions are considered to be limited in large icy moons, like Ganymede and Titan, and water rich exoplanets. In the case of salty-rich oceans, recent experimental and modeling works have shown that aqueous fluids can be stable at higher pressures [1, 2]. This can ultimately allow direct interaction with the rocky core of icy moons. This effect is nevertheless limited and for larger bodies such as water rich exoplanets with much higher pressures in their hydrosphere, HP ice should be present between the rocky core and a putative ocean. Salts are highly incompatible with low pressure ice Ih, but recent experimental work has shown that alkali metal and halogen salts are moderately incompatible with ice VII, that can incorporate up to several mol/kg of salts [3, 4, 5]. As far as we know, no similar study has been done on ice VI, a HP ice phase expected inside large icy moons. We present here the first experimental data on the partition coefficient of RbI salt between aqueous fluids, ice VI and ice VII using in-situ synchrotron X-Ray single crystal diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence mapping (ESRF - ID-27 beam line [6]). Our experiment enable us to observe a density inversion between ice VI and the salty fluid, and to measure the values of salt partition coefficients between the aqueous fluid and ice VI (strongly incompatible) and ice VII (moderately incompatible). Using the volumes determined with X-Ray diffraction, we were able to measure the density of salty ice VI and ice VII and determine that salty ice VI is lighter than pure H2O ice VI. These results are very relevant for the study of water rich planetary bodies interior because the partition

  10. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  11. Postexercise Impact of Ice-Cold Water Bath on the Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance in Healthy Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Sutkowy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of a 5 min head-out ice-cold water bath on the oxidant-antioxidant balance in response to exercise. The crossover study included the subjects (n=24; aged 28.7±7.3 years who performed two identical stationary cycling bouts for 30 min and recovered for 10 min at room temperature (RT=20°C; session 1 or in a pool with ice-cold water (ICW=3°C, 5 min immersion; session 2. The concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS in blood plasma (TBARSpl and erythrocytes (TBARSer and the erythrocytic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were measured three times during each of the two study sessions: before the exercise (baseline and 20 and 40 min after the appropriate recovery session. Lower concentration of TBARSpl 40 min after postexercise recovery in ICW was revealed as compared with that after recovery at RT (P<0.05. Moreover, a statistically significant postexercise increase in the TBARSpl and TBARSer concentrations was found (P<0.01 and P<0.05, resp.. A short-term ice-cold water bath decreases postexercise lipid peroxidation.

  12. Geostatistical analysis and isoscape of ice core derived water stable isotope records in an Antarctic macro region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani, István Gábor; Leuenberger, Markus; Kohán, Balázs; Kern, Zoltán

    2017-09-01

    Water stable isotopes preserved in ice cores provide essential information about polar precipitation. In the present study, multivariate regression and variogram analyses were conducted on 22 δ2H and 53 δ18O records from 60 ice cores covering the second half of the 20th century. Taking the multicollinearity of the explanatory variables into account, as also the model's adjusted R2 and its mean absolute error, longitude, elevation and distance from the coast were found to be the main independent geographical driving factors governing the spatial δ18O variability of firn/ice in the chosen Antarctic macro region. After diminishing the effects of these factors, using variography, the weights for interpolation with kriging were obtained and the spatial autocorrelation structure of the dataset was revealed. This indicates an average area of influence with a radius of 350 km. This allows the determination of the areas which are as yet not covered by the spatial variability of the existing network of ice cores. Finally, the regional isoscape was obtained for the study area, and this may be considered the first step towards a geostatistically improved isoscape for Antarctica.

  13. The Influence of Platelet Ice and Snow on Antarctic Land-fast Sea Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppmann, Mario; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Sea ice fastened to coasts, icebergs and ice shelves is of crucial importance for climate- and ecosystems. Near Antarctic ice shelves, this land-fast sea ice exhibits two unique characteristics that distinguish it from most other sea ice: 1) Ice platelets form and grow in super-cooled water, which originates from ice shelf cavities. The crystals accumulate beneath the solid sea-ice cover and are incorporated into the sea-ice fabric, contributing between 10 and 60% to the mas...

  14. Basal melt, seasonal water mass transformation, ocean current variability, and deep convection processes along the Amery Ice Shelf calving front, East Antarctica}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz Borreguero, Laura; Church, John A.; Alison, Ian; Peña Molino, Beatriz; Coleman, Richard; Tomczak, Mathias; Craven, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Despite the Amery Ice Shelf (AIS) being the third largest ice shelf in Antarctica, the seasonal variability of the physical processes involved in the AIS-ocean interaction remains undocumented and a robust observational, oceanographic-based basal melt rate estimate has been lacking. Here we use year-long time series of water column temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities measured along the ice shelf front from 2001 to 2002. Our results show strong zonal variations in the distribution of water masses along the ice shelf front: modified Circumpolar Deep Water (mCDW) arrives in the east, while in the west, Ice Shelf Water (ISW) and Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formed in the Mackenzie polynya dominate the water column. Baroclinic eddies, formed during winter deep convection (down to 1100 m), drive the inflow of DSW into the ice shelf cavity. Our net basal melt rate estimate is 57.4±25.3 Gt yr?1 (1±0.4 m yr?1), larger than previous modeling-based and glaciological-based estimates, and results from the inflow of DSW (0.52±0.38 Sv; 1 Sv=106 m3 s?1) and mCDW (0.22±0.06 Sv) into the cavity. Our results highlight the role of the Mackenzie polynya in the seasonal exchange of water masses across the ice shelf front, and the role of the ISW in controlling the formation rate and thermohaline properties of DSW. These two processes directly impact on the ice shelf mass balance, and on the contribution of DSW/ISW to the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water.

  15. HIRDLS-MLS/Aura Level 3 Ice Water Content V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HIRMLS3IWC is the Joint EOS High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) monthly 10 deg lat x 20 deg lon gridded product for ice...

  16. Advanced Radiometer For Cloud Liquid Water and Aircraft Icing Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft icing continues to be one of the major safety and operational concerns of the FAA, elements of the military, and the foreign military and civilian...

  17. Impact of water and ice 1h formation in a photonic crystal fiber grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, C.; Canning, J.; Kristensen, M.; Groothoff, N.

    2006-03-01

    The impact of ice 1h formation inside the holes of a photonic crystal fiber Bragg grating was analyzed and discussed. As a result of the ice's expansion, a broadening of the grating spectrum was observed that corresponds to internal microbending of the fiber and after some temperature cycling leads to failure of the fiber. An analytical model with which to estimate the internal compression forces is proposed, and the calculated values are found to be in agreement with reported data.

  18. Impact of water and ice 1h formation in a photonic crystal fiber grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, C; Canning, J; Kristensen, M; Groothoff, N

    2006-03-15

    The impact of ice 1h formation inside the holes of a photonic crystal fiber Bragg grating was analyzed and discussed. As a result of the ice's expansion, a broadening of the grating spectrum was observed that corresponds to internal microbending of the fiber and after some temperature cycling leads to failure of the fiber. An analytical model with which to estimate the internal compression forces is proposed, and the calculated values are found to be in agreement with reported data.

  19. A Novel Concrete-Based Sensor for Detection of Ice and Water on Roads and Bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Tabatabai, Habib; Aljuboori, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Hundreds of people are killed or injured annually in the United States in accidents related to ice formation on roadways and bridge decks. In this paper, a novel embedded sensor system is proposed for the detection of black ice as well as wet, dry, and frozen pavement conditions on roads, runways, and bridges. The proposed sensor works by detecting changes in electrical resistance between two sets of stainless steel poles embedded in the concrete sensor to assess surface and near-surface cond...

  20. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  1. An Assessment of Southern Ocean Water Masses and Sea Ice During 1988-2007 in a Suite of Interannual CORE-II Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Stephanie M.; Farneti, Riccardo; Uotila, Petteri; Griffies, Stephen M.; Marsland, Simon J.; Bailey, David; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; hide

    2015-01-01

    We characterise the representation of the Southern Ocean water mass structure and sea ice within a suite of 15 global ocean-ice models run with the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment Phase II (CORE-II) protocol. The main focus is the representation of the present (1988-2007) mode and intermediate waters, thus framing an analysis of winter and summer mixed layer depths; temperature, salinity, and potential vorticity structure; and temporal variability of sea ice distributions. We also consider the interannual variability over the same 20 year period. Comparisons are made between models as well as to observation-based analyses where available. The CORE-II models exhibit several biases relative to Southern Ocean observations, including an underestimation of the model mean mixed layer depths of mode and intermediate water masses in March (associated with greater ocean surface heat gain), and an overestimation in September (associated with greater high latitude ocean heat loss and a more northward winter sea-ice extent). In addition, the models have cold and fresh/warm and salty water column biases centred near 50 deg S. Over the 1988-2007 period, the CORE-II models consistently simulate spatially variable trends in sea-ice concentration, surface freshwater fluxes, mixed layer depths, and 200-700 m ocean heat content. In particular, sea-ice coverage around most of the Antarctic continental shelf is reduced, leading to a cooling and freshening of the near surface waters. The shoaling of the mixed layer is associated with increased surface buoyancy gain, except in the Pacific where sea ice is also influential. The models are in disagreement, despite the common CORE-II atmospheric state, in their spatial pattern of the 20-year trends in the mixed layer depth and sea-ice.

  2. X-ray absorption and infrared spectra of water and ice: A first-principles electronic structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei

    Water is of essential importance for chemistry and biology, yet the physics concerning many of its distinctive properties is not well known. In this thesis we present a theoretical study of the x-ray absorption (XA) and infrared (IR) spectra of water in liquid and solid phase. Our theoretical tools are the density functional theory (DFT), Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD), and the so-called GW method. Since a systematic review of these ab initio methods is not the task of this thesis, we only briefly recall the main concepts of these methods as needed in the course of our exposition. The focus is, instead, an investigation of what is the important physics necessary for a better description of these excitation processes, in particular, core electron excitations (in XA) that reveal the local electronic structure, and vibrational excitations (in IR) associated to the molecular dynamics. The most interesting question we are trying to answer is: as we include better approximations and more complete physical descriptions of these processes, how do the aforementioned spectra reflect the underlying hydrogen-bonding network of water? The first part of this thesis consists of the first four chapters, which focus on the study of core level excitation of water and ice. The x-ray absorption spectra of water and ice are calculated with a many-body approach for electron-hole excitations. The experimental features, even the small effects of a temperature change in the liquid, are reproduced with quantitative detail using molecular configurations generated by ab initio molecular dynamics. We find that the spectral shape is controlled by two major modifications of the short range order that mark the transition from ice to water. One is associated to dynamic breaking of the hydrogen bonds which leads to a strong enhancement of the pre-edge intensity in the liquid. The other is due to densification, which follows the partial collapse of the hydrogen bond network and is

  3. Open-water and under-ice seasonal variations in trace element content and physicochemical associations in fluvial bed sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Lorne E; Carr, Meghan K; Meissner, Anna G N; Jardine, Tim D; Jones, Paul D; Bharadwaj, Lalita; Lindenschmidt, Karl-Erich

    2017-11-01

    Across the circumpolar world, intensive anthropogenic activities in the southern reaches of many large, northward-flowing rivers can cause sediment contamination in the downstream depositional environment. The influence of ice cover on concentrations of inorganic contaminants in bed sediment (i.e., sediment quality) is unknown in these rivers, where winter is the dominant season. A geomorphic response unit approach was used to select hydraulically diverse sampling sites across a northern test-case system, the Slave River and delta (Northwest Territories, Canada). Surface sediment samples (top 1 cm) were collected from 6 predefined geomorphic response units (12 sites) to assess the relationships between bed sediment physicochemistry (particle size distribution and total organic carbon content) and trace element content (mercury and 18 other trace elements) during open-water conditions. A subset of sites was resampled under-ice to assess the influence of season on these relationships and on total trace element content. Concentrations of the majority of trace elements were strongly correlated with percent fines and proxies for grain size (aluminum and iron), with similar trace element grain size/grain size proxy relationships between seasons. However, finer materials were deposited under ice with associated increases in sediment total organic carbon content and the concentrations of most trace elements investigated. The geomorphic response unit approach was effective at identifying diverse hydrological environments for sampling prior to field operations. Our data demonstrate the need for under-ice sampling to confirm year-round consistency in trace element-geochemical relationships in fluvial systems and to define the upper extremes of these relationships. Whether contaminated or not, under-ice bed sediment can represent a "worst-case" scenario in terms of trace element concentrations and exposure for sediment-associated organisms in northern fluvial systems

  4. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, R.N.; Lennert, K.

    2012-01-01

    chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO 2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km 2 (0.5-1 m thick) drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait...... during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced...... within the ice floe of 0.3-1.3 mmol m -2 sea ice d -1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO 2 uptake. © Author(s) 2012....

  5. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  6. Effectiveness of a chemical herder in association with in-situ burning of oil spills in ice-infested water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-02-15

    The average herded slick thickness, surface distribution and burning efficiency of a light crude oil were studied in ice-infested water to determine the effectiveness of a chemical herder in facilitating the in-situ burning of oil. Experiments were performed in a small scale (1.0m2) and an intermediate scale (19m2) setup with open water and 3/10, 5/10 and 7/10 brash ice coverages. The herded slick thicknesses (3-8mm) were ignitable in each experiment. The presence of ice caused fracturing of the oil during the herding process, which reduced the size of the herded slicks and, as a consequence, their ignitability, which in turn decreased the burning efficiency. Burning efficiencies relative to the ignited fraction of the oil were in the expected range (42-86%). This shows that the herder will be an effective tool for in-situ burning of oil when the ignitability issues due to fracturing of the oil are resolved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pronounced anomalies of air, water, ice conditions in the Barents and Kara Seas, and the Sea of Azov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady G. Matishov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the anomalous hydrometeorological situation that occurred at the beginning of 2012 in the seas of the Russian Arctic and Russian South. Atmospheric blocking in the temperate zone and the extension of the Siberian High to the Iberian Peninsula (known as the Voeikov et al. axis led to a positive anomaly of air and water temperatures and a decrease in the ice extent in the Barents and Kara Seas. At the same time a prolonged negative air temperature anomaly was recorded in central and southern Europe and led to anomalously severe ice conditions in the Sea of Azov. Winter hydrographic conditions in the Barents and Kara Seas are illustrated by a unique set of observations made using expendable bathythermosalinographs (XCTD.

  8. On the observation of unusual high concentration of small chain-like aggregate ice crystals and large ice water contents near the top of a deep convective cloud during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Gayet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the CIRCLE-2 experiment carried out over Western Europe in May 2007, combined in situ and remote sensing observations allowed to describe microphysical and optical properties near-top of an overshooting convective cloud (11 080 m/−58 °C. The airborne measurements were performed with the DLR Falcon aircraft specially equipped with a unique set of instruments for the extensive in situ cloud measurements of microphysical and optical properties (Polar Nephelometer, FSSP-300, Cloud Particle Imager and PMS 2-D-C and nadir looking remote sensing observations (DLR WALES Lidar. Quasi-simultaneous space observations from MSG/SEVIRI, CALIPSO/CALIOP-WFC-IIR and CloudSat/CPR combined with airborne RASTA radar reflectivity from the French Falcon aircraft flying above the DLR Falcon depict very well convective cells which overshoot by up to 600 m the tropopause level. Unusual high values of the concentration of small ice particles, extinction, ice water content (up to 70 cm−3, 30 km−1 and 0.5 g m−3, respectively are experienced. The mean effective diameter and the maximum particle size are 43 μm and about 300 μm, respectively. This very dense cloud causes a strong attenuation of the WALES and CALIOP lidar returns. The SEVIRI retrieved parameters confirm the occurrence of small ice crystals at the top of the convective cell. Smooth and featureless phase functions with asymmetry factors of 0.776 indicate fairly uniform optical properties. Due to small ice crystals the power-law relationship between ice water content (IWC and radar reflectivity appears to be very different from those usually found in cirrus and anvil clouds. For a given equivalent reflectivity factor, IWCs are significantly larger for the overshooting cell than for the cirrus. Assuming the same prevalent microphysical properties over the depth of the overshooting cell, RASTA reflectivity profiles scaled into ice water content show that retrieved

  9. Diurnal variations of humidity and ice water content in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Observational results of diurnal variations of humidity from Odin-SMR and AURA-MLS, and cloud ice mass from Odin-SMR and CloudSat are presented for the first time. Comparisons show that the retrievals of humidity and cloud ice from these two satellite combinations are in good agreement. The retrieved data are combined from four almost evenly distributed times of the day allowing mean values, amplitudes and phases of the diurnal variations around 200 hpa to be estimated. This analysis is applied to six climatologically distinct regions, five located in the tropics and one over the subtropical northern Pacific Ocean. The strongest diurnal cycles are found over tropical land regions, where the amplitude is ~7 RHi for humidity and ~50% for ice mass. The greatest ice mass for these regions is found during the afternoon, and the humidity maximum is observed to lag this peak by ~6 h. Over tropical ocean regions the variations are smaller and the maxima in both ice mass and humidity are found during the early morning. Observed results are compared with output from three climate models (ECHAM, EC-EARTH and CAM3. Direct measurement-model comparisons were not possible because the measured and modelled cloud ice masses represent different quantities. To make a meaningful comparison, the amount of snow had to be estimated from diagnostic parameters of the models. There is a high probability that the models underestimate the average ice mass (outside the 1-σ uncertainty. The models also show clear deficiencies when it comes to amplitude and phase of the regional variations, but to varying degrees.

  10. High Performance Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) for Space Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Billings, Keith J.; Kisor, Adam; Bennett, William R.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Burke, Kenneth; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative fuel cells provide a pathway to energy storage system development that are game changers for NASA missions. The fuel cell/ electrolysis MEA performance requirements 0.92 V/ 1.44 V at 200 mA/cm2 can be met. Fuel Cell MEAs have been incorporated into advanced NFT stacks. Electrolyzer stack development in progress. Fuel Cell MEA performance is a strong function of membrane selection, membrane selection will be driven by durability requirements. Electrolyzer MEA performance is catalysts driven, catalyst selection will be driven by durability requirements. Round Trip Efficiency, based on a cell performance, is approximately 65%.

  11. Effects of sea-ice light attenuation and CDOM absorption in the water below the Eurasian sector of central Arctic Ocean (> 880N)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Lars Chresten; Markager, Stiig; Hancke, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    -year and first-year PAR transmittances. In spite of this low under-ice PAR, only 3% of the transmitted PAR through the ice was absorbed by phytoplankton in the water. On average, chlorophyll-a concentrations were low (0.34±0.69 SD mg chl-a m−3) in the water compared to the high (a375=0.52 m−1) coloured dissolved...... organic matter (CDOM) absorption coefficient with a strong terrestrial optical signature. Two distinct clusters of stations with waters of Pacific and North Atlantic origin were identified based on significant differences in temperature, salinity and CDOM absorption coefficient between water masses...

  12. Experimental Water Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils, Simulated Ice Shapes, an Engine Inlet and a Finite Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, M.; Breer, M.; Craig, N.; Liu, X.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Experimental impingement efficiency data represented for a NLF (1)-0414 airfoil, a swept MS (1)-0317 airfoil, a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model, two simulated ice shapes and a swept NACA 0012 wingtip. Analytical impingement efficiency data are also presented for the NLF (1)-0414 airfoil and the Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  13. Using a Flying Thing in the Sky to See How Much Water is in the Cover of Tiny Ice Pieces in the High Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, M.

    2016-12-01

    Groups of tiny ice pieces fall from the sky in the cold times and cover the high places. Later, the tiny ice pieces become water that moves to the lower places, where people can use it for drinking and stuff. The time when the tiny ice pieces turn to water is controlled by the sun. New tiny ice pieces from the sky, which are very white and don't take up much sun, group up and grow tall. When they become dark from getting old and large, and from getting covered in tiny dark bits from the sky, they take up more sun and turn to water. The more tiny dark bits, the faster they become water. Using a flying thing over the high places we can see how much water will come from the cover of tiny ice pieces by using ground looking things to see how tall it is, and and when it will become water by using picture taking things to see how much sun is taken up. The low places are happy to know how much water is in the high places.

  14. Measurements of the Ice Water Content of Cirrus in the Tropics and Subtropics. I; Instrument Details and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D.; Pittman, J. V.; Allen, N.; Demusz, J.; Greenberg, M.; Rivero, M.; Anderson, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe an instrument mounted in a pallet on the NASA WB-57 aircraft that is designed to measure the sum of gas phase and solid phase water, or total water, in cirrus clouds. Using an isokinetic inlet, a 600-watt heater mounted directly in the flow, and Lyman-alpha photofragment fluorescence technique for detection, accurate measurements of total water have been made over almost three orders of magnitude. Isokinetic flow is achieved with an actively controlled roots pump by referencing aircraft pressure, temperature, and true air speed, together with instrument flow velocity, temperature, and pressure. During CRYSTAL FACE, the instrument operated at duct temperatures sufficiently warm to completely evaporate particles up to 150 microns diameter. In flight diagnostics, intercomparison with water measured by absorption in flight, as well as intercomparisons in clear air with water vapor measured by the Harvard water vapor instrument and the JPL infrared tunable diode laser hygrometer validate the detection sensitivity of the instrument and illustrate minimal hysteresis from instrument surfaces. The simultaneous measurement of total water and water vapor in cirrus clouds yields their ice water content.

  15. On laboratory simulation and the effect of small temperature oscillations about the freezing point and ice formation on the evaporation rate of water on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Shauntae R; Sears, Derek W G

    2006-08-01

    We report measurements of the evaporation rate of water under Mars-like conditions (CO2 atmosphere at 7 mbar and approximately 0 degrees C) in which small temperature oscillations about the freezing point repeatedly formed and removed a thin layer of ice. We found that the average evaporation at 2.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C without an ice layer (corrected for the difference in gravity on Earth and on Mars) was 1.24 +/- 0.12 mm/h, while at -2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C with an ice layer the average evaporation rate was 0.84 +/- 0.08 mm/h. These values are in good agreement with those calculated for the evaporation of liquid water and ice when it is assumed that evaporation only depends on diffusion and buoyancy. Our findings suggest that such differences in evaporation rates are entirely due to the temperature difference and that the ice layer has little effect on evaporation rate. We infer that the formation of thin layers of ice on pools of water on Mars does not significantly increase the stability of water on the surface of Mars.

  16. Water and methanol in low-mass protostellar outflows: gas-phase synthesis, ice sputtering and destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suutarinen, A. N.; Kristensen, L. E.; Mottram, J. C.; Fraser, H. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2014-05-01

    Water in outflows from protostars originates either as a result of gas-phase synthesis from atomic oxygen at T ≳ 200 K, or from sputtered ice mantles containing water ice. We aim to quantify the contribution of the two mechanisms that lead to water in outflows, by comparing observations of gas-phase water to methanol (a grain surface product) towards three low-mass protostars in NGC 1333. In doing so, we also quantify the amount of methanol destroyed in outflows. To do this, we make use of James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and Herschel-Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared data of H2O, CH3OH and CO emission lines and compare them to RADEX non-local thermodynamic equilibrium excitation simulations. We find up to one order of magnitude decrease in the column density ratio of CH3OH over H2O as the velocity increases in the line wings up to ˜15 km s-1. An independent decrease in X(CH3OH) with respect to CO of up to one order of magnitude is also found in these objects. We conclude that gas-phase formation of H2O must be active at high velocities (above 10 km s-1 relative to the source velocity) to re-form the water destroyed during sputtering. In addition, the transition from sputtered water at low velocities to form water at high velocities must be gradual. We place an upper limit of two orders of magnitude on the destruction of methanol by sputtering effects.

  17. Effect of cryotherapy on the ankle temperature in athletes: ice pack and cold water immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Batista da Costa Santos

    Full Text Available Introduction Cryotherapy is often used for rehabilitation of injured athletes. Objective To compare the effectiveness of ice pack (IP and cold water immersion (CWI on lowering the ankle skin surface temperature in athletes. Materials and methods Thirteen athletes (seven women and six men, age 19.53 (± 2.9 years. IP and CWI were applied on the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL of the dominant leg for 30 minutes. The skin surface temperature was measured with an infrared digital thermometer prior to the application and during cryotherapy (10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes and up to two hours of rewarming. During rewarming, the athletes remained at rest and the temperature was measured every 1 minute until 10 minutes, every 5 minutes for up to an hour and every 15 minutes until 2 hours. Results The two types of cold application were effective in lowering the skin surface temperature after the 30-minute procedure. Significant differences were observed among the following temperatures: pre-application (IP = 29.8 ± 2.4 °C and CWI = 27.5 ± 3 °C – P < 0.05; after 30 minutes (IP = 5 ± 2.4 °C and CWI = 7.8 ± 3 °C – P < 0.01. For rewarming, after 25 minutes (IP = 20.8 ± 3.3 °C and CWI = 18.2 ± 2.7 °C – P < 0.04; after 45 minutes (IP = 24.5 ± 2.3 °C and IP = 22.1 ± 3.5 °C – P < 0.05; after 75 minutes (IP = 26.4 ± 2.2 °C and CWI = 24 ± 2.7 °C – P < 0.02. Conclusion After the 30-minute application, both IP and CWI produced the appropriate temperature; however the application of CWI produced the lowest temperature during rewarming.

  18. Ice water content of Arctic, midlatitude, and tropical cirrus – Part 2: Extension of the database and new statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Luebke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ice clouds are known to be major contributors to radiative forcing in the Earth's atmosphere, yet describing their microphysical properties in climate models remains challenging. Among these properties, the ice water content (IWC of cirrus clouds is of particular interest both because it is measurable and because it can be directly related to a number of other radiatively important variables such as extinction and effective radius. This study expands upon the work of Schiller et al. (2008, extending a climatology of IWC by combining datasets from several European and US airborne campaigns and ground-based lidar measurements over Jülich, Germany. The relationship between IWC and temperature is further investigated using the new merged dataset and probability distribution functions (PDFs. A PDF-based formulation allows for representation of not only the mean values of IWC, but also the variability of IWC within a temperature band. The IWC-PDFs are observed to be bimodal over the whole cirrus temperature range. This bimodality is also found in ice crystal number PDFs and might be attributed to different cirrus formation mechanisms such as heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing.

  19. Preliminary observations of voluminous ice-rich and water-rich lahars generated during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Major, Jon J.; Scott, William E.

    2012-01-01

    juvenile andesite. We infer that the lahars generated on March 23 were initiated by a rapid succession of vent-clearing explosions that blasted through about 50–100 m of crater-filling glacier ice and snow, producing a voluminous release of meltwater from the Drift glacier. The resulting flood eroded and entrained snow, fragments of glacier and river ice, and liquid water along its flow path. Small-volume pyroclastic flows, possibly associated with destruction of a small dome or minor eruption-column collapses, may have contributed additional meltwater to the lahar. Meltwater generated by subglacial hydrothermal activity and stored beneath the Drift glacier may have been ejected or released rapidly as well. The April 4 lahar was initiated when hot dome-collapse pyroclastic flows entrained and swiftly melted snow and ice, and incorporated additional rock debris from the Drift glacier. The peak discharge of the April 4 lahar was in the range of 60,000–160,000 m3s-1. For comparison, the largest lahar of the 1989–90 eruption had a peak discharge of about 80,000 m3s-1. Lahars generated by the 2009 eruption led to significant channel aggradation in the lower Drift River valley and caused extensive inundation at an oil storage and transfer facility located there. The April 4, 2009, lahar was 6–30 times larger than the largest meteorological floods known or estimated in the Drift River drainage.

  20. Reconstructing the history of water ice formation from HDO/H2O and D2O/HDO ratios in protostellar cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Aikawa, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Recent interferometer observations have found that the D2O/HDO abundance ratio is higher than that of HDO/H2O by about one order of magnitude in the vicinity of low-mass protostar NGC 1333-IRAS 2A, where water ice has sublimated. Previous laboratory and theoretical studies show that the D2O/HDO ice ratio should be lower than the HDO/H2O ice ratio, if HDO and D2O ices are formed simultaneously with H2O ice. In this work, we propose that the observed feature, D2O/HDO > HDO/H2O, is a natural consequence of chemical evolution in the early cold stages of low-mass star formation as follows: 1) majority of oxygen is locked up in water ice and other molecules in molecular clouds, where water deuteration is not efficient; and 2) water ice formation continues with much reduced efficiency in cold prestellar/protostellar cores, where deuteration processes are highly enhanced as a result of the drop of the ortho-para ratio of H2, the weaker UV radiation field, etc. Using a simple analytical model and gas-ice astrochemical simulations, which traces the evolution from the formation of molecular clouds to protostellar cores, we show that the proposed scenario can quantitatively explain the observed HDO/H2O and D2O/HDO ratios. We also find that the majority of HDO and D2O ices are likely formed in cold prestellar/protostellar cores rather than in molecular clouds, where the majority of H2O ice is formed. This work demonstrates the power of the combination of the HDO/H2O and D2O/HDO ratios as a tool to reveal the past history of water ice formation in the early cold stages of star formation, and when the enrichment of deuterium in the bulk of water occurred. Further observations are needed to explore if the relation, D2O/HDO > HDO/H2O, is common in low-mass protostellar sources.

  1. Evidence of a warm early instrumental period found in temperature related water isotope records from high elevation Alpine ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohleber, Pascal; Schöner, Wolfgang; Wagenbach, Dietmar

    2015-04-01

    The variability of water isotopes (delta-O18 or delta-D) preserved in Alpine glacier ice may provide mid-latitude temperature proxy records supplementing respective information from other archives. In order to archive long term records (i.e. exceeding 100 years) the limited glacier depth at suitable Alpine drill sites requires a relatively low net accumulation rate. In this respect, the cold glacier saddle Colle Gnifetti (CG) is the unique drilling site in the European Alps offering ice core records substantially exceeding the instrumental period. However, the unique low net accumulation at CG is characterised by strong spatio-temporal variability causing depositional noise that strongly challenges the interpretation of the ice core isotope records in terms of net temperature change. Here we present our findings from comparing stable water isotope records of the CG multi core array to a site-specific temperature time series. The latter is synthesized from high elevation stations of the instrumental HISTALP network considering among others the temperature shift from the accumulation bias towards growing seasons. Within the last century dedicated time series analysis reveals a common signal in the (supra-) decadal components of the instrumental temperature and isotope records. Extending the comparison over the entire 250 years instrumental period, systematic discrepancies are found within the early instrumental period (EIP). The delta-O18 record shows an overall decreasing trend from 1760 to 1890 AD, which is not reflected in the temperature record. However, using high Alpine summer temperature lacking the latest EIP adjustment, the long-term trends between isotope and instrumental data are in better agreement. The overall mean of the isotope based temperature in the EIP indicates substantially warmer levels than the EIP-corrected instrumental temperature. It differs, however, not significantly with respect to the non-EIP-corrected temperature mean. Although the main

  2. Bimodality and variability of particle size distributions in high Ice Water Content regions and their implications for microphysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Leroy, D.; Korolev, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Wu, W.; Strapp, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Aviation records since the 1990s indicate that aircraft engines are facing a threat of occasional power loss due to ice ingestion over tropical oceanic convective clouds. The typical absence of radar echoes greater than 30 dBZ during such incidents suggests the existence of large amounts of small ice particles. The industrial aviation safety concerns inspired the High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content (HAIC/HIWC) campaign, whose Phase I was conducted between January and March 2014. A 2-D Stereo (2DS) probe, Precipitation Imaging Probe (PIP) and Isokinetic Evaporator Probe were installed on the French Falcon 20 making in-situ observations off the coast of Darwin, Australia. Composite particle size distributions (PSDs) using 2DS and PIP data were derived for each 5 second period in cloud. Using an automated technique to identify multiple modes in PSDs and an Incomplete Gamma Fit technique, the intercept (N0), slope (λ) and shape parameter (μ) of each mode of a gamma distribution were determined. The variation of PSDs and fit parameters for Ice Water Contents (IWCs) > 1.5 g m-3 with cloud and environmental parameters and their differences from PSDs measured outside of high IWC conditions are summarized here. Two types of HIWC conditions were observed, according to whether the median mass diameters (MMD) were positively or negatively correlated with IWC. The principal findings about high IWC regions are as follows: 1) larger μ and N0 are found in high IWC regions while λ tends to remain unchanged; 2) PSDs are more likely to be bimodal at lower temperatures. 3) Positive MMD-IWC correlations are associated with larger μ and smaller N0; 4) Bimodal distributions are more frequent for positive MMD-IWC correlations; and 5) Positive MMD-IWC correlations are usually associated with longer-aged clouds, but there are exceptions, showing other factors affect the occurrence of frequent small particles in high IWC regions. Implications for modeling of high IWC

  3. The interaction of radio frequency electromagnetic fields with atmospheric water droplets and applications to aircraft ice prevention. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of computerized simulation of the physics of advanced microwave anti-icing systems, which preheat impinging supercooled water droplets prior to impact, was investigated. Theoretical and experimental work performed to create a physically realistic simulation is described. The behavior of the absorption cross section for melting ice particles was measured by a resonant cavity technique and found to agree with theoretical predictions. Values of the dielectric parameters of supercooled water were measured by a similar technique at lambda = 2.82 cm down to -17 C. The hydrodynamic behavior of accelerated water droplets was studied photograhically in a wind tunnel. Droplets were found to initially deform as oblate spheroids and to eventually become unstable and break up in Bessel function modes for large values of acceleration or droplet size. This confirms the theory as to the maximum stable droplet size in the atmosphere. A computer code which predicts droplet trajectories in an arbitrary flow field was written and confirmed experimentally. The results were consolidated into a simulation to study the heating by electromagnetic fields of droplets impinging onto an object such as an airfoil. It was determined that there is sufficient time to heat droplets prior to impact for typical parameter values. Design curves for such a system are presented.

  4. Postexercise impact of ice-cold water bath on the oxidant-antioxidant balance in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutkowy, Paweł; Woźniak, Alina; Boraczyński, Tomasz; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Boraczyński, Michał

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of a 5 min head-out ice-cold water bath on the oxidant-antioxidant balance in response to exercise. The crossover study included the subjects (n = 24; aged 28.7 ± 7.3 years) who performed two identical stationary cycling bouts for 30 min and recovered for 10 min at room temperature (RT = 20°C; session 1) or in a pool with ice-cold water (ICW = 3°C, 5 min immersion; session 2). The concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in blood plasma (TBARSpl) and erythrocytes (TBARSer) and the erythrocytic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were measured three times during each of the two study sessions: before the exercise (baseline) and 20 and 40 min after the appropriate recovery session. Lower concentration of TBARSpl 40 min after postexercise recovery in ICW was revealed as compared with that after recovery at RT (P cold water bath decreases postexercise lipid peroxidation.

  5. Surface-charge-induced orientation of interfacial water suppresses heterogeneous ice nucleation on α-alumina (0001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdelmonem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface charge is one of the surface properties of atmospheric aerosols, which has been linked to heterogeneous ice nucleation and hence cloud formation, microphysics, and optical properties. Despite the importance of surface charge for ice nucleation, many questions remain on the molecular-level mechanisms at work. Here, we combine droplet-freezing assay studies with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG spectroscopy to correlate interfacial water structure to surface nucleation strength. We study immersion freezing of aqueous solutions of various pHs on the atmospherically relevant aluminum oxide α-Al2O3 (0001 surface using an isolated droplet on the surface. The high-pH solutions freeze at temperatures higher than that of the low-pH solution, while the neutral pH has the highest freezing temperature. On the molecular level, the SFG spectrum of the interfacial water changes substantially upon freezing. At all pHs, crystallization leads to a reduction of intensity of the 3400 cm−1 water resonance, while the 3200 cm−1 intensity drops for low pH but increases for neutral and high pHs. We find that charge-induced surface templating suppresses nucleation, irrespective of the sign of the surface charge. Heterogeneous nucleation is most efficient for the nominally neutral surface.

  6. Surface-charge-induced orientation of interfacial water suppresses heterogeneous ice nucleation on α-alumina (0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Hoffmann, Nadine; Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Cyran, Jenée D.; Kiselev, Alexei; Bonn, Mischa

    2017-06-01

    Surface charge is one of the surface properties of atmospheric aerosols, which has been linked to heterogeneous ice nucleation and hence cloud formation, microphysics, and optical properties. Despite the importance of surface charge for ice nucleation, many questions remain on the molecular-level mechanisms at work. Here, we combine droplet-freezing assay studies with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to correlate interfacial water structure to surface nucleation strength. We study immersion freezing of aqueous solutions of various pHs on the atmospherically relevant aluminum oxide α-Al2O3 (0001) surface using an isolated droplet on the surface. The high-pH solutions freeze at temperatures higher than that of the low-pH solution, while the neutral pH has the highest freezing temperature. On the molecular level, the SFG spectrum of the interfacial water changes substantially upon freezing. At all pHs, crystallization leads to a reduction of intensity of the 3400 cm-1 water resonance, while the 3200 cm-1 intensity drops for low pH but increases for neutral and high pHs. We find that charge-induced surface templating suppresses nucleation, irrespective of the sign of the surface charge. Heterogeneous nucleation is most efficient for the nominally neutral surface.

  7. Anti-icing surfaces based on enhanced self-propelled jumping of condensed water microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaolan; He, Min; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jianjun; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2013-05-18

    A spontaneous and controllable removal of condensed microdroplets at high supersaturation via self-propelled jumping is achieved by introducing a designed micropore array on a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface. The fabricated surface was demonstrated to delay the ice formation for 1 hour at -15 °C with a supersaturation of 6.97.

  8. Tidally Induced Variations of PMC Altitudes and Ice Water Content Using a Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    69° N ( Andenes , Norway) and 85 235 km geometric altitude in Figure 5. In addition, we performed five short term integrations of the 236 forecast...intercomparison between two approaches to calculating winds and the Andenes data. 251 252 2.2 Ice Particle Trajectories and CARMA 253 254 As noted

  9. Changing distributions of sea ice melt and meteoric water west of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meredith, M.P.; Stammerjohn, S.; venables, H.J.; Ducklow, H.W.; Martinson, D.G.; Iannuzzi, R.A.; Leng, M.J.; van Wessem, J.M.; Reijmer, C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229345956; Barrand, N.E.

    The Western Antarctic Peninsula has recently undergone rapid climatic warming, with associated decreases in sea ice extent and duration, and increases in precipitation and glacial discharge to the ocean. These shifts in the freshwater budget can have significant consequences on the functioning of

  10. Does Hot Water Freeze Faster Than Cold? Or Why Mpemba's Ice Cream Is a Discrepant Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Bill

    1993-01-01

    A discrepant event is a happening contrary to our current beliefs. Discrepant events are said to be useful in clarifying concepts. This is one of the interesting features of current theories of constructivism. The story of Mpemba's ice cream is quite well known, but it is the educational aspects of the experiment that are of interest in this…

  11. Sea Spray and Icing in the Emerging Open Water of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the NOAA /OAR/ESRL PSD, Boulder, Colorado, USA, from http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/ ) for 1979- 2014 into three-month blocks. The plan is to analyze...hours. The highest winds we experienced, during the nor’easter, were accompanied by snow. Salinities of ice/snow samples from antennas and cables on

  12. Sea?level fingerprint of continental water and ice mass change from GRACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riva, R.E.M.; Bamber, J.L.; Lavallée, D.A.; Wouters, B.

    2010-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellites (GRACE) provide, for the first time, a method to directly measure mass exchange between the land and oceans over time. The dominant components of this exchange are due to continental ice loss/gain and land hydrology. Here, we determine the

  13. Electrochemical characterization of single cell and short stack PEM electrolyzers based on a nanosized IrO{sub 2} anode electrocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siracusano, S.; Baglio, V.; Di Blasi, A.; Briguglio, N.; Stassi, A.; Antonucci, V.; Arico, A.S. [CNR-ITAE, Via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse, 5-98126 Messina (Italy); Ornelas, R.; Trifoni, E. [Tozzi Renewable Energy SpA, Via Zuccherificio, 10-48010 Mezzano (RA) (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    A nanosized IrO{sub 2} anode electrocatalyst was prepared by a sulfite-complex route for application in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolyzer. The physico-chemical properties of the IrO{sub 2} catalyst were studied by termogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical activity of this catalyst for oxygen evolution was investigated in a single cell PEM electrolyzer consisting of a Pt/C cathode and a Nafion {sup registered} membrane. A current density of 1.26 A cm{sup -2} was obtained at 1.8 V and a stable behavior during steady-state operation at 80 C was recorded. The Tafel plots for the overall electrochemical process indicated a slope of about 80 mV dec{sup -1} in a temperature range from 25 C to 80 C. The kinetic and ohmic activation energies for the electrochemical process were 70.46 kJ mol{sup -1} and 13.45 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. A short stack (3 cells of 100 cm{sup 2} geometrical area) PEM electrolyzer was investigated by linear voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy and chrono-amperometric measurements. The amount of H{sub 2} produced was 80 l h{sup -1} at 60 A under 330 W of applied electrical power. The stack electrical efficiency at 60 A and 75 C was 70% and 81% with respect to the low and high heating value of hydrogen, respectively. (author)

  14. Putative Large and Small Volcanic Edifices in Valles Marineris, Mars, and Evidence of Ground Water/Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M. G.; Smellie, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    Large mounds and mesas of interior layered deposits (ILDs) in Valles Marineris Chasmata have been suggested to be sub-ice volcanoes based on MGS and Viking data [1,2,3]. Similar to terrestrial sub-ice volcanoes, spectral investigation indicates the bright mounds are hydrothermally altered, palagonitic rocks [4]. These putative edifices are associated with outcrops of dark materials that have each been interpreted previously as young, volcanic ash deposits of mafic composition [5,6]. Spectral investigation also indicates that the dark materials are less water-altered and mafic in composition [4]. TES-detected concentrations of crystalline hematite have been noted to occur in these dark materials [7]. Mars Observer Camera (MOC) images indicate that the dark materials locally blanket chasmata floors and embay ILDs and are associated with small volcanic vents. These apparent vents may have emitted some of the ash-like deposits. The vent features appear very young, lacking impact craters and having non-eroded rims. Where they embay the ILDs, the vents have low rims similar to terrrestrial maar or tuff cones, which possibly indicates interaction with groundwater or ice. In support of ground-ice within the ILDs, MOC data show (1) channels that occur on the flanks of the bright mounds, and (2) theatre-headed gullies are eroded into caprock of the ILDs and the heads of valleys, formerly interpreted by Viking data to be wind flutes on ILD flanks. Both features may be related to spring sapping. MOC images also show that dark materials on the floor of many chasmata and Aram Chaos are associated with small fissures or cone-shaped mounds with central depressions that do not appear to have interacted with ground-ice. Perhaps late-stage water/ice circulated or was stored within the interior mounds after removal of large ponds of surface ice elsewhere. Young, dark, volcanic ash in the chasmata could be a product of both "dry" volcanism and water/magma interactions, which may have

  15. Hydrogen-oxygen proton-exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, R.; Pham, M.; Leonida, A.; Mcelroy, J.; Nalette, T.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment is planned for the validation, in a microgravity environment, of several ground-proven simplification features relating to SPE fuel cells and SPE electrolyzers. With a successful experiment, these features can be incorporated into equipment designs for specific extraterrestrial energy storage applications.

  16. Computational model for a high temperature electrolyzer coupled to a HTTR for efficient nuclear hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Rojas, Leorlen; Rosales, Jesus; Castro, Landy; Gamez, Abel; Brayner, Carlos, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Garcia, Lazaro; Garcia, Carlos; Torre, Raciel de la, E-mail: lgarcia@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Sanchez, Danny [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    High temperature electrolysis process coupled to a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is one of the most promising methods for hydrogen production using a nuclear reactor as the primary heat source. However there are not references in the scientific publications of a test facility that allow to evaluate the efficiency of the process and other physical parameters that has to be taken into consideration for its accurate application in the hydrogen economy as a massive production method. For this lack of experimental facilities, mathematical models are one of the most used tools to study this process and theirs flowsheets, in which the electrolyzer is the most important component because of its complexity and importance in the process. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model for the evaluation and optimization of the electrolyzer of a high temperature electrolysis hydrogen production process flowsheet was developed using ANSYS FLUENT®. Electrolyzer's operational and design parameters will be optimized in order to obtain the maximum hydrogen production and the higher efficiency in the module. This optimized model of the electrolyzer will be incorporated to a chemical process simulation (CPS) code to study the overall high temperature flowsheet coupled to a high temperature accelerator driven system (ADS) that offers advantages in the transmutation of the spent fuel. (author)

  17. Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can We Listen for Open Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can we listen for... Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can we listen for open water? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...the source. These different sounds can be described as “ soundscapes ”, and graphically represented by comparing two or more features of the sound

  18. Laser-induced plasma from pure and doped water-ice at high fluence by ultraviolet and infrared radiation - art. no. 70050X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, A.; Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Ice made of ultrapure water or water doped with 1 % polymer (polyethylene glycol, "PEG") was irradiated by laser light with fluences between 2 and 80 J/cm(2) in the ultraviolet (UV) regime at 355 nm and in the infrared (IR) regime at 1064 nm in vacuum. In the UV regime there is a threshold...

  19. The microbiome of glaciers and ice sheets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandre M Anesio; Stefanie Lutz; Nathan A M Chrismas; Liane G Benning

    2017-01-01

    .... Habitats on glaciers and ice sheets with enough liquid water to sustain microbial activity include snow, surface ice, cryoconite holes, englacial systems and the interface between ice and overridden rock/soil...

  20. Development of antioxidative effect in ice cream with Kalakai (Stenochlaena palustris) water extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadhiwaluyo, Kristania; Rahmawati, Della; Gunawan Puteri, Maria D. P. T.

    2017-11-01

    Kalakai (Stenochlaena. palustris) extract was used to develop the ice cream. The antioxidant activity of the extracts and its stability over process and storage were evaluated through various antioxidant assay including DPPH assay, Folin-Ciocalteau assay and aluminum chloride colorimetric method. In general, the leaves of S. palustris had a significantly higher antioxidant activity (p extract was able to develop antioxidant activity (IC50) with suitable iron content (antioxidant. The result of the stability test also suggested the ability low temperature storage and processing in maintaining the stability of the antioxidant activity of the extract (p > 0.05) over processing and storage. Thus, this strengthen the feasibility of S. palustris to be used as a potential functional food ingredient that is low cost and easily accessible with an antioxidant activity and safe iron content that is beneficial to increase the quality of food produced including in ice cream.

  1. AERATION OF THE ICE-COVERED WATER POOLS USING THE WAVE FLOW AERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomin E.E

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the technical advantages and economic benefits of the ice-covered pool aeration plants consuming power from renewable energy sources. We made a comparative evaluation of the wave flow-aeration method and other methods of pool aeration. We showed the indexes and the characteristics of the wave flow-maker for aeration of ice-covered pools on the territory of Russia. We also made calculations of the economic benefits of aeration plants using the devices converting renewable energy. The project can be scaled and extended to the territory of the CIS, Europe, USA and Canada in the changing climate conditions and the variety of feed reservoirs around the world.

  2. Towards 3D prediction of supercooled liquid water for aircraft icing: Modifications of the microphysics in COSMO-EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Köhler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Supercooled liquid water (SLW in the atmosphere is responsible for aircraft icing which can cause severe accidents. To date, the microphysics scheme in the model of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD for the European scale (COSMO-EU; due to be replaced by ICON-EU in 2015 has been optimised to forecast precipitation on the ground but not the water phase in the atmosphere. As a consequence, prediction of SLW is rather poor, as was shown in a series of case studies by the Aeronautical Meteorology department at DWD. ADWICE – the tool used by the DWD to predict aircraft icing – therefore does not rely on COSMO model SLW output, but predicts SLW by itself using a simple parcel method. In an effort to improve ADWICE it has been found that this algorithm has its limits and that it should be replaced by SLW prediction from a 3D weather prediction model. To this end it is necessary to improve the SLW prediction in the COSMO model. In this paper we analyse the microphysics scheme of COSMO-EU with respect to SLW production and depletion and present modifications that greatly improve SLW prediction. As reference for two case studies we use radar-lidar-radiometer products from the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg to verify the change in SLW prediction.

  3. Decadal to millennial-scale variability in sea ice, primary productivity, and Pacific-Water inflow in the Chukchi/East Siberian Sea area (Arctic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Matthiessen, Jens; Méheust, Marie; Nam, Seung-il; Niessen, Frank; Schade, Inka; Schreck, Michael; Wassmuth, Saskia; Xiao, Xiaotong

    2014-05-01

    Sea-ice is an essential component of the global climate system and, especially, the Polar Oceans. An alarming decrease in term of sea-ice concentration, thickness and duration, has been observed in the Arctic Ocean and its marginal seas over the last 30 years. Thus, understanding the processes controlling modern sea-ice variability and reconstructing paleo-sea-ice extent and variability in polar regions have become of great interest for the international scientific community during the last years. Here, we present new proxy records determined in sediment cores from the East Siberian Sea (RV Polarstern Expedition ARK-XXIII/3 in 2008; Core PS72/350) and from the Chukchi Sea (RV Araon Expedition ARA2B in 2011; Core ARA2B-1A, -1B). These records, including organic-geochemical bulk parameters, specific biomarkers (IP25 and sterols; PIP25; for recent reviews see Stein et al., 2012; Belt and Müller, 2013), biogenic opal, mineralogical data as well as high-resolution XRF scanning data, give new insight into the short-term (decadal-, centennial- to millennial-scale) variability in sea-ice, primary productivity and Pacific-Water inflow during Holocene times. Maximum concentrations of phytoplankton biomarkers and biogenic opal were determined between 8.5 and 4 kyrs. BP, suggesting enhanced primary productivity triggered by increased inflow of nutrient-rich Pacific Water (and/or an increased nutrient input due to an ice-edge position). Short-lived peak values in productivity might be related to strong pulses of Pacific-Water input during this time period (cf., Ortiz et al., 2009). A seasonal sea-ice cover was present in the Chukchi Sea throughout the last 10 kyrs. During the last 3-4 kyrs. BP, the sea-ice cover significantly extended. References Belt, S.T. and Müller, J., 2013. The Arctic sea ice biomarker IP25: a review of current understanding, recommendations for future research and applications in palaeo sea ice reconstructions. Quaternary Science Review 73, 9-25. Ortiz

  4. Ice slurry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffeld, M. [Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Moltkestr. 30, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wang, M.J.; Goldstein, V. [Sunwell Technologies Inc., 180 Caster Avenue, Woodbridge, L4L 5Y (Canada); Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single-phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. (author)

  5. Dead-Ended Passive Electrolyzer with Elimination of Vapor/Liquid Separation for Life Support Oxygen Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall technical objective of the proposed Phase II NASA program is to demonstrate the ability of the WaMM™-based static vapor feed electrolyzer to...

  6. Develop Hydrophilic Conductive Coating Technology with High Oxidation Resistance for Non-Flow-Through PEM Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ElectroChem proposes to develop oxidation resistant, electrically conductive, hydrophilic coatings in PEM fuel cells and in PEM electrolyzers. The use of hydrophilic...

  7. Alkaline Exchange Membrane (AEM) for High-Efficiency Fuel Cells, Electrolyzers and Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an alkaline exchange membrane (AEM)for use as a polymer electrolyte in both fuel cell and electrolyzer systems.  The ultimate goal in AEM development is...

  8. High-resolution continuous-flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, B. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Keller, E. D.; Gkinis, V.

    2015-07-01

    Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotope (δ18O and δD) continuous-flow measurements and provide metrics defining the performance of the setup during a major ice core measurement campaign (Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution; RICE). We also use the metrics to compare alternate systems. Our setup is the first continuous-flow laser spectroscopy system that is using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research, LGR) in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze water samples from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source (WVISS) calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to (1) enable measurements on several water standards, (2) increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time and (3) reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the continuous-flow analysis (CFA) of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The custom setups provide a shorter response time (~ 54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively) compared to the original WVISS unit (~ 62 s), which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the custom setups have a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the custom and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan) were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the custom 2013 setup the precision after integration times of 103 s is 0.060 and 0.070 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. The corresponding σAllan values for the custom 2014 setup are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043 ‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042 ‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the custom setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The

  9. High-resolution continuous flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, B. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Keller, E. D.; Gkinis, V.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) continuous flow measurements. It is the first continuous flow laser spectroscopy system that is using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research - LGR) in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze sample from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotopic Standard Source (WVISS) calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to: (1) increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time (2) enable measurements on several water standards, and (3) to reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The modified setup provides a shorter response time (~54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively) compared to the original WVISS unit (~62 s), which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the modified setup has a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the modified WVISS and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan) were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the 2013 modified setup the precision after integration times of 103 s are 0.060 and 0.070‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. For the WVISS setup the corresponding σAllan values are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the modified setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The σAllan values for δ18O of 0.30 and 0.18‰ for the modified (2013) and WVISS setup, respectively after averaging times of 104 s (2.78 h). The Isotopic Water Analyzer (IWA)-modified WVISS setup used during the

  10. Preservation of Late Amazonian Mars ice and water-related deposits in a unique crater environment in Noachis Terra: Age relationships between lobate debris tongues and gullies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth A.; Head, James W.; Marchant, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The Amazonian period of Mars has been described as static, cold, and dry. Recent analysis of high-resolution imagery of equatorial and mid-latitude regions has revealed an array of young landforms produced in association with ice and liquid water; because near-surface ice in these regions is currently unstable, these ice-and-water-related landforms suggest one or more episodes of martian climate change during the Amazonian. Here we report on the origin and evolution of valley systems within a degraded crater in Noachis Terra, Asimov Crater. The valleys have produced a unique environment in which to study the geomorphic signals of Amazonian climate change. New high-resolution images reveal Hesperian-aged layered basalt with distinctive columnar jointing capping interior crater fill and providing debris, via mass wasting, for the surrounding annular valleys. The occurrence of steep slopes (>20°), relatively narrow (sheltered) valleys, and a source of debris have provided favorable conditions for the preservation of shallow-ice deposits. Detailed mapping reveals morphological evidence for viscous ice flow, in the form of several lobate debris tongues (LDT). Superimposed on LDT are a series of fresh-appearing gullies, with typical alcove, channel, and fan morphologies. The shift from ice-rich viscous-flow formation to gully erosion is best explained as a shift in martian climate, from one compatible with excess snowfall and flow of ice-rich deposits, to one consistent with minor snow and gully formation. Available dating suggests that the climate transition occurred >8 Ma, prior to the formation of other small-scale ice-rich flow features identified elsewhere on Mars that have been interpreted to have formed during the most recent phases of high obliquity. Taken together, these older deposits suggest that multiple climatic shifts have occurred over the last tens of millions of years of martian history.

  11. Ice, Ice, Baby!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an outreach program based on hands-on activities called "Ice, Ice, Baby". These lessons are designed to teach the science principles of displacement, forces of motion, density, and states of matter. These properties are easily taught through the interesting topics of glaciers, icebergs, and sea level rise in K-8 classrooms. The activities are fun, engaging, and simple enough to be used at science fairs and family science nights. Students who have participated in "Ice, Ice, Baby" have successfully taught these to adults and students at informal events. The lessons are based on education standards which are available on our website www.cresis.ku.edu. This presentation will provide information on the activities, survey results from teachers who have used the material, and other suggested material that can be used before and after the activities.

  12. Overcoming the Instability of Nanoparticle-Based Catalyst Films in Alkaline Electrolyzers by using Self-Assembling and Self-Healing Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwe, Stefan; Masa, Justus; Andronescu, Corina; Mei, Bastian; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Ventosa, Edgar

    2017-07-10

    Engineering stable electrodes using highly active catalyst nanopowders for electrochemical water splitting remains a challenge. We report an innovative and general approach for attaining highly stable catalyst films with self-healing capability based on the in situ self-assembly of catalyst particles during electrolysis. The catalyst particles are added to the electrolyte forming a suspension that is pumped through the electrolyzer. Particles with negatively charged surfaces stick onto the anode, while particles with positively charged surfaces stick to the cathode. The self-assembled catalyst films have self-healing properties as long as sufficient catalyst particles are present in the electrolyte. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated in a non-zero gap alkaline electrolyzer using NiFe-LDH and Ni x B catalyst nanopowders for anode and cathode, respectively. Steady cell voltages were maintained for at least three weeks during continuous electrolysis at 50-100 mA cm -2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Adsorption of glycine on cometary dust grains: II—Effect of amorphous water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Roa, E.; Moreno, F.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years glycine, the simplest amino acid, has become a topic of great importance in astrobiology owing to its unambiguous detection in comet 81P/Wild 2 dust by Stardust mission. A possible end state for glycine in comets is by forming a molecular bond with some species of cometary dust. Many questions remain about of how glycine survives the extreme conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium (ISM). The detailed chemical interactions occurring on the dust grain surfaces with organic molecules are of great interest, as they shed light on possible routes of life to Earth from extraterrestrial space. In a previous work we simulated the interaction between glycine molecules and a forsterite surface and found that the interaction occurs through a chemisorption process. In this paper, we try to describe a more realistic situation, by adding an ice component to the mixture. We propose two models for that interaction. In the first model, neutral glycine is adsorbed on a mineral surface covered by a thin layer of amorphous ice, while in the second model neutral glycine and ice are adsorbed simultaneously onto the mineral surface. We find that this second model is the most likely scenario, although the particular adsorption process depends on the kind of surface. For a dipolar surface the adsorption proceeds through an associative process. In the case of a non-dipolar surface the adsorption process is both associative and dissociative and the chemisorption process is stronger. For the stable systems, we calculated the infrared frequencies to characterize the most reactive sites in the chemisorption processes. We observed important shifts frequencies that have relationship with the position of the main vibrational modes of the CO and COO- moieties, which react chemically with the mineral surface.

  14. Voluminous ice-rich and water-rich lahars generated during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Major, Jon J.; Scott, William E.

    2013-06-01

    Redoubt Volcano in south-central Alaska began erupting on March 15, 2009, and by April 4, 2009, had produced at least 20 explosive events that generated multiple plumes of ash and numerous lahars. The 3108-m-high, snow- and ice-clad stratovolcano has an ice-filled summit crater that is breached to the north. The volcano supports about 4 km3 of ice and snow and about 1 km3 of this makes up the Drift glacier on the north side of the volcano. Explosive eruptions between March 23 and April 4, which included the destruction of at least two lava domes, triggered significant lahars in the Drift River valley on March 23 and April 4, and several smaller lahars between March 24 and March 31. Mud-line high-water marks, character of deposits, areas of inundation, and estimates of flow velocity revealed that the lahars on March 23 and April 4 were the largest of the eruption. In the 2-km-wide upper Drift River valley, average flow depths were at least 2-5 m. Average peak-flow velocities were likely between 10 and 15 ms- 1, and peak discharges were on the order of 104-105 m3 s- 1. The area inundated by lahars on March 23 was at least 100 km2 and on April 4 about 125 km2. Two substantial lahars emplaced on March 23 and one on April 4 had volumes on the order of 107-108 m3 and were similar in size to the largest lahar of the 1989-90 eruption. The two principal March 23 lahars were primarily flowing slurries of snow and ice derived from Drift glacier and the Drift River valley where seasonal snow and tabular blocks of river ice were entrained and incorporated into the lahars. Despite morphologic evidence of two lahars, only a single deposit up to 5 m thick was found in most places and it contained about 80-95% of poorly sorted, massive to imbricate assemblages of snow and ice clasts. The deposit was frozen soon after it was emplaced and later eroded and buried by the April 4 lahar. The lahar of April 4, in contrast, was primarily a hyperconcentrated flow, as interpreted from 1- to

  15. USGS46 Greenland ice core water – A new isotopic reference material for δ2H and δ18O measurements of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Tarbox, Lauren V.; Lorenz, Jennifer M.; Buck, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Ice core from Greenland was melted, filtered, homogenised, loaded into glass ampoules, sealed, autoclaved to eliminate biological activity, and calibrated by dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. This isotopic reference material (RM), USGS46, is intended as one of two secondary isotopic reference waters for daily normalisation of stable hydrogen (δ2H) and stable oxygen (δ18O) isotopic analysis of water with a mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer. The measured δ2H and δ18O values of this reference water were −235.8 ± 0.7‰ and −29.80 ± 0.03‰, respectively, relative to VSMOW on scales normalised such that the δ2H and δ18O values of SLAP reference water are, respectively, −428 and −55.5‰. Each uncertainty is an estimated expanded uncertainty (U = 2uc) about the reference value that provides an interval that has about a 95-percent probability of encompassing the true value. This reference water is available in cases containing 144 glass ampoules that are filled with either 4 ml or 5 ml of water per ampoule.

  16. Spectral modeling of water ice-rich areas on Ceres' surface from Dawn-VIR data analysis: abundance and grain size retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Frigeri, Alessandro; Zambon, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Magni, Gianfranco; Capria, Maria Teresa; Formisano, Michelangelo; Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; Pieters, Carle; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol; Dawn/VIR Team

    2016-10-01

    Dawn spacecraft orbits around Ceres since early 2015 acquiring a huge amount of data at different spatial resolutions during the several phases of the mission. VIR, the visible and InfraRed spectrometer onboard Dawn [1] allowed to detect the principal mineralogical phases present on Ceres: a large abundance of dark component, NH4-phillosilicates and carbonates.Water has been detected in small areas on Ceres' surface by the Dawn-VIR instrument. The most obvious finding is located in Oxo crater [2]. Further detections of water have been made during the Survey observation phase (1.1 km/pixel) and High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (400 m/px) [3]. During the LAMO phase (Low Altitude Mapping Orbit), the data with increased spatial resolution (100 m/px) coming from both regions have improved the detection of water, highlighting clear diagnostic water ice absorption features. In this study, we focused on spectral modeling of VIR spectra of Oxo and another crater (lon = 227°, lat 57°), near Messor crater.The Hapke radiative transfer model [4] has been applied in order to retrieve the water ice properties. We consider two types of mixtures: areal and intimate mixing. In areal mixing, the surface is modelled as patches of pure water ice, with each photon scattered within one patch. In intimate mixing, the particles of water ice are in contact with particles of the dark terrain, and both are involved in the scattering of a single photon. The best fit with the measured spectra has been derived with the areal mixture. The water ice abundance obtained is up to 15-20% within the field of view, and the grain size retrieved is of the order of 100-200 μm. Phyllosilicates and carbonates, which are ubiquitous on Ceres surface [5], have been also detected and modeled in correspondence with the icy regions. The water ice is typically located near and within the shadows projected by the crater rims. Further analysis is required to study the thermal state of the ice and its origin

  17. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known...... as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events would add to our knowledge of the climatic system and – hopefully – enable better forecasts. Likewise, to forecast possible future sea level rise it is crucial to correctly model the large ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. This project is divided into two parts...

  18. The Seasonal Behavior of Water Ice Clouds in the Tharsis and Valles Marineris Regions of Mars: Mars Orbiter Camera Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J. L.; Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Shan, K. J.; Cantor, B. A.; Caplinger, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) was used to obtain global maps of the Martian surface