WorldWideScience

Sample records for electrolysis cell components

  1. Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Electrolysis is a well-established technology with many different applications. In particular, it can be used to produce hydrogen by using electricity to split water. As an increasing part of the energy system consists of fluctuating power sources such as wind and solar it becomes increasingly...... necessary to be able to store large amounts of electrical energy. One option is to do it in the form of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich synthetic compounds. This has led to increased interest in electrolysis with new cell types being developed. This entry provides an overview of the status and technological...... challenges of electrolysis systems and discusses their role in the future energy system....

  2. Static Feed Water Electrolysis Subsystem Testing and Component Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Schubert, F. H.; Burke, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    A program was carried out to develop and test advanced electrochemical cells/modules and critical electromechanical components for a static feed (alkaline electrolyte) water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem. The accomplishments were refurbishment of a previously developed subsystem and successful demonstration for a total of 2980 hours of normal operation; achievement of sustained one-person level oxygen generation performance with state-of-the-art cell voltages averaging 1.61 V at 191 ASF for an operating temperature of 128F (equivalent to 1.51V when normalized to 180F); endurance testing and demonstration of reliable performance of the three-fluid pressure controller for 8650 hours; design and development of a fluid control assembly for this subsystem and demonstration of its performance; development and demonstration at the single cell and module levels of a unitized core composite cell that provides expanded differential pressure tolerance capability; fabrication and evaluation of a feed water electrolyte elimination five-cell module; and successful demonstration of an electrolysis module pressurization technique that can be used in place of nitrogen gas during the standby mode of operation to maintain system pressure and differential pressures.

  3. Durable solid oxide electrolysis cells and stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming Chen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this project was to make a substantial contribution to development of a cost competitive electrolysis technology based on solid oxide cells. The strategy was to address what had been identified as the key issues in previous research projects. Accordingly five lines of work were carried out in the here reported project: 1) Cell and stack element testing and post test characterization to identify major degradation mechanisms under electrolysis operation. 2) Development of interconnects and coatings to allow stable electrolysis operation at approx850 deg. C or above. 3) Development of seals with reduced Si emission. 4) Development of durable SOEC cathodes. 5) Modeling. Good progress has been made on several of the planned activities. The outcome and most important achievements of the current project are listed for the five lines of the work. (LN)

  4. Poisoning of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells by Impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune; Graves, Christopher R.; Hauch, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Electrolysis of H2O, CO2, and co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 was studied in Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrode supported solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) consisting of a Ni/YSZ support, a Ni/YSZ electrode layer, a YSZ electrolyte, and an lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/YSZ ox...

  5. Fabrication of cathode supported tubular solid oxide electrolysis cell for high temperature steam electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Le; Wang, Shaorong; Qian, Jiqin; Xue, Yanjie; Liu, Renzhu

    2011-01-15

    In recent years, hydrogen has been identified as a potential alternative fuel and energy carrier for the future energy supply. Water electrolysis is one of the important hydrogen production technologies which do not emit carbon dioxide. High temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) consumes even less electrical energy than low temperature water electrolysis. Theoretically, HTSE using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) can efficiently utilize renewable energy to produce hydrogen, and it is also possible to operate the SOEC in reverse mode as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to produce electricity. Tubular SOFC have been widely investigated. In this study, tubular solid oxide cells were fabricated by dip-coating and cosintering techniques. In SOEC mode, results suggested that steam ratio had a strong impact on the performance of the tubular cell; the tubular SOEC preferred to be operated at high steam ratio in order to avoid concentration polarization. The microstructure of the tubular SOEC should therefore be optimized for high temperature steam electrolysis.

  6. Microbial electrolysis cells as innovative technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorbadzhiyska, Elitsa; Hristov, Georgi; Mitov, Mario; Hubenova, Yolina

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production is becoming increasingly important in view of using hydrogen in fuel cells. However, most of the production of hydrogen so far comes from the combustion of fossil fuels and water electrolysis. Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC), also known as Bioelectrochemically Assisted Microbial Reactor, is an ecologically clean, renewable and innovative technology for hydrogen production. Microbial electrolysis cells produce hydrogen mainly from waste biomass assisted by various bacteria strains. The principle of MECs and their constructional elements are reviewed and discussed. Keywords: microbial Electrolysis Cells, hydrogen production, waste biomass purification

  7. Solid oxide electrolysis cells - Performance and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauch, A.

    2007-10-15

    In this work H2 electrode supported solid oxide cells (SOC) produced at Risoe National Laboratory, DTU, have been used for steam electrolysis. Electrolysis tests have been performed at temperatures from 650AeC to 950AeC, p(H2O)/p(H2) from 0.99/0.01 to 0.30/0.70 and current densities from -0.25 A/cm2 to -2 A/cm2. The solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) have been characterised by iV curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at start and end of tests and by EIS under current load during electrolysis testing. The tested SOCs have shown the best initial electrolysis performance reported in literature to date. Area specific resistances of 0.26 Oecm2 at 850AeC and 0.17 Oecm2 at 950AeC were obtained from electrolysis iV curves. The general trend for the SOEC tests was: 1) a short-term passivation in first few hundred hours, 2) then an activation and 3) a subsequent and underlying long-term degradation. The transient phenomenon (passivation/activation) was shown to be a set-up dependent artefact caused by the albite glass sealing with a p(Si(OH)4) of 1.10-7 atm, leading to silica contamination of the triple-phase boundaries (TPBs) of the electrode. The long-term degradation for the SOECs was more pronounced than for fuel cell testing of similar cells. Long-term degradation of 2%/1000 h was obtained at 850AeC, p(H2O)/p(H2) = 0.5/0.5 and -0.5 A/cm2, whereas the degradation rate increased to 6%/1000h at 950AeC, p(H2O)/p(H2) = 0.9/0.1 and -1.0 A/cm2. Both the short-term passivation and the long-term degradation appear mainly to be related to processes in the H2 electrode. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs show that only limited changes occur in the Ni particle size distribution and these are not the main degradation mechanism for the SOECs. Micro and nano analysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM reveals that glassy phase impurities have accumulated at the TPBs as a result of

  8. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  9. High Temperature Electrolysis using Electrode-Supported Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. The cells currently under study were developed primarily for the fuel cell mode of operation. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes (∼10 (micro)m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes (∼1400 (micro)m thick), and manganite (LSM) air-side electrodes (∼90 (micro)m thick). The purpose of the present study was to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of DC potential sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-duration testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode over more than 500 hours of operation. Results indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of the single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

  10. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  11. Alkaline water electrolysis technology for Space Station regenerative fuel cell energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hoberecht, M. A.; Le, M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell system (RFCS), designed for application to the Space Station energy storage system, is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte technology and incorporates a dedicated fuel cell system (FCS) and water electrolysis subsystem (WES). In the present study, emphasis is placed on the WES portion of the RFCS. To ensure RFCS availability for the Space Station, the RFCS Space Station Prototype design was undertaken which included a 46-cell 0.93 cu m static feed water electrolysis module and three integrated mechanical components.

  12. Solid oxide electrolysis cell for decomposition of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Ohno, H.; Yoshida, H.; Katsuta, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The decomposition of tritiated water vapor by means of solid oxide electrolysis cells has been proposed for the application to the D-T fusion reactor system. This method is essentially free from problems such as large tritium inventory, radiation damage, and generation of solid waste, so it is expected to be a promising one. Electrolysis of water vapor in an argon carrier was performed using a tube-type stabilized zirconia cell with porous platinum electrodes over the temperature range 500-950 0 C. High conversion ratios from water to hydrogen, of up to 99.9%, were achieved. The characteristics of the cell were deduced from the Nernst equation and the conversion ratios expressed as a function of the IR-free voltage. Experimental results agreed with the equation. The isotope effect in electrolysis is also discussed and experiments with heavy water were carried out. The obtained separation factor was slightly higher than the theoretical value. (author)

  13. Solid oxide electrolysis cell for decomposition of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Katsuta, H.; Naruse, Y.; Ohno, H.; Yoshida, H.

    1984-01-01

    The decomposition of tritiated water vapor with solid oxide electrolysis cell was proposed for the application to the D-T fusion reactor system. This method is essentially free from problems such as large tritium inventory, radiation damage, and generation of solid waste, so it is expected to be a promising one. Electrolysis of water vapor in argon carrier was performed using tube-type stabilized zirconia cell with porous platinum electrodes in the temperature range of 500 0 C to 950 0 C. High conversion ratio from water to hydrogen up to 99.9% was achieved. The characteristics of the cell is deduced from the Nernst's equation and conversion ratio is described as the function of the open circuit voltage. Experimental results agreed with the equation. Isotope effect in electrolysis is also discussed and experiments with heavy water were carried out. Obtained separation factor was slightly higher than the theoretical value

  14. Endurance Test and Evaluation of Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Andrew J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Chang, B. J.; Larkins, Jim T.

    1985-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to assess the state of alkaline water electrolysis cell technology and its potential as part of a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) of a multikilowatt orbiting powerplant. The program evaluates the endurance capabilities of alkaline electrolyte water electrolysis cells under various operating conditions, including constant condition testing, cyclic testing and high pressure testing. The RFCS demanded the scale-up of existing cell hardware from 0.1 sq ft active electrode area to 1.0 sq ft active electrode area. A single water electrolysis cell and two six-cell modules of 1.0 sq ft active electrode area were designed and fabricated. The two six-cell 1.0 sq ft modules incorporate 1.0 sq ft utilized cores, which allow for minimization of module assembly complexity and increased tolerance to pressure differential. A water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated to allow testing of the six-cell modules. After completing checkout, shakedown, design verification and parametric testing, a module was incorporated into the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Breadboard (RFCSB) for testing at Life Systems, Inc., and at NASA JSC.

  15. A model-based understanding of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for syngas production by H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vikram; Fu, Qingxi; Janardhanan, Vinod M.; Deutschmann, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    High temperature co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 offers a promising route for syngas (H2, CO) production via efficient use of heat and electricity. The performance of a SOEC during co-electrolysis is investigated by focusing on the interactions between transport processes and electrochemical parameters. Electrochemistry at the three-phase boundary is modeled by a modified Butler-Volmer approach that considers H2O electrolysis and CO2 electrolysis, individually, as electrochemically active charge transfer pathways. The model is independent of the geometrical structure. A 42-step elementary heterogeneous reaction mechanism for the thermo-catalytic chemistry in the fuel electrode, the dusty gas model (DGM) to account for multi-component diffusion through porous media, and a plug flow model for flow through the channels are used in the model. Two sets of experimental data are reproduced by the simulations, in order to deduce parameters of the electrochemical model. The influence of micro-structural properties, inlet cathode gas velocity, and temperature are discussed. Reaction flow analysis is performed, at OCV, to study methane production characteristics and kinetics during co-electrolysis. Simulations are carried out for configurations ranging from simple one-dimensional electrochemical button cells to quasi-two-dimensional co-flow planar cells, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the computational tool for performance and design optimization.

  16. Hydrogen by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen production by water electrolysis (aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide) is shortly presented with theoretical aspects (thermodynamics and kinetics), and components of the electrolytic cell (structural materials, cathodes, anodes, diaphragms), and examples of industrial processes. (A.B.). 4 figs

  17. Durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauch, A.; Hoejgaard Jensen, S.; Dalgaard Ebbesen, S.

    2007-05-15

    In the perspective of the increasing interest in renewable energy and hydrogen economy, the reversible solid oxide cells (SOCs) is a promising technology as it has the potential of providing efficient and cost effective hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam (HTES). Furthermore development of such electrolysis cells can gain from the results obtained within the R and D of SOFCs. For solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) to become interesting from a technological point of view, cells that are reproducible, high performing and long-term stable need to be developed. In this paper we address some of the perspectives of the SOEC technology i.e. issues such as a potential H2 production price as low as 0.71 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} using SOECs for HTES; is there a possible market for the electrolysers? and what R and D steps are needed for the realisation of the SOEC technology? In the experimental part we present electrolysis test results on SOCs that have been optimized for fuel cell operation but applied for HTES. The SOCs are produced on a pre-pilot scale at Risoe National Laboratory. These cells have been shown to have excellent initial electrolysis performance, but the durability of such electrolysis cells are not optimal and examples of results from SOEC tests over several hundreds of hours are given here. The long-term tests have been run at current densities of -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} and -1 A/cm{sup 2}, temperatures of 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C and p(H{sub 2}O)/p(H{sub 2}) of 0.5/0.5 and 0.9/0.1. Long-term degradation rates are shown to be up to 5 times higher for SOECs compared to similar SOFC testing. Furthermore, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production prices are calculated using the experimental results from long-term electrolysis test as input and a short outlook for the future work on SOECs will be given as well. (au)

  18. Endurance test and evaluation of alkaline water electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Utilization in the development of multi-kW low orbit power systems is discussed. The following technological developments of alkaline water electrolysis cells for space power application were demonstrated: (1) four 92.9 cm2 single water electrolysis cells, two using LST's advanced anodes and two using LST's super anodes; (2) four single cell endurance test stands for life testing of alkaline water electrolyte cells; (3) the solid performance of the advanced electrode and 355 K; (4) the breakthrough performance of the super electrode; (5) the four single cells for over 5,000 hours each significant cell deterioration or cell failure. It is concluded that the static feed water electrolysis concept is reliable and due to the inherent simplicity of the passive water feed mechanism coupled with the use of alkaline electrolyte has greater potential for regenerative fuel cell system applications than alternative electrolyzers. A rise in cell voltage occur after 2,000-3,000 hours which was attributed to deflection of the polysulfone end plates due to creepage of the thermoplastic. More end plate support was added, and the performance of the cells was restored to the initial performance level.

  19. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and an immobilized electrolyte allow for reversible operation as electrolysis cell or fuel...... cell. In the present work we demonstrate the application of hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active gas diffusion electrodes. PTFE particles and silver nanowires as electro-catalysts were used in the gas diffusion electrodes. Impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed...... to determine the cell characteristics. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was only 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance of 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at 200 °C and 20 bar. A new production method was developed to increase the cell size from lab scale (1...

  20. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and a liquid immobilized electrolyte allow the operation...... of the newly designed electrolysis cell as a fuel cell, but condensation of steam may lead to blocked pores, thereby inhibiting gas diffusion and decreasing the performance of the cell. In the here presented work we present the application of a hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active layer...... the electrochemical characteristics of the cell. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was reduced to 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance as low as 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at a temperature of 200 °C and 20 bar pressure. A new production method was developed...

  1. Steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) with proton-conducting oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Boulfrad, Samir; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-12-21

    Energy crisis and environmental problems caused by the conventional combustion of fossil fuels boost the development of renewable and sustainable energies. H2 is regarded as a clean fuel for many applications and it also serves as an energy carrier for many renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power. Among all the technologies for H2 production, steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency and low environmental impact, provided that the needed electrical power is generated from renewable sources. However, the deployment of SOECs based on conventional oxygen-ion conductors is limited by several issues, such as high operating temperature, hydrogen purification from water, and electrode stability. To avoid these problems, proton-conducting oxides are proposed as electrolyte materials for SOECs. This review paper provides a broad overview of the research progresses made for proton-conducting SOECs, summarizing the past work and finding the problems for the development of proton-conducting SOECs, as well as pointing out potential development directions.

  2. Steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) with proton-conducting oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Boulfrad, Samir; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Energy crisis and environmental problems caused by the conventional combustion of fossil fuels boost the development of renewable and sustainable energies. H2 is regarded as a clean fuel for many applications and it also serves as an energy carrier for many renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power. Among all the technologies for H2 production, steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency and low environmental impact, provided that the needed electrical power is generated from renewable sources. However, the deployment of SOECs based on conventional oxygen-ion conductors is limited by several issues, such as high operating temperature, hydrogen purification from water, and electrode stability. To avoid these problems, proton-conducting oxides are proposed as electrolyte materials for SOECs. This review paper provides a broad overview of the research progresses made for proton-conducting SOECs, summarizing the past work and finding the problems for the development of proton-conducting SOECs, as well as pointing out potential development directions.

  3. Microstructure characterisation of solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Jacob R.; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Chen, Ming

    degradation of cell components in relation to the loss of electrochemical performance specific to the mode of operation. Thus descriptive microstructure characterization methods are required in combination with electrochemical characterization methods to decipher degradation mechanisms. In the present work......High temperature solid oxide cells can be operated either as fuel cells or electrolysis cells for efficient power generation or production of hydrogen from steam or synthesis gas (H2 + CO) from steam and CO2 respectively. When operated under harsh conditions, they often exhibit microstructural...... quantified using the mean linear intercept method as a function of current density and correlated to increases in serial resistance. The above structural changes are then compared in terms of electrode degradation observed during the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 at current densities up to -1.5 A cm-2...

  4. Polybenzimidazole membranes for zero gap alkaline electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær; Aili, David; Christensen, Erik

    Membranes of m-PBI doped in KOH (aq), 15-35 wt%, show high ionic conductivity in the temperature range 20-80 ºC. In electrolysis cells with nickel foam electrodes m-PBI membranesprovide low internal resistance. With a 60 µm membraneat 80ºC in 20 wt% KOH,1000 mA/cm2 is achieved at 2.25....

  5. Results of tritium experiments on ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium diffusers for application to fusion reactor fuel cleanup systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Tritium tests at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly have demonstrated that ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium alloy diffuser developed in Japan are possible components for a fusion reactor fuel cleanup system. Both components have been successfully operated with tritium for over a year. A failure of the first electrolysis cell was most likely the result of an over voltage on the ceramic. A simple circuit was developed to eliminate this mode of failure. The palladium diffusers tubes exhibited some degradation of mechanical properties as a result of the build up of helium from the tritium decay, after 450 days of operation with tritium, however the effects were not significant enough to affect the performance. New models of the diffuser and electrolysis cell, providing higher flow rates and more tritium compatible designs are currently being tested with tritium. 8 refs., 5 figs

  6. Improved cell for water-vapor electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous-flow electrolytic cells decompose water vapor in steam and room air into hydrogen and oxygen. Sintered iridium oxide catalytic anode coating yields dissociation rates hundredfold greater than those obtained using platinum black. Cell consists of two mirror-image cells, with dual cathode sandwiched between two anodes. Gas traverses serpentine channels within cell and is dissociated at anode. Oxygen mingles with gas stream, while hydrogen migrates through porous matrix and is liberated as gas at cathode.

  7. Cadmium (II) removal mechanisms in microbial electrolysis cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colantonio, Natalie; Kim, Younggy, E-mail: younggy@mcmaster.ca

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • Rapid removal of Cd(II) was achieved in 24 h using microbial electrolysis cells. • Cathodic reduction (electrodeposition) of Cd(II) cannot explain the rapid removal. • H{sub 2} evolution in microbial electrolysis cells increases local pH near the cathode. • High local pH induces Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdCO{sub 3} precipitation only with electric current. • Neutral pH caused by low current and depleted substrate dissolves the precipitated Cd. - Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal, causing serious environmental and human health problems. Conventional methods for removing cadmium from wastewater are expensive and inefficient for low concentrations. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can simultaneously treat wastewater, produce hydrogen gas, and remove heavy metals with low energy requirements. Lab-scale MECs were operated to remove cadmium under various electric conditions: applied voltages of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 V; and a fixed cathode potential of −1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Regardless of the electric condition, rapid removal of cadmium was demonstrated (50–67% in 24 h); however, cadmium concentration in solution increased after the electric current dropped with depleted organic substrate under applied voltage conditions. For the fixed cathode potential, the electric current was maintained even after substrate depletion and thus cadmium concentration did not increase. These results can be explained by three different removal mechanisms: cathodic reduction; Cd(OH){sub 2} precipitation; and CdCO{sub 3} precipitation. When the current decreased with depleted substrates, local pH at the cathode was no longer high due to slowed hydrogen evolution reaction (2H{sup +} + 2e{sup −} → H{sub 2}); thus, the precipitated Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdCO{sub 3} started dissolving. To prevent their dissolution, sufficient organic substrates should be provided when MECs are used for cadmium removal.

  8. Durable solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2014-01-01

    production is required for promoting commercialization of the SOEC technology. In this work, we report a recent 4400 hours test of a state-of-the-art Ni-YSZ electrode supported SOEC cell. The cell consists of a Ni-YSZ (YSZ: yttria stabilized zirconia) support and active fuel electrode, an YSZ electrolyte...... that except for the first 250 hours fast initial degradation, for the rest of the testing period, the cell showed rather stable performance with an moderate degradation rate of around 25 mV/1000 h. The electrochemical impedance spectra show that both serial resistance and polarization resistance of the cell...... and changing of porosity inside the active layer. The degree of these microstructural changes becomes less and less severe along the hydrogen-steam flow path. The present test results show that this type of cell can be used for early demonstration electrolysis at 1A/cm2. Future work should be focus on reducing...

  9. Method and system for purification of gas/liquid streams for fuel cells or electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the first electrode of the fuel cell or electrolysis cell; and/or providing at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the second electrode of the fuel cell or electrolysis cell; and - purifying the gas....../liquid streams towards the first and second electrode; wherein the at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the first electrode and/or the at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the second electrode comprises a material suitable as an electrolyte material...... with the at least one scrubber, with the proviso that the fuel cell or electrolysis cell is not a solid oxide cell....

  10. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logan, B.E.; Call, D.; Cheng, S.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Jeremiasse, A.W.; Rozendal, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few

  11. Conjugated oligoelectrolyte represses hydrogen oxidation by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia; Hou, Huijie; Chen, Xiaofen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Logan, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. A conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), which spontaneously aligns within cell membranes, was shown to completely inhibit H2 uptake by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells. Coulombic efficiencies that were 490

  12. Electrode kinetics of a water vapor electrolysis cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G.

    1974-01-01

    The anodic electrochemical behavior of the water vapor electrolysis cell was investigated. A theoretical review of various aspects of cell overvoltage is presented with special emphasis on concentration overvoltage and activation overvoltage. Other sources of overvoltage are described. The experimental apparatus controlled and measured anode potential and cell current. Potentials between 1.10 and 2.60 V (vs NHE) and currents between 0.1 and 3000 mA were investigated. Different behavior was observed between the standard cell and the free electrolyte cell. The free electrolyte cell followed typical Tafel behavior (i.e. activation overvoltage) with Tafel slopes of about 0.15, and the exchange current densities of 10 to the minus 9th power A/sq cm, both in good agreement with literature values. The standard cell exhibitied this same Tafel behavior at lower current densities but deviated toward lower than expected current densities at higher potentials. This behavior and other results were examined to determine their origin.

  13. A comparative evaluation of different types of microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangli; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Haiping; Cheng, Xing; Zhang, Renduo; Teng, Wenkai

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate different microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production. The systems included microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC), microbial electrolysis desalination cell (MEDC) with bipolar membrane and anion exchange membrane (BP-A MEDC), MEDC with bipolar membrane and cation exchange membrane (BP-C MEDC), and modified microbial desalination cell (M-MDC). The microbial electrolysis desalination cells performed differently in terms of malic acid production and energy consumption. The MEDCC performed best with the highest malic acid production rate (18.4 ± 0.6 mmol/Lh) and the lowest energy consumption (0.35 ± 0.14 kWh/kg). The best performance of MEDCC was attributable to the neutral pH condition in the anode chamber, the lowest internal resistance, and the highest Geobacter percentage of the anode biofilm population among all the reactors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Mineral carbonation can be used for CO2 sequestration, but the reaction rate is slow. In order to accelerate mineral carbonation, acid generated in a microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) was examined to dissolve

  15. A quantitative method to evaluate microbial electrolysis cell effectiveness for energy recovery and wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Ivan; Ren, Lijiao; Siegert, Michael; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are potential candidates for sustainable wastewater treatment as they allow for recovery of the energy input by producing valuable chemicals such as hydrogen gas. Evaluating the effectiveness of MEC treatment

  16. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Cusick, Roland D.; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown

  17. Hydrogen production profiles using furans in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Gover, Tansu; Yaman, Bugra; Droguetti, Jessica; Yilancioglu, Kaan

    2017-06-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells including microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are novel biotechnological tools that can convert organic substances in wastewater or biomass into electricity or hydrogen. Electroactive microbial biofilms used in this technology have ability to transfer electrons from organic compounds to anodes. Evaluation of biofilm formation on anode is crucial for enhancing our understanding of hydrogen generation in terms of substrate utilization by microorganisms. In this study, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were analyzed for hydrogen generation using single chamber membrane-free MECs (17 mL), and anode biofilms were also examined. MECs were inoculated with mixed bacterial culture enriched using chloroethane sulphonate. Hydrogen was succesfully produced in the presence of HMF, but not furfural. MECs generated similar current densities (5.9 and 6 mA/cm 2 furfural and HMF, respectively). Biofilm samples obtained on the 24th and 40th day of cultivation using aromatic compounds were evaluated by using epi-fluorescent microscope. Our results show a correlation between biofilm density and hydrogen generation in single chamber MECs.

  18. Influence of the oxygen electrode and inter-diffusion barrier on the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalmarsson, Per; Sun, Xiufu; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    -diffusion barrier sandwiched between the YSZ electrolyte and an LSCF:CGO oxygen electrode. Impedance Spectroscopy was used during the tests to diagnose the change in electrochemical response of the different components of the SOECs. The results showed a significantly lower degradation rate for the cell with an LSCF......Two Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with different oxygen electrodes have been tested in galvanostatic tests carried out at −1.5 Acm−2 and 800 °C converting 60% of a 50:50% mixture of H2O and CO2 (co-electrolysis). One of the cells had an LSM:YSZ oxygen electrode. The other had an CGO inter...

  19. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. O' Brien; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

    2011-11-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  20. Testing And Performance Analysis Of NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM Bi-Supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Operated In Both Fuel Cell And Steam Electrolysis Modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.C.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Zhang, X.; Farmer, S.C.; Cable, T.L.; Setlock, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  1. Methanobacterium Dominates Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Methane is the primary end product from cathodic current in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the absence of methanogenic inhibitors, but little is known about the archaeal communities that develop in these systems. MECs containing cathodes made from different materials (carbon brushes, or plain graphite blocks or blocks coated with carbon black and platinum, stainless steel, nickel, ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide) were inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated at a set potential of -600 mV (versus a standard hydrogen electrode). The archaeal communities on all cathodes, except those coated with platinum, were predominated by Methanobacterium (median 97% of archaea). Cathodes with platinum contained mainly archaea most similar to Methanobrevibacter. Neither of these methanogens were abundant (<0.1% of archaea) in the inoculum, and therefore their high abundance on the cathode resulted from selective enrichment. In contrast, bacterial communities on the cathode were more diverse, containing primarily δ-Proteobacteria (41% of bacteria). The lack of a consistent bacterial genus on the cathodes indicated that there was no similarly selective enrichment of bacteria on the cathode. These results suggest that the genus Methanobacterium was primarily responsible for methane production in MECs when cathodes lack efficient catalysts for hydrogen gas evolution. (Figure Presented).

  2. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  3. Microbial electrolysis cells turning to be versatile technology: recent advances and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    and achieve high-yield hydrogen production from wide range of organic matters at relatively mild conditions. This approach greatly reduces the electric energy cost for hydrogen production in contrast to direct water electrolysis. In addition to hydrogen production, MECs may also support several energetically......Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are an electricity-mediated microbial bioelectrochemical technology, which is originally developed for high-efficiency biological hydrogen production from waste streams. Compared to traditional biological technologies, MECs can overcome thermodynamic limitations...

  4. Life Time Performance Characterization of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer a promising technological solution for efficient energy conversion and production of hydrogen or syngas. The commercialization of the SOEC technology can be promoted if SOECs can be operated at high current density with stable performance over ~5 years...... - 3 years (continuous operation, setting 1.5 V as the upper voltage defining “end of life”). The results provide technological input to future design of electrolysis plants for hydrogen production. © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  5. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs

  6. Model-supported characterization of a PEM water electrolysis cell for the effect of compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frensch, Steffen Henrik; Olesen, Anders Christian; Simon Araya, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the cell compression of a PEM water electrolysis cell. A small single cell is therefore electrochemically analyzed by means of polarization behavior and impedance spectroscopy throughout a range of currents (0.01 A cm−2 to 2.0 A cm−2) at two temperatures (60...

  7. High Temperature Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elder, Rachael; Cumming, Denis; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of carbon dioxide, or co-electrolysis of carbon dioxide and steam, has a great potential for carbon dioxide utilisation. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), operating between 500 and 900. °C, is used to reduce carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. If steam is also i...

  8. Microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells for the production of bioelectricity and biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Tao; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2013-01-01

    Today's global energy crisis requires a multifaceted solution. Bioenergy is an important part of the solution. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology stands out as an attractive potential technology in bioenergy. MFCs can convert energy stored in organic matter directly into bioelectricity. MFCs can also be operated in the electrolysis mode as microbial electrolysis cells to produce bioproducts such as hydrogen and ethanol. Various wastewaters containing low-grade organic carbons that are otherwise unutilized can be used as feed streams for MFCs. Despite major advances in the past decade, further improvements in MFC power output and cost reduction are needed for MFCs to be practical. This paper analysed MFC operating principles using bioenergetics and bioelectrochemistry. Several major issues were explored to improve the MFC performance. An emphasis was placed on the use of catalytic materials for MFC electrodes. Recent advances in the production of various biomaterials using MFCs were also investigated.

  9. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before...

  10. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  11. Hydrogen Production Performance of a 10-Cell Planar Solid-Oxide Electrolysis Stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Steve Herring; J. Hartvigsen

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (∼140 (micro)m thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1-0.6), gas flow rates (1000-4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 100 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate

  12. Syntrophic interactions drive the hydrogen production from glucose at low temperature in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    H2 can be obtained from glucose by fermentation at mesophilic temperatures, but here we demonstrate that hydrogen can also be obtained from glucose at low temperatures using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). H2 was produced from glucose at 4°C

  13. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.; Perez, Joe M.; Lloyd, Wallis A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of glycerol for hydrogen gas production was examined via electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A hydrogen yield of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation

  14. Diagnosis of a cathode-supported solid oxide electrolysis cell by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nechache, A.; Mansuy, A.; Petitjean, M.; Mougin, J.; Mauvy, F.; Boukamp, Bernard A.; Cassir, M.; Ringuede, A.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis (HTSE) is a quite recent topic where most of the studies are focused on performance measurements and degradation observations, mainly achieved by polarization curve. However, it mainly leads to the overall cell behaviour. To get more specific knowledge on the operation

  15. The importance of OH − transport through anion exchange membrane in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Yaoli; Logan, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    In two-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) with anion exchange membranes (AEMs), a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) is typically used to avoid increases in catholyte pH as Nernst equation calculations indicate that high pHs adversely impact

  16. Optimization of catholyte concentration and anolyte pHs in two chamber microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen production rate in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) using a non-buffered saline catholyte (NaCl) can be optimized through proper control of the initial anolyte pH and catholyte NaCl concentration. The highest hydrogen yield of 3

  17. High Temperature Alkaline Electrolysis Cells with Metal Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operating at 250°C and 40 bar are able to convert electrical energy into hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. In the present work we demonstrate the application of a PTFE hydrophobic network and Ag nanowires as oxygen evolution electrocatalyst...

  18. New Electrolytes for CO2 Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Pia Lolk

    The aim of this thesis has been to explore the potential of aqueous immobilized K2CO3 as a possible electrolyte for co-electrolysis of CO2 and water at approx. 200 °C. This has been done by exploring the properties of pure K2CO3 (aq) and immobilized K2CO3 (aq) as well as the properties...... was observed for 10 wt% K2CO3 immobilized in TiO2 when changing the atmosphere from N2 to CO2. K2CO3 (aq) immobilized in TiO2 shows good promise as a potential electrolyte for co-electrolysis of CO2 and water at 200 °C....... in a 10 wt% K2CO3 (aq) solution are K+ and HCO3-. The water partial pressure as well as the amount of water vapour at different temperatures, pressures and K2CO3 (aq) concentrations was also calculated using FactSage. K2CO3 (aq) was immobilized in both SrTiO3 and TiO2. It was found that a loss...

  19. Understanding the processes governing performance and durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Sun, Xiufu; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    Operation of a Ni–YSZ electrode supported Solid Oxide Cell (SOC) was studied in both fuel cell mode (FC-mode) and electrolysis cell mode (EC-mode) in mixtures of H2O/H2, CO2/CO, H2O/H2O/CO2/CO at 750 °C, 800 °C and 850 °C. Although the SOCs are reversible, the polarisation characterisation shows ...

  20. Hydrogen production through high-temperature electrolysis in a solid oxide cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.St.; Lessing, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.; Hartvigsen, J.; Elangovan, S.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental research programme is being conducted by the INEEL and Ceramatec, Inc., to test the high-temperature, electrolytic production of hydrogen from steam using a solid oxide cell. The research team is designing and testing solid oxide cells for operation in the electrolysis mode, producing hydrogen rising a high-temperature heat and electrical energy. The high-temperature heat and the electrical power would be supplied simultaneously by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. Operation at high temperature reduces the electrical energy requirement for electrolysis and also increases the thermal efficiency of the power-generating cycle. The high-temperature electrolysis process will utilize heat from a specialized secondary loop carrying a steam/hydrogen mixture. It is expected that, through the combination of a high-temperature reactor and high-temperature electrolysis, the process will achieve an overall thermal conversion efficiency of 40 to 50%o while avoiding the challenging chemistry and corrosion issues associated with the thermochemical processes. Planar solid oxide cell technology is being utilised because it has the best potential for high efficiency due to minimized voltage and current losses. These losses also decrease with increasing temperature. Initial testing has determined the performance of single 'button' cells. Subsequent testing will investigate the performance of multiple-cell stacks operating in the electrolysis mode. Testing is being performed both at Ceramatec and at INEEL. The first cells to be tested were single cells based on existing materials and fabrication technology developed at Ceramatec for production of solid oxide fuel cells. These cells use a relatively thick (∼ 175 μm) electrolyte of yttria- or scandia-stabilised zirconia, with nickel-zirconia cermet anodes and strontium-doped lanthanum manganite cathodes. Additional custom cells with lanthanum gallate electrolyte have been developed and tested. Results to date have

  1. On process model representation and AlF{sub 3} dynamics of aluminium electrolysis cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drengstig, Tormod

    1997-12-31

    This thesis develops a formal graphical based process representation scheme for modelling complex, non-standard unit processes. The scheme is based on topological and phenomenological decompositions. The topological decomposition is the modularization of processes into modules representing volumes and boundaries, whereas the phenomenological decomposition focuses on physical phenomena and characteristics inside these topological modules. This defines legal and illegal connections between components at all levels and facilitates a full implementation of the methodology into a computer aided modelling tool that can interpret graphical symbols and guide modelers towards a consistent mathematical model of the process. The thesis also presents new results on the excess AlF{sub 3} and bath temperature dynamics of an aluminium electrolysis cell. A dynamic model of such a cell is developed and validated against known behaviour and real process data. There are dynamics that the model does not capture and this is further discussed. It is hypothesized that long-term prediction of bath temperature and excess AlF{sub 3} is impossible with a current efficiency model considering only bath composition and temperature. A control strategy for excess AlF{sub 3} and bath temperature is proposed based on an almost constant AlF{sub 3} input close to average consumption and energy manipulations to compensate for the disturbances. 96 refs., 135 figs., 22 tabs.

  2. Characterization of Time-Dependent Behavior of Ramming Paste Used in an Aluminum Electrolysis Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orangi, Sakineh; Picard, Donald; Alamdari, Houshang; Ziegler, Donald; Fafard, Mario

    2015-12-01

    A new methodology was proposed for the characterization of time-dependent behavior of materials in order to develop a constitutive model. The material used for the characterization was ramming paste, a porous material used in an aluminum electrolysis cell, which is baked in place under varying loads induced by the thermal expansion of other components of the cell. In order to develop a constitutive model representing the paste mechanical behavior, it was necessary to get some insight into its behavior using samples which had been baked at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 1000 °C. Creep stages, effect of testing temperature on the creep, creep-recovery, as well as nonlinear creep were observed for designing a constitutive law. Uniaxial creep-recovery tests were carried out at two temperatures on the baked paste: ambient and higher. Results showed that the shape of creep curves was similar to a typical creep; recovery happened and the creep was shown to be nonlinear. Those experimental observations and the identification of nonlinear parameters of developed constitutive model demonstrated that the baked paste experiences nonlinear viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior at different temperatures.

  3. Modeling and optimization of a novel solar chimney cogeneration power plant combined with solid oxide electrolysis/fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneydi Shariatzadeh, O.; Refahi, A.H.; Abolhassani, S.S.; Rahmani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed a solar chimney cogeneration power plant combined with solid oxide fuel cell. • Conducted single-objective economic optimization of cycle by genetic algorithm. • Stored surplus hydrogen in season solarium to supply electricity in winter by SOFC. - Abstract: Using solar chimney in desert areas like El Paso city in Texas, USA, with high intensity solar radiation is efficient and environmental friendly. However, one of the main challenges in terms of using solar chimneys is poor electricity generation at night. In this paper, a new power plant plan is proposed which simultaneously generates heat and electricity using a solar chimney with solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide electrolysis cells. In one hand, the solar chimney generates electricity by sunlight and supplies a part of demand. Then, additional electricity is generated through the high temperature electrolysis which produces hydrogen that is stored in tanks and converted into electricity by solid oxide fuel cells. After designing and modeling the cycle components, the economic aspect of this power plant is considered numerically by means of genetic algorithm. The results indicate that, 0.28 kg/s hydrogen is produced at the peak of the radiation. With such a hydrogen production rate, this system supplies 79.26% and 37.04% of the demand in summer and winter respectively in a district of El Paso city.

  4. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.

    2015-01-01

    . Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in both H2/H2O and CO/CO2 revealed an increase in resistance of the fuel electrode after each CO2 electrolysis current-voltage curve, indicating possible carbon deposition. The difference in partial oxygen pressure between inlet and outlet was analyzed to verify carbon...... in detail. In an attempt to mitigate the degradation due to carbon deposition, the Ni-YSZ electrode was infiltrated with a gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) solution. Initial results indicate that the coking tolerance was not enhanced, but it is still unclear whether infiltrated cells degrade less. However......, infiltrated cells display a significant performance enhancement before coking, especially under electrolysis current. The investigation thus indicated carbon formation in the Ni containing fuel electrode before the thermodynamically calculated threshold for average measurements of the cell was reached...

  5. Life Time Performance Characterization of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    . In this work, long-term durability of Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) supported planar SOECs were investigated at 800 oC for electrolysis of steam. The cells, which represent the state-of-the-art SOEC technology at Technical University of Denmark (DTU), have a Ni/YSZ support and active fuel electrode......, OCV) to -1.25 A/cm2. Detailed electrochemical and post-mortem characterizations were further conducted in order to clarify the cell or electrode degradation mechanisms. The cells show stable performance, with a steady-state degradation rate of up to 2 %/1000 h for electrolysis tests with current......Globally the amount of electricity generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar energy is increasing. To integrate high amount of fluctuating renewable energy into the existing energy grid, efficient and cost competitive conversion of electricity into other kinds of energy carriers...

  6. Multiple paths of electron flow to current in microbial electrolysis cells fed with low and high concentrations of propionate

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda; Katuri, Krishna; Gorron, Eduardo; Logan, Bruce E.; Saikaly, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) provide a viable approach for bioenergy generation from fermentable substrates such as propionate. However, the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs are unknown. Here, the paths

  7. Evaluation of low cost cathode materials for treatment of industrial and food processing wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tenca, Alberto; Cusick, Roland D.; Schievano, Andrea; Oberti, Roberto; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to treat wastewater and produce hydrogen gas, but low cost cathode catalysts are needed to make this approach economical. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and stainless steel (SS) were evaluated

  8. CFD Model Of A Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell For Hydrogen Production From Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec2, Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL

  9. Treatment of process water containing heavy metals with a two-stage electrolysis procedure in a membrane electrolysis cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, R.; Krebs, P. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Siedlungs- und Industriewasserwirtschaft, Mommsenstrasse 13, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seidel, H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Morgenstern, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Analytik, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Foerster, H.J.; Thiele, W. [Eilenburger Elektrolyse- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Ziegelstrasse 2, D-04838 Eilenburg (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The capability of a two-stage electrochemical treatment for the regeneration of acidic heavy-metal containing process water was examined. The process water came from sediment bioleaching and was characterized by a wide spectrum of dissolved metals, a high sulfate content, and a pH of about 3. In the modular laboratory model cell used, the anode chamber and the cathode chamber were separated by a central chamber fitted with an ion exchanger membrane on either side. The experiments were carried out applying a platinum anode and a graphite cathode at a current density of 0.1 A/cm{sup 2}. The circulation flow of the process water in the batch process amounted to 35 L/h, the electrolysis duration was 5.5 h at maximum and the total electrolysis current was about 1 A. In the first stage, the acidic process water containing metals passed through the cathode chamber. In the second stage, the cathodically pretreated process water was electrolyzed anodically. In the cathode chamber the main load of dissolved Cu, Zn, Cr and Pb was eliminated. The sulfuric acid surplus of 3-4 g/L decreased to about 1 g/L, the pH rose from initially 3.0 to 4-5, but the desired pH of 9-10 was not achieved. Precipitation in the proximity to the cathode evidently takes place at a higher pH than farther away. The dominant process in the anode chamber was the precipitation of amorphous MnO{sub 2} owing to the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II). The further depletion of the remaining heavy metals in the cathodically pretreated process water by subsequent anodic treatment was nearly exhaustive, more than 99 % of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were removed from the leachate. The high depletion of heavy metals might be due to both the sorption on MnO{sub 2} precipitates and/or basic ferrous sulfate formed anodically, and the migration of metal ions through the cation exchanger membrane via the middle chamber into the cathode chamber. In the anode chamber, the sulfuric acid content increased to 6-7 g/L and the

  10. Experiments on a ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ohno, Hideo; Naruse, Yuji; Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.; Binning, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser are developed in Japan and is tested with tritium in Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in order to confirm the feasibility as possible upgrades for the fuel cleanup system (PCU). The ceramic electrolysis cell made of stabilized zirconia was operated at 630 0 C for an extended period with a mixture of 3% T 2 O in He carrier gas in the circulation system with oxidizing catalyst bed. The palladium diffuser was tested with circulated pure tritium gas at 280 0 C to verify the compatibility of the alloy with tritium, since the 3 He produced in the metal could cause a degradation. The isotopic effects were also measured for both devices

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel production in pressurized solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2012-01-01

    A promising way to store wind and solar electricity is by electrolysis of H2O and CO2 using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) to produce synthetic hydrocarbon fuels that can be used in existing fuel infrastructure. Pressurized operation decreases the cell internal resistance and enables...... improved system efficiency, potentially lowering the fuel production cost significantly. In this paper, we present a thermodynamic analysis of synthetic methane and dimethyl ether (DME) production using pressurized SOECs, in order to determine feasible operating conditions for producing the desired......, and outlet gas composition. For methane production, low temperature and high pressure operation could improve the system efficiency, but might lead to a higher capital cost. For DME production, high pressure SOEC operation necessitates higher operating temperature in order to avoid carbon formation at higher...

  12. Research Progress of Hydrogen Production fromOrganic Wastes in Microbial Electrolysis Cell(MEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Yin-sheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrolysis cell(MECtechnology as an emerging technology, has achieved the target of hydrogen production from different substrates such as waste water, forestry wastes, activated sludge by simultaneous enzymolysis and fermentation, which can effectively improve the efficiency of resource utilization. This paper described the working principle of MEC and analyzed these factors influencing the process of hydrogen production from organic waste in MEC.

  13. Summary Report on Solid-oxide Electrolysis Cell Testing and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; R.C. O' Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2012-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. From 2003 to 2009, this work was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, under the Office of Nuclear Energy. Starting in 2010, the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research program has been sponsored by the INL Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This report provides a summaryof program activities performed in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 and the first quarter of FY-12, with a focus on small-scale testing and cell development activities. HTE research priorities during this period have included the development and testing of SOEC and stack designs that exhibit high-efficiency initial performance and low, long-term degradation rates. This report includes contributions from INL and five industry partners: Materials and Systems Research, Incorporated (MSRI); Versa Power Systems, Incorporated (VPS); Ceramatec, Incorporated; National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Glenn Research Center (NASA - GRC); and the St. Gobain Advanced Materials Division. These industry partners have developed SOEC cells and stacks for in-house testing in the electrolysis mode and independent testing at INL. Additional fundamental research and post-test physical examinations have been performed at two university partners: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Connecticut. Summaries of these activities and test results are also presented in this report.

  14. Feasibility of Using an Electrolysis Cell for Quantification of the Electrolytic Products of Water from Gravimetric Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Samuel; Gebeyehu, Zewdu; Dabke, Rajeev B

    2018-01-01

    A gravimetric method for the quantitative assessment of the products of electrolysis of water is presented. In this approach, the electrolysis cell was directly powered by 9 V batteries. Prior to electrolysis, a known amount of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) was added to the cathode compartment, and an excess amount of KHCO 3 was added to the anode compartment electrolyte. During electrolysis, cathode and anode compartments produced OH - (aq) and H + (aq) ions, respectively. Electrolytically produced OH - (aq) neutralized the KHP, and the completion of this neutralization was detected by a visual indicator color change. Electrolytically produced H + (aq) reacted with HCO 3 - (aq) liberating CO 2 (g) from the anode compartment. Concurrent liberation of H 2 (g) and O 2 (g) at the cathode and anode, respectively, resulted in a decrease in the mass of the cell. Mass of the electrolysis cell was monitored. Liberation of CO 2 (g) resulted in a pronounced effect of a decrease in mass. Experimentally determined decrease in mass (53.7 g/Faraday) agreed with that predicted from Faraday's laws of electrolysis (53.0 g/Faraday). The efficacy of the cell was tested to quantify the acid content in household vinegar samples. Accurate results were obtained for vinegar analysis with a precision better than 5% in most cases. The cell offers the advantages of coulometric method and additionally simplifies the circuitry by eliminating the use of a constant current power source or a coulometer.

  15. Complementary techniques for solid oxide electrolysis cell characterisation at the micro- and nano-scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiedenmann, D.; Hauch, Anne; Grobety, B.

    2010-01-01

    ), material degradation and evaporation can occur, e.g., from the cell-sealing material, leading to poisoning effects and aging mechanisms that decrease the cell efficiency and long-term durability. To investigate such cell degradation processes, thorough examination of SOCs often requires a chemical...... approach for the structural and chemical characterisation of changes in aged cathode-supported electrolysis cells produced at Risø DTU, Denmark. Additionally, we present results from the characterisation of impurities at the electrolyte/hydrogen interface caused by evaporation of sealing material....

  16. Studies of water electrolysis in polymeric membrane cells; Estudos de eletrolise aquosa em celulas de membrana polimerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira-Silva, M.A.; Linardi, M.; Saliba-Silva, A.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen represents great opportunity to be a substitute for fossil fuels in the future. Water as a renewable source of hydrogen is of great interest, since it is abundant and can decompose, producing only pure H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This decomposition of water can be accomplished by processes such as electrolysis, thermal decomposition and thermochemical cycles. The membrane electrolysis has been proposed as a viable process for hydrogen production using thermal and electrical energy derived from nuclear energy or any renewable source like solar energy. In this work, within the context of optimization of the electrolysis process, it is intended to develop a mathematical model that can simulate and assist in parameterization of the electrolysis performed by polymer membrane electrolytic cell. The experimental process to produce hydrogen via the cell membrane, aims to optimize the amount of gas produced using renewable energy with non-carbogenic causing no harm by producing gases deleterious to the environment. (author)

  17. Bioelectrohydrogenesis and inhibition of methanogenic activity in microbial electrolysis cells - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Rengasamy; Cheng, Ka Yu; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Bose, Arpita; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2017-11-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are a promising technology for biological hydrogen production. Compared to abiotic water electrolysis, a much lower electrical voltage (~0.2V) is required for hydrogen production in MECs. It is also an attractive waste treatment technology as a variety of biodegradable substances can be used as the process feedstock. Underpinning this technology is a recently discovered bioelectrochemical pathway known as "bioelectrohydrogenesis". However, little is known about the mechanism of this pathway, and numerous hurdles are yet to be addressed to maximize hydrogen yield and purity. Here, we review various aspects including reactor configurations, microorganisms, substrates, electrode materials, and inhibitors of methanogenesis in order to improve hydrogen generation in MECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Summary of the Mol electrolysis cell test program in the CRL tritium laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Keyes, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The development of electrolysis technology for highly tritiated water at the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN), Mol, Belgium, focused on A Low Inventory Capillary Electrolyser (ALICE). The key characteristic of ALICE is its low liquid inventory, a key feature for the radio-toxicity of tritiated water. A program to test this electrolytic cell design with highly tritiated water in the Chalk River Tritium Laboratory was initiated in 1988 and extended through to early 1995. The activities conducted at CRL and associated with the experimental program-design, installation, licensing and commissioning activities- are described in this report along with the results of the test program conducted on the experimental system with non-tritiated heavy water. The installation in the CRL Tritium Laboratory consisted of three main sections: the electrolysis section, the tritium storage and supply section, and the recombination section. 16 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  19. Hydrogen Through Water Electrolysis and Biomass Gasification for Application in Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kirosa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is considered to be one of the most promising green energy carrier in the energy storage and conversion scenario. Although it is abundant on Earth in the form of compounds, its occurrence in free form is extremely low. Thus, it has to be produced by reforming processes, steam reforming (SR, partial oxidation (POX and auto-thermal reforming (ATR mainly from fossil fuels for high throughput with high energy requirements, pyrolysis of biomass and electrolysis. Electrolysis is brought about by passing electric current though two electrodes to evolve water into its constituent parts, viz. hydrogen and oxygen, respectively. Hydrogen produced by non-noble metal catalysts for both anode and cathode is therefore cost-effective and can be integrated into fuel cells for direct chemical energy conversion into electrical energy electricity, thus meeting the sustainable and renewable use with low carbon footprint.

  20. Status on the Component Models Developed in the Modelica Framework: High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis Plant & Gas Turbine Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk Kim, Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKellar, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This report has been prepared as part of an effort to design and build a modeling and simulation (M&S) framework to assess the economic viability of a nuclear-renewable hybrid energy system (N-R HES). In order to facilitate dynamic M&S of such an integrated system, research groups in multiple national laboratories have been developing various subsystems as dynamic physics-based components using the Modelica programming language. In fiscal year (FY) 2015, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed a dynamic analysis of two region-specific N-R HES configurations, including the gas-to-liquid (natural gas to Fischer-Tropsch synthetic fuel) and brackish water reverse osmosis desalination plants as industrial processes. In FY 2016, INL has developed two additional subsystems in the Modelica framework: a high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) plant and a gas turbine power plant (GTPP). HTSE has been proposed as a high priority industrial process to be integrated with a light water reactor (LWR) in an N-R HES. This integrated energy system would be capable of dynamically apportioning thermal and electrical energy (1) to provide responsive generation to the power grid and (2) to produce alternative industrial products (i.e., hydrogen and oxygen) without generating any greenhouse gases. A dynamic performance analysis of the LWR/HTSE integration case was carried out to evaluate the technical feasibility (load-following capability) and safety of such a system operating under highly variable conditions requiring flexible output. To support the dynamic analysis, the detailed dynamic model and control design of the HTSE process, which employs solid oxide electrolysis cells, have been developed to predict the process behavior over a large range of operating conditions. As first-generation N-R HES technology will be based on LWRs, which provide thermal energy at a relatively low temperature, complementary temperature-boosting technology was suggested for integration with the

  1. Water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Franz H. (Inventor); Grigger, David J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an electrolysis cell forming hydrogen and oxygen at space terminals. The anode terminal is porous and able to form oxygen within the cell and permit escape of the gaseous oxygen through the anode and out through a flow line in the presence of backpressure. Hydrogen is liberated in the cell at the opposing solid metal cathode which is permeable to hydrogen but not oxygen so that the migratory hydrogen formed in the cell is able to escape from the cell. The cell is maintained at an elevated pressure so that the oxygen liberated by the cell is delivered at elevated pressure without pumping to raise the pressure of the oxygen.

  2. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  3. Alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperature and pressure of 250 °C and 42 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    A new type of alkaline electrolysis cells with nickel foam based gas diffusion electrodes and KOH (aq) immobilized in mesoporous SrTiO3 has been developed and tested at temperatures and pressures up to 250 °C and 42 bar, respectively. Current densities of 1.0 A cm−2 have been measured at a cell v...... voltage of 1.5 V without the use of expensive noble metal catalysts. High electrical efficiency and current density combined with relatively small production costs may lead to both reduced investment and operating costs for hydrogen and oxygen production....

  4. Innovative self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC) for biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC), in which a specially designed anode chamber and external electricity supply were not needed, was developed for in situ biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors. In batch experiments, the hydrogen production rate reached 17.8 m...... improvement of voltage output and reduction of electron losses were essential for efficient hydrogen generation. In addition, alternate exchanging the electricity-assisting and hydrogen-producing function between the two cell units of the SMEC was found to be an effective approach to inhibit methanogens...

  5. Long-term Steam Electrolysis with Electrolyte-Supported Solid Oxide Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefold, Josef; Brisse, Annabelle; Poepke, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Steam electrolysis over 11000 h with an electrolyte-supported solid oxide cell is discussed. The cell of 45 cm"2 area consists of a scandia/ceria doped zirconia electrolyte (6Sc1CeSZ), CGO diffusion-barrier/adhesion layers, a lanthanum strontium cobaltite ferrite (LSCF) oxygen electrode, and a nickel steam/hydrogen electrode. After initial 2500 h operation with lower current-density magnitude, the current density was set to j = -0.9 A cm"−"2 and the steam conversion rate to 51%. This led to a cell voltage of 1.185 V at 847 °C cell temperature. Average voltage degradation was 7.3 mV/1000 h ( 100% throughout the test (with an external heat source for evaporation). Impedance spectroscopic measurements revealed a degradation almost entirely due to increasing ohmic resistance. The rate of resistance increase was initially faster (up to 40 mΩ cm"2/1000 h) and stabilised after several 1000 h operation. After 9000 h a small (non-ohmic) electrode degradation became detectable (<2 mV/1000 h), superimposed to ohmic degradation. The small electrode degradation is understood as indication for largely reversible (electrolysis cell/fuel cell) behaviour.

  6. The Effect of PFSA Membrane Compression on the Predicted Performance of a High Pressure PEM Electrolysis Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a non-equilibrium formulation of a compression dependent water uptake model has been implemented in a two-dimensional, two-phase, multi-component and non-isothermal high pressure PEM electrolysis model. The non-equilibrium formulation of the water uptake model was chosen in order...... to account for interfacial transport kinetics between each fluid phase and the perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane. Besides modeling water uptake, the devised membrane model accounts for water transport through diffusion and electro-osmotic drag in the electrolyte phase, and hydraulic permeation...... in the liquid phase. Charge transport and electrochemistry are likewise included. The obtained model is validated against experimental measurements. In order to investigate the effect of membrane compression, a parametric study is carried. Results underline that the predicted water uptake and cell voltage...

  7. Mechanical Properties of Supports and Half‐Cells for Solid Oxide Electrolysis Influenced by Alumina‐Zirconia Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlas, Benoit; Ni, De Wei; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the durability and robustness of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) and stacks, it is necessary to improve the strength of its components. In cathode supported SOEC, the main structural component is the Ni(O)- YSZ support. But the strength of the half-cell or cell is also...... determined by the strength of other weaker components and by the residual stress state induced by the thermal expansion mismatch. In this study, the mechanical properties of Ni(O)-3YSZ supports with a reference composition and with substitution of 3YSZ by 20A3YSZ (3YSZ with 20 wt.% Al2O3) have been tested...... and compared. The initial interest of this substitution are a decrease of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch within the half-cell and the fact that 20A3YSZ is stronger than 3YSZ. The influence of the process on the composition, strength, elastic properties and electrical conductivity...

  8. Cell and method for electrolysis of water and anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, J. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for converting water vapor to oxygen and hydrogen include an anode comprising a foraminous conductive metal substrate with a 65-85 weight percent iridium oxide coating and 15-35 weight percent of a high temperature resin binder. A matrix member contains an electrolyte to which a cathode substantially inert. The foraminous metal member is most desirably expanded tantalum mesh, and the cell desirably includes reservoir elements of porous sintered metal in contact with the anode to receive and discharge electrolyte to the matrix member as required. Upon entry of a water vapor containing airstream into contact with the outer surface of the anode and thence into contact with iridium oxide coating, the water vapor is electrolytically converted to hydrogen ions and oxygen with the hydrogen ions migrating through the matrix to the cathode and the oxygen gas produced at the anode to enrich the air stream passing by the anode.

  9. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.

    2015-01-01

    the onset of carbon deposition. The outlet gas composition at each current step was estimated based on the inlet gas composition and the reactant conversion using Faraday's law. The increase in voltage was observed at lower outlet pCO/pCO2 ratios than that corresponding to the expected thermodynamic......The carbon formation threshold in an operating cell was investigated during electrolysis of an idealized reactant atmosphere of CO and CO2. The electrolysis current was gradually increased in steps until the cell voltage spontaneously increased, thereby indicating cell degradation and possibly...

  10. Microbial electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) as a novel type of microbial electrochemical technologies has been proposed to produce H2 and CH4. In this study, we developed MREC to produce the strong oxidant H2O2. In the MREC, electrical potential generated by the exoelectrogens...... and the salinity-gradient between sea water and river water were utilized to drive the high-rate H2O2 production without external power supply. Operational parameters such as air flow rate, pH, cathodic potential, flow rate of high and low concentration solution were investigated. The optimal H2O2 production were...

  11. VOF modelling of gas–liquid flow in PEM water electrolysis cell micro-channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafmejani, Saeed Sadeghi; Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the gaseliquid flow through an interdigitated anode flow field of a PEM water electrolysis cell (PEMEC) is analysed using a three-dimensional, transient, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. To account for two-phase flow, the volume of fluid (VOF) method in ANSYS Fluent 17...... of the channel. The model is capable of revealing effect of different bubble shapes/lengths in the outgoing channel. Shape and the sequence of the bubbles affect the water flow distribution in the ATL. The model presented in this work is the first step in the development of a comprehensive CFD model...

  12. Two stage bioethanol refining with multi litre stacked microbial fuel cell and microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugnaux, Marc; Happe, Manuel; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Gloriod, Olivier; Huguenin, Gérald; Blatter, Maxime; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-12-01

    Ethanol, electricity, hydrogen and methane were produced in a two stage bioethanol refinery setup based on a 10L microbial fuel cell (MFC) and a 33L microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The MFC was a triple stack for ethanol and electricity co-generation. The stack configuration produced more ethanol with faster glucose consumption the higher the stack potential. Under electrolytic conditions ethanol productivity outperformed standard conditions and reached 96.3% of the theoretically best case. At lower external loads currents and working potentials oscillated in a self-synchronized manner over all three MFC units in the stack. In the second refining stage, fermentation waste was converted into methane, using the scale up MEC stack. The bioelectric methanisation reached 91% efficiency at room temperature with an applied voltage of 1.5V using nickel cathodes. The two stage bioethanol refining process employing bioelectrochemical reactors produces more energy vectors than is possible with today's ethanol distilleries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Powering microbial electrolysis cells by capacitor circuits charged using microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2013-05-01

    A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was powered by a capacitor based energy storage circuit using energy from a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to increase MEC hydrogen production rates compared to that possible by the MFC alone. To prevent voltage reversal, MFCs charged the capacitors in a parallel configuration, and then the capacitors were discharged in series to boost the voltage that was used to power the MECs. The optimal capacitance for charging was found to be ∼0.01 F for each MFC. The use of the capacitor charging system increased energy recoveries from 9 to 13%, and hydrogen production rates increased from 0.31 to 0.72 m3 m-3-day-1, compared to coupled systems without capacitors. The circuit efficiency (the ratio of the energy that was discharged to the MEC to the energy provided to the capacitor from the MFCs) was ∼90%. These results provide an improved method for linking MFCs to MECs for renewable hydrogen gas production. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of an electrolysis cell for highly tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahier, A.; Baetsle, L.; Buggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Goossens, W.

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the European fusion technology programme, SCK/CEN has started the development of a 100 ml per day electrolyser for decomposing the highly tritiated water that will be formed when tritium is extracted from the breeder or when the plasma exhaust is purified. Safety and reliability of this electrolytic system will have to be guaranteed for at least 10 4 working hours. Three different cell configurations are being studied one of which is most promising because of its low tritiated water inventory (about 12 ml), its low working temperature ( 0 C) and other advantages such as avoiding any recirculation of radioactive streams

  15. A Vivens Ex Vivo Study on the Synergistic Effect of Electrolysis and Freezing on the Cell Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugnani, Franco; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Marcuzzo, Thomas; Bottin, Cristina; Mikus, Paul; Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Freezing-cryosurgery, and electrolysis-electrochemical therapy (EChT), are two important minimally invasive surgery tissue ablation technologies. Despite major advantages they also have some disadvantages. Cryosurgery cannot induce cell death at high subzero freezing temperatures and requires multiple freeze thaw cycles, while EChT requires high concentrations of electrolytic products-which makes it a lengthy procedure. Based on the observation that freezing increases the concentration of solutes (including products of electrolysis) in the frozen region and permeabilizes the cell membrane to these products, this study examines the hypothesis that there could be a synergistic effect between freezing and electrolysis in their use together for tissue ablation. Using an animal model we refer to as vivens ex vivo, which may be of value in reducing the use of animals for experiments, combined with a Hematoxylin stain of the nucleus, we show that there are clinically relevant protocols in which the cell nucleus appears intact when electrolysis and freezing are used separately but is affected by certain combinations of electrolysis and freezing.

  16. Degradation of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Operated at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    In this work the durability of solid oxide cells for co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45 % H2O + 45 % CO2 + 10 % H2) at high current densities was investigated. The tested cells are Ni-YSZ electrode supported, with a YSZ electrolyte and either a LSM-YSZ or LSCF-CGO oxygen electrode....... A current density of -1.5 and -2.0 A/cm2 was applied to the cell and the gas conversion was 45 % and 60 %, respectively. The cells were operated for a period of up to 700 hours. The electrochemical analysis revealed significant performance degradation for the ohmic process, oxygen ion interfacial transfer...

  17. Carbon dioxide reduction in a tubular solid oxide electrolysis cell for a carbon recycling energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dipu, Arnoldus Lambertus, E-mail: dipu.a.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ujisawa, Yutaka [Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, 16-1, Sunayama, Kamisu, Ibaraki 314-0255 (Japan); Ryu, Junichi; Kato, Yukitaka [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-22, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    A new energy transformation system based on carbon recycling is proposed called the active carbon recycling energy system (ACRES). A high-temperature gas reactor was used as the main energy source for ACRES. An experimental study based on the ACRES concept of carbon monoxide (CO) regeneration via high-temperature reduction of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was carried out using a tubular solid oxide electrolysis cell employing Ni-LSM cermet|YSZ|YSZ-LSM as the cathode|electrolyte|anode. The current density increased with increasing CO{sub 2} concentration at the cathode, which was attributed to a decrease in cathode activation and concentration overpotential. Current density, as well as the CO and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production rates, increased with increasing operating temperature. The highest CO and O{sub 2} production rates of 1.24 and 0.64 μmol/min cm{sup 2}, respectively, were measured at 900 °C. Based on the electrolytic characteristics of the cell, the scale of a combined ACRES CO{sub 2} electrolysis/iron production facility was estimated.

  18. Highly efficient high temperature electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Ebbesen, Sune; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2008-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of water and steam may provide an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly production of H-2 Using electricity produced from sustainable, non-fossil energy sources. To achieve cost competitive electrolysis cells that are both high performing i.e. minimum...... internal resistance of the cell, and long-term stable, it is critical to develop electrode materials that are optimal for steam electrolysis. In this article electrolysis cells for electrolysis of water or steam at temperatures above 200 degrees C for production of H-2 are reviewed. High temperature...... electrolysis is favourable from a thermodynamic point of view, because a part of the required energy can be supplied as thermal heat, and the activation barrier is lowered increasing the H-2 production rate. Only two types of cells operating at high temperature (above 200 degrees C) have been described...

  19. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianshu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER under the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m−3·day−1 to 110 g·m−3·day−1. BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up.

  20. Estimating Hydrogen Production Potential in Biorefineries Using Microbial Electrolysis Cell Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are devices that use a hybrid biocatalysis-electrolysis process for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Future biofuel and bioproducts industries are expected to generate significant volumes of waste streams containing easily degradable organic matter. The emerging MEC technology has potential to derive added- value from these waste streams via production of hydrogen. Biorefinery process streams, particularly the stillage or distillation bottoms contain underutilized sugars as well as fermentation and pretreatment byproducts. In a lignocellulosic biorefinery designed for producing 70 million gallons of ethanol per year, up to 7200 m3/hr of hydrogen can be generated. The hydrogen can either be used as an energy source or a chemical reagent for upgrading and other reactions. The energy content of the hydrogen generated is sufficient to meet 57% of the distillation energy needs. We also report on the potential for hydrogen production in existing corn mills and sugar-based biorefineries. Removal of the organics from stillage has potential to facilitate water recycle. Pretreatment and fermentation byproducts generated in lignocellulosic biorefinery processes can accumulate to highly inhibitory levels in the process streams, if water is recycled. The byproducts of concern including sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furans and phenolics can also be converted to hydrogen in MECs. We evaluate hydrogen production from various inhibitory byproducts generated during pretreatment of various types of biomass. Finally, the research needs for development of the MEC technology and aspects particularly relevant to the biorefineries are discussed.

  1. Real-time measurement of dynamic structure for Pd-D system in heavy-water electrolysis cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Zeng Xianxin; Yang Jilian; Zhang Baisheng; Ruan Jinghui

    1993-01-01

    The real-time dynamic structure of Pd-D system in D 2 O electrolysis cell is measured on neutron powder diffractometer in CIAE. Diffraction patterns in 2 θ range of 34 degree-95 degree are obtained under the conditions of electrolysing for 0, 3 and 48 A ·h respectively, and the gradual transition of Pd-D system from α-phase to β-phase is observed. The real-time measurements of β peak of (220) reflection show that intensity of β peak almost reaches the saturation point after electrolysing for 0.65 A · h and increases slowly with further electrolysis afterwards

  2. Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

    2009-03-06

    Small-scale (100-500 kg H2/day) electrolysis is an important step in increasing the use of hydrogen as fuel. Until there is a large population of hydrogen fueled vehicles, the smaller production systems will be the most cost-effective. Performing conceptual designs and analyses in this size range enables identification of issues and/or opportunities for improvement in approach on the path to 1500 kg H2/day and larger systems. The objectives of this program are to establish the possible pathways to cost effective larger Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis systems and to identify areas where future research and development efforts have the opportunity for the greatest impact in terms of capital cost reduction and efficiency improvements. System design and analysis was conducted to determine the overall electrolysis system component architecture and develop a life cycle cost estimate. A design trade study identified subsystem components and configurations based on the trade-offs between system efficiency, cost and lifetime. Laboratory testing of components was conducted to optimize performance and decrease cost, and this data was used as input to modeling of system performance and cost. PEM electrolysis has historically been burdened by high capital costs and lower efficiency than required for large-scale hydrogen production. This was known going into the program and solutions to these issues were the focus of the work. The program provided insights to significant cost reduction and efficiency improvement opportunities for PEM electrolysis. The work performed revealed many improvement ideas that when utilized together can make significant progress towards the technical and cost targets of the DOE program. The cell stack capital cost requires reduction to approximately 25% of today’s technology. The pathway to achieve this is through part count reduction, use of thinner membranes, and catalyst loading reduction. Large-scale power supplies are available

  3. Y-doped BaZrO3 as a chemically stable electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cell using an Y-doped BaZrO3 electrolyte film, which has been demonstrated to be chemically stable, was successfully fabricated for the first time and showed a promising electrolysis performance.

  4. Upgrading of straw hydrolysate for production of hydrogen and phenols in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Marzorati, Massimo; Boon, Nico

    2011-01-01

    In a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw was used for hydrogen production during selective recovery of phenols. The average H2 production rate was 0.61 m3 H2/m3 MEC·day and equivalent to a rate of 0.40 kg COD/m3 MEC·day. The microbial...... the energy content in the consumed compounds and the cell voltage of 0.7 V. The highest hydrogen production was equivalent to 0.8 kg COD/m3 MEC·day and was obtained at pH 7–8 and 25°C. Accumulation of 53% w/v phenolic compounds in the liquor was obtained by stepwise addition of the hydrolysate during...

  5. Flow maldistribution in the anode of a polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis cell employing interdigitated channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    of liquid water towards the catalytic layer of the electrode. As opposed to the more common serpentine and parallel channels, interdigitated channels force liquid water through the porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) of the electrode. This improves the supply of water, however it increases pressure losses......-circular cell design on the distribution of water in the anode. In the electrolysis of water using PEMEC the anode is fed by demineralized water. Throughout the anode, oxygen is produced and a two-phase flow develops. Interdigitated channels assist in avoiding that gaseous oxygen obstructs the transport......: water stoichiometry, temperature, GDL permeability and thickness. In conclusion, it is found that the interdigitated flow field results in an uneven distribution across the cell and that the extent depends strongly on the permeability and weaker on the remaining parameters....

  6. Conjugated oligoelectrolyte represses hydrogen oxidation by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. A conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), which spontaneously aligns within cell membranes, was shown to completely inhibit H2 uptake by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells. Coulombic efficiencies that were 490±95%, due to H2 recycling between the cathode and microorganisms on the anode, were reduced to 86±2% with COE addition. The use of the COE resulted in a 67-fold increase in H2 gas recovery, and a 4.4-fold increase in acetate removal. Current generation, H2 recovery and COD removals by Geobacter metallireducens, which cannot use H2, were unaffected by COE addition. These results show that this COE is an effective H2 uptake inhibitor, and that it can enable improved and sustained H2 gas recovery in this bioelectrochemical system.

  7. System Identification of a Non-Uniformly Sampled Multi-Rate System in Aluminium Electrolysis Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkon Viumdal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard system identification algorithms are usually designed to generate mathematical models with equidistant sampling instants, that are equal for both input variables and output variables. Unfortunately, real industrial data sets are often disrupted by missing samples, variations of sampling rates in the different variables (also known as multi-rate systems, and intermittent measurements. In industries with varying events based maintenance or manual operational measures, intermittent measurements are performed leading to uneven sampling rates. Such is the case with aluminium smelters, where in addition the materials fed into the cell create even more irregularity in sampling. Both measurements and feeding are mostly manually controlled. A simplified simulation of the metal level in an aluminium electrolysis cell is performed based on mass balance considerations. System identification methods based on Prediction Error Methods (PEM such as Ordinary Least Squares (OLS, and the sub-space method combined Deterministic and Stochastic system identification and Realization (DSR, and its variants are applied to the model of a single electrolysis cell as found in the aluminium smelters. Aliasing phenomena due to large sampling intervals can be crucial in avoiding unsuitable models, but with knowledge about the system dynamics, it is easier to optimize the sampling performance, and hence achieve successful models. The results based on the simulation studies of molten aluminium height in the cells using the various algorithms give results which tally well with the synthetic data sets used. System identification on a smaller data set from a real plant is also implemented in this work. Finally, some concrete suggestions are made for using these models in the smelters.

  8. Feasibility Study of Seawater Electrolysis for Photovoltaic/Fuel Cell Hybrid Power System for the Coastal Areas in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisiriwat, A.; Pirom, W.

    2017-10-01

    Solar photovoltaic cell and fuel cell are the practicable options to realize as a possible hybrid power system because the power of the sun cannot be utilized at night or cloudy days but hydrogen has been found as an ideal energy carrier for being transportable, storable, and converting energy though fuel cell. Hydrogen storage is chosen for its ability to obtain a clean energy option. Electrolysis, which is the simplest process to produce hydrogen, can be powered by the dc voltage from the photovoltaic cell instead of using the battery as power supply. This paper concentrates on a feasibility study of seawater electrolysis using photovoltaic power integrated fuel cell system for the coastal cities in Thailand. The proposed system composed of photovoltaic arrays, seawater electrolyzer and fuel cell is presented when the 10-kW of fuel cell electrical power is considered. The feasibility study of hydrogen production and energy analysis of this proposed system is also evaluated.

  9. Influence from sea water constituents on the efficiency of water electrolysis by PEM-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Karsten; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Yde-Andersen, S.

    Among the sea-water specific impurities tested, magnesium has the most profound effect on PEM-cell degradation. Significant amounts of the cation was retrieved in the NAFION®-membrane structure after testing. Degradation was seen from a magnesium concentration as low as 3 10-7 mol/l, and increasing...... with concentration it led to a 86% increase of the area specific resistance at a concentration of 3 10-5 mol/l; equivalent to a conductivity of ~5 μS/cm. Other species (Cl-, Na+, SO4 2- ) seems to affect, though slowly, the performance negatively. If PEM will be used for electrolysis it seems therefore necessary...... to purify the feed water to ~1 μS/cm or even further while particularly focusing on the concentrations of polyvalent cations. e.g. magnesium....

  10. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao; Siegert, Michael; Ivanov, Ivan; Pisciotta, John M.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) were used to perform treatability studies on many different refinery wastewater samples all having appreciably different characteristics, which resulted in large differences in current generation. A de-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1±0.2A/m2 (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal. These results were similar to those obtained using domestic wastewater. Two other de-oiled refinery wastewater samples also showed good performance, with a de-oiled oily sewer sample producing less current. A stabilization lagoon sample and a stripped sour wastewater sample failed to produce appreciable current. Electricity production, organics removal, and startup time were improved when the anode was first acclimated to domestic wastewater. These results show mini-MECs are an effective method for evaluating treatability of different wastewaters. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Comparison of complex effluent treatability in different bench scale microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ullery, Mark L.

    2014-10-01

    A range of wastewaters and substrates were examined using mini microbial electrolysis cells (mini MECs) to see if they could be used to predict the performance of larger-scale cube MECs. COD removals and coulombic efficiencies corresponded well between the two reactor designs for individual samples, with 66-92% of COD removed for all samples. Current generation was consistent between the reactor types for acetate (AC) and fermentation effluent (FE) samples, but less consistent with industrial (IW) and domestic wastewaters (DW). Hydrogen was recovered from all samples in cube MECs, but gas composition and volume varied significantly between samples. Evidence for direct conversion of substrate to methane was observed with two of the industrial wastewater samples (IW-1 and IW-3). Overall, mini MECs provided organic treatment data that corresponded well with larger scale reactor results, and therefore it was concluded that they can be a useful platform for screening wastewater sources. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2013-05-01

    High-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) were used to perform treatability studies on many different refinery wastewater samples all having appreciably different characteristics, which resulted in large differences in current generation. A de-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1±0.2A/m2 (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal. These results were similar to those obtained using domestic wastewater. Two other de-oiled refinery wastewater samples also showed good performance, with a de-oiled oily sewer sample producing less current. A stabilization lagoon sample and a stripped sour wastewater sample failed to produce appreciable current. Electricity production, organics removal, and startup time were improved when the anode was first acclimated to domestic wastewater. These results show mini-MECs are an effective method for evaluating treatability of different wastewaters. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE STACKS WITH ELECTRODE-SUPPORTED CELLS OPERATING IN THE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; R. C. O' Brien; X. Zhang; G. Tao; B. J. Butler

    2011-11-01

    Performance characterization and durability testing have been completed on two five-cell high-temperature electrolysis stacks constructed with advanced cell and stack technologies. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. The per-cell active area is 100 cm2. The stack is internally manifolded with compliant mica-glass seals. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells. Stack compression is accomplished by means of a custom spring-loaded test fixture. Initial stack performance characterization was determined through a series of DC potential sweeps in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes of operation. Results of these sweeps indicated very good initial performance, with area-specific resistance values less than 0.5 ?.cm2. Long-term durability testing was performed with A test duration of 1000 hours. Overall performance degradation was less than 10% over the 1000-hour period. Final stack performance characterization was again determined by a series of DC potential sweeps at the same flow conditions as the initial sweeps in both electrolysis and fuel cell modes of operation. A final sweep in the fuel cell mode indicated a power density of 0.356 W/cm2, with average per-cell voltage of 0.71 V at a current of 50 A.

  14. Carbon Deposition in Solid Oxide Cells during Co-Electrolysis of H2O and CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    current densities from 1.5 to 2.25 A/cm2 and reactant (H2O + CO2) conversion of up to 67%. Delamination and carbon nano-fibers were observed at the Ni-YSZ|YSZ interface for two cells with a dense microstructure operated at electrolysis current densities of 2.0 and 2.25 A/cm2 and a conversion of 59% and 67...... and the active Ni-YSZ electrode. Carbon nano-fibers were only observed close to the YSZ electrolyte, indicating a very reducing atmosphere and a large over-potential gradient in the active electrode, being highest at the interface to the bulk electrolyte and decreasing toward the Ni-YSZ support.......Carbon formation during co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 in Ni-YSZ supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) may occur, especially at high current density and high conversion. In order to evaluate the carbon formation limits, five galvanostatic tests were performed in this work at electrolysis...

  15. Innovative anode materials and architectured cells for high temperature steam electrolysis operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogier, Tiphaine

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the electrochemical performances of cells for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), innovative oxygen electrode materials have been studied. The compounds Ln_2NiO_4_+_δ (Ln = La, Pr or Nd), Pr_4Ni_3O_1_0_±_δ and La_0_,_6S_r0_,_4Fe_0_,_8Co_0_,_2O_3_-_δ have been selected for their mixed electronic and ionic conductivity. First, their physical and chemical properties have been investigated. Then, the electrodes were shaped on symmetrical half cells,adding a thin ceria-based interlayer between the electrode and the yttria doped zirconia-based electrolyte. These architectured cells lead to low polarization resistances (RP≤ 0.1 Ω.cm"2 at 800 C) as well as reduced anodic over potentials. An electrochemical model has been developed in order to describe and analyze the experimental polarization curves.The electrode with the lower overpotential, i.e. Pr_2NiO_4_+δ, has been selected and characterized into complete cermet-supported cells. Under HTSE operation, at 800 C, a high current density was measured, close to i = -0.9 A.cm"-"2 for a cell voltage equals to 1.3 V, the conversion rate being about 60%. (author) [fr

  16. Determination of the efficiency of ethanol oxidation in a proton exchange membrane electrolysis cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Rakan M.; Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2017-05-01

    Products and residual ethanol in the anode and cathode exhausts of an ethanol electrolysis cell (EEC) have been analyzed by proton NMR and infrared spectrometry under a variety of operating conditions. This provides a full accounting of the fate of ethanol entering the cell, including the stoichiometry of the ethanol oxidation reaction (i.e. the average number of electrons transferred per ethanol molecule), product distribution and the crossover of ethanol and products through the membrane. The reaction stoichiometry (nav) is the key parameter that determines the faradaic efficiency of both EECs and direct ethanol fuel cells. Values determined independently from the product distribution, amount of ethanol consumed, and a simple electrochemical method based on the dependence of the current on the flow rate of the ethanol solution are compared. It is shown that the electrochemical method yields results that are consistent with those based on the product distribution, and based on the consumption of ethanol when crossover is accounted for. Since quantitative analysis of the cathode exhaust is challenging, the electrochemical method provides a valuable alternative for routine determination of nav, and hence the faradaic efficiency of the cell.

  17. Test Plan for Long-Term Operation of a Ten-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-01-01

    This document defines a test plan for a long-term (2500 Hour) test of a ten-cell high-temperature electrolysis stack to be performed at INL during FY09 under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This test was originally planned for FY08, but was removed from our work scope as a result of the severe budget cuts in the FY08 NHI Program. The purpose of this test is to evaluate stack performance degradation over a relatively long time period and to attempt to identify some of the degradation mechanisms via post-test examination. This test will be performed using a planar ten-cell Ceramatec stack, with each cell having dimensions of 10 cm x 10 cm. The specific makeup of the stack will be based on the results of a series of shorter duration ten-cell stack tests being performed during FY08, funded by NGNP. This series of tests was aimed at evaluating stack performance with different interconnect materials and coatings and with or without brazed edge rails. The best performing stack from the FY08 series, in which five different interconnect/coating/edge rail combinations were tested, will be selected for the FY09 long-term test described herein

  18. Critical Causes of Degradation in Integrated Laboratory Scale Cells during High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.S. Sohal; J.E. O' Brien; C.M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; S. Elangovan; J.S. Herring; J.D. Carter; V.I. Sharma; B. Yildiz

    2009-05-01

    An ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory involves generating hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC). This report describes background information about SOECs, the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) testing of solid-oxide electrolysis stacks, ILS performance degradation, and post-test examination of SOECs by various researchers. The ILS test was a 720- cell, three-module test comprised of 12 stacks of 60 cells each. A peak H2 production rate of 5.7 Nm3/hr was achieved. Initially, the module area-specific resistance ranged from 1.25 Ocm2 to just over 2 Ocm2. Total H2 production rate decreased from 5.7 Nm3/hr to a steady state value of 0.7 Nm3/hr. The decrease was primarily due to cell degradation. Post test examination by Ceramatec showed that the hydrogen electrode appeared to be in good condition. The oxygen evolution electrode does show delamination in operation and an apparent foreign layer deposited at the electrolyte interface. Post test examination by Argonne National Laboratory showed that the O2-electrode delaminated from the electrolyte near the edge. One possible reason for this delamination is excessive pressure buildup with high O2 flow in the over-sintered region. According to post test examination at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the electrochemical reactions have been recognized as one of the prevalent causes of their degradation. Specifically, two important degradation mechanisms were examined: (1) transport of Crcontaining species from steel interconnects into the oxygen electrode and LSC bond layers in SOECs, and (2) cation segregation and phase separation in the bond layer. INL conducted a workshop October 27, 2008 to discuss possible causes of degradation in a SOEC stack. Generally, it was agreed that the following are major degradation issues relating to SOECs: • Delamination of the O2-electrode and bond layer on the steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites

  19. Hydrogen production with effluent from an ethanol–H2-coproducing fermentation reactor using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Lu; Ren, Nanqi; Xing, Defeng; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by bacterial fermentation of sugars, but substrate conversion to hydrogen is incomplete. Using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), we show that additional hydrogen can be produced from the effluent

  20. Technology advancement of the static feed water electrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A program to advance the technology of oxygen- and hydrogen-generating subsystems based on water electrolysis was studied. Major emphasis was placed on static feed water electrolysis, a concept characterized by low power consumption and high intrinsic reliability. The static feed based oxygen generation subsystem consists basically of three subassemblies: (1) a combined water electrolysis and product gas dehumidifier module; (2) a product gas pressure controller and; (3) a cyclically filled water feed tank. Development activities were completed at the subsystem as well as at the component level. An extensive test program including single cell, subsystem and integrated system testing was completed with the required test support accessories designed, fabricated, and assembled. Mini-product assurance activities were included throughout all phases of program activities. An extensive number of supporting technology studies were conducted to advance the technology base of the static feed water electrolysis process and to resolve problems.

  1. Carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning during CO2 electrolysis in nickel-based solid oxide cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Blennow, Peter; Hjelm, Johan; Graves, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Reduction of CO2 to CO and O2 in the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) has the potential to play a crucial role in closing the CO2 loop. Carbon deposition in nickel-based cells is however fatal and must be considered during CO2 electrolysis. Here, the effect of operating parameters is investigated systematically using simple current-potential experiments. Due to variations of local conditions, it is shown that higher current density and lower fuel electrode porosity will cause local carbon formation at the electrochemical reaction sites despite operating with a CO outlet concentration outside the thermodynamic carbon formation region. Attempts at mitigating the issue by coating the composite nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia electrode with carbon-inhibiting nanoparticles and by sulfur passivation proved unsuccessful. Increasing the fuel electrode porosity is shown to mitigate the problem, but only to a certain extent. This work shows that a typical SOEC stack converting CO2 to CO and O2 is limited to as little as 15-45% conversion due to risk of carbon formation. Furthermore, cells operated in CO2-electrolysis mode are poisoned by reactant gases containing ppb-levels of sulfur, in contrast to ppm-levels for operation in fuel cell mode.

  2. Carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning during CO2 electrolysis in nickel-based solid oxide cell electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Blennow, Peter; Hjelm, Johan

    2017-01-01

    is investigated systematically using simple current-potential experiments. Due to variations of local conditions, it is shown that higher current density and lower fuel electrode porosity will cause local carbon formation at the electrochemical reaction sites despite operating with a CO outlet concentration...... outside the thermodynamic carbon formation region. Attempts at mitigating the issue by coating the composite nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia electrode with carbon-inhibiting nanoparticles and by sulfur passivation proved unsuccessful. Increasing the fuel electrode porosity is shown to mitigate......Reduction of CO2 to CO and O2 in the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) has the potential to play a crucial role in closing the CO2 loop. Carbon deposition in nickel-based cells is however fatal and must be considered during CO2 electrolysis. Here, the effect of operating parameters...

  3. Novel bio-electro-Fenton technology for azo dye wastewater treatment using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Jin, Xiangdan; Zhao, Nannan

    2017-01-01

    Development of sustanaible technologies for treatment of azo dyes containing wastewaters has long been of great interest. In this study, we proposed an innovative concept of using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) based Fenton process to treat azo dye wastewater. In such ......Development of sustanaible technologies for treatment of azo dyes containing wastewaters has long been of great interest. In this study, we proposed an innovative concept of using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) based Fenton process to treat azo dye wastewater....... In such MREC-Fenton integrated process, the production of H2O2 which is the key reactant of fenton-reaction was driven by the electrons harvested from the exoelectrogens and salinity-gradient between sea water and fresh water in MREC. Complete decolorization and mineralization of 400 mg L-1 Orange G...

  4. Phosphate recovery as struvite within a single chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    An energy efficient method of concurrent hydrogen gas and struvite (MgNH 4PO 4·6H 2O) production was investigated based on bioelectrochemically driven struvite crystallization at the cathode of a single chamber microbial electrolysis struvite

  5. Current generation in microbial electrolysis cells with addition of amorphous ferric hydroxide, Tween 80, or DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2012-11-01

    Iron-oxide nanoparticles and the Tween 80 have previously been shown to improve power generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), presumably by improving electron transfer from the bacteria to the anode. We examined whether several chemicals would affect current production in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), where hydrogen gas is produced at the cathode, using mixed cultures and Geobacter sulfurreducens. Tween 80 did not increase the current. Fe(OH) 3 addition increased the maximum current density of both the mixed cultures (from 6.1 ± 0.9 A/m 2 to 8.8 ± 0.3 A/m 2) and pure cultures (from 4.8 ± 0.5 A/m 2 to 7.4 ± 1.1 A/m 2). Improved current production was sustained even after iron was no longer added to the medium. It was demonstrated that increased current resulted from improved cathode performance. Analysis using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the iron primarily reduced the diffusion resistances of the cathodes, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed the formation of highly porous structures on the cathode. The addition of DNA also did not improve MEC or MFC performance. These results demonstrated that among these treatments only Fe(OH) 3 addition was a viable method for enhancing current densities in MECs, primarily by improving cathode performance. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights.

  6. Comparison of cathode catalyst binders for the hydrogen evolution reaction in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Ivan

    2017-06-02

    Nafion is commonly used as a catalyst binder in many types of electrochemical cells, but less expensive binders are needed for the cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) which are operated in neutral pH buffers, and reverse electrodialysis stacks (RED),which use thermolytic solutions such as ammonium bicarbonate. Six different binders were examined based on differences in ion exchange properties (anionic: Nafion, BPSH20, BPSH40, S-Radel; cationic: Q-Radel; and neutral: Radel, BAEH) and hydrophobicity based on water uptake (0%, Radel; 17–56% for the other binders). BPSH40 had similar performance to Nafion based on steady-state polarization single electrode experiments in a neutral pH phosphate buffer, and slightly better performance in ammonium bicarbonate. Three different Mo-based catalysts were examined as alternatives to Pt, with MoB showing the best performance under steady-state polarization. In MECs, MoB/BPSH40 performed similarly to Pt with Nafion or Radel binders. The main distinguishing feature of the BPSH40 was that it is very hydrophilic, and thus it had a greater water content (56%) than the other binders (0–44%). These results suggest the binders for hydrogen evolution in MECs should be designed to have a high water content without sacrificing ionic or electronic conductivity in the electrode.

  7. Comparison of cathode catalyst binders for the hydrogen evolution reaction in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Ivan; Ahn, YongTae; Poirson, Thibault; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Nafion is commonly used as a catalyst binder in many types of electrochemical cells, but less expensive binders are needed for the cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) which are operated in neutral pH buffers, and reverse electrodialysis stacks (RED),which use thermolytic solutions such as ammonium bicarbonate. Six different binders were examined based on differences in ion exchange properties (anionic: Nafion, BPSH20, BPSH40, S-Radel; cationic: Q-Radel; and neutral: Radel, BAEH) and hydrophobicity based on water uptake (0%, Radel; 17–56% for the other binders). BPSH40 had similar performance to Nafion based on steady-state polarization single electrode experiments in a neutral pH phosphate buffer, and slightly better performance in ammonium bicarbonate. Three different Mo-based catalysts were examined as alternatives to Pt, with MoB showing the best performance under steady-state polarization. In MECs, MoB/BPSH40 performed similarly to Pt with Nafion or Radel binders. The main distinguishing feature of the BPSH40 was that it is very hydrophilic, and thus it had a greater water content (56%) than the other binders (0–44%). These results suggest the binders for hydrogen evolution in MECs should be designed to have a high water content without sacrificing ionic or electronic conductivity in the electrode.

  8. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-07-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before moving into MECs, respectively. Subsequently, CSFE was used as feedstock in all the three MECs. The maximum hydrogen yield with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate (5.21±0.24L H 2 /L CSFE) was higher than that pre-acclimated with acetate (4.22±0.19L H 2 /L CSFE) and CSFE (4.55±0.14L H 2 /L CSFE). The current density (480±11A/m 3 ) and hydrogen production rate (4.52±0.13m 3 /m 3 /d) with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate were also higher that another two reactors. These results demonstrated that the anode biofilm pre-acclimated with butyrate has significant advantages in CSFE treatment and could improve the performance of hydrogen production in MEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Manufacturing of Dysprosium-Iron Alloys by Electrolysis in Fluoride-Based Electrolytes. Electrolysis in a Laboratory-Scale Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana Maria; Osen, Karen Sende; Støre, Anne; Gudbrandsen, Henrik; Kjos, Ole Sigmund; Solheim, Asbjørn; Wang, Zhaohui; Oury, Alexandre; Namy, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Electrolytic production of light rare earth elements and rare earth alloys with transition elements takes place in a fluoride-based electrolyte using rare earth oxides as raw material. The optimization of this method, mainly in terms of the energy efficiency and environmental impact control, is rather challenging. Anode effects, evolution of fluorine-containing compounds and side cathode reactions could largely be minimized by good control of the amount of rare earth oxide species dissolved in the fluoride-based electrolyte and their dissolution rate. The Dy2O3 feed rate needed for stable cell operation was studied by following up the anode voltage and gas analysis. On-line analysis of the cell off-gases by FTIR showed that the electrochemical reaction for the formation of Dy-Fe alloy gives mainly CO gas and that CF4 is starting to evolve gradually at anode voltages of ca. 3.25 V. The limiting current density for the discharge of the oxide ions at the graphite anode was in the range of 0.1 to 0.18 A cm-2 at dissolved Dy2O3 contents of ca. 1 wt pct. Modeling of the laboratory cell reactor was also carried out by implementing two models, i.e., an electrical model simulating the current density distribution at the electrodes and a laminal bubbly flow model that explains the electrolyte velocity induced by gas bubble production at the anode.

  10. La0.8Sr0.2Co0.8Ni0.2O3-δ impregnated oxygen electrode for H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis in solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haoyu; Tian, Yunfeng; Zhang, Lingling; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Jian, Li

    2018-04-01

    High-temperature H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis through reversible solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) provides potentially a feasible and eco-friendly way to convert electrical energy into chemicals stored in syngas. In this work, La0.8Sr0.2Co0.8Ni0.2O3-δ (LSCN) impregnated Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 (GDC)-(La0.8Sr0.2)0.95MnO3-δ (LSM) composite oxygen electrode is studied as high-performance electrode for H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis. The LSCN impregnated cell exhibits competitive performance with the peak power density of 1057 mW cm-2 at 800 °C in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) mode; in co-electrolysis mode, the current density can reach 1.60 A cm-2 at 1.5 V at 800 °C with H2O/CO2 ratio of 2/1. With LSCN nanoparticles dispersed on the surface of GDC-LSM to maximize the reaction active sites, the LSCN impregnated cell shows significant enhanced electrochemical performance at both SOEC and SOFC modes. The influence of feed gas composition (H2O-H2-CO2) and operating voltages on the performance of co-electrolysis are discussed in detail. The cell shows a very stable performance without obvious degradation for more than 100 h. Post-test characterization is analyzed in detail by multiple measurements.

  11. Anode microbial communities produced by changing from microbial fuel cell to microbial electrolysis cell operation using two different wastewaters

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.; Cusick, Roland; Call, Douglas F.; Selembo, Priscilla A.; Regan, John M.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Conditions in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) differ from those in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) due to the intrusion of oxygen through the cathode and the release of H2 gas into solution. Based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, anode communities in reactors fed acetic acid decreased in species richness and diversity, and increased in numbers of Geobacter sulfurreducens, when reactors were shifted from MFCs to MECs. With a complex source of organic matter (potato wastewater), the proportion of Geobacteraceae remained constant when MFCs were converted into MECs, but the percentage of clones belonging to G. sulfurreducens decreased and the percentage of G. metallireducens clones increased. A dairy manure wastewater-fed MFC produced little power, and had more diverse microbial communities, but did not generate current in an MEC. These results show changes in Geobacter species in response to the MEC environment and that higher species diversity is not correlated with current. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Efficient treatment of aniline containing wastewater in bipolar membrane microbial electrolysis cell-Fenton system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Jin, Xiangdan; Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-08-01

    Aniline-containing wastewater can cause significant environmental problems and threaten the humans's life. However, rapid degradation of aniline with cost-efficient methods remains a challenge. In this work, a novel microbial electrolysis cell with bipolar membrane was integrated with Fenton reaction (MEC-Fenton) for efficient treatment of real wastewater containing a high concentration (4460 ± 52 mg L -1 ) of aniline. In this system, H 2 O 2 was in situ electro-synthesized from O 2 reduction on the graphite cathode and was simultaneously used as source of OH for the oxidation of aniline wastewater under an acidic condition maintained by the bipolar membrane. The aniline was effectively degraded following first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 0.0166 h -1 under an applied voltage of 0.5 V. Meanwhile, a total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency of 93.1 ± 1.2% was obtained, revealing efficient mineralization of aniline. The applicability of bipolar membrane MEC-Fenton system was successfully demonstrated with actual aniline wastewater. Moreover, energy balance showed that the system could be a promising technology for removal of biorefractory organic pollutants from wastewaters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Real-time monitoring of a microbial electrolysis cell using an electrical equivalent circuit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S A; Perrier, M; Tartakovsky, B

    2018-04-01

    Efforts in developing microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) resulted in several novel approaches for wastewater treatment and bioelectrosynthesis. Practical implementation of these approaches necessitates the development of an adequate system for real-time (on-line) monitoring and diagnostics of MEC performance. This study describes a simple MEC equivalent electrical circuit (EEC) model and a parameter estimation procedure, which enable such real-time monitoring. The proposed approach involves MEC voltage and current measurements during its operation with periodic power supply connection/disconnection (on/off operation) followed by parameter estimation using either numerical or analytical solution of the model. The proposed monitoring approach is demonstrated using a membraneless MEC with flow-through porous electrodes. Laboratory tests showed that changes in the influent carbon source concentration and composition significantly affect MEC total internal resistance and capacitance estimated by the model. Fast response of these EEC model parameters to changes in operating conditions enables the development of a model-based approach for real-time monitoring and fault detection.

  14. Electrical current generation in microbial electrolysis cells by hyperthermophilic archaea Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari

    KAUST Repository

    Yilmazel, Yasemin D.

    2017-10-02

    Few microorganisms have been examined for current generation under thermophilic (40–65 °C) or hyperthermophilic temperatures (≥ 80 °C) in microbial electrochemical systems. Two iron-reducing archaea from the family Archaeoglobaceae, Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari, showed electro-active behavior leading to current generation at hyperthermophilic temperatures in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A current density (j) of 0.68 ± 0.11 A/m2 was attained in F. placidus MECs at 85 °C, and 0.57 ± 0.10 A/m2 in G. ahangari MECs at 80 °C, with an applied voltage of 0.7 V. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) showed that both strains produced a sigmoidal catalytic wave, with a mid-point potential of − 0.39 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for F. placidus and − 0.37 V for G. ahangari. The comparison of CVs using spent medium and turnover CVs, coupled with the detection of peaks at the same potentials in both turnover and non-turnover conditions, suggested that mediators were not used for electron transfer and that both archaea produced current through direct contact with the electrode. These two archaeal species, and other hyperthermophilic exoelectrogens, have the potential to broaden the applications of microbial electrochemical technologies for producing biofuels and other bioelectrochemical products under extreme environmental conditions.

  15. Enrichment of extremophilic exoelectrogens in microbial electrolysis cells using Red Sea brine pools as inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Noura A; Ortiz-Medina, Juan F; Katuri, Krishna P; Hari, Ananda Rao; Amy, Gary; Logan, Bruce E; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2017-09-01

    Applying microbial electrochemical technologies for the treatment of highly saline or thermophilic solutions is challenging due to the lack of proper inocula to enrich for efficient exoelectrogens. Brine pools from three different locations (Valdivia, Atlantis II and Kebrit) in the Red Sea were investigated as potential inocula sources for enriching exoelectrogens in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) under thermophilic (70°C) and hypersaline (25% salinity) conditions. Of these, only the Valdivia brine pool produced high and consistent current 6.8±2.1A/m 2 -anode in MECs operated at a set anode potential of +0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl (+0.405V vs. standard hydrogen electrode). These results show that exoelectrogens are present in these extreme environments and can be used to startup MEC under thermophilic and hypersaline conditions. Bacteroides was enriched on the anode of the Valdivia MEC, but it was not detected in the open circuit voltage reactor seeded with the Valdivia brine pool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Syntrophic interactions drive the hydrogen production from glucose at low temperature in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Lu

    2012-11-01

    H2 can be obtained from glucose by fermentation at mesophilic temperatures, but here we demonstrate that hydrogen can also be obtained from glucose at low temperatures using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). H2 was produced from glucose at 4°C in single-chamber MECs at a yield of about 6mol H2mol-1 glucose, and at rates of 0.25±0.03-0.37±0.04m3 H2m-3d-1. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and electrochemical analyses showed that syntrophic interactions combining glucose fermentation with the oxidization of fermentation products by exoelectrogens was the predominant pathway for current production at a low temperature other than direct glucose oxidization by exoelectrogens. Another syntrophic interaction, methanogenesis and homoacetogenesis, which have been found in 25°C reactors, were not detected in MECs at 4°C. These results demonstrate the feasibility of H2 production from abundant biomass of carbohydrates at low temperature in MECs. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Phosphate recovery as struvite within a single chamber microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-03-01

    An energy efficient method of concurrent hydrogen gas and struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4)·6H(2)O) production was investigated based on bioelectrochemically driven struvite crystallization at the cathode of a single chamber microbial electrolysis struvite-precipitation cell (MESC). The MESC cathodes were either stainless steel 304 mesh or flat plates. Phosphate removal ranged from 20% to 40%, with higher removals obtained using mesh cathodes than with flat plates. Cathode accumulated crystals were verified as struvite using a scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Crystal accumulation did not affect the rate of hydrogen production in struvite reactors. The rate of struvite crystallization (g/m(2)-h) and hydrogen production (m(3)/m(3)-d) were shown to be dependent on applied voltage and cathode material. Overall energy efficiencies (substrate and electricity) were high (73 ± 4%) and not dependent on applied voltage. These results show that MESCs may be useful both as a method for hydrogen gas and struvite production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Cellulose fermentation wastewaters (FWWs) contain short chain volatile fatty acids and alcohols, but they also have high concentrations of proteins. Hydrogen gas production from FWW was examined using continuous flow microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), with a focus on fate of the protein. H2 production rates were 0.49±0.05m3/m3-d for the FWW, compared to 0.63±0.02m3/m3-d using a synthetic wastewater containing only acetate (applied potential of 0.9V). Total organic matter removal was 76±6% for the FWW, compared to 87±5% for acetate. The MEC effluent became relatively enriched in protein (69%) compared to that in the original FWW (19%). Protein was completely removed using higher applied voltages (1.0 or 1.2V), but current generation was erratic due to more positive anode potentials (-113±38mV, Eap=1.2V; -338±38mV, 1.0V; -0.426±4mV, 0.9V). Bacteria on the anodes with FWW were primarily Deltaproteobacteria, while Archaea were predominantly Methanobacterium.

  19. Repression of hydrogen uptake using conjugated oligoelectrolytes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Huijie; Chen, Xiaofen; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Xiuping; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. DSBN+, a conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), was added to microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) to improve hydrogen recovery. The volume of hydrogen gas recovered in a fedbatch cycle of mixed culture MECs increased by 126× compared to controls (no COE addition), mainly by preventing the loss of hydrogen to methane production. Performance in pure culture MECs fed with Geobacter sulfurreducens increased by factors of 10.5 in terms of energy yield, 2.1 in COD removal, and 11.8 in hydrogen yield. Hydrogen gas recycling was reduced, and the volume of hydrogen gas recovered increased by 6.5× compared to controls. Minimal methane production and a lack of hydrogen gas uptake by G. sulfurreducens suggested that the COEs increased hydrogen recoveries by interfering with hydrogen uptake by hydrogenotrophic methanogens but also by exoelectrogenic bacteria. COEs may therefore be useful for inhibiting the activities of certain hydrogenases, although the mechanism of inhibition needs further investigation.

  20. Hydrogen production with nickel powder cathode catalysts in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2010-01-01

    Although platinum is commonly used as catalyst on the cathode in microbial electrolysis cells (MEC), non-precious metal alternatives are needed to reduce costs. Cathodes were constructed using a nickel powder (0.5-1 μm) and their performance was compared to conventional electrodes containing Pt (0.002 μm) in MECs and electrochemical tests. The MEC performance in terms of coulombic efficiency, cathodic, hydrogen and energy recoveries were similar using Ni or Pt cathodes, although the maximum hydrogen production rate (Q) was slightly lower for Ni (Q = 1.2-1.3 m3 H2/m3/d; 0.6 V applied) than Pt (1.6 m3 H2/m3/d). Nickel dissolution was minimized by replacing medium in the reactor under anoxic conditions. The stability of the Ni particles was confirmed by examining the cathodes after 12 MEC cycles using scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry. Analysis of the anodic communities in these reactors revealed dominant populations of Geobacter sulfurreduces and Pelobacter propionicus. These results demonstrate that nickel powder can be used as a viable alternative to Pt in MECs, allowing large scale production of cathodes with similar performance to systems that use precious metal catalysts. © 2009 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu.

  1. Enhanced hydrogen generation using a saline catholyte in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2011-11-01

    High rates of hydrogen gas production were achieved in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) without a catholyte phosphate buffer by using a saline catholyte solution and a cathode constructed around a stainless steel mesh current collector. Using the non-buffered salt solution (68 mM NaCl) produced the highest current density of 131 ± 12 A/m3, hydrogen yield of 3.2 ± 0.3 mol H2/mol acetate, and gas production rate of 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m 3·d, compared to MECs with catholytes externally sparged with CO2 or containing a phosphate buffer. The salinity of the catholyte achieved a high solution conductivity, and therefore the electrode spacing did not appreciably affect performance. The coulombic efficiency with the cathode placed near the membrane separating the chambers was 83 ± 4%, similar to that obtained with the cathode placed more distant from the membrane (84 ± 4%). Using a carbon cloth cathode instead of the stainless steel mesh cathode did not significantly affect performance, with all reactor configurations producing similar performance in terms of total gas volume, COD removal, rcat and overall energy recovery. These results show MEC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A microbial fluidized electrode electrolysis cell (MFEEC) for enhanced hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2014-12-01

    A microbial fluidized electrode electrolysis cell (MFEEC) was used to enhance hydrogen gas production from dissolved organic matter. Flowable granular activated carbon (GAC) particles were used to provide additional surface area for growth of exoelectrogenic bacteria. The use of this exoelectrogenic biofilm on the GAC particles with fluidization produced higher current densities and hydrogen gas recoveries than controls (no recirculation or no GAC), due to intermittent contact of the capacitive particles with the anode. The total cumulative charge of 1688C m-2 with the MFEEC reactor (a recirculation flow rate of 19 mL min-1) was 20% higher than that of the control reactor (no GAC). The highest hydrogen gas yield of 0.82 ± 0.01 mol-H2/mol-acetate (17 mL min-1) was 39% higher than that obtained without recirculation (0.59 ± 0.01 mol-H 2/mol-acetate), and 116% higher than that of the control (no GAC, without recirculation). These results show that flowable GAC particles provide a useful approach for enhancing hydrogen gas production in bioelectrochemical systems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-07-01

    The use of glycerol for hydrogen gas production was examined via electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A hydrogen yield of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation, at relatively high rates of 2.0 ± 0.4 m3/m3 d (Eap = 0.9 V). Under the same conditions, hydrogen was produced from glucose at a yield of 7.2 mol-H2/mol and a rate of 1.9 ± 0.3 m3/m3 d. Glycerol was completely removed within 6 h, with 56% of the electrons in intermediates (primarily 1,3-propanediol), with the balance converted to current, intracellular storage products or biomass. Glucose was removed within 5 h, but intermediates (mainly propionate) accounted for only 19% of the electrons. Hydrogen was also produced using the glycerol byproduct of biodiesel fuel production at a rate of 0.41 ± 0.1 m3/m3 d. These results demonstrate that electrohydrogenesis is an effective method for producing hydrogen from either pure glycerol or glycerol byproducts of biodiesel fuel production. © 2009 International Association for Hydrogen Energy.

  4. Optimization of catholyte concentration and anolyte pHs in two chamber microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-12-01

    The hydrogen production rate in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) using a non-buffered saline catholyte (NaCl) can be optimized through proper control of the initial anolyte pH and catholyte NaCl concentration. The highest hydrogen yield of 3.3 ± 0.4 mol H2/mole acetate and gas production rate of 2.2 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m3/d were achieved here with an initial anolyte pH = 9 and catholyte NaCl concentration of 98 mM. Further increases in the salt concentration substantially reduced the anolyte pH to as low as 4.6, resulting in reduced MEC performance due to pH inhibition of exoelectrogens. Cathodic hydrogen recovery was high (rcat > 90%) as hydrogen consumption by hydrogenotrophic methanogens was prevented by separating the anode and cathode chambers using a membrane. These results show that the MEC can be optimized for hydrogen production through proper choices in the concentration of a non-buffered saline catholyte and initial anolyte pH in two chamber MECs. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS 2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m3 H2/m3·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H2/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Repression of hydrogen uptake using conjugated oligoelectrolytes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Huijie

    2014-11-01

    Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. DSBN+, a conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), was added to microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) to improve hydrogen recovery. The volume of hydrogen gas recovered in a fedbatch cycle of mixed culture MECs increased by 126× compared to controls (no COE addition), mainly by preventing the loss of hydrogen to methane production. Performance in pure culture MECs fed with Geobacter sulfurreducens increased by factors of 10.5 in terms of energy yield, 2.1 in COD removal, and 11.8 in hydrogen yield. Hydrogen gas recycling was reduced, and the volume of hydrogen gas recovered increased by 6.5× compared to controls. Minimal methane production and a lack of hydrogen gas uptake by G. sulfurreducens suggested that the COEs increased hydrogen recoveries by interfering with hydrogen uptake by hydrogenotrophic methanogens but also by exoelectrogenic bacteria. COEs may therefore be useful for inhibiting the activities of certain hydrogenases, although the mechanism of inhibition needs further investigation.

  8. Phosphate recovery as struvite within a single chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.

    2012-03-01

    An energy efficient method of concurrent hydrogen gas and struvite (MgNH 4PO 4·6H 2O) production was investigated based on bioelectrochemically driven struvite crystallization at the cathode of a single chamber microbial electrolysis struvite-precipitation cell (MESC). The MESC cathodes were either stainless steel 304 mesh or flat plates. Phosphate removal ranged from 20% to 40%, with higher removals obtained using mesh cathodes than with flat plates. Cathode accumulated crystals were verified as struvite using a scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Crystal accumulation did not affect the rate of hydrogen production in struvite reactors. The rate of struvite crystallization (g/m 2-h) and hydrogen production (m 3/m 3-d) were shown to be dependent on applied voltage and cathode material. Overall energy efficiencies (substrate and electricity) were high (73±4%) and not dependent on applied voltage. These results show that MESCs may be useful both as a method for hydrogen gas and struvite production. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effect of pre-acclimation of granular activated carbon on microbial electrolysis cell startup and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarge, Nicole; Yilmazel, Yasemin Dilsad; Hong, Pei-Ying; Logan, Bruce E

    2017-02-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can generate methane by fixing carbon dioxide without using expensive catalysts, but the impact of acclimation procedures on subsequent performance has not been investigated. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was used to pre-enrich electrotrophic methanogenic communities, as GAC has been shown to stimulate direct transfer of electrons between different microbial species. MEC startup times using pre-acclimated GAC were improved compared to controls (without pre-acclimation or without GAC), and after three fed batch cycles methane generation rates were similar (P>0.4) for GAC acclimated to hydrogen (22±9.3nmolcm -3 d -1 ), methanol (25±9.7nmolcm -3 d -1 ), and a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mix (22±11nmolcm -3 d -1 ). However, MECs started with GAC but no pre-acclimation had lower methane generation rates (13±4.1nmolcm -3 d -1 ), and MECs without GAC had the lowest rates (0.7±0.8nmolcm -3 d -1 after cycle 2). Microbes previously found in methanogenic MECs, or previously shown to be capable of exocellular electron transfer, were enriched on the GAC. Pre-acclimation using GAC is therefore a simple approach to enrich electroactive communities, improve methane generation rates, and decrease startup times in MECs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrical current generation in microbial electrolysis cells by hyperthermophilic archaea Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari

    KAUST Repository

    Yilmazel, Yasemin D.; Zhu, Xiuping; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Holmes, Dawn E.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Few microorganisms have been examined for current generation under thermophilic (40–65 °C) or hyperthermophilic temperatures (≥ 80 °C) in microbial electrochemical systems. Two iron-reducing archaea from the family Archaeoglobaceae, Ferroglobus placidus and Geoglobus ahangari, showed electro-active behavior leading to current generation at hyperthermophilic temperatures in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A current density (j) of 0.68 ± 0.11 A/m2 was attained in F. placidus MECs at 85 °C, and 0.57 ± 0.10 A/m2 in G. ahangari MECs at 80 °C, with an applied voltage of 0.7 V. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) showed that both strains produced a sigmoidal catalytic wave, with a mid-point potential of − 0.39 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for F. placidus and − 0.37 V for G. ahangari. The comparison of CVs using spent medium and turnover CVs, coupled with the detection of peaks at the same potentials in both turnover and non-turnover conditions, suggested that mediators were not used for electron transfer and that both archaea produced current through direct contact with the electrode. These two archaeal species, and other hyperthermophilic exoelectrogens, have the potential to broaden the applications of microbial electrochemical technologies for producing biofuels and other bioelectrochemical products under extreme environmental conditions.

  11. Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell fed winery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Bryan, Bill; Parker, Denny S; Merrill, Matthew D; Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D; Liu, Guangli; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    A pilot-scale (1,000 L) continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell was constructed and tested for current generation and COD removal with winery wastewater. The reactor contained 144 electrode pairs in 24 modules. Enrichment of an exoelectrogenic biofilm required ~60 days, which is longer than typically needed for laboratory reactors. Current generation was enhanced by ensuring adequate organic volatile fatty acid content (VFA/SCOD ≥ 0.5) and by raising the wastewater temperature (31 ± 1°C). Once enriched, SCOD removal (62 ± 20%) was consistent at a hydraulic retention time of 1 day (applied voltage of 0.9 V). Current generation reached a maximum of 7.4 A/m(3) by the planned end of the test (after 100 days). Gas production reached a maximum of 0.19 ± 0.04 L/L/day, although most of the product gas was converted to methane (86 ± 6%). In order to increase hydrogen recovery in future tests, better methods will be needed to isolate hydrogen gas produced at the cathode. These results show that inoculation and enrichment procedures are critical to the initial success of larger-scale systems. Acetate amendments, warmer temperatures, and pH control during startup were found to be critical for proper enrichment of exoelectrogenic biofilms and improved reactor performance.

  12. Microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2014-05-01

    Mineral carbonation can be used for CO2 sequestration, but the reaction rate is slow. In order to accelerate mineral carbonation, acid generated in a microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) was examined to dissolve natural minerals rich in magnesium/calcium silicates (serpentine), and the alkali generated by the same process was used to absorb CO2 and precipitate magnesium/calcium carbonates. The concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ dissolved from serpentine increased 20 and 145 times by using the acid solution. Under optimal conditions, 24mg of CO2 was absorbed into the alkaline solution and 13mg of CO2 was precipitated as magnesium/calcium carbonates over a fed-batch cycle (24h). Additionally, the MEDCC removed 94% of the COD (initially 822mg/L) and achieved 22% desalination (initially 35g/L NaCl). These results demonstrate the viability of this process for effective CO2 sequestration using renewable organic matter and natural minerals. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Enrichment of extremophilic exoelectrogens in microbial electrolysis cells using Red Sea brine pools as inocula

    KAUST Repository

    Chehab, Noura A.

    2017-05-03

    Applying microbial electrochemical technologies for the treatment of highly saline or thermophilic solutions is challenging due to the lack of proper inocula to enrich for efficient exoelectrogens. Brine pools from three different locations (Valdivia, Atlantis II and Kebrit) in the Red Sea were investigated as potential inocula sources for enriching exoelectrogens in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) under thermophilic (70°C) and hypersaline (25% salinity) conditions. Of these, only the Valdivia brine pool produced high and consistent current 6.8 ± 2.1 A/m2-anode in MECs operated at a set anode potential of +0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl (+0.405 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode). These results show that exoelectrogens are present in these extreme environments and can be used to startup MEC under thermophilic and hypersaline conditions. Bacteroides was enriched on the anode of the Valdivia MEC, but it was not detected in the open circuit voltage reactor seeded with the Valdivia brine pool.

  14. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael; Li, Xiu-Fen; Yates, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  15. Nitrogen removal from wastewater through microbial electrolysis cells and cation exchange membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Sakineh; Nabi-Bidhendi, Gholamreza; Mehrdadi, Nasser

    2014-02-17

    Vulnerability of water resources to nutrients led to progressively stricter standards for wastewater effluents. Modification of the conventional procedures to meet the new standards is inevitable. New technologies should give a priority to nitrogen removal. In this paper, ammonium chloride and urine as nitrogen sources were used to investigate the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) configured by cation exchange membrane (CEM) for electrochemical removal of nitrogen over open-and closed-circuit potentials (OCP and CCP) during biodegradation of organic matter. Results obtained from this study indicated that CEM was permeable to both organic and ammonium nitrogen over OCP. Power substantially mediated ammonium migration from anodic wastewater to the cathode, as well. With a urine rich wastewater in the anode, the maximum rate of ammonium intake into the cathode varied from 34.2 to 40.6 mg/L.h over CCP compared to 10.5-14.9 mg/L.h over OCP. Ammonium separation over CCP was directly related to current. For 1.46-2.12 mmol electron produced, 20.5-29.7 mg-N ammonium was removed. Current also increased cathodic pH up to 12, a desirable pH for changing ammonium ion to ammonia gas. Results emphasized the potential for MEC in control of ammonium through ammonium separation and ammonia volatilization provided that membrane characteristic is considered in their development.

  16. Electrolysis activities at FCH Test Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn Nielsen, Eva; Nygaard, Frederik Berg

    FCH Test Center for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies was established in 2010 at Risø DTU in Denmark. Today, the test center is part of DTU Energy Conversion. The center gives industry access to advanced testing and demonstration of components and systems. A number of national projects and EU...... projects regarding water electrolysis involve FCH Test Center as a partner. This presentation gives an overview of the activities....

  17. Analysis of Trends and Emerging Technologies in Water Electrolysis Research Based on a Computational Method: A Comparison with Fuel Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaya Ogawa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Water electrolysis for hydrogen production has received increasing attention, especially for accumulating renewable energy. Here, we comprehensively reviewed all water electrolysis research areas through computational analysis, using a citation network to objectively detect emerging technologies and provide interdisciplinary data for forecasting trends. The results show that all research areas increase their publication counts per year, and the following two areas are particularly increasing in terms of number of publications: “microbial electrolysis” and “catalysts in an alkaline water electrolyzer (AWE and in a polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolyzer (PEME.”. Other research areas, such as AWE and PEME systems, solid oxide electrolysis, and the whole renewable energy system, have recently received several review papers, although papers that focus on specific technologies and are cited frequently have not been published within the citation network. This indicates that these areas receive attention, but there are no novel technologies that are the center of the citation network. Emerging technologies detected within these research areas are presented in this review. Furthermore, a comparison with fuel cell research is conducted because water electrolysis is the reverse reaction to fuel cells, and similar technologies are employed in both areas. Technologies that are not transferred between fuel cells and water electrolysis are introduced, and future water electrolysis trends are discussed.

  18. Electrolysis apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure in which electrolysis is combined with radiolysis to improve the reaction yield is proposed for the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water. An apparatus for this procedure is disclosed. High-energy electric pulses are applied between the anode and kathode of an electrolytical cell in such a way that short-wave electromagnetic radiation is generated at the same time

  19. The importance of OH − transport through anion exchange membrane in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Yaoli

    2018-01-11

    In two-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) with anion exchange membranes (AEMs), a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) is typically used to avoid increases in catholyte pH as Nernst equation calculations indicate that high pHs adversely impact electrochemical performance. However, ion transport between the chambers will also impact performance, which is a factor not included in those calculations. To separate the impacts of pH and ion transport on MEC performance, a high molecular weight polymer buffer (PoB), which was retained in the catholyte due to its low AEM transport and cationic charge, was compared to PBS in MECs and abiotic electrochemical half cells (EHCs). In MECs, catholyte pH control was less important than ion transport. MEC tests using the PoB catholyte, which had a higher buffer capacity and thus maintained a lower catholye pH (<8), resulted in a 50% lower hydrogen production rate (HPR) than that obtained using PBS (HPR = 0.7 m3-H2 m−3 d−1) where the catholyte rapidly increased to pH = 12. The main reason for the decreased performance using PoB was a lack of hydroxide ion transfer into the anolyte to balance pH. The anolyte pH in MECs rapidly decreased to 5.8 due to a lack of hydroxide ion transport, which inhibited current generation by the anode, whereas the pH was maintained at 6.8 using PBS. In abiotic tests in ECHs, where the cathode potential was set at −1.2 V, the HPR was 133% higher using PoB than PBS due to catholyte pH control, as the anolyte pH was not a factor in the performance. These results show that maintaining charge transfer to control anolyte pH is more important than obtaining a more neutral pH catholyte.

  20. High performance reversible electrochemical cell for H2O electrolysis or conversion of CO2 and H2O to fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a reversible electrochemical cell, such as an electrolysis cell for water splitting or for conversion of carbon dioxide and water into fuel. The present invention relates also to an electrochemical cell that when operated in reverse performs as a fuel cell...

  1. Investigation of a novel concept for hydrogen production by PEM water electrolysis integrated with multi-junction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, Domenico; Santarelli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A 2D model of a PEM water electrolyzer is developed and validated. • A novel system integrating PEM and multi-junction solar cells is proposed. • The model is applied to the simulation of the novel system. • The integration of PEM and MJ cells enhances the hydrogen production efficiency. - Abstract: A 2D finite element model of a high-pressure PEM water electrolyzer is developed and validated over experimental data obtained from a demonstration prototype. The model includes the electrochemical, fluidic and thermal description of the repeating unit of a PEM electrolyzer stack. The model is applied to the simulation of a novel system composed by a high-temperature, high-pressure PEM electrochemical cell coupled with a photovoltaic multi-junction solar cell installed in a solar concentrator. The thermo-electrochemical characterization of the solar-driven PEM electrolysis system is presented and the advantages of the high-temperature operation and of the direct coupling of electrolyzer and solar cell are assessed. The results show that the integration of the multi-junction cell enhances the performance of the electrolyzer and allows to achieve higher system efficiency compared to separated photovoltaic generation and hydrogen production by electrolysis.

  2. Potential Use of Microbial Electrolysis Cells in Domestic Wastewater Treatment Plants for Energy Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escapa, Adrián; San-Martín, María Isabel; Morán, Antonio, E-mail: amorp@unileon.es [Chemical and Environmental Bioprocess Engineering Group, Natural Resources Institute (IRENA), University of León, León (Spain)

    2014-06-06

    Globally, large amounts of electrical energy are spent every year for domestic wastewater (dWW) treatment. In the future, energy prices are expected to rise as the demand for energy resources increases and fossil fuel reserves become depleted. By using appropriate technologies, the potential chemical energy contained in the organic compounds present in dWWs might help to improve the energy and economic balance of dWW treatment plants. Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) in general and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in particular represent an emerging technology capable of harvesting part of this energy. This study offers an overview of the potential of using MEC technology in domestic wastewater treatment plants (dWWTPs) to reduce the energy bill. It begins with a brief account of the basics of BESs, followed by an examination of how MECs can be integrated in dWWTPs, identifying scaling-up bottlenecks and estimating potential energy savings. A simplified analysis showed that the use of MEC technology may help to reduce up to ~20% the energy consumption in a conventional dWWTP. The study concludes with a discussion of the future perspectives of MEC technology for dWW treatment. The growing rates of municipal water and wastewater treatment markets in Europe offer excellent business prospects and it is expected that the first generation of MECs could be ready within 1–4 years. However, before MEC technology may achieve practical implementation in dWWTPs, it need not only to overcome important techno-economic challenges, but also to compete with other energy-producing technologies.

  3. POTENTIAL USE OF MICROBIAL ELECTROLYSIS CELLS (MECs IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS FOR ENERGY RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eEscapa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, large amounts of electrical energy are spent every year for domestic wastewater (dWW treatment. In the future, energy prices are expected to rise as the demand for energy resources increases and fossil fuel reserves become depleted. By using appropriate technologies, the potential chemical energy contained in the organic compounds present in dWWs might help to improve the energy and economic balance of dWW treatment plants. Bioelectrochemical Systems (BESs in general and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs in particular represent an emerging technology capable of harvesting part of this energy. This study offers an overview of the potential of using MEC technology in dWW treatment plants (dWWTPs to reduce the energy bill. It begins with a brief account of the basics of BESs, followed by an examination of how MECs can be integrated in dWW treatment plants (dWWTPs, identifying scaling-up bottlenecks and estimating potential energy savings. A simplified analysis showed that the use of MEC technology may help to reduce up to ~20% the energy consumption in a conventional dWWTP. The study concludes with a discussion of the future perspectives of MEC technology for dWW treatment. The growing rates of municipal water and wastewater treatment markets in Europe offer excellent business prospects and it is expected that the first generation of MECs could be ready within 1-4 years. However, before MEC technology may achieve practical implementation in dWWTPs, it needs not only to overcome important techno-economic challenges, but also to compete with other energy-producing technologies.

  4. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Ullery, Mark L; Dempsey, Brian A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2 mA/m(2)), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0 V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2 Wh/L, 7.5 Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1 g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12 mM) from digestate amended with 1 g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2mA/m2), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2Wh/L, 7.5Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12mM) from digestate amended with 1g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Multi-electrode continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell for biogas production from acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Geoffrey K.; Logan, Bruce E. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Most microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) contain only a single set of electrodes. In order to examine the scalability of a multiple-electrode design, we constructed a 2.5 L MEC containing 8 separate electrode pairs made of graphite fiber brush anodes pre-acclimated for current generation using acetate, and 304 stainless steel mesh cathodes (64 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}). Under continuous flow conditions and a one day hydraulic retention time, the maximum current was 181 mA (1.18 A/m{sup 2}, cathode surface area; 74 A/m{sup 3}) within three days of operation. The maximum hydrogen production (day 3) was 0.53 L/L-d, reaching an energy efficiency relative to electrical energy input of {eta}{sub E} = 144%. Current production remained relatively steady (days 3-18), but the gas composition dramatically shifted over time. By day 16, there was little H{sub 2} gas recovered and methane production increased from 0.049 L/L-d (day 3) to 0.118 L/L-d. When considering the energy value of both hydrogen and methane, efficiency relative to electrical input remained above 100% until near the end of the experiment (day 17) when only methane gas was being produced. Our results show that MECs can be scaled up primarily based on cathode surface area, but that hydrogen can be completely consumed in a continuous flow system unless methanogens can be completely eliminated from the system. (author)

  7. Comparison of microbial electrolysis cells operated with added voltage or by setting the anode potential

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) can be achieved by either setting the anode potential with a potentiostat, or by adding voltage to the circuit with a power source. In batch tests the largest total gas production (46 ± 3 mL), lowest energy input (2.3 ± 0.3 kWh/m 3 of H2 generated), and best overall energy recovery (E+S = 58 ± 6%) was achieved at a set anode potential of EAn = -0.2 V (vs Ag/AgCl), compared to set potentials of -0.4 V, 0 V and 0.2 V, or an added voltage of Eap = 0.6 V. Gas production was 1.4 times higher with EAn = -0.2 V than with Eap = 0.6 V. Methane production was also reduced at set anode potentials of -0.2 V and higher than the other operating conditions. Continuous flow operation of the MECs at the optimum condition of EAn = -0.2 V initially maintained stable hydrogen gas production, with 68% H2 and 21% CH4, but after 39 days the gas composition shifted to 55% H2 and 34% CH 4. Methane production was not primarily anode-associated, as methane was reduced to low levels by placing the anode into a new MEC housing. These results suggest that MEC performance can be optimized in terms of hydrogen production rates and gas composition by setting an anode potential of -0.2 V, but that methanogen proliferation must be better controlled on non-anodic surfaces. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The use and optimization of stainless steel mesh cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yimin

    2010-11-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) provide a high-yield method for producing hydrogen from renewable biomass. One challenge for commercialization of the technology is a low-cost and highly efficient cathode. Stainless steel (SS) is very inexpensive, and cathodes made of this material with high specific surface areas can achieve performance similar to carbon cathodes containing a platinum catalyst in MECs. SS mesh cathodes were examined here as a method to provide a higher surface area material than flat plate electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry tests showed that the electrochemically active surface area of certain sized mesh could be three times larger than a flat sheet. The relative performance of SS mesh in linear sweep voltammetry at low bubble coverages (low current densities) was also consistent with performance on this basis in MEC tests. The best SS mesh size (#60) in MEC tests had a relatively thick wire size (0.02 cm), a medium pore size (0.02 cm), and a specific surface area of 66 m2/m3. An applied voltage of 0.9 V produced a high hydrogen recovery (98 ± 4%) and overall energy efficiency (74 ± 4%), with a hydrogen production rate of 2.1 ± 0.3 m3H 2/m3d (current density of 8.08 A/m2, volumetric current density of 188 ± 19 A/m3). These studies show that SS in mesh format shows great promise for the development of lower cost MEC systems for hydrogen production. © 2010 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A method for high throughput bioelectrochemical research based on small scale microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Call, Douglas F.

    2011-07-01

    There is great interest in studying exoelectrogenic microorganisms, but existing methods can require expensive electrochemical equipment and specialized reactors. We developed a simple system for conducting high throughput bioelectrochemical research using multiple inexpensive microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) built with commercially available materials and operated using a single power source. MECs were small crimp top serum bottles (5mL) with a graphite plate anode (92m 2/m 3) and a cathode of stainless steel (SS) mesh (86m 2/m 3), graphite plate, SS wire, or platinum wire. The highest volumetric current density (240A/m 3, applied potential of 0.7V) was obtained using a SS mesh cathode and a wastewater inoculum (acetate electron donor). Parallel operated MECs (single power source) did not lead to differences in performance compared to non-parallel operated MECs, which can allow for high throughput reactor operation (>1000 reactors) using a single power supply. The utility of this method for cultivating exoelectrogenic microorganisms was demonstrated through comparison of buffer effects on pure (Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens) and mixed cultures. Mixed cultures produced current densities equal to or higher than pure cultures in the different media, and current densities for all cultures were higher using a 50mM phosphate buffer than a 30mM bicarbonate buffer. Only the mixed culture was capable of sustained current generation with a 200mM phosphate buffer. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this inexpensive method for conducting in-depth examinations of pure and mixed exoelectrogenic cultures. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Multi-electrode continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell for biogas production from acetate

    KAUST Repository

    Rader, Geoffrey K.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Most microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) contain only a single set of electrodes. In order to examine the scalability of a multiple-electrode design, we constructed a 2.5 L MEC containing 8 separate electrode pairs made of graphite fiber brush anodes pre-acclimated for current generation using acetate, and 304 stainless steel mesh cathodes (64 m2/m3). Under continuous flow conditions and a one day hydraulic retention time, the maximum current was 181 mA (1.18 A/m2, cathode surface area; 74 A/m 3) within three days of operation. The maximum hydrogen production (day 3) was 0.53 L/L-d, reaching an energy efficiency relative to electrical energy input of ηE = 144%. Current production remained relatively steady (days 3-18), but the gas composition dramatically shifted over time. By day 16, there was little H2 gas recovered and methane production increased from 0.049 L/L-d (day 3) to 0.118 L/L-d. When considering the energy value of both hydrogen and methane, efficiency relative to electrical input remained above 100% until near the end of the experiment (day 17) when only methane gas was being produced. Our results show that MECs can be scaled up primarily based on cathode surface area, but that hydrogen can be completely consumed in a continuous flow system unless methanogens can be completely eliminated from the system. © 2010 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A quantitative method to evaluate microbial electrolysis cell effectiveness for energy recovery and wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Ivan

    2013-10-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are potential candidates for sustainable wastewater treatment as they allow for recovery of the energy input by producing valuable chemicals such as hydrogen gas. Evaluating the effectiveness of MEC treatment for different wastewaters requires new approaches to quantify performance, and the establishment of specific procedures and parameters to characterize the outcome of fed-batch treatability tests. It is shown here that Coulombic efficiency can be used to directly calculate energy consumption relative to wastewater treatment in terms of COD removal, and that the average current, not maximum current, is a better metric to evaluate the rate of the bioelectrochemical reactions. The utility of these methods was demonstrated using simulated current profiles and actual wastewater tests. Industrial and domestic wastewaters were evaluated using small volume MECs, and different inoculation strategies. The energy needed for treatment was 2.17kWhkgCOD-1 for industrial wastewater and 2.59kWhkgCOD-1 for domestic wastewater. When these wastewaters were combined in equal amounts, the energy required was reduced to 0.63kWhkgCOD-1. Acclimation of the MEC to domestic wastewater, prior to tests with industrial wastewaters, was the easiest and most direct method to optimize MEC performance for industrial wastewater treatment. A pre-acclimated MEC accomplished the same removal (1847 ± 53 mg L-1) as reactor acclimated to only the industrial wastewater (1839 ± 57 mg L-1), but treatment was achieved in significantly less time (70 h versus 238 h). © 2013, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.; Ullery, Mark L.; Dempsey, Brian A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2mA/m2), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2Wh/L, 7.5Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12mM) from digestate amended with 1g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effect of pre-acclimation of granular activated carbon on microbial electrolysis cell startup and performance

    KAUST Repository

    LaBarge, Nicole

    2016-09-09

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can generate methane by fixing carbon dioxide without using expensive catalysts, but the impact of acclimation procedures on subsequent performance has not been investigated. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was used to pre-enrich electrotrophic methanogenic communities, as GAC has been shown to stimulate direct transfer of electrons between different microbial species. MEC startup times using pre-acclimated GAC were improved compared to controls (without pre-acclimation or without GAC), and after three fed batch cycles methane generation rates were similar (P > 0.4) for GAC acclimated to hydrogen (22 ± 9.3 nmol cm− 3 d− 1), methanol (25 ± 9.7 nmol cm− 3 d− 1), and a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mix (22 ± 11 nmol cm− 3 d− 1). However, MECs started with GAC but no pre-acclimation had lower methane generation rates (13 ± 4.1 nmol cm− 3 d− 1), and MECs without GAC had the lowest rates (0.7 ± 0.8 nmol cm− 3 d− 1 after cycle 2). Microbes previously found in methanogenic MECs, or previously shown to be capable of exocellular electron transfer, were enriched on the GAC. Pre-acclimation using GAC is therefore a simple approach to enrich electroactive communities, improve methane generation rates, and decrease startup times in MECs. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Multi-electrode continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell for biogas production from acetate

    KAUST Repository

    Rader, Geoffrey K.

    2010-09-01

    Most microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) contain only a single set of electrodes. In order to examine the scalability of a multiple-electrode design, we constructed a 2.5 L MEC containing 8 separate electrode pairs made of graphite fiber brush anodes pre-acclimated for current generation using acetate, and 304 stainless steel mesh cathodes (64 m2/m3). Under continuous flow conditions and a one day hydraulic retention time, the maximum current was 181 mA (1.18 A/m2, cathode surface area; 74 A/m 3) within three days of operation. The maximum hydrogen production (day 3) was 0.53 L/L-d, reaching an energy efficiency relative to electrical energy input of ηE = 144%. Current production remained relatively steady (days 3-18), but the gas composition dramatically shifted over time. By day 16, there was little H2 gas recovered and methane production increased from 0.049 L/L-d (day 3) to 0.118 L/L-d. When considering the energy value of both hydrogen and methane, efficiency relative to electrical input remained above 100% until near the end of the experiment (day 17) when only methane gas was being produced. Our results show that MECs can be scaled up primarily based on cathode surface area, but that hydrogen can be completely consumed in a continuous flow system unless methanogens can be completely eliminated from the system. © 2010 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PEM Water Electrolysis at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar

    . This is followed in chapter 4 by a description of the electrolysis setups and electrolysis cells used during the work. Two different setups were used, one operating at atmospheric pressure and another that could operate at elevated pressure so that liquid water electrolysis could be performed at temperature above...... such as porosity and resistance which were supported by images acquired using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In chapters 6 and 7 the results of the steam electrolysis and pressurised water electrolysis, respectively, are presented and discussed. The steam electrolysis was tested at 130 °C and atmospheric...... needed and hence it has become acute to be able to store the energy. Hydrogen has been identified as a suitable energy carrier and water electrolysis is one way to produce it in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way. In this thesis an introduction to the subject (chapter 1) is given followed...

  16. Durability of the Solid Oxide Cells for Co-Electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide under High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun

    Production of hydrogen and syngas (CO + H2) using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) has become increasingly attractive due to high oil price, the capability for conversion and storage of intermittent energy from renewable sources and the general interest in hydrogen energy and carbon...... severe percolation loss of Ni particles. The blocking of the Ni-YSZ TPBs by impurities (e.g. SiOx) also contributed to the fast degradation of SOECs in the initial test period. However, the post-test observation revealed dominating SiOx inclusions inside the Ni grain close to the electrolyte, instead...

  17. Hydrogen Production by Geobacter Species and a Mixed Consortium in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.

    2009-10-09

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m3 H2/m 3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 ± 7 A/m3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% ± 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% ± 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% ± 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% ± 16% compared to 80% ± 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% ± 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 ± 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current. Copyright

  18. Microbial Challenge Testing of Single Liquid Cathode Feed Water Electrolysis Cells for the International Space Station (ISS) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Robert J.; Wilson, Mark E.; Diderich, Greg S.; Steele, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) operational performance may be adversely impacted by microbiological growth and biofilm formation over the electrolysis cell membranes. Biofilms could hinder the transport of water from the bulk fluid stream to the membranes and increase the cell concentration overpotential resulting in higher cell voltages and a shorter cell life. A microbial challenge test was performed on duplicate single liquid-cathode feed water electrolysis cells to evaluate operational performance with increasing levels of a mixture of five bacteria isolated from ISS and Space Shuttle potable water systems. Baseline performance of the single water electrolysis cells was determined for approximately one month with deionized water. Monthly performance was also determined following each inoculation of the feed tank with 100, 1000, 10,000 and 100,000 cells/ml of the mixed suspension of test bacteria. Water samples from the feed tank and recirculating water loops for each cell were periodically analyzed for enumeration and speciation of bacteria and total organic carbon. While initially a concern, this test program has demonstrated that the performance of the electrolysis cell is not adversely impacted by feed water containing the five species of bacteria tested at a concentration measured as high as 1,000,000 colony forming units (CFU)/ml. This paper presents the methodologies used in the conduct of this test program along with the performance test results at each level of bacteria concentration.

  19. Temporal Microbial Community Dynamics in Microbial Electrolysis Cells – Influence of Acetate and Propionate Concentration

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2017-07-20

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are widely considered as a next generation wastewater treatment system. However, fundamental insight on the temporal dynamics of microbial communities associated with MEC performance under different organic types with varied loading concentrations is still unknown, nevertheless this knowledge is essential for optimizing this technology for real-scale applications. Here, the temporal dynamics of anodic microbial communities associated with MEC performance was examined at low (0.5 g COD/L) and high (4 g COD/L) concentrations of acetate or propionate, which are important intermediates of fermentation of municipal wastewaters and sludge. The results showed that acetate-fed reactors exhibited higher performance in terms of maximum current density (I: 4.25 ± 0.23 A/m), coulombic efficiency (CE: 95 ± 8%), and substrate degradation rate (98.8 ± 1.2%) than propionate-fed reactors (I: 2.7 ± 0.28 A/m; CE: 68 ± 9.5%; substrate degradation rate: 84 ± 13%) irrespective of the concentrations tested. Despite of the repeated sampling of the anodic biofilm over time, the high-concentration reactors demonstrated lower and stable performance in terms of current density (I: 1.1 ± 0.14 to 4.2 ± 0.21 A/m), coulombic efficiency (CE: 44 ± 4.1 to 103 ± 7.2%) and substrate degradation rate (64.9 ± 6.3 to 99.7 ± 0.5%), while the low-concentration reactors produced higher and dynamic performance (I: 1.1 ± 0.12 to 4.6 ± 0.1 A/m; CE: 52 ± 2.5 to 105 ± 2.7%; substrate degradation rate: 87.2 ± 0.2 to 99.9 ± 0.06%) with the different substrates tested. Correlating reactor\\'s performance with temporal dynamics of microbial communities showed that relatively similar anodic microbial community composition but with varying relative abundances was observed in all the reactors despite differences in the substrate and concentrations tested. Particularly, Geobacter was the predominant bacteria on the anode biofilm of all MECs over time suggesting its

  20. Energy-positive wastewater treatment and desalination in an integrated microbial desalination cell (MDC)-microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Styczynski, Jordyn; Huang, Yuankai; Xu, Zhiheng; McCutcheon, Jeffrey; Li, Baikun

    2017-07-01

    Simultaneous removal of nitrogen in municipal wastewater, metal in industrial wastewater and saline in seawater was achieved in an integrated microbial desalination cell-microbial electrolysis cell (MDC-MEC) system. Batch tests showed that more than 95.1% of nitrogen was oxidized by nitrification in the cathode of MDC and reduced by heterotrophic denitrification in the anode of MDC within 48 h, leading to the total nitrogen removal rate of 4.07 mg L-1 h-1. Combining of nitrogen removal and desalination in MDC effectively solved the problem of pH fluctuation in anode and cathode, and led to 63.7% of desalination. Power generation of MDC (293.7 mW m-2) was 2.9 times higher than the one without salt solution. The electric power of MDC was harvested by a capacitor circuit to supply metal reduction in a MEC, and 99.5% of lead (II) was removed within 48 h. A kinetic MDC model was developed to elucidate the correlation of voltage output and desalination efficiency. Ratio of wastewater and sea water was calculated for MDC optimal operation. Energy balance of nutrient removal, metal removal and desalination in the MDC-MEC system was positive (0.0267 kW h m-3), demonstrating the promise of utilizing low power output of MDCs.

  1. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Aijie

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25mL) connected in series to an MEC (72mL) produced a maximum of 0.43V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48m 3 H 2/m 3/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2mmol H 2/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3mmol H 2/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24m 3 H 2/m 3/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25 mL) connected in series to an MEC (72 mL) produced a maximum of 0.43 V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2 mmol H(2)/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3 mmol H(2)/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cobalt and molybdenum activated electrodes in foam based alkaline electrolysis cells at 150-250 °C and 40 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    A new type of alkaline electrolysis cells with nickel foam based gas diffusion electrodes and KOH (aq) immobilized in mesoporous SrTiO3 has been developed and tested at temperatures of 150 C, 200 C and 250 C at a pressure of 40 bar. Two cells have been characterized during the 270 h long test...

  4. Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells coupled with thermolytic solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xi

    2013-07-01

    Waste heat can be captured as electrical energy to drive hydrogen evolution in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) by using thermolytic solutions such as ammonium bicarbonate. To determine the optimal membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in MRECs using ammonium bicarbonate solutions, different numbers of cell pairs and stack arrangements were tested. The optimum number of cell pairs was determined to be five based on MREC performance and a desire to minimize capital costs. The stack arrangement was altered by placing an extra low concentration chamber adjacent to anode chamber to reduce ammonia crossover. This additional chamber decreased ammonia nitrogen losses into anolyte by 60%, increased the coulombic efficiency to 83%, and improved the hydrogen yield to a maximum of 3.5mol H2/mol acetate, with an overall energy efficiency of 27%. These results improve the MREC process, making it a more efficient method for renewable hydrogen gas production. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A monetary comparison of energy recovered from microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells fed winery or domestic wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusick, Roland D.; Kiely, Patrick D.; Logan, Bruce E. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, H2E Center, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Microbial fuel (MFCs) and electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to recover energy directly as electricity or hydrogen from organic matter. Organic removal efficiencies and values of the different energy products were compared for MFCs and MECs fed winery or domestic wastewater. TCOD removal (%) and energy recoveries (kWh/kg-COD) were higher for MFCs than MECs with both wastewaters. At a cost of 4.51/kg-H{sub 2} for winery wastewater and 3.01/kg-H{sub 2} for domestic wastewater, the hydrogen produced using MECs cost less than the estimated merchant value of hydrogen (6/kg-H{sub 2}). 16S rRNA clone libraries indicated the predominance of Geobacter species in anodic microbial communities in MECs for both wastewaters, suggesting low current densities were the result of substrate limitations. The results of this study show that energy recovery and organic removal from wastewater are more effective with MFCs than MECs, but that hydrogen production from wastewater fed MECs can be cost effective. (author)

  6. Degradation of solid oxide cells during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide at high current densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    and ∼15 μm LSM–YSZ oxygen electrode. The gas conversion was 45% at −1.5 A cm−2 and 60% at −2.0 A cm−2, and the operating durations were up to 700 h. The detailed electrochemical analysis revealed significant increase of the ohmic resistance, oxide ion transport resistance in the Ni–YSZ composite......In this work, the durability of Ni–YSZ based solid oxide cells was investigated during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45% H2O + 45% CO2 + 10% H2) at current density of −1.5 or −2.0 A cm−2. The cell consists of ∼300 μm Ni–YSZ support, ∼10 μm Ni–YSZ electrode, ∼10 μm YSZ electrolyte...

  7. Current as an indicator of ammonia concentration during wastewater treatment in an integrated microbial electrolysis cell - Nitrification system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2018-01-01

    with synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater. A good linear relationship (R2 = 0.9419) was observed between current (0.5130–3.906 mA) and ammonia levels (0–62.1 mg NH4+-N/L). Such linear relationship was always obtained regardless of the tested external power supply or wastewater pH. The external electrochemical cell......A key challenge for ammonia monitoring during nitrogen removal process is the extra cost and toxic reagent consuming. Herein the feasibility of current generated by an integrated microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) - nitrification reactor as an indicator of initial ammonia levels (NH3/NH4......+) in wastewater was explored. In this loop system, ammonia was first oxidized to nitrate in the nitrification reactor, and then the effluent was introduced into the cathode of MEC where nitrate was reduced as electron acceptor. The correlation between current and ammonia concentration was first investigated...

  8. Bioelectrochemical enhancement of methane production from highly concentrated food waste in a combined anaerobic digester and microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungyu; Lee, Beom; Tian, Donjie; Jun, Hangbae

    2018-01-01

    A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a promising technology for enhancing biogas production from an anaerobic digestion (AD) reactor. In this study, the effects of the MEC on the rate of methane production from food waste were examined by comparing an AD reactor with an AD reactor combined with a MEC (AD+MEC). The use of the MEC accelerated methane production and stabilization via rapid organic oxidation and rapid methanogenesis. Over the total experimental period, the methane production rate and stabilization time of the AD+MEC reactor were approximately 1.7 and 4.0 times faster than those of the AD reactor. Interestingly however, at the final steady state, the methane yields of both the reactors were similar to the theoretical maximum methane yield. Based on these results, the MEC did not increase the methane yield over the theoretical value, but accelerated methane production and stabilization by bioelectrochemical reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A comprehensive review of microbial electrolysis cells (MEC reactor designs and configurations for sustainable hydrogen gas production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abudukeremu Kadier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen gas has tremendous potential as an environmentally acceptable energy carrier for vehicles. A cutting edge technology called a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC can achieve sustainable and clean hydrogen production from a wide range of renewable biomass and wastewaters. Enhancing the hydrogen production rate and lowering the energy input are the main challenges of MEC technology. MEC reactor design is one of the crucial factors which directly influence on hydrogen and current production rate in MECs. The rector design is also a key factor to up-scaling. Traditional MEC designs incorporated membranes, but it was recently shown that membrane-free designs can lead to both high hydrogen recoveries and production rates. Since then multiple studies have developed reactors that operate without membranes. This review provides a brief overview of recent advances in research on scalable MEC reactor design and configurations.

  10. Production of "Green Natural Gas" Using Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC): Status of Technology and Costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard

    2012-01-01

    energy sources only. Also dimethyl ether (DME = (CH3)2O), which might be called Liquefied Green Gas, LGG, in analogy to Liquefied Petroleum Gas, LPG, because DME has properties similar to LPG. It further gives a short review of the state of the art of electrolysis in general and SOEC in particular......This paper gives arguments in favour of using green natural gas (GNG) as storage media for the intermittent renewable energy sources. GNG is here defined as being CH4, i.e. methane, often called synthetic natural gas or substitute natural gas (SNG), produced using renewable or at least CO2 neutral....... Production of synthesis gas (H2 + CO) from CO2 and H2O using SOEC technology is evaluated. GNG and LGG can be produced from synthesis gas (or short: syngas) by means of well established commercially available catalysis technology. Finally, estimations of costs and efficiencies are presented and the relative...

  11. Enhanced performance of solid oxide electrolysis cells by integration with a partial oxidation reactor: Energy and exergy analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visitdumrongkul, Nuttawut; Tippawan, Phanicha; Authayanun, Suthida; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Process design of solid oxide electrolyzer integrated with a partial oxidation reactor is studied. • Effect of key operating parameters of partial oxidation reactor on the electrolyzer performance is presented. • Exergy analysis of the electrolyzer process is performed. • Partial oxidation reactor can enhance the solid oxide electrolyzer performance. • Partial oxidation reactor in the process is the highest exergy destruction unit. - Abstract: Hydrogen production without carbon dioxide emission has received a large amount of attention recently. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) can produce pure hydrogen and oxygen via a steam electrolysis reaction that does not emit greenhouse gases. Due to the high operating temperature of SOEC, an external heat source is required for operation, which also helps to improve SOEC performance and reduce operating electricity. The non-catalytic partial oxidation reaction (POX), which is a highly exothermic reaction, can be used as an external heat source and can be integrated with SOEC. Therefore, the aim of this work is to study the effect of operating parameters of non-catalytic POX (i.e., the oxygen to carbon ratio, operating temperature and pressure) on SOEC performance, including exergy analysis of the process. The study indicates that non-catalytic partial oxidation can enhance the hydrogen production rate and efficiency of the system. In terms of exergy analysis, the non-catalytic partial oxidation reactor is demonstrated to be the highest exergy destruction unit due to irreversible chemical reactions taking place, whereas SOEC is a low exergy destruction unit. This result indicates that the partial oxidation reactor should be improved and optimally designed to obtain a high energy and exergy system efficiency.

  12. Optimization studies of bio-hydrogen production in a coupled microbial electrolysis-dye sensitized solar cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Folusho Francis; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Choi, Mi-Jin; Chang, In Seop; Kim, In S

    2010-03-01

    Bio-hydrogen production in light-assisted microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) was optimized by connecting multiple MECs to a single dye (N719) sensitized solar cell (V(OC) approx. 0.7 V). Hydrogen production occurred simultaneously in all the connected MECs when the solar cell was irradiated with light. The amount of hydrogen produced in each MEC depends on the activity of the microbial catalyst on their anode. Substrate (acetate) to hydrogen conversion efficiencies ranging from 42% to 65% were obtained from the reactors during the experiment. A moderate light intensity of 430 W m(-2) was sufficient for hydrogen production in the coupled MEC-DSSC. A higher light intensity of 915 W m(-2), as well as an increase in substrate concentration, did not show any improvement in the current density due to limitation caused by the rate of microbial oxidation on the anode. A significant reduction in the surface area of the connected DSSC only showed a slight effect on current density in the coupled MEC-DSSC system when irradiated with light.

  13. Modeling and optimization of proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cell: Conversion of CO2 into value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwong, Lawit; Authayanun, Suthida; Saebea, Dang; Patcharavorachot, Yaneeporn; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2016-11-01

    Proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC-H+) are a promising technology that can utilize carbon dioxide to produce syngas. In this work, a detailed electrochemical model was developed to predict the behavior of SOEC-H+ and to prove the assumption that the syngas is produced through a reversible water gas-shift (RWGS) reaction. The simulation results obtained from the model, which took into account all of the cell voltage losses (i.e., ohmic, activation, and concentration losses), were validated using experimental data to evaluate the unknown parameters. The developed model was employed to examine the structural and operational parameters. It is found that the cathode-supported SOEC-H+ is the best configuration because it requires the lowest cell potential. SOEC-H+ operated favorably at high temperatures and low pressures. Furthermore, the simulation results revealed that the optimal S/C molar ratio for syngas production, which can be used for methanol synthesis, is approximately 3.9 (at a constant temperature and pressure). The SOEC-H+ was optimized using a response surface methodology, which was used to determine the optimal operating conditions to minimize the cell potential and maximize the carbon dioxide flow rate.

  14. Simulator of Non-homogenous Alumina and Current Distribution in an Aluminum Electrolysis Cell to Predict Low-Voltage Anode Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Lukas; Kiss, László I.; Poncsák, Sándor; Lagacé, Charles-Luc

    2018-04-01

    Perfluorocarbons are important contributors to aluminum production greenhouse gas inventories. Tetrafluoromethane and hexafluoroethane are produced in the electrolysis process when a harmful event called anode effect occurs in the cell. This incident is strongly related to the lack of alumina and the current distribution in the cell and can be classified into two categories: high-voltage and low-voltage anode effects. The latter is hard to detect during the normal electrolysis process and, therefore, new tools are necessary to predict this event and minimize its occurrence. This paper discusses a new approach to model the alumina distribution behavior in an electrolysis cell by dividing the electrolytic bath into non-homogenous concentration zones using discrete elements. The different mechanisms related to the alumina distribution are discussed in detail. Moreover, with a detailed electrical model, it is possible to calculate the current distribution among the different anodic assemblies. With this information, the model can evaluate if low-voltage emissions are likely to be present under the simulated conditions. Using the simulator will help the understanding of the role of the alumina distribution which, in turn, will improve the cell energy consumption and stability while reducing the occurrence of high- and low-voltage anode effects.

  15. Clean hydrogen generation through the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Cell (PEMEC): Effect of the nature and structure of the catalytic anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Claude; Jaubert, Thomas; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol was investigated in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Cell (PEMEC) working at low temperature (20°C) on several Pt-based catalysts (Pt/C, PtSn/C, PtSnRu/C) in order to produce very clean hydrogen by electrolysis of a biomass compound. The electrocatalytic activity was determined by cyclic voltammetry and the rate of hydrogen evolution was measured for each catalyst at different current densities. The cell voltages UEtOH were recorded as a function of time for each current density. At 100 mA cm-2, i.e. 0.5 A with the 5 cm2 surface area PEMEC used, the cell voltage did not exceed 0.9 V for an evolution rate of about 220 cm3 of hydrogen per hour and the electrical energy consumed was less than 2.3 kWh (Nm3)-1, i.e. less than one half of the energy needed for water electrolysis (4.7 kWh (Nm3)-1 at UH2O = 2 V). This result is valid for the decomposition of any organic compound, particularly those originated from biomass resource, provided that their electro-oxidation rate is sufficient (>100 mA cm-2) at a relatively low cell voltage (Ucell < 1 V) which necessitates the development of efficient electrocatalysts for the electrochemical decomposition of this compound.

  16. Experimental and thermodynamic study on the performance of water electrolysis by solid oxide electrolyzer cells with Nb-doped Co-based perovskite anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Zehua; Liu, Qinglin; Zhang, Lan; Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Caizhi; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • BCFN was applied on traditional YSZ electrolyte with GDC interlayer. • Dense YSZ-GDC bilayer electrolyte was obtained by co-sintering at 1300 °C. • Area specific resistance of full cell is 0.195 Ω cm"2 at 800 °C with 60% water vapor. • Cell voltage is 1.13 V at 1 A cm"−"2 at 800 °C with feedstock of 60% H_2O-40% H_2. • The electricity to hydrogen efficiency is 73% with generation rate of 4180 L h"−"1 m"−"2. - Abstract: In this work, Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell (SOEC) based on Ba_0_._9Co_0_._7Fe_0_._2Nb_0_._1O_3_-_δ (BCFN) air electrode and YSZ-GDC bilayer electrolyte was systematically investigated and the efficiency of high-temperature water electrolysis by such a cell was analyzed. Firstly, chemical compatibility test between BCFN and YSZ showed that BaZrO_3 formed after heat treatment at 1000 °C for 5 h, which adversely influenced the performance of BCFN dramatically. A fully dense GDC interlayer was thus developed by co-sintering GDC layer, with addition of 0.5 at.% Fe_2O_3, with YSZ electrolyte at only 1300 °C. The as-prepared fuel electrode-supported eletrolyzer cell consisting of Ni-YSZ fuel electrode, YSZ-GDC bilayer electrolyte and BCFN air electrode was evaluated for water electrolysis. Specifically, at 800 °C using a feedstock of 60% H_2O-40% H_2, the cell showed total area specific resistance of 0.195 Ω cm"2 and the cell voltage was 1.13 V with an electrolysis current of 1 A cm"−"2. After short-term stability test for 120 h with 1 A cm"−"2 electrolysis current at 800 °C, the cell showed no microstructural changes as observed by scanning electron microscopy. At last, a high-temperature water electrolysis system based on the cell studied was proposed and the system analysis shows that the overall electricity to hydrogen efficiency can reach 73% based on lower heating value of hydrogen, with a hydrogen generation rate of 4180 L h"−"1 m"−"2.

  17. The Interconversion of Electrical and Chemical Energy: The Electrolysis of Water and the Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses some of the drawbacks of using a demonstration of the electrolysis of water to illustrate the interconversion between electrical and chemical energy. Illustrates a simple apparatus allowing demonstration of this concept while overcoming these drawbacks. (CW)

  18. Recovery of nitrogen and water from landfill leachate by a microbial electrolysis cell-forward osmosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Mohan; Molitor, Hannah; Brazil, Brian; Novak, John T; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)-forward osmosis (FO) system was previously reported for recovering ammonium and water from synthetic solutions, and here it has been advanced with treating landfill leachate. In the MEC, 65.7±9.1% of ammonium could be recovered in the presence of cathode aeration. Without aeration, the MEC could remove 54.1±10.9% of ammonium from the leachate, but little ammonia was recovered. With 2M NH4HCO3 as the draw solution, the FO process achieved 51% water recovery from the MEC anode effluent in 3.5-h operation, higher than that from the raw leachate. The recovered ammonia was used as a draw solute in the FO for successful water recovery from the treated leachate. Despite the challenges with treating returning solution from the FO, this MEC-FO system has demonstrated the potential for resource recovery from wastes, and provide a new solution for sustainable leachate management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved performance of the microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell with enlarged anode and high applied voltages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bo; Luo, Haiping; Lu, Yaobin; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Li, Xiao

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to improve performance of the microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) using enlarged anode and high applied voltages. MEDCCs with anode lengths of 9 and 48cm (i.e., the 9cm-anode MEDCC and 48cm-anode MEDCC, respectively) were tested under different voltages (1.2-3.0V). Our results demonstrated for the first time that the MEDCC could maintain high performance even under the applied voltage higher than that for water dissociation (i.e., 1.8V). Under the applied voltage of 2.5V, the maximum current density in the 48cm-anode MEDCC reached 32.8±2.6A/m 2 , which is one of the highest current densities reported so far in the bioelectrochemical system (BES). The relative abundance of Geobacter was changed along the anode length. Our results show the great potential of the BES with enlarged anode and high applied voltages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Set anode potentials affect the electron fluxes and microbial community structure in propionate-fed microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-12-09

    Anode potential has been shown to be a critical factor in the rate of acetate removal in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), but studies with fermentable substrates and set potentials are lacking. Here, we examined the impact of three different set anode potentials (SAPs; −0.25, 0, and 0.25 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode) on the electrochemical performance, electron flux to various sinks, and anodic microbial community structure in two-chambered MECs fed with propionate. Electrical current (49–71%) and CH4 (22.9–41%) were the largest electron sinks regardless of the potentials tested. Among the three SAPs tested, 0 V showed the highest electron flux to electrical current (71 ± 5%) and the lowest flux to CH4 (22.9 ± 1.2%). In contrast, the SAP of −0.25 V had the lowest electron flux to current (49 ± 6%) and the highest flux to CH4 (41.1 ± 2%). The most dominant genera detected on the anode of all three SAPs based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing were Geobacter, Smithella and Syntrophobacter, but their relative abundance varied among the tested SAPs. Microbial community analysis implies that complete degradation of propionate in all the tested SAPs was facilitated by syntrophic interactions between fermenters and Geobacter at the anode and ferementers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in suspension.

  1. The use of stainless steel and nickel alloys as low-cost cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.; Merrill, Mathew D.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are used to produce hydrogen gas from the current generated by bacteria, but low-cost alternatives are needed to typical cathode materials (carbon cloth, platinum and Nafion™). Stainless steel A286 was superior to platinum sheet metal in terms of cathodic hydrogen recovery (61% vs. 47%), overall energy recovery (46% vs. 35%), and maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate (1.5 m3 m-3 day-1 vs. 0.68 m3 m-3 day-1) at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. Nickel 625 was better than other nickel alloys, but it did not perform as well as SS A625. The relative ranking of these materials in MEC tests was in agreement with cyclic voltammetry studies. Performance of the stainless steel and nickel cathodes was further increased, even at a lower applied voltage (0.6 V), by electrodepositing a nickel oxide layer onto the sheet metal (cathodic hydrogen recovery, 52%, overall energy recovery, 48%; maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate, 0.76 m3 m-3 day-1). However, performance of the nickel oxide cathodes decreased over time due to a reduction in mechanical stability of the oxides (based on SEM-EDS analysis). These results demonstrate that non-precious metal cathodes can be used in MECs to achieve hydrogen gas production rates better than those obtained with platinum. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of stainless steel and nickel alloys as low-cost cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are used to produce hydrogen gas from the current generated by bacteria, but low-cost alternatives are needed to typical cathode materials (carbon cloth, platinum and Nafion™). Stainless steel A286 was superior to platinum sheet metal in terms of cathodic hydrogen recovery (61% vs. 47%), overall energy recovery (46% vs. 35%), and maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate (1.5 m3 m-3 day-1 vs. 0.68 m3 m-3 day-1) at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. Nickel 625 was better than other nickel alloys, but it did not perform as well as SS A625. The relative ranking of these materials in MEC tests was in agreement with cyclic voltammetry studies. Performance of the stainless steel and nickel cathodes was further increased, even at a lower applied voltage (0.6 V), by electrodepositing a nickel oxide layer onto the sheet metal (cathodic hydrogen recovery, 52%, overall energy recovery, 48%; maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate, 0.76 m3 m-3 day-1). However, performance of the nickel oxide cathodes decreased over time due to a reduction in mechanical stability of the oxides (based on SEM-EDS analysis). These results demonstrate that non-precious metal cathodes can be used in MECs to achieve hydrogen gas production rates better than those obtained with platinum. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulation of electro-fermentation in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells driven by genetically engineered anode biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awate, Bhushan; Steidl, Rebecca J.; Hamlischer, Thilo; Reguera, Gemma

    2017-07-01

    Unwanted metabolites produced during fermentations reduce titers and productivity and increase the cost of downstream purification of the targeted product. As a result, the economic feasibility of otherwise attractive fermentations is low. Using ethanol fermentation by the consolidated bioprocessing cellulolytic bacterium Cellulomonas uda, we demonstrate the effectiveness of anodic electro-fermentations at maximizing titers and productivity in a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (SCMEC) without the need for metabolic engineering of the fermentative microbe. The performance of the SCMEC platform relied on the genetic improvements of anode biofilms of the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens that prevented the oxidation of cathodic hydrogen and improved lactate oxidation. Furthermore, a hybrid bioanode was designed that maximized the removal of organic acids in the fermentation broth. The targeted approach increased cellobiose consumption rates and ethanol titers, yields, and productivity three-fold or more, prevented pH imbalances and reduced batch-to-batch variability. In addition, the sugar substrate was fully consumed and ethanol was enriched in the broth during the electro-fermentation, simplifying its downstream purification. Such improvements and the possibility of scaling up SCMEC configurations highlight the potential of anodic electro-fermentations to stimulate fermentative bacteria beyond their natural capacity and to levels required for industrial implementation.

  4. Effect of the anode feeding composition on the performance of a continuous-flow methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppilli, Marco; Villano, Marianna; Aulenta, Federico; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni; Majone, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    A methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was continuously fed at the anode with a synthetic solution of soluble organic compounds simulating the composition of the soluble fraction of a municipal wastewater. The MEC performance was assessed at different anode potentials in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, methane production, and energy efficiency. As a main result, about 72-80% of the removed substrate was converted into current at the anode, and about 84-86% of the current was converted into methane at the cathode. Moreover, even though both COD removed and methane production slightly decreased as the applied anode potential decreased, the energy efficiency (i.e., the energy recovered as methane with respect to the energy input into the system) increased from 54 to 63%. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses revealed a high diversity in the anodic bacterial community with the presence of both fermentative (Proteiniphilum acetatigenes and Petrimonas sulphurifila) and aerobic (Rhodococcus qingshengii) microorganisms, whereas only two microorganisms (Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus and Methanosarcina mazei), both assignable to methanogens, were observed in the cathodic community.

  5. Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis and Chemical-Production Cell for H2 Production and CO2 Sequestration.

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping; Hatzell, Marta C; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Natural mineral carbonation can be accelerated using acid and alkali solutions to enhance atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the production of these solutions needs to be carbon-neutral. A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis and chemical-production cell (MRECC) was developed to produce these solutions and H2 gas using only renewable energy sources (organic matter and salinity gradient). Using acetate (0.82 g/L) as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber (liquid volume of 28 mL), 0.45 mmol of acid and 1.09 mmol of alkali were produced at production efficiencies of 35% and 86%, respectively, along with 10 mL of H2 gas. Serpentine dissolution was enhanced 17-87-fold using the acid solution, with approximately 9 mL of CO2 absorbed and 4 mg of CO2 fixed as magnesium or calcium carbonates. The operational costs, based on mineral digging and grinding, and water pumping, were estimated to be only $25/metric ton of CO2 fixed as insoluble carbonates. Considering the additional economic benefits of H2 generation and possible wastewater treatment, this method may be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for CO2 sequestration.

  6. Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis and Chemical-Production Cell for H2 Production and CO2 Sequestration.

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2014-03-24

    Natural mineral carbonation can be accelerated using acid and alkali solutions to enhance atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the production of these solutions needs to be carbon-neutral. A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis and chemical-production cell (MRECC) was developed to produce these solutions and H2 gas using only renewable energy sources (organic matter and salinity gradient). Using acetate (0.82 g/L) as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber (liquid volume of 28 mL), 0.45 mmol of acid and 1.09 mmol of alkali were produced at production efficiencies of 35% and 86%, respectively, along with 10 mL of H2 gas. Serpentine dissolution was enhanced 17-87-fold using the acid solution, with approximately 9 mL of CO2 absorbed and 4 mg of CO2 fixed as magnesium or calcium carbonates. The operational costs, based on mineral digging and grinding, and water pumping, were estimated to be only $25/metric ton of CO2 fixed as insoluble carbonates. Considering the additional economic benefits of H2 generation and possible wastewater treatment, this method may be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for CO2 sequestration.

  7. A Decade of Improvements for Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells. Long-Term Degradation Rate from 40%/Kh to 0.4 % Kh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Brodersen, Karen; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) have the potential for efficient large-scale conversion from electrical energy to chemical energy stored in fuels, such as hydrogen or synthetic hydrocarbon fuels by use of well-known catalysis processes. Key issues for the break-through of this technology...... are to provide inexpensive, reliable, high performing and long-term stable SOEC for stack and system applications. At DTU Energy (formerly Department of Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry, Risø National Laboratory), research within SOEC for more than a decade has led to long-term degradation rates on cell...

  8. Co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O in solid oxide cells: Performance and durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the initial performance and durability of a solid oxide cell applied for co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O. Such a cell, when powered by renewable/nuclear energy, could be used to recycle CO2 into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels. Polarization curves and electrochemical impedance...... systematically varied test conditions enabled clear visual identification of five electrode processes that contribute to the cell resistance. The processes could be assigned to each electrode and to gas concentration effects by examining their dependence on gas composition changes and temperature. This study...

  9. Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Y.

    2011-09-19

    There is a tremendous source of entropic energy available from the salinity difference between river water and seawater, but this energy has yet to be efficiently captured and stored. Here we demonstrate that H(2) can be produced in a single process by capturing the salinity driven energy along with organic matter degradation using exoelectrogenic bacteria. Only five pairs of seawater and river water cells were sandwiched between an anode, containing exoelectrogenic bacteria, and a cathode, forming a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell. Exoelectrogens added an electrical potential from acetate oxidation and reduced the anode overpotential, while the reverse electrodialysis stack contributed 0.5-0.6 V at a salinity ratio (seawater:river water) of 50. The H(2) production rate increased from 0.8 to 1.6 m(3)-H(2)/m(3)-anolyte/day for seawater and river water flow rates ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 mL/ min. H(2) recovery, the ratio of electrons used for H(2) evolution to electrons released by substrate oxidation, ranged from 72% to 86%. Energy efficiencies, calculated from changes in salinities and the loss of organic matter, were 58% to 64%. By using a relatively small reverse electrodialysis stack (11 membranes), only ~1% of the produced energy was needed for pumping water. Although Pt was used on the cathode in these tests, additional tests with a nonprecious metal catalyst (MoS(2)) demonstrated H(2) production at a rate of 0.8 m(3)/m(3)/d and an energy efficiency of 51%. These results show that pure H(2) gas can efficiently be produced from virtually limitless supplies of seawater and river water, and biodegradable organic matter.

  10. Co-Electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide in Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Knibbe, Ruth; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of H2O and CO2 as well as oxidation of H2 and CO was studied in a Ni/YSZ electrode supported Solid Oxide Cell (SOC) produced at DTU Energy conversion (former Risø DTU). Even though these Ni/YSZ based SOCs were developed and optimized for fuel cell use, they can work as reversible SOCs i...

  11. Steam Electrolysis by Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with Chemically Stable BaZrO3-Based Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-07-17

    BaZrO3-based material was applied as the electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOECs). Compared with the instability of BaCeO3-based proton-conductors, BaZrO3-based material could be a more promising candidate for proton-conducting SOECs due to its excellent chemical stability under H2O conditions, but few reports on this aspect has been made due to the processing difficulty for BaZrO3. Our recent pioneering work has demonstrated the feasibility of using BaZrO3-based electrolyte for SOECs and the fabricated cell achieves relatively high cell performance, which is comparable or even higher than that for BaCeO3-based SOECs and offers better chemical stability. Cell performance can be further improved by tailoring the electrolyte and electrode. © The Electrochemical Society.

  12. Hydrogen and synthetic fuel production using pressurized solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Sun, Xiufu; Ebbesen, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Wind and solar power is troubled by large fluctuations in delivery due to changing weather. The surplus electricity can be used in a Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell (SOEC) to split CO2 + H2O into CO + H2 (+O2). The synthesis gas (CO + H2) can subsequently be catalyzed into various types of synthetic...... fuels using a suitable catalyst. As the catalyst operates at elevated pressure the fuel production system can be simplified by operating the SOEC at elevated pressure. Here we present the results of a cell test with pressures ranging from 0.4 bar to 10 bar. The cell was tested both as an SOEC...

  13. Multiple paths of electron flow to current in microbial electrolysis cells fed with low and high concentrations of propionate

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-03-03

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) provide a viable approach for bioenergy generation from fermentable substrates such as propionate. However, the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs are unknown. Here, the paths of electron flow involved in propionate oxidation in the anode of two-chambered MECs were examined at low (4.5 mM) and high (36 mM) propionate concentrations. Electron mass balances and microbial community analysis revealed that multiple paths of electron flow (via acetate/H2 or acetate/formate) to current could occur simultaneously during propionate oxidation regardless of the concentration tested. Current (57–96 %) was the largest electron sink and methane (0–2.3 %) production was relatively unimportant at both concentrations based on electron balances. At a low propionate concentration, reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had slightly higher coulombic efficiencies than reactors lacking this methanogenesis inhibitor. However, an opposite trend was observed at high propionate concentration, where reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had a lower coulombic efficiency and there was a greater percentage of electron loss (23.5 %) to undefined sinks compared to reactors without 2-bromoethanesulfonate (11.2 %). Propionate removal efficiencies were 98 % (low propionate concentration) and 78 % (high propionate concentration). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of sequences most similar to Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and G. sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus. Collectively, these results provide new insights on the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs fed with low and high propionate concentrations.

  14. Evaluation of low cost cathode materials for treatment of industrial and food processing wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tenca, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to treat wastewater and produce hydrogen gas, but low cost cathode catalysts are needed to make this approach economical. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and stainless steel (SS) were evaluated as alternative cathode catalysts to platinum (Pt) in terms of treatment efficiency and energy recovery using actual wastewaters. Two different types of wastewaters were examined, a methanol-rich industrial (IN) wastewater and a food processing (FP) wastewater. The use of the MoS2 catalyst generally resulted in better performance than the SS cathodes for both wastewaters, although the use of the Pt catalyst provided the best performance in terms of biogas production, current density, and TCOD removal. Overall, the wastewater composition was more of a factor than catalyst type for accomplishing overall treatment. The IN wastewater had higher biogas production rates (0.8-1.8 m3/m3-d), and COD removal rates (1.8-2.8 kg-COD/m3-d) than the FP wastewater. The overall energy recoveries were positive for the IN wastewater (3.1-3.8 kWh/kg-COD removed), while the FP wastewater required a net energy input of -0.7 - 1.2 kWh/kg-COD using MoS 2 or Pt cathodes, and -3.1 kWh/kg-COD with SS. These results suggest that MoS2 is the most suitable alternative to Pt as a cathode catalyst for wastewater treatment using MECs, but that net energy recovery will be highly dependent on the specific wastewater. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V. M.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rozendal, René A.

    2008-01-01

    production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here

  16. Understanding degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells through modeling of electrochemical potential profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2016-01-01

    conductivities in the electrolyte, the gas composition, temperature, and pressure on the current density distribution over the cell and the oxygen activity distribution within the electrolyte. The developed model is further used to simulate long-term durability experiments during different stages of operation......, thereby helping to rationalize microstructural and chemical changes observed in post-mortem analysis. Finally, measures to mitigate degradation by changing conditions of operation, material or electrode properties or overall cell geometry are suggested....

  17. Long Term Stability Investigation of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell with Infiltrated Porous YSZ Air Electrode Under High Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune; Ovtar, Simona; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    2015-01-01

    stabilised zirconia (YSZ) backbone air electrode and Ni/YSZ cermet fuel electrode. The SOC was tested at electrolysis conditions under high current (up to -1 A/cm2). The porous YSZ electrodes was infiltrated with gadolinium-doped ceria oxide (CGO), to act as a barrier layer between the catalyst...

  18. Steam Electrolysis by Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with Chemically Stable BaZrO3-Based Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Traversa, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    BaZrO3-based material was applied as the electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOECs). Compared with the instability of BaCeO3-based proton-conductors, BaZrO3-based material could be a more promising candidate for proton

  19. Water Electrolysis at Different Current - Voltage Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleperis, J.; Blums, J.; Vanags, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Electrochemical impedance and volt-amperic methods were used to compare an efficiency of water electrolysis for different materials and different electrode configurations. Two and three electrode measurements were made, using standard calomel reference electrode. Non-standard capacitative electrolysis was analyzed in special cell made from cylindrical steel electrodes. Volt-amperic measurements from - 15V to +15V DC didn't indicated the presence of oxidation - reduction reactions when distilled water was used as electrolyte. Impedance measurements showed unusual frequency behavior when the AC voltage increased till 0.5V. Different nickel and carbon electrodes (plate, porous and textile - type) were used to learn classical Faraday electrolysis in strong alkali solutions. Flying increase of current was indicator of the presence of electrolysis, and characteristic potential was used differ between materials accordingly they effectiveness for usage in an electrolyser device. (Aithors)

  20. Modeling Bubble Flow and Current Density Distribution in an Alkaline Electrolysis Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandra S. Jupudi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bubbles on the current density distribution over the electrodes of an alkaline electrolyzer cell is studied using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model. Model includes Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow methodology to model the multiphase flow of Hydrogen and Oxygen with water and the behavior of each phase is accounted for using first principle. Hydrogen/Oxygen evolution, flow field and current density distribution are incorporated in the model to account for the complicated physics involved in the process. Fluent 6.2 is used to solve two-phase flow and electrochemistry is incorporated using UDF (User Defined Function feature of Fluent. Model is validated with mesh refinement study and by comparison with experimental measurements. Model is found to replicate the effect of cell voltage and inter-electrode gap (distance between the electrodes on current density accurately. Further, model is found to capture the existence of optimum cell height. The validated model is expected to be a very useful tool in the design and optimization of alkaline electrolyzer cells.

  1. Ni/YSZ microstructure optimization for long-term stability of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Brodersen, Karen; Karas, Filip

    2014-01-01

    of keeping the Ni particles in their required positions in the porous Ni/YSZ cermet close to the electrolyte. In this work we report cell tests and microstructures from reference and long-term tested SOEC with varied initial Ni/YSZ ratio with the aim of investigating the effect of changed Ni/YSZ ratio...

  2. Tritium separation from heavy water using electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Sakuma, Y.; Ohtani, N.; Kodaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tritium separation from heavy water by the electrolysis using a solid polymer electrode (SPE) was specified on investigation. The heavy water (∼10 Bq g -1 ) and the light water (∼70 Bq g -1 ) were electrolysed using an electrolysis device (Tripure XZ001, Permelec Electrode Ltd.) with the SPE layer. The cathode was made of stainless steel (SUS314). The electrolysis was carried out at 20 A x 60 min, with the electrolysis temperature at 10, 20, or 30degC, and 15 A x 80 min at 5degC. The produced hydrogen and oxygen gases were recombined using a palladium catalyst (ND-101, N.E. Chemcat Ltd.) with nitrogen gas as a carrier. The activities of the water in the cell and of the recombined water were analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The electrolysis potential to keep the current 20 A was 2-3 V. The yields of the recombined water were more than 90%. The apparent separation factors (SF) for the heavy water and the light water were ∼2 and ∼12, respectively. The SF value was in agreement with the results in other work. The factors were changed with the cell temperature. The electrolysis using the SPE is applicable for the tritium separation, and is able to perform the small-scale apparatus at the room temperature. (author)

  3. Residual stresses and strength of multilayer tape cast solid oxide fuel and electrolysis half-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlas, Benoit; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brodersen, Karen

    2015-01-01

    those with 3 layers (MTC3: without barrier layer). The bending strength of MTC3 and MTC4 under various loading orientations (electrolyte on the tensile or compressive side of the loading) is compared. The analysis, by taking residual stresses into account, shows that the strength of the half...... coefficient (TEC) mismatch between the layers, cumulated from high temperature, induces significant residual stresses in the half-cells. Furthermore, it has been observed that MTC half-cells with 4 layers (MTC4: support, fuel electrode, electrolyte and barrier layer) are sometimes more fragile to handle than...... stresses, especially in the outer barrier-layer, possible changes to the layer properties are discussed and some optimization guidelines proposed....

  4. TOF-SIMS characterization of impurity enrichment and redistribution in solid oxide electrolysis cells during operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Norrman, Kion; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos

    2014-01-01

    cathode. The surfaces and cross-sections of the cells were analyzed, and several elemental impurities like Si, Ca and Na were identified and spatially mapped and their enrichment and migration during operation is reported. With advancing operation time, the concentration of these elements, especially Na...... and Ca, increases. For Si, a concentration gradient is found from the gas inlet to the gas outlet. Additionally, a loss of Ni percolation in the active cathode is observed in the same area where the Si enrichment is found. Based on the obtained TOF-SIMS results, the influence of the operating conditions...

  5. Fundamental Insights into Propionate Oxidation in Microbial Electrolysis Cells Using a Combination of Electrochemical, Molecular biology and Electron Balance Approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-11-01

    Increasing demand for freshwater and energy is pushing towards the development of alternative technologies that are sustainable. One of the realistic solutions to address this is utilization of the renewable resources like wastewater. Conventional wastewater treatment processes can be highly energy demanding and can fails to recover the full potential of useful resources such as energy in the wastewater. As a consequence, there is an urgent necessity for sustainable wastewater treatment technologies that could harness such resources present in wastewaters. Advanced treatment process based on microbial electrochemical technologies (METs) such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) have a great potential for the resources recovery through a sustainable wastewater treatment process. METs rely on the abilities of microorganisms that are capable of transferring electrons extracellularly by oxidizing the organic matter in the wastewater and producing electrical current for electricity generation (MFC) or H2 and CH4 production (MEC). Propionate is an important volatile fatty acid (VFA) (24-70%) in some wastewaters and accumulation of this VFA can cause a process failure in a conventional anaerobic digestion (AD) system. To address this issue, MECs were explored as a novel, alternative wastewater treatment technology, with a focus on a better understanding of propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs. Having such knowledge could help in the development of more robust and efficient wastewater treatment systems to recover energy and produce high quality effluents. Several studies were conducted to: 1) determine the paths of electron flow in the anode of propionate fed MECs low (4.5 mM) and high (36 mM) propionate concentrations; 2) examine the effect of different set anode potentials on the electrochemical performance, propionate degradation, electron fluxes, and microbial community structure in MECs fed propionate; and 3) examine the temporal

  6. Electrical impedance tomography of electrolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Meir

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations.

  7. Assessment of four different cathode materials at different initial pHs using unbuffered catholytes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ribot-Llobet, Edgar; Nam, Joo-Youn; Tokash, Justin C.; Guisasola, Albert; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel foam (NF), stainless steel wool (SSW), platinum coated stainless steel mesh (Pt), and molybdenum disulfide coated stainless steel mesh (MoS 2) electrodes have been proposed as catalysts for hydrogen gas production, but previous tests have primarily examined their performance in well buffered solutions. These materials were compared using two-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) in unbuffered saline solutions at two different initial pHs (7 and 12). There was generally no appreciable effect of initial pH on production rates or total gas production. NF produced hydrogen gas at a rate of 1.1 m3 H2/m 3·d, which was only slightly less than that using Pt (1.4 m3 H2/m3·d), but larger than that obtained with SSW (0.52 m3 H2/m3·d) or MoS2 (0.67 m3 H2/m3·d). Overall hydrogen gas recoveries with SSW (29.7 ± 0.5 mL), MoS2 (28.6 ± 1.3 mL) and NF (32.4 ± 2 mL) were only slightly less than that of Pt (37.9 ± 0.5 mL). Total energy recoveries, based on the gas produced versus electrical energy input, ranged from 0.75 ± 0.02 for Pt, to 0.55 ± 0.02 for SSW. An LSV analysis showed no effect of pH for NF and Pt, but overpotentials were reduced for MoS2 and SSW by using an initial lower pH. At cathode potentials more negative than -0.85 V (vs Ag/AgCl), NF had lower overpotentials than the MoS2. These results provide the first assessment of these materials under practical conditions of high pH in unbuffered saline catholytes, and position NF as the most promising inexpensive alternative to Pt.

  8. Assessment of four different cathode materials at different initial pHs using unbuffered catholytes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ribot-Llobet, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    Nickel foam (NF), stainless steel wool (SSW), platinum coated stainless steel mesh (Pt), and molybdenum disulfide coated stainless steel mesh (MoS 2) electrodes have been proposed as catalysts for hydrogen gas production, but previous tests have primarily examined their performance in well buffered solutions. These materials were compared using two-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) in unbuffered saline solutions at two different initial pHs (7 and 12). There was generally no appreciable effect of initial pH on production rates or total gas production. NF produced hydrogen gas at a rate of 1.1 m3 H2/m 3·d, which was only slightly less than that using Pt (1.4 m3 H2/m3·d), but larger than that obtained with SSW (0.52 m3 H2/m3·d) or MoS2 (0.67 m3 H2/m3·d). Overall hydrogen gas recoveries with SSW (29.7 ± 0.5 mL), MoS2 (28.6 ± 1.3 mL) and NF (32.4 ± 2 mL) were only slightly less than that of Pt (37.9 ± 0.5 mL). Total energy recoveries, based on the gas produced versus electrical energy input, ranged from 0.75 ± 0.02 for Pt, to 0.55 ± 0.02 for SSW. An LSV analysis showed no effect of pH for NF and Pt, but overpotentials were reduced for MoS2 and SSW by using an initial lower pH. At cathode potentials more negative than -0.85 V (vs Ag/AgCl), NF had lower overpotentials than the MoS2. These results provide the first assessment of these materials under practical conditions of high pH in unbuffered saline catholytes, and position NF as the most promising inexpensive alternative to Pt.

  9. Two-stage conversion of crude glycerol to energy using dark fermentation linked with microbial fuel cell or microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chookaew, Teera; Prasertsan, Poonsuk; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-03-25

    Crude glycerol is a main byproduct of the biodiesel industry, and the beneficial use of waste glycerol has been a major challenge. This study characterises the conversion of crude glycerol into bioenergy such as H2 and electricity using a two-stage process linking dark fermentation with a microbial fuel cell (MFC) or microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The results showed that fermentation achieved a maximum H2 rate of 332 mL/L and a yield of 0.55 mol H2/mol glycerol, accompanied by 20% of organic removal. Fed with the raw fermentation products with an initial COD of 7610 mg/L, a two-chamber MFC produced 92 mW/m(2) in power density and removed 50% of COD. The Columbic efficiency was 14%. When fed with 50% diluted fermentation product, a similar power output (90m W/m(2)) and COD removal (49%) were obtained, but the CE doubled to 27%. Similar substrates were used to produce H2 in two-chamber MECs, and the diluted influent had a higher performance, with the highest yield at 106 mL H2/g COD and a CE of 24%. These results demonstrate that dark fermentation linked with MFC/MEC can be a feasible option for conversion of waste glycerol into bioenergy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prospects for UK fuel cells component suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, C.; Tunnicliffe, M.

    2002-07-01

    This report examines the capabilities of the UK fuel cell industry in meeting the expected increase in demand, and aims to identify all UK suppliers of fuel cell components, evaluate their products and match them to fuel cell markets, and identify components where the UK is in a competitive position. Component areas are addressed along with the need to reduce costs and ensure efficient production. The well established supplier base in the UK is noted, and the car engine manufacturing base and fuel supply companies are considered. The different strengths of UK suppliers of the various types of fuel cells are listed. The future industry structure, the opportunities and dangers for business posed by fuel cells, the investment in cleaner technologies by the large fuel companies, opportunities for catalyst suppliers, and the residential combined heat and power and portable electronics battery markets are discussed.

  11. Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne

    2008-01-01

    kulmonoxid der er et udmærket udgangspunkt for fremstilling af flydende brændsler som methanol og benzin. I dette ph.d. projekt er der arbejdet med fastoxidceller til elektrolyse af vanddamp i temperaturområdet 650-950oC. Cellerne er fremstillet på Afdelingen for Brændselsceller og Faststofkemi, Risø DTU, og...

  12. Microscale Electrolysis Using Coin-Type Lithium Batteries and Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Yajima, Seiko

    2013-01-01

    An educational experiment illustrates the electrolysis of water and copper chloride to middle school science students. The electrolysis cell is composed of filter paper soaked with Na[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4] or CuCl[subscript 2] aqueous solution sandwiched, along with a sheet of platinum foil, between two coin-type lithium batteries. When the…

  13. Fused salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Working conditions for zirconium preparation by fused salt electrolysis were studied. For such purpose, a cell was built for operation under argon atmosphere. A graphite crucible served as anode, with steel cathodes. Proper design allowed cathode rechange under the inert atmosphere. Cathodic deposits of zirconium powder occluded salts from the bath. After washing with both water and hydrochloric acid, the metallic powder was consolidated by fusion. Optimum operating conditions were found to arise from an electrolyte of 12% potassium hexafluorzirconate -88% sodium chloride, at 820 deg C and 5 A/cm 2 cathodic current density. Deposits contained 35% of metal and current efficiency reached 66%. The powder contained up to 600 ppm of chlorine and 1.700 ppm of fluorine; after fusion, those amounts decreased to 2 ppm and 3 ppm respectively, with low proportion of metallic impurities. Though oxygen proportion was 4.500 ppm, it should be lowered by improving working conditions, as well as working on an ampler scale. (Author)

  14. A numerical study of the gas-liquid, two-phase flow maldistribution in the anode of a high pressure PEM water electrolysis cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Rømer, Carsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the use of a circular-planar, interdigitated flow field for the anode of a high pressure proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis cell is investigated in a numerical study. While PEM fuel cells have separated flow fields for reactant transport and coolant, it is possible...... causes maldistribution, if land areas of equal width are applied. Moreover, below a water stoichiometry of 350, and at a current density of 1 A/cm2, flow and temperature maldistribution is adversely affected by the presence of the gas phase; particularly gas hold-up near outlet channels can cause......-phase flow model for establishing the effect of geometry and a two-phase flow model for studying the effect of dispersed gas bubbles. Both models account for turbulence and heat transport. By means of the developed models, it is elucidated that the circular-planar shape of the interdigitated flow field...

  15. A Demonstration of Carbon-Assisted Water Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan D. Adeniyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that carbon fuel cell technology can be combined with that of high temperature steam electrolysis by the incorporation of carbon fuel at the cell anode, with the resulting reduction of the required electrolysis voltage by around 1 V. The behaviour of the cell current density and applied voltage are shown to be connected with the threshold of electrolysis and the main features are compared with theoretical results from the literature. The advantage arises from the avoidance of efficiency losses associated with electricity generation using thermal cycles, as well as the natural separation of the carbon dioxide product stream for subsequent processing.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline RuS2 nanoparticles as cathodic catalysts in the methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanjuan; Li, Nan; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Li, Xiaotian; Yan, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Highly crystalline RuS 2 nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method. • The product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS 2 with average particle size of 14.8 nm. • RuS 2 nanoparticles were used as cathodic catalysts in methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. • The catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl − . - Abstract: Highly crystalline ruthenium sulfide (RuS 2 ) nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method at 400 °C, using ruthenium chloride and thiourea as reactants. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analyze (TG-DTA), transmission electron microscopy equipped with selected area electron diffraction (TEM/SAED). Fourier transform infrared spectra (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD result illustrates that the highly crystalline product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS 2 and the average particle size is 14.8 nm. SEM and TEM images display the products have irregular shape of 6–25 nm. XPS analyst indicates that the sulfur exists in the form of S 2 2− . Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are conducted to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the highly crystalline RuS 2 nanoparticles in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. The results illustrate that RuS 2 is active towards oxygen reduction reaction. Although the activity of RuS 2 is lower than that of Pt/C, the RuS 2 catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl −

  17. Glycoprotein component of plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.B.; Chen, J.A.; Varner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary wall surrounding most dicotyledonous plant cells contains a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) component named extensin. A small group of glycopeptides solubilized from isolated cell walls by proteolysis contained a repeated pentapeptide glycosylated by tri- and tetraarabinosides linked to hydroxyproline and, by galactose, linked to serine. Recently, two complementary approaches to this problem have provided results which greatly increase the understanding of wall extensin. In this paper the authors describe what is known about the structure of soluble extensin secreted into the walls of the carrot root cells

  18. Towards solid oxide electrolysis plants in 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Blennow, Peter; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    The goal of the project is to further improve performance and durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) and stacks targeting applications specifically for regulating the future Danish power system with a high amount of fluctuating renewable energies, and at the same time enhance the co...

  19. Hydrogen production by high-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam. Test results obtained with an electrolysis tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam is an advanced hydrogen production process decomposing high temperature steam up to 1,000degC, which applies an electro-chemical reaction reverse to the solid oxide fuel cell. At Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 electrolysis cells in order to develop heat utilization systems for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The electrolysis cells of which electrolyte was yttria-stabilized zirconia were formed on a porous ceramic tube in series by plasma spraying. In the experiments, water steam mixed with argon carrier gas was supplied into the electrolysis tube heated at a constant temperature regulated in the range from 850degC to 950degC, and electrolysis power was supplied by a DC power source. Hydrogen production rate increased with applied voltage and electrolysis temperature; the maximum production rate was 6.9Nl/h at 950degC. Hydrogen production rate was correlated with applied current densities on the basis of experimental data. High energy efficiency was achieved under the applied current density ranging from 80 to 100 mA/cm 2 . (author)

  20. Electrochemical extraction of oxygen using PEM electrolysis technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOULBABA ELADEB

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical extraction of oxygen from air can be carried out by chemical reduction of oxygen at the cathode and simultaneous oxygen evolution by water anode oxidation. The present investigation deals with the use of an electrolysis cell of PEM technology for this purpose. A dedicated 25 cm2 cell provided with a commercial water electrolysis MEA and titanium grooved plates has been designed for continuous operation at pressures close to the ambient level. The MEA consisted of a Nafion 117 membrane sandwiched between a Pt/C cathode and a non-supported Pt-Ir anode. Oxygen partial consumption in long-term runs was evaluated by analysis of the outlet air by gas chromatography, depending on the cell voltage - or the current density - and the excess in air oxygen fed to the cathode. Runs over more 50 hours indicated the relative stability of the components used for current densities ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 A cm-2 with high efficiency of oxygen reduction. Higher current density could be envisaged with more efficient MEA’s, exhibiting lower overpotentials for oxygen evolution to avoid too significant degradation of the anode material and the membrane. Interpretation of the data has been carried out by calculation of the cathode current efficiency.

  1. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process for the extraction of oxygen for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements for use in fabrication on the Moon. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis is ideal for extraction, since the electron is the only practical reducing agent. MOE has several advantages over other extraction methods. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. Alternatively, MOE requires no import of consumable reagents (e.g. fluorine and carbon) as other processes do, and does not rely on interfacing multiple processes to obtain refined products. Electrolytic processing has the advantage of selectivity of reaction in the presence of a multi-component feed. Products from lunar regolith can be extracted in sequence according to the stabilities of their oxides as expressed by the values of the free energy of oxide formation (e.g. chromium, manganese, Fe, Si, Ti, Al, magnesium, and calcium). Previous work has demonstrated the viability of producing Fe and oxygen from oxide mixtures similar in composition to lunar regolith by molten oxide electrolysis (electrowinning), also called magma electrolysis having shown electrolytic extraction of Si from regolith simulant. This paper describes recent advances in demonstrating the MOE process by a joint project with participation by NASA KSC and

  2. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Effect of Gas-Shrouded Plasma Spraying on Cathode Coating of Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Reißner, R.; Schiller, G.; Ansar, A.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the performance of electrodes prepared via atmospheric plasma spray by means of gas shrouding which is expected to apparently reduce the oxygen content of the plasma plume and subsequently improve the coating quality. Electrodes with dual-layer coating for alkaline water electrolysis were deposited on Ni-coated perforated substrates. Microstructure and morphology were studied by SEM. Element content was measured by EDS. Enthalpy probe was employed for measuring plasma temperature and velocity as well as the gas composition. For verifying and better understanding the shrouding effect numerical calculation was carried out according to the experimental settings. Electrochemical test was carried out to validate the shrouding effect. The results showed slight protecting effect of gas shrouding on plasma plume and the final coating. Over the dual-layer section, the measured oxygen fraction was 3.46 and 3.15% for the case without gas shrouding and with gas shrouding, respectively. With gas shrouding the coating exhibited similar element contents as the coating sprayed by VPS, while no obvious improvement was observed in the microstructure or the morphology. Evident electrochemical improvement was nevertheless achieved that with gas shrouding the electrode exhibited similar performance as that of the VPS-sprayed electrode.

  3. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Stefania; Salvi, Paolo; Nelli, Paolo; Pesenti, Rachele; Villa, Marco; Berrettoni, Mario; Zangari, Giovanni; Kiros, Yohannes

    2012-01-01

    A short review on the fundamental and technological issues relevant to water electrolysis in alkaline and proton exchange membrane (PEM) devices is given. Due to price and limited availability of the platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts they currently employ, PEM electrolyzers have scant possibilities of being employed in large-scale hydrogen production. The importance and recent advancements in the development of catalysts without PGMs are poised to benefit more the field of alkaline electrolysis rather than that of PEM devices. This paper presents our original data which demonstrate that an advanced alkaline electrolyzer with performances rivaling those of PEM electrolyzers can be made without PGM and with catalysts of high stability and durability. Studies on the advantages/limitations of electrolyzers with different architectures do show how a judicious application of pressure differentials in a recirculating electrolyte scheme helps reduce mass transport limitations, increasing efficiency and power density.

  4. Degradation of solid oxide cells during co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2: Carbon deposition under high current densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    conversions of the reactants were no more than 66.8 %. Ni-YSZ electrode delamination and carbon nano-fibers could be observed after test at the Ni-YSZ | YSZ electrolyte interface for two of the cells. Thermodynamic calculation shows that the reactant conversion needed for carbon formation is above 99 %, far...... above the experimental conversions. The observed carbon formation may be caused by the gas diffusion limitations at high current densities. Carbon nano-fibers were only observed close to the YSZ electrolyte indicating a large overpotential gradient at the TPBs close to the electrolyte......During co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 using solid oxide cells (SOCs) the risk of carbon deposition in the Ni-YSZ electrode under high current densities (∼ 2.0 A/cm2) was studied in this work. Five galvanostatic tests were performed at current density between 1.5 and 2.25 A/cm2 and the average...

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles as cathodic catalysts in the methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanjuan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Minisry of Education Ocean University of China, Qingdao, 266100 (China); College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Nan, E-mail: lin@jlu.edu.cn [College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Yanagisawa, Kazumichi [Research Laboratory of Hydrothermal Chemistry, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Li, Xiaotian [College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Yan, Xiao [Key Laboratory of Physics and Technology for Advanced Batteries (Ministry of Education), College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method. • The product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS{sub 2} with average particle size of 14.8 nm. • RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles were used as cathodic catalysts in methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. • The catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl{sup −}. - Abstract: Highly crystalline ruthenium sulfide (RuS{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method at 400 °C, using ruthenium chloride and thiourea as reactants. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analyze (TG-DTA), transmission electron microscopy equipped with selected area electron diffraction (TEM/SAED). Fourier transform infrared spectra (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD result illustrates that the highly crystalline product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS{sub 2} and the average particle size is 14.8 nm. SEM and TEM images display the products have irregular shape of 6–25 nm. XPS analyst indicates that the sulfur exists in the form of S{sub 2}{sup 2−}. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are conducted to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. The results illustrate that RuS{sub 2} is active towards oxygen reduction reaction. Although the activity of RuS{sub 2} is lower than that of Pt/C, the RuS{sub 2} catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl{sup −}.

  6. Studies on membrane acid electrolysis for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marco Antonio Oliveira da; Linardi, Marcelo; Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen represents great opportunity to be a substitute for fossil fuels in the future. Water as a renewable source of hydrogen is of great interest, since it is abundant and can decompose, producing only pure H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This decomposition of water can be accomplished by processes such as electrolysis, thermal decomposition and thermochemical cycles. The electrolysis by membrane has been proposed as a viable process for hydrogen production using thermal and electrical energy derived from nuclear energy or any renewable source like solar energy. In this work, within the context of optimization of the electrolysis process, it is intended to develop a mathematical model that can simulate and assist in parameterization of the electrolysis performed by polymer membrane electrolytic cell. The experimental process to produce hydrogen via the cell membrane, aims to optimize the amount of gas produced using renewable energy with noncarbogenic causing no harm by producing gases deleterious to the environment. (author)

  7. Pt and PtRu catalyst bilayers increase efficiencies for ethanol oxidation in proton exchange membrane electrolysis and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Rakan M.; Pickup, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    Polarization curves, product distributions, and reaction stoichiometries have been measured for the oxidation of ethanol at anodes consisting of Pt and PtRu bilayers and a homogeneous mixture of the two catalysts. These anode structures all show synergies between the two catalysts that can be attributed to the oxidation of acetaldehyde produced at the PtRu catalyst by the Pt catalyst. The use of a PtRu layer over a Pt layer produces the strongest effect, with higher currents than a Pt on PtRu bilayer, mixed layer, or either catalyst alone, except for Pt at high potentials. Reaction stoichiometries (average number of electrons transferred per ethanol molecule) were closer to the values for Pt alone for both of the bilayer configurations but much lower for PtRu and mixed anodes. Although Pt alone would provide the highest overall fuel cell efficiency at low power densities, the PtRu on Pt bilayer would provide higher power densities without a significant loss of efficiency. The origin of the synergy between the Pt and PtRu catalysts was elucidated by separation of the total current into the individual components for generation of carbon dioxide and the acetaldehyde and acetic acid byproducts.

  8. Enhanced treatment of Fischer-Tropsch wastewater using up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket system coupled with micro-electrolysis cell: A pilot scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexin; Han, Yuxing; Han, Hongjun; Li, Kun; Xu, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of micro-electrolysis cell (MEC) with an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) system in pilot scale was established for enhanced treatment of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) wastewater. The lowest influent pH (4.99±0.10) and reduced alkali addition were accomplished under the assistance of anaerobic effluent recycling of 200% (stage 5). Simultaneously, the optimum COD removal efficiency (93.5±1.6%) and methane production (2.01±0.13m 3 /m 3 ·d) at the lower hydraulic retention time (HRT) were achieved in this stage. In addition, the dissolved iron from MEC could significantly increase the protein content of tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS), which was beneficial to formation of stable granules. Furthermore, the high-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing in this study further confirmed that Geobacter species could utilize iron oxides particles as electron conduit to perform the direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) with Methanothrix, finally facilitating the syntrophic degradation of propionic acid and butyric acid and contributing completely methane production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen production with effluent from an ethanol–H2-coproducing fermentation reactor using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Lu

    2009-06-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by bacterial fermentation of sugars, but substrate conversion to hydrogen is incomplete. Using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), we show that additional hydrogen can be produced from the effluent of an ethanol-type dark-fermentation reactor. An overall hydrogen recovery of 83 ± 4% was obtained using a buffered effluent (pH 6.7-7.0), with a hydrogen production rate of 1.41 ± 0.08 m3 H2/m3 reactor/d, at an applied voltage of Eap = 0.6 V. When the MEC was combined with the fermentation system, the overall hydrogen recovery was 96%, with a production rate of 2.11 m3 H2/m3/d, corresponding to an electrical energy efficiency of 287%. High cathodic hydrogen recoveries (70 ± 5% to 94 ± 4%) were obtained at applied voltages of 0.5-0.8 V due to shorter cycle times, and repression of methanogen growth through exposure of the cathode to air after each cycle. Addition of a buffer to the fermentation effluent was critical to MEC performance as there was little hydrogen production using unbuffered effluent (0.0372 m3 H2/m3/d at Eap = 0.6 V, pH 4.5-4.6). These results demonstrate that hydrogen yields from fermentation can be substantially increased by using MECs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High-temperature electrolysis of CO2-enriched mixtures by using fuel-electrode supported La0.6Sr0.4CoO3/YSZ/Ni-YSZ solid oxide cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si-Won; Bae, Yonggyun; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jong-Heun; Hong, Jongsup

    2018-02-01

    To mitigate CO2 emissions, its reduction by high-temperature electrolysis using solid oxide cells is extensively investigated, for which excessive steam supply is assumed. However, such condition may degrade its feasibility due to massive energy required for generating hot steam, implying the needs for lowering steam demand. In this study, high-temperature electrolysis of CO2-enriched mixtures by using fuel-electrode supported La0.6Sr0.4CoO3/YSZ/Ni-YSZ solid oxide cells is considered to satisfy such needs. The effect of internal and external steam supply on its electrochemical performance and gas productivity is elucidated. It is shown that the steam produced in-situ inside the fuel-electrode by a reverse water gas shift reaction may decrease significantly the electrochemical resistance of dry CO2-fed operations, attributed to self-sustaining positive thermo-electrochemical reaction loop. This mechanism is conspicuous at low current density, whereas it is no longer effective at high current density in which total reactant concentrations for electrolysis is critical. To overcome such limitations, a small amount of external steam supply to the CO2-enriched feed stream may be needed, but this lowers the CO2 conversion and CO/H2 selectivity. Based on these results, it is discussed that there can be minimum steam supply sufficient for guaranteeing both low electrochemical resistance and high gas productivity.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Population Balance Model Simulation of Effects of Cell Design and Operating Parameters on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows and Bubble Distribution Characteristics in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Zhentao; Yang, Jianhong

    2018-02-01

    The effects of different cell design and operating parameters on the gas-liquid two-phase flows and bubble distribution characteristics under the anode bottom regions in aluminum electrolysis cells were analyzed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-population balance model. These parameters include inter-anode channel width, anode-cathode distance (ACD), anode width and length, current density, and electrolyte depth. The simulations results show that the inter-anode channel width has no significant effect on the gas volume fraction, electrolyte velocity, and bubble size. With increasing ACD, the above values decrease and more uniform bubbles can be obtained. Different effects of the anode width and length can be concluded in different cell regions. With increasing current density, the gas volume fraction and electrolyte velocity increase, but the bubble size keeps nearly the same. Increasing electrolyte depth decreased the gas volume fraction and bubble size in particular areas and the electrolyte velocity increased.

  12. Quorum sensing alters the microbial community of electrode-respiring bacteria and hydrogen scavengers toward improving hydrogen yield in microbial electrolysis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Weiwei; Zhang, Zhaojing; Ren, Ge; Shen, Qiuxuan; Hou, Yanan; Ma, Anzhou; Deng, Ye; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enhanced hydrogen yield has been achieved with addition of AHL. • AHL regulated exoelectrogens resulting in electrochemical activity enhancement. • Microbial community shift in cathodic biofilm inhibited hydrogen loss. - Abstract: Quorum sensing has been widely applied to enhance the energy recovery of bioelectrochemical system as a sustainable pathway to enhance communication between cells and electrodes. However, how signalling molecules (acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs) regulate the microbial community to improve hydrogen generation in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is not well understood, especially the subsequent influence on interspecies relationships among not only electrode-respiring bacteria but also hydrogen scavengers. Understanding AHL regulation in a complicated and actual biofilm system will be valuable for future applications of microbial electrochemical technology. Herein, we added short-chain AHLs (3OC6) to regulate the biofilm community on bio-electrodes in MECs. As a result, hydrogen yields were enhanced with AHL addition, increasing by 5.57%, 38.68%, and 81.82% with varied external voltages (0.8 V, 0.6 V, and 0.4 V, respectively). Accordingly, overall reactor performance was enhanced, including coulombic efficiency, electron recovery efficiency, and energy efficiency. Based on an electrochemical impedance spectra analysis, the structured biofilm under simple nutrient conditions (acetate) showed a lower internal resistance with AHL addition, indicating that the microbial communities were altered to enhance electron transfer between the biofilm and electrode. The change in the cathodic microbial structure with more electrochemically active bacteria and fewer hydrogen scavengers could contribute to a higher electron recovery and hydrogen yield with AHL addition. The regulation of the microbial community structure by AHLs represents a potential strategy to enhance electron transfer and hydrogen generation in

  13. NASA fuel cell applications for space: Endurance test results on alkaline fuel cell electrolyzer components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheibley, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel cells continue to play a major role in manned spacecraft power generation. The Gemini and Apollo programs used fuel cell power plants as the primary source of mission electrical power, with batteries as the backup. The current NASA use for fuel cells is in the Orbiter program. Here, low temperature alkaline fuel cells provide all of the on-board power with no backup power source. Three power plants per shipset are utilized; the original power plant contained 32-cell substacks connected in parallel. For extended life and better power performance, each power plant now contains three 32-cell substacks connected in parallel. One of the possible future applications for fuel cells will be for the proposed manned Space Station in low earth orbit (LEO)(1, 2, 3). By integrating a water electrolysis capability with a fuel cell (a regenerative fuel cell system), a multikilowatt energy storage capability ranging from 35 kW to 250 kW can be achieved. Previous development work on fuel cell and electrolysis systems would tend to minimize the development cost of this energy storage system. Trade studies supporting initial Space Station concept development clearly show regenerative fuel cell (RFC) storage to be superior to nickel-cadmium and nickel-hydrogen batteries with regard to subsystem weight, flexibility in design, and integration with other spacecraft systems when compared for an initial station power level ranging from 60 kW to 75 kW. The possibility of scavenging residual O 2 and H 2 from the Shuttle external tank for use in fuel cells for producing power also exists

  14. Time efficiency of tritium measurement in the environmental water by electrolysis enrichment (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Koganezawa, T.; Iida, T.

    2003-01-01

    Now the electrolysis enrichment is necessary for tritium measurement of the environmental water in Japan. Generally, the electrolysis needs distilling the sample water before and after the electrolysis. To save the time to measure, it was investigated that a possibility of the omission of the distillation after the electrolysis and of the substitution the filtration for the distillation before the electrolysis. The electrolysis was carried out with a device using solid polymer electrolyte layer, which was recently developed in Japan. Initially, impurities eluted from the device were measured by enrichment of ultra pure water. Although some impurities eluted from the layer, the concentrations were so low that the enriched water brought ineffectual quenching for the liquid scintillation counting. Secondly, two filtration methods, i.e.; micro filtration with the pore size of 0.1 μm and reverse osmosis, were applied to eliminate the impurities in the environmental waters before the electrolysis. Although the impurity concentrations in the samples by the filtrations were higher than those by the distillation, the filtered water brought only slight quenching. However, the frequent electrolysis of the water treated with the micro filtration caused degradation of the electrolysis cell. Consequently, the distillation after the electrolysis may omit, and the reverse osmosis treatment may alternate the distillation before the electrolysis. Improving the treatment will not only save the time and labor but also reduce the error with the treatment. The measurement technique proposed here will take 25 hours to measure one sample using the electrolysis device produced commercially. A hypothetic electrolysis device of which final sample volume were 20 cm 3 could allow the measuring time of 10 hours. (author)

  15. Preliminary Electrochemical Characterization of Anode Supported Solid Oxide Cell (AS-SOC) Produced in the Institute of Power Engineering Operated in Electrolysis Mode (SOEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupecki, Jakub; Motyliński, Konrad; Skrzypkiewicz, Marek; Wierzbicki, Michał; Naumovich, Yevgeniy

    2017-12-01

    The article discusses the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOC) developed in the Institute of Power Engineering as prospective key components of power-to-gas systems. The fundamentals of the solid oxide cells operated as fuel cells (SOFC - solid oxide fuel cells) and electrolysers (SOEC - solid oxide fuel cells) are given. The experimental technique used for electrochemical characterization of cells is presented. The results obtained for planar cell with anodic support are given and discussed. Based on the results, the applicability of the cells in power-to-gas systems (P2G) is evaluated.

  16. Progress in Aluminum Electrolysis Control and Future Direction for Smart Aluminum Electrolysis Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Tianshuang; Li, Jie; Yang, Shuai; Zou, Zhong

    2017-02-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions. However, these conditions have restricted the measurement of key control parameters, making the control of aluminum reduction cells a difficult problem in the industry. Because aluminum electrolysis control systems have a significant economic influence, substantial research has been conducted on control algorithms, control systems and information systems for aluminum reduction cells. This article first summarizes the development of control systems and then focuses on the progress made since 2000, including alumina concentration control, temperature control and electrolyte molecular ratio control, fault diagnosis, cell condition prediction and control system expansion. Based on these studies, the concept of a smart aluminum electrolysis plant is proposed. The frame construction, key problems and current progress are introduced. Finally, several future directions are discussed.

  17. Integrated Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC) with an anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) for low strength wastewater treatment, energy harvesting and water reclamation

    KAUST Repository

    Jimenez Sandoval, Rodrigo J.

    2013-11-01

    Shortage of potable water is a problem that affects many nations in the world and it will aggravate in a near future if pertinent actions are not carried out. Decrease in consumption, improvements in water distribution systems to avoid losses and more efficient water treatment processes are some actions that can be implemented to attack this problem. Membrane technology and biological processes are used in wastewater treatment to achieve high water quality standards. Some other technologies, besides water treatment, attempt to obtain energy from organic wastes present in water. In this study, a proof-of-concept was accomplished demonstrating that a Microbial Electrolysis Cell can be fully integrated with a Membrane Bioreactor to achieve wastewater treatment and harvest energy. Conductive hollow fiber membranes made of nickel functioned as both filter material for treated water reclamation and as a cathode to catalyze hydrogen production reaction. The produced hydrogen was subsequently converted into methane by hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Organic removal was 98.9% irrespective of operation mode. Maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate was 0.2 m3/m3d, while maximum current density achieved was 6.1 A/m2 (based on cathode surface area). Biofouling, an unavoidable phenomenon in traditional MBRs, can be minimized in this system through self-cleaning approach of hybrid membranes by hydrogen production. The increased rate of hydrogen evolution at high applied voltage (0.9 V) reduces the membrane fouling. Improvements can be done in the system to make it as a promising net energy positive technology for the low strength wastewater treatment.

  18. Evaluation of stainless steel cathodes and a bicarbonate buffer for hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells using a new method for measuring gas production

    KAUST Repository

    Ambler, Jack R.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are often examined for hydrogen production using non-sustainable phosphate buffered solutions (PBS), although carbonate buffers have been shown to work in other bioelectrochemical systems with a platinum (Pt) catalyst. Stainless steel (SS) has been shown to be an effective catalyst for hydrogen evolution in MECs, but it has not been tested with carbonate buffers. We evaluated the combined using of SS cathodes and a bicarbonate buffer (BBS) at the applied voltages of 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 V using a new inexpensive method for measuring gas production called the gas bag method (GBM). This method achieved an average error of only 5.0% based on adding known volumes of gas to the bag. Using the GBM, hydrogen production with SS and a BBS was 26.6 ± 1.8 mL which compared well to 26.4 ± 2.8 mL using Pt and BBS, and 26.8 ± 2.5 mL with a Pt cathode and PBS. Electrical energy efficiency was highest with a SS cathode and BBS at 159 ± 17%, compared to 126 ± 14% for the Pt cathode and BBS, and 134 ± 17% for a Pt cathode and PBS. The main disadvantage of the SS was a lower gas production rate of 1.1 ± 0.3 m3 H2-m-3 d-1 with BBS and 1.2 ± 0.3 m3 H2-m-3 d -1 with PBS, compared to 1.7 ± 0.4 m3 H 2-m-3 d-1 with Pt and PBS. These results show that the GBM is an effective new method for measuring gas production of anaerobic gas production processes, and that SS and bicarbonate buffers can be used to effectively produce hydrogen in MECs. © 2010 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Magnetohydrodynamic Flow and Deformation of Electrolyte-Metal Interface in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jinsong; Rudshaug, Magne; Droste, Christian; Jorgensen, Robert; Giskeodegard, Nils-Haavard

    2018-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics based multiphase magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow model for simulating the melt flow and bath-metal interface deformation in realistic aluminum reduction cells is presented. The model accounts for the complex physics of the MHD problem in aluminum reduction cells by coupling two immiscible fluids, electromagnetic field, Lorentz force, flow turbulence, and complex cell geometry with large length scale. Especially, the deformation of bath-metal interface is tracked directly in the simulation, and the condition of constant anode-cathode distance (ACD) is maintained by moving anode bottom dynamically with the deforming bath-metal interface. The metal pad deformation and melt flow predicted by the current model are compared to the predictions using a simplified model where the bath-metal interface is assumed flat. The effects of the induced electric current due to fluid flow and the magnetic field due to the interior cell current on the metal pad deformation and melt flow are investigated. The presented model extends the conventional simplified box model by including detailed cell geometry such as the ledge profile and all channels (side, central, and cross-channels). The simulations show the model sensitivity to different side ledge profiles and the cross-channel width by comparing the predicted melt flow and metal pad heaving. In addition, the model dependencies upon the reduction cell operation conditions such as ACD, current distribution on cathode surface and open/closed channel top, are discussed.

  20. Water electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadao; Ikehara, Masahisa; Kataoka, Noboru; Ueno, Syuichi; Ishikawa, Nobuhide.

    1996-01-01

    Nissho Iwai Co. and Ebara Co. received an order for hydrogen and oxygen generating system (water electrolysis system) to be installed at Tokai-2 power station of The Japan Atomic Power Company, following the previous order at Tsuruga-1 where the gas injection from FY1996 is planned. Hydrogen gas generated by the system will be injected to coolant of boiling water reactors to improve corrosive environment. The system is being offered by a tripartite party, Nissho Iwai, Ebara, and Norsk Hydro Electrolysers of Norway (NHEL). NHEL provides a electrolyser unit, as a core of the system. Ebara provides procurement, installation, and inspection as well as total engineering work, under the basic design by NHEL which has over 60 years-experience in this field. (author)

  1. Carbon dioxide and water vapor high temperature electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Verostko, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    The design, fabrication, breadboard testing, and the data base obtained for solid oxide electrolysis systems that have applications for planetary manned missions and habitats are reviewed. The breadboard tested contains sixteen tubular cells in a closely packed bundle for the electrolysis of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The discussion covers energy requirements, volume, weight, and operational characteristics related to the measurement of the reactant and product gas compositions, temperature distribution along the electrolyzer tubular cells and through the bundle, and thermal energy losses. The reliability of individual cell performance in the bundle configuration is assessed.

  2. Mediated water electrolysis in biphasic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Micheál D; Peljo, Pekka; Rivier, Lucie; Vrubel, Heron; Girault, Hubert H

    2017-08-30

    The concept of efficient electrolysis by linking photoelectrochemical biphasic H 2 evolution and water oxidation processes in the cathodic and anodic compartments of an H-cell, respectively, is introduced. Overpotentials at the cathode and anode are minimised by incorporating light-driven elements into both biphasic reactions. The concepts viability is demonstrated by electrochemical H 2 production from water splitting utilising a polarised water-organic interface in the cathodic compartment of a prototype H-cell. At the cathode the reduction of decamethylferrocenium cations ([Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + ) to neutral decamethylferrocene (Cp 2 *Fe (II) ) in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) solvent takes place at the solid electrode/oil interface. This electron transfer process induces the ion transfer of a proton across the immiscible water/oil interface to maintain electroneutrality in the oil phase. The oil-solubilised proton immediately reacts with Cp 2 *Fe (II) to form the corresponding hydride species, [Cp 2 *Fe (IV) (H)] + . Subsequently, [Cp 2 *Fe (IV) (H)] + spontaneously undergoes a chemical reaction in the oil phase to evolve hydrogen gas (H 2 ) and regenerate [Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + , whereupon this catalytic Electrochemical, Chemical, Chemical (ECC') cycle is repeated. During biphasic electrolysis, the stability and recyclability of the [Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + /Cp 2 *Fe (II) redox couple were confirmed by chronoamperometric measurements and, furthermore, the steady-state concentration of [Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + monitored in situ by UV/vis spectroscopy. Post-biphasic electrolysis, the presence of H 2 in the headspace of the cathodic compartment was established by sampling with gas chromatography. The rate of the biphasic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was enhanced by redox electrocatalysis in the presence of floating catalytic molybdenum carbide (Mo 2 C) microparticles at the immiscible water/oil interface. The use of a superhydrophobic organic electrolyte salt was critical to

  3. Preconceptual design of hyfire. A fusion driven high temperature electrolysis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been engaged in a scoping study to investigate the potential merits of coupling a fusion reactor with a high temperature blanket to a high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Westinghouse is assisting this study in the areas of systems design integration, plasma engineering, balance of plant design and electrolyzer technology. The aim of the work done in the past year has been to focus on a reference design point for the plant, which has been designated HYFIRE. In prior work, the STARFIRE commercial tokamak fusion reactor was directly used as the fusion driver. This report describes a new design obtained by scaling the basic STARFIRE design to permit the achievement of a blanket power of 6000 MWt. The high temperature blanket design employs a thermally insulated refractory oxide region which provides high temperature (>1000 deg. C) steam at moderate pressures to high temperature electrolysis units. The electrolysis process selected is based on the high temperature, solid electrolyte fuel cell technology developed by Westinghouse. An initial process design and plant layout has been completed; component cost and plant economics studies are now underway to develop estimates of hydrogen production costs and to determine the sensitivity of this cost to changes in major design parameters. (author)

  4. The development of a non-cryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply system. [using hydrazine/water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, B. M.; Mahan, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrazine/water electrolysis process system module design was fabricated and tested to demonstrate component and module performance. This module is capable of providing both the metabolic oxygen for crew needs and the oxygen and nitrogen for spacecraft leak makeup. The component designs evolved through previous R and D efforts, and were fabricated and tested individually and then were assembled into a complete module which was successfully tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate integration of the individual components. A survey was made of hydrazine sensor technology and a cell math model was derived.

  5. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank

    against conventional technologies for hydrogen production, such as natural gas reforming, the production and investment costs have to be reduced. A reduction of the investment costs may be achieved by increasing the operational pressure and temperature of the electrolyzer, as this will result in: 1.......3 A cm-2 combined with relatively small production costs may lead to both reduced investment and operating costs for hydrogen and oxygen production. One of the produced electrolysis cells was operated for 350 h. Based on the successful results a patent application covering this novel cell was filed...

  6. Electrolysis of Water in the Secondary School Science Laboratory with Inexpensive Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. A.; Athey, S. L.; Vandevender, M. L.; Crihfield, C. L.; Kolanko, C. C. E.; Shao, S.; Ellington, M. C. G.; Dicks, J. K.; Carver, J. S.; Holland, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This activity allows students to visualize the electrolysis of water in a microfluidic device in under 1 min. Instructional materials are provided to demonstrate how the activity meets West Virginia content standards and objectives. Electrolysis of water is a standard chemistry experiment, but the typical laboratory apparatus (e.g., Hoffman cell)…

  7. Hydrogen production from sugar beet juice using an integrated biohydrogen process of dark fermentation and microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-12-01

    An integrated dark fermentation and microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) process was evaluated for hydrogen production from sugar beet juice. Different substrate to inoculum (S/X) ratios were tested for dark fermentation, and the maximum hydrogen yield was 13% of initial COD at the S/X ratio of 2 and 4 for dark fermentation. Hydrogen yield was 12% of initial COD in the MEC using fermentation liquid end products as substrate, and butyrate only accumulated in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production from the integrated biohydrogen process was 25% of initial COD (equivalent to 6 mol H2/mol hexoseadded), and the energy recovery from sugar beet juice was 57% using the combined biohydrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process for hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.; Stevens, W.H.; Butler, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes can be separated efficiently by a process which combines an electrolysis cell with a trickle bed column packed with a hydrophobic platinum catalyst. The column effects isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of electrolytic hydrogen and liquid water while the electrolysis cell contributes to isotope separation by virtue of the kinetic isotope effect inherent in the hydrogen evolution reaction. The main features of the CECE process for heavy water production are presented as well as a discussion of the inherent positive synergistic effects, and other advantages and disadvantages of the process. Several potential applications of the process in the nuclear power industry are discussed. 3 figures, 2 tables

  9. Static feed water electrolysis subsystem development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Franz H. (Inventor); Grigger, David J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an electrolysis cell forming hydrogen and oxygen at spaced terminals. The anode terminal is porous and able to form oxygen within the cell and permit escape of the gaseous oxygen through the anode and out through a flow line in the presence of backpressure. Hydrogen is liberated in the cell at the opposing solid metal cathode which is permeable to hydrogen but not oxygen so that the migratory hydrogen formed in the cell is able to escape from the cell. The cell is maintained at an elevated pressure so that oxygen liberated by the cell is delivered at elevated pressure without pumping to raise the pressure of the oxygen.

  10. Synergistic Effects of Micro-electrolysis-Photocatalysis on Water Treatment and Fish Performance in Saline Recirculating Aquaculture System

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Zhangying; Wang, Shuo; Gao, Weishan; Li, Haijun; Pei, Luowei; Shen, Mingwei; Zhu, Songming

    2017-01-01

    A new physico-chemical process for TAN (total ammonia nitrogen) removal and disinfection is introduced in saline recirculating aquaculture system (RAS), in which the biofilter is replaced with an integrated electrolysis cell and an activated carbon filter. The electrolysis cell which is based on micro current electrolysis combined with UV-light was self-designed. After the fundamental research, a small pilot scale RAS was operated for 30 days to verify the technical feasibility. The system wa...

  11. planSOEC. R and D and commercialization roadmap for SOEC electrolysis. R and D of SOEC stacks with improved durability. Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, A.; Friis Pedersen, C.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik [Topsoe Fuel Cells A/S, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Mogensen, M.; Hoejgaard Jensen, S.; Ming Chen [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Div., DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Sloth, M. [H2 Logic A/S, Herning (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    The project has been divided into two parts: PART 1: Formulation of a R and D and commercialization roadmap for SOEC electrolysis. PART 2: Conducting R and D of SOEC stacks with improved durability. The purpose of Part 1 has been to develop a R and D and commercialisation roadmap for hydrogen and CO production plants based on the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) technology. SOEC technology is still on an early R and D stage but years of extensive R and D within SOFC technology provides a strong platform for an accelerated commercialisation. However, in order to guide the future SOEC R and D activities towards reaching commercial market requirements a detailed roadmap is necessary. An overall strategy for R and D of various electrolysis technologies in Denmark already exists{sup 2}, formulated in the Hydrogen Production working group in the Danish Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Partnership. The SOEC roadmap developed as part of the planSOEC project supplements the overall strategy, by conducting an updated analysis of state-of-the-art. Also planSOEC provides a detailed analysis of requirements for different market applications for SOEC, which enables formulation of precise and detailed R and D targets. The objectives of Part 2 in this project were multiple: 1) To investigate durability of solid oxide cells (SOCs) and stack components under industrially relevant (''harsh'') electrolysis operating conditions; 2) to investigate performance of standard TOFC (Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S) SOC stacks (based on state-of-the-art solid oxide cells) under mild electrolysis operating conditions ({<=}0.75 A/cm{sup 2}); 3) to further develop SOEC stack computer models available at Riso DTU and TOFC. Accordingly four lines of work were carried out in the here reported project: 1) Investigation of corrosion resistance of interconnect alloys. 2) Cell and stack element testing. 3) SOEC stack testing. 4) SOEC stack modeling. (LN)

  12. Development status of a preprototype water electrolysis subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. B.; Erickson, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    A preprototype water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated for NASA's advanced regenerative life support program. A solid polymer is used for the cell electrolyte. The electrolysis module has 12 cells that can generate 5.5 kg/day of oxygen for the metabolic requirements of three crewmembers, for cabin leakage, and for the oxygen and hydrogen required for carbon dioxide collection and reduction processes. The subsystem can be operated at a pressure between 276 and 2760 kN/sq m and in a continuous constant-current, cyclic, or standby mode. A microprocessor is used to aid in operating the subsystem. Sensors and controls provide fault detection and automatic shutdown. The results of development, demonstration, and parametric testing are presented. Modifications to enhance operation in an integrated and manned test are described. Prospective improvements for the electrolysis subsystem are discussed.

  13. Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle Momany

    2009-10-26

    Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

  14. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  15. High Temperature Co‐Electrolysis of Steam and CO2 in an SOC Stack: Performance and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Nielsen, J. U.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, co‐electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide was studied in a Topsoe Fuel Cell (TOFC®) 10‐cell stack, containing three different types of Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrode supported solid oxide electrolysis cells with a footprint of 12 × 12 cm. The stack was operated at 800...

  16. Effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoo-Shyng Wang Hsu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmentally friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on the chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water (DOW. DOW was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum–plated titanium anode and cathode. The results showed that chlorine concentration reached maximal level in the batch process. Prolonged electrolysis reduced chlorine concentration in the electrolyte and was detrimental to electrolysis efficiency, especially under high electric potential conditions. Therefore, the optimal choice of electrolysis time depends on the electrolyzable chloride in DOW and cell potential adopted for electrolysis. The higher the electric potential, the faster the chlorine level reaches its maximum, but the lower the electric efficiency will be.

  17. Effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Guoo-Shyng Wang; Lu, Yi-Fa; Hsu, Shun-Yao

    2017-10-01

    Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmentally friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on the chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water (DOW). DOW was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum-plated titanium anode and cathode. The results showed that chlorine concentration reached maximal level in the batch process. Prolonged electrolysis reduced chlorine concentration in the electrolyte and was detrimental to electrolysis efficiency, especially under high electric potential conditions. Therefore, the optimal choice of electrolysis time depends on the electrolyzable chloride in DOW and cell potential adopted for electrolysis. The higher the electric potential, the faster the chlorine level reaches its maximum, but the lower the electric efficiency will be. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O& #39; Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  19. Cell cycle control by components of cell anchorage

    OpenAIRE

    Gad, Annica

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular factors, such as growth factors and cell anchorage to the extracellular matrix, control when and where cells may proliferate. This control is abolished when a normal cell transforms into a tumour cell. The control of cell proliferation by cell anchorage was elusive and less well studied than the control by growth factors. Therefore, we aimed to clarify at what points in the cell cycle and through which molecular mechanisms cell anchorage controls cell cycle pro...

  20. High temperature electrolysis for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J. Stephen; O'brien, James E.; Stoots, Carl M.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from water splitting, which can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) or thermochemical processes. In order to achieve competitive efficiencies, both processes require high-temperature operation (∼850degC). High-temperature electrolytic water splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce hydrogen with overall system efficiencies of 45 to 55%. At the Idaho National Laboratory, we are developing solid-oxide cells to operate in the steam electrolysis mode. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Experimental results were obtained from ten-cell and 22-cell planar electrolysis stacks, fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (∼200 μm thick, 64 cm 2 active area), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions, gas glow rates, and current densities. Hydrogen production rates greater than 100 normal liters per hour for 196 hours have been demonstrated. In order to evaluate the performance of large-scale HTE operations, we have developed single-cell models, based on FLUENT, and a process model, using the systems-analysis code HYSYS. (author)

  1. Development status of solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis for manned spacecraft life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, L. J.; Titterington, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the design and system verification test results are presented for a six-man-rated oxygen generation system. The system configuration incorporates components and instrumentation for computer-controlled operation with automatic start-up/shutdown sequencing, fault detection and isolation, and with self-contained sensors and controls for automatic safe emergency shutdown. All fluid and electrical components, sensors, and electronic controls are designed to be easily maintainable under zero-gravity conditions. On-board component spares are utilized in the system concept to sustain long-term operation (six months minimum) in a manned spacecraft application. The system is centered on a 27-cell solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis module which, combined with the associated system components and controls, forms a total system envelope 40 in. high, 40 in. wide, and 30 in. deep.

  2. Development of Hydrogen Electrodes for Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjartansdóttir, Cecilía Kristín

    , production of electricity via fuel cells, fuel for internal combustion engines or gas turbines, or as a raw material for the production of synthetic fuels via Sabatier or Fischer - Tropsch process. In some situations it may be suitable to simply inject hydrogen into the existing natural gas based...... will be needed. Producing hydrogen via water electrolysis using surplus, low cost, power from renewables offers the possibility of increased production capacity and load management with no greenhouse emissions. Hydrogen is a valuable energy carrier, which is able to contribute to various forms of energy, such as...... infrastructure. Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is the current standard (stat of the art) for industrial large-scale water electrolysis systems. One of the main criteria for industrial AWE is efficient and durable electrodes. The aim of the present PhD study was to develop electrode materials for hydrogen...

  3. Economical hydrogen production by electrolysis using nano pulsed DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmaraj, C.H. [Tangedco, Tirunelveli, ME Environmental Engineering (India); Adshkumar, S. [Department of Civil Engineering, Anna University of Technology Tirunelveli, Tirunelveli - 627007 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogen is an alternate renewable eco fuel. The environmental friendly hydrogen production method is electrolysis. The cost of electrical energy input is major role while fixing hydrogen cost in the conventional direct current Electrolysis. Using nano pulse DC input makes the input power less and economical hydrogen production can be established. In this investigation, a lab scale electrolytic cell developed and 0.58 mL/sec hydrogen/oxygen output is obtained using conventional and nano pulsed DC. The result shows that the nano pulsed DC gives 96.8 % energy saving.

  4. Heavy water production by alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Sachin; Sandeep, K.C.; Bhanja, Kalyan; Mohan, Sadhana; Sugilal, G.

    2014-01-01

    Several heavy water isotope production processes are reported in literature. Water electrolysis in combination with catalytic exchange CECE process is considered as a futuristic process to increase the throughput and reduce the cryogenic distillation load but the application is limited due to the high cost of electricity. Any improvement in the efficiency of electrolyzers would make this process more attractive. The efficiency of alkaline water electrolysis is governed by various phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization and concentration polarization in the cell. A systematic study on the effect of these factors can lead to methods for improving the efficiency of the electrolyzer. A bipolar and compact type arrangement of the alkaline water electrolyzer leads to increased efficiency and reduced inventory in comparison to uni-polar tank type electrolyzers. The bipolar type arrangement is formed when a number of single cells are stacked together. Although a few experimental studies have been reported in the open literature, CFD simulation of a bipolar compact alkaline water electrolyzer with porous electrodes is not readily available.The principal aim of this study is to simulate the characteristics of a single cell compact electrolyzer unit. The simulation can be used to predict the Voltage-Current Density (V-I) characteristics, which is a measure of the efficiency of the process.The model equations were solved using COMSOL multi-physics software. The simulated V-I characteristic is compared with the experimental data

  5. Determination of the Electronics Charge--Electrolysis of Water Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachar, Arun C.

    1985-01-01

    Presents an alternative method for measuring the electronic charge using data from the electrolysis of acidified distilled water. The process (carried out in a commercially available electrolytic cell) has the advantage of short completion time so that students can determine electron charge and mass in one laboratory period. (DH)

  6. Power to fuel using electrolysis and CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Graves, Christopher R.; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos

    2014-01-01

    % of the cost of H2 produced by electrolysis originates from electricity cost. How much more depends on the actual electricity price and depends further on efficiency, investment cost and lifetime of electrolyzer. Investment costs are inversely proportional the current density at a given cell voltage...

  7. Hydrogen Production System with High Temperature Electrolysis for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kentaro, Matsunaga; Eiji, Hoashi; Seiji, Fujiwara; Masato, Yoshino; Taka, Ogawa; Shigeo, Kasai

    2006-01-01

    Steam electrolysis with solid oxide cells is one of the most promising methods for hydrogen production, which has the potential to be high efficiency. Its most parts consist of environmentally sound and common materials. Recent development of ceramics with high ionic conductivity suggests the possibility of widening the range of operating temperature with maintaining the high efficiency. Toshiba is constructing a hydrogen production system with solid oxide electrolysis cells for nuclear power plants. Tubular-type cells using YSZ (Yttria-Stabilized- Zirconia) as electrolyte showed good performance of steam electrolysis at 800 to 900 deg C. Larger electrolysis cells with present configuration are to be combined with High Temperature Reactors. The hydrogen production efficiency on the present designed system is expected around 50% at 800 to 900 deg C of operating temperature. For the Fast Reactors, 'advanced cell' with higher efficiency at lower temperature are to be introduced. (authors)

  8. Study on in-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement of anodic reaction in SO_2 depolarized electrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Lulu; Zhang Ping; Chen Songzhe; Wang Laijun

    2014-01-01

    SO_2 depolarized electrolysis (SDE) is the pivotal reaction in hybrid sulfur process, one of the most promising approaches for mass hydrogen production without CO_2 emission. The net result of hybrid sulfur process is to split water into hydrogen and oxygen at a relatively low voltage, which will dramatically decrease the energy consumption for the production of hydrogen. The potential loss of SDE process could be separated into four components, i.e. reversible cell potential, anode overpotential, cathode overpotential and ohmic loss. So far, it has been identified that the total cell potential for the SO_2 depolarized electrolyzer is dominantly controlled by sulfuric acid concentration of the anolyte and electrolysis temperature of the electrolysis process. In this work, an in-situ Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement of the anodic SDE reaction was conducted. Results show that anodic overpotential is mainly resulted from the SO_2 oxidation reaction other than ohmic resistance or mass transfer limitation. This study extends the understanding to SDE process and gives suggestions for the further improvement of the SDE performance. (author)

  9. Study on hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Aita, Hideki; Sekita, Kenji; Haga, Katsuhiro; Iwata, Tomo-o.

    1997-09-01

    In JAERI, design and R and D works on hydrogen production process have been conducted for connecting to the HTTR under construction at the Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI as a nuclear heat utilization system. As for a hydrogen production process by high-temperature electrolysis of steam, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out with a practical electrolysis tube with 12 cells connected in series. Hydrogen was produced at a maximum density of 44 Nml/cm 2 h at 950degC, and know-how of operational procedures and operational experience were also accumulated. Thereafter, a planar electrolysis cell supported by a metallic plate was fabricated in order to improve hydrogen production performance and durability against thermal cycles. In the preliminary test with the planar cell, hydrogen has been produced continuously at a maximum density of 33.6 Nml/cm 2 h at an electrolysis temperature of 950degC. This report presents typical test results mentioned above, a review of previous studies conducted in the world and R and D items required for connecting to the HTTR. (author)

  10. Water Electrolysis for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Sending humans to Mars for any significant amount of time will require capabilities and technologies that enable Earth independence. To move towards this independence, the resources found on Mars must be utilized to produce the items needed to sustain humans away from Earth. To accomplish this task, NASA is studying In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) systems and techniques to make use of the atmospheric carbon dioxide and the water found on Mars. Among other things, these substances can be harvested and processed to make oxygen and methane. Oxygen is essential, not only for sustaining the lives of the crew on Mars, but also as the oxidizer for an oxygen-methane propulsion system that could be utilized on a Mars ascent vehicle. Given the presence of water on Mars, the electrolysis of water is a common technique to produce the desired oxygen. Towards this goal, NASA designed and developed a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis system, which was originally slated to produce oxygen for propulsion and fuel cell use in the Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project. As part of the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) project, this same electrolysis system, originally targeted at enabling in situ propulsion and power, operated in a life-support scenario. During HESTIA testing at Johnson Space Center, the electrolysis system supplied oxygen to a chamber simulating a habitat housing four crewmembers. Inside the chamber, oxygen was removed from the atmosphere to simulate consumption by the crew, and the electrolysis system's oxygen was added to replenish it. The electrolysis system operated nominally throughout the duration of the HESTIA test campaign, and the oxygen levels in the life support chamber were maintained at the desired levels.

  11. THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS PROGRAM AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: OBSERVATIONS ON PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the high-temperature electrolysis research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory, with selected observations of electrolysis cell degradation at the single-cell, small stack and large facility scales. The objective of the INL program is to address the technical and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. In the envisioned application, high-temperature electrolysis would be coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor for efficient large-scale non-fossil non-greenhouse-gas hydrogen production. The program supports a broad range of activities including small bench-scale experiments, larger scale technology demonstrations, detailed computational fluid dynamic modeling, and system modeling. A summary of the current status of these activities and future plans will be provided, with a focus on the problem of cell and stack degradation.

  12. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  13. Basic study of alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, A.; Kashiwase, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayashida, T.; Kato, A.; Hirao, K.; Shimomura, I.; Nagashima, I.

    2013-01-01

    In order to realize future hydrogen society, hydrogen production systems must meet the large demand of hydrogen usage. Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) would be one of the candidate technologies to produce hydrogen on a large scale from renewable energy. We have conducted basic research into AWE, trying to reveal technical issues under zero gap system in new cell technology. The zero gap system contributes lower cell voltage without causing any major operating problems compared with conventional finite gap cell. However, it was observed that Ni base electrodes showed corrosion phenomena in a number of test trials including steady operating conditions and several shut-downs. Activated Raney Ni alloy coating for anode material had an advantage for oxygen overvoltage. It showed a saving of around 100 mV at 40 A/dm 2 (0.4 A/cm 2 ) against Ni bare anodes. In the Chlor–Alkali (C/A) industry, thermal decomposition coating of mixed noble metal on Ni substrate is commonly used for advanced activated cathodes. It showed very low hydrogen over-potential of around 100 mV in AWE. To achieve better cell performance, separator selection is very important. We evaluated several separators including ion exchange membrane (IEM) to understand the basic function in AWE. IEM for C/A electrolysis showed high cell voltage (over 2.2 V) but low O 2 impurity in H 2 gas. Hydrogen purity was over 99.95%. Porous separators made of polypropylene showed 1.76 V at 40 A/dm 2 (0.4 A/cm 2 ), 80 °C. But there was a weakness on the durability for continuous operation. Proper selection of separator is important in an actual plant for effective and safe cell operation. The concept of safety operation is referred to by diffusion coefficient of hydrogen

  14. 2nd Generation alkaline electrolysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde, L. [Aarhus Univ. Business and Social Science - Centre for Energy Technologies (CET), Aarhus (Denmark); Kjartansdottir, C.K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Mechanical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Allebrod, F. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)] [and others

    2013-03-15

    The overall purpose of this project has been to contribute to this load management by developing a 2{sup nd} generation of alkaline electrolysis system characterized by being compact, reliable, inexpensive and energy efficient. The specific targets for the project have been to: 1) Increase cell efficiency to more than 88% (according to the higher heating value (HHV)) at a current density of 200 mA /cm{sup 2}; 2) Increase operation temperature to more than 100 degree Celsius to make the cooling energy more valuable; 3) Obtain an operation pressure more than 30 bar hereby minimizing the need for further compression of hydrogen for storage; 4) Improve stack architecture decreasing the price of the stack with at least 50%; 5) Develop a modular design making it easy to customize plants in the size from 20 to 200 kW; 6) Demonstrating a 20 kW 2{sup nd} generation stack in H2College at the campus of Arhus University in Herning. The project has included research and development on three different technology tracks of electrodes; an electrochemical plating, an atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and finally a high temperature and pressure (HTP) track with operating temperature around 250 deg. C and pressure around 40 bar. The results show that all three electrode tracks have reached high energy efficiencies. In the electrochemical plating track a stack efficiency of 86.5% at a current density of 177mA/cm{sup 2} and a temperature of 74.4 deg. C has been shown. The APS track showed cell efficiencies of 97%, however, coatings for the anode side still need to be developed. The HTP cell has reached 100 % electric efficiency operating at 1.5 V (the thermoneutral voltage) with a current density of 1. 1 A/cm{sup 2}. This track only tested small cells in an externally heated laboratory set-up, and thus the thermal loss to surroundings cannot be given. The goal set for the 2{sup nd} generation electrolyser system, has been to generate 30 bar pressure in the cell stack. An obstacle to be

  15. Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher Ronald

    Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co-electrolysis

  16. Procedure and technique critique for tritium enrichment by electrolysis at the IAEA Laboratory (effective November 1976)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-11-05

    This publication gives a detailed description of the experimental and calculation procedures for tritium enrichment. Most descriptive sections are divided into 2 parts: Section A describes the procedure in the IAEA laboratory; section B discusses the reasons behind the various procedures, and may indicate alternative acceptable, or in some cases even better, procedures. The description of the equipment focuses on electrolysis cells, cooling system and power supply. Routine procedures are discussed including handling and checking of samples after receipt, 'spike' and blank water, initial sample distillation, preparation of cells and samples for electrolysis, electrolysis and completion of electrolysis (weighing of cells, neutralisation and distillation) and precautions against contaminations (prevention, detection and cure). A list of equipment required for electrolytic enrichment of tritium is provided.

  17. Procedure and technique critique for tritium enrichment by electrolysis at the IAEA Laboratory (effective November 1976)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This publication gives a detailed description of the experimental and calculation procedures for tritium enrichment. Most descriptive sections are divided into 2 parts: Section A describes the procedure in the IAEA laboratory; section B discusses the reasons behind the various procedures, and may indicate alternative acceptable, or in some cases even better, procedures. The description of the equipment focuses on electrolysis cells, cooling system and power supply. Routine procedures are discussed including handling and checking of samples after receipt, 'spike' and blank water, initial sample distillation, preparation of cells and samples for electrolysis, electrolysis and completion of electrolysis (weighing of cells, neutralisation and distillation) and precautions against contaminations (prevention, detection and cure). A list of equipment required for electrolytic enrichment of tritium is provided

  18. Operational Modelling of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick Lovera; Franck Blein; Julien Vulliet

    2006-01-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) work on two opposite processes. The basic equations (Nernst equation, corrected by a term of over-voltage) are thus very similar, only a few signs are different. An operational model, based on measurable quantities, was finalized for HTE process, and adapted to SOFCs. The model is analytical, which requires some complementary assumptions (proportionality of over-tensions to the current density, linearization of the logarithmic term in Nernst equation). It allows determining hydrogen production by HTE using a limited number of parameters. At a given temperature, only one macroscopic parameter, related to over-voltages, is needed for adjusting the model to the experimental results (SOFC), in a wide range of hydrogen flow-rates. For a given cell, this parameter follows an Arrhenius law with a satisfactory precision. The prevision in HTE process is compared to the available experimental results. (authors)

  19. Advances in the electrolysis of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierini, G.; Spelta, B.; Maffei, S.; Modica, G.; Perez, G.; Possagno, E.

    1988-01-01

    The exhaust plasma processing plant, proposed a few years ago as an alternative to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly plant in operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, required further research in such areas as low liquid inventory electrolytic cell and the types of separator or membrane resistant to beta radiation. Moreover, it was suggested that the value of the separation factors among H/sub 2/, D/sub 2/, and T/sub 2/ should be checked during electrolysis at high D/sub 2/O concentration in a alkaline medium by using different materials for the cathode. The results of experimental work carried out in these directions have shown the feasibility of the process, although some improvements can still be made in the optimization of the separators and in the design of the cell. The research carried out at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy, with support from other institutes, is described

  20. Production of Synthetic Fuels by Co-Electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2009-01-01

    reactions, the equilibrium of the water-gas shift reaction is reached, and moreover, CO is produced via the water-gas shift reaction. The degradation observed when performing co-electrolysis in these SOCs occurs mainly at the Ni/YSZ cathode and may be a consequence of impurities in the gas stream, adsorbing......Co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 was studied in solid oxide cells (SOCs) supported by nickel-/yittria-stabilized zirconia (Ni/YSZ) electrode. Polarization characterization indicates that electrochemical reduction of both CO2 and H2O occurs during co-electrolysis. In parallel with the electrochemical...

  1. Tritium test of the tritium processing components under the Annex III US-Japan Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Naruse, Yuji; Binning, K.E.; Carlson, R.V.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1993-03-01

    The process ready components for Fuel Cleanup System were tested at the TSTA under the US-Japan Collaboration program. Palladium diffuser for tritium purification and Ceramic Electrolysis Cell for decomposition of tritiated water respectively were tested with pure tritium for years. The characteristics of the components with hydrogen isotopes, effects of impurities, and long-term reliability of the components were studied. It was concluded that these components are suitable and attractive for fusion fuel processing systems. (author)

  2. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo M. F. Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article, the electrochemical fundamentals of alkaline water electrolysis are explained and the main process constraints (e.g., electrical, reaction, and transport are analyzed. The historical background of water electrolysis is described, different technologies are compared, and main research needs for the development of water electrolysis technologies are discussed.

  3. Analysis of cavitation effect for water purifier using electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Ko, Han Seo; Lee, Seung Ho

    2015-11-01

    Water is a limited and vital resource, so it should not be wasted by pollution. A development of new water purification technology is urgent nowadays since the original and biological treatments are not sufficient. The microbubble-aided method was investigated for removal of algal in this study since it overcomes demerits of the existing purification technologies. Thus, the cavitation effect in a venturi-type tube using the electrolysis was analyzed. Ruthenium-coated titanium plates were used as electrodes. Optimum electrode interval and applied power were determined for the electrolysis. Then, the optimized electrodes were installed in the venturi-type tube for generating cavitation. The cavitation effect could be enhanced without any byproduct by the bubbly flow induced by the electrolysis. The optimum mass flow rate and current were determined for the cavitation with the electrolysis. Finally, the visualization techniques were used to count the cell number of algal and microbubbles for the confirmation of the performance. As a result, the energy saving and high efficient water purifier was fabricated in this study. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. 2013R1A2A2A01068653).

  4. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.; Figueiredo, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article...

  5. Fuel-cell-system and its components for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturi, Massimo [NuCellSys GmbH, Kirchheim/Teck-Nabern (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    In the past years the development of fuel cell systems for mobile applications has made significant progress in power density, performance and robustness. For a successful market introduction the cost of the fuel system powertrain needs to be competitive to diesel hybrid engine. The current development activities are therefore focusing on cost reduction. There are 3 major areas for cost reduction: functional integration, materials and design, supplier competitiveness and volume. Today unique fuel cell system components are developed by single suppliers, which lead to a monopoly. In the future the components will be developed at multiple suppliers to achieve a competitor situation, which will further reduce the component cost. Using all these cost reduction measures the fuel cell system will become a competitive alternative drive train. (orig.)

  6. Advances in polymer concrete technology for cell house components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, P.

    2000-01-01

    The cell house environment is very challenging with regard to protection of the concrete structure and components against the corrosive effects of acid. Coating technology using Epoxy, Vinyl Ester and Polyurethane Polymers is available, to provide the necessary chemical and heat resistance. However, producing suitable POLYMER CONCRETE technology for pre-cast components, especially tanks and cells requires not only the correct POLYMER selection, but also significant know-how in mineral aggregate technology to achieve the desired performance properties. Furthermore, the POLYMER CONCRETE technology must enable the pre-caster to manufacture the components in a simple one-step procedure. This paper outlines the important aspects in formulating POLYMER CONCRETE, the performance properties that can be achieved and the practical issues relating to the cost effective pre-casting of tanks and cells in particular. (author)

  7. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  8. High-pressure water electrolysis: Electrochemical mitigation of product gas crossover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalenbach, Maximilian; Stolten, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New technique to reduce gas crossover during water electrolysis • Increase of the efficiency of pressurized water electrolysis • Prevention of safety hazards due to explosive gas mixtures caused by crossover • Experimental realization for a polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer • Discussion of electrochemical crossover mitigation for alkaline water electrolysis - Abstract: Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis can be used as an energy carrier storing electricity generated from renewables. During water electrolysis hydrogen can be evolved under pressure at isothermal conditions, enabling highly efficient compression. However, the permeation of hydrogen through the electrolyte increases with operating pressure and leads to efficiency loss and safety hazards. In this study, we report on an innovative concept, where the hydrogen crossover is electrochemically mitigated by an additional electrode between the anode and the cathode of the electrolysis cell. Experimentally, the technique was applied to a proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer operated at a hydrogen pressure that was fifty times larger than the oxygen pressure. Therewith, the hydrogen crossover was reduced and the current efficiency during partial load operation was increased. The concept is also discussed for water electrolysis that is operated at balanced pressures, where the crossover of hydrogen and oxygen is mitigated using two additional electrodes

  9. Advancements in oxygen generation and humidity control by water vapor electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, D. B.; Sudar, M.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of manned spacecraft atmospheres or other manned habitats are essential for realization of long-term space missions. These processes include oxygen generation through water electrolysis. One promising technique of water electrolysis is the direct conversion of the water vapor contained in the cabin air to oxygen. This technique is the subject of the present program on water vapor electrolysis development. The objectives were to incorporate technology improvements developed under other similar electrochemical programs and add new ones; design and fabricate a mutli-cell electrochemical module and a testing facility; and demonstrate through testing the improvements. Each aspect of the water vapor electrolysis cell was reviewed. The materials of construction and sizing of each element were investigated analytically and sometime experimentally. In addition, operational considerations such as temperature control in response to inlet conditions were investigated. Three specific quantitative goals were established.

  10. Mouse endometrial stromal cells produce basement-membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Damjanov, A; Weiss, J

    1986-01-01

    During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations. The dec......During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations....... Mouse decidual cells isolated from 6- to 7-day pregnant uteri explanted in vitro continue to synthesize basement-membrane-like extracellular matrix. Using immunohistochemistry and metabolic labeling followed by immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and fluorography, it was shown that the decidual cells...... to undergo pseudodecidualization. We thus showed that stromal cells from pregnant and nonpregnant mouse uteri synthesize significant amounts of basement-membrane components in vitro, and hence could serve as a good model for the study of normal basement-membrane components....

  11. Development of a static feed water electrolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lantz, J. B.; Hallick, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    A one person level oxygen generation subsystem was developed and production of the one person oxygen metabolic requirements, 0.82 kg, per day was demonstrated without the need for condenser/separators or electrolyte pumps. During 650 hours of shakedown, design verification, and endurance testing, cell voltages averaged 1.62 V at 206 mA/sq cm and at average operating temperature as low as 326 K, virtually corresponding to the state of the art performance previously established for single cells. This high efficiency and low waste heat generation prevented maintenance of the 339 K design temperature without supplemental heating. Improved water electrolysis cell frames were designed, new injection molds were fabricated, and a series of frames was molded. A modified three fluid pressure controller was developed and a static feed water electrolysis that requires no electrolyte in the static feed compartment was developed and successfully evaluated.

  12. Uranium metal production by molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasawa, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a promising uranium enrichment technology in the next generation. Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides into uranium metal is proposed for the preparation of uranium metal as a feed material for AVLIS plant. Considering economical performance, continuos process concept and minimizing the amount of radioactive waste, an electrolytic process for producing uranium metal directly from uranium oxides will offer potential advantages over the existing commercial process. Studies of uranium metal by electrolysis in fluoride salts (BaF 2 -LiF-UF 4 (74-11-15 w/o) at 1150-1200degC, using both a laboratory scale apparatus and an engineering scale one, and continuous casting of uranium metal were carried out in order to decide the optimum operating conditions and the design of the industrial electrolytic cells. (author)

  13. Electrolysis of carbon dioxide in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2009-01-01

    of the current density and irreversible when operated at conditions that would oxidise carbon. This clearly shows that the passivation was not caused by coke formation. On the other hand, the passivation was partly reversible when introducing hydrogen. The passivation may be a consequence of impurities...

  14. Study of the effect of pressure on electrolysis of H2O and co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernadet, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    This thesis work investigates the behavior of a solid oxide cell operating under pressure in high temperature steam electrolysis and co-electrolysis mode (H 2 O and CO 2 ). The experimental study of single cell associated with the development of multi-physical models have been set up. The experiments, carried out using an original test bench developed by the CEA-Grenoble on two types of cells between 1 and 10 bar and 700 to 800 C, allowed to identify in both operating modes that the pressure has a positive or negative effect on performance depending on the cell operating point (current, voltage). In addition, gas analyzes performed in co-electrolysis led to detect in situ CH 4 production under pressure. These pressure effects were simulated by models calibrated at atmospheric pressure. Simulations analysis helped identify the pressure dependent mechanisms and propose operating conditions thanks to the establishment of operating maps. (author) [fr

  15. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  16. Alternate switching between microbial fuel cell and microbial electrolysis cell operation as a new method to control H2O2 level in Bioelectro-Fenton system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Wang, Yong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    cell (MEC) and microbial fuel cell (MFC) mode of operation was developed to meet the challenges. In the MEC mode, a bioelectrochemical system (BES) produces H2O2 which reacts with Fenton's reagent (Fe II) to form hydroxyradical. The unused H2O2 (residual H2O2) is removed as electron acceptor...... by switching the system to MFC mode of operation. Complete decolorization and mineralization of 50 mg L−1 methylene blue (MB) was achieved in the MEC mode with apparent first order rate constants of 0.43 and 0.22 h−1, respectively. After switching to the MFC mode, residual H2O2 of 180 mg L−1 was removed...... at a removal rate of 4.61 mg L−1 h−1 while generating a maximum current density of 0.49 A m−2. The MB degradation and residual H2O2 removal were affected by external resistance, cathode pH and initial MB concentration. Furthermore, the system performance was enhanced under stack operation. This study provides...

  17. Static feed water electrolysis module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced static feed water electrolysis module (SFWEM) and associated instrumentation for generating breathable O2 was developed. The system also generates a H2 byproduct for use in an air revitalization system for O2 recovery from metabolic CO2. Special attention was given to: (1) eliminating water feed compartment degassing, (2) eliminating need for zero gravity condenser/separators, (3) increasing current density capability, and (4) providing a self contained module so that operation is independent of laboratory instrumentation and complicated startup/shutdown procedures.

  18. Autophagic components contribute to hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Joensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated as a prosurvival mechanism to restrict programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. This model is based on the observation that HR lesions spread in plants with reduced autophagy gene...... expression. Here, we examined receptor-mediated HR PCD responses in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg), and show that infection-induced lesions are contained in atg mutants. We also provide evidence that HR cell death initiated via Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR)-type immune receptors through...... the defense regulator EDS1 is suppressed in atg mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PCD triggered by coiled-coil (CC)-type immune receptors via NDR1 is either autophagy-independent or engages autophagic components with cathepsins and other unidentified cell death mediators. Thus, autophagic cell death...

  19. Merging Mixture Components for Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Finak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a framework for the identification of cell subpopulations in flow cytometry data based on merging mixture components using the flowClust methodology. We show that the cluster merging algorithm under our framework improves model fit and provides a better estimate of the number of distinct cell subpopulations than either Gaussian mixture models or flowClust, especially for complicated flow cytometry data distributions. Our framework allows the automated selection of the number of distinct cell subpopulations and we are able to identify cases where the algorithm fails, thus making it suitable for application in a high throughput FCM analysis pipeline. Furthermore, we demonstrate a method for summarizing complex merged cell subpopulations in a simple manner that integrates with the existing flowClust framework and enables downstream data analysis. We demonstrate the performance of our framework on simulated and real FCM data. The software is available in the flowMerge package through the Bioconductor project.

  20. Myoepithelial cells are the main component in pleomorphic adenomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Bravo, Santa; Ledesma Montes, Constantino; López Becerril, Uriel; Morales Sánchez, Israel

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify by immunohistochemistry the number of myoepithelial cells (MyECs) in pleomorphic adenomas (PAs). We retrieved the paraffin cubes of 27 PAs, new slides were done and they were stained with anti-S100 protein antibody. The amount of S-100 protein positive cells was quantified, their morphology was recorded and comparison among MyEC number with age, gender and involved gland were also done. With S-100 protein, MyECs in normal salivary gland tissue were seen surrounding the ductual structures only. In the analysed PAs a mean of 27.4% of the neoplastic cells were positive to the antibody. With the exception of one PA, in all the analysed cases the plasmacytoid cells were the most commonly identified cells (48,6%). Results of this study suggest that MyECs do not constitute the main cellular component of the neoplastic compartment in PAs and corroborate the previously reported evidence by different authors, who studying the PAs suggested that MyECs does not comprise the main cellular neoplastic component of these entities.

  1. Anion-selective materials with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane functional groups for advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnát, J.; Plevová, M.; Žitka, Jan; Paidar, M.; Bouzek, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 248, 10 September (2017), s. 547-555 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20728S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : water electrolysis * alkaline environment * anion-selective membrane Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  2. Suppressed Sr segregation and performance of directly assembled La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ oxygen electrode on Y2O3-ZrO2 electrolyte of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Na; He, Shuai; Li, Na; Zhang, Qi; Rickard, William D. A.; Chen, Kongfa; Zhang, Teng; Jiang, San Ping

    2018-04-01

    Active and stable oxygen electrode is probably the most important in the development of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) technologies. Herein, we report the successful development of mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) perovskite oxides directly assembled on barrier-layer-free yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte as highly active and stable oxygen electrodes of SOECs. Electrolysis polarization effectively induces the formation of electrode/electrolyte interface, similar to that observed under solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operation conditions. However, in contrast to the significant performance decay under SOFC operation conditions, the cell with directly assembled LSCF oxygen electrodes shows excellent stability, tested for 300 h at 0.5 A cm-2 and 750 °C under SOEC operation conditions. Detailed microstructure and phase analysis reveal that Sr segregation is inevitable for LSCF electrode, but anodic polarization substantially suppresses Sr segregation and migration to the electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to the formation of stable and efficient electrode/electrolyte interface for water and CO2 electrolysis under SOECs operation conditions. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using directly assembled MIEC cobaltite based oxygen electrodes on barrier-layer-free YSZ electrolyte of SOECs.

  3. HYFIRE: a tokamak/high-temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.P.; Benenati, R.; Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    The HYFIRE studies to date have investigated a number of technical approaches for using the thermal energy produced in a high-temperature Tokamak blanket to provide the electrical and thermal energy required to drive a high-temperature (> 1000 0 C) water electrolysis process. Current emphasis is on two design points, one consistent with electrolyzer peak inlet temperatures of 1400 0 C, which is an extrapolation of present experience, and one consistent with a peak electrolyzer temperature of 1100 0 C. This latter condition is based on current laboratory experience with high-temperature solid electrolyte fuel cells. Our major conclusion to date is that the technical integration of fusion and high-temperature electrolysis appears to be feasible and that overall hydrogen production efficiencies of 50 to 55% seem possible

  4. Water electrolysis for hydrogen production in Brazilian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Carvalho, Fatima M.S.; Bergamaschi, Vanderlei Sergio; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCCH/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Center], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation and distributed energy sector of Brazilian economy. Fossil fuels are polluting by carbogenic emissions from their combustion, being so co-responsible for present global warming. However, no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally non-carbogenic hydrogen production process is currently available for commercialization. There are feasible possibilities to use electrolysis as one of the main sources of hydrogen, especially thinking on combination with renewable sources of energy, mainly eolic and solar. In this work some perspectives for Brazilian energy context is presented, where electrolysis combined with renewable power source and fuel cell power generation would be a good basis to improve the distributed energy supply for remote areas, where the electricity grid is not present or is deficient. (author)

  5. Can high temperature steam electrolysis function with geothermal heat?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurvinsson, J.; Mansilla, C.; Werkoff, F.; Lovera, P.

    2007-01-01

    It is possible to improve the performance of electrolysis processes by operating at a high temperature. This leads to a reduction in electricity consumption but requires a part of the energy necessary for the dissociation of water to be in the form of thermal energy. Iceland produces low cost electricity and very low cost geothermal heat. However, the temperature of geothermal heat is considerably lower than the temperature required at the electrolyser's inlet, making heat exchangers necessary to recuperate part of the heat contained in the gases at the electrolyser's outlet. A techno-economic optimisation model devoted to a high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) process which includes electrolysers as well as a high temperature heat exchanger network was created. Concerning the heat exchangers, the unit costs used in the model are based on industrial data. For the electrolyser cells, the unit cost scaling law and the physical sub-model we used were formulated using analogies with solid oxide fuel cells. The method was implemented in a software tool, which performs the optimisation using genetic algorithms. The first application of the method is done by taking into account the prices of electricity and geothermal heat in the Icelandic context. It appears that even with a geothermal temperature as low as 230 degrees C, the HTE could compete with alkaline electrolysis. (authors)

  6. Production of hydrogen using composite membrane in PEM water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhi priya, E.L.; Mahender, C.; Mahesh, Naga; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Electrolysis of water is the best known technology till today to produce hydrogen. The only practical way to produce hydrogen using renewable energy sources is by proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis. The most commonly used PEM membrane is Nafion. Composite membrane of TiO2 is synthesized by casting method using Nafion 5wt% solution. RuO2 is used as anode and 10 wt% Pd on activated carbon is used as cathode in the water electrolyser system. The performance of this Composite membrane is studied by varying voltage range 1.8 to 2.6V with respect to hydrogen yield and at current density 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5(A cm-2). This Composite membrane has been tested using in-house fabricated single cell PEM water electrolysis cell with 10cm2 active area at temperatures ranging from 30,45,65 850c and at 1 atmosphere pressure.

  7. Design of a water electrolysis flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. Gene; Grigger, David J.; Thompson, C. Dean; Cusick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Supply of oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) by electolyzing water in space will play an important role in meeting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) needs and goals for future space missios. Both O2 and H2 are envisioned to be used in a variety of processes including crew life support, spacecraft propulsion, extravehicular activity, electrical power generation/storage as well as in scientific experiment and manufacturing processes. The Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) flight experiment described herein is sponsored by NASA Headquarters as a part of the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP). The objective of the EPICS is to further contribute to the improvement of the SEF technology, specifially by demonstrating and validating the SFE electromechanical process in microgravity as well as investigating perrformance improvements projected possible in a microgravity environment. This paper defines the experiment objective and presents the results of the preliminary design of the EPICS. The experiment will include testing three subscale self-contained SFE units: one containing baseline components, and two units having variations in key component materials. Tests will be conducted at varying current and thermal condition.

  8. Evolution of the cell wall components during terrestrialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Banasiak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of terrestrial ecosystems by the first land plants, and their subsequent expansion and diversification, were crucial for the life on the Earth. However, our understanding of these processes is still relatively poor. Recent intensification of studies on various plant organisms have identified the plant cell walls are those structures, which played a key role in adaptive processes during the evolution of land plants. Cell wall as a structure protecting protoplasts and showing a high structural plasticity was one of the primary subjects to changes, giving plants the new properties and capabilities, which undoubtedly contributed to the evolutionary success of land plants. In this paper, the current state of knowledge about some main components of the cell walls (cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins and lignins and their evolutionary alterations, as preadaptive features for the land colonization and the plant taxa diversification, is summarized. Some aspects related to the biosynthesis and modification of the cell wall components, with particular emphasis on the mechanism of transglycosylation, are also discussed. In addition, new surprising discoveries related to the composition of various cell walls, which change how we perceive their evolution, are presented, such as the presence of lignin in red algae or MLG (1→3,(1→4-β-D-glucan in horsetails. Currently, several new and promising projects, regarding the cell wall, have started, deciphering its structure, composition and metabolism in the evolutionary context. That additional information will allow us to better understand the processes leading to the terrestrialization and the evolution of extant land plants.

  9. Snake venoms components with antitumor activity in murine melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Rodrigo Guimaraes

    2012-01-01

    Despite the constant advances in the treatment of cancer, this disease remains one of the main causes of mortality worldwide. So, the development of new treatment modalities is imperative. Snake venom causes a variety of biological effects because they constitute a complex mixture of substances as disintegrins, proteases (serine and metalo), phospholipases A2, L-amino acid oxidases and others. The goal of the present work is to evaluate a anti-tumor activity of some snake venoms fractions. There are several studies of components derived from snake venoms with this kind of activity. After fractionation of snake venoms of the families Viperidae and Elapidae, the fractions were assayed towards murine melanoma cell line B16-F10 and fibroblasts L929. The results showed that the fractions of venom of the snake Notechis ater niger had higher specificity and potential antitumor activity on B16-F10 cell line than the other studied venoms. Since the components of this venom are not explored yet coupled with the potential activity showed in this work, we decided to choose this venom to develop further studies. The cytotoxic fractions were evaluated to identify and characterize the components that showed antitumoral activity. Western blot assays and zymography suggests that these proteins do not belong to the class of metallo and serine proteinases. (author)

  10. Carbon dioxide electrolysis using a ceramic electrolyte. [for space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstfeld, T. E.; Mullins, O., Jr.; Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of an experimental study of the electrical aspects of carbon dioxide electrolysis using a ceramic electrolyte. The electrolyte compositions used in this study are 8% Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2, 7.5% CaO stabilized ZrO2, and 5% Y2O3 stabilized ThO2. Results indicate that the 8% Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 is the best material to use for electrolysis, in terms of current as a function of voltage and temperature, and in terms of efficiency of oxide ion flow through it. The poorest results were obtained with the 5% Y2O3 stabilized ThO2 composition. An electrolysis system which might be employed to reclaim oxygen and carbon from effluents of space manufacturing, assuming that an industry would have to electrolyze 258,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, is predicted to require a total cell area of 110,000 sq m of 1 mm thickness and electrical capacity of 441 MW.

  11. Electrocatalysis in Water Electrolysis with Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasten, Egil

    2001-10-01

    Development and optimization of the electrodes in a water electrolysis system using a polymer membrane as electrolyte have been carried out in this work. A cell voltage of 1.59 V (energy consumption of about 3.8 kWh/Nm{sub 3} H{sub 2}) has been obtained at practical operation conditions of the electrolysis cell (10 kA . m2, 90{sup o}C) using a total noble metal loading of less than 2.4 mg.cm{sub 2} and a Nafion -115 membrane. It is further shown that a cell voltage of less than 1.5 V is possible at the same conditions by combination of the best electrodes obtained in this work. The most important limitation of the electrolysis system using polymer membrane as electrolyte has proven to be the electrical conductivity of the catalysts due to the porous backing/current collector system, which increases the length of the current path and decreases the cross section compared to the apparent one. A careful compromise must therefore be obtained between electrical conductivity and active surface area, which can be tailored by preparation and annealing conditions of the metal oxide catalysts. Anode catalysts of different properties have been developed. The mixed oxide of Ir-Ta (85 mole% Ir) was found to exhibit highest voltage efficiency at a current density of 10 kA.m{sub 2} or below, whereas the mixed oxide of Ir and Ru (60-80 mole% Ir) was found to give the highest voltage efficiency for current densities of above 10 kA.m{sub 2}. Pt on carbon particles, was found to be less suitable as cathode catalyst in water electrolysis. The large carbon particles introduced an unnecessary porosity into the catalytic layer, which resulted in a high ohmic drop. Much better voltage efficiency was obtained by using Pt-black as cathode catalyst, which showed a far better electrical conductivity. Ru-oxide as cathode catalyst in water electrolysis systems using a polymer electrolyte was not found to be of particular interest due to insufficient electrochemical activity and too low

  12. Water electrolysis system refurbishment and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The electrolytic oxygen generator for the back-up water electrolysis system in a 90-day manned test was refurbished, improved and subjected to a 182-day bench test. The performance of the system during the test demonstrated the soundness of the basic electrolysis concept, the high development status of the automatic controls which allowed completely hands-off operation, and the capability for orbital operation. Some design improvements are indicated.

  13. Electromagnetic radiation during electrolysis of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chuk, E.P.; Yanchuk, O.M.; Reshetnyak, O.V.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions during electrolysis of heavy water on nickel and palladium cathodes was determined for the first time. A sharp jump of the intensity photon flow was observed at a current density of higher than 125 mA/cm 2 . A hypothesis about the relation of the electrochemiluminescence phenomenon during electrolysis of heavy water with the formation of fresh surfaces in consequence of the hydrogenous corrosion of the cathode material is formulated. ((orig.))

  14. Titanium metal obtention by fused salts electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Potassium fluorotitanate dissolved in fused sodium chloride or potassium chloride may be electrolyzed under an inert gas atmosphere. Solid electrolysis products are formed on the cathode which contains titanium metal, sodium chloride, lower fluorotitanates and small quantities of alkali metal fluorotitanate. The extraction of titanium from the electrolysis products may be carried out by aqueous leaching (removal of chloride salts of alkali metals and a certain amount of fluorotitanates). Titanium metal obtained is relatively pure. (Author)

  15. Wnt6 maintains anterior escort cells as an integral component of the germline stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxi; Page-McCaw, Andrea

    2018-02-07

    Stem cells reside in a niche, a local environment whose cellular and molecular complexity is still being elucidated. In Drosophila ovaries, germline stem cells depend on cap cells for self-renewing signals and physical attachment. Germline stem cells also contact the anterior escort cells, and here we report that anterior escort cells are absolutely required for germline stem cell maintenance. When escort cells die from impaired Wnt signaling or hid expression, the loss of anterior escort cells causes loss of germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells function as an integral niche component by promoting DE-cadherin anchorage and by transiently expressing the Dpp ligand to promote full-strength BMP signaling in germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells are maintained by Wnt6 ligands produced by cap cells; without Wnt6 signaling, anterior escort cells die leaving vacancies in the niche, leading to loss of germline stem cells. Our data identify anterior escort cells as constituents of the germline stem cell niche, maintained by a cap cell-produced Wnt6 survival signal. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Intermediate Temperature Steam Electrolysis with Phosphate-Based Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Carsten Brorson

    as the technological issues and challenges faced. A setup suitable for intermediate temperature electrolysis has been constructed in order to accommodate testing in the IT region. This included the evaluation of multiple generations of components such as end plates and flow plates. Chemical vapour deposition...... treatment step of the synthesis. It was found that initial heating of the synthesis precursors to 270 _C gave a high quality sample in a reproducible fashion. Investigations of two additional novel phosphates was attempted. These were phosphoric acid treated Nb5P7O30 and a mixture of Bi2P4O13, BiPO4 and 2...

  17. Separation factor dependence upon cathode material for tritium separation from heavy water by electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Sakuma, Y.; Ohtani, N.; Kotaka, M.

    2002-01-01

    Using three cathode materials, i.e. carbon (C), stainless steel (SUS), and nickel (Ni), tritium was separated from heavy water by electrolysis, and the separation factors were compared. To separate hydrogen isotopes, heavy water was electrolyzed by an electrolysis device with a solid polymer electrode (SPE), which needed no electrolyte additives for electrolysis. The anode was made of 3 mm thickness of a sintered porous titanium plate covered with iridium oxide. The cathode was made of the same thickness of a sintered porous carbon, stainless steel, or nickel plate. Heavy water or light water spiked with tritiated water was electrolyzed 20 A x 60 min with the electrolysis cell temperature at 10, 20 or 30degC, and 15 A x 80 min at 5degC. The produced hydrogen and oxygen gases were recombined using a palladium catalyst with nitrogen gas as a carrier. The activities of the water in the electrolysis cell and of the recombined water were analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The apparent D-T separation factor (SF D/T ) and H-T separation factor (SF H/T ) were calculated as quotient the specific activity of the water in the cell divided by that of the recombined water. The electrolysis potential to keep the current 20 A was 2-3 V. The average yields of the recombined water were 95%. At the cell temperature of 20degC, SF D/T (C), SF D/T (SUS), and SF D/T (Ni) were 2.42, 2.17, and 2.05, respectively. At the same temperature, SF H/T (C), SF H/T (SUS), and SF H/T (Ni) were 12.5, 10.8, and 11.8, respectively. The SFs were in agreement with the results in other works. The SFs were changed with the cell temperature. (author)

  18. Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Water Photo-Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Girolamo, Mariarita; Siracusano, Stefania; Sebastian, David; Baglio, Vincenzo; Schuster, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Water-fed photo-electrolysis cells equipped with perfluorosulfonic acid (Nafion® 115) and quaternary ammonium-based (Fumatech® FAA3) ion exchange membranes as separator for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions were investigated. Protonic or anionic ionomer dispersions were deposited on the electrodes to extend the interface with the electrolyte. The photo-anode consisted of a large band-gap Ti-oxide semiconductor. The effect of membrane characteristics on the photo-electrochemical conversion of solar energy was investigated for photo-voltage-driven electrolysis cells. Photo-electrolysis cells were also studied for operation under electrical bias-assisted mode. The pH of the membrane/ionomer had a paramount effect on the photo-electrolytic conversion. The anionic membrane showed enhanced performance compared to the Nafion®-based cell when just TiO2 anatase was used as photo-anode. This was associated with better oxygen evolution kinetics in alkaline conditions compared to acidic environment. However, oxygen evolution kinetics in acidic conditions were significantly enhanced by using a Ti sub-oxide as surface promoter in order to facilitate the adsorption of OH species as precursors of oxygen evolution. However, the same surface promoter appeared to inhibit oxygen evolution in an alkaline environment probably as a consequence of the strong adsorption of OH species on the surface under such conditions. These results show that a proper combination of photo-anode and polymer electrolyte membrane is essential to maximize photo-electrolytic conversion. PMID:28468242

  19. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis preprototype subsystem. [oxygen production for life support systems on space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Hardware and controls developed for an electrolysis demonstration unit for use with the life sciences payload program and in NASA's regenerative life support evaluation program are described. Components discussed include: the electrolysis module; power conditioner; phase separator-pump and hydrogen differential regulator; pressure regulation of O2, He, and N2; air-cooled heat exchanger; water accumulator; fluid flow sight gage assembly; catalytic O2/H2 sensor; gas flow sensors; low voltage power supply; 100 Amp DC contactor assembly; and the water purifier design.

  20. Determination of residual cell culture media components by MEKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junge; Chakraborty, Utpal; Foley, Joe P

    2009-11-01

    Folic acid, hypoxanthine, mycophenolic acid, nicotinic acid, riboflavin, and xanthine are widely used as cell culture media components in monoclonal antibody manufacturing. These components are subsequently removed during the downstream purification processes. This article describes a single MEKC method that can simultaneously determine all the listed compounds with acceptable LOD and LOQ. All the analytes were successfully separated by MEKC using running buffer containing 40 mM SDS, 20 mM sodium phosphate, and 20 mM sodium borate at pH 9.0. The MEKC method was compared to the corresponding CZE method using the same running buffer containing no SDS. The effect of SDS concentration on separation, the pH of the running buffer, and the detection wavelength were studied and optimal MEKC conditions were established. Good linearity was obtained with correlation coefficients of more than 0.99 for all analytes. Specificity, accuracy, and precision were also evaluated. The recovery was in the range of 89-112%. The precision results were in the range of 1.7-4.8%. The experimentally determined data demonstrated that the MEKC method is applicable to the determination of the six analytes in in-process samples from monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

  1. Design considerations for a 10-kW integrated hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, M. A.; Miller, T. B.; Rieker, L. L.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1984-01-01

    Integration of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem with an alkaline electrolysis subsystem to form a regenerative fuel cell (RFC) system for low earth orbit (LEO) applications characterized by relatively high overall round trip electrical efficiency, long life, and high reliability is possible with present state of the art technology. A hypothetical 10 kW system computer modeled and studied based on data from ongoing contractual efforts in both the alkaline fuel cell and alkaline water electrolysis areas. The alkaline fuel cell technology is under development utilizing advanced cell components and standard Shuttle Orbiter system hardware. The alkaline electrolysis technology uses a static water vapor feed technique and scaled up cell hardware is developed. The computer aided study of the performance, operating, and design parameters of the hypothetical system is addressed.

  2. Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ preparation and use in electrolysis process for aluminum production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C.C.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    A continuous process for producing aluminum sulfide and for electrolyzing the aluminum sulfide to form metallic aluminum in which the aluminum sulfide is produced from aluminum oxide and COS or CS/sub 2/ in the presence of a chloride melt which also serves as the electrolysis bath. Circulation between the reactor and electrolysis cell is carried out to maintain the desired concentration of aluminum sulfide in the bath.

  3. Iron migration from the anode surface in alumina electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, Elena N.; Drozdova, Tatiana N.; Ponomareva, Svetlana V. [Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirik, Sergei D., E-mail: kiriksd@yandex.ru [Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion destruction of two-component iron-based alloys in high-temperature aluminum electrolysis in the cryolite alumina melt has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was found that at the first stage oxidative polarization of iron atoms on the anode surface into Fe{sup 2+} takes place. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 2+} interacts with cryolite melt producing FeF{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FeF{sub 2} gives oxides FeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The participation of oxygen in the corrosion has not been observed. - Abstract: Corrosion destruction of two-component iron-based alloys used as an anode in high-temperature alumina electrolysis in the melt of NaF/KF/AlF{sub 3} electrolyte has been considered. Ni, Si, Cu, Cr, Mn, Al, Ti in the amount of up to 10% have been tested as the dopants to an anode alloys. The composition of the corrosion products has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. It has been established that the anode corrosion is induced by a surface electrochemical polarization and iron atom oxidation. Iron ions come into an exchange interaction with the fluoride components of the melted electrolyte, producing FeF{sub 2}. The last interacts with oxyfluoride species transforming into the oxide forms: FeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Due to the low solubility, the iron oxides are accumulated in the near-electrode sheath. The only small part of iron from anode migrates to cathode that makes an production of high purity aluminum of a real task. The alloy dopants are also subjected to corrosion in accordance with electromotive series resulting corrosion tunnels on the anode surface. The oxides are final compounds which collect in the same area. The corrosion products form an anode shell which is electronic conductor at electrolysis temperature. The

  4. Applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the aluminum electrolysis industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lanxiang; Yu, Haibin; Cong, Zhibo; Lu, Hui; Cao, Bin; Zeng, Peng; Dong, Wei; Li, Yang

    2018-04-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and corrosive conditions. Monitoring the molten aluminum and electrolyte components is very important for controlling the chemical reaction process. Due to the lack of fast methods to monitor the components, controlling aluminum reduction cells is difficult. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to aluminum electrolysis. A new method for calculating the molecular ratio, which is an important control parameter that represents the acidity of the electrolyte, was proposed. Experiments were first performed on solid electrolyte samples to test the performance of the proposed method. Using this method, the average relative standard deviation (RSD) of the molecular ratio measurement was 0.39%, and the average root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.0236. These results prove that LIBS can accurately measure the molecular ratio. Then, in situ measurements of the molten aluminum and electrolyte were performed in industrial aluminum induction cells using the developed LIBS equipment. The spectra of the molten electrolyte were successfully obtained and were consistent with the spectra of the solid electrolyte.

  5. Alkaline membrane water electrolysis with non-noble catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær

    at 1.7 V and 2800 mA cm-2 at 2.0 V. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data showed a 6-fold reduction in ohmic cell resistance compared to conventional materials. Albeit good performance, ex-situ characterization and durability tests showed that polymer backbone and membrane stability remained......As renewable energy sources reach higher grid penetration, large scale energy storage solutions are becoming increasingly important. Hydrogen produced with renewable energy by water electrolysis is currently the only option to solve this challenge on a global scale, and green hydrogen is essential...

  6. Hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of water vapour and nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Pierre Py; Alain Capitaine

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents hydrogen production by a nuclear reactor (High Temperature Reactor, HTR or Pressurized Water Reactor, PWR) coupled to a High Temperature Electrolyser (HTE) plant. With respect to the coupling of a HTR with a HTE plant, EDF and AREVA NP had previously selected a combined cycle HTR scheme to convert the reactor heat into electricity. In that case, the steam required for the electrolyser plant is provided either directly from the steam turbine cycle or from a heat exchanger connected with such cycle. Hydrogen efficiency production is valued using high temperature electrolysis. Electrolysis production of hydrogen can be performed with significantly higher thermal efficiencies by operating in the steam phase than in the water phase. The electrolysis performance is assessed with solid oxide and solid proton electrolysis cells. The efficiency from the three operating conditions (endo-thermal, auto-thermal and thermo-neutral) of a high temperature electrolysis process is evaluated. The technical difficulties to use the gases enthalpy to heat the water are analyzed, taking into account efficiency and technological challenges. EDF and AREVA NP have performed an analysis to select an optimized process giving consideration to plant efficiency, plant operation, investment and production costs. The paper provides pathways and identifies R and D actions to reach hydrogen production costs competitive with those of other hydrogen production processes. (authors)

  7. Electrolysis byproduct D2O provides a third way to mitigate CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenewerk, William Ernest

    2009-01-01

    Rapid atomic power deployment may be possible without using fast breeder reactors or making undue demands on uranium resource. Using by-product D2O and thorium-U233 in CANDU and RBMK piles may circumvent need for either fast breeder reactors or seawater uranium. Atmospheric CO2 is presently increasing 2.25%/year in proportion to 2.25%/year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. Roughly 1/3 anthropologic CO2 is removed by various CO2 sinks. CO2 removal is modelled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO2 amount above 280 ppm-C Water electrolysis produces roughly 0.1 kg-D20/kWe-y. Material balance assumes each electrolysis stage increases D2O bottoms concentration times 3. Except for first two electrolysis stages, all water from hydrogen consumption is returned to electrolysis. The unique characteristic of this process is the ability to economically burn all deuterium-enriched H2 in vehicles. Condensate from vehicles returns to appropriate electrolysis stage. Fuel cell condensate originally from reformed natural gas may augment second-sage feed. Atomic power expansion is 5%/year, giving 55000 GWe by 2100. World primary energy increases 2.25%/y, exceeding 4000 EJ/y by 2100. CO2 maximum is roughly 600 ppm-C around year 2085. CO2 declines back below 300 ppm-C by 2145 if the 45-year-delay seawater sink remains effective

  8. Dedifferentiated giant-cell tumor of bone with an undifferentiated round cell mesenchymal component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eréndira G. Estrada-Villaseñor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The dedifferentiated giant-cell tumor of the bone is a very rare variant of the giant-cell tumor (GCT. We report the clinical, radiographic and histological findings of a dedifferentiated GCT in which the dedifferentiated component consisted of small round cells. We also comment on previously reported cases of dedifferentiated GCT, discuss the clinical implications of this dual histology, and analyze the information published about the coexistence of similar genetic abnormalities in GCT and small round cell tumors of the bone.

  9. Heterogeneous anion conducting membranes based on linear and crosslinked KOH doped polybenzimidazole for alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Hansen, Martin Kalmar; Renzaho, Richard Fulgence

    2013-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole is a highly hygroscopic polymer that can be doped with aqueous KOH to give a material with high ion conductivity in the 10−2Scm−1 range, which in combination with its low gas permeability makes it an interesting electrolyte material for alkaline water electrolysis. In this study...... on their linear counterpart. The technical feasibility of the membranes was evaluated by the preliminary water electrolysis tests showing performance comparable to that of commercially available cell separators with great potential of further improvement....

  10. Elimination of heavy metals from leachates by membrane electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, R. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Siedlungs- und Industriewasserwirtschaft, Mommsenstrasse 13, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seidel, H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Rahner, D. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie und Eektrochemie, Mommsenstrasse 13, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Morgenstern, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Analytik, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Loeser, C. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Lebensmittel- und Bioverfahrenstechnik, Bergstrasse 120, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    The elimination of heavy metals from bioleaching process waters (leachates) by electrolysis was studied in the anode and cathode region of a membrane electrolysis cell at current densities of 5-20 mA/cm{sup 2} using various electrode materials. The leaching waters containing a wide range of dissolved heavy metals, were high in sulfate, and had pH values of approx. 3. In preliminary tests using a rotating disc electrode the current density-potential curve (CPK) was recorded at a rotation velocity of 0, 1000 and 2000 rpm and a scan rate of 10 mV/s in order to collect information on the influence of transport processes on the electrochemical processes taking place at the electrodes. The electrochemical deposition-dissolution processes at the cathode are strongly dependent on the hydrodynamics. Detailed examination of the anodic oxidation of dissolved Mn(II) indicated that the manganese dioxide which formed adhered well to the electrode surface but in the cathodic return run it was again reduced. Electrode pairs of high-grade steel, lead and coal as well as material combinations were used to investigate heavy metal elimination in a membrane electrolysis cell. Using high-grade steel, lead and carbon electrode pairs, the reduction and deposition of Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni and some Cd in metallic or hydroxide form were observed in an order of 10-40 % in the cathode chamber. The dominant process in the anode chamber was the precipitation of manganese dioxide owing to the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II). Large amounts of heavy metals were co-precipitated by adsorption onto the insoluble MnO{sub 2}. High-grade steel and to some extent lead anodes were dissolved and hence were proven unsuitable as an anode material. These findings were largely confirmed by experiments using combination electrodes of coal and platinized titanium as an anode material and steel as a cathode material.The results indicate that electrochemical metal separation in the membrane electrolysis cell can represent a

  11. Mathematical Analysis of High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of CO2 and O2 Production in a Closed-Loop Atmosphere Revitalization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael G. McKellar; Manohar S. Sohal; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna; Morgan B. Abney

    2010-03-01

    NASA has been evaluating two closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures based on Sabatier and Bosch carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. A number of process models have been developed and analyzed to determine the theoretical power required to recover oxygen, O2, in each case. These models include the current Sabatier and Bosch technologies and combinations of those processes with high-temperature co-electrolysis. The cases of constant CO2 supply and constant O2 production were evaluated. In addition, a process model of the hydrogenation process with co-electrolysis was developed and compared. Sabatier processes require the least amount of energy input per kg of oxygen produced. If co-electrolysis replaces solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) electrolysis within the Sabatier architecture, the power requirement is reduced by over 10%, but only if heat recuperation is used. Sabatier processes, however, require external water to achieve the lower power results. Under conditions of constant incoming carbon dioxide flow, the Sabatier architectures require more power than the other architectures. The Bosch, Boudouard with co-electrolysis, and the hydrogenation with co-electrolysis processes require little or no external water. The Bosch and hydrogenation processes produce water within their reactors, which aids in reducing the power requirement for electrolysis. The Boudouard with co-electrolysis process has a higher electrolysis power requirement because carbon

  12. Al-induced root cell wall chemical components differences of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Root growth is different in plants with different levels of Al-tolerance under Al stress. Cell wall chemical components of root tip cell are related to root growth. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between root growth difference and cell wall chemical components. For this purpose, the cell wall chemical ...

  13. Degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile in aqueous solution by Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Yang, Ping; Yang, Jinghui; Wang, Juling

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile was investigated using the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system. Effects of influent pH value, Fe(0)/GAC ratio and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption on the removal efficiency of the pollutant were studied in the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system. The degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile was affected by influent pH, and a decrease of the influent pH values from 8.0 to 4.0 led to the increase of degradation efficiency. Granular activated carbon was added as cathode to form macroscopic galvanic cells between Fe(0) and GAC and enhance the current efficiency of the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system. The GAC could only adsorb the pollutant and provide buffer capacity for the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system, and the macroscopic galvanic cells of the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system played a leading role in degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile. With the analysis of the degradation products with GC-MS, possible reaction pathway for the degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile by the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system was suggested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ANALYSIS OF A POSSIBLE REDUCTION IN ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN WATER ELECTROLYSIS REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel George POPESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It was experimentally observed that the electrolysis reaction continues a short period of time - time torelax c - after the cell power supply is interrupted. This paper presents an analysis of transient phenomenaoccurring and pr opose technical solutions

  15. The electrolysis of water: An actuation principle for MEMS with a big opportunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, C.R.; Neagu, Cristina; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    In this paper the theory of water electrolysis in a closed electrochemical cell, that contains two electrodes, an electrolyte and a pressure sensor is described. From the leakage and electrochemical experiments done with this macrocell it is possible to obtain information about the applicability of

  16. Durable SOC stacks for production of hydrogen and synthesis gas by high temperature electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Nielsen, Karsten Agersted

    2011-01-01

    . The degradation of the electrolysis cells was found to be influenced by the adsorption of impurities from the applied inlet gases, whereas the application of chromium containing interconnect plates and glass sealings do not seem to influence the durability when operated at 850 °C. Cleaning the inlet gases...

  17. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by marijuana components is related to cell number and cell source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, T.; Pross, S.; Newton, C.; Friedman, H.

    1986-01-01

    Conflicting reports have appeared concerning the effect of marijuana components on immune responsiveness. The authors have observed that the effect of cannabinoids on lymphocyte proliferation varied with both the concentration of the drug and the mitogen used. They now report that at a constant concentration of drug, the cannabinoid effect varied from no effect to suppression depending upon the number of cells in culture and the organ source of the cells. Dispersed cell suspensions of mouse lymph node, spleen, and thymus were prepared and cultured at varying cell numbers with either delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and various mitogens. Lymphocyte proliferation was analyzed by 3 H-thymidine incorporation. T-lymphocyte mitogen responses in cultures containing high cell numbers were unaffected by the cannabinoids but as cell numbers were reduced a suppression of the response was observed. Furthermore, thymus cells were considerably more susceptible to cannabinoid suppression than cells from either lymph node or spleen. These results suggest that certain lymphocyte subpopulations are more sensitive to cannabinoid suppression and that in addition to drug concentration other variables such as cell number and cell source must be considered when analyzing cannabinoid effects

  18. Components of Streptococcus pneumoniae suppress allergic airways disease and NKT cells by inducing regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Alison N; Foster, Paul S; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2012-05-01

    Asthma is an allergic airways disease (AAD) caused by dysregulated immune responses and characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). NKT cells have been shown to contribute to AHR in some mouse models. Conversely, regulatory T cells (Tregs) control aberrant immune responses and maintain homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae induces Tregs that have potential to be harnessed therapeutically for asthma. In this study, mouse models of AAD were used to identify the S. pneumoniae components that have suppressive properties, and the mechanisms underlying suppression were investigated. We tested the suppressive capacity of type-3-polysaccharide (T3P), isolated cell walls, pneumolysoid (Ply) and CpG. When coadministered, T3P + Ply suppressed the development of: eosinophilic inflammation, Th2 cytokine release, mucus hypersecretion, and AHR. Importantly, T3P + Ply also attenuated features of AAD when administered during established disease. We show that NKT cells contributed to the development of AAD and also were suppressed by T3P + Ply treatment. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of NKT cells induced AHR, which also could be reversed by T3P + Ply. T3P + Ply-induced Tregs were essential for the suppression of NKT cells and AAD, which was demonstrated by Treg depletion. Collectively, our results show that the S. pneumoniae components T3P + Ply suppress AAD through the induction of Tregs that blocked the activity of NKT cells. These data suggest that S. pneumoniae components may have potential as a therapeutic strategy for the suppression of allergic asthma through the induction of Tregs and suppression of NKT cells.

  19. Transient nanobubbles in short-time electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, Vitaly; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2013-01-01

    Water electrolysis in a microsystem is observed and analyzed on a short-time scale of ∼10 μs. The very unusual properties of the process are stressed. An extremely high current density is observed because the process is not limited by the diffusion of electroactive species. The high current is

  20. Analysis and Countermeasures of Wind Power Accommodation by Aluminum Electrolysis Pot-Lines in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ran, Ling; He, Guixiong; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The unit energy consumption and its price have become the main obstacles for the future development of the aluminum electrolysis industry in China. Meanwhile, wind power is widely being abandoned because of its instability. In this study, a novel idea for wind power accommodation is proposed to achieve a win-win situation: the idea is for nearby aluminum electrolysis plants to absorb the wind power. The features of the wind power distribution and aluminum electrolysis industry are first summarized, and the concept of wind power accommodation by the aluminum industry is introduced. Then, based on the characteristics of aluminum reduction cells, the key problems, including the bus-bar status, thermal balance, and magnetohydrodynamics instabilities, are analyzed. In addition, a whole accommodation implementation plan for wind power by aluminum reduction is introduced to explain the theoretical value of accommodation, evaluation of the reduction cells, and the industrial experiment scheme. A numerical simulation of a typical scenario proves that there is large accommodation potential for the aluminum reduction cells. Aluminum electrolysis can accommodate wind power and remain stable under the proper technique and accommodation scheme, which will provide promising benefits for the aluminum plant and the wind energy plant.

  1. Present status of r and d on hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Aita, Hideki; Sekita, Kenji; Haga, Katsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Iwata, Tomo-o.

    1995-08-01

    In JAERI, design and R and D works on hydrogen production process have been conducted for connecting to the HTTR under construction at the Oarai Establishment of the JAERI as the nuclear heat utilization system. As for a hydrogen production process by high-temperature electrolysis of steam, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 cells connected in series. Hydrogen was produced at a maximum density of 44 Nml/cm 2 h at 950degC, and know-how of operational procedures and operational experience have been also accumulated. Then, a self-supporting planar electrolysis cell was fabricated in order to improve hydrogen production performance. In the preliminary test with the planar cell, hydrogen has been produced continuously at a maximum density of 36 Nml/cm 2 h at lower electrolysis temperature of 850degC. This report presents typical test results mentioned above, a review of previous studies conducted in the world and R and D items required for connecting to the HTTR. (author)

  2. HEK293 cell culture media study towards bioprocess optimization: Animal derived component free and animal derived component containing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing demand for biopharmaceuticals produced in mammalian cells has lead industries to enhance bioprocess volumetric productivity through different strategies. Among those strategies, cell culture media development is of major interest. In the present work, several commercially available culture media for Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293) were evaluated in terms of maximal specific growth rate and maximal viable cell concentration supported. The main objective was to provide different cell culture platforms which are suitable for a wide range of applications depending on the type and the final use of the product obtained. Performing simple media supplementations with and without animal derived components, an enhancement of cell concentration from 2 × 10(6) cell/mL to 17 × 10(6) cell/mL was achieved in batch mode operation. Additionally, the media were evaluated for adenovirus production as a specific application case of HEK293 cells. None of the supplements interfered significantly with the adenovirus infection although some differences were encountered in viral productivity. To the best of our knowledge, the high cell density achieved in the work presented has never been reported before in HEK293 batch cell cultures and thus, our results are greatly promising to further study cell culture strategies in bioreactor towards bioprocess optimization. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a 'hydrogen economy.' The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  4. Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Friendly Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Process for Magnesium Oxide Reduction: Experiment and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports a solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis experiment using an LSM(La0.8Sr0.2MnO3-δ)-Inconel inert anode current collector for production of magnesium and oxygen directly from magnesium oxide at 1423 K (1150 °C). The electrochemical performance of the SOM cell was evaluated by means of various electrochemical techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic scan, and electrolysis. Electronic transference numbers of the flux were measured to assess the magnesium dissolution in the flux during SOM electrolysis. The effects of magnesium solubility in the flux on the current efficiency and the SOM stability during electrolysis are discussed. An inverse correlation between the electronic transference number of the flux and the current efficiency of the SOM electrolysis was observed. Based on the experimental results, a new equivalent circuit of the SOM electrolysis process is presented. A general electrochemical polarization model of SOM process for magnesium and oxygen gas production is developed, and the maximum allowable applied potential to avoid zirconia dissociation is calculated as well. The modeling results suggest that a high electronic resistance of the flux and a relatively low electronic resistance of SOM are required to achieve membrane stability, high current efficiency, and high production rates of magnesium and oxygen.

  5. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-01-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  6. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilschut, Karlijn J. [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Haagsman, Henk P. [Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelen, Bernard A.J., E-mail: b.a.j.roelen@uu.nl [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  7. Performance Testing of Molten Regolith Electrolysis with Transfer of Molten Material for the Production of Oxygen and Metals on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald; Tripathy, Prabhat; Standish, Evan; Sirk, Aislinn; Melendez, Orlando; Stefanescu, Doru

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated the production of oxygen by electrolysis of molten regolith simulants at temperatures near 1600 C. Using an inert anode and suitable cathode, direct electrolysis (no supporting electrolyte) of the molten silicate is carried out, resulting in the production of molten metallic products at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Initial direct measurements of current efficiency have confirmed that the process offer potential advantages of high oxygen production rates in a smaller footprint facility landed on the moon, with a minimum of consumables brought from Earth. We now report the results of a scale-up effort toward the goal of achieving production rates equivalent to 1 metric ton O2/year, a benchmark established for the support of a lunar base. We previously reported on the electrochemical behavior of the molten electrolyte as dependent on anode material, sweep rate and electrolyte composition in batches of 20-200g and at currents of less than 0.5 A. In this paper, we present the results of experiments performed at currents up to 10 Amperes) and in larger volumes of regolith simulant (500 g - 1 kg) for longer durations of electrolysis. The technical development of critical design components is described, including: inert anodes capable of passing continuous currents of several Amperes, container materials selection, direct gas analysis capability to determine the gas components co-evolving with oxygen. To allow a continuous process, a system has been designed and tested to enable the withdrawal of cathodically-reduced molten metals and spent molten oxide electrolyte. The performance of the withdrawal system is presented and critiqued. The design of the electrolytic cell and the configuration of the furnace were supported by modeling the thermal environment of the system in an effort to realize a balance between external heating and internal joule heating. We will discuss the impact these simulations and experimental findings have

  8. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Aberle

    Full Text Available In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel, an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering.

  9. Microbial electrolysis kinetics and cell design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutels, T.H.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of hydrogen are produced worldwide, which are nearly all from fossil origin. Use of biomass instead of fossil fuels to produce hydrogen can contribute to a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the hydrogen has to be produced at high yield and efficiency. A Microbial

  10. An investigation of energy balances in palladium cathode electrolysis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, G. R.; Dolan, T. J.; Henriksen, G. L.

    1990-09-01

    A series of experiments was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate mechanisms that may contribute to energy flows in electrolysis cells like those of Fleischmann and Pons. Ordinary water (H2O), heavy water (D2O), and a mixture of the two were used in the INEL experiments. Cathodes used include a 51-μm Pd foil and 1-mm diameter extruded wire Pd rods in straight and coiled configurations. Energy balances in these experiments revealed no significant net gain or net loss of energy. Cell overpotential curves were fit well with a Tafel equation, with parameters dependent on electrode configuration, electrolyte composition, and temperature. Water evaporation and interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the Pd cathode were evaluated and found not to be significant to energy balances. No ionizing radiation, tritium production, or other evidence of fusion reactions was observed in the INEL experiments.

  11. Review: Durability and degradation issues of PEM fuel cell components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de F.A.; Dam, V.A.T.; Janssen, G.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Besides cost reduction, durability is the most important issue to be solved before commercialisation of PEM Fuel Cells can be successful. For a fuel cell operating under constant load conditions, at a relative humidity close to 100% and at a temperature of maximum 75 °C, using optimal stack and flow

  12. Site-Dependent Environmental Impacts of Industrial Hydrogen Production by Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christian Koj

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial hydrogen production via alkaline water electrolysis (AEL is a mature hydrogen production method. One argument in favor of AEL when supplied with renewable energy is its environmental superiority against conventional fossil-based hydrogen production. However, today electricity from the national grid is widely utilized for industrial applications of AEL. Also, the ban on asbestos membranes led to a change in performance patterns, making a detailed assessment necessary. This study presents a comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA using the GaBi software (version 6.115, thinkstep, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Germany, revealing inventory data and environmental impacts for industrial hydrogen production by latest AELs (6 MW, Zirfon membranes in three different countries (Austria, Germany and Spain with corresponding grid mixes. The results confirm the dependence of most environmental effects from the operation phase and specifically the site-dependent electricity mix. Construction of system components and the replacement of cell stacks make a minor contribution. At present, considering the three countries, AEL can be operated in the most environmentally friendly fashion in Austria. Concerning the construction of AEL plants the materials nickel and polytetrafluoroethylene in particular, used for cell manufacturing, revealed significant contributions to the environmental burden.

  13. Experiment Plan of High Temperature Steam and Carbon dioxide Co-electrolysis for Synthetic Gas Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Ko, Jae-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Currently, Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) come into the spotlight in the middle of the energy technologies of the future for highly effective conversion of fossil fuels into electricity without carbon dioxide emission. The SOFC is a reversible cell. By applying electrical power to the cell, which is solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), it is possible to produce synthetic gas (syngas) from high temperature steam and carbon dioxide. The produced syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) can be used for synthetic fuels. This SOEC technology can use high temperature from VHTRs for high efficiency. This paper describes KEPRI's experiment plan of high temperature steam and carbon co-electrolysis for syngas production using SOEC technology

  14. Influence of dietary components on regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    It is no longer a myth that a balanced diet is fundamental for general health. Common dietary components including vitamins A and D, omega-3 and probiotics are now widely accepted to be essential to protect against many diseases with an inflammatory nature. On the other hand, high fat diets...... components on diseases in which Tregs play a seminal role will be discussed. Among chronic diseases where dietary factors could have a direct influence via modulation of Tregs homeostasis and functions, we will review chronic tissue-specific autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as IBD, T1D, MS, RA...

  15. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800 0 C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400 0 C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) [$1000/KW(E) equivalent], the H 2 energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10 6 scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen

  16. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  17. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance.

  18. Economics of liquid hydrogen from water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F. N.; Moore, W. I.; Walker, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    An economical model for preliminary analysis of LH2 cost from water electrolysis is presented. The model is based on data from vendors and open literature, and is suitable for computer analysis of different scenarios for 'directional' purposes. Cost data associated with a production rate of 10,886 kg/day are presented. With minimum modification, the model can also be used to predict LH2 cost from any electrolyzer once the electrolyzer's cost data are available.

  19. Tunable microbubble generator using electrolysis and ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Younes Achaoui; Khaled Metwally; Damien Fouan; Zoubida Hammadi; Roger Morin; Eric Debieu; Cédric Payan; Serge Mensah

    2017-01-01

    This letter reports on a method for producing on demand calibrated bubbles in a non-chemically controlled solution using localized micro-electrolysis and ultrasound. Implementing a feedback loop in the process leads to a point source of stable mono-dispersed microbubbles. This approach overcomes the inertial constraints encountered in microfluidics with the possibility to produce from a single to an array of calibrated bubbles. Moreover, this method avoids the use of additional surfactant tha...

  20. Performance of supported catalysts for water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gurrik, Stian

    2012-01-01

    The most active catalyst for oxygen evolution in PEM water electrolysis is ruthenium oxide. Its major drawback as a commercial catalyst is its poor stability. In a mixed oxide with iridium, ruthenium becomes more stable. However, it would be favorable to find a less expensive substitute to iridium. In this work, the dissolution potential and lifetime of mixed oxides containing ruthenium and tantalum are investigated. In order to effectively determine what effects tantalum and particle size ha...

  1. Impact of low gravity on water electrolysis operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, F. T.; Schubert, F. H.; Lee, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced space missions will require oxygen and hydrogen utilities for several important operations including the following: (1) propulsion; (2) electrical power generation and storage; (3) environmental control and life support; (4) extravehicular activity; (5) in-space manufacturing and (6) in-space science activities. An experiment suited to a Space Shuttle standard middeck payload has been designed for the Static Feed Water Electrolysis technology which has been viewed as being capable of efficient, reliable oxygen and hydrogen generation with few subsystem components. The program included: end use design requirements, phenomena to be studied, Space Shuttle Orbiter experiment constraints, experiment design and data requirements, and test hardware requirements. The objectives are to obtain scientific and engineering data for future research and development and to focus on demonstrating and monitoring for safety of a standard middeck payload.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of the efficiency of high-temperature steam electrolysis system for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyi, Liu; Bo, Yu; Jingming, Xu; Jing, Chen

    High-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), a reversible process of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) in principle, is a promising method for highly efficient large-scale hydrogen production. In our study, the overall efficiency of the HTSE system was calculated through electrochemical and thermodynamic analysis. A thermodynamic model in regards to the efficiency of the HTSE system was established and the quantitative effects of three key parameters, electrical efficiency (η el), electrolysis efficiency (η es), and thermal efficiency (η th) on the overall efficiency (η overall) of the HTSE system were investigated. Results showed that the contribution of η el, η es, η th to the overall efficiency were about 70%, 22%, and 8%, respectively. As temperatures increased from 500 °C to 1000 °C, the effect of η el on η overall decreased gradually and the η es effect remained almost constant, while the η th effect increased gradually. The overall efficiency of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with the HTSE system under different conditions was also calculated. With the increase of electrical, electrolysis, and thermal efficiency, the overall efficiencies were anticipated to increase from 33% to a maximum of 59% at 1000 °C, which is over two times higher than that of the conventional alkaline water electrolysis.

  3. Single exponential decay waveform; a synergistic combination of electroporation and electrolysis (E2 for tissue ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Klein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Electrolytic ablation and electroporation based ablation are minimally invasive, non-thermal surgical technologies that employ electrical currents and electric fields to ablate undesirable cells in a volume of tissue. In this study, we explore the attributes of a new tissue ablation technology that simultaneously delivers a synergistic combination of electroporation and electrolysis (E2. Method A new device that delivers a controlled dose of electroporation field and electrolysis currents in the form of a single exponential decay waveform (EDW was applied to the pig liver, and the effect of various parameters on the extent of tissue ablation was examined with histology. Results Histological analysis shows that E2 delivered as EDW can produce tissue ablation in volumes of clinical significance, using electrical and temporal parameters which, if used in electroporation or electrolysis separately, cannot ablate the tissue. Discussion The E2 combination has advantages over the three basic technologies of non-thermal ablation: electrolytic ablation, electrochemical ablation (reversible electroporation with injection of drugs and irreversible electroporation. E2 ablates clinically relevant volumes of tissue in a shorter period of time than electrolysis and electroporation, without the need to inject drugs as in reversible electroporation or use paralyzing anesthesia as in irreversible electroporation.

  4. Hydrogen electrolysis using a NASICON solid protonic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulens, J.; Longhurst, T.H.; Kuriakose, A.K.; Canaday, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    A protonic conductor based on a bonded NASICON disc has been used for hydrogen electrolysis at 300 K. Currents up to 200 mA can be passed through the disc, and the electrolysis proceeds with 100% current efficiency. The resistance of the ceramic is affected by its extent of hydration. Degradation and failure of the ceramic occurs at the cathode as a result of electrolysis.

  5. Modeling of Gas Diffusion in Ni/YSZ Electrodes in CO2 and Co-electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Carbon formation may occur during CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis using solid oxide electrolyzer cells due to the Boudouard reaction (2CO →  CO2 + C(s)). Formed carbon may disintegrate the cell structure and it is therefore of importance to be able to predict when carbon is formed, and take actions...

  6. System level modeling and component level control of fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xingjian

    This dissertation investigates the fuel cell systems and the related technologies in three aspects: (1) system-level dynamic modeling of both PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); (2) condition monitoring scheme development of PEM fuel cell system using model-based statistical method; and (3) strategy and algorithm development of precision control with potential application in energy systems. The dissertation first presents a system level dynamic modeling strategy for PEM fuel cells. It is well known that water plays a critical role in PEM fuel cell operations. It makes the membrane function appropriately and improves the durability. The low temperature operating conditions, however, impose modeling difficulties in characterizing the liquid-vapor two phase change phenomenon, which becomes even more complex under dynamic operating conditions. This dissertation proposes an innovative method to characterize this phenomenon, and builds a comprehensive model for PEM fuel cell at the system level. The model features the complete characterization of multi-physics dynamic coupling effects with the inclusion of dynamic phase change. The model is validated using Ballard stack experimental result from open literature. The system behavior and the internal coupling effects are also investigated using this model under various operating conditions. Anode-supported tubular SOFC is also investigated in the dissertation. While the Nernst potential plays a central role in characterizing the electrochemical performance, the traditional Nernst equation may lead to incorrect analysis results under dynamic operating conditions due to the current reverse flow phenomenon. This dissertation presents a systematic study in this regard to incorporate a modified Nernst potential expression and the heat/mass transfer into the analysis. The model is used to investigate the limitations and optimal results of various operating conditions; it can also be utilized to perform the

  7. Treatment of oilfield wastewater by combined process of micro-electrolysis, Fenton oxidation and coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenchao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, a combined process was developed that included micro-electrolysis, Fenton oxidation and coagulation to treat oilfield fracturing wastewater. Micro-electrolysis and Fenton oxidation were applied to reduce chemical oxygen demand (COD) organic load and to enhance organic components gradability, respectively. Orthogonal experiment were employed to investigate the influence factors of micro-electrolysis and Fenton oxidation on COD removal efficiency. For micro-electrolysis, the optimum conditions were: pH, 3; iron-carbon dosage, 50 mg/L; mass ratio of iron-carbon, 2:3; reaction time, 60 min. For Fenton oxidation, a total reaction time of 90 min, a H 2 O 2 dosage of 12 mg/L, with a H 2 O 2 /Fe 2+ mole ratio of 30, pH of 3 were selected to achieve optimum oxidation. The optimum conditions in coagulation process: pH, cationic polyacrylamide dosage, mixing speed and time is 4.3, 2 mg/L, 150 rpm and 30 s, respectively. In the continuous treatment process under optimized conditions, the COD of oily wastewater fell 56.95%, 46.23%, 30.67%, respectively, from last stage and the total COD removal efficiency reached 83.94% (from 4,314 to 693 mg/L). In the overall treatment process under optimized conditions, the COD of oily wastewater was reduced from 4,314 to 637 mg/L, and the COD removal efficiency reached 85.23%. The contribution of each stage is 68.45% (micro-electrolysis), 24.07% (Fenton oxidation), 7.48% (coagulation), respectively. Micro-electrolysis is the uppermost influencing process on COD removal. Compared with the COD removal efficiency of three processes on raw wastewater under optimized conditions: the COD removal efficiency of single micro-electrolysis, single Fenton oxidation, single coagulation is 58.34%, 44.88% and 39.72%, respectively. Experiments proved the effect of combined process is marvelous and the overall water quality of the final effluent could meet the class III national wastewater discharge standard of petrochemical industry of China

  8. Proton-conductive nano zeolite-PVA composite film as a new water-absorbing electrolyte for water electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nishihara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, organic-inorganic composite electrolyte membranes are developed for a novel water-absorbing porous electrolyte water electrolysis cell. As the materials of the composite electrolyte membrane, 80 wt% of a proton-conducting nano zeolite (H-MFI as an electrolyte and 20 wt% of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA as a cross-linkable matrix are used. The nano zeolite is prepared by a milling process. The nano zeolite-PVA composite membrane precursors are prepared by spraying onto a substrate, followed by cross-linking. The resulting nano zeolite-cross-linked PVA composite films are then evaluated for their properties such as proton conductivity as electrolyte membranes for the water-absorbing porous electrolyte water electrolysis cell. It is confirmed that conventional materials such as zeolites and PVA can be used for the water electrolysis as an electrolyte.

  9. Effect of the somatic cell count on physicochemical components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xz

    2015-04-29

    Apr 29, 2015 ... the standard method to determine the quality of raw milk. (Ribas, 1999). Magalhães .... somatic cell score (SCS) resulted in an increase in the protein concentration of .... Yield of Dairy Herds]. C. E. Martins, C. N. Costa, J. R. F..

  10. Effect of the somatic cell count on physicochemical components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science of the Federal University of Goiás (Escola de Veterinária e Zootecnia da Universidade Federal de Goiás). Protein, fat, lactose, casein, urea, defatted dry extract and somatic cell counts (SCC) were analyzed. A completely randomized experimental design was used.

  11. STRIPAK components determine mode of cancer cell migration and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Chris D; Hooper, Steven; Tozluoglu, Melda

    2015-01-01

    demonstrate that co-localization of contractile activity and actin-plasma membrane linkage reduces cell speed on planar surfaces, but favours migration in confined environments similar to those observed in vivo. We further show that FAM40B mutations found in human tumours uncouple it from PP2A and enable...

  12. Advancements in water vapor electrolysis technology. [for Space Station ECLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda; Heppner, Dennis B.; Sudar, Martin

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes a technology development program whose goal is to develop water vapor electrolysis (WVE) hardware that can be used selectively as localized topping capability in areas of high metabolic activity without oversizing the central air revitalization system on long-duration manned space missions. The WVE will be used primarily to generate O2 for the crew cabin but also to provide partial humidity control by removing water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The electrochemically based WVE interfaces with cabin air which is controlled in the following ranges: dry bulb temperature of 292 to 300 K; dew point temperature of 278 to 289 K; relative humidity of 25 to 75 percent; and pressure of 101 + or - 1.4 kPa. Design requirements, construction details, and results for both single-cell and multicell module testing are presented, and the preliminary sizing of a multiperson subsystem is discussed.

  13. A Decade of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Improvements at DTU Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Brodersen, Karen; Chen, Ming

    2017-01-01

    a short review of the R&D work on SOEC single cells conducted at DTU Energy from 2005 to 2015. The SOEC improvements have involved increasing the of the oxygen electrode performance, elimination of impurities in the feed streams, optimization of processing routes, and fuel electrode structure optimization....... All together, these improvements have led to a decrease in long-term degradation rate from ∼40 %/kh to ∼0.4 %/kh for steam electrolysis at -1 A/cm2, while the initial area specific resistance has been decreased from 0.44 Ωcm2 to 0.15 Ωcm2 at -0.5 A/cm2 and 750 °C....

  14. Hydrogen production through small capacity water electrolysis systems; Production d'hydrogene par electrolyse de l'eau. Application a des systemes de petite capacite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Ph. [TotalFinaElf, la Defense 6, 92 - Courbevoie (France)

    2002-01-01

    Less than 1 % of the world's hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water, in large plants mainly in connection with hydropower. For users requiring extremely pure hydrogen, electrolysis can be a convenient mean of obtaining the required hydrogen quality, where cheap electricity is available. This paper aims at presenting the latest technical developments of small capacity electrolyzers, that could fuel hydrogen cells or internal combustion engines. (author)

  15. Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research program –experimental and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2009-04-01

    This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

  16. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  17. Tritium experiments on components for fusion fuel processing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.; Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Under a collaborative agreement between US and Japan, two tritium processing components, a palladium diffuser and a ceramic electrolysis cell have been tested with tritium for application to a Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for plasma exhaust processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fundamental characteristics, compatibility with tritium, impurities effects with tritium, and long-term behavior of the components, were studied over a three year period. Based on these studies, an integrated process loop, ''JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' equipped with above components was installed at the TSTA for full scale demonstration of the plasma exhaust reprocessing

  18. New Components for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caramori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs are among the most promising solar energy conversion devices of new generation, since coupling ease of fabrication and low cost offer the possibility of building integration in photovoltaic windows and facades. Although in their earliest configuration these systems are close to commercialization, fundamental studies are still required for developing new molecules and materials with more desirable properties as well as improving our understanding of the fundamental processes at the basis of the functioning of photoactive heterogeneous interfaces. In this contribution, some recent advances, made in the effort of improving DSSC devices by finding alternative materials and configurations, are reviewed.

  19. Reversibility of the SOFC for the hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisse, A.; Marrony, M.; Perednis, D.; Schefold, J.; Jose-Garcia, M.; Zahid, M.

    2007-01-01

    The behaviour of two SOFC cells in electrolysis mode is studied. The performances of these solid oxide cells, reversible at 800 C and for current densities between 0 and -0.42 A/cm 2 , are presented. A weaker polarisation resistance has been measured for the cell containing a mixed conductor as oxygen electrode. For each cell, a limitation by gaseous diffusion has been observed under current. This phenomenon appears for current densities which are higher for the mixed conductor cell as oxygen electrode. (O.M.)

  20. Hydrogen from renewable energy - Photovoltaic/water electrolysis as an exemplary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprafka, R. J.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted for a NASA Kennedy Space Center liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen production facility using solar cell arrays as the power source for electrolysis. The 100 MW output of the facility would be split into 67.6 and 32 MW portions for electrolysis and liquefaction, respectively. The solar cell array would cover 1.65 sq miles, and would be made up of 249 modular 400-kW arrays. Hydrogen and oxygen are generated at either dispersed or centralized water electrolyzers. The yearly hydrogen output is projected to be 5.76 million lbs, with 8 times that much oxygen; these fuel volumes can support approximately 18 Space Shuttle launches/year.

  1. Use of sodium salt electrolysis in the process of continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents test results concerning the selection of sodium salt for the technology of continuous modification of the EN AC-AlSi12 alloy, which is based on electrolysis of sodium salts, occurring directly in a crucible with liquid alloy. Sodium ions formed as a result of the sodium salt dissociation and the electrolysis are ...

  2. Bi-directional exchange of membrane components occurs during co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassburg, Sandra; Hodson, Nigel W; Hill, Patrick I; Richardson, Stephen M; Hoyland, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies have been proposed as novel treatments for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that when MSCs are co-cultured with nucleus pulposus (NP) cells with direct cell-cell contact, they differentiate along the NP lineage and simultaneously stimulate the degenerate NP cell population to regain a normal (non-degenerate) phenotype, an effect which requires cell-cell communication. However, the mechanisms by which NP cells and MSCs interact in this system are currently unclear. Thus, in this study we investigated a range of potential mechanisms for exchange of cellular components or information that may direct these changes, including cell fusion, gap-junctional communication and exchange of membrane components by direct transfer or via microvesicle formation. Flow cytometry of fluorescently labeled MSCs and NP cells revealed evidence of some cell fusion and formation of gapjunctions, although at the three timepoints studied these phenomena were detectable only in a small proportion of cells. While these mechanisms may play a role in cell-cell communication, the data suggests they are not the predominant mechanism of interaction. However, flow cytometry of fluorescently dual-labeled cells showed that extensive bi-directional transfer of membrane components is operational during direct co-culture of MSCs and NP cells. Furthermore, there was also evidence for secretion and internalization of membrane-bound microvesicles by both cell types. Thus, this study highlights bi-directional intercellular transfer of membrane components as a possible mechanism of cellular communication between MSC and NP cells.

  3. Tunable microbubble generator using electrolysis and ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaoui, Younes; Metwally, Khaled; Fouan, Damien; Hammadi, Zoubida; Morin, Roger; Debieu, Eric; Payan, Cédric; Mensah, Serge

    2017-01-01

    This letter reports on a method for producing on demand calibrated bubbles in a non-chemically controlled solution using localized micro-electrolysis and ultrasound. Implementing a feedback loop in the process leads to a point source of stable mono-dispersed microbubbles. This approach overcomes the inertial constraints encountered in microfluidics with the possibility to produce from a single to an array of calibrated bubbles. Moreover, this method avoids the use of additional surfactant that may modify the composition of the host fluid. It impacts across a broad range of scientific domains from bioengineering, sensing to environment.

  4. Tunable microbubble generator using electrolysis and ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Achaoui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This letter reports on a method for producing on demand calibrated bubbles in a non-chemically controlled solution using localized micro-electrolysis and ultrasound. Implementing a feedback loop in the process leads to a point source of stable mono-dispersed microbubbles. This approach overcomes the inertial constraints encountered in microfluidics with the possibility to produce from a single to an array of calibrated bubbles. Moreover, this method avoids the use of additional surfactant that may modify the composition of the host fluid. It impacts across a broad range of scientific domains from bioengineering, sensing to environment.

  5. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  6. B cells exposed to enterobacterial components suppress development of experimental colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Larsen, Hjalte List; Kristensen, Nanna Ny

    2012-01-01

    ). RESULTS: We demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to ebx produce large amounts of IL-10 in vitro and express CD1d and CD5 previously known to be associated with regulatory B cells. In SCID mice transplanted with colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells, co-transfer of ebx-B cells significantly suppressed...... development of colitis. Suppression was dependent on B cell-derived IL-10, as co-transfer of IL-10 knockout ebx-B cells failed to suppress colitis. Ebx-B cell-mediated suppression of colitis was associated with a decrease in interferon gamma (IFN-¿)-producing T(H) 1 cells and increased frequencies of Foxp3......-expressing T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to enterobacterial components acquire immunosuppressive functions by which they can suppress development of experimental T cell-mediated colitis in an IL-10-dependent way. (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2011;)....

  7. Energy efficient thermochemical conversion of very wet biomass to biofuels by integration of steam drying, steam electrolysis and gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2017-01-01

    A novel system concept is presented for the thermochemical conversion of very wet biomasses such as sewage sludge and manure. The system integrates steam drying, solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) and gasification for the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG). The system is analyzed...

  8. Renewable and high efficient syngas production from carbon dioxide and water through solar energy assisted electrolysis in eutectic molten salts

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Hongjun; Liu, Yue; Ji, Deqiang; Li, Zhida; Yi, Guanlin; Yuan, Dandan; Wang, Baohui; Zhang, Zhonghai; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    sustainable energy sources: concentrated solar light heats molten salt and solar cell supplies electricity for electrolysis. The eutectic Li0.85Na0.61K0.54CO3/nLiOH molten electrolyte is rationally designed with low melting point (<450 °C). The synthesized

  9. HYFIRE: fusion-high temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.D.; Horn, F.; Isaacs, H.; Lazareth, O.; Makowitz, H.; Usher, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a comprehensive conceptual design study called HYFIRE of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor, high-temperature electrolysis system. The study is placing particular emphasis on the adaptability of the STARFIRE power reactor to a synfuel application. The HYFIRE blanket must perform three functions: (a) provide high-temperature (approx. 1400 0 C) process steam at moderate pressures (in the range of 10 to 30 atm) to the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) units; (b) provide high-temperature (approx. 700 to 800 0 C) heat to a thermal power cycle for generation of electricity to the HTE units; and (c) breed enough tritium to sustain the D-T fuel cycle. In addition to thermal energy for the decomposition of steam into its constitutents, H 2 and O 2 , electrical input is required. Power cycle efficiencies of approx. 40% require He cooling for steam superheat. Fourteen hundred degree steam coupled with 40% power cycle efficiency results in a process efficiency (conversion of fusion energy to hydrogen chemical energy) of 50%

  10. Efficient uranous nitrate production using membrane electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhongwei Yuan; Taihong Yan; Weifang Zheng; Hongying Shuang; Liang Xian; Xiaoyan Bian; Chen Zuo; Chuanbo Li; Zhi Cao

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, simple way to make uranous ion. In order to improve the ratio of uranous ion to the total uranium and maintain high current efficiency, an electrolyser with very thin cathodic and anodic compartment, which were separated by a cation exchange membrane, was setup, and its performance was tested. The effects of various parameters on the reduction were also evaluated. The results show that the apparatus is quite positive. It runs well with 120 mA/cm 2 current density (72 cm 2 cathode, constant current batch operation). U(IV) yield can achieve 93.1 % (500 mL feed, total uranium 199 g/L) after 180 min electrolysis. It was also shown that when U(IV) yield was below 80 %, very high current efficiency was maintained, and there was almost a linear relationship between uranous ion yield and electrolysis time; under the range of experimental conditions, the concentration of uranyl nitrate, hydrazine, and nitric acid had little effect on the reduction. (author)

  11. Ovarian mixed germ cell tumor with yolk sac and teratomatous components in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nicholas A; Manivel, J Carlos; Olson, Erik J

    2013-05-01

    Mixed germ cell tumors of the ovary have rarely been reported in veterinary species. A 3-year-old intact female Labrador Retriever dog was presented for lethargy, abdominal distention, and a midabdominal mass. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (23 cm in diameter) left ovarian tumor and multiple small (2-3 cm in diameter) pale tan masses on the peritoneum and abdominal surface of the diaphragm. Histological examination of the left ovary revealed a mixed germ cell tumor with a yolk sac component with rare Schiller-Duval bodies and a teratomatous component comprised primarily of neural differentiation. The abdominal metastases were solely comprised of the yolk sac component. The yolk sac component was diffusely immunopositive for cytokeratin with scattered cells reactive for α-fetoprotein and placental alkaline phosphatase. Within the teratomatous component, the neuropil was diffusely immunopositive for S100, neuron-specific enolase, and neurofilaments with a few glial fibrillary acidic protein immunopositive cells. Ovarian germ cell tumors may be pure and consist of only 1 germ cell element or may be mixed and include more than 1 germ cell element, such as teratoma and yolk sac tumor.

  12. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE MATURE TERATOMA AND THE CHORIOCARCINOMA COMPONENT OF A TESTICULAR MIXED NONSEMINOMATOUS GERM-CELL TUMOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGRAAFF, WE; OOSTERHUIS, JW; DEJONG, B; VANECHTENARENDS, J; WIERSEMABUIST, J; KOOPS, HS; SLEIJFER, DT

    1992-01-01

    We karyotyped two histologically distinct components with different metastatic behavior of a testicular nonseminomatous germ cell tumor. The two components showed an almost identical chromosomal pattern. These almost identical karyotypes of the two components with different metastatic potential

  14. Method of nickel-plating large components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbuer, K.

    1997-01-01

    The invention concerns a method of nickel-plating components, according to which even large components can be provided with an adequate layer of nickel which is pore- and stress-free and such that water is not lost. According to the invention, the component is heated and, after heating, is pickled, rinsed, scoured, plated in an electrolysis process, and rinsed again. (author)

  15. The selective role of ECM components on cell adhesion, morphology, proliferation and communication in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Cell binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell and tissue functions. In this context, each tissue consists of a unique ECM composition, which may be responsible for tissue-specific cell responses. Due to the complexity of ECM-cell interactions—which depend on the interplay of inside-out and outside-in signaling cascades, cell and tissue specificity of ECM-guidance is poorly understood. In this paper, we investigate the role of different ECM components like laminin, fibronectin, and collagen type I with respect to the essential cell behaviour patterns: attachment dynamics such as adhesion kinetic and force, formation of focal adhesion complexes, morphology, proliferation, and intercellular communication. A detailed in vitro comparison of fibroblasts, endothelial cells, osteoblasts, smooth muscle cells, and chondrocytes reveals significant differences in their cell responses to the ECM: cell behaviour follows a cell specific ligand priority ranking, which was independent of the cell type origin. Fibroblasts responded best to fibronectin, chondrocytes best to collagen I, the other cell types best to laminin. This knowledge is essential for optimization of tissue-biomaterial interfaces in all tissue engineering applications and gives insight into tissue-specific cell guidance. -- Highlights: • We analyse the impact of ECM components on cell behaviour in vitro. • We compare five different cell types, using the same culture conditions. • The ECM significantly guides all cell responses. • Cell behaviour follows a cell specific ligand-priority ranking. • This gives insight in tissue formation and is essential for biomedical applications

  16. The selective role of ECM components on cell adhesion, morphology, proliferation and communication in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina, E-mail: s.schlie@lzh.de [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Ngezahayo, Anaclet, E-mail: ngezahayo@biophysik.uni-hannover.de [Institute of Biophysics, Leibniz University Hannover, Herrenhäuser Str. 2, Hannover 30419 (Germany); Chichkov, Boris N., E-mail: b.chichkov@lzh.de [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany)

    2013-06-10

    Cell binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell and tissue functions. In this context, each tissue consists of a unique ECM composition, which may be responsible for tissue-specific cell responses. Due to the complexity of ECM-cell interactions—which depend on the interplay of inside-out and outside-in signaling cascades, cell and tissue specificity of ECM-guidance is poorly understood. In this paper, we investigate the role of different ECM components like laminin, fibronectin, and collagen type I with respect to the essential cell behaviour patterns: attachment dynamics such as adhesion kinetic and force, formation of focal adhesion complexes, morphology, proliferation, and intercellular communication. A detailed in vitro comparison of fibroblasts, endothelial cells, osteoblasts, smooth muscle cells, and chondrocytes reveals significant differences in their cell responses to the ECM: cell behaviour follows a cell specific ligand priority ranking, which was independent of the cell type origin. Fibroblasts responded best to fibronectin, chondrocytes best to collagen I, the other cell types best to laminin. This knowledge is essential for optimization of tissue-biomaterial interfaces in all tissue engineering applications and gives insight into tissue-specific cell guidance. -- Highlights: • We analyse the impact of ECM components on cell behaviour in vitro. • We compare five different cell types, using the same culture conditions. • The ECM significantly guides all cell responses. • Cell behaviour follows a cell specific ligand-priority ranking. • This gives insight in tissue formation and is essential for biomedical applications.

  17. Carbonate fuel cell and components thereof for in-situ delayed addition of carbonate electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Richard [Waterbury, CT; Yuh, Chao-Yi [New Milford, CT; Farooque, Mohammad [Danbury, CT

    2011-05-10

    An apparatus and method in which a delayed carbonate electrolyte is stored in the storage areas of a non-electrolyte matrix fuel cell component and is of a preselected content so as to obtain a delayed time release of the electrolyte in the storage areas in the operating temperature range of the fuel cell.

  18. 21 CFR 864.2220 - Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components. 864.2220 Section 864.2220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture...

  19. Conversion of laser energy to chemical energy by the photoassisted electrolysis of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrighton, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation of the n-type semiconductor TiO2 crystal electrode of an aqueous electrochemical cell evolves O2 at the TiO2 electrode and H2 at the Pt electrode. The gases are typically evolved in a 2:1 (H2:O2) volume ratio. The photoassisted reaction seems to require applied voltages, but values as low as 0.25 V do allow the photoassisted electrolysis to proceed. Prolonged irradiation in either acid or base evolves the gaseous products in amounts which clearly demonstrate that the reaction is catalytic with respect to the TiO2. The wavelength response of the TiO2 and the correlation of product yield and current are reported. The results support the claim that TiO2 is a true photoassistance agent for the electrolysis of water. Minimum optical storage efficiencies of the order of 1 percent can be achieved by the production of H2.

  20. Development of Non-Platinum Catalysts for Intermediate Temperature Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich; Petrushina, Irina Michailovna; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Water electrolysis is recognized as an efficient energy storage (in the form of hydrogen) supplement in renewable energy production. However, industrial alkaline water electrolyzers are rather ineffective and space requiring for a commercial use in connection with energy storage. The most effective...... modern water electrolyzers are based on polymeric proton-conducting membrane electrolytes (PEM), e.g. Nafion®, a perfluorocarbon-sulfonic acid polymer. These electrolyzers work at temperatures up to around 80 °C, and, in extreme cases, up to 130-140 °C. The most developed PEM electrolyzers...... as electrolytes for the intermediate temperature applications, such as CsHSO4, KHSO45. The most successful systems have been developed with CsH2PO4 (solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) and Sn0.9In0.1P2O7 electrolytes6,7. While developing materials for the promising medium temperature electrolysis systems...

  1. Test results of six-month test of two water electrolysis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, E. S.; Wells, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    The two water electrolysis systems used in the NASA space station simulation 90-day manned test of a regenerative life support system were refurbished as required and subjected to 26-weeks of testing. The two electrolysis units are both promising systems for oxygen and hydrogen generation and both needed extensive long-term testing to evaluate the performance of the respective cell design and provide guidance for further development. Testing was conducted to evaluate performance in terms of current, pressure, variable oxygen demands, and orbital simulation. An automatic monitoring system was used to record, monitor and printout performance data at one minute, ten minute or one-hour intervals. Performance data is presented for each day of system operation for each module used during the day. Failures are analyzed, remedial action taken to eliminate problems is discussed and recommendations for redesign for future space applications are stated.

  2. Development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures. Task 3 report; Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkous, C.A.; Anderson, R.; Kopitzke, R.W.

    1995-12-01

    This project is an attempt to synthesize and fabricate proton exchange membranes for hydrogen production via water electrolysis that can take advantage of the better kinetic and thermodynamic conditions that exist at higher temperatures. Current PEM technology is limited to the 125--150 C range. Based on previous work evaluating thermohydrolytic stability, some 5 families of polymers were chosen as viable candidates: polyether ketones, polyether sulfones, fluorinated polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenyl quinoxalines. Several of these have been converted into ionomers via sulfonation and fashioned into membranes for evaluation. In particular, the sulfonated polyetheretherketone, or SPEEK, was tested for water uptake, thermo-conductimetric analysis, and performance as the solid electrolyte material in an electrolysis cell. Results comparable to commercial perfluorocarbon sulfonates were obtained.

  3. Detection of the Merkel cell polyomavirus in the neuroendocrine component of combined Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervarrec, Thibault; Samimi, Mahtab; Gaboriaud, Pauline; Gheit, Tarik; Beby-Defaux, Agnès; Houben, Roland; Schrama, David; Fromont, Gaëlle; Tommasino, Massimo; Le Corre, Yannick; Hainaut-Wierzbicka, Eva; Aubin, Francois; Bens, Guido; Maillard, Hervé; Furudoï, Adeline; Michenet, Patrick; Touzé, Antoine; Guyétant, Serge

    2018-05-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. The main etiological agent is Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), detected in 80% of cases. About 5% of cases, called combined MCC, feature an admixture of neuroendocrine and non-neuroendocrine tumor cells. Reports of the presence or absence of MCPyV in combined MCC are conflicting, most favoring the absence, which suggests that combined MCC might have independent etiological factors and pathogenesis. These discrepancies might occur with the use of different virus identification assays, with different sensitivities. In this study, we aimed to determine the viral status of combined MCC by a multimodal approach. We histologically reviewed 128 cases of MCC and sub-classified them as "combined" or "conventional." Both groups were compared by clinical data (age, sex, site, American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] stage, immunosuppression, risk of recurrence, and death during follow-up) and immunochemical features (cytokeratin 20 and 7, thyroid transcription factor 1 [TTF1], p53, large T antigen [CM2B4], CD8 infiltrates). After a first calibration step with 12 conventional MCCs and 12 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas as controls, all eight cases of combined MCC were investigated for MCPyV viral status by combining two independent molecular procedures. Furthermore, on multiplex genotyping assay, the samples were examined for the presence of other polyoma- and papillomaviruses. Combined MCC differed from conventional MCC in earlier AJCC stage, increased risk of recurrence and death, decreased CD8 infiltrates, more frequent TTF1 positivity (5/8), abnormal p53 expression (8/8), and frequent lack of large T antigen expression (7/8). With the molecular procedure, half of the combined MCC cases were positive for MCPyV in the neuroendocrine component. Beta papillomaviruses were detected in 5/8 combined MCC cases and 9/12 conventional MCC cases. In conclusion, the detection of MCPyV DNA in half of

  4. Preliminary estimations on the heat recovery method for hydrogen production by the high temperature steam electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Duck Joo

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the project 'development of hydrogen production technologies by high temperature electrolysis using very high temperature reactor', we have developed an electrolyzer model for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) system and carried out some preliminary estimations on the effects of heat recovery on the HTSE hydrogen production system. To produce massive hydrogen by using nuclear energy, the HTSE process is one of the promising technologies with sulfur-iodine and hybrid sulfur process. The HTSE produces hydrogen through electrochemical reaction within the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), which is a reverse reaction of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The HTSE system generally operates in the temperature range of 700∼900 .deg. C. Advantages of HTSE hydrogen production are (a) clean hydrogen production from water without carbon oxide emission, (b) synergy effect due to using the current SOFC technology and (c) higher thermal efficiency of system when it is coupled nuclear reactor. Since the HTSE system operates over 700 .deg. C, the use of heat recovery is an important consideration for higher efficiency. In this paper, four different heat recovery configurations for the HTSE system have been investigated and estimated

  5. Stimulated human mast cells secrete mitochondrial components that have autocrine and paracrine inflammatory actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodi Zhang

    Full Text Available Mast cells are hematopoietically-derived tissue immune cells that participate in acquired and innate immunity, as well as in inflammation through release of many chemokines and cytokines, especially in response to the pro-inflammatory peptide substance P (SP. Inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of many diseases, but the trigger(s is often unknown. We investigated if mast cell stimulation leads to secretion of mitochondrial components and whether these could elicit autocrine and/or paracrine inflammatory effects. Here we show that human LAD2 mast cells stimulated by IgE/anti-IgE or by the SP led to secretion of mitochondrial particles, mitochondrial (mt mtDNA and ATP without cell death. Mitochondria purified from LAD2 cells and, when mitochondria added to mast cells trigger degranulation and release of histamine, PGD(2, IL-8, TNF, and IL-1β. This stimulatory effect is partially inhibited by an ATP receptor antagonist and by DNAse. These results suggest that the mitochondrial protein fraction may also contribute. Purified mitochondria also stimulate IL-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF release from cultured human keratinocytes, and VEGF release from primary human microvascular endothelial cells. In order to investigate if mitochondrial components could be secreted in vivo, we injected rats intraperiotoneally (ip with compound 48/80, which mimicks the action of SP. Peritoneal mast cells degranulated and mitochondrial particles were documented by transimission electron microscopy outside the cells. We also wished to investigate if mitochondrial components secreted locally could reach the systemic circulation. Administration ip of mtDNA isolated from LAD2 cells in rats was detected in their serum within 4 hr, indicating that extravascular mtDNA could enter the systemic circulation. Secretion of mitochondrial components from stimulated live mast cells may act as "autopathogens" contributing to the pathogenesis of inflammatory

  6. Percutaneous treatment of pulmonary tumors by electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, L.; Joensson, L.; Stahl, E.

    1983-06-01

    Five lung tumors in four patients were treated with electrolysis. One of the tumors was probably primary, while the others were metastases. Under local anesthesia, two or three platinum electrodes (diameter 3 mm) were introduced through the thoracic wall into the lung tumor using biplane fluoroscopy. The patient was sedated before the procedure and a chest tube was inserted into the pleural cavity. Between anode and cathode a direct current of 80 mA and 10 V was passed during 2-4 h, creating substantial electrolytic destruction mainly through chlorine liberation. Observations at autopsy, surgery, chest X-ray, and CT showed that 60%-80% of the tumor mass was destroyed. No tumor was completely destroyed. The patients stood the procedure well.

  7. Economic Analysis of Improved Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm; Ketelaer, Thomas; Koj, Jan Christian

    2017-01-01

    Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is a mature hydrogen production technology and there exists a range of economic assessments for available technologies. For advanced AWEs, which may be based on novel polymer-based membrane concepts, it is of prime importance that development comes along with new configurations and technical and economic key process parameters for AWE that might be of interest for further economic assessments. This paper presents an advanced AWE technology referring to three different sites in Europe (Germany, Austria, and Spain). The focus is on financial metrics, the projection of key performance parameters of advanced AWEs, and further financial and tax parameters. For financial analysis from an investor’s (business) perspective, a comprehensive assessment of a technology not only comprises cost analysis but also further financial analysis quantifying attractiveness and supply/market flexibility. Therefore, based on cash flow (CF) analysis, a comprehensible set of metrics may comprise levelised cost of energy or, respectively, levelized cost of hydrogen (LCH) for cost assessment, net present value (NPV) for attractiveness analysis, and variable cost (VC) for analysis of market flexibility. The German AWE site turns out to perform best in all three financial metrics (LCH, NPV, and VC). Though there are slight differences in investment cost and operation and maintenance cost projections for the three sites, the major cost impact is due to the electricity cost. Although investment cost is slightly lower and labor cost is significantly lower in Spain, the difference can not outweigh the higher electricity cost compared to Germany. Given the assumption that the electrolysis operators are customers directly and actively participating in power markets, and based on the regulatory framework in the three countries, in this special case electricity cost in Germany is lowest. However, as electricity cost is profoundly influenced by political decisions as

  8. Economic Analysis of Improved Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm, E-mail: w.kuckshinrichs@fz-juelich.de; Ketelaer, Thomas; Koj, Jan Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Energy and Climate Research – Systems Analysis and Technology Evaluation (IEK-STE), Juelich (Germany)

    2017-02-20

    Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is a mature hydrogen production technology and there exists a range of economic assessments for available technologies. For advanced AWEs, which may be based on novel polymer-based membrane concepts, it is of prime importance that development comes along with new configurations and technical and economic key process parameters for AWE that might be of interest for further economic assessments. This paper presents an advanced AWE technology referring to three different sites in Europe (Germany, Austria, and Spain). The focus is on financial metrics, the projection of key performance parameters of advanced AWEs, and further financial and tax parameters. For financial analysis from an investor’s (business) perspective, a comprehensive assessment of a technology not only comprises cost analysis but also further financial analysis quantifying attractiveness and supply/market flexibility. Therefore, based on cash flow (CF) analysis, a comprehensible set of metrics may comprise levelised cost of energy or, respectively, levelized cost of hydrogen (LCH) for cost assessment, net present value (NPV) for attractiveness analysis, and variable cost (VC) for analysis of market flexibility. The German AWE site turns out to perform best in all three financial metrics (LCH, NPV, and VC). Though there are slight differences in investment cost and operation and maintenance cost projections for the three sites, the major cost impact is due to the electricity cost. Although investment cost is slightly lower and labor cost is significantly lower in Spain, the difference can not outweigh the higher electricity cost compared to Germany. Given the assumption that the electrolysis operators are customers directly and actively participating in power markets, and based on the regulatory framework in the three countries, in this special case electricity cost in Germany is lowest. However, as electricity cost is profoundly influenced by political decisions as

  9. Innovative Procedure for fhe, In Situ, Measurement of the Resistive Thermal Coefficient Of H(D)/Pd During Electrolysis; Cross-Comparison of New Elements Detected in The Th–Hg–Pd–D(H) Electrolytic Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Celani, F; Righi, E; Trenta, G; Catena, C; D’Agostaro, G; Quercia, P; Andreassi, V; Marini, P; Di Stefano, V; Nakamura, M; Mancini, A; Sona, P G; Fontana, F; Gamberale, L; Garbelli, D; Celia, E; Falcioni, F; Marchesini, M; Novaro, E; Mastromatteo, U

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of cold fusion studies one of the most important parameters is the deuterium (D) to palladium (Pd) ratio, D/Pd. It is well known that the value of this parameter is related to the normalised resistivity (R/R0) of the D–Pd system. When at high D/Pd ratios (i.e. at low R/R0 values) some excess heat occurs, the Pd wire temperature increase and, as a consequence, the apparent R/R0 value also increases. This effect might give raise to ambiguous data interpretation: similar results are in fact expected in case of a Pd wire degassing (i.e. decreasing of D/Pd ratio). To solve this problem, we developed an innovative procedure and a suitable experimental set-up for the in situ measurement of the Resistive Temperature Coefficient (which is affected only by the real D/Pd ratio) during electrolysis. We will report the results on the hydrogen and deuterium loading of thin (50 µm), and long (60 cm) Pd wires, immersed in a solution of C2H5OD (or C2H5OH) and D2O (or H2O), with addition of thorium (Th) a...

  10. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  11. Thermal dynamic analysis of sulfur removal from coal by electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Gao, J.; Meng, F. [Qinghua University, Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering

    2002-06-01

    The electrolytic reactions about sulfur removal from coal were studied by using chemical thermal dynamic analysis. According to the thermodynamical data, the Gibbs free energy value of the electrolytic reactions of pyritic and organic sulfur removal from coal is higher than zero. So, these electrolytic reactions are not spontaneous chemical reactions. In order to carry out desulfurisation by electrolysis, a certain voltage is necessary and important. Because theoretic decomposition voltage of pyrite and some parts of organic sulfur model compound is not very high, electrolysis reactions are easily to be carried out by using electrolysis technology. Mn ion and Fe ion are added into electrolysis solutions to accelerate the desulfurisation reaction. The electrolytic decomposition of coal is discussed. Because the theoretical decomposition voltage of some organic model compound is not high, the coal decomposition might happen. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Advanced Additive Manufacturing Feedstock from Molten Regolith Electrolysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate the feasibility of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) Reactor start by initiating resistive-heating of the regolith past its melting point using...

  13. Micro-electrolysis technology for industrial wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Yue-Feng; Li, Wei

    2003-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the role of micro-electrolysis in removing chromaticity and COD and improving the biodegradability of wastewater from pharmaceutical, dye-printing and papermaking plants. Results showed that the use of micro-electrolysis technology could remove more than 90% of chromaticity and more than 50% of COD and greatly improved the biodegradability of pharmaceutical wastewater. Lower initial pH could be advantageous to the removal of chromaticity. A retention time of 30 minutes was recommended for the process design of micro-electrolysis. For the use of micro-electrolysis in treatment of dye-printing wastewater, the removal rates of both chromaticity and COD were increased from neutral condition to acid condition for disperse blue wastewater; more than 90% of chromaticity and more than 50% of COD could be removed in neutral condition for vital red wastewater.

  14. Chemically durable polymer electrolytes for solid-state alkaline water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Joo; Capuano, Christopher B.; Ayers, Katherine E.; Bae, Chulsung

    2018-01-01

    Generation of high purity hydrogen using electrochemical splitting of water is one of the most promising methods for sustainable fuel production. The materials to be used as solid-state electrolytes for alkaline water electrolyzer require high thermochemical stability against hydroxide ion attack in alkaline environment during the operation of electrolysis. In this study, two quaternary ammonium-tethered aromatic polymers were synthesized and investigated for anion exchange membrane (AEM)-based alkaline water electrolyzer. The membranes properties including ion exchange capacity (IEC), water uptake, swelling degree, and anion conductivity were studied. The membranes composed of all C-C bond polymer backbones and flexible side chain terminated by cation head groups exhibited remarkably good chemical stability by maintaining structural integrity in 1 M NaOH solution at 95 °C for 60 days. Initial electrochemical performance and steady-state operation performance were evaluated, and both membranes showed a good stabilization of the cell voltage during the steady-state operation at the constant current density at 200 mA/cm2. Although both membranes in current form require improvement in mechanical stability to afford better durability in electrolysis operation, the next generation AEMs based on this report could lead to potentially viable AEM candidates which can provide high electrolysis performance under alkaline operating condition.

  15. Carbon components in the phosphoric acid fuel cell-an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, J.

    1983-01-01

    The single breakthrough that has made the phosphoric acid fuel cell a practical reality has been the use of carbon or graphite components for the repeat parts of the cell stack. While the thermodynamic stability of carbon is such that rapid corrosion would be expected at the cathode at fuel cell operating temperature, its kinetic stability is remarkable despite the absence of passivating layers analogous to those on, for example, the Group VA elements niobium and tantalum. This happy accident, combined with the adequate electronic conductivity of the carbon materials used, has provided the opportunity to reduce fuel cell cost to attractive levels. The development of these carbon compounds is reviewed

  16. Improving The Efficiency Of Ammonia Electrolysis For Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Ramasamy

    electrolysis. PAA-K allowed for a wider operating potential for the electrolytic cell while increasing the rate for HER at lower cell voltages. The conversion of ammonia improved from 16 % to 25 %, while the current efficiency for the consumption of ammonia increased from 92 +/- 1 % to 97 +/- 2 % by using PAA-K in lieu of KOH. The use of PAA-K also prevented the crossover of the hydrogen produced to the anode side, unlike aqueous KOH.

  17. The micro-electrolysis technique in waste water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiti Zhou; Weihen Yang; Fenglin Yang; Xuemin Xiang; Yulu Wang

    1997-01-01

    The micro-electrolysis is one of the efficient methods to treat some kinds of waste water. The experiments have shown its high efficiency in sewage treatment and some kinds of industrial waste water. It is suitable for pre-treatment of high concentrated waste water and deep treatment of waste water for reuse purpose. The disadvantage of micro-electrolysis is its high energy consumption in case of high electrolyte concentration. (author) 2 figs., 11 tabs., 2 refs

  18. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production

  19. The micro-electrolysis technique in waste water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiti Zhou; Weihen Yang; Fenglin Yang; Xuemin Xiang; Yulu Wang [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China)

    1997-12-31

    The micro-electrolysis is one of the efficient methods to treat some kinds of waste water. The experiments have shown its high efficiency in sewage treatment and some kinds of industrial waste water. It is suitable for pre-treatment of high concentrated waste water and deep treatment of waste water for reuse purpose. The disadvantage of micro-electrolysis is its high energy consumption in case of high electrolyte concentration. (author) 2 figs., 11 tabs., 2 refs.

  20. Cell culture medium improvement by rigorous shuffling of components using media blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Martin; Voisard, Damien; Berthoud, Antoine; Tercier, Laetitia; Kleuser, Beate; Baer, Gianni; Broly, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    A novel high-throughput methodology for the simultaneous optimization of many cell culture media components is presented. The method is based on the media blending approach which has several advantages as it works with ready-to-use media. In particular it allows precise pH and osmolarity adjustments and eliminates the need of concentrated stock solutions, a frequent source of serious solubility issues. In addition, media blending easily generates a large number of new compositions providing a remarkable screening tool. However, media blending designs usually do not provide information on distinct factors or components that are causing the desired improvements. This paper addresses this last point by considering the concentration of individual medium components to fix the experimental design and for the interpretation of the results. The extended blending strategy was used to reshuffle the 20 amino acids in one round of experiments. A small set of 10 media was specifically designed to generate a large number of mixtures. 192 mixtures were then prepared by media blending and tested on a recombinant CHO cell line expressing a monoclonal antibody. A wide range of performances (titers and viable cell density) was achieved from the different mixtures with top titers significantly above our previous results seen with this cell line. In addition, information about major effects of key amino acids on cell densities and titers could be extracted from the experimental results. This demonstrates that the extended blending approach is a powerful experimental tool which allows systematic and simultaneous reshuffling of multiple medium components.

  1. SILAC Proteomics of Planarians Identifies Ncoa5 as a Conserved Component of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Böser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA, which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research.

  2. Water vapor pressure over molten KH2PO4 and demonstration of water electrolysis at ∼300ºC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich; Petrushina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    A new potentially high-efficiency electrolyte for water electrolysis: molten monobasic potassium phosphate, KH2PO4 or KDP has been investigated at temperatures ∼275–325 °C. At these temperatures, KH2PO4 was found to dissociate into H2O gas in equilibrium with a melt mixture of KH2PO4—K2H2P2O7—KPO3...... of water and methane or hydrogen to be 0.40 ± 0.02 or 1.2 ± 0.03. At equilibrium the vapor pressure was much lower than the vapor pressure above liquid water at the same temperature. Electrolysis was realized by passing current through closed ampoules (vacuum sealed quartz glass electrolysis cells...... with platinum electrodes and the electrolyte melt). The formation of mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen gases as well as the water vapor was detected by Raman spectroscopy. In this way it was demonstrated that water is present in the new electrolyte: molten KH2PO4 can be split by electrolysis via the reaction 2H2O...

  3. Soy Components Genistein and Lunasin Regulate E-Cadherin and Wnt Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enhanced Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of tumorigenesis. We previously showed by microarray gene profiling that dietary intake of soy-based AIN-93G diets altered components of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in rat mammary epithelial cells. To furth...

  4. Examination of water phase transitions in Loblolly pine and cell wall components by differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Michael J. Lambrecht; Samuel V. Glass; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Daniel J. Yelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines phase transformations of water in wood and isolated wood cell wall components using differential scanning calorimetry with the purpose of better understanding "Type II water" or "freezable bound water" that has been reported for cellulose and other hydrophilic polymers. Solid loblolly pine (Pinus taeda...

  5. Water vapor pressure over molten KH_2PO_4 and demonstration of water electrolysis at ∼300 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, R.W.; Nikiforov, A.V.; Petrushina, I.M.; Bjerrum, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The vapor pressure over molten KH_2PO_4 was measured by Raman spectroscopy to be about 8 bars at ∼300 °C. • Raman spectroscopy shows that molten KH_2PO_4 under its own vapor pressure contains much dissolved water. • It is demonstrated spectroscopically that water electrolysis is possible in KH_2PO_4 electrolyte forming H_2 and O_2 at 300 °C. • Molten KH_2PO_4 is a possible electrolyte for water electrolysis. - Abstract: A new potentially high-efficiency electrolyte for water electrolysis: molten monobasic potassium phosphate, KH_2PO_4 or KDP has been investigated at temperatures ∼275–325 °C. At these temperatures, KH_2PO_4 was found to dissociate into H_2O gas in equilibrium with a melt mixture of KH_2PO_4−K_2H_2P_2O_7−KPO_3−H_2O. The water vapor pressure above the melt, when contained in a closed ampoule, was determined quantitatively vs. temperature by use of Raman spectroscopy with methane or hydrogen gas as an internal calibration standard, using newly established relative ratios of Raman scattering cross sections of water and methane or hydrogen to be 0.40 ± 0.02 or 1.2 ± 0.03. At equilibrium the vapor pressure was much lower than the vapor pressure above liquid water at the same temperature. Electrolysis was realized by passing current through closed ampoules (vacuum sealed quartz glass electrolysis cells with platinum electrodes and the electrolyte melt). The formation of mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen gases as well as the water vapor was detected by Raman spectroscopy. In this way it was demonstrated that water is present in the new electrolyte: molten KH_2PO_4 can be split by electrolysis via the reaction 2H_2O → 2H_2 + O_2 at temperatures ∼275–325 °C. At these temperatures, before the start of the electrolysis, the KH_2PO_4 melt gives off H_2O gas that pressurizes the cell according to the following dissociations: 2KH_2PO_4 ↔ K_2H_2P_2O_7 + H_2O ↔ 2KPO_3 + 2H_2O. The spectra show however that the water by

  6. Effects of dendritic cell vaccine activated with protein components of toxoplasma gondii on tumor specific CD8+ T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amari A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Dendritic Cell (DC is an important antigen-presenting cell that present tumor antigen to CD8+ and CD4+ T- Lymphocytes and induce specific anti-tumor immunity. In order to induce effective anti-tumor response, an option is increasing the efficiency of antigen presentation of dendritic cells and T cell activation capacity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dendritic cell maturation with protein components of toxoplasma gondii on cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and their infiltration in to the tumor."n"nMethods: For DC generation, bone marrow cells were cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for five days. After that, LPS, protein components and whole extract of toxoplasma gondii were added to the culture media and incubated for another two days for DC maturation. To generate tumor, mices were injected subcutaneously with WEHI-164 cell line. For immunotherapy 106 DCs matured with different compounds were injected around the tumor site. Infiltration of CD8+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry and cytotoxic activity was measured by LDH detection kit."n"nResults: Immunotherapy with DCs treated with protein components of toxoplasma gondii led to a significant increase in the

  7. Porous poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) membranes for alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Hansen, Martin Kalmar; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2015-01-01

    Poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) (PFSA) is one of a few polymer types that combine excellent alkali resistance with extreme hydrophilicity. It is therefore of interest as a base material in separators for alkaline water electrolyzers. In the pristine form it, however, shows high cation selectivity. T...... for the unmodified membrane. The technological feasibility was demonstrated by testing the membranes in an alkaline water electrolysis cell with encouraging performance.......Poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) (PFSA) is one of a few polymer types that combine excellent alkali resistance with extreme hydrophilicity. It is therefore of interest as a base material in separators for alkaline water electrolyzers. In the pristine form it, however, shows high cation selectivity...... and washed out and the obtained porous materials allowed for swelling to reach water contents up to λ=85 [H2O] [−SO3K]−1. After equilibration in 22 wt% aqueous KOH, ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm−1 was recorded for this membrane type at room temperature, which is significantly higher than 0.01 S cm−1...

  8. The expression of essential components for human influenza virus internalisation in Vero and MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugiyadi, Maharani; Tan, Marselina I; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati A; Zuhairi, Fawzi R; Sumarsono, Sony H

    2014-05-01

    MDCK and Vero cell lines have been used as substrates for influenza virus replication. However, Vero cells produced lower influenza virus titer yield compared to MDCK. Influenza virus needs molecules for internalisation of the virus into the host cell, such as influenza virus receptor and clathrin. Human influenza receptor is usually a membrane protein containing Sia(α2,6) Gal, which is added into the protein in the golgi apparatus by α2,6 sialyltransferase (SIAT1). Light clathrin A (LCA), light clathrin B (LCB) and heavy clathrin (HC) are the main components needed for virus endocytosis. Therefore, it is necessary to compare the expression of SIAT1 and clathrin in Vero and MDCK cells. This study is reporting the expression of SIAT1 and clathrin observed in both cells with respect to the levels of (1) RNA by using RT-PCR, (2) protein by using dot blot analysis and confocal microscope. The results showed that Vero and MDCK cells expressed both SIAT1 and clathrin proteins, and the expression of SIAT1 in MDCK was higher compared to Vero cells. On the other hand, the expressions of LCA, LCB and HC protein in MDCK cells were not significantly different to Vero cells. This result showed that the inability of Vero cells to internalize H1N1 influenza virus was possibly due to the lack of transmembrane protein receptor which contained Sia(α2,6) Gal.

  9. Lunar Metal Oxide Electrolysis with Oxygen and Photovoltaic Array Production Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A.; Ethridge, E.; Hudson, S.; Sen, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a Marshall Space Flight Center funded effort to conduct an experimental demonstration of the processing of simulated lunar resources by the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process to produce oxygen and metal from lunar resources to support human exploration of space. Oxygen extracted from lunar materials can be used for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements produced can be used for in situ fabrication of thin-film solar cells for power production. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis, MOE, is chosen for extraction, since the electron is the most practical reducing agent. MOE was also chosen for following reasons. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. In the experiments reported here, melts containing iron oxide were electrolyzed in a low temperature supporting oxide electrolyte (developed by D. Sadoway, MIT). The production of oxygen and reduced iron were observed. Electrolysis was also performed on the supporting electrolyte with JSC-1 Lunar Simulant. The cell current for the supporting electrolyte alone is negligible while the current for the electrolyte with JSC-1 shows significant current and a peak at about -0.6 V indicating reductive reaction in the simulant.

  10. Reactions on carbon anodes in aluminium electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidet, Trygve

    1997-12-31

    The consumption of carbon anodes and energy in aluminium electrolysis is higher than what is required theoretically. This thesis studies the most important of the reactions that consume anode materials. These reactions are the electrochemical anode reaction and the airburn and carboxy reactions. The first part of the thesis deals with the kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical anode reaction using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The second part deals with air and carboxy reactivity of carbon anodes and studies the effects of inorganic impurities on the reactivity of carbon anodes in the aluminium industry. Special attention is given to sulphur since its effect on the carbon gasification is not well understood. Sulphur is always present in anodes, and it is expected that the sulphur content of available anode cokes will increase in the future. It has also been suggested that sulphur poisons catalyzing impurities in the anodes. Other impurities that were investigated are iron, nickel and vanadium, which are common impurities in anodes which have been reported to catalyze carbon gasification. 88 refs., 92 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. Accelerated testing of fuel cell components in 2 x 2 inch fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, A.J.; Adams, A.A.; Joebstl, J.A.; Walker, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of diagnostic procedures which can be used to predict failure modes and assess the effects of these failures on fuel cell performance. Some straightforward diagnostic techniques have been used to evaluate fuel cells assembled with a variety of matrix and electrode combinations. These techniques included accelerated on-off cycling, thermal cycling with H2/CO mixtures, and automatic polarization measurements. Information has been obtained concerning the effects of electrolyte management and catalyst poisoning on performance and lifetime characteristics of 2 x 2 in. single cells. The use of on-off cycling has shown that short-term fuel cell performance is generally unaffected by load changes and cycle sequence in 2 x 2 in. cells when electrolyte management is adequate. Dynamic polarization curves can be used instead of point by point steady-state plots without any loss in accuracy

  12. High Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and CO2 in an SOC stack: Performance and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    C and -0.5 A/cm2 with no long term degradation, as long as the inlet gases to the Ni/YSZ electrode were cleaned [3]. In this work, co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide was studied in a TOFC® 10-cell stack, containing 3 different types ofNi/YSZ electrode supported cells with a footprint of 12X12 cm2....... The stack was operated at 800 oC and -0.75 A/cm2 with 60% conversion for a period of 1000 hours. One type of the cells showed no long term degradation but actually activation during the entire electrolysis period, while the other two types degraded. The performance and durability of the different cell types...... is discussed with respect to cell material composition and microstructure. The results of this study show that long term electrolysis is feasible without notable degradation also at lower temperature (800 oC) and higher current density (-0.75 A/cm2)....

  13. From Oxygen Generation to Metals Production: In Situ Resource Utilization by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetpal, Deepak; Ducret, Andrew C.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    For the exploration of other bodies in the solar system, electrochemical processing is arguably the most versatile technology for conversion of local resources into usable commodities: by electrolysis one can, in principle, produce (1) breathable oxygen, (2) silicon for the fabrication of solar cells, (3) various reactive metals for use as electrodes in advanced storage batteries, and (4) structural metals such as steel and aluminum. Even so, to date there has been no sustained effort to develop such processes, in part due to the inadequacy of the database. The objective here is to identify chemistries capable of sustaining molten oxide electrolysis in the cited applications and to examine the behavior of laboratory-scale cells designed to generate oxygen and to produce metal. The basic research includes the study of the underlying high-temperature physical chemistry of oxide melts representative of lunar regolith and of Martian soil. To move beyond empirical approaches to process development, the thermodynamic and transport properties of oxide melts are being studied to help set the limits of composition and temperature for the processing trials conducted in laboratory-scale electrolysis cells. The goal of this investigation is to deliver a working prototype cell that can use lunar regolith and Martian soil to produce breathable oxygen along with metal by-product. Additionally, the process can be generalized to permit adaptation to accommodate different feedstock chemistries, such as those that will be encountered on other bodies in the solar system. The expected results of this research include: (1) the identification of appropriate electrolyte chemistries; (2) the selection of candidate anode and cathode materials compatible with electrolytes named above; and (3) performance data from a laboratory-scale cell producing oxygen and metal. On the strength of these results it should be possible to assess the technical viability of molten oxide electrolysis for in

  14. Clinicopathologic and Molecular Features of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma with Signet-Ring Cell Component.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wei

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective study to assess the clinicopathological characters, molecular alterations and multigene mutation profiles in colorectal cancer patients with signet-ring cell component.Between November 2008 and January 2015, 61 consecutive primary colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were available for pathological confirmation. RAS/BRAF status was performed by direct sequencing. 14 genes associated with hereditary cancer syndromes were analyzed by targeted gene sequencing.A slight male predominance was detected in these patients (59.0%. Colorectal carcinomas with signet-ring cell component were well distributed along the large intestine. A frequently higher TNM stage at the time of diagnosis was observed, compared with the conventional adenocarcinoma. Family history of malignant tumor was remarkable with 49.2% in 61 cases. The median OS time of stage IV patients in our study was 14 months. RAS mutations were detected in 22.2% (12/54 cases with KRAS mutations in 16.7% (9/54 cases and Nras mutations in 5.4%(3/54 cases. BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 3.7% (2/54 cases. As an exploration, we analyzed 14 genes by targeted gene sequencing. These genes were selected based on their biological role in association with hereditary cancer syndromes. 79.6% cases carried at least one pathogenic mutation. Finally, the patients were classified by the percentage of signet-ring cell. 39 (63.9% cases were composed of ≥50% signet-ring cells; 22 (36.1% cases were composed of <50% signet-ring cells. We compared clinical parameters, molecular and genetic alterations between the two groups and found no significant differences.Colorectal adenocarcinoma with signet-ring cell component is characterized by advanced stage at diagnosis with remarkable family history of malignant tumor. It is likely a negative prognostic factor and tends to affect male patients with low rates of RAS /BRAF mutation. Colorectal patients with any component of

  15. 1-N-aminoindol derivatives synthesis in no aqueous means from the 1, 4-dihydrocinnoline obtained by electrolysis in continuous flow redox cell; Sintesis de derivados del 1-N-aminoindol en medios no acuosos a partir de la 1, 4-dihidrocinolina obtenida por electrolisis en celda redox de flujo continuo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frontana-Uribe, Bernardo A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Moinet, Claude [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Organometalliques UMR, Paris (France)

    1999-08-01

    This work describes the synthesis of 1-N-aminoindol derivatives in organic anhydrous media from 1, 4-dihydrocinnoline. 1, 4-dihydrocinnoline 4 is obtained by electrolysis of 2-(orto-notropheny)-ethylamine 1a in a continuous flow redox cell. The cinnoline ring contraction products are obtained in low yield, but they show the possibility to carry out the reaction in organic media without water addition, as it was noted in previous works. [Spanish] En este trabajo se describe la sintesis de derivados del 1-N-aminoindol en medios anhidros a partir de la 1, 4-dihidrocinolina 4. Esta se obtiene mediante la electrolisis de la 2-(orto-notrofenil)-etilamina 1a en celda redox de flujo continuo. Los productos de contraccion del ciclo de la cinolina en 1-N-aminoindol se obtiene en rendimiento bajo, pero demuestran la posibilidad de llevar a cabo esta reaccion en medios totalmente organicos, sin la necesidad de la adicion de agua en el medio de reaccion, como esta descrito en trabajos precedentes.

  16. Electrolysis with diamond anodes: Eventually, there are refractory species!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Ismael F; Cotillas, Salvador; Díaz, Elena; Sáez, Cristina; Rodríguez, Juan J; Cañizares, P; Mohedano, Ángel F; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2018-03-01

    In this work, synthetic wastewater polluted with ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (Bmim) bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (NTf 2 ) undergoes four electrolytic treatments with diamond anodes (bare electrolysis, electrolysis enhanced with peroxosulfate promoters, irradiated with UV light and with US) and results obtained were compared with those obtained with the application of Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation (CWPO). Despite its complex heterocyclic structure, Bmim + cation is successfully depleted with the five technologies tested, being transformed into intermediates that eventually can be mineralized. Photoelectrolysis attained the lowest concentration of intermediates, while CWPO is the technology less efficient in their degradation. However, the most surprising result is that concentration of NTf 2 - anion does not change during the five advanced oxidation processes tested, pointing out its strong refractory character, being the first species that exhibits this character in wastewater undergoing electrolysis with diamond. This means that the hydroxyl and sulfate radicals mediated oxidation and the direct electrolysis are inefficient for breaking the C-S, C-F and S-N bounds of the NTf 2 - anion, which is a very interesting mechanistic information to understand the complex processes undergone in electrolysis with diamond. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought.

  18. A Small-Scale and Low-Cost Apparatus for the Electrolysis of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeen, Per-Odd; Kvittingen, Lise

    2004-01-01

    The construction of two simple, inexpensive apparatuses that clearly show the electrolysis of water are described. Traditionally the electrolysis of water is conducted in a Hofmann apparatus which is expensive and fragile.

  19. Diurnal Periodicity in the Supply of Cell Wall Components during Wood Cell Wall Formation

    OpenAIRE

    細尾, 佳宏

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes recent studies on the diurnal periodicity in wood cell wall formation, with a major focus on those that we have conducted. Differences in the innermost surface of developing secondary walls of differentiating conifer tracheids can be seen from day to night Cellulose microfibrils are clearly evident during the day, and amorphous material containing abundant hemicelluloses is prevalent at night. These findings suggest a diurnal periodicity in the supply of cell wall compo...

  20. Development of an advanced static feed water electrolysis module. [for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.; Jensen, F. C.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    A Static Feed Water Electrolysis Module (SFWEM) was developed to produce 0.92 kg/day (2.0 lb/day) of oxygen (O2). Specific objectives of the program's scope were to (1) eliminate the need for feed water cavity degassing, (2) eliminate the need for subsystem condenser/separators, (3) increase current density capability while decreasing electrolysis cell power (i.e., cell voltage) requirements, and (4) eliminate subsystem rotating parts and incorporate control and monitor instrumentation. A six-cell, one-man capacity module having an active area of 0.00929 sq m (0.10 sq ft) per cell was designed, fabricated, assembled, and subjected to 111 days (2664 hr) of parametric and endurance testing. The SFWEM was successfully operated over a current density range of 0 to 1076 mA/sq cm (0 to 1000 ASF), pressures of ambient to 2067 kN/sq m (300 psia), and temperatures of ambient to 366 K (200 F). During a 94-day endurance test, the SFWEM successfully demonstrated operation without the need for feed water compartment degassing.

  1. Design and Modelling of a Microfluidic Electro-Lysis Device with Controlling Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, A.; Chen, C. P.; Spearing, S.; Monaco, L. A.; Steele, A.; Flores, G.

    2006-04-01

    Many Lab-on-Chip applications require sample pre-treatment systems. Using electric fields to perform cell lysis in bio-MEMS systems has provided a powerful tool which can be integrated into Lab-on-a- Chip platforms. The major design considerations for electro-lysis devices include optimal geometry and placement of micro-electrodes, cell concentration, flow rates, optimal electric field (e.g. pulsed DC vs. AC), etc. To avoid electrolysis of the flowing solution at the exposed electrode surfaces, magnitudes and the applied voltages and duration of the DC pulse, or the AC frequency of the AC, have to be optimized for a given configuration. Using simulation tools for calculation of electric fields has proved very useful, for exploring alternative configurations and operating conditions for achieving electro cell-lysis. To alleviate the problem associated with low electric fields within the microfluidics channel and the high voltage demand on the contact electrode strips, two ''control plates'' are added to the microfluidics configuration. The principle of placing the two controlling plate-electrodes is based on the electric fields generated by a combined insulator/dielectric (glass/water) media. Surface charges are established at the insulator/dielectric interface. This paper discusses the effects of this interface charge on the modification of the electric field of the flowing liquid/cell solution.

  2. Main Quality Attributes of Monoclonal Antibodies and Effect of Cell Culture Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Behrouz

    2017-05-01

    The culture media optimization is an inevitable part of upstream process development in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) production. The quality by design (QbD) approach defines the assured quality of the final product through the development stage. An important step in QbD is determination of the main quality attributes. During the media optimization, some of the main quality attributes such as glycosylation pattern, charge variants, aggregates, and low-molecular-weight species, could be significantly altered. Here, we provide an overview of how cell culture medium components affects the main quality attributes of the mAbs. Knowing the relationship between the culture media components and the main quality attributes could be successfully utilized for a rational optimization of mammalian cell culture media for industrial mAbs production.

  3. Spectral network based on component cells under the SOPHIA European project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Rubén, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Antón, Ignacio; Askins, Steve; Sala, Gabriel [Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Domínguez, César; Voarino, Philippe [CEA-INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73375 Le Bourget-du-Lac (France); Steiner, Marc; Siefer, Gerald [Fraunhofer ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Fucci, Rafaelle; Roca, Franco [ENEA, P.le E.Fermi 1, Località Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy); Minuto, Alessandro; Morabito, Paolo [RSE, Via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    In the frame of the European project SOPHIA, a spectral network based on component (also called isotypes) cells has been created. Among the members of this project, several spectral sensors based on component cells and collimating tubes, so-called spectroheliometers, were installed in the last years, allowing the collection of minute-resolution spectral data useful for CPV systems characterization across Europe. The use of spectroheliometers has been proved useful to establish the necessary spectral conditions to perform power rating of CPV modules and systems. If enough data in a given period of time is collected, ideally a year, it is possible to characterize spectrally the place where measurements are taken, in the same way that hours of annual irradiation can be estimated using a pyrheliometer.

  4. Method of forming components for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Franklin C.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of forming a component for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell having a positive electrode including a sulfide selected from the group consisting of iron sulfides, nickel sulfides, copper sulfides and cobalt sulfides, a negative electrode including an alloy of aluminum and an electrically insulating porous separator between said electrodes. The improvement comprises forming a slurry of solid particles dispersed in a liquid electrolyte such as the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutetic, casting the slurry into a form having the shape of one of the components and smoothing the exposed surface of the slurry, cooling the cast slurry to form the solid component, and removing same. Electrodes and separators can be thus formed.

  5. Treatment results and prognostic factors of clear cell ovarian carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas with clear cell component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ahmedova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important prognostic factors for clear cell carcinoma (CCC are clinical and morphological signs and clinical stage of the disease. Analyses of 5-year survival in patients with I stage of CCC is 69 %, in II stage – 55 %, in III stage – 14 % and in IV stage – 4 % patients. We analyzed distant results of treatment of 71 patients with CCC and of 25 patients with mixed malignant ovaries neoplasm with obligatory clear cell component taking into consideration main clinical and morphological sings of disease. On the base of performed reseal we revealed that morphological structure of the tumors and stage of the disease exerted heist influence on the exponent of survival of the patients with clear CCC ovaries neoplasm. Besides, there is a correlation between exponent of patients’ survival and radicalized of surgery, character of tumor growth, differentiation degree, cell anaplasia and mitotic activity of tumor cells.

  6. Driving an Industry: Medium and Heavy Duty Fuel Cell Electric Truck Component Sizing

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinkoski, J.; Vijayagopal, R.; Kast, J.; Duran, A.

    2016-01-01

    Medium and heavy duty (MD and HD respectively) vehicles are responsible for 26 percent of the total U.S. transportation petroleum consumption [1]. Hydrogen fuel cells have demonstrated value as part of a portfolio of strategies for reducing petroleum use and emissions from MD and HD vehicles [2] [3], but their performance and range capabilities, and associated component sizing remain less clear when compared to other powertrains. This paper examines the suitability of converting a representat...

  7. A review of proton exchange membrane water electrolysis on degradation mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qi; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Liu, Gaoyang; Wei, Bing; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang

    2017-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE) is an advanced and effective solution to the primary energy storage technologies. A better understanding of performance and durability of PEMWE is critical for the engineers and researchers to further advance this technology for its market penetration, and for the manufacturers of PEM water electrolyzers to implement quality control procedures for the production line or on-site process monitoring/diagnosis. This paper reviews the published works on performance degradations and mitigation strategies for PEMWE. Sources of degradation for individual components are introduced. With degradation causes discussed and degradation mechanisms examined, the review emphasizes on feasible strategies to mitigate the components degradation. To avoid lengthy real lifetime degradation tests and their high costs, the importance of accelerated stress tests and protocols is highlighted for various components. In the end, R&D directions are proposed to move the PEMWE technology forward to become a key element in future energy scenarios.

  8. Electrolysis test of different composite membranes at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar

    temperatures, phosphoric acid (H3PO4)[1] and zirconium phosphate (ZrP)[2] were introduced. These composite membranes were tested in an electrolysis setup. A typical electrolysis test was performed at 130°C with a galvanostatic load. Polarization curves were recorded under stationary conditions. Testing...... night at 150°C in a zirconium phosphate saturated 85wt% phosphoric acid solution. Different thicknesses of membranes were tested and as expected, the performance increased when the thickness of the membranes decreased. Furthermore composite membranes only treated with phosphoric acid or only treated...

  9. Polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis: Restraining degradation in the presence of fluctuating power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakousky, Christoph; Reimer, Uwe; Wippermann, Klaus; Kuhri, Susanne; Carmo, Marcelo; Lueke, Wiebke; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-02-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) water electrolysis generates 'green' hydrogen when conducted with electricity from renewable - but fluctuating - sources like wind or solar photovoltaic. Unfortunately, the long-term stability of the electrolyzer performance is still not fully understood under these input power profiles. In this study, we contrast the degradation behavior of our PEM water electrolysis single cells that occurs under operation with constant and intermittent power and derive preferable operating states. For this purpose, five different current density profiles are used, of which two were constant and three dynamic. Cells operated at 1 A cm-2 show no degradation. However, degradation was observed for the remaining four profiles, all of which underwent periods of high current density (2 A cm-2). Hereby, constant operation at 2 A cm-2 led to the highest degradation rate (194 μV h-1). Degradation can be greatly reduced when the cells are operated with an intermittent profile. Current density switching has a positive effect on durability, as it causes reversible parts of degradation to recover and results in a substantially reduced degradation per mole of hydrogen produced. Two general degradation phenomena were identified, a decreased anode exchange current density and an increased contact resistance at the titanium porous transport layer (Ti-PTL).

  10. A study of water electrolysis using ionic polymer-metal composite for solar energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keow, Alicia; Chen, Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen gas can be harvested via the electrolysis of water. The gas is then fed into a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to produce electricity with clean emission. Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC), which is made from electroplating a proton-conductive polymer film called Nafion encourages ion migration and dissociation of water under application of external voltage. This property has been proven to be able to act as catalyst for the electrolysis of pure water. This renewable energy system is inspired by photosynthesis. By using solar panels to gather sunlight as the source of energy, the generation of electricity required to activate the IPMC electrolyser is acquired. The hydrogen gas is collected as storable fuel and can be converted back into energy using a commercial fuel cell. The goal of this research is to create a round-trip energy efficient system which can harvest solar energy, store them in the form of hydrogen gas and convert the stored hydrogen back to electricity through the use of fuel cell with minimal overall losses. The effect of increasing the surface area of contact is explored through etching of the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) with argon plasma or manually sanding the surface and how it affects the increase of energy conversion efficiency of the electrolyser. In addition, the relationship between temperature and the IPMC is studied. Experimental results demonstrated that increases in temperature of water and changes in surface area contact correlate with gas generation.

  11. Fabrication and Characterizations of Materials and Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells and Water Electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Prag, Carsten Brorson; Li, Qingfeng

    The worldwide development of fuel cells and electrolysers has so far almost exclusively addressed either the low temperature window (20-200 °C) or the high temperature window (600-1000 °C). This work concerns the development of key materials and components of a new generation of fuel cells...... and electrolysers for operation in the intermediate temperature range from 200 to 400 °C. The intermediate temperature interval is of importance for the use of renewable fuels. Furthermore electrode kinetics is significantly enhanced compared to when operating at low temperature. Thus non-noble metal catalysts...... might be used. One of the key materials in the fuel cell and electrolyser systems is the electrolyte. Proton conducting materials such as cesium hydrogen phosphates, zirconium hydrogen phosphates and tin pyrophosphates have been investigated by others and have shown interesting potential....

  12. Secretory production of cell wall components by Saccharomyces cerevisiae protoplasts in static liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Hideki; Ishizaka, Mikiko; Tanaka, Hideo

    2012-04-01

    When protoplasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae T7 and IFO 0309 are cultured in a static liquid culture at 2.5 × 10(6) protoplasts/ml, cell wall regeneration does not occur and cell wall components (CWC) are released into the culture broth. By using a specialized fluorometer, the concentrations of CWC could be measured on the basis of the fluorescence intensity of the CWC after staining with Fluostain I. The inoculum concentration, pH, and osmotic pressure of the medium were important factors for the production of CWC in culture. Under optimal culture conditions, S. cerevisiae T7 protoplasts produced 0.91 mg/ml CWC after 24 h. The CWC induced the tumor necrosis factor-α production about 1.3 times higher than that of the commercially available β-1,3/1,6-glucan from baker's yeast cells.

  13. Exergy analysis of components of integrated wind energy / hydrogen / fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Galvez, G.; Pathiyamattom, J.S.; Sanchez Gamboa, S.

    2009-01-01

    Exergy analysis is made of three components of an integrated wind energy to hydrogen fuel cell: wind turbine, fuel cell (PEMFC) and electrolyzer (PEM). The methodology used to assess how affect the second law efficiency of the electrolyzer and the FC parameters as temperature and operating pressure and membrane thickness. It develop methods to evaluate the influence of changes in the air density and height of the tower on the second law efficiency of the turbine. This work represents a starting point for developing the global availability analysis of an integrated wind / hydrogen / fuel cells, which can be used as a tool to achieve the optimum design of the same. The use of this system contribute to protect the environment

  14. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M.

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degree C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M r , 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125 I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degree C but did occur at 22 and 37 degree C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degree C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M r , 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M r , 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M r -120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-α-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate

  15. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  16. Basic characteristics of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF): blood cell components and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kazuhiko; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Taisuke; Isobe, Kazushige; Suzuki, Masashi; Masuki, Hideo; Okudera, Hajime; Uematsu, Kohya; Nakata, Koh; Kawase, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is widely used in regenerative medicine because of its high concentrations of various growth factors and platelets. However, the distribution of blood cell components has not been investigated in either PRP or other PRP derivatives. In this study, we focused on plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF), a PRP derivative, and analyzed the distributions of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs). Peripheral blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers ( N  = 14) and centrifuged to prepare PRGF and PRP. Blood cells were counted using an automated hematology analyzer. The effects of PRP and PRGF preparations on cell proliferation were determined using human periosteal cells. In the PRGF preparations, both red blood cells and WBCs were almost completely eliminated, and platelets were concentrated by 2.84-fold, whereas in the PRP preparations, both platelets and WBCs were similarly concentrated by 8.79- and 5.51-fold, respectively. Platelet counts in the PRGF preparations were positively correlated with platelet counts in the whole blood samples, while the platelet concentration rate was negatively correlated with red blood cell counts in the whole blood samples. In contrast, platelet counts and concentration rates in the PRP preparations were significantly influenced by WBC counts in whole blood samples. The PRP preparations, but not the PRGF preparations, significantly suppressed cell growth at higher doses in vitro. Therefore, these results suggest that PRGF preparations can clearly be distinguished from PRP preparations by both inclusion of WBCs and dose-dependent stimulation of periosteal cell proliferation in vitro.

  17. The monolithic multicell: a tool for testing material components in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, H.; Gruszecki, T. [IVF Industrial Research and Development Corporation, Moelndal (Sweden); Bernhard, R. [IVF Industrial Research and Development Corporation, Moelndal (Sweden); The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Center of Molcular Devices, Department of Chemistry; Haeggman, L.; Gorlov, M.; Boschloo, G.; Edvinsson, T.; Kloo, L.; Hagfeldt, A. [The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Center of Molcular Devices, Department of Chemistry

    2006-07-01

    A multicell is presented as a tool for testing material components in encapsulated dye-sensitized solar cells. The multicell is based on a four-layer monolithic cell structure and an industrial process technology. Each multicell plate includes 24 individual well-encapsulated cells. A sulfur lamp corrected to the solar spectrum has been used to characterize the cells. Efficiencies up to 6.8% at a light-intensity of 1000 W/m{sup su2} (up to 7.5% at 250 W/m{sup 2}) have been obtained with an electrolyte solution based on {upsilon}-butyrolactone. Additionally, a promising long-term stability at cell efficiencies close to 5% at 1000 W/m{sup 2} has been obtained with an electrolyte based on glutaronitrile. The reproducibility of the cell performance before and after exposure to accelerated testing has been high. This means that the multicell can be used as an efficient tool for comparative performance and stability tests. (author)

  18. The effect of cell surface components on adhesion ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak-Berecka, Magdalena; Waśko, Adam; Paduch, Roman; Skrzypek, Tomasz; Sroka-Bartnicka, Anna

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cell envelope components and surface properties of two phenotypes of Lactobacillus rhamnosus isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract. The ability of the bacteria to adhere to human intestinal cells and to aggregate with other bacteria was determined. L. rhamnosus strains E/N and PEN differed with regard to the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and specific surface proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed differences in the structure of the outer cell surface of the strains tested. Bacterial surface properties were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fatty acid methyl esters and hydrophobicity assays. Aggregation capacity and adhesion of the tested strains to the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 was determined. The results indicated a high adhesion and aggregation ability of L. rhamnosus PEN, which possessed specific surface proteins, had a unique fatty acid content, and did not synthesize EPS. Adherence of L. rhamnosus was dependent on specific interactions and was promoted by surface proteins (42-114 kDa) and specific fatty acids. Polysaccharides likely hindered bacterial adhesion and aggregation by masking protein receptors. This study provides information on the cell envelope constituents of lactobacilli that influence bacterial aggregation and adhesion to intestinal cells. This knowledge will help to understand better their specific contribution in commensal-host interactions and adaptation to this ecological niche.

  19. Effect of the type of ion exchange membrane on performance, ion transport, and pH in biocatalyzed electrolysis of wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the application of cation exchange membranes (CEMs) in bioelectrochemical systems running on wastewater can cause operational problems. In this paper the effect of alternative types of ion exchange membrane is studied in biocatalyzed electrolysis cells. Four types of

  20. Solid electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, H. S.

    Progress in the development of functioning solid electrolyte fuel cells is summarized. The solid electrolyte cells perform at 1000 C, a temperature elevated enough to indicate high efficiencies are available, especially if the cell is combined with a steam generator/turbine system. The system is noted to be sulfur tolerant, so coal containing significant amounts of sulfur is expected to yield satisfactory performances with low parasitic losses for gasification and purification. Solid oxide systems are electrically reversible, and are usable in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Employing zirconium and yttrium in the electrolyte provides component stability with time, a feature not present with other fuel cells. The chemical reactions producing the cell current are reviewed, along with materials choices for the cathodes, anodes, and interconnections.

  1. Selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha: components, activity and pathway analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Nashi; Takagi, Yasuomi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2008-04-08

    Ashwagandha, also called as "Queen of Ayurveda" and "Indian ginseng", is a commonly used plant in Indian traditional medicine, Ayurveda. Its roots have been used as herb remedy to treat a variety of ailments and to promote general wellness. However, scientific evidence to its effects is limited to only a small number of studies. We had previously identified anti-cancer activity in the leaf extract (i-Extract) of Ashwagandha and demonstrated withanone as a cancer inhibitory factor (i-Factor). In the present study, we fractionated the i-Extract to its components by silica gel column chromatography and subjected them to cell based activity analyses. We found that the cancer inhibitory leaf extract (i-Extract) has, at least, seven components that could cause cancer cell killing; i-Factor showed the highest selectivity for cancer cells and i-Factor rich Ashwagandha leaf powder was non-toxic and anti-tumorigenic in mice assays. We undertook a gene silencing and pathway analysis approach and found that i-Extract and its components kill cancer cells by at least five different pathways, viz. p53 signaling, GM-CFS signaling, death receptor signaling, apoptosis signaling and G2-M DNA damage regulation pathway. p53 signaling was most common. Visual analysis of p53 and mortalin staining pattern further revealed that i-Extract, fraction F1, fraction F4 and i-Factor caused an abrogation of mortalin-p53 interactions and reactivation of p53 function while the fractions F2, F3, F5 work through other mechanisms.

  2. Effect of component compression on the initial performance of an IPV nickel-hydrogen cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, Randall F.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental method was developed for evaluating the effect of component compression on the charge and discharge voltage characteristics of a 3 1/2 in. diameter boiler plate cell. A standard boiler plate pressure vessel was modified by the addition of a mechanical feedthrough on the bottom of the vessel which permitted different compressions to be applied to the components without disturbing the integrity of the stack. Compression loadings from 0.94 to 27.4 psi were applied by suspending weights from the feedthrough rod. Cell voltages were measured for 0.96-C, 55-min charge and for 1.37-C, 35-min and 2-C, 24-min discharges. An initial change in voltage performance on both charge and discharge as the loading increased was attributed to seating of the components. Subsequent variation of the compression from 2.97 to 27.4 psi caused only minor changes in either the charge or the discharge voltages. Several one month open-circuit voltage stands and 1100 cycles under LEO conditions at the maximum loading have produced no change in performance.

  3. Hydrogen: the great debate. 'Power to Gas - how to cope with the challenge of electricity storage?; Hydrogen in energy transition: which challenges to be faced?; Hydrogen, essential today, indispensable tomorrow; Electrolytic hydrogen, a solution for energy transition?; Development of high power electrolysis systems: need and approach; Hydrogen as energy vector, Potential and stakes: a perspective; The Toyota Fuel Cell System: a new era for the automotive industry; Three key factors: production, applications to mobility, and public acceptance; Hydrogen, benevolent fairy or tempting demon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauet, Jean-Pierre; Boucly, Philippe; Beeker, Etienne; Mauberger, Pascal; Quint, Aliette; Pierre, Helene; Lucchese, Paul; Bouillon-Delporte, Valerie; Chauvet, Bertrand; Brisse, Annabelle; Gautier, Ludmila; Hercberg, Sylvain; De Volder, Marc; Gruson, Jean-Francois; Marion, Pierre; Grellier, Sebastien; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Mansilla, Christine; Le Net, Elisabeth; Le Duigou, Alain; Maire, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This publication proposes a set of contributions which address various issues related to the development of the use of hydrogen as an energy source. More precisely, these contributions discuss how to face the challenge of electricity storage by using the Power-to-Gas technology, the challenges to be faced regarding the role of hydrogen in energy transition, the essential current role of hydrogen and its indispensable role for tomorrow, the possible role of electrolytic hydrogen as a solution for energy transition, the need of and the approach to a development of high power electrolysis systems, the potential and stakes of hydrogen as an energy vector, the Toyota fuel cell system as a sign for new era for automotive industry, the three main factors (production, applications to mobility, and public acceptance) for the use of hydrogen in energy transition, and the role of hydrogen perceived either as a benevolent fairy or a tempting demon

  4. Delineation of a novel pre-B cell component in plasma cell myeloma: immunochemical, immunophenotypic, genotypic, cytologic, cell culture, and kinetic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, T M; Durie, B G; Lomen, C; Spier, C; Wirt, D P; Nagle, R; Wilson, G S; Richter, L; Vela, E; Maxey, V

    1987-10-01

    A novel pre-B cell component in direct and cultured myeloma bone marrow material has been delineated by using immunochemistry and flow cytometry techniques. Our phenotypic studies suggest a novel hybrid expression of pre-B and plasma cell antigens with coexpression of cytoplasmic mu, common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, and plasma cell antigens (PCA-1 and PC-1). This suggests that myeloma pre-B-like cells are aberrant malignant cells and not normal pre-B lymphocytic counterparts. With the advantage of a pure and stable source of these cells from M3 culture to allow molecular characterization, we performed one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. We found that the cytoplasmic mu in myeloma pre-B-like cells has a molecular weight of 74,000 daltons and an isoelectric point of 6.3 and that it is strikingly homogeneous and discrete in size and charge compared with standard secretory mu, which suggests an aberrant, mutant, or monoclonal form of mu. Monoclonality was further evidenced by heavy- and light-chain immunoglobulin gene rearrangements demonstrated with JH and C kappa probes. We also established that this novel myeloma pre-B component is a major proliferative element as determined by double-labeling experiments with phenotype coupled to labeling/proliferative indexes. Our stimulatory studies indicate some capacity of these cells to mature on exposure to phorbol esters. These myeloma pre-B cells may represent the stem cell or self-renewal component in myeloma. Our establishment of these cells in long-term culture offers a considerable asset in studying the immature cells, which may be critical to the immortalization of myeloma.

  5. Surface conditioning with Escherichia coli cell wall components can reduce biofilm formation by decreasing initial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana C. Gomes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces pose major risks to human health. Non-efficient cleaning of equipment surfaces and piping can act as a conditioning layer that affects the development of a new biofilm post-disinfection. We have previously shown that surface conditioning with cell extracts could reduce biofilm formation. In the present work, we hypothesized that E. coli cell wall components could be implicated in this phenomena and therefore mannose, myristic acid and palmitic acid were tested as conditioning agents. To evaluate the effect of surface conditioning and flow topology on biofilm formation, assays were performed in agitated 96-well microtiter plates and in a parallel plate flow chamber (PPFC, both operated at the same average wall shear stress (0.07 Pa as determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD. It was observed that when the 96-well microtiter plate and the PPFC were used to form biofilms at the same shear stress, similar results were obtained. This shows that the referred hydrodynamic feature may be a good scale-up parameter from high-throughput platforms to larger scale flow cell systems as the PPFC used in this study. Mannose did not have any effect on E. coli biofilm formation, but myristic and palmitic acid inhibited biofilm development by decreasing cell adhesion (in about 50%. These results support the idea that in food processing equipment where biofilm formation is not critical below a certain threshold, bacterial lysis and adsorption of cell components to the surface may reduce biofilm buildup and extend the operational time.

  6. Factors in electrode fabrication for performance enhancement of anion exchange membrane water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Kyung; Park, Hee-Young; Choe, Seunghoe; Yoo, Sung Jong; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Henkensmeier, Dirk; Lee, So Young; Sung, Yung-Eun; Park, Hyun S.; Jang, Jong Hyun

    2017-04-01

    To improve the cell performance for alkaline anion exchange membrane water electrolysis (AEMWE), the effects of the amount of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) non-ionomeric binder in the anode and the hot-pressing conditions during the fabrication of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) on cell performances are studied. The electrochemical impedance data indicates that hot-pressing at 50 °C for 1 min during MEA construction can reduce the polarization resistance of AEMWE by ∼12%, and increase the initial water electrolysis current density at 1.8 V (from 195 to 243 mA cm-2). The electrochemical polarization and impedance results also suggest that the AEMWE performance is significantly affected by the content of PTFE binder in the anode electrode, and the optimal content is found to be 9 wt% between 5 and 20 wt%. The AEMWE device fabricated with the optimized parameters exhibits good water splitting performance (299 mA cm-2 at 1.8 V) without noticeable degradation in voltage cycling operations.

  7. Study and modelling of an industrial plant for hydrogen production by High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertier, L.

    2012-01-01

    HTSE field (High Temperature Steam Electrolysis) is moving from the research phase to development phase. It's now necessary to prove and to possibly improve the technology competitiveness. Therefore we need a tool able to allow communication between hydrogen producers and electrolysis cell stack designers. Designers seek where their efforts have to focus, for example by searching what are the operating best conditions for HTSE (voltage, temperature). On the contrary, the producer wants to choose the most suitable stack for its needs and under the best conditions: hydrogen has to be produced at the lowest price. Two main constraints have been identified to reach this objective: the tool has to be inserted into a process simulation software and needs to be representative of the cell and stack used technology. These constraints are antagonistic. Making an object model in a process simulation usually involves a highly simplified representation of it. To meet these constraints, we have built a model chain starting from the electrode models and leading to a representative model of the HTSE technology used process. Work and added value of this thesis mainly concern a global and local energy optimization approach. Our model allows at each scale an appropriate analysis of the main phenomena occurring in each object and a quantification of the energy and economic impacts of the technology used. This approach leads to a tool able to achieve the technical and economic optimization of a HTSE production unit. (author) [fr

  8. Analysis of Active Components in Salvia Miltiorrhiza Injection Based on Vascular Endothelial Cell Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Jie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Correlation analysis based on chromatograms and pharmacological activities is essential for understanding the effective components in complex herbal medicines. In this report, HPLC and measurement of antioxidant properties were used to describe the active ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza injection (SMI. HPLC results showed that tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid B, protocatechuic acid and their metabolites in rat serum may contribute to the efficacy of SMI. Assessment of antioxidant properties indicated that differences in the composition of serum powder of SMI caused differences in vascular endothelial cell protection. When bivariate correlation was carried out it was found that salvianolic acid B, tanshinol and protocatechuic aldehyde were active components of SMI because they were correlated to antioxidant properties.

  9. Design and development of major balance of plant components in solid oxide fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wen-Tang; Huang, Cheng-Nan; Tan, Hsueh-I; Chao, Yu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan County 32546 (Taiwan, Province of China); Yen, Tzu-Hsiang [Green Technology Research Institute, CPC Corporation, Chia-Yi City 60036 (Taiwan, Province of China)

    2013-07-01

    The balance of plant (BOP) of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system with a 2 kW stack and an electric efficiency of 40% is optimized using commercial GCTool software. The simulation results provide a detailed understanding of the optimal operating temperature, pressure and mass flow rate in all of the major BOP components, i.e., the gas distributor, the afterburner, the reformer and the heat exchanger. A series of experimental trials are performed to validate the simulation results. Overall, the results presented in this study not only indicate an appropriate set of operating conditions for the SOFC power system, but also suggest potential design improvements for several of the BOP components.

  10. Pulmonary surfactant and its components inhibit secretion of phosphatidylcholine from cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, L.G.; Wright, J.R.; Hawgood, S.; Gonzalez, R.; Venstrom, K.; Nellenbogen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells. Radioactive phosphatidylcholine has been used as a marker for surfactant secretion. The authors report findings that suggest that surfactant inhibits secretion of 3 H-labeled phosphatidylcholine by cultured rat type II cells. The lipid components and the surfactant protein group of M/sub r/ 26,000-36,000 (SP 26-36) inhibit secretion to different extents. Surfactant lipids do not completely inhibit release; in concentrations of 100 μg/ml, lipids inhibit stimulated secretion by 40%. SP 26-36 inhibits release with an EC 50 of 0.1 μg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 μg/ml, SP 26-36 inhibits basal secretion and reduces to basal levels secretion stimulated by terbutaline, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and the ionophore A23187. The inhibitory effect of SP 26-36 can be blocked by washing type II cells after adding SP 26-36, by heating the proteins to 100 0 C for 10 min, by adding antiserum specific to SP 26-36, or by incubating cells in the presence of 0.2 mM EGTA. SP 26-36 isolated from canine and human sources also inhibits phosphatidylcholine release from rat type II cells. Neither type I collagen nor serum apolipoprotein A-1 inhibits secretion. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that surfactant secretion is under feedback regulatory control

  11. Applications of snake venom components to modulate integrin activities in cell-matrix interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    Snake venom proteins are broadly investigated in the different areas of life science. Direct interaction of these compounds with cells may involve a variety of mechanisms that result in diverse cellular responses leading to the activation or blocking of physiological functions of the cell. In this review, the snake venom components interacting with integrins will be characterized in context of their effect on cellular response. Currently, two major families of snake venom proteins are considered as integrin-binding molecules. The most attention has been devoted to the disintegrin family, which binds certain types of integrins through specific motifs recognized as a tri-peptide structurally localized on an integrin-binding loop. Other snake venom integrin-binding proteins belong to the C-type lectin family. Snake venom molecules bind to the cellular integrins resulting in a modulation of cell signaling and in consequence, the regulation of cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Therefore, snake venom research on the integrin-binding molecules may have significance in biomedicine and basic cell biology. PMID:23811033

  12. Primary histiocytic sarcoma arising in the head and neck with predominant spindle cell component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao XF

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the first case report of Histiocytic Sarcoma (HS with predominant spindle cell component occurring in the head and neck region of a 41-year-old man. The tumor was composed of sheets of large round to oval cells with pleomorphic vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Multinucleated forms, numerous mitoses, and tumor necrosis were also noted. Sheets, fascicles, and whorls of spindle cells with spindled to ovoid vesicular nuclei, small to medium-sized distinct nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm were frequently observed. Immunohistochemical staining in the tumor cells was positive for CD163, CD68, lysozyme, CD45, and NSE. Focal expression of CD4 and S-100 was also noted. Electron microscopy demonstrated an abundance of lysosomes in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Chromosome study revealed a 57–80 hyperdiploid [7]/46, XY [13] karyotype, including 3 to 4 copies of various chromosomes. The immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings confirmed the diagnosis of HS.

  13. Sustainable design of fuel cell systems and components. Paper no. IGEC-1-148

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, D.

    2005-01-01

    'Full text:' Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology are touted as the major future enabler for a renewable energy future. This is particularly true for vehicular applications were there are few competitive alternatives. However, without zero-emission production of hydrogen, this will not be a very sustainable solution. Hydrogen generation from biomass, solar, hydro or wind energy will allow this realization. In addition, we need to evaluate the whole life cycle of a fuel cell system in order to make sure that it is truly 'green'. Hydrogenics has in place corporate initiatives to ensure that sustainability is part of the corporate objectives and philosophy. A sustainable future ensures that this generation does not prevent future generations from a similar (or better) standard of living. Fuel cell recyclability and reusability will be a major factor in ensuring a renewable, sustainable future. This is accomplished using sustainable design methodology whereby fuel cell system components are analyzed for their total life cycle impact. This concept of 'cradle to grave' product design responsibility is applied to Hydrogenics fuel cell products and is discussed in this paper. (author)

  14. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1 in cell division: its role in bovine granulosa cells mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Terzaghi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present studies were aimed to assess Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (PGRMC1 role in regulating bovine granulosa cells (bGC mitosis. First, we performed immunofluorescence studies on in vitro cultured bGC collected from antral follicles, which showed that PGRMC1 localizes to the spindle apparatus in mitotic cells. Then, to evaluate PGRMC1 effect on cell proliferation we silenced its expression with RNA interference technique (RNAi. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting confirmed down-regulation of PGRMC1 expression, when compared to CTRL-RNAi treated bGC (p<0.05. After 72h of culture, PGRMC1 silencing determined a lower growth rate (p<0.05 and a higher percentage of cells arrested at G2/M phase as assessed by flowcytometry (p<0.05. Accordingly, live imaging studies revealed more aberrant mitosis and a delayed M-phase in PGRMC1-RNAi treated cells compared to CTRL-RNAi group (p<0.05. These data confirmed that PGRMC1 is directly involved in bGC mitosis and ongoing preliminary studies are aimed to elucidate its putative mechanisms of action. Since PGRMC1 is a membrane protein, we hypothesize its possible involvement in vesicular trafficking and endocytosis, which is in turn an important process to assure proper cell division. To assess this hypothesis, we have preliminarily conducted immunofluorescence and in situ proximity ligation assay experiments that showed PGRMC1 co-localization and direct interaction with clathrin. This is important since clathrin is an essential protein for both endosomes formation, and cell division acting directly on the spindle apparatus. Thus our studies set the stage for analysis aimed to further characterize PGRMC1’s mechanism of action in mitotic cell.

  15. Principle and perspectives of hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Metz, S.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2006-01-01

    Biocatalyzed electrolysis is a novel biological hydrogen production process with the potential to efficiently convert a wide range of dissolved organic materials in wastewaters. Even substrates formerly regarded to be unsuitable for hydrogen production due to the endothermic nature of the involved

  16. Computer simulation of the NASA water vapor electrolysis reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The water vapor electrolysis (WVE) reactor is a spacecraft waste reclamation system for extended-mission manned spacecraft. The WVE reactor's raw material is water, its product oxygen. A computer simulation of the WVE operational processes provided the data required for an optimal design of the WVE unit. The simulation process was implemented with the aid of a FORTRAN IV routine.

  17. Behavior of oxygem bubbles during alkaline water electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedershoven, H.M.S.; Jonge, de R.M.; Sillen, C.W.M.P.; Stralen, van S.J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Growth rate, departure radius and population of oxygen bubbles at the transparent anode during alkaline water electrolysis have been investigated experimentally. The supersaturation of dissolved oxygen in the electrolyte adjacent to the anode surface has been derived from bubble growth rates.

  18. Use of sodium salt electrolysis in the process of continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of sodium salt electrolysis in the process of continuous modification of eutectic EN ... the plastic groundmass of the solid solution α (Al), have an effect on their ..... Onyia C, Okorie B, Neife S and Obayi C 2013 World J. Eng. Technol. 1 9. 35.

  19. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  20. The labor protection and safety measures at the electrolysis department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galushkin, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter of monograph is devoted to labor protection and safety measures at the electrolysis department. Thus, the characteristics of dangerous and harmful production factors as well as the danger of thermal burns and thermal exposure were considered. Safety requirements on labor safety were studied.