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Sample records for electrical signaling stomatal

  1. Electrical signaling, stomatal conductance, ABA and Ethylene content in avocado trees in response to root hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, Luis; Schaffer, Bruce; García, Nicolás; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) trees are among the most sensitive of fruit tree species to root hypoxia as a result of flooded or poorly drained soil. Similar to drought stress, an early physiological response to root hypoxia in avocado is a reduction of stomatal conductance. It has been previously determined in avocado trees that an extracellular electrical signal between the base of stem and leaves is produced and related to reductions in stomatal conductance in response to drought stress. The current study was designed to determine if changes in the extracellular electrical potential between the base of the stem and leaves in avocado trees could also be detected in response to short-term (min) or long-term (days) root hypoxia, and if these signals could be related to stomatal conductance (gs), root and leaf ABA and ACC concentrations, ethylene emission from leaves and leaf abscission. In contrast to previous observations for drought-stressed trees, short-term or long-term root hypoxia did not stimulate an electrical potential difference between the base of the stem and leaves. Short-term hypoxia did not result in a significant decrease in gs compared with plants in the control treatment, and no differences in ABA concentration were found between plants subjected to hypoxia and control plants. Long-term hypoxia in the root zone resulted in a significant decrease in gs, increased leaf ethylene and increased leaf abscission. The results indicate that for avocado trees exposed to root hypoxia, electrical signals do not appear to be the primary root-to-shoot communication mechanism involved in signaling for stomatal closure as a result of hypoxia in the root zone. PMID:19649181

  2. Evolutionary Conservation of ABA Signaling for Stomatal Closure1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuqing; Dai, Fei; Franks, Peter J.; Nevo, Eviatar; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Xue, Dawei; Zhang, Guoping; Pogson, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-driven stomatal regulation reportedly evolved after the divergence of ferns, during the early evolution of seed plants approximately 360 million years ago. This hypothesis is based on the observation that the stomata of certain fern species are unresponsive to ABA, but exhibit passive hydraulic control. However, ABA-induced stomatal closure was detected in some mosses and lycophytes. Here, we observed that a number of ABA signaling and membrane transporter protein families diversified over the evolutionary history of land plants. The aquatic ferns Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata have representatives of 23 families of proteins orthologous to those of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and all other land plant species studied. Phylogenetic analysis of the key ABA signaling proteins indicates an evolutionarily conserved stomatal response to ABA. Moreover, comparative transcriptomic analysis has identified a suite of ABA-responsive genes that differentially expressed in a terrestrial fern species, Polystichum proliferum. These genes encode proteins associated with ABA biosynthesis, transport, reception, transcription, signaling, and ion and sugar transport, which fit the general ABA signaling pathway constructed from Arabidopsis and Hordeum vulgare. The retention of these key ABA-responsive genes could have had a profound effect on the adaptation of ferns to dry conditions. Furthermore, stomatal assays have shown the primary evidence for ABA-induced closure of stomata in two terrestrial fern species P. proliferum and Nephrolepis exaltata. In summary, we report, to our knowledge, new molecular and physiological evidence for the presence of active stomatal control in ferns. PMID:28232585

  3. Evolutionary Conservation of ABA Signaling for Stomatal Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shengguan; Chen, Guang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Huang, Yuqing; Marchant, D Blaine; Wang, Yizhou; Yang, Qian; Dai, Fei; Hills, Adrian; Franks, Peter J; Nevo, Eviatar; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Sessa, Emily; Wolf, Paul G; Xue, Dawei; Zhang, Guoping; Pogson, Barry J; Blatt, Michael R; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-driven stomatal regulation reportedly evolved after the divergence of ferns, during the early evolution of seed plants approximately 360 million years ago. This hypothesis is based on the observation that the stomata of certain fern species are unresponsive to ABA, but exhibit passive hydraulic control. However, ABA-induced stomatal closure was detected in some mosses and lycophytes. Here, we observed that a number of ABA signaling and membrane transporter protein families diversified over the evolutionary history of land plants. The aquatic ferns Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata have representatives of 23 families of proteins orthologous to those of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and all other land plant species studied. Phylogenetic analysis of the key ABA signaling proteins indicates an evolutionarily conserved stomatal response to ABA. Moreover, comparative transcriptomic analysis has identified a suite of ABA-responsive genes that differentially expressed in a terrestrial fern species, Polystichum proliferum These genes encode proteins associated with ABA biosynthesis, transport, reception, transcription, signaling, and ion and sugar transport, which fit the general ABA signaling pathway constructed from Arabidopsis and Hordeum vulgare The retention of these key ABA-responsive genes could have had a profound effect on the adaptation of ferns to dry conditions. Furthermore, stomatal assays have shown the primary evidence for ABA-induced closure of stomata in two terrestrial fern species Pproliferum and Nephrolepis exaltata In summary, we report, to our knowledge, new molecular and physiological evidence for the presence of active stomatal control in ferns. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Crosstalk among hormones and signaling networks during stomatal development in Arabidopsis hypocotyls

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    Laura Serna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During development, signaling networks specify stomatal cell fate and patterning in response to phytohormones. A number of studies in the past few years have revealed that brassinosteroids repress the signaling pathway that inactivates SPEECHLESS (SPCH, promoting stomatal cell fate determination in the hypocotyl. These plant hormones also control stomatal patterning specification by regulating genes in the TTG/BHLHs/MYBs/GL2 network. Gibberellins, like brassinosteroids, promote stomatal formation in the embryonic stem, which suggests that their signaling pathways may converge. These phytohormones also regulate LLM-domain B-GATA factors. The involvement of these factors as positive regulators of stomatal formation, which function upstream of SPCH, suggests that the brassinosteroid and gibberellin signaling pathways may converge to control stomatal cell fate specification. In addition, the leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor-like protein TOO MANY MOUTHS acts later than these hormones in the cell division sequence that triggers stomatal formation, and it also appears to control stomatal initiation in response to brassinosteroids. The emerging picture suggests that crosstalk among hormones and signaling networks guides stomatal cell fate determination and patterning in the hypocotyl.

  5. Electrical Signaling, Photosynthesis and Systemic Acquired Acclimation

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    Magdalena Szechyńska-Hebda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical signaling in higher plants is required for the appropriate intracellular and intercellular communication, stress responses, growth and development. In this review, we have focus on recent findings regarding the electrical signaling, as a major regulator of the systemic acquired acclimation (SAA and the systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The electric signaling on its own cannot confer the required specificity of information to trigger SAA and SAR, therefore, we have also discussed a number of other mechanisms and signaling systems that can operate in combination with electric signaling. We have emphasized the interrelation between ionic mechanism of electrical activity and regulation of photosynthesis, which is intrinsic to a proper induction of SAA and SAR. In a special way, we have summarized the role of non-photochemical quenching and its regulator PsbS. Further, redox status of the cell, calcium and hydraulic waves, hormonal circuits and stomatal aperture regulation have been considered as components of the signaling. Finally, a model of light-dependent mechanisms of electrical signaling propagation has been presented together with the systemic regulation of light-responsive genes encoding both, ion channels and proteins involved in regulation of their activity. Due to space limitations, we have not addressed many other important aspects of hormonal and ROS signaling, which were presented in a number of recent excellent reviews.

  6. Stomatal malfunctioning under low VPD conditions: induced by alterations in stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy or in the ABA signaling?

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    Aliniaeifard, Sasan; Malcolm Matamoros, Priscila; van Meeteren, Uulke

    2014-12-01

    Exposing plants to low VPD reduces leaf capacity to maintain adequate water status thereafter. To find the impact of VPD on functioning of stomata, stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy, fava bean plants were grown at low (L, 0.23 kPa) or moderate (M, 1.17 kPa) VPDs and some plants that developed their leaves at moderate VPD were then transferred for 4 days to low VPD (M→L). Part of the M→L-plants were sprayed with ABA (abscisic acid) during exposure to L. L-plants showed bigger stomata, larger pore area, thinner leaves and less spongy cells compared with M-plants. Stomatal morphology (except aperture) and leaf anatomy of the M→L-plants were almost similar to the M-plants, while their transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were identical to that of L-plants. The stomatal response to ABA was lost in L-plants, but also after 1-day exposure of M-plants to low VPD. The level of foliar ABA sharply decreased within 1-day exposure to L, while the level of ABA-GE (ABA-glucose ester) was not affected. Spraying ABA during the exposure to L prevented loss of stomatal closing response thereafter. The effect of low VPD was largely depending on exposure time: the stomatal responsiveness to ABA was lost after 1-day exposure to low VPD, while the responsiveness to desiccation was gradually lost during 4-day exposure to low VPD. Leaf anatomical and stomatal morphological alterations due to low VPD were not the main cause of loss of stomatal closure response to closing stimuli. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Stomatal Cytoskeletal Patterns during the Activation of Immune Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Masaki Shimono

    Full Text Available Historically viewed as primarily functioning in the regulation of gas and water vapor exchange, it is now evident that stomata serve an important role in plant immunity. Indeed, in addition to classically defined functions related to cell architecture and movement, the actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a central component of the plant immune system, underpinning not only processes related to cell shape and movement, but also receptor activation and signaling. Using high resolution quantitative imaging techniques, the temporal and spatial changes in the actin microfilament array during diurnal cycling of stomatal guard cells has revealed a highly orchestrated transition from random arrays to ordered bundled filaments. While recent studies have demonstrated that plant stomata close in response to pathogen infection, an evaluation of stimulus-induced changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics during immune activation in the guard cell, as well as the relationship of these changes to the function of the actin cytoskeleton and stomatal aperture, remains undefined. In the current study, we employed quantitative cell imaging and hierarchical clustering analyses to define the response of the guard cell actin cytoskeleton to pathogen infection and the elicitation of immune signaling. Using this approach, we demonstrate that stomatal-localized actin filaments respond rapidly, and specifically, to both bacterial phytopathogens and purified pathogen elicitors. Notably, we demonstrate that higher order temporal and spatial changes in the filament array show distinct patterns of organization during immune activation, and that changes in the naïve diurnal oscillations of guard cell actin filaments are perturbed by pathogens, and that these changes parallel pathogen-induced stomatal gating. The data presented herein demonstrate the application of a highly tractable and quantifiable method to assign transitions in actin filament organization to the activation of

  8. Stomatal malfunctioning under low VPD conditions: induced by alterations in stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy or in the ABA signaling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Niaei Fard, S.; Malcolm Matamoros, P.; Meeteren, van U.

    2014-01-01

    Exposing plants to low VPD reduces leaf capacity to maintain adequate water status thereafter. To find the impact of VPD on functioning of stomata, stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy, fava bean plants were grown at low (L, 0.23 kPa) or moderate (M, 1.17 kPa) VPDs and some plants that developed

  9. Can prolonged exposure to low VPD disturb the ABA signalling in stomatal guard cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliniaeifard, Sasan; van Meeteren, Uulke

    2013-01-01

    The response of stomata to many environmental factors is well documented. Multiple signalling pathways for abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure have been proposed over the last decades. However, it seems that exposure of a leaf for a long time (several days) to some environmental conditions generates a sort of memory in the guard cells that results in the loss of suitable responses of the stomata to closing stimuli, such as desiccation and ABA. In this review paper we discuss changes in the normal pattern of signal transduction that could account for disruption of guard cell signalling after long-term exposure to some environmental conditions, with special emphasis on long-term low vapour pressure deficit (VPD). PMID:23956410

  10. Electric circuits and signals

    CERN Document Server

    Sabah, Nassir H

    2007-01-01

    Circuit Variables and Elements Overview Learning Objectives Electric Current Voltage Electric Power and Energy Assigned Positive Directions Active and Passive Circuit Elements Voltage and Current Sources The Resistor The Capacitor The Inductor Concluding Remarks Summary of Main Concepts and Results Learning Outcomes Supplementary Topics on CD Problems and Exercises Basic Circuit Connections and Laws Overview Learning Objectives Circuit Terminology Kirchhoff's Laws Voltage Division and Series Connection of Resistors Current Division and Parallel Connection of Resistors D-Y Transformation Source Equivalence and Transformation Reduced-Voltage Supply Summary of Main Concepts and Results Learning Outcomes Supplementary Topics and Examples on CD Problems and Exercises Basic Analysis of Resistive Circuits Overview Learning Objectives Number of Independent Circuit Equations Node-Voltage Analysis Special Considerations in Node-Voltage Analysis Mesh-Current Analysis Special Conside...

  11. Convergence and Divergence of Signaling Events in Guard Cells during Stomatal Closure by Plant Hormones or Microbial Elicitors

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    AGURLA SRINIVAS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic regulation of stomatal aperture is essential for plants to optimize water use and CO2 uptake. Stomatal opening or closure is accompanied by the modulation of guard cell turgor. Among the events leading to stomatal closure by plant hormones or microbial elicitors, three signaling components stand out as the major converging points. These are reactive oxygen species (ROS, cytosolic free Ca2+ and ion channels. Once formed, the ROS and free Ca2+ of guard cells regulate both downstream and upstream events. A major influence of ROS is to increase the levels of NO and cytosolic free Ca2+ in guard cells. Although the rise in NO is an important event during stomatal closure, the available evidences do not support the description of NO as the point of convergence. The rise in ROS and NO would cause an increase of free Ca2+ and modulate ion channels, through a network of events, in such a way that the guard cells lose K+/Cl-/anions. The efflux of these ions decreases the turgor of guard cells and leads to stomatal closure. Thus, ROS, NO and cytosolic free Ca2+ act as points of divergence. The other guard cell components, which are modulated during stomatal closure are G-proteins, cytosolic pH, phospholipids and sphingolipids. However, the current information on the role of these components is not convincing so as to assign them as the points of convergence or divergence. The interrelationships and interactions of ROS, NO, cytosolic pH, and free Ca2+ are quite complex and need further detailed examination. Our review is an attempt to critically assess the current status of information on guard cells, while emphasizing the convergence and divergence of signaling components during stomatal closure. The existing gaps in our knowledge are identified to stimulate further research.

  12. Resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus: role of type I interferon signaling.

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    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Shah, Nirav R; Murphy, Andrea M; Hastie, Eric; Mukherjee, Pinku; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2013-02-05

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy takes advantage of common cancer characteristics, such as defective type I interferon (IFN) signaling, to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells with viruses. Our recent study (Murphy et al., 2012. J. Virol. 86, 3073-87) found human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells were highly heterogeneous in their permissiveness to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and suggested at least some resistant cell lines retained functional type I IFN responses. Here we examine cellular responses to infection by the oncolytic VSV recombinant VSV-ΔM51-GFP by analyzing a panel of 11 human PDA cell lines for expression of 33 genes associated with type I IFN pathways. Although all cell lines sensed infection by VSV-ΔM51-GFP and most activated IFN-α and β expression, only resistant cell lines displayed constitutive high-level expression of the IFN-stimulated antiviral genes MxA and OAS. Inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling decreased levels of MxA and OAS and increased VSV infection, replication and oncolysis, further implicating IFN responses in resistance. Unlike VSV, vaccinia and herpes simplex virus infectivity and killing of PDA cells was independent of the type I IFN signaling profile, possibly because these two viruses are better equipped to evade type I IFN responses. Our study demonstrates heterogeneity in the type I IFN signaling status of PDA cells and suggests MxA and OAS as potential biomarkers for PDA resistance to VSV and other OVs sensitive to type I IFN responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Triptolide-mediated inhibition of interferon signaling enhances vesicular stomatitis virus-based oncolysis.

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    Ben Yebdri, Fethia; Van Grevenynghe, Julien; Tang, Vera A; Goulet, Marie-Line; Wu, Jian Hui; Stojdl, David F; Hiscott, John; Lin, Rongtuan

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and clinical trials demonstrated that use of oncolytic viruses (OVs) is a promising new therapeutic approach to treat multiple types of cancer. To further improve their viral oncolysis, experimental strategies are now combining OVs with different cytotoxic compounds. In this study, we investigated the capacity of triptolide - a natural anticancer molecule - to enhance vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) oncolysis in OV-resistant cancer cells. Triptolide treatment increased VSV replication in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3 and in other VSV-resistant cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, triptolide (TPL) inhibited the innate antiviral response by blocking type I interferon (IFN) signaling, downstream of IRF3 activation. Furthermore, triptolide-enhanced VSV-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion in VSV-resistant cells, as measured by annexin-V, cleaved caspase-3, and B-cell lymphoma 2 staining. In vivo, using the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and PC3 mouse xenograft models, combination treatment with VSV and triptolide delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing animals by enhancing viral replication. Together, these results demonstrate that triptolide inhibition of IFN production sensitizes prostate cancer cells to VSV replication and virus-mediated apoptosis.

  14. Differential Effects of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase (PI4K and 3-Kinase (PI3K Inhibitors on Stomatal Responses to Environmental Signals

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    Koh Iba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific cellular components including products of phosphatidylinositol (PI metabolism play an important role as signaling molecules in stomatal responses to environmental signals. In this study, pharmacological inhibitors of a set of cellular components, including PI4-kinase (PI4K and PI3K, were used to investigate stomatal closure in response to CO2, darkness, and abscisic acid (ABA. Treatment with PAO, a specific inhibitor of PI4K, specifically inhibited the stomatal response to CO2 compared with that to darkness and ABA. In contrast, treatment with LY294002, a PI3K-specific inhibitor, specifically inhibited the stomatal response to darkness compared with that to CO2 and ABA. The specific inhibitory effects of PAO and LY294002 were also observed as changes in the spatial density of dot-like structures labeled by green fluorescent protein-tagged PATROL1, a protein that controls stomatal aperture possibly via regulation of H+-ATPase amount in guard cell plasma membranes. Our results suggest an important role for PI4K and PI3K in the CO2 and darkness signal transduction pathways, respectively, that mediate PATROL1 dynamics.

  15. Electrical measurement, signal processing, and displays

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, John G

    2003-01-01

    ELECTROMAGNETIC VARIABLES MEASUREMENTVoltage MeasurementCurrent Measurement Power Measurement Power Factor Measurement Phase Measurement Energy Measurement Electrical Conductivity and Resistivity Charge Measurement Capacitance and Capacitance Measurements Permittivity Measurement Electric Field Strength Magnetic Field Measurement Permeability and Hysteresis MeasurementInductance Measurement Immittance MeasurementQ Factor Measurement Distortion Measurement Noise Measurement.Microwave Measurement SIGNAL PROCESSINGAmplifiers and Signal ConditionersModulation Filters Spectrum Analysis and Correlat

  16. Modification of leaf apoplastic pH in relation to stomatal sensitivity to root-sourced abscisic acid signals.

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    Jia, Wensuo; Davies, William John

    2007-01-01

    The confocal microscope was used to determine the pH of the leaf apoplast and the pH of microvolumes of xylem sap. We quantified variation in leaf apoplast and sap pH in relation to changes in edaphic and atmospheric conditions that impacted on stomatal sensitivity to a root-sourced abscisic acid signal. Several plant species showed significant changes in the pH of both xylem sap and the apoplast of the shoot in response to environmental perturbation. Xylem sap leaving the root was generally more acidic than sap in the midrib and the apoplast of the leaf. Increasing the transpiration rate of both intact plants and detached plant parts resulted in more acidic leaf apoplast pHs. Experiments with inhibitors suggested that protons are removed from xylem sap as it moves up the plant, thereby alkalinizing the sap. The more rapid the transpiration rate and the shorter the time that the sap resided in the xylem/apoplastic pathway, the smaller the impact of proton removal on sap pH. Sap pH of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and Commelina communis did not change significantly as soil dried, while pH of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) sap increased as water availability in the soil declined. Increasing the availability of nitrate to roots also significantly alkalinized the xylem sap of tomato plants. This nitrogen treatment had the effect of enhancing the sensitivity of the stomatal response to soil drying. These responses were interpreted as an effect of nitrate addition on sap pH and closure of stomata via an abscisic acid-based mechanism.

  17. Microtubule arrays and Arabidopsis stomatal development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jessica R. Lucas; Jeanette A. Nadeau; Fred D. Sack

    Microtubule arrays in living cells were analysed during Arabidopsis stomatal development in order to more closely define stages in the pathway and contexts where intercellular signalling might operate...

  18. Fourier Transform of Electric Signal using Kundt's Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Srijit; Gandikota, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    An experiment to demonstrate the Fourier transform of an electric signal using the Kundt's tube is described. The results of finding the component frequencies and an approximation to the amplitudes of two sinusoidal signals which compose an input electric signal is presented. Undergraduate students are expected to more easily relate to the meaning of a Fourier transform through such mechanical demonstrations.

  19. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

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    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  20. Ion channels in mechanosensing and electrical signaling in plants

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    Frachisse Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The second example concerns the role of mechano-gated and voltage-gated channels in the generation and long distance propagation of electrical signal in plant. More precisely, it illustrate how Action Potential and Slow Wave of depolarization are generated and propagate along plant tissues. Eventually the relevance of such electrical signals in plant is illustrated by two examples.

  1. Behavioral ecology, endocrinology and signal reliability of electric communication

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    Gavassa, Sat; Goldina, Anna; Silva, Ana C.; Stoddard, Philip K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The balance between the costs and benefits of conspicuous animal communication signals ensures that signal expression relates to the quality of the bearer. Signal plasticity enables males to enhance conspicuous signals to impress mates and competitors and to reduce signal expression to lower energetic and predation-related signaling costs when competition is low. While signal plasticity may benefit the signaler, it can compromise the reliability of the information conveyed by the signals. In this paper we review the effect of signal plasticity on the reliability of the electrocommunication signal of the gymnotiform fish Brachyhypopomus gauderio. We (1) summarize the endocrine regulation of signal plasticity, (2) explore the regulation of signal plasticity in females, (3) examine the information conveyed by the signal, (4) show how that information changes when the signal changes, and (5) consider the energetic strategies used to sustain expensive signaling. The electric organ discharge (EOD) of B. gauderio changes in response to social environment on two time scales. Two hormone classes, melanocortins and androgens, underlie the short-term and long-term modulation of signal amplitude and duration observed during social interaction. Population density drives signal amplitude enhancement, unexpectedly improving the reliability with which the signal predicts the signaler's size. The signal's second phase elongation predicts androgen levels and male reproductive condition. Males sustain signal enhancement with dietary intake, but when food is limited, they ‘go for broke’ and put extra energy into electric signals. Cortisol diminishes EOD parameters, but energy-limited males offset cortisol effects by boosting androgen levels. While physiological constraints are sufficient to maintain signal amplitude reliability, phenotypic integration and signaling costs maintain reliability of signal duration, consistent with theory of honest signaling. PMID:23761465

  2. Processing on weak electric signals by the autoregressive model

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    Ding, Jinli; Zhao, Jiayin; Wang, Lanzhou; Li, Qiao

    2008-10-01

    A model of the autoregressive model of weak electric signals in two plants was set up for the first time. The result of the AR model to forecast 10 values of the weak electric signals is well. It will construct a standard set of the AR model coefficient of the plant electric signal and the environmental factor, and can be used as the preferences for the intelligent autocontrol system based on the adaptive characteristic of plants to achieve the energy saving on agricultural productions.

  3. Rapid, Long-Distance Electrical and Calcium Signaling in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Gyu; Hilleary, Richard; Swanson, Sarah J; Kim, Su-Hwa; Gilroy, Simon

    2016-04-29

    Plants integrate activities throughout their bodies using long-range signaling systems in which stimuli sensed by just a few cells are translated into mobile signals that can influence the activities in distant tissues. Such signaling can travel at speeds well in excess of millimeters per second and can trigger responses as diverse as changes in transcription and translation levels, posttranslational regulation, alterations in metabolite levels, and even wholesale reprogramming of development. In addition to the use of mobile small molecules and hormones, electrical signals have long been known to propagate throughout the plant. This electrical signaling network has now been linked to waves of Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species that traverse the plant and trigger systemic responses. Analysis of cell type specificity in signal propagation has revealed the movement of systemic signals through specific cell types, suggesting that a rapid signaling network may be hardwired into the architecture of the plant.

  4. LLM-Domain B-GATA Transcription Factors Promote Stomatal Development Downstream of Light Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana Hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranftl, Quirin L.; Diener, Julia; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Richter, René

    2016-01-01

    Stomata are pores that regulate the gas and water exchange between the environment and aboveground plant tissues, including hypocotyls, leaves, and stems. Here, we show that mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana LLM-domain B-GATA genes are defective in stomata formation in hypocotyls. Conversely, stomata formation is strongly promoted by overexpression of various LLM-domain B-class GATA genes, most strikingly in hypocotyls but also in cotyledons. Genetic analyses indicate that these B-GATAs act upstream of the stomata formation regulators SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, and SCREAM/SCREAM2 and downstream or independent of the patterning regulators TOO MANY MOUTHS and STOMATAL DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION1. The effects of the GATAs on stomata formation are light dependent but can be induced in dark-grown seedlings by red, far-red, or blue light treatments. PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) mutants form stomata in the dark, and in this genetic background, GATA expression is sufficient to induce stomata formation in the dark. Since the expression of the LLM-domain B-GATAs GNC (GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED) and GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 as well as that of SPCH is red light induced but the induction of SPCH is compromised in a GATA gene mutant background, we hypothesize that PIF- and light-regulated stomata formation in hypocotyls is critically dependent on LLM-domain B-GATA genes. PMID:26917680

  5. A Measurement System of Electric Signals on Standing Trees

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    Hao TIAN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The standing tree electric signal (STES, defined as the electric potential difference between standing trees and the surrounding soil, can be utilized to reflect the biological nature of the trees. This signal should be measured precisely because it can also be collected and used as the electric power energy. In this paper, the automatic measurement system of standing tree biological electric signal based on MSP430 MCU. First of all, the basic structure of the presented system is introduced and it includes three modules: amplification module of the standing tree electric signal, the acquisition and processing of the signal module and the serial communication module. Then, the performances of the built system are respectively validated by the Poplar, Planetree, and Platanus in Beijing Forestry University. The result indicated that the relative error of this system is less than 2 %. The presented system can be considered as the foundation of the subsequent study on the mechanism of the biological electric signal and the application of the biological electric energy on standing trees.

  6. Root-to-shoot ABA signaling does not contribute to genotypic variation in stomatal functioning induced by high relative air humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, Dália R.A.; Fanourakis, D.; Correia, M.J.; Monteiro, J.A.; Araújo-Alves, J.P.L.; Vasconcelos, M.W.; Almeida, D.P.F.; Heuvelink, E.; Pinto de Carvalho, S.

    2016-01-01

    High relative air humidity (RH ≥85%) during leaf expansion hampers stomatal responsiveness to closing stimuli, a genotype-dependent effect. Genotypes with reduced stomatal closure in response to closing stimuli (i.e., sensitive genotypes) show low bulk leaf abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]). We

  7. Cerato-platanin induces resistance in Arabidopsis leaves through stomatal perception, overexpression of salicylic acid- and ethylene-signalling genes and camalexin biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Baccelli

    Full Text Available Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs lead to the activation of the first line of plant defence. Few fungal molecules are universally qualified as MAMPs, and proteins belonging to the cerato-platanin protein (CPP family seem to possess these features. Cerato-platanin (CP is the name-giving protein of the CPP family and is produced by Ceratocystis platani, the causal agent of the canker stain disease of plane trees (Platanus spp.. On plane tree leaves, the biological activity of CP has been widely studied. Once applied on the leaf surface, CP acts as an elicitor of defence responses. The molecular mechanism by which CP elicits leaves is still unknown, and the protective effect of CP against virulent pathogens has not been clearly demonstrated. In the present study, we tried to address these questions in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results suggest that stomata rapidly sense CP since they responded to the treatment with ROS signalling and stomatal closure, and that CP triggers salicylic acid (SA- and ethylene (ET-signalling pathways, but not the jasmonic acid (JA-signalling pathway, as revealed by the expression pattern of 20 marker genes. Among these, EDS1, PAD4, NPR1, GRX480, WRKY70, ACS6, ERF1a/b, COI1, MYC2, PDF1.2a and the pathogenesis-related (PR genes 1-5. CP rapidly induced MAPK phosphorylation and induced the biosynthesis of camalexin within 12 hours following treatment. The induction of localised resistance was shown by a reduced susceptibility of the leaves to the infection with Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. These results contribute to elucidate the key steps of the signalling process underlying the resistance induction in plants by CP and point out the central role played by the stomata in this process.

  8. Brassinosteroids modulate ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yunmi; Shang, Yun; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2016-12-01

    Stomatal movement in response to water availability is an important physiological process in the survival of land plants. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate stomatal closure. The physiological functions of ABA and BRs, including germination, cell elongation and stomatal movement, are generally known to be antagonistic. Here, we investigated how BRs affect stomatal movement alone and in combination with ABA. We demonstrate that brassinoslide (BL), the most active BR, promotes stomatal closure in an ABA-independent manner. Interestingly, BL also inhibited ABA-induced stomatal closure when a high concentration of BL was added to ABA. Furthermore, we found that the induction of some genes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by ABA (AtrbohD, NIA1 and NIA2) and subsequent ROS production were repressed by BL treatment. The BR signaling mutant bri1-301 failed to inhibit ABA-induced stomatal closure upon BL treatment. However, BRI1-overexpressing transgenic plants were hypersensitive to ABA during stomatal closure, and BL reversed ABA-induced stomatal closure more completely than in wild type plants. Taken together, these results suggest that BRs can positively and negatively modulate ABA-induced stomatal closure. Therefore, interactions between ABA and BR signaling are important for the regulation of stomatal closure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Beam dumping ghost signals in electric sweep scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, M.P.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Keller, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2004-12-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates.

  10. Classification of Single and Multiple Disturbances in Electric Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Moisés Vidal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses and presents a different perspective for classifying single and multiple disturbances in electric signals, such as voltage and current ones. Basically, the principle of divide to conquer is applied to decompose the electric signals into what we call primitive signals or components from which primitive patterns can be independently recognized. A technique based on such concept is introduced to demonstrate the effectiveness of such idea. This technique decomposes the electric signals into three main primitive components. In each primitive component, few high-order-statistics- (HOS- based features are extracted. Then, Bayes' theory-based techniques are applied to verify the ocurrence or not of single or multiple disturbances in the electric signals. The performance analysis carried out on a large number of data indicates that the proposed technique outperforms the performance attained by the technique introduced by He and Starzyk. Additionally, the numerical results verify that the proposed technique is capable of offering interesting results when it is applied to classify several sets of disturbances if one cycle of the main frequency is considered, at least.

  11. Smart signal processing for an evolving electric grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Leandro Rodrigues Manso; Duque, Calos Augusto; Ribeiro, Paulo F.

    2015-12-01

    Electric grids are interconnected complex systems consisting of generation, transmission, distribution, and active loads, recently called prosumers as they produce and consume electric energy. Additionally, these encompass a vast array of equipment such as machines, power transformers, capacitor banks, power electronic devices, motors, etc. that are continuously evolving in their demand characteristics. Given these conditions, signal processing is becoming an essential assessment tool to enable the engineer and researcher to understand, plan, design, and operate the complex and smart electronic grid of the future. This paper focuses on recent developments associated with signal processing applied to power system analysis in terms of characterization and diagnostics. The following techniques are reviewed and their characteristics and applications discussed: active power system monitoring, sparse representation of power system signal, real-time resampling, and time-frequency (i.e., wavelets) applied to power fluctuations.

  12. ACUTE STOMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.N. Drobot’ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of diseases of mucous membrane of oral cavity is one of the main ones in dentistry. Special attention in this problem should be given to the acute herpetic stomatitis. 80% of all cases of mucous membrane of oral cavity in children are herpetic stomatitis. Local immunity in children with acute stomatitis is closely related to the character of course of pathology. An administration of immunomodulatory treatment is pathogenetically grounded. Bacterial lysates mixture causes etiotropical and pathogenetical effect and increases the activity of immune system resulting in relapses prophylaxis.Key words: children, acute herpetic stomatitis, bacterial lysates mixture.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:146-149

  13. Jasmonate-mediated stomatal closure under elevated CO2 revealed by time-resolved metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foliar stomatal movements are critical for regulating plant water status and gas exchange. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are known to induce stomatal closure. However, current knowledge on CO2 signal transduction in stomatal guard cells is limited. Here we report the metabolomic respo...

  14. OsASR5 enhances drought tolerance through a stomatal closure pathway associated with ABA and H2 O2 signalling in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinjie; Li, Yang; Yin, Zhigang; Jiang, Jihong; Zhang, Minghui; Guo, Xiao; Ye, Zhujia; Zhao, Yan; Xiong, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhanying; Shao, Yujie; Jiang, Conghui; Zhang, Hongliang; An, Gynheung; Paek, Nam-Chon; Ali, Jauhar; Li, Zichao

    2017-02-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses that directly implicate plant growth and crop productivity. Although many genes in response to drought stress have been identified, genetic improvement to drought resistance especially in food crops is showing relatively slow progress worldwide. Here, we reported the isolation of abscisic acid, stress and ripening (ASR) genes from upland rice variety, IRAT109 (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica), and demonstrated that overexpression of OsASR5 enhanced osmotic tolerance in Escherichia coli and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis and rice by regulating leaf water status under drought stress conditions. Moreover, overexpression of OsASR5 in rice increased endogenous ABA level and showed hypersensitive to exogenous ABA treatment at both germination and postgermination stages. The production of H2 O2 , a second messenger for the induction of stomatal closure in response to ABA, was activated in overexpression plants under drought stress conditions, consequently, increased stomatal closure and decreased stomatal conductance. In contrast, the loss-of-function mutant, osasr5, showed sensitivity to drought stress with lower relative water content under drought stress conditions. Further studies demonstrated that OsASR5 functioned as chaperone-like protein and interacted with stress-related HSP40 and 2OG-Fe (II) oxygenase domain containing proteins in yeast and plants. Taken together, we suggest that OsASR5 plays multiple roles in response to drought stress by regulating ABA biosynthesis, promoting stomatal closure, as well as acting as chaperone-like protein that possibly prevents drought stress-related proteins from inactivation. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Analysis of Stomatal Patterning in Selected Mutants of MAPK Pathways

    KAUST Repository

    Felemban, Abrar

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are cellular valves in plants that play an essential role in the regulation of gas exchange and are distributed in the epidermis of aerial organs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, stomatal production and development are coordinated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, which modulates a variety of other processes, including cell proliferation, regulation of cytokinesis, programed cell death, and response to abiotic and biotic stress. The environment also plays a role in stomatal development, by influencing the frequency at which stomata develop in leaves. This thesis presents an analysis of stomatal development in Arabidopsis mutants in two MAPK pathways: MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4, and MAP3K17/18-MKK3. Obtained results demonstrate the effect of stress conditions on stomatal development and specify the involvement of analysed MAPK in stomatal patterning. First, both analysed pathways modulate stomatal patterning in Arabidopsis cotyledons. Second, plant growth-promoting bacteria tested enhance stomatal density and affect guard cell morphology. Third, the sucrose or mannitol treatment increases defects in stomatal patterning. Finally, salt stress or high temperature can suppress stomatal defects in mutants of the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 pathway.

  17. Buckwheat stomatal traits under aluminium toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr E. Smirnov; Anatoliy M. Kosyan; Oksana I. Kosyk; Natalia Yu. Taran

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium influence on some stomatal parameters of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) was studied. Significant changes in stomatal density, stomatal index and stomatal shape coefficient under aluminium treatment were revealed. Stomatal closure and no difference in total stomatal potential conductance index of treatment plants were suggested as aluminium resistance characteristics.

  18. Buckwheat stomatal traits under aluminium toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr E. Smirnov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium influence on some stomatal parameters of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. was studied. Significant changes in stomatal density, stomatal index and stomatal shape coefficient under aluminium treatment were revealed. Stomatal closure and no difference in total stomatal potential conductance index of treatment plants were suggested as aluminium resistance characteristics.

  19. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Natalie Rose; Saleh, Dahlia; Miller, Richard A

    2017-03-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from idiopathic benign causes to inherited fever syndromes, to connective tissue disease, or even inflammatory bowel diseases. A thorough history and review of systems can assist the clinician in determining whether it is related to a systemic inflammatory process or truly idiopathic. Management of aphthous stomatitis is challenging. For recurrent aphthous stomatitis or recalcitrant aphthous stomatitis from underlying disease, first-line treatment consists of topical medications with use of systemic medications as necessary. Herein, the authors discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment ladder of aphthous stomatitis as described in the literature.

  20. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Greenberg, Martin S

    2005-01-01

    The cause of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) remains unknown despite considerable research. This article reviews the evidence for current theories regarding this disorder, including possible suspected relationships with microbial and immunologic factors, and presents medical diseases that mimic RAS lesions in certain patients. Topical management of the common form of minor RAS is described along with systemic therapy currently available to patients with severe forms of this disease.

  1. The BIG protein distinguishes the process of CO2-induced stomatal closure from the inhibition of stomatal opening by CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Zhang, Ruo-Xi; Peng, Kai; Tagliavia, Cecilia; Li, Siwen; Xue, Shaowu; Liu, Amy; Hu, Honghong; Zhang, Jingbo; Hubbard, Katharine E; Held, Katrin; McAinsh, Martin R; Gray, Julie E; Kudla, Jörg; Schroeder, Julian I; Liang, Yun-Kuan; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2018-04-01

    We conducted an infrared thermal imaging-based genetic screen to identify Arabidopsis mutants displaying aberrant stomatal behavior in response to elevated concentrations of CO 2 . This approach resulted in the isolation of a novel allele of the Arabidopsis BIG locus (At3g02260) that we have called CO 2 insensitive 1 (cis1). BIG mutants are compromised in elevated CO 2 -induced stomatal closure and bicarbonate activation of S-type anion channel currents. In contrast with the wild-type, they fail to exhibit reductions in stomatal density and index when grown in elevated CO 2 . However, like the wild-type, BIG mutants display inhibition of stomatal opening when exposed to elevated CO 2 . BIG mutants also display wild-type stomatal aperture responses to the closure-inducing stimulus abscisic acid (ABA). Our results indicate that BIG is a signaling component involved in the elevated CO 2 -mediated control of stomatal development. In the control of stomatal aperture by CO 2 , BIG is only required in elevated CO 2 -induced closure and not in the inhibition of stomatal opening by this environmental signal. These data show that, at the molecular level, the CO 2 -mediated inhibition of opening and promotion of stomatal closure signaling pathways are separable and BIG represents a distinguishing element in these two CO 2 -mediated responses. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Delivering key signals to the machine: seeking the electric signal that muscles emanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Hashim, A. Y.; Maslan, M. N.; Izamshah, R.; Mohamad, I. S.

    2014-11-01

    Due to the limitation of electric power generation in the human body, present human-machine interfaces have not been successful because of the nature of standard electronics circuit designs, which do not consider the specifications of signals that resulted from the skin. In general, the outcomes and applications of human-machine interfaces are limited to custom-designed subsystems, such as neuroprosthesis. We seek to model the bio dynamical of sub skin into equivalent mathematical definitions, descriptions, and theorems. Within the human skin, there are networks of nerves that permit the skin to function as a multi dimension transducer. We investigate the nature of structural skin. Apart from multiple networks of nerves, there are other segments within the skin such as minute muscles. We identify the segments that are active when there is an electromyography activity. When the nervous system is firing signals, the muscle is being stimulated. We evaluate the phenomena of biodynamic of the muscles that is concerned with the electromyography activity of the nervous system. In effect, we design a relationship between the human somatosensory and synthetic systems sensory as the union of a complete set of the new domain of the functional system. This classifies electromyogram waveforms linked to intent thought of an operator. The system will become the basis for delivering key signals to machine such that the machine is under operator's intent, hence slavery.

  3. Origins and Evolution of Stomatal Development1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The fossil record suggests stomata-like pores were present on the surfaces of land plants over 400 million years ago. Whether stomata arose once or whether they arose independently across newly evolving land plant lineages has long been a matter of debate. In Arabidopsis, a genetic toolbox has been identified that tightly controls stomatal development and patterning. This includes the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, FAMA, and ICE/SCREAMs (SCRMs), which promote stomatal formation. These factors are regulated via a signaling cascade, which includes mobile EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) peptides to enforce stomatal spacing. Mosses and hornworts, the most ancient extant lineages to possess stomata, possess orthologs of these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal toolbox genes, and manipulation in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens has shown that the bHLH and EPF components are also required for moss stomatal development and patterning. This supports an ancient and tightly conserved genetic origin of stomata. Here, we review recent discoveries and, by interrogating newly available plant genomes, we advance the story of stomatal development and patterning across land plant evolution. Furthermore, we identify potential orthologs of the key toolbox genes in a hornwort, further supporting a single ancient genetic origin of stomata in the ancestor to all stomatous land plants. PMID:28356502

  4. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar, Natalie Rose; Saleh, Dahlia; Miller, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from idiopathic benign causes to inherited fever syndromes, to connective tissue disease, or even inflammatory bowel diseases. A thorough history and review of...

  5. Electrical signals as mechanism of photosynthesis regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This review summarizes current works concerning the effects of electrical signals (ESs) on photosynthesis, the mechanisms of the effects, and its physiological role in plants. Local irritations of plants induce various photosynthetic responses in intact leaves, including fast and long-term inactivation of photosynthesis, and its activation. Irritation-induced ESs, including action potential, variation potential, and system potential, probably causes the photosynthetic responses in intact leaves. Probable mechanisms of induction of fast inactivation of photosynthesis are associated with Ca(2+)- and (or) H(+)-influxes during ESs generation; long-term inactivation of photosynthesis might be caused by Ca(2+)- and (or) H(+)-influxes, production of abscisic and jasmonic acids, and inactivation of phloem H(+)-sucrose symporters. It is probable that subsequent development of inactivation of photosynthesis is mainly associated with decreased CO2 influx and inactivation of the photosynthetic dark reactions, which induces decreased photochemical quantum yields of photosystems I and II and increased non-photochemical quenching of photosystem II fluorescence and cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. However, other pathways of the ESs influence on the photosynthetic light reactions are also possible. One of them might be associated with ES-connected acidification of chloroplast stroma inducing ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase accumulation at the thylakoids in Tic62 and TROL complexes. Mechanisms of ES-induced activation of photosynthesis require further investigation. The probable ultimate effect of ES-induced photosynthetic responses in plant life is the increased photosynthetic machinery resistance to stressors, including high and low temperatures, and enhanced whole-plant resistance to environmental factors at least during 1 h after irritation.

  6. A New Application of the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) for Acquiring and Measuring Electrical Signals in Phloem Sieve Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Recatalà, Vicenta; Tjallingii, W Freddy

    2015-07-02

    Electrophysiological properties of cells are often studied in vitro, after dissociating them from their native environments. However, the study of electrical transmission between distant cells in an organism requires in vivo, artifact-free recordings of cells embedded within their native environment. The transmission of electrical signals from wounded to unwounded areas in a plant has since long piqued the interest of botanists. The phloem, the living part of the plant vasculature that is spread throughout the plant, has been postulated as a major tissue in electrical transmission in plants. The lack of suitable electrophysiological methods poses many challenges for the study of the electrical properties of the phloem cells in vivo. Here we present a novel approach for intracellular electrophysiology of sieve elements (SEs) that uses living aphids, or other phloem-feeding hemipteran insects, integrated in the electrical penetration graph (EPG) circuit. The versatility, robustness, and accuracy of this method made it possible to record and study in detail the wound-induced electrical signals in SEs of central veins of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana(1). Here we show that EPG-electrodes can be easily implemented for intracellular electrophysiological recordings of SEs in marginal veins, as well as to study the capacity of SEs to respond with electrical signals to several external stimuli. The EPG approach applied to intracellular electrophysiology of SEs can be implemented to a wide variety of plant species, in a large number of plant/insect combinations, and for many research aims.

  7. Hardware System for Real-Time EMG Signal Acquisition and Separation Processing during Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Ya-Hsin; Yin, Chieh; Chen, Yan-Hong

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to develop a real-time electromyography (EMG) signal acquiring and processing device that can acquire signal during electrical stimulation. Since electrical stimulation output can affect EMG signal acquisition, to integrate the two elements into one system, EMG signal transmitting and processing method has to be modified. The whole system was designed in a user-friendly and flexible manner. For EMG signal processing, the system applied Altera Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as the core to instantly process real-time hybrid EMG signal and output the isolated signal in a highly efficient way. The system used the power spectral density to evaluate the accuracy of signal processing, and the cross correlation showed that the delay of real-time processing was only 250 μs.

  8. Modeling of Electric Disturbance Signals Using Damped Sinusoids via Atomic Decompositions and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tcheou Michel P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of waveforms monitored in power systems is increasing rapidly. This creates a demand for computational tools that aid in the analysis of the phenomena and also that allow efficient transmission and storage of the information acquired. In this context, signal processing techniques play a fundamental role. This work is a tutorial reviewing the principles and applications of atomic signal modeling of electric disturbance signals. The disturbance signal is modeled using a linear combination of damped sinusoidal components which are closely related to the phenomena typically observed in power systems. The signal model obtained is then employed for disturbance signal denoising, filtering of "DC components," and compression.

  9. [Recurrent aphthous stomatitis in Rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera Matute, Gabriel; Riera Alonso, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis consists on recurring oral ulcers of unknown etiology. Oral ulcers may be different in number and size depending on the clinical presentation, which also determines the time needed for healing. Moreover, there are factors associated to outbreaks but not implicated in its etiopathogenesis. When oral aphthosis has a known etiology, it is not considered as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The severity and the clinical presentation helps in the differential diagnosis. Treatment is symptomatic in recurrent aphthous stomatitis while, if there is an underlying systemic disease, the treatment of such disease is need in addition to topical treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging using Dynamic Price Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenas, Sergejus; Pedersen, Anders Bro; Marinelli, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    With yearly increases in Electric Vehicle (EV) sales, the future for electric mobility continues to brighten, and with more vehicles hitting the roads every day, the energy requirements on the grid will increase, potentially causing low-voltage distribution grid congestion. This problem can...... proposed in this paper, involves a real-time control strategy for charging the EV using a dynamic price tariff, with the objective of minimizing the charging cost. Two different charging scenario are investigated, and the results are verified by experiments on a real Electric Vehicle. Finally, the costs......, however, be resolved by using intelligent EV charging strategies, commonly referred to as ”Smart Charging”. The basic approach involves modifying the default vehicle charging scheme of ”immediate charging”, to a more optimal one that is derived from insight into the current state of the grid. This work...

  11. Three-phase electrical signals analysis for mechanical faults monitoring in rotating machine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cablea, Georgia; Granjon, Pierre; Bérenguer, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    The current paper proposes a method to detect mechanical faults in rotating machines using three-phase electrical currents analysis. The proposed fault indicator relies on the use of instantaneous symmetrical components (ISCs), followed by a demodulation step enhancing the small modulations generated in electrical signals by mechanical faults. The limitations due to the multi-component nature of electrical signals, as well as to the noise naturally present in the measured signals are studied and taken into account in order to elaborate a proper and efficient algorithm to compute a mechanical fault indicator. It is theoretically shown that the ISCs based approach results in an increase of the signal-to-noise ratio compared to a single-phase approach, finally leading to an improvement of early fault detection capabilities. This result is validated using both synthetic and experimental signals where the proposed method is used to detect bearing faults and the obtained results are compared to single-phase results.

  12. Natural variation in stomatal responses to environmental changes among Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Takahashi

    Full Text Available Stomata are small pores surrounded by guard cells that regulate gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere. Guard cells integrate multiple environmental signals and control the aperture width to ensure appropriate stomatal function for plant survival. Leaf temperature can be used as an indirect indicator of stomatal conductance to environmental signals. In this study, leaf thermal imaging of 374 Arabidopsis ecotypes was performed to assess their stomatal responses to changes in environmental CO2 concentrations. We identified three ecotypes, Köln (Kl-4, Gabelstein (Ga-0, and Chisdra (Chi-1, that have particularly low responsiveness to changes in CO2 concentrations. We next investigated stomatal responses to other environmental signals in these selected ecotypes, with Col-0 as the reference. The stomatal responses to light were also reduced in the three selected ecotypes when compared with Col-0. In contrast, their stomatal responses to changes in humidity were similar to those of Col-0. Of note, the responses to abscisic acid, a plant hormone involved in the adaptation of plants to reduced water availability, were not entirely consistent with the responses to humidity. This study demonstrates that the stomatal responses to CO2 and light share closely associated signaling mechanisms that are not generally correlated with humidity signaling pathways in these ecotypes. The results might reflect differences between ecotypes in intrinsic response mechanisms to environmental signals.

  13. Research on the Effect of Electrical Signals on Growth of Sansevieria under Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liguo; Meng, Qinghao; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Wu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The plant electrical signal has some features, e.g. weak, low-frequency and time-varying. To detect changes in plant electrical signals, LED light source was used to create a controllable light environment in this study. The electrical signal data were collected from Sansevieria leaves under the different illumination conditions, and the data was analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time-frequency domain, respectively. These analyses are helpful to explore the relationship between changes in the light environment and electrical signals in Sansevieria leaves. The changes in the plant electrical signal reflected the changes in the intensity of photosynthesis. In this study, we proposed a new method to express plant photosynthetic intensity as a function of the electrical signal. That is, the plant electrical signal can be used to describe the state of plant growth.

  14. Research on the Effect of Electrical Signals on Growth of Sansevieria under Light-Emitting Diode (LED Lighting Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Tian

    Full Text Available The plant electrical signal has some features, e.g. weak, low-frequency and time-varying. To detect changes in plant electrical signals, LED light source was used to create a controllable light environment in this study. The electrical signal data were collected from Sansevieria leaves under the different illumination conditions, and the data was analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time-frequency domain, respectively. These analyses are helpful to explore the relationship between changes in the light environment and electrical signals in Sansevieria leaves. The changes in the plant electrical signal reflected the changes in the intensity of photosynthesis. In this study, we proposed a new method to express plant photosynthetic intensity as a function of the electrical signal. That is, the plant electrical signal can be used to describe the state of plant growth.

  15. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ricky Z; Bruce, Alison J; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common acute oral ulcerative condition in North America. RAS is divided into a mild, common form, simple aphthosis, and a severe, less common form, complex aphthosis. Aphthosis is a reactive condition. The lesions of RAS can represent the mucosal manifestation of a variety of conditions. These include conditions with oral and genital aphthae such as ulcus vulvae acutum, reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers, and Behçet disease. The mouth is the beginning of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and the lesions of RAS can be a manifestation of GI diseases such as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn disease. Complex aphthosis may also have correctable causes. The clinician should seek these in a careful evaluation. Successful management of both simple and complex aphthosis depends on accurate diagnosis, proper classification, recognition of provocative factors, and the identification of associated diseases. The outlook for patients with both simple and complex aphthosis is positive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous electrical and mechanical resonance drive for large signal amplification of micro resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, M. H.

    2018-01-12

    Achieving large signal-noise ratio using low levels of excitation signal is key requirement for practical applications of micro and nano electromechanical resonators. In this work, we introduce the double electromechanical resonance drive concept to achieve an order-of-magnitude dynamic signal amplification in micro resonators. The concept relies on simultaneously activating the micro-resonator mechanical and electrical resonance frequencies. We report an input voltage amplification up to 15 times for a micro-resonator when its electrical resonance is tuned to match the mechanical resonance that leads to dynamic signal amplification in air (Quality factor enhancement). Furthermore, using a multi-frequency excitation technique, input voltage and vibrational amplification of up to 30 times were shown for the same micro-resonator while relaxing the need to match its mechanical and electrical resonances.

  17. The Integration of Electrical Signals Originating in the Root of Vascular Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Canales

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed different signaling systems allowing for the integration of environmental cues to coordinate molecular processes associated to both early development and the physiology of the adult plant. Research on systemic signaling in plants has traditionally focused on the role of phytohormones as long-distance signaling molecules, and more recently the importance of peptides and miRNAs in building up this communication process has also been described. However, it is well-known that plants have the ability to generate different types of long-range electrical signals in response to different stimuli such as light, temperature variations, wounding, salt stress, or gravitropic stimulation. Presently, it is unclear whether short or long-distance electrical communication in plants is linked to nutrient uptake. This review deals with aspects of sensory input in plant roots and the propagation of discrete signals to the plant body. We discuss the physiological role of electrical signaling in nutrient uptake and how nutrient variations may become an electrical signal propagating along the plant.

  18. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K+ accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. PMID:26307440

  19. Chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis relationship hypothesis: A neuroimmunobiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiquita Prahasanti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic injuries to the oral mucosa in fixed orthodontic patients are common, especially in the first week of bracket placement, and occasionally lead to the development of aphthous stomatitis or ulcers. Nevertheless, these lesions are selflimiting. Purpose: The objective of this study is to reveal the connection between chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis which is still unclear. Case: A patient with a persistent lesion for more than six months. Case Management: RAS was treated with scaling procedure, the gingival inflammation was healed. However, in this case report, despite the appropriate management procedures had been done, the lesion still worsen and became more painful. Moreover, the symptoms did not heal for more than two weeks. Actually, they had been undergone orthodontic treatment more than six months and rarely suffered from aphthous stomatitis. Coincidentally, at that time they also suffered from chronic gingivitis. It was interesting that after scaling procedures, the ulcer subsides in two days. Conclusion: Recently, the neuroimmunobiological researches which involved neurotransmitters and cytokines on cell-nerve signaling, and heat shock proteins in gingivitis and stomatitis are in progress. Nevertheless, they were done separately, thus do not explain the interrelationship. This proposed new concept which based on an integrated neuroimmunobiological approach could explain the benefit of periodontal treatment, especially scaling procedures, for avoiding prolonged painful episodes and unnecessary medications in aphthous stomatitis. However, for widely acceptance of the chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis relationship, further clinical and laboratory study should be done. Regarding to the relatively fast healing after scaling procedures in this case report; it was concluded that the connection between chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis is possible.

  20. Effects of stomatal development on stomatal conductance and on stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in Syringa oblata and Euonymus japonicus Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing-Jie; Chow, Wah Soon; Liu, Yu-Jun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuang-Dao

    2014-12-01

    During leaf development, the increase in stomatal conductance cannot meet photosynthetic demand for CO2, thus leading to stomatal limitation of photosynthesis (Ls). Considering the crucial influences of stomatal development on stomatal conductance, we speculated whether stomatal development limits photosynthesis to some extent. To test this hypothesis, stomatal development, stomatal conductance and photosynthesis were carefully studied in both Syringa oblata (normal greening species) and Euonymus japonicus Thunb (delayed greening species). Our results show that the size of stomata increased gradually with leaf expansion, resulting in increased stomatal conductance up to the time of full leaf expansion. During this process, photosynthesis also increased steadily. Compared to that in S. oblata, the development of chloroplasts in E. japonicus Thunb was obviously delayed, leading to a delay in the improvement of photosynthetic capacity. Further analysis revealed that before full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation increased rapidly in both S. oblata and E. japonicus Thunb; after full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation continually increased in E. japonicus Thunb. Accordingly, we suggested that the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity is the main factor leading to stomatal limitation during leaf development but that stomatal development can alleviate stomatal limitation with the increase of photosynthesis by controlling gas exchange. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Certain applied electrical signals during EPG cause negative effects on stylet probing behaviors by adult Lygus lineolaris (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study is the first to fully evaluate whether electrical signals applied to insects during electropenetrography (EPG; also called electrical penetration graph) affect insect behavior. During EPG, electrical signals are applied to plants, and thus to the gold-wire-tethered insects feeding on elec...

  2. System and method of modulating electrical signals using photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductors as variable resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John Richardson; Caporaso, George J; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2013-10-22

    A system and method for producing modulated electrical signals. The system uses a variable resistor having a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material construction whose conduction response to changes in amplitude of incident radiation is substantially linear throughout a non-saturation region to enable operation in non-avalanche mode. The system also includes a modulated radiation source, such as a modulated laser, for producing amplitude-modulated radiation with which to direct upon the variable resistor and modulate its conduction response. A voltage source and an output port, are both operably connected to the variable resistor so that an electrical signal may be produced at the output port by way of the variable resistor, either generated by activation of the variable resistor or propagating through the variable resistor. In this manner, the electrical signal is modulated by the variable resistor so as to have a waveform substantially similar to the amplitude-modulated radiation.

  3. Small Signal Stability Improvement of Power Systems Using Optimal Load Responses in Competitive Electricity Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Weihao; Su, Chi; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Since the hourly spot market price is available one day ahead in Denmark, the price could be transferred to the consumers and they may shift some of their loads from high price periods to the low price periods in order to save their energy costs. The optimal load response to an electricity price...... for demand side management generates different load profiles and may provide an opportunity to improve the small signal stability of power systems with high wind power penetrations. In this paper, the idea of power system small signal stability improvement by using optimal load response to the electricity...

  4. ANN-based wavelet analysis for predicting electrical signal from photovoltaic power supply system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellit, A. [Medea Univ., Medea (Algeria). Inst. of Science Engineering, Dept. of Electronics

    2007-07-01

    This study was conducted to predict different electrical signals from a photovoltaic power supply system (PVPS) using an artificial neural networks (ANN) with wavelet analysis. It involved the creation of a database of electrical signals (PV-generator current, voltage, battery current voltage, regulator current and voltage) obtained from an experimental PVPS system installed in the south of Algeria. The potential applications were for sizing and analyzing the performance of PVPS systems; control of maximum power point tracker (MPPT) in order to deliver the maximum energy from the PV-array; prediction of the optimal configuration (PV-array and battery sizing) of PVPS systems; expert configuration of PV-systems; faults diagnosis; supervision; and, control and monitoring. First, based on the wavelet analysis each electrical signal was mapped in several time frequency domains. The PV-system was then divided into 3-subsystems corresponding to ANN-PV generator model, ANN-battery model, and ANN-regulator model. An example of day-by-day prediction for each electrical signal was presented. The results of the proposed approach were in good agreement with experimental results. In addition, the accuracy of the proposed approach was more satisfactory when only ANN was used. It was concluded that this methodology offers the possibility of developing a new expert configuration of PVPS by implementing the soft computing ANN-wavelet program with a digital signal processing (DSP) circuit. 26 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  5. RBF neural network prediction on weak electrical signals in Aloe vera var. chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lanzhou; Zhao, Jiayin; Wang, Miao

    2008-10-01

    A Gaussian radial base function (RBF) neural network forecast on signals in the Aloe vera var. chinensis by the wavelet soft-threshold denoised as the time series and using the delayed input window chosen at 50, is set up to forecast backward. There was the maximum amplitude at 310.45μV, minimum -75.15μV, average value -2.69μV and Aloe vera var. chinensis respectively. The electrical signal in Aloe vera var. chinensis is a sort of weak, unstable and low frequency signals. A result showed that it is feasible to forecast plant electrical signals for the timing by the RBF. The forecast data can be used as the preferences for the intelligent autocontrol system based on the adaptive characteristic of plants to achieve the energy saving on the agricultural production in the plastic lookum or greenhouse.

  6. Dynamic Range Enhancement of High-Speed Electrical Signal Data via Non-Linear Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, Matthew C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for high-speed compression of dynamic electrical signal waveforms to extend the measuring capabilities of conventional measuring devices such as oscilloscopes and high-speed data acquisition systems are discussed. Transfer function components and algorithmic transfer functions can be used to accurately measure signals that are within the frequency bandwidth but beyond the voltage range and voltage resolution capabilities of the measuring device.

  7. Modeling of Electric Disturbance Signals Using Damped Sinusoids via Atomic Decompositions and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. M. Rodrigues

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of waveforms monitored in power systems is increasing rapidly. This creates a demand for computational tools that aid in the analysis of the phenomena and also that allow efficient transmission and storage of the information acquired. In this context, signal processing techniques play a fundamental role. This work is a tutorial reviewing the principles and applications of atomic signal modeling of electric disturbance signals. The disturbance signal is modeled using a linear combination of damped sinusoidal components which are closely related to the phenomena typically observed in power systems. The signal model obtained is then employed for disturbance signal denoising, filtering of “DC components,” and compression.

  8. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Christopher; Turner, Carla; Landim, Marcela Guimaraes; Cameron, Duncan; Gray, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development. PMID:27275842

  9. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ship, J A

    1996-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous ulceration or recurrent aphthous stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal disease known to human beings. Despite much clinical and research attention, the causes remain poorly understood, the ulcers are not preventable, and treatment is symptomatic. The most common presentation is minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis: recurrent, round, clearly defined, small, painful ulcers that heal in 10 to 14 days without scarring. Major recurrent aphthous stomatitis lesions are larger (greater than 5 mm), can last for 6 weeks or longer, and frequently scar. The third variety of recurrent aphthous stomatitis is herpetiform ulcers, which present as multiple small clusters of pinpoint lesions that can coalesce to form large irregular ulcers and last 7 to 10 days. Diagnosis of all varieties is usually made after clinical examination. Many local and systemic factors have been associated with these conditions, and there is evidence that there may be a genetic and immunopathogenic basis for recurrent aphthous ulceration. Management of this condition depends on the clinical presentation and symptoms and includes analgesic, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory drugs. As dental clinicians and researchers become better trained in oral medicine and stomatology, it is anticipated that the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of recurrent aphthous ulceration will improve in the future.

  10. Prosthetic stomatitis with removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozalieva Yu.Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Research Objective: To study patients with prosthetic stomatitis, who use the removable laminar dentures. Materials: The consultations and treatment of 79 patients aged 47-65 years have been conducted. The patients have been divided into two clinical groups. The first clinical group (39 persons with the performance of immediate prosthet-ics; the second control clinical group (40 persons — the permanent dentures were produced without the preliminary instruction. Results: All the patients, having the laminar dentures without the preliminary use of immediate constructions of dentures, in spite of repeated correction of them, have had changes of dentures and transitory fold. Patients have been exposed to prosthetic stomatitis of different etiology (without trauma; the single-shot or multiple correction of dentures by the method of rebasing with using of cold cure plastics has been made. Conclusion: Structural and functional changes of dentition during the prosthetic stomatitis lead to disorders, associated by the mucositis. Use of the term of «prosthetic stomatitis» reflects etiological and pathogenetic component of changes in the denture-supporting tissues

  11. Receipt of Input Signal Amplitudes in Microprocessor Protection of Electrical Installations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Romaniuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency-independent methods for receipt of input signal amplitudes in microprocessor protection of an electrical installation in the aggregate with earlier analyzed digital filters are considered in the paper. The paper contains comparative analysis and specified characteristics have been obtained.

  12. Spontaneous, pro-arrhythmic calcium signals disrupt electrical pacing in mouse pulmonary vein sleeve cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Rietdorf

    Full Text Available The pulmonary vein, which returns oxygenated blood to the left atrium, is ensheathed by a population of unique, myocyte-like cells called pulmonary vein sleeve cells (PVCs. These cells autonomously generate action potentials that propagate into the left atrial chamber and cause arrhythmias resulting in atrial fibrillation; the most common, often sustained, form of cardiac arrhythmia. In mice, PVCs extend along the pulmonary vein into the lungs, and are accessible in a lung slice preparation. We exploited this model to study how aberrant Ca(2+ signaling alters the ability of PVC networks to follow electrical pacing. Cellular responses were investigated using real-time 2-photon imaging of lung slices loaded with a Ca(2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator (Ca(2+ measurements and phase contrast microscopy (contraction measurements. PVCs displayed global Ca(2+ signals and coordinated contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS. The effects of EFS relied on both Ca(2+ influx and Ca(2+ release, and could be inhibited by nifedipine, ryanodine or caffeine. Moreover, PVCs had a high propensity to show spontaneous Ca(2+ signals that arose via stochastic activation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs. The ability of electrical pacing to entrain Ca(2+ signals and contractile responses was dramatically influenced by inherent spontaneous Ca(2+ activity. In PVCs with relatively low spontaneous Ca(2+ activity (1.5 Hz, electrical pacing was less effective; PVCs became unpaced, only partially-paced or displayed alternans. Because spontaneous Ca(2+ activity varied between cells, neighboring PVCs often had different responses to electrical pacing. Our data indicate that the ability of PVCs to respond to electrical stimulation depends on their intrinsic Ca(2+ cycling properties. Heterogeneous spontaneous Ca(2+ activity arising from stochastic RyR opening can disengage them from sinus rhythm and lead to autonomous, pro-arrhythmic activity.

  13. Near-infrared signals associated with electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Sergio; Chen, Debbie K.; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.

    2009-02-01

    We report our studies on the optical signals measured non-invasively on electrically stimulated peripheral nerves. The stimulation consists of the delivery of 0.1 ms current pulses, below the threshold for triggering any visible motion, to a peripheral nerve in human subjects (we have studied the sural nerve and the median nerve). In response to electrical stimulation, we observe an optical signal that peaks at about 100 ms post-stimulus, on a much longer time scale than the few milliseconds duration of the electrical response, or sensory nerve action potential (SNAP). While the 100 ms optical signal we measured is not a direct optical signature of neural activation, it is nevertheless indicative of a mediated response to neural activation. We argue that this may provide information useful for understanding the origin of the fast optical signal (also on a 100 ms time scale) that has been measured non-invasively in the brain in response to cerebral activation. Furthermore, the optical response to peripheral nerve activation may be developed into a diagnostic tool for peripheral neuropathies, as suggested by the delayed optical signals (average peak time: 230 ms) measured in patients with diabetic neuropathy with respect to normal subjects (average peak time: 160 ms).

  14. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2016-11-07

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, Micromega detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  15. Stomatal complex types, stomatal density, and the stomatal index in some species of dioscorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahaman A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dioscorea alata L. has three stomatal complex types, namely, paracytic, anisocytic, and tetracytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 50, 18, and 32, respectively. Dioscorea bulbifera has paracytic and anisocytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 87.60 and 12.40, respectively. Dioscorea cayenensis has anisocytic stomata, with a percent­age frequency value of 100. Dioscorea dumetorum has tetracytic and paractytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 91.05 and 8.95, respectively. Both D. esculenta and D. rotundata have paracytic stomata, with a percentage frequency of 100. The range of variation of stomatal density is from 10 (lowest value in D. alata and D. dumentorum to 27 (highest value in D. bulbifera. The stomatal index also varies, from 24 in D. alata to 47 in D. cayenensis. The size of stomata in all species is small, varying in length from 0.74 μm in D. alata to 1.79 μm in D. dumentorum. An indented dichotomous key based on stomatal features was constructed to distinguish and identify the species.

  16. Guard cell photosynthesis is critical for stomatal turgor production, yet does not directly mediate CO2- and ABA-induced stomatal closing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Palomares, Axxell; Bagheri, Andish; Israelsson-Nordstrom, Maria; Engineer, Cawas B.; Bargmann, Bastiaan O.R.; Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Stomata mediate gas exchange between the inter-cellular spaces of leaves and the atmosphere. CO2 levels in leaves (Ci) are determined by respiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and atmospheric [CO2]. [CO2] in leaves mediates stomatal movements. The role of guard-cell photosynthesis in stomatal conductance responses is a matter of debate, and genetic approaches are needed. We have generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that are chlorophyll-deficient in guard cells only, expressing a constitutively active chlorophyllase in a guard-cell specific enhancer trap-line. Our data show that more than 90% of guard cells were chlorophyll-deficient. Interestingly, approximately ~ 45% of stomata had an unusual, previously not-described, morphology of thin-shaped chlorophyll-less stomata. Nevertheless, stomatal size, stomatal index, plant morphology, and whole-leaf photosynthetic parameters (PSII, qP, qN, FV′/FM′) were comparable to wild-type plants. Time-resolved intact leaf gas exchange analyses showed a reduction in stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation rates of the transgenic plants. Normalization of CO2 responses showed that stomata of transgenic plants respond to [CO2] shifts. Detailed stomatal aperture measurements of normal kidney-shaped stomata, which lack chlorophyll, showed stomatal closing responses to [CO2] elevation and abscisic acid (ABA), while thin-shaped stomata were continuously closed. Our present findings show that stomatal movement responses to [CO2] and ABA are functional in guard cells that lack chlorophyll. These data suggest that guard-cell CO2 and ABA signal transduction are not directly modulated by guard-cell photosynthesis/electron transport. Moreover, the finding that chlorophyll-less stomata cause a “deflated” thin-shaped phenotype, suggests that photosynthesis in guard cells is critical for energization and guard-cell turgor production. PMID:26096271

  17. Guard cell photosynthesis is critical for stomatal turgor production, yet does not directly mediate CO2 - and ABA-induced stomatal closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Palomares, Axxell; Bagheri, Andisheh; Israelsson-Nordstrom, Maria; Engineer, Cawas B; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Stephan, Aaron B; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-08-01

    Stomata mediate gas exchange between the inter-cellular spaces of leaves and the atmosphere. CO2 levels in leaves (Ci) are determined by respiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and atmospheric [CO2 ]. [CO2 ] in leaves mediates stomatal movements. The role of guard cell photosynthesis in stomatal conductance responses is a matter of debate, and genetic approaches are needed. We have generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that are chlorophyll-deficient in guard cells only, expressing a constitutively active chlorophyllase in a guard cell specific enhancer trap line. Our data show that more than 90% of guard cells were chlorophyll-deficient. Interestingly, approximately 45% of stomata had an unusual, previously not-described, morphology of thin-shaped chlorophyll-less stomata. Nevertheless, stomatal size, stomatal index, plant morphology, and whole-leaf photosynthetic parameters (PSII, qP, qN, FV '/FM' ) were comparable with wild-type plants. Time-resolved intact leaf gas-exchange analyses showed a reduction in stomatal conductance and CO2 -assimilation rates of the transgenic plants. Normalization of CO2 responses showed that stomata of transgenic plants respond to [CO2 ] shifts. Detailed stomatal aperture measurements of normal kidney-shaped stomata, which lack chlorophyll, showed stomatal closing responses to [CO2 ] elevation and abscisic acid (ABA), while thin-shaped stomata were continuously closed. Our present findings show that stomatal movement responses to [CO2 ] and ABA are functional in guard cells that lack chlorophyll. These data suggest that guard cell CO2 and ABA signal transduction are not directly modulated by guard cell photosynthesis/electron transport. Moreover, the finding that chlorophyll-less stomata cause a 'deflated' thin-shaped phenotype, suggests that photosynthesis in guard cells is critical for energization and guard cell turgor production. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Method for Signal Processing of Electric Field Modulation Sensor in a Conductive Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Miseyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the large waters and deep oceans the most promising are modulation sensors for measuring electric field in a conducting environment in a very low frequency range in devices of autonomous or non-autonomous vertical sounding. When using sensors of this type it is necessary to solve the problem of enhancement and measurement of the modulated signal from the baseband noise.The work analyses hydrodynamic and electromagnetic noise at the input of transducer with "rotating" sensitive axis. By virtue of matching the measuring electrodes with the signal processing circuit a conclusion has been drawn that the proposed basic model of a transducer with "rotating” sensitive axis is the most efficient in terms of enhancement and measurement of modulated signal from the baseband noise. It has been shown that it is undesirable for transducers to have the rotation of electrodes resulting, in this case, in arising noise to be synchronously changed with transducer rotation frequency (modulation frequency. This will complicate the further signal-noise enhancement later in their processing.The paper justifies the choice of demodulation output signal, called synchronous demodulation using a low-pass filter with a cutoff frequency much lower than the carrier frequency to provide an output signal in the range of very low frequency and dc electric fields.The paper offers an original circuit to process the signals taken from the modulation sensor with "rotating" measurement base. This circuit has advantages over the earlier known circuits for measuring electric fields in a conducting (marine environment in the ultralow frequency range of these fields in terms of sensitivity and measuring accuracy of modulation sensors.

  19. Review on signal-by-wire and power-by-wire actuation for more electric aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Charles MARÉ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The huge and rapid progress in electric drives offers new opportunities to improve the performances of aircraft at all levels: fuel burn, environmental footprint, safety, integration and production, serviceability, and maintainability. Actuation for safety-critical applications like flight-controls, landing gears, and even engines is one of the major consumers of non-propulsive power. Conventional actuation with centralized hydraulic power generation and distribution and control of power by throttling has been well established for decades, but offers a limited potential of evolution. In this context, electric drives become more and more attractive to remove the natural drawbacks of conventional actuation and to offer new opportunities for improving performance. This paper takes the stock, at both the signal and power levels, of the evolution of actuation for safety-critical applications in aerospace. It focuses on the recent advances and the remaining challenges to be taken toward full electrical actuation for commercial and military aircraft, helicopters, and launchers. It logically starts by emphasizing the specificity of safety-critical actuation for aerospace. The following section addresses in details the evolution of aerospace actuation from mechanically-signaled and hydraulically-supplied to all electric, with special emphasis on research and development programs and on solutions entered into service. Finally, the last section reviews the challenges to be taken to generalize the use of all-electric actuators for future aircraft programs.

  20. Electrical Signal Path Study and Component Assay for the MAJORANA N-Type Segmented Contact Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amman, Mark; Bergevin, Marc; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Fujikawa, Brian .; Lesko, Kevin T.; Luke, Paul N.; Prior, Gersende; Poon, Alan W.; Smith, Alan R.; Vetter, Kai; Yaver, Harold; Zimmermann, Sergio

    2009-02-24

    The purpose of the present electrical signal path study is to explore the various issues related to the deployment of highly-segmented low-background Ge detectors for the MAJORANA double-beta decay experiment. A significant challenge is to simultaneously satisfy competing requirements for the mechanical design, electrical readout performance, and radiopurity specifications from the MAJORANA project. Common to all rare search experiments, there is a very stringent limit on the acceptable radioactivity level of all the electronics components involved. Some of the findings are summarized in this report.

  1. Allergic Stomatitis From Orthodontic Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark R; Wong, Priscilla H; Dickson, Scott D; Coop, Christopher A

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of a type IV hypersensitivity reaction causing oral stomatitis, presumed to be the result of common dental adhesives. The case was diagnosed using patch testing to the dental adhesives that were used in the patient. Both of the adhesives tested contained a form of acrylate that is being seen more frequently in the literature as a cause of type IV hypersensitivity reactions. Metals can cause allergic reactions; however, other contact items need to be considered as a cause of oral allergic reactions. Cases of allergic stomatitis are rising and there is question if all-in-one adhesives may be contributing to this rise. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Drift Removal in Plant Electrical Signals via IIR Filtering Using Wavelet Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Saptarshi; Chatterjee, Shre Kumar; Ghosh, Sanmitra; Maharatna, Koushik; Dasmahapatra, Srinandan; Vitaletti, Andrea; Masi, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Plant electrical signals often contains low frequency drifts with or without the application of external stimuli. Quantification of the randomness in plant signals in a stimulus-specific way is hindered because the knowledge of vital frequency information in the actual biological response is not known yet. Here we design an optimum Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filter which removes the low frequency drifts and preserves the frequency spectrum corresponding to the random component of the unstimulated plant signals by bringing the bias due to unknown artifacts and drifts to a minimum. We use energy criteria of wavelet packet transform (WPT) for optimization based tuning of the IIR filter parameters. Such an optimum filter enforces that the energy distribution of the pre-stimulus parts in different experiments are almost overlapped but under different stimuli the distributions of the energy get changed. The reported research may popularize plant signal processing, as a separate field, besides other conventiona...

  3. Stomatal development in new leaves is related to the stomatal conductance of mature leaves in poplar (Populus trichocarpaxP. deltoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Livingston, Nigel J; Turpin, David H

    2006-01-01

    In general, stomatal density (SD) decreases when plants are grown at high CO2 concentrations. Recent studies suggest that signals produced from mature leaves regulate the SD of expanding leaves. To determine the underlying driver of these signals in poplar (Populus trichocarpaxP. deltoides) saplings, a cuvette system was used whereby the environment around mature (lower) leaves could be controlled independently of that around developing (upper) leaves. A series of experiments were performed in which the CO2 concentration, vapour pressure deficit (D), and irradiance (Q) around the lower leaves were varied while the (ambient) conditions around the upper leaves were unchanged. The overall objective was to break the nexus between leaf stomatal conductance and transpiration and photosynthesis rates of lower leaves and determine which, if any, of these parameters regulate stomatal development in the upper expanding leaves. SD, stomatal index (SI), and epidermal cell density (ED) were measured on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of fully expanded upper leaves. SD and SI decreased with increasing lower leaf CO2 concentration (150-780 ppm) at both ambient (1.3-1.6 kPa) and low (0.7-1.0 kPa) D. SD and SI at low D were generally higher than at ambient D. By contrast, ED was relatively insensitive to both vapour pressure and CO2 concentration. When lower leaves were shaded, upper leaf SD, SI, and ED decreased but did not change with varying CO2 concentration. These results suggest that epidermal cell development and stomatal development are regulated by different physiological mechanisms. SI of the upper leaves was positively and highly correlated (r2>0.84) with the stomatal conductance of the lower leaves independent of their net photosynthesis and transpiration rates, suggesting that the stomatal conductance of mature leaves has a regulatory effect on the stomatal development of expanding leaves.

  4. Myoelectric Signals from Paretic Wrist Extensor Controlling Electrical Stimulation of the Same Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, Thorsen; Fin, Biering-Sørensen; Hansen, Steffen Duus

    1996-01-01

    A device for enhancement of the grip in C5/6 spinal cord lesioned tetraplegics is under development. It uses the myoelectric signal from the paretic wrist extensor for control of electrical stimulation of the same muscle. The tetraplegics shall with the device be able to obtain a passive grip bet...... between the thumb an the index finger by extension of the wrist. Surface electrodes are used for myoelectric recording and stimulation. Main problems are filtering of the recorded signal and stimulation. Solutions to these problems are addressed and discussed....

  5. An Attempt to Partition Stomatal and Non-stomatal Ozone Deposition Parts on a Short Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, L.; Koncz, P.; Móring, A.; Nagy, Z.; Pintér, K.; Weidinger, T.

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the damaging effect of tropospheric ozone on vegetation, it is important to evaluate the stomatal uptake of ozone. Although the stomatal flux is a dominant pathway of ozone deposition onto vegetated surfaces, non-stomatal uptake mechanisms such as soil and cuticular deposition also play a vital role, especially when the leaf area index {LAI}model. We then derived the stomatal conductance of ozone using the Penman-Monteith (PM) theory based on the similarity to water vapour conductance. The non-stomatal conductance was calculated by subtracting the stomatal conductance from the canopy conductance derived from directly-measured fluxes. Our results show that for short vegetation (LAI = 0.25) dry deposition of ozone was dominated by the non-stomatal flux, which exceeded the stomatal flux even during the daytime. At night the stomatal uptake of ozone was found to be negligibly small. In the case of vegetation with {LAI}≈ 1 , the daytime stomatal and non-stomatal fluxes were of the same order of magnitude. These results emphasize that non-stomatal processes must be considered even in the case of well-developed vegetation where cuticular uptake is comparable in magnitude with stomatal uptake, and especially in the case of vegetated surfaces with {LAI}ozone deposition.

  6. Signal amelioration of electrophoretically deposited whole-cell biosensors using external electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar, E-mail: benyoav@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Amzel, Tal [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sternheim, Marek [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Belkin, Shimshon [Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Rubin, Adi [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Freeman, Amihay [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: > We present an electrochemical whole-cell biochip that can apply electric fields. > We examine the integration of cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition. > The effect of electric fields on the whole-cell biosensor has been demonstrated. > Relatively short DC electric pulse improves the performance of whole-cell biosensors. > Prolonged AC electric fields deteriorated the whole-cell biosensor performance. - Abstract: This paper presents an integrated whole-cell biochip system where functioning cells are deposited on the solid micro-machined surfaces while specially designed indium tin oxide electrodes that can be used to apply controllable electric fields during various stages; for example during cell deposition. The electrodes can be used also for sensing currents associated with the sensing mechanisms of electrochemical whole-cell biosensors. In this work a new approach integrating live bacterial cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition is presented. The biomaterial deposition technique was characterized under various driving potentials and chamber configurations. An analytical model of the electrophoretic deposition kinetics was developed and presented here. The deposited biomass included genetically engineered bacterial cells that may respond to toxic material exposure by expressing proteins that react with specific analytes generating electrochemically active byproducts. In this study the effect of external electric fields on the whole-cell biochips has been successfully developed and tested. The research hypothesis was that by applying electric fields on bacterial whole-cells, their permeability to the penetration of external analytes can be increased. This effect was tested and the results are shown here. The effect of prolonged and short external electric fields on the bioelectrochemical signal generated by sessile bacterial whole-cells in response to the presence of toxins was studied. It was demonstrated that relatively

  7. A Cable Equation Model of Electrical Signal Transmission in Non-uniformly Deformed Nerve Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Emily

    2012-03-01

    In order for the human body to function, neurons must be able to properly transmit electrical signals. One method of modeling this voltage flow is through the cable equation. Assuming that an aneurysm or tumor is present, we modify the cable equation to account for radially asymmetric deformation of a dendrite. Through this modification, we hope to improve our current understanding of overall brain function in the presence of neuronal deformation.

  8. Chaos analysis of the electrical signal time series evoked by acupuncture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jiang [School of Electrical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: jiangwang@tju.edu.cn; Sun Li [School of Electrical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fei Xiangyang [School of Electrical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhu Bing [Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700 (China)

    2007-08-15

    This paper employs chaos theory to analyze the time series of electrical signal which are evoked by different acupuncture methods applied to the Zusanli point. The phase space is reconstructed and the embedding parameters are obtained by the mutual information and Cao's methods. Subsequently, the largest Lyapunov exponent is calculated. From the analyses we can conclude that the time series are chaotic. In addition, differences between various acupuncture methods are discussed.

  9. Mathematical model of optical signals emitted by electrical discharges occuring in electroinsulating oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozioł Michał

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a parametric model describing the registered distributions spectrum of optical radiation emitted by electrical discharges generated in the systems: the needle- needle, the needleplate and in the system for surface discharges. Generation of electrical discharges and registration of the emitted radiation was carried out in three different electrical insulating oils: fabric new, operated (used and operated with air bubbles. For registration of optical spectra in the range of ultraviolet, visible and near infrared a high resolution spectrophotometer was. The proposed mathematical model was developed in a regression procedure using gauss-sigmoid type function. The dependent variable was the intensity of the recorded optical signals. In order to estimate the optimal parameters of the model an evolutionary algorithm was used. The optimization procedure was performed in Matlab environment. For determination of the matching quality of theoretical parameters of the regression function to the empirical data determination coefficient R2 was applied.

  10. Mathematical model of optical signals emitted by electrical discharges occuring in electroinsulating oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozioł, Michał

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a parametric model describing the registered distributions spectrum of optical radiation emitted by electrical discharges generated in the systems: the needle- needle, the needleplate and in the system for surface discharges. Generation of electrical discharges and registration of the emitted radiation was carried out in three different electrical insulating oils: fabric new, operated (used) and operated with air bubbles. For registration of optical spectra in the range of ultraviolet, visible and near infrared a high resolution spectrophotometer was. The proposed mathematical model was developed in a regression procedure using gauss-sigmoid type function. The dependent variable was the intensity of the recorded optical signals. In order to estimate the optimal parameters of the model an evolutionary algorithm was used. The optimization procedure was performed in Matlab environment. For determination of the matching quality of theoretical parameters of the regression function to the empirical data determination coefficient R2 was applied.

  11. Electrical signals in avocado trees: responses to light and water availability conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarce, Patricio; Gurovich, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Plant responses to environmental changes are associated with electrical excitability and signaling; automatic and continuous measurements of electrical potential differences (DeltaEP) between plant tissues can be effectively used to study information transport mechanisms and physiological responses that result from external stimuli on plants. The generation and conduction of electrochemical impulses within plant different tissues and organs, resulting from abiotic and biotic changes in environmental conditions is reported. In this work, electrical potential differences are monitored continuously using Ag/AgCl microelectrodes, inserted 5 mm deep into sapwood at two positions in the trunks of several Avocado trees. Electrodes are referenced to a non polarisable Ag/AgCl microelectrode installed 20 cm deep in the soil. Systematic patterns of DeltaEP during absolute darkness, day-night cycles and different conditions of soil water availability are discussed as alternative tools to assess early plant stress conditions.

  12. Sounding the Earth's electrical structure with satellite-detected ocean tidal magnetic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayver, Alexander; Schnepf, Neesha; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Sabaka, Terence; Nair, Manoj; Olsen, Nils

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade, the quality of satellite data, processing and modeling methods have experienced substantial improvements leading to a stage where satellite-observed tidal magnetic signals can be used to image electrical conductivity of the subsurface. In 2015, a collaborative project supported by ESA's STSE program was kicked off with the primary goal of performing the necessary data processing and their inversion. We present the first radial electrical conductivity model of the oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle obtained by inverting ocean tidal magnetic signals on the global scale. Specifically, the oceanic M2 tidal magnetic field was extracted as a part of the comprehensive magnetic field model (CM5) based on the twelve years of data from pre-Swarm satellite missions and magnetic observatories. The magnetic field was shown to exhibit structure on multiple spatial scales providing uniform global spatial coverage. In order to accurately model the tidal signal, we built the source by using the latest generation of the high-resolution HAMTIDE oceanic tide model and also derived laterally variable electrical conductivity of the world ocean. A surface conductance map that takes into account continent/ocean conductivity and sea-bottom sediment conductivity was used to account for the near-surface inhomogeneous layer. The integral equation forward solver was combined with a global stochastic optimization method and random sampling to carry out the inversion and uncertainty quantification. The obtained model is consistent with the existing regional models and provides a view on global lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  13. Putting the brakes on: abscisic acid as a central environmental regulator of stomatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Caspar C C; Oliver, James; Casson, Stuart; Gray, Julie E

    2014-04-01

    Stomata are produced by a controlled series of epidermal cell divisions. The molecular underpinnings of this process are becoming well understood, but mechanisms that determine plasticity of stomatal patterning to many exogenous and environmental cues remain less clear. Light quantity and quality, vapour pressure deficit, soil water content, and CO2 concentration are detected by the plant, and new leaves adapt their stomatal densities accordingly. Mature leaves detect these environmental signals and relay messages to immature leaves to tell them how to adapt and grow. Stomata on mature leaves may act as stress signal-sensing and transduction centres, locally by aperture adjustment, and at long distance by optimizing stomatal density to maximize future carbon gain while minimizing water loss. Although mechanisms of stomatal aperture responses are well characterized, the pathways by which mature stomata integrate environmental signals to control immature epidermal cell fate, and ultimately stomatal density, are not. Here we evaluate current understanding of the latter through the influence of the former. We argue that mature stomata, as key portals by which plants coordinate their carbon and water relations, are controlled by abscisic acid (ABA), both metabolically and hydraulically, and that ABA is also a core regulator of environmentally determined stomatal development. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  15. Endogenous field feedback promotes the detectability for exogenous electric signal in the hybrid coupled population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xile; Zhang, Danhong; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao, E-mail: htyu@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu, Meili [School of Informational Technology and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin 300222 (China); Che, Yanqiu [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin 300222 (China)

    2015-01-15

    This paper presents the endogenous electric field in chemical or electrical synaptic coupled networks, aiming to study the role of endogenous field feedback in the signal propagation in neural systems. It shows that the feedback of endogenous fields to network activities can reduce the required energy of the noise and enhance the transmission of input signals in hybrid coupled populations. As a common and important nonsynaptic interactive method among neurons, particularly, the endogenous filed feedback can not only promote the detectability of exogenous weak signal in hybrid coupled neural population but also enhance the robustness of the detectability against noise. Furthermore, with the increasing of field coupling strengths, the endogenous field feedback is conductive to the stochastic resonance by facilitating the transition of cluster activities from the no spiking to spiking regions. Distinct from synaptic coupling, the endogenous field feedback can play a role as internal driving force to boost the population activities, which is similar to the noise. Thus, it can help to transmit exogenous weak signals within the network in the absence of noise drive via the stochastic-like resonance.

  16. Passive vortex currents in magneto- and electrocardiography: comparison of magnetic and electric signal strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutz, Silvio; Bellemann, Matthias E.; Leder, Uwe; Haueisen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Vortex currents may be of importance in the early diagnosis of myocardial infarction caused by an occlusion of a coronary artery. We investigated the influence of a passive vortex current distribution, modelled by different conductivities in a hollow cylinder, on the localization error and on the signal strength in both the magnetocardiogram and the electrocardiogram. The hollow cylinder was mounted in a realistically shaped physical torso phantom. A platinum dipole was inserted into the cylinder. The compartment boundaries were modelled with two special ionic exchange membranes. The conductivity ratio of the cylinder compartment to the torso compartment was varied from 0.25 to 100. We compared the simultaneously measured magnetic and electric signal strengths as a function of this conductivity ratio. We found that an increasing conductivity ratio causes only a slight increase (about 19%) of the magnetic signal strength but a strong decrease (about 81%) of the electric signal strength. Using a homogeneous torso model, the dipole localization errors were, depending on the conductivity ratio, up to 16 mm. In conclusion, passive vortex currents might partially explain the differences between magnetocardiographic and electrocardiographic recordings observed both experimentally and clinically.

  17. Passive vortex currents in magneto- and electrocardiography: comparison of magnetic and electric signal strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutz, Silvio [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany); Biomagnetic Center, Department of Neurology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Bellemann, Matthias E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany); Leder, Uwe [Clinic of Internal Medicine III, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Haueisen, Jens [Biomagnetic Center, Department of Neurology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Technical University Ilmenau, Gustav-Kirchoff-Strasse 2, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2006-01-07

    Vortex currents may be of importance in the early diagnosis of myocardial infarction caused by an occlusion of a coronary artery. We investigated the influence of a passive vortex current distribution, modelled by different conductivities in a hollow cylinder, on the localization error and on the signal strength in both the magnetocardiogram and the electrocardiogram. The hollow cylinder was mounted in a realistically shaped physical torso phantom. A platinum dipole was inserted into the cylinder. The compartment boundaries were modelled with two special ionic exchange membranes. The conductivity ratio of the cylinder compartment to the torso compartment was varied from 0.25 to 100. We compared the simultaneously measured magnetic and electric signal strengths as a function of this conductivity ratio. We found that an increasing conductivity ratio causes only a slight increase (about 19%) of the magnetic signal strength but a strong decrease (about 81%) of the electric signal strength. Using a homogeneous torso model, the dipole localization errors were, depending on the conductivity ratio, up to 16 mm. In conclusion, passive vortex currents might partially explain the differences between magnetocardiographic and electrocardiographic recordings observed both experimentally and clinically.

  18. Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; Haworth, Matthew; Yearsley, Jon M.; Batke, Sven P.; Lawson, Tracy; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency. PMID:27605929

  19. Does size matter? Atmospheric CO2 may be a stronger driver of stomatal closing rate than stomatal size in taxa that diversified under low CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Elliott-Kingston

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available (1 One strategy for plants to optimise stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. (2 We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380ppm CO2; 20.9% O2. (3 The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group or life strategy. (4 Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimise water use efficiency.

  20. Multi-label spacecraft electrical signal classification method based on DBN and random forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Yu, Nan; Li, Pengfei; Song, Shimin; Wu, Yalei; Li, Yang; Liu, Meng

    2017-01-01

    In spacecraft electrical signal characteristic data, there exists a large amount of data with high-dimensional features, a high computational complexity degree, and a low rate of identification problems, which causes great difficulty in fault diagnosis of spacecraft electronic load systems. This paper proposes a feature extraction method that is based on deep belief networks (DBN) and a classification method that is based on the random forest (RF) algorithm; The proposed algorithm mainly employs a multi-layer neural network to reduce the dimension of the original data, and then, classification is applied. Firstly, we use the method of wavelet denoising, which was used to pre-process the data. Secondly, the deep belief network is used to reduce the feature dimension and improve the rate of classification for the electrical characteristics data. Finally, we used the random forest algorithm to classify the data and comparing it with other algorithms. The experimental results show that compared with other algorithms, the proposed method shows excellent performance in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and stability in addressing spacecraft electrical signal data.

  1. Optimal stomatal behaviour around the world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Duursma, Remko A.

    2015-01-01

    , a globalscale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. Here,we present a database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We find that stomatal behaviour diers among...

  2. Urban legends: recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaglini, L; Lalla, R V; Bruce, A J; Sartori-Valinotti, J C; Latortue, M C; Carrozzo, M; Rogers, R S

    2011-11-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common idiopathic intraoral ulcerative disease in the USA. Aphthae typically occur in apparently healthy individuals, although an association with certain systemic diseases has been reported. Despite the unclear etiopathogenesis, new drug trials are continuously conducted in an attempt to reduce pain and dysfunction. We investigated four controversial topics: (1) Is complex aphthosis a mild form of Behçet's disease (BD)? (2) Is periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome a distinct medical entity? (3) Is RAS associated with other systemic diseases [e.g., celiac disease (CD) and B12 deficiency]? (4) Are there any new RAS treatments? Results from extensive literature searches, including a systematic review of RAS trials, suggested the following: (1) Complex aphthosis is not a mild form of BD in North America or Western Europe; (2) Diagnostic criteria for PFAPA have low specificity and the characteristics of the oral ulcers warrant further studies; (3) Oral ulcers may be associated with CD; however, these ulcers may not be RAS; RAS is rarely associated with B12 deficiency; nevertheless, B12 treatment may be beneficial, via mechanisms that warrant further study; (4) Thirty-three controlled trials published in the past 6 years reported some effectiveness, although potential for bias was high. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Histopathological study of stomatitis nicotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C R; Kameswari, V R; Ramulu, C; Reddy, P G

    1971-09-01

    One hundred and thirteen biopsies of the palate in people accustomed to smoking cigars, most of them with the burning end of the cigar inside the mouth, have been studied.Thirty-eight of these showed mild to severe atypical changes in the epithelium. There were 19 lesions showing orthokeratosis and 53 showing hyperorthokeratosis.The earliest atypical change is seen in the mouths of the ducts of the glands.There were 3 cases showing microinvasive carcinomas.Pigmentation is a prominent feature in these cases.The papules with umbilication could be due to hyperplasia of the mucous glands.It is suggested that stomatitis nicotina occurring in men and women with the habit of reverse smoking is probably precancerous because of the presence of atypical changes in the epithelium and also the finding of 3 microinvasive carcinomas without any macroscopic evidence.There is no acceptable explanation why the soft palate escapes getting either stomatitis nicotina lesion or carcinoma in reverse smokers.

  4. Relaxation phenomena of electrical signal emissions from rock following application of abrupt mechanical stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Hloupis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The emission of electrical signals during application of mechanical stress to brittle geo-materials (the so-called pressure-stimulated current; PSC can provide significant information regarding the mechanical status of a studied rock sample. PSCs originate as a result of the opening of cracks and microfractures in rock. In this study, such electrical signal emissions are detected and studied when rock samples are subjected to step-wise mechanical stress, increased from low stress levels vL up to higher stress levels vH. This increase is performed at high stress rates and consequently the stress is maintained practically constant for a long period. During this time, the applied stress reaches its maximum value, and the emitted PSC decays gradually and relaxes back to a minimum value. The conducted experiments suggest that the characteristics of the relaxation processes of the PSC depend directly on the high level of the applied stress that is maintained constant after the application of each stress step. Analysis of the macroscopic parameters that characterize the relaxation phenomenon of the PSC provides clear information regarding the proximity of the applied stress to the fracture limit of the rock sample.

  5. Nonredundant functions of Arabidopsis LecRK-V.2 and LecRK-VII.1 in controlling stomatal immunity and jasmonate-mediated stomatal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekondi, Shweta; Liang, Fu-Chun; Okuma, Eiji; Radziejwoski, Amandine; Mai, Hsien-Wei; Swain, Swadhin; Singh, Prashant; Gauthier, Mathieu; Chien, Hsiao-Chiao; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2017-12-18

    Stomatal immunity restricts bacterial entry to leaves through the recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and downstream abscisic acid and salicylic acid signaling. Through a reverse genetics approach, we characterized the function of the L-type lectin receptor kinase-V.2 (LecRK-V.2) and -VII.1 (LecRK-VII.1). Analyses of interactions with the PRR FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2) were performed by co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation and whole-cell patch-clamp analyses were used to evaluate guard cell Ca2+ -permeable cation channels. The Arabidopsis thaliana LecRK-V.2 and LecRK-VII.1 and notably their kinase activities were required for full activation of stomatal immunity. Knockout lecrk-V.2 and lecrk-VII.1 mutants were hyper-susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae infection and showed defective stomatal closure in response to bacteria or to the MAMPs flagellin and EF-Tu. By contrast, Arabidopsis over-expressing LecRK-V.2 or LecRK-VII.1 demonstrated a potentiated stomatal immunity. LecRK-V.2 and LecRK-VII.1 are shown to be part of the FLS2 PRR complex. In addition, LecRK-V.2 and LecRK-VII.1 were critical for methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-mediated stomatal closure, notably for MeJA-induced activation of guard cell Ca2+ -permeable cation channels. This study highlights the role of LecRK-V.2 and LecRK-VII.1 in stomatal immunity at the FLS2 PRR complex and in MeJA-mediated stomatal closure. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Stomatal conductance increases with rising temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Josef; Ingwers, Miles; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O

    2017-08-03

    Stomatal conductance directly modifies plant water relations and photosynthesis. Many environmental factors affecting the stomatal conductance have been intensively studied but temperature has been largely neglected, even though it is one of the fastest changing environmental variables and it is rising due to climate change. In this study, we describe how stomata open when the temperature increases. Stomatal conductance increased by ca 40% in a broadleaf and a coniferous species, poplar (Populus deltoides x nigra) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) when temperature was increased by 10 °C, from 30 °C to 40 °C at a constant vapor pressure deficit of 1 kPa. The mechanism of regulating stomatal conductance by temperature was, at least partly, independent of other known mechanisms linked to water status and carbon metabolism. Stomatal conductance increased with rising temperature despite the decrease in leaf water potential, increase in transpiration, increase in intercellular CO2 concentration and was decoupled from photosynthesis. Increase in xylem and mesophyll hydraulic conductance coming from lower water viscosity may to some degree explain temperature dependent opening of stomata. The direct stomatal response to temperature allows plants to benefit from increased evaporative cooling during the heat waves and from lower stomatal limitations to photosynthesis but they may be jeopardized by faster depletion of soil water.

  7. Cardiac contractility modulation electrical signals improve myocardial gene expression in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butter, Christian; Rastogi, Sharad; Minden, Hans-Heinrich; Meyhöfer, Jürgen; Burkhoff, Daniel; Sabbah, Hani N

    2008-05-06

    The objective of this study was to test whether cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) electric signals induce reverse molecular remodeling in myocardium of patients with heart failure. Heart failure is associated with up-regulation of myocardial fetal and stretch response genes and down-regulation of Ca(2+) cycling genes. Treatment with CCM signals has been associated with improved symptoms and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients. We tested the impact of CCM signals on myocardial gene expression in 11 patients. Endomyocardial biopsies were obtained at baseline and 3 and 6 months thereafter. The CCM signals were delivered in random order of ON for 3 months and OFF for 3 months. Messenger ribonucleic acid expression was analyzed in the core lab by investigators blinded to treatment sequence. Expression of A- and B-type natriuretic peptides and alpha-myosin heavy chain (MHC), the sarcoplasmic reticulum genes SERCA-2a, phospholamban and ryanodine receptors, and the stretch response genes p38 mitogen activated protein kinase and p21 Ras were measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and bands quantified in densitometric units. The 3-month therapy OFF phase was associated with increased expression of A- and B-type natriuretic peptides, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, and p21 Ras and decreased expression of alpha-MHC, SERCA-2a, phospholamban, and ryanodine receptors. In contrast, the 3-month ON therapy phase resulted in decreased expression of A- and B-type natriuretic peptides, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase and p21 Ras and increased expression of alpha-MHC, SERCA-2a, phospholamban, and ryanodine receptors. The CCM signal treatment reverses the cardiac maladaptive fetal gene program and normalizes expression of key sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) cycling and stretch response genes. These changes may contribute to the clinical effects of CCM.

  8. Assembling a prototype resonance electrical impedance spectroscopy system for breast tissue signal detection: preliminary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumkin, Jules; Zheng, Bin; Gruss, Michelle; Drescher, John; Leader, Joseph; Good, Walter; Lu, Amy; Cohen, Cathy; Shah, Ratan; Zuley, Margarita; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technology to detect breast abnormalities in general and cancer in particular has been attracting research interests for decades. Large clinical tests suggest that current EIS systems can achieve high specificity (>= 90%) at a relatively low sensitivity ranging from 15% to 35%. In this study, we explore a new resonance frequency based electrical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) technology to measure breast tissue EIS signals in vivo, which aims to be more sensitive to small tissue changes. Through collaboration between our imaging research group and a commercial company, a unique prototype REIS system has been assembled and preliminary signal acquisition has commenced. This REIS system has two detection probes mounted in the two ends of a Y-shape support device with probe separation of 60 mm. During REIS measurement, one probe touches the nipple and the other touches to an outer point of the breast. The electronic system continuously generates sweeps of multi-frequency electrical pulses ranging from 100 to 4100 kHz. The maximum electric voltage and the current applied to the probes are 1.5V and 30mA, respectively. Once a "record" command is entered, multi-frequency sweeps are recorded every 12 seconds until the program receives a "stop recording" command. In our imaging center, we have collected REIS measurements from 150 women under an IRB approved protocol. The database includes 58 biopsy cases, 78 screening negative cases, and other "recalled" cases (for additional imaging procedures). We measured eight signal features from the effective REIS sweep of each breast. We applied a multi-feature based artificial neural network (ANN) to classify between "biopsy" and normal "non-biopsy" breasts. The ANN performance is evaluated using a leave-one-out validation method and ROC analysis. We conducted two experiments. The first experiment attempted to classify 58 "biopsy" breasts and 58 "non-biopsy" breasts acquired on 58 women

  9. Impaired stomatal control is associated with reduced photosynthetic physiology in crop species grown at elevated [CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Haworth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological control of stomatal conductance (Gs permits plants to balance CO2-uptake for photosynthesis (PN against water-loss, so optimising water use efficiency (WUE. An increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide ([CO2] will result in a stimulation of PN and reduction of Gs in many plants, enhancing carbon gain while reducing water-loss. It has also been hypothesised that the increase in WUE associated with lower Gs at elevated [CO2] would reduce the negative impacts of drought on many crops. Despite the large number of CO2-enrichment studies to date, there is relatively little information regarding the effect of elevated [CO2] on stomatal control. Five crop species with active physiological stomatal behaviour were grown at ambient (400 ppm and elevated (2000 ppm [CO2]. We investigated the relationship between stomatal function, stomatal size and photosynthetic capacity in the five species, and then assessed the mechanistic effect of elevated [CO2] on photosynthetic physiology, stomatal sensitivity to [CO2] and the effectiveness of stomatal closure to darkness. We observed positive relationships between the speed of stomatal response and the maximum rates of PN and Gs sustained by the plants; indicative of close co-ordination of stomatal behaviour and PN. In contrast to previous studies we did not observe a negative relationship between speed of stomatal response and stomatal size. The sensitivity of stomata to [CO2] declined with the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate limited rate of PN at elevated [CO2]. The effectiveness of stomatal closure was also impaired at high [CO2]. Growth at elevated [CO2] did not affect the performance of photosystem II indicating that high [CO2] had not induced damage to the photosynthetic physiology, and suggesting that photosynthetic control of Gs is either directly impaired at high [CO2], sensing/signalling of environmental change is disrupted or elevated [CO2] causes some physical effect that

  10. Auxin represses stomatal development in dark-grown seedlings via Aux/IAA proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerowicz, Martin; Ranjan, Aashish; Rupprecht, Laura; Fiene, Gabriele; Hoecker, Ute

    2014-08-01

    Stomatal development is tightly regulated through internal and external factors that are integrated by a complex signalling network. Light represents an external factor that strongly promotes stomata formation. Here, we show that auxin-resistant aux/iaa mutants, e.g. axr3-1, exhibit a de-repression of stomata differentiation in dark-grown seedlings. The higher stomatal index in dark-grown axr3-1 mutants when compared with the wild type is due to increased cell division in the stomatal lineage. Excessive stomata in dark-grown seedlings were also observed in mutants defective in auxin biosynthesis or auxin perception and in seedlings treated with the polar auxin transport inhibitor NPA. Consistent with these findings, exogenous auxin repressed stomata formation in light-grown seedlings. Taken together, these results indicate that auxin is a negative regulator of stomatal development in dark-grown seedlings. Epistasis analysis revealed that axr3-1 acts genetically upstream of the bHLH transcription factors SPCH, MUTE and FAMA, as well as the YDA MAP kinase cascade, but in parallel with the repressor of photomorphogenesis COP1 and the receptor-like protein TMM. The effect of exogenous auxin required the ER family of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases, suggesting that auxin acts at least in part through the ER family. Expression of axr3-1 in the stomatal lineage was insufficient to alter the stomatal index, implying that cell-cell communication is necessary to mediate the effect of auxin. In summary, our results show that auxin signalling contributes to the suppression of stomatal differentiation observed in dark-grown seedlings. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. TREATMENT OF APHTHOUS STOMATITIS IN ADOLESCENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L. M. Kozlova; O. A. Zorina; N. B. Petrukhina

    2014-01-01

    ...) has been in use in clinical practice for years. The study was aimed at comparing the clinical efficacy of the drug based on the listed active substances and other stomatological agents in adolescents with aphthous stomatitis. Results...

  12. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-10-12

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants' regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES.

  13. Electric signal emissions during repeated abrupt uniaxial compressional stress steps in amphibolite from KTB drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Triantis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments have confirmed that the application of uniaxial stress on rock samples is accompanied by the production of weak electric currents, to which the term Pressure Stimulated Currents – PSC has been attributed. In this work the PSC emissions in amphibolite samples from KTB drilling are presented and commented upon. After having applied sequential loading and unloading cycles on the amphibolite samples, it was ascertained that in every new loading cycle after unloading, the emitted PSC exhibits lower peaks. This attitude of the current peaks is consistent with the acoustic emissions phenomena, and in this work is verified for PSC emissions during loading – unloading procedures. Consequently, the evaluation of such signals can help to correlate the state and the remaining strength of the sample with respect to the history of its mechanical stress.

  14. EIRP Characterization of Electrically Large Wireless Equipment with Integrated Signal Generator in a Compact Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Soo Oh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a measurement technique to characterize the equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP of electrically large wireless equipment in a compact environment. A modified phase-measurement method was proposed and, thus, the separation of the signal generator and radiating element was not required during the measurement. A Fresnel-to-far-field transformation was used for the fast measurement time in a compact anechoic chamber. An experimental verification of the method was carried out in a compact anechoic chamber, where the source-detector separation was approximately 1/5 of the far-field distance. The measured magnitude and phase pattern exhibited only a small error. The EIRP obtained using a Fresnel-to-far-field transformation was compared with a reference value, and the error was within 0.5 dB.

  15. Carbonic anhydrases are upstream regulators of CO2-controlled stomatal movements in guard cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Honghong

    2009-12-13

    The continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 causes stomatal pores in leaves to close and thus globally affects CO2 influx into plants, water use efficiency and leaf heat stress. However, the CO2-binding proteins that control this response remain unknown. Moreover, which cell type responds to CO2, mesophyll or guard cells, and whether photosynthesis mediates this response are matters of debate. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant plants in the beta-carbonic anhydrases betaCA1 and betaCA4 show impaired CO2-regulation of stomatal movements and increased stomatal density, but retain functional abscisic-acid and blue-light responses. betaCA-mediated CO2-triggered stomatal movements are not, in first-order, linked to whole leaf photosynthesis and can function in guard cells. Furthermore, guard cell betaca-overexpressing plants exhibit instantaneous enhanced water use efficiency. Guard cell expression of mammalian alphaCAII complements the reduced sensitivity of ca1 ca4 plants, showing that carbonic anhydrase-mediated catalysis is an important mechanism for betaCA-mediated CO2-induced stomatal closure and patch clamp analyses indicate that CO2/HCO3- transfers the signal to anion channel regulation. These findings, together with ht1-2 (ref. 9) epistasis analysis demonstrate that carbonic anhydrases function early in the CO2 signalling pathway, which controls gas-exchange between plants and the atmosphere.

  16. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx arising from compartmentalized electrical signals in dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L Bloodgood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory synapses on mammalian principal neurons are typically formed onto dendritic spines, which consist of a bulbous head separated from the parent dendrite by a thin neck. Although activation of voltage-gated channels in the spine and stimulus-evoked constriction of the spine neck can influence synaptic signals, the contribution of electrical filtering by the spine neck to basal synaptic transmission is largely unknown. Here we use spine and dendrite calcium (Ca imaging combined with 2-photon laser photolysis of caged glutamate to assess the impact of electrical filtering imposed by the spine morphology on synaptic Ca transients. We find that in apical spines of CA1 hippocampal neurons, the spine neck creates a barrier to the propagation of current, which causes a voltage drop and results in spatially inhomogeneous activation of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs on a micron length scale. Furthermore, AMPA and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively that are colocalized on individual spine heads interact to produce two kinetically and mechanistically distinct phases of synaptically evoked Ca influx. Rapid depolarization of the spine triggers a brief and large Ca current whose amplitude is regulated in a graded manner by the number of open AMPARs and whose duration is terminated by the opening of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK channels. A slower phase of Ca influx is independent of AMPAR opening and is determined by the number of open NMDARs and the post-stimulus potential in the spine. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx only occurs when AMPARs and NMDARs are coactive within an individual spine. These results demonstrate that the morphology of dendritic spines endows associated synapses with specialized modes of signaling and permits the graded and independent control of multiple phases of synaptic Ca influx.

  17. Long-range correlations in the electric signals that precede rupture: further investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotsos, P A; Sarlis, N V; Skordas, E S

    2003-02-01

    The correlations within the time series of the seismic electric signal (SES) activities have been studied in a previous paper [P. Varotsos, N. Sarlis, and E. Skordas, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011902 (2002)]. Here, we analyze the time series of successive high- and low-level states' durations. The existence of correlation between the states is investigated by means of Hurst and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The multifractal DFA (MF-DFA) is also employed. The results point to a stronger correlation, and hence longer memory, in the series of the high-level states. Furthermore, an analysis in the "natural" time domain reveals that certain power spectrum characteristics seem to distinguish SES activities from "artificial" (man-made) electric noises. More precisely, for natural frequencies 0spectrum analysis in the natural time domain shows that the ICFMC curve almost coincides (in the range 0

  18. Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm Based Electric Dipole Source Localization Method in an Underwater Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel localization method based on multiple signal classification (MUSIC algorithm is proposed for positioning an electric dipole source in a confined underwater environment by using electric dipole-receiving antenna array. In this method, the boundary element method (BEM is introduced to analyze the boundary of the confined region by use of a matrix equation. The voltage of each dipole pair is used as spatial-temporal localization data, and it does not need to obtain the field component in each direction compared with the conventional fields based localization method, which can be easily implemented in practical engineering applications. Then, a global-multiple region-conjugate gradient (CG hybrid search method is used to reduce the computation burden and to improve the operation speed. Two localization simulation models and a physical experiment are conducted. Both the simulation results and physical experiment result provide accurate positioning performance, with the help to verify the effectiveness of the proposed localization method in underwater environments.

  19. AIDS and Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziara, Ivan Dieb; Araujo Filho, Bernardo Cunha; Weber, Raimar

    2005-01-01

    The immunodeficiency state in HIV infected patients has been the cause of severe episodes of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS). Our study aims to establish correlation between the manifestations of RAS and the immunosuppression state caused by HIV infection, through counting of CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, CD4+:CD8+ cells ratio and viral load. Series study. Ninety-four HIV infected patients (25 women and 69 men) with RAS were evaluated in the ENT Department of the University of Sao Paulo-Medical School from January 1998 to December 2003. The age ranged between 19 and 63 years (mean = 35.3 years). The patients were divided in two groups: AIDS group and HIV infected group. The patients with AIDS and HIV infection presented, respectively, eight ulcers and two ulcers by outbreaks. Similarly, patients with major RAS presented smaller counting of cells CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ cells, and higher mean value of viral load than the patients with herpetiform and minor RAS. Between patients with minor and herpetiform RAS there were no statistical differences. The emergence of the lesions, mainly in major RAS, is directly related to the immunological state of the HIV infected patient. These patients frequently present nutritional deficits and worsening in life style. Thus, diagnosis and treatment of RAS is a challenge that should not be neglected.

  20. Temporal Code-Driven Stimulation: Definition and Application to Electric Fish Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareo, Angel; Forlim, Caroline G.; Pinto, Reynaldo D.; Varona, Pablo; Rodriguez, Francisco de Borja

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop activity-dependent stimulation is a powerful methodology to assess information processing in biological systems. In this context, the development of novel protocols, their implementation in bioinformatics toolboxes and their application to different description levels open up a wide range of possibilities in the study of biological systems. We developed a methodology for studying biological signals representing them as temporal sequences of binary events. A specific sequence of these events (code) is chosen to deliver a predefined stimulation in a closed-loop manner. The response to this code-driven stimulation can be used to characterize the system. This methodology was implemented in a real time toolbox and tested in the context of electric fish signaling. We show that while there are codes that evoke a response that cannot be distinguished from a control recording without stimulation, other codes evoke a characteristic distinct response. We also compare the code-driven response to open-loop stimulation. The discussed experiments validate the proposed methodology and the software toolbox. PMID:27766078

  1. Unmasking local activity within local field potentials (LFPs) by removing distal electrical signals using independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Nathan W; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2016-05-15

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly thought to reflect the aggregate dynamics in local neural circuits around recording electrodes. However, we show that when LFPs are recorded in awake behaving animals against a distal reference on the skull as commonly practiced, LFPs are significantly contaminated by non-local and non-neural sources arising from the reference electrode and from movement-related noise. In a data set with simultaneously recorded LFPs and electroencephalograms (EEGs) across multiple brain regions while rats perform an auditory oddball task, we used independent component analysis (ICA) to identify signals arising from electrical reference and from volume-conducted noise based on their distributed spatial pattern across multiple electrodes and distinct power spectral features. These sources of distal electrical signals collectively accounted for 23-77% of total variance in unprocessed LFPs, as well as most of the gamma oscillation responses to the target stimulus in EEGs. Gamma oscillation power was concentrated in volume-conducted noise and was tightly coupled with the onset of licking behavior, suggesting a likely origin of muscle activity associated with body movement or orofacial movement. The removal of distal signal contamination also selectively reduced correlations of LFP/EEG signals between distant brain regions but not within the same region. Finally, the removal of contamination from distal electrical signals preserved an event-related potential (ERP) response to auditory stimuli in the frontal cortex and also increased the coupling between the frontal ERP amplitude and neuronal activity in the basal forebrain, supporting the conclusion that removing distal electrical signals unmasked local activity within LFPs. Together, these results highlight the significant contamination of LFPs by distal electrical signals and caution against the straightforward interpretation of unprocessed LFPs. Our results provide a principled approach to

  2. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Analysis of a Phase-Sensitive Voltmeter for Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ethan K; Takhti, Mohammad; Skinner, Joseph; Halter, Ryan J; Odame, Kofi

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, thorough analysis along with mathematical derivations of the matched filter for a voltmeter used in electrical impedance tomography systems are presented. The effect of the random noise in the system prior to the matched filter, generated by other components, are considered. Employing the presented equations allow system/circuit designers to find the maximum tolerable noise prior to the matched filter that leads to the target signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the voltmeter, without having to over-design internal components. A practical model was developed that should fall within 2 dB and 5 dB of the median SNR measurements of signal amplitude and phase, respectively. In order to validate our claims, simulation and experimental measurements have been performed with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) followed by a digital matched filter, while the noise of the whole system was modeled as the input referred at the ADC input. The input signal was contaminated by a known value of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) noise, and the noise level was swept from 3% to 75% of the least significant bit (LSB) of the ADC. Differences between experimental and both simulated and analytical SNR values were less than 0.59 and 0.35 dB for RMS values ≥ 20% of an LSB and less than 1.45 and 2.58 dB for RMS values circuit designers in EIT, and a more accurate error analysis that was previously missing in EIT literature.

  3. Analysis of electrical and magnetic bio-signals associated with motor performance and fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bing

    This dissertation reports findings centered principally on comprehensive research related to human bio-signals (EEG, MEG, EMG and fMRI) acquired during repetitive maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) that induced severe fatigue. Fatigue is a common experience that reduces productivity and quality of life and increases chances of injury. Although abundant information has been gained in the last several decades regarding muscular and spinal-level mechanisms of muscle fatigue, very little is known about how cortical centers control and respond to fatigue. The main purpose of this study was to examine the fatigue effects on the central nervous system by analyzing the bio-signals collected in the designed experiments. Healthy human subjects were asked to perform a series of repetitive handgrip MVCs with their dominant hand until exhaustion. Handgrip forces, electrical activity (EMG) from primary and non-primary muscles, and EEG, MEG, or fMRI signals from different locations of the brain were recorded simultaneously. The time series data were segmented into several physiologically meaningful epochs (time phases), from rest to preparation to movement execution/sustaining. A series of studies, including motor-related cortical potential (MRCP) analysis, power spectrum analysis, time-frequency (spectrogram) analysis of EEG, EEG source localization and nonlinear analysis (fractal dimension and largest Lyapunov exponent), and fMRI analysis, was applied to the data. We hypothesized that the fatigue effects would act differently on brain signals of different phases. The MRCP results showed that the negative potential (NP) related to motor task preparation only had minimal changes with fatigue. The power of all EEG frequencies did not alter significantly during the preparation phase but decreased significantly during the sustained phase of the contraction. The fractal dimension and the largest Lyapunov exponent decreased significantly during the sustained phase as fatigue

  4. [Stomatitis in childhood, not always benign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, A M; Ramaker, C

    2000-10-14

    Two boys of 1 and 16 year had painful buccal lesions and were admitted for dehydration. The younger had finger and toe blisters; the older, severely ill, had conjunctivitis, urethritis and skin lesions. Only symptomatic treatment with lidocaine gel and paracetamol gave good recovery. A 5-year-old Turkish girl had recurrent painful buccal ulcers which each time cleared up spontaneously. Stomatitis is common in childhood. Viral infections are the most common causes of stomatitis, in particular infections with herpes simplex virus (herpes gingivostomatitis), Coxsackie virus (herpangina, hand-foot-mouth-disease), chickenpox and infectious mononucleosis. Bacterial infections are rare and mostly secondary to the viral infections. In infants oral candidiasis (thrush) is a common cause of stomatitis. Most infections are self-limiting and reassurance of parents is important. Dehydration is a common complication and admission to hospital can be prevented by analgesics. The most important non-infectious conditions that cause stomatitis in children are recurrent aphthous stomatitis, erythema multiforme major (Stevens-Johnson syndrome), Behçet's disease, malignancy (leukaemia), immune-mediated disorders (agranulocytosis, cyclic neutropenia), traumata, blistering disorders of the skin and lichen planus. A complete history and a thorough physical examination usually give the correct diagnosis and further investigations are seldom necessary.

  5. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Hepworth

    Full Text Available Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development.

  6. Integration of Biochemical and Electrical Signaling-Multiscale Model of the Medium Spiny Neuron of the Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioni, Michele; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Neuron behavior results from the interplay between networks of biochemical processes and electrical signaling. Synaptic plasticity is one of the neuronal properties emerging from such an interaction. One of the current approaches to study plasticity is to model either its electrical aspects or its biochemical components. Among the chief reasons are the different time scales involved, electrical events happening in milliseconds while biochemical cascades respond in minutes or hours. In order to create multiscale models taking in consideration both aspects simultaneously, one needs to synchronize the two models, and exchange relevant variable values. We present a new event-driven algorithm to synchronize different neuronal models, which decreases computational time and avoids superfluous synchronizations. The algorithm is implemented in the TimeScales framework. We demonstrate its use by simulating a new multiscale model of the Medium Spiny Neuron of the Neostriatum. The model comprises over a thousand dendritic spines, where the electrical model interacts with the respective instances of a biochemical model. Our results show that a multiscale model is able to exhibit changes of synaptic plasticity as a result of the interaction between electrical and biochemical signaling. Our synchronization strategy is general enough to be used in simulations of other models with similar synchronization issues, such as networks of neurons. Moreover, the integration between the electrical and the biochemical models opens up the possibility to investigate multiscale process, like synaptic plasticity, in a more global manner, while taking into account a more realistic description of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:23843966

  7. Spatial resolution of electrical source localization depends on inter-electrode spacing and signal-to-noise ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular recordings of electrical neuronal sources with non-planar multichannel microelectrodes promise a high spatio-temporal resolution. We have developed signal-based algorithms, simulations and models to inversely estimate neuronal source positions and electrical properties by using multi-sensor recorded extracellular action potentials (EAP. Here, we analyse the dependence of electrode configurations on the position estimation by simulations. Estimations were simulated for various inter-electrode spacings, electrode-source distances and signal-to-noise ratios. The results show that inverse estimation depends on the electrode size or rather on the inter-electrode spacing. We find, as a rule, the larger the spacing, the larger the eligible source location area, but estimation quality of sources which are in the proximity of an electrode contact decreases. In addition, noise worsen the estimation and decreases the assessable distance between source and electrode. Thus, multichannel micro-electrodes should be selected towards signal and spatial sensitivity requirements.

  8. Investigation of seismicity after the initiation of a Seismic Electric Signal activity until the main shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlis, N V; Skordas, E S; Lazaridou, M S; Varotsos, P A

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of seismicity in the area candidate to suffer a main shock is investigated after the observation of the Seismic Electric Signal activity until the impending main shock. This is based on the view that the occurrence of earthquakes is a critical phenomenon to which statistical dynamics may be applied. In the present work, analysing the time series of small earthquakes, the concept of natural time chi was used and the results revealed that the approach to criticality itself can be manifested by the probability density function (PDF) of kappa(1) calculated over an appropriate statistical ensemble. Here, kappa(1) is the variance kappa(1)(=-(2)) resulting from the power spectrum of a function defined as Phi(omega)= summation operator(k=1)(N) p(k) exp(iomegachi(k)), where p(k) is the normalized energy of the k-th small earthquake and omega the natural frequency. This PDF exhibits a maximum at kappa(1) asymptotically equal to 0.070 a few days before the main shock. Examples are presented, referring to the magnitude 6 approximately 7 class earthquakes that occurred in Greece.

  9. Directional migration and transcriptional analysis of oligodendrocyte precursors subjected to stimulation of electrical signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Wang, Xinkun; Yao, Li

    2015-10-15

    Loss of oligodendrocytes as the result of central nervous system disease causes demyelination that impairs axon function. Effective directional migration of endogenous or grafted oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to a lesion is crucial in the neural remyelination process. In this study, the migration of OPCs in electric fields (EFs) was investigated. We found that OPCs migrated anodally in applied EFs, and the directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the EF strength increased from 50 to 200 mV/mm. However, EFs did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. The transcriptome of OPCs subjected to EF stimulation (100 and 200 mV/mm) was analyzed using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), and results were verified by the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis revealed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that signals cell migration was significantly upregulated in cells treated with an EF of 200 mV/mm compared with control cells. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed the downregulation of differentially expressed genes in chemotaxis. This study suggests that an applied EF is an effective cue to guiding OPC migration in neural regeneration and that transcriptional analysis contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of EF-guided cell migration. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Measurement of a false electric dipole moment signal from $^{199}$Hg atoms exposed to an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Afach, S; Ban, G; Bison, G; Bodek, K; Chowdhuri, Z; Daum, M; Fertl, M; Franke, B; Geltenbort, P; Green, K; van der Grinten, M G D; Grujic, Z; Harris, P G; Heil, W; Hélaine, V; Henneck, R; Horras, M; Iaydjiev, P; Ivanov, S N; Kasprzak, M; Kermaïdic, Y; Kirch, K; Knowles, P; Koch, H -C; Komposch, S; Kozela, A; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemière, Y; Mtchedlishvili, A; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Pendlebury, J M; Piegsa, F M; Pignol, G; Prashant, P N; Quéméner, G; Rebreyend, D; Ries, D; Roccia, S; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Severijns, N; Weis, A; Wursten, E; Wyszynski, G; Zejma, J; Zenner, J; Zsigmond, G

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of a Larmor frequency shift proportional to the electric-field strength for $^{199}{\\rm Hg}$ atoms contained in a volume permeated with aligned magnetic and electric fields. This shift arises from the interplay between the inevitable magnetic field gradients and the motional magnetic field. The proportionality to electric-field strength makes it apparently similar to an electric dipole moment (EDM) signal, although unlike an EDM this effect is P- and T-conserving. We have used a neutron magnetic resonance EDM spectrometer, featuring a mercury co-magnetometer and an array of external cesium magnetometers, to measure the shift as a function of the applied magnetic field gradient. Our results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  11. Stomatal and non-stomatal factors regulated the photosynthesis of soybean seedlings in the present of exogenous bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Liya; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2017-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an emerging environmental endocrine disruptor that has toxic effects on plants growth. Photosynthesis supplies the substances and energy required for plant growth, and regulated by stomatal and non-stomatal factors. Therefore, in this study, to reveal how BPA affects photosynthesis in soybean seedlings (Glycine max L.) from the perspective of stomatal and non-stomatal factors, the stomatal factors (stomatal conductance and behaviours) and non-stomatal factors (Hill reaction, apparent quantum efficiency, Rubisco activity, carboxylation efficiency, the maximum Rubisco carboxylation velocity, ribulose-1,5-bisphospate regeneration capacities mediated by maximum electron transport rates, and triose phosphate utilization rate) were investigated using a portable photosynthesis system. Moreover, the pollution of BPA in the environment was simulated. The results indicate that low-dose BPA enhanced net photosynthetic rate (Pn) primarily by promoting stomatal factors, resulting in increased relative growth rates and accelerated soybean seedling growth. High-dose BPA decreases the Pn by simultaneously inhibiting stomatal and non-stomatal factors, and this inhibition decreases the relative growth rates further reducing soybean seedling growth. Following the withdrawal of BPA, all of the indices were restored to varying degrees. In conclusion, low-dose BPA increased the Pn by promoting stomatal factors while high-dose BPA decreased the Pn by simultaneously inhibiting stomatal and non-stomatal factors. These findings provide a model (or, hypothesis) for the effects of BPA on plant photosynthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Response Analysis on Electrical Pulses under Severe Nuclear Accident Temperature Conditions Using an Abnormal Signal Simulation Analysis Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil-Mo Koo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike design basis accidents, some inherent uncertainties of the reliability of instrumentations are expected while subjected to harsh environments (e.g., high temperature and pressure, high humidity, and high radioactivity occurring in severe nuclear accident conditions. Even under such conditions, an electrical signal should be within its expected range so that some mitigating actions can be taken based on the signal in the control room. For example, an industrial process control standard requires that the normal signal level for pressure, flow, and resistance temperature detector sensors be in the range of 4~20 mA for most instruments. Whereas, in the case that an abnormal signal is expected from an instrument, such a signal should be refined through a signal validation process so that the refined signal could be available in the control room. For some abnormal signals expected under severe accident conditions, to date, diagnostics and response analysis have been evaluated with an equivalent circuit model of real instruments, which is regarded as the best method. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a program designed to implement a diagnostic and response analysis for equivalent circuit modeling. The program links signal analysis tool code to abnormal signal simulation engine code not only as a one body order system, but also as a part of functions of a PC-based ASSA (abnormal signal simulation analysis module developed to obtain a varying range of the R-C circuit elements in high temperature conditions. As a result, a special function for abnormal pulse signal patterns can be obtained through the program, which in turn makes it possible to analyze the abnormal output pulse signals through a response characteristic of a 4~20 mA circuit model and a range of the elements changing with temperature under an accident condition.

  13. Reconstructing the Fastest Chemical and Electrical Signalling Responses to Microgravity Stress in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, Sergio; Pandolfi, Camilla; Masi, Elisa; Azzarello, Elisa; Voigt, Boris; Baluska, Frantisek; Volkmann, Dieter; Mancuso, Stefano

    Plants are particularly suited to study the response of a living organism to gravity as they are extremely sensitive to its changes. Gravity perception is a well-studied phenomenon, but the chain of events related to signal transduction and transmission still suffers lack of information. Preliminary results obtained in previous parabolic flight campaigns (PFCs) by our Lab show that microgravity (¡0.05g), but not hypergravity (1.8g), repeatedly induced immediate (less than 1.5 s) oxygen bursts when maize roots experienced loss of gravity forces. Interestingly, these changes were located exclusively in the apex, but not in the mature zone of the root. Ground experiments have also revealed the onset of strong and rapid electrical responses in maize root apices subjected to stress, which lead to the hypothesis of an intrinsic capacity of the root apex to generate functional networks. Experiments during the 49th and 51st ESA PFCs were aimed 1) to find out if the different consumption of oxygen at root level recorded in the previous PFCs can lead to a subsequent local emissions of ROS in living root apices; 2) to study the space-temporal pattern of the neuronal network generated by roots under gravity changing conditions; 3) to evaluate the onset of synchronization events during gravity changes conditions. Concerning oxygen bursts, results indicate that they probably implicate a strong generation of ROS (such as nitric oxide) matching exactly the microgravity events suggesting that the sensing mechanism is not only related to a general mechanical stress (i.e. tensegrity model, present also during hypergravity), but can be specific for the microgravity event. To further investigate this hypothesis we studied the distributed/synchronized electrical activity of cells by the use of a Multi-Electrode Array (MEA). The main results obtained are: root transition zone (TZ) showed a higher spike rate activity compared to the mature zone (MZ). Also, microgravity appeared to

  14. Heterotrimeric G protein mediates ethylene-induced stomatal closure via hydrogen peroxide synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiao-Min; Cai, Hong-Li; Lei, Xue; Zhou, Xue; Yue, Ming; He, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins function as key players in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production in plant cells, but whether G proteins mediate ethylene-induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure are not clear. Here, evidences are provided to show the Gα subunit GPA1 as a missing link between ethylene and H2O2 in guard cell ethylene signalling. In wild-type leaves, ethylene-triggered H2O2 synthesis and stomatal closure were dependent on activation of Gα. GPA1 mutants showed the defect of ethylene-induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure, whereas wGα and cGα overexpression lines showed faster stomatal closure and H2O2 production in response to ethylene. Ethylene-triggered H2O2 generation and stomatal closure were impaired in RAN1, ETR1, ERS1 and EIN4 mutants but not impaired in ETR2 and ERS2 mutants. Gα activator and H2O2 rescued the defect of RAN1 and EIN4 mutants or etr1-3 in ethylene-induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure, but only rescued the defect of ERS1 mutants or etr1-1 and etr1-9 in ethylene-induced H2O2 production. Stomata of CTR1 mutants showed constitutive H2O2 production and stomatal closure, but which could be abolished by Gα inhibitor. Stomata of EIN2, EIN3 and ARR2 mutants did not close in responses to ethylene, Gα activator or H2O2, but do generate H2O2 following challenge of ethylene or Gα activator. The data indicate that Gα mediates ethylene-induced stomatal closure via H2O2 production, and acts downstream of RAN1, ETR1, ERS1, EIN4 and CTR1 and upstream of EIN2, EIN3 and ARR2. The data also show that ETR1 and ERS1 mediate both ethylene and H2O2 signalling in guard cells. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Ways of signal transmission and physiological role of electrical potentials in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Dziubińska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are subject to stimuli from the environment on which they strongly depend and in contrast to animals, they are unable to escape harmful influences. Therefore, being able to receive stimuli they have developed adequate responses to them. Such a reaction can occur in the area of a stimulus action or cover the whole plant or its parts. In the latter case, it is a systemic reaction. The plant reaction is expressed by various intensity, rate and kind of response. It is interesting to know the character of the signal informing about a stimulus, the routes of its propagation and the transmission mechanism. Three conceptions of excitation are distinguished: 1 propagation of chemical agents formed at the site of a stimulus action with the flow of the phloem sap or through the atmosphere (in the case of volatile substances to other plant parts, 2 a very fast transmission by the xylem in the wave of hydraulic pressure formed after a plant damage. From combining the "hydraulic" and "chemical" hypothesis a conception of hydraulic dispersion has been formulated which assumes that chemical substances synthetized after an injury can be transferred very fast with the wave of hydraulic pressure changes in the whole plant, 3 a stimulus evokes the action potential (AP, and its transmission along the whole plant, plant organ or specialized tissue, by local circuits from cell to cell. Strong, damaging stimuli can evoke variation potentials (VPs, the character of which differs from APs. It is postulated that transmission of VP occurs by a hydraulic dispersion and electrical changes seem to be secondary phenomena.

  16. Optimal stomatal behaviour around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Duursma, Remko A.; Prentice, I. Colin; Wang, Han; Baig, Sofia; Eamus, Derek; de Dios, Victor Resco; Mitchell, Patrick; Ellsworth, David S.; de Beeck, Maarten Op; Wallin, Göran; Uddling, Johan; Tarvainen, Lasse; Linderson, Maj-Lena; Cernusak, Lucas A.; Nippert, Jesse B.; Ocheltree, Troy W.; Tissue, David T.; Martin-Stpaul, Nicolas K.; Rogers, Alistair; Warren, Jeff M.; de Angelis, Paolo; Hikosaka, Kouki; Han, Qingmin; Onoda, Yusuke; Gimeno, Teresa E.; Barton, Craig V. M.; Bennie, Jonathan; Bonal, Damien; Bosc, Alexandre; Löw, Markus; Macinins-Ng, Cate; Rey, Ana; Rowland, Lucy; Setterfield, Samantha A.; Tausz-Posch, Sabine; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Broadmeadow, Mark S. J.; Drake, John E.; Freeman, Michael; Ghannoum, Oula; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Kelly, Jeff W.; Kikuzawa, Kihachiro; Kolari, Pasi; Koyama, Kohei; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Meir, Patrick; Lola da Costa, Antonio C.; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Salinas, Norma; Sun, Wei; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land-surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycle changes, a global-scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. Here, we present a database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We find that stomatal behaviour differs among PFTs according to their marginal carbon cost of water use, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model and the leaf and wood economics spectrum. We also demonstrate a global relationship with climate. These findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of gs across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of ecosystem productivity, energy balance and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.

  17. Testing the critical exponent in the relation between stress drop of earthquake and lead time of seismic electric signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dologlou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of new data in the power law relation between the stress drop of the earthquake and the lead time of the precursory seismic electric signal led to an exponent which falls in the range of the values of critical exponents for fracture and it is in excellent agreement with a previous one found by (Dologlou, 2012. In addition, this exponent is very close to the one reported by Varotsos and Alexopoulos (1984a, which interconnects the amplitude of the precursory seismic electric signals (SES and the magnitude of the impending earthquake. Hence, the hypothesis that underlying dynamic processes evolving to criticality prevail in the pre-focal area when the SES is emitted is significantly supported.

  18. PYR/RCAR Receptors Contribute to Ozone-, Reduced Air Humidity-, Darkness-, and CO2-Induced Stomatal Regulation1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilo, Ebe; Laanemets, Kristiina; Hu, Honghong; Xue, Shaowu; Jakobson, Liina; Tulva, Ingmar; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Rodriguez, Pedro L.; Schroeder, Julian I.; Broschè, Mikael; Kollist, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Rapid stomatal closure induced by changes in the environment, such as elevation of CO2, reduction of air humidity, darkness, and pulses of the air pollutant ozone (O3), involves the SLOW ANION CHANNEL1 (SLAC1). SLAC1 is activated by OPEN STOMATA1 (OST1) and Ca2+-dependent protein kinases. OST1 activation is controlled through abscisic acid (ABA)-induced inhibition of type 2 protein phosphatases (PP2C) by PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE/REGULATORY COMPONENTS OF ABA RECEPTOR (PYR/RCAR) receptor proteins. To address the role of signaling through PYR/RCARs for whole-plant steady-state stomatal conductance and stomatal closure induced by environmental factors, we used a set of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in ABA metabolism/signaling. The stomatal conductance values varied severalfold among the studied mutants, indicating that basal ABA signaling through PYR/RCAR receptors plays a fundamental role in controlling whole-plant water loss through stomata. PYR/RCAR-dependent inhibition of PP2Cs was clearly required for rapid stomatal regulation in response to darkness, reduced air humidity, and O3. Furthermore, PYR/RCAR proteins seem to function in a dose-dependent manner, and there is a functional diversity among them. Although a rapid stomatal response to elevated CO2 was evident in all but slac1 and ost1 mutants, the bicarbonate-induced activation of S-type anion channels was reduced in the dominant active PP2C mutants abi1-1 and abi2-1. Further experiments with a wider range of CO2 concentrations and analyses of stomatal response kinetics suggested that the ABA signalosome partially affects the CO2-induced stomatal response. Thus, we show that PYR/RCAR receptors play an important role for the whole-plant stomatal adjustments and responses to low humidity, darkness, and O3 and are involved in responses to elevated CO2. PMID:23703845

  19. Electrocommunication signals alone are sufficient to increase neurogenesis in the brain of adult electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Kent D; McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Jashari, Denisa

    2008-10-01

    Social interaction can have profound influences on the structure of the adult brain, but little is known about the precise stimulus feature found within social interaction that induces such brain plasticity. We examined the effects of social stimuli on cell addition and radial glial fiber formation in the brains of adult electric fish. These fish communicate primarily through weak, quasi-sinusoidal electric signals. Fish were housed in isolation, paired with another fish or exposed to only the electrocommunication signals of another fish for 7 days. After 3 days of exposure to these stimulus conditions, fish were injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mark newborn cells. We sacrificed the fish 4 days after BrdU injection and used immunohistochemistry to measure cell addition (BrdU+), the fraction of added cells that differentiated into neurons (BrdU+/NeuroTrace+) and the density of radial glia fibers (vimentin+) in the periventricular zone of the diencephalon. Fish that were exposed only to the electrocommunication signals of another fish and no other social stimuli had equivalent levels of cell addition and radial glial fiber density to fish that were housed with full social interaction and higher levels than fish housed in isolation. About 60% of the added cells differentiated into neurons; this fraction did not differ among treatment groups. Artificial sine wave electrical stimuli that mimicked electrocommunication signals were ineffective in increasing cell addition and glia fiber formation above those found in isolated fish. Thus, stimuli through a single modality are sufficient for inducing this brain plasticity, but the waveform or dynamic features of communication signals are crucial for the effect. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Optimal scheduling of electrical vehicle charging under two types of steering signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klauw, Thijs; Gerards, Marco Egbertus Theodorus; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Hurink, Johann L.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing penetration of electrical vehicles and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles is causing an increasing load upon our residential distribution network. However, the charging of these vehicles is often shiftable in time to off-peak hours due to long parking times at a fixed location during

  1. Integrated Measurements of Electrical Activity, Oxygen Tension, Blood Flow, and Ca2+ -Signaling in Rodents In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Claus; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    , short description of the methods commonly used for recording of electrophysiological signals, examples of data analysis and limitations of the methods. This chapter describes the origin of the extracellularly recorded electrical signal, with special regard to the EEG, local field potentials, and spikes......In order to assess perfusion and metabolic responses in relation to neural function we need to know the cellular signaling network, which types of neurons and astrocytes are involved, and the timing of their activation. We here present the basic electrophysiological indicators of neuronal function...... in rodent preparation. We also describe methods for recording of cerebral blood flow (CBF), tissue partial pressure of oxygen (tpO2), and cytosolic calcium transients. We finally give examples where electrophysiology, blood flow, metabolism, and calcium transients have been studied together....

  2. Introduction to applied statistical signal analysis guide to biomedical and electrical engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shiavi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Introduction to Applied Statistical Signal Analysis is designed for the experienced individual with a basic background in mathematics, science, and computer. With this predisposed knowledge, the reader will coast through the practical introduction and move on to signal analysis techniques, commonly used in a broad range of engineering areas such as biomedical engineering, communications, geophysics, and speech.Introduction to Applied Statistical Signal Analysis intertwines theory and implementation with practical examples and exercises. Topics presented in detail include: mathematical

  3. [How to cope with recurrent aphthous stomatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, C; Jaques, B; Bouferrrache, K; Broome, M

    2010-10-06

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common oral mucosa ailment. This condition is frequently considered as idiopathic due to the doubts about its etiology, probably related to a minor immunological dysregulation in a context of genetic predisposition. However, ulcers that resemble recurrent aphthous stomatitis in some respects can be found in systemic disorders that must be ruled out for the differential diagnosis of SAR, particularly when they appear after adolescence and/or when associated lesions exist out of the oral cavity. SAR management lies on the elimination of predisposing factors (drugs, oral trauma, food allergies...) and if needed, topical corticosteroids are the first choice regimen. More severe cases may require systemic regimens.

  4. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: genetic aspects of etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szponar, Elżbieta; Kowalska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS; recurrent aphthous ulcers – RAU; canker sores) is a chronic inflammatory, ulcerative condition of the oral mucosa. Its prevalence in the general population ranges between 5% and 20%, depending on the method and group studied. The etiopathogenesis of the disease is considered to be multifactorial, but remains still not fully understood. In patients with RAS, an enhanced immunologic response occurs to some trigger factors that may include: mechanical injury, stress or bacterial and viral antigens. Higher prevalence of aphthae in relatives may also indicate the genetic background of the condition. The inheritance of some specific gene polymorphisms, especially those encoding proinflammatory cytokines, which play a role in the formation of aphthous ulcer, may predispose family members to RAS. The purpose of this paper was to present the main clinical features of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, epidemiologic data and crucial etiopathogenetic factors with a special emphasis on genetic background of the condition. PMID:24278055

  5. STUDY REGARDING STOMATAL DENSITY IN MAGNOLIA SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta-Valentina GROZA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to reveal the structural aspects of the leaf as occurring in the genus Magnolia. The leaves are bifacial and hypostomatic. Secretory oil cells are a constant presence. We have revealed significant dissimilarities in stomatal density and size as occurring in three ornamental species: Magnolia kobus, Magnolia x soulangeana “Soulange-Bodin” (M. denudata x M. liliiflora and Magnolia x “Susan” (M. kobus var. stellata “Rosea” x M. liliiflora “Nigra”. The highest stomatal density was recorded in the diploid species Magnolia kobus. The stomata are significantly elongated in Magnolia x soulangeana “Soul.-Bod.” and wide in Magnolia kobus.

  6. Nitric oxide in guard cells as an important secondary messenger during stomatal closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunja eGayatri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available he modulation of guard cell function is the basis of stomatal closure, essential for optimizing water use and CO2 uptake by leaves. Nitric oxide (NO in guard cells plays a very important role as a secondary messenger during stomatal closure induced by effectors, including hormones. For example, exposure to abscisic acid (ABA triggers a marked increase in NO of guard cells, well before stomatal closure. In guard cells of multiple species, like Arabidopsis, Vicia and pea, exposure to ABA or methyl jasmonate or even microbial elicitors (e.g. chitosan induces production of NO as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS. The role of NO in stomatal closure has been confirmed by using NO donors (e.g. SNP and NO scavengers (like cPTIO and inhibitors of NOS (L-NAME or NR (tungstate. Two enzymes: a L-NAME-sensitive, nitric oxide synthase (NOS-like enzyme and a tungstate-sensitive nitrate reductase (NR, can mediate ABA-induced NO rise in guard cells. However, the existence of true NOS in plant tissues and its role in guard cell NO-production are still a matter of intense debate. Guard cell signal transduction leading to stomatal closure involves the participation of several components, besides NO, such as cytosolic pH, ROS, free Ca2+ and phospholipids. Use of fluorescent dyes has revealed that the rise in NO of guard cells occurs after the increase in cytoplasmic pH and ROS. The rise in NO causes an elevation in cytosolic free Ca2+ and promotes the efflux of cations as well as anions from guard cells. Stomatal guard cells have become a model system to study the signalling cascade mechanisms in plants, particularly with NO as a dominant component. The interrelationships and interactions of NO with cytosolic pH, ROS, and free Ca2+ are quite complex and need further detailed examination. While assessing critically the available literature, the present review projects possible areas of further work related to NO-action in stomatal guard cells.

  7. An Optimal Frequency in Ca2+ Oscillations for Stomatal Closure Is an Emergent Property of Ion Transport in Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguet-Parramona, Carla; Wang, Yizhou; Hills, Adrian; Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere; Griffiths, Howard; Rogers, Simon; Lawson, Tracy; Lew, Virgilio L; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) have been proposed to encode information that controls stomatal closure. [Ca(2+)]i oscillations with a period near 10 min were previously shown to be optimal for stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), but the studies offered no insight into their origins or mechanisms of encoding to validate a role in signaling. We have used a proven systems modeling platform to investigate these [Ca(2+)]i oscillations and analyze their origins in guard cell homeostasis and membrane transport. The model faithfully reproduced differences in stomatal closure as a function of oscillation frequency with an optimum period near 10 min under standard conditions. Analysis showed that this optimum was one of a range of frequencies that accelerated closure, each arising from a balance of transport and the prevailing ion gradients across the plasma membrane and tonoplast. These interactions emerge from the experimentally derived kinetics encoded in the model for each of the relevant transporters, without the need of any additional signaling component. The resulting frequencies are of sufficient duration to permit substantial changes in [Ca(2+)]i and, with the accompanying oscillations in voltage, drive the K(+) and anion efflux for stomatal closure. Thus, the frequency optima arise from emergent interactions of transport across the membrane system of the guard cell. Rather than encoding information for ion flux, these oscillations are a by-product of the transport activities that determine stomatal aperture. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Plant virus infections control stomatal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rose R.; Emblow, Mark S. M.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-09-01

    Stomata are important regulators of carbon dioxide uptake and transpirational water loss. They also represent points of vulnerability as bacterial and fungal pathogens utilise this natural opening as an entry portal, and thus have an increasingly complex relationship. Unlike the situation with bacterial and fungal pathogens, we know very little about the role of stomata in viral infection. Here we report findings showing that viral infection influences stomatal development in two susceptible host systems (Nicotiana tabacum with TMV (Tobacco mosaic virus), and Arabidopsis thaliana with TVCV (Turnip vein-clearing virus)), but not in resistant host systems (Nicotiana glutinosa and Chenopodium quinoa with TMV). Virus infected plants had significantly lower stomatal indices in systemic leaves of susceptible systems; N. tabacum 9.8% reduction and A. thaliana 12.3% reduction, but not in the resistant hosts. Stomatal density in systemic leaves was also significantly reduced in virus infected A. thaliana by 19.6% but not in N. tabacum or the resistant systems. In addition, transpiration rate was significantly reduced in TMV infected N. tabacum.

  9. Vesicular stomatitis forecasting based on Google Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Zhou, GuangYa; Chen, Qin

    2018-01-01

    Background Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is an important viral disease of livestock. The main feature of VS is irregular blisters that occur on the lips, tongue, oral mucosa, hoof crown and nipple. Humans can also be infected with vesicular stomatitis and develop meningitis. This study analyses 2014 American VS outbreaks in order to accurately predict vesicular stomatitis outbreak trends. Methods American VS outbreaks data were collected from OIE. The data for VS keywords were obtained by inputting 24 disease-related keywords into Google Trends. After calculating the Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, it was found that there was a relationship between outbreaks and keywords derived from Google Trends. Finally, the predicted model was constructed based on qualitative classification and quantitative regression. Results For the regression model, the Pearson correlation coefficients between the predicted outbreaks and actual outbreaks are 0.953 and 0.948, respectively. For the qualitative classification model, we constructed five classification predictive models and chose the best classification predictive model as the result. The results showed, SN (sensitivity), SP (specificity) and ACC (prediction accuracy) values of the best classification predictive model are 78.52%,72.5% and 77.14%, respectively. Conclusion This study applied Google search data to construct a qualitative classification model and a quantitative regression model. The results show that the method is effective and that these two models obtain more accurate forecast. PMID:29385198

  10. Splitting a droplet with oil encapsulation using surface acoustic wave excited by electric signal with low power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anliang Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method for splitting a droplet with oil encapsulation is presented. An interdigital transducer and a reflector are fabricated on a 128° yx-LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate using microelectric technology. An electric signal with the power of 12.3 dBm is applied to the interdigital transducer to generate surface acoustic wave, which is radiated into a droplet with oil encapsulation, leading to surface acoustic wave streaming force. When the electric signal is suddenly moved off, the breakup of the droplet occurs due to inertial force. Color dye solution droplets encapsulated by oil droplets are demonstrated. The effects of electric power, the volume ratio of color dye solution to oil, and the volume of mother droplet on the breakup of droplets are studied. As applications, the presented method is successfully applied to mixture operation and color development reaction of two droplets. The method provides a new sample preparation technique, which is helpful for microfluidic biochemical analysis in a piezoelectric microfluidic system.

  11. Effect of significant data loss on identifying electric signals that precede rupture estimated by detrended fluctuation analysis in natural time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skordas, E S; Sarlis, N V; Varotsos, P A

    2010-09-01

    Electric field variations that appear before rupture have been recently studied by employing the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to quantify their long-range temporal correlations. These studies revealed that seismic electric signal (SES) activities exhibit a scale invariant feature with an exponent αDFA≈1 over all scales investigated (around five orders of magnitude). Here, we study what happens upon significant data loss, which is a question of primary practical importance, and show that the DFA applied to the natural time representation of the remaining data still reveals for SES activities an exponent close to 1.0, which markedly exceeds the exponent found in artificial (man-made) noises. This enables the identification of a SES activity with probability of 75% even after a significant (70%) data loss. The probability increases to 90% or larger for 50% data loss.

  12. Experimental correlation of electric fields and Raman signals in SERS and TERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Zachary D; Wang, Hao; Kwasnieski, Daniel T; Marr, James M

    2015-08-09

    Enhanced Raman scattering from plasmonic nanostructures associated with surface enhanced (SERS) and tip enhanced (TERS) is seeing a dramatic increase in applications from bioimaging to chemical catalysis. The importance of gap-modes for high sensitivity indicates plasmon coupling between nanostructures plays an important role. However, the observed Raman scattering can change with different geometric arrangements of nanoparticles, excitation wavelengths, and chemical environments; suggesting differences in the local electric field. Our results indicate that molecules adsorbed to the nanostructures are selectively enhanced in the presence of competing molecules. This selective enhancement arises from controlled interactions between nanostructures, such as an isolated nanoparticle and a TERS tip. Complementary experiments suggest that shifts in the vibrational frequency of reporter molecules can be correlated to the electric field. Here we present a strategy that utilizes the controlled formation of coupled plasmonic structures to experimentally measure both the magnitude of the electric fields and the observed Raman scattering.

  13. MINYAK GOSOK DAPAT MENGOBATI STOMATITIS APTOSA REKUREN SECARA TOPIKAL

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Yusran; Donald RN

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have been done to get the right material in the treatment of recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis, but the result still unsatisfied. The aim ofthistudy was to know the influence application of rubbing oil against the healing and comportable at recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis. This study was a clinical observasionally and healing was resulted in about four days. The use of topical rubbing oil in the treatment of recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis could...

  14. Electrical signal analysis to assess the physical condition of a human or animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daryl F.; Hochanadel, Charles D.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2010-06-15

    The invention is a human and animal performance data acquisition, analysis, and diagnostic system for fitness and therapy devices having an interface box removably disposed on incoming power wiring to a fitness and therapy device, at least one current transducer removably disposed on said interface box for sensing current signals to said fitness and therapy device, and a means for analyzing, displaying, and reporting said current signals to determine human and animal performance on said device using measurable parameters.

  15. Some Aspects Regarding the Use of Digital Signal Controllers in Electrical Drivers for Stepper Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoil Toma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this paper are presented and compared two practical implementation of unipolar stepper drives for didactical destination, one with 8 bit microcontroller and one with 16 bits digital signal controller. In the second part, a practical implementation of micro stepping drive for bipolar motor with a 16 bits digital signal controller designed for switching mode power supply. A physical prototype was realized and some experimental measurements are presented.

  16. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-01-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar. PMID:22760471

  17. Plant water potential improves prediction of empirical stomatal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R L Anderegg

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to lead to increases in drought frequency and severity, with deleterious effects on many ecosystems. Stomatal responses to changing environmental conditions form the backbone of all ecosystem models, but are based on empirical relationships and are not well-tested during drought conditions. Here, we use a dataset of 34 woody plant species spanning global forest biomes to examine the effect of leaf water potential on stomatal conductance and test the predictive accuracy of three major stomatal models and a recently proposed model. We find that current leaf-level empirical models have consistent biases of over-prediction of stomatal conductance during dry conditions, particularly at low soil water potentials. Furthermore, the recently proposed stomatal conductance model yields increases in predictive capability compared to current models, and with particular improvement during drought conditions. Our results reveal that including stomatal sensitivity to declining water potential and consequent impairment of plant water transport will improve predictions during drought conditions and show that many biomes contain a diversity of plant stomatal strategies that range from risky to conservative stomatal regulation during water stress. Such improvements in stomatal simulation are greatly needed to help unravel and predict the response of ecosystems to future climate extremes.

  18. Data-driven estimation of cardiac electrical diffusivity from 12-lead ECG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettinig, Oliver; Mansi, Tommaso; Neumann, Dominik; Georgescu, Bogdan; Rapaka, Saikiran; Seegerer, Philipp; Kayvanpour, Elham; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Amr, Ali; Haas, Jan; Steen, Henning; Katus, Hugo; Meder, Benjamin; Navab, Nassir; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2014-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is challenging due to a large variety of causes and disease stages. Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology (EP) can be used to improve the assessment and prognosis of DCM, plan therapies and predict their outcome, but require personalization. In this work, we present a data-driven approach to estimate the electrical diffusivity parameter of an EP model from standard 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG). An efficient forward model based on a mono-domain, phenomenological Lattice-Boltzmann model of cardiac EP, and a boundary element-based mapping of potentials to the body surface is employed. The electrical diffusivity of myocardium, left ventricle and right ventricle endocardium is then estimated using polynomial regression which takes as input the QRS duration and electrical axis. After validating the forward model, we computed 9500 EP simulations on 19 different DCM patients in just under three seconds each to learn the regression model. Using this database, we quantify the intrinsic uncertainty of electrical diffusion for given ECG features and show in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation that the regression method is able to predict myocardium diffusion within the uncertainty range. Finally, our approach is tested on the 19 cases using their clinical ECG. 84% of them could be personalized using our method, yielding mean prediction errors of 18.7ms for the QRS duration and 6.5° for the electrical axis, both values being within clinical acceptability. By providing an estimate of diffusion parameters from readily available clinical data, our data-driven approach could therefore constitute a first calibration step toward a more complete personalization of cardiac EP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pre-earthquake signals – Part I: Deviatoric stresses turn rocks into a source of electric currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Freund

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are feared because they often strike so suddenly. Yet, there are innumerable reports of pre-earthquake signals. Widespread disagreement exists in the geoscience community how these signals can be generated in the Earth's crust and whether they are early warning signs, related to the build-up of tectonic stresses before major seismic events. Progress in understanding and eventually using these signals has been slow because the underlying physical process or processes are basically not understood. This has changed with the discovery that, when igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks are subjected to deviatoric stress, dormant electronic charge carriers are activated: electrons and defect electrons. The activation increases the number density of mobile charge carriers in the rocks and, hence, their electric conductivity. The defect electrons are associated with the oxygen anion sublattice and are known as positive holes or pholes for short. The boundary between stressed and unstressed rock acts a potential barrier that lets pholes pass but blocks electrons. Therefore, like electrons and ions in an electrochemical battery, the stress-activated electrons and pholes in the "rock battery" have to flow out in different directions. When the circuit is closed, the battery currents can flow. The discovery of such stress-activated currents in crustal rocks has far-reaching implications for understanding pre-earthquake signals.

  20. The Arabidopsis lectin receptor kinase LecRK-V.5 represses stomatal immunity induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Desclos-Theveniau

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Stomata play an important role in plant innate immunity by limiting pathogen entry into leaves but molecular mechanisms regulating stomatal closure upon pathogen perception are not well understood. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana L-type lectin receptor kinase-V.5 (LecRK-V.5 negatively regulates stomatal immunity. Loss of LecRK-V.5 function increased resistance to surface inoculation with virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Levels of resistance were not affected after infiltration-inoculation, suggesting that LecRK-V.5 functions at an early defense stage. By contrast, lines overexpressing LecRK-V.5 were more susceptible to Pst DC3000. Enhanced resistance in lecrk-V.5 mutants was correlated with constitutive stomatal closure, while increased susceptibility phenotypes in overexpression lines were associated with early stomatal reopening. Lines overexpressing LecRK-V.5 also demonstrated a defective stomatal closure after pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP treatments. LecRK-V.5 is rapidly expressed in stomatal guard cells after bacterial inoculation or treatment with the bacterial PAMP flagellin. In addition, lecrk-V.5 mutants guard cells exhibited constitutive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibition of ROS production opened stomata of lecrk-V.5. LecRK-V.5 is also shown to interfere with abscisic acid-mediated stomatal closure signaling upstream of ROS production. These results provide genetic evidences that LecRK-V.5 negatively regulates stomatal immunity upstream of ROS biosynthesis. Our data reveal that plants have evolved mechanisms to reverse bacteria-mediated stomatal closure to prevent long-term effect on CO(2 uptake and photosynthesis.

  1. RIN4 functions with plasma membrane H+-ATPases to regulate stomatal apertures during pathogen attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jun; Elmore, James M.; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Pathogen perception by the plant innate immune system is of central importance to plant survival and productivity. The Arabidopsis protein RIN4 is a negative regulator of plant immunity. In order to identify additional proteins involved in RIN4- mediated immune signal transduction, we...... exhibit differential PM H+-ATPase activity. PM H+-ATPase activation induces stomatal opening, enabling bacteria to gain entry into the plant leaf; inactivation induces stomatal closure thus restricting bacterial invasion. The rin4 knockout line exhibited reduced PM H+-ATPase activity and, importantly, its...... stomata could not be re-opened by virulent Pseudomonas syringae. We also demonstrate that RIN4 is expressed in guard cells, highlighting the importance of this cell type in innate immunity. These results indicate that the Arabidopsis protein RIN4 functions with the PM H+-ATPase to regulate stomatal...

  2. A hazard-based duration model for analyzing crossing behavior of cyclists and electric bike riders at signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaobao; Huan, Mei; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Peng, Yichuan; Gao, Ziyou

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a hazard-based duration approach to investigate riders' waiting times, violation hazards, associated risk factors, and their differences between cyclists and electric bike riders at signalized intersections. A total of 2322 two-wheeled riders approaching the intersections during red light periods were observed in Beijing, China. The data were classified into censored and uncensored data to distinguish between safe crossing and red-light running behavior. The results indicated that the red-light crossing behavior of most riders was dependent on waiting time. They were inclined to terminate waiting behavior and run against the traffic light with the increase of waiting duration. Over half of the observed riders cannot endure 49s or longer. 25% of the riders can endure 97s or longer. Rider type, gender, waiting position, conformity tendency and crossing traffic volume were identified to have significant effects on riders' waiting times and violation hazards. Electric bike riders were found to be more sensitive to the external risk factors such as other riders' crossing behavior and crossing traffic volume than cyclists. Moreover, unobserved heterogeneity was examined in the proposed models. The finding of this paper can explain when and why cyclists and electric bike riders run against the red light at intersections. The results of this paper are useful for traffic design and management agencies to implement strategies to enhance the safety of riders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. On the electric signal direction indicator for teh control of road traffic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An electronic signal direction indicator (ESDI) for the control of road traffic has been designed, constructed and studied. The construction was done using 555 timer IC, a transistor-transistor logic compatible device that can operate in several modes as the major active element. The ESDI system circuit is reliable, satisfactorily ...

  4. Comparative analysis of risky behaviors of electric bicycles at signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lu; Liu, Pan; Guo, Yanyong; Yu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the risky behaviors of e-bike, e-scooter, and bicycle riders as they were crossing signalized intersections. Pearson's chi-square test was used to identify whether there were significant differences in the risky behaviors among e-bike, e-scooter, and bicycle riders. Binary logit models were developed to evaluate how various variables affected the behaviors of 2-wheeled vehicle riders at signalized intersections. Field data collection was conducted at 13 signalized intersections in 2 cities (Nanjing and Kunming) in China. Three different types of risky behaviors were identified, including stop beyond the stop line, riding in motorized lanes, and riding against traffic. Two-wheeled vehicle riders' gender and age and traffic conditions were significantly associated with the behaviors of 2-wheeled vehicle riders at the selected signalized intersections. Compared to e-bike and bicycle riders, e-scooter riders are more likely to take risky behaviors. More specifically, they are more likely to ride in motorized lanes and ride against traffic.

  5. A minimal dose of electrically induced muscle activity regulates distinct gene signaling pathways in humans with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Petrie

    Full Text Available Paralysis after a spinal cord injury (SCI induces physiological adaptations that compromise the musculoskeletal and metabolic systems. Unlike non-SCI individuals, people with spinal cord injury experience minimal muscle activity which compromises optimal glucose utilization and metabolic control. Acute or chronic muscle activity, induced through electrical stimulation, may regulate key genes that enhance oxidative metabolism in paralyzed muscle. We investigated the short and long term effects of electrically induced exercise on mRNA expression of human paralyzed muscle. We developed an exercise dose that activated the muscle for only 0.6% of the day. The short term effects were assessed 3 hours after a single dose of exercise, while the long term effects were assessed after training 5 days per week for at least one year (adherence 81%. We found a single dose of exercise regulated 117 biological pathways as compared to 35 pathways after one year of training. A single dose of electrical stimulation increased the mRNA expression of transcriptional, translational, and enzyme regulators of metabolism important to shift muscle toward an oxidative phenotype (PGC-1α, NR4A3, IFRD1, ABRA, PDK4. However, chronic training increased the mRNA expression of specific metabolic pathway genes (BRP44, BRP44L, SDHB, ACADVL, mitochondrial fission and fusion genes (MFF, MFN1, MFN2, and slow muscle fiber genes (MYH6, MYH7, MYL3, MYL2. These findings support that a dose of electrical stimulation (∼10 minutes/day regulates metabolic gene signaling pathways in human paralyzed muscle. Regulating these pathways early after SCI may contribute to reducing diabetes in people with longstanding paralysis from SCI.

  6. Performance evaluation of CO-OFDM systems based on electrical constant-envelope signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Vinicius O. C.; Pereira, Ezequiel da V.; Rocha, Helder R. O.; Segatto, Marcelo E. V.; Silva, Jair A. L.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the electrical phase modulation index h in the performance of constant-envelope orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CE-OFDM) in coherent detection optical systems is treated analytically and its range of validity examined by simulations. A compromise between h and subcarrier mapping is identified according to differences in sensitivity related to non-linearities inserted by the optical modulator. It is shown that the proposed scheme outperforms conventional coherent detection OFDM systems, which is strongly dependent on both phase and optical modulation indexes.

  7. Engineering quorum sensing signaling of Pseudomonas for enhanced wastewater treatment and electricity harvest: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Cao, Ying-Xiu; Song, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Cell-cell communication that enables synchronized population behaviors in microbial communities dictates various biological processes. It is of great interest to unveil the underlying mechanisms of fine-tuning cell-cell communication to achieve environmental and energy applications. Pseudomonas is a ubiquitous microbe in environments that had wide applications in bioremediation and bioenergy generation. The quorum sensing (QS, a generic cell-cell communication mechanism) systems of Pseudomonas underlie the aromatics biodegradation, denitrification and electricity harvest. Here, we reviewed the recent progresses of the genetic strategies in engineering QS circuits to improve efficiency of wastewater treatment and the performance of microbial fuel cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Total antioxidant status and oxidative stress in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugrul, Selahattin; Koçyiğit, Abdurrahim; Doğan, Remzi; Eren, Sabri Baki; Senturk, Erol; Ozturan, Orhan; Ozar, Omer Faruk

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is an idiopathic, chronic, recurrent inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa. It is thought that oxidative stress caused by systemic inflammation plays a basic role in the etiopathogenesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The aim of this study is to review oxidative status and DNA damage in recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The study included 42 patients with an active recurrent aphthous stomatitis lesion and 39 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics. DNA damage was analyzed using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Plasma levels of total antioxidant status and total oxidative status were determined by using an automated measurement method. Oxidative stress index was calculated as total oxidative status/total antioxidant status and × 100. The total oxidative status and oxidative stress index values were significantly higher in the recurrent aphthous stomatitis group compared to the control group, while total antioxidant status values were significantly lower. In the recurrent aphthous stomatitis group, DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher than the control group. In correlation analysis, significant correlation was found between DNA damage and the oxidative stress index and total oxidative status values in the recurrent aphthous stomatitis group. This is the first report in the literature that demonstrates association of recurrent aphthous stomatitis with increased oxidative status. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Stomatal characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis clonal hybrids in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim was to investigate the degree to which stomatal conductance (gs) and stomatal density differ between the clonal hybrids across seasons and in response to water stress. Plants from one E. grandis x E. camaldulensis (GC) and two E. grandis x E. urophylla (GU1 and GU2) clones were grown for 18 months in 80 l ...

  10. Dynamic changes of stomatal characteristics during the flower, fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that there were stomata on the median region of exocarps, adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the petals and leaf midribs. The petal and fruit epidermal cells were polygonal in shape, while leaf epidermal cells were strip. The leaf stomatal index and stomatal density were the largest in the surfaces ...

  11. Quantitative trait loci mapping for stomatal traits in interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dr.YASODHA

    Cartographer v 2.5 (Wang et al. 2007) to identify QTLs for stomatal density, stomatal area and pore length in adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces adopting backcross model. The LOD threshold was determined by permutation analysis with 1000 repetitions. The size of the analysis window was maintained at 10 cM with a walk ...

  12. Urban Legends Series: Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaglini, Lorena; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Bruce, Alison J.; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C.; Latortue, Marie C.; Carrozzo, Marco; Rogers, Roy S.

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common idiopathic intraoral ulcerative disease in the USA. Aphthae typically occur in apparently healthy individuals, although an association with certain systemic diseases has been reported. Despite the unclear etiopathogenesis, new drug trials are continuously conducted in an attempt to reduce pain and dysfunction. We investigated four controversial topics: (1) Is complex aphthosis a mild form of Behçet’s disease (BD)? (2) Is periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome a distinct medical entity? (3) Is RAS associated with other systemic diseases (e.g., celiac disease and B12 deficiency)? (4) Are there any new RAS treatments? Results from extensive literature searches, including a systematic review of RAS trials, suggested that: (1) Complex aphthosis is not a mild form of BD in North America or Western Europe; (2) Diagnostic criteria for PFAPA have low specificity and the characteristics of the oral ulcers warrant further studies; (3) Oral ulcers may be associated with celiac disease; however, these ulcers may not be RAS; RAS is rarely associated with B12 deficiency; nevertheless, B12 treatment may be beneficial, via mechanisms that warrant further study; (4) Thirty-three controlled trials published in the past 6 years reported some effectiveness, though potential for bias was high. PMID:21812866

  13. A genetic screen reveals Arabidopsis stomatal and/or apoplastic defenses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqing Zeng

    2011-10-01

    implicate an important role of stress-associated protein translation in stomatal guard cell signaling in response to microbe-associated molecular patterns and bacterial infection.

  14. Current characteristic signals of aqueous solution transferring through microfluidic channel under non-continuous DC electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HongWei Ma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface effect is becoming apparently significant as the miniaturization of fluidic devices. In the micro/nanochannel fluidics, the electrode surface effects have the same important influence on the current signals as the channel surface effects. In this paper, when aqueous solution are driven with non-continuous DC electric field force, the characteristics of current signals of the fluid transferring through microfluidic channel are systematically studied. Six modes of current signal are summarized, and some new significant phenomena are found, e.g. there exists a critical voltage at which the steady current value equals to zero; the absolute value of the steady current decreases at first, however, it increases with the external voltage greater than the critical voltage as the electrode area ratio of cathode and anode is 10 and 20; the critical voltage increases with the enhancing of electrode area ratio of cathode and anode and solution pH, while it decreases with the raising of ion concentration. Finally, the microscopic mechanism of the electrode surface charge effects is discussed preliminarily. The rules will be helpful for detecting and manipulating single biomolecules in the micro/nanofluidic chips and biosensors.

  15. Indices to Study the Electrical Power Signals in Active and Passive Distribution Lines: A Combined Analysis with Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvano Vergura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The broad diffusion of renewable energy-based technologies has introduced several open issues in the design and operation of smart grids (SGs when distributed generators (DGs inject a large amount of power into the grid. In this paper, a theoretical investigation on active and reactive power data is performed for one active line characterized by several photovoltaic (PV plants with a great amount of injectable power and two passive lines, one of them having a small peak power PV plant and the other one having no PV power. The frequencies calculated via the empirical mode decomposition (EMD method based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT are compared to the ones obtained via the fast Fourier transform (FFT and the wavelet transform (WT, showing a wider spectrum of significant modes mainly due to the non-periodical behavior of the power signals. The results obtained according to the HHT-EMD analysis are corroborated by the calculation of three new indices that are computed starting from the electrical signal itself and not from the Hilbert spectrum. These indices give the quantitative deviation from the periodicity and the coherence degree of the power signals, which typically deviate from the stationary regime and have a nonlinear behavior in terms of amplitude and phase. This information allows to extract intrinsic features of power lines belonging to SGs and this is useful for their optimal operation and planning.

  16. The Design and Use of an Optical Mapping System for the Study of Intracardiac Electrical Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Shrivastav, PhD

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent optical mapping of electrically active cardiac tissues provides a unique method to examine the excitation wave dynamics of underlying action potentials. Such mapping can be viewed as a bridge between cellular level and organ systems physiology, e.g., by facilitating the development of advanced theoretical concepts of arrhythmia. We present the design and use of a high-speed, high-resolution optical mapping system composed entirely of “off the shelf” components. The electrical design integrates a 256 element photodiode array with a 16 bit data acquisition system. Proper grounding and shielding at various stages of the design reduce electromagnetic interference. Our mechanical design provides flexibility in terms of mounting positions and applications (use for whole heart or tissue preparations, while maintaining precise alignment between all optical components. The system software incorporates a user friendly graphical user interface, e.g., spatially recorded action potentials can be represented as intensity graphs or in strip chart format. Thus, this system is capable of displaying cardiac action potentials with high spatiotemporal resolution. Results from cardiac action potential mapping with intact mouse hearts are provided. It should be noted that this system could be readily configured to study isolated myocardial biopsies (e.g., isolated ventricular trabeculae. We describe the details of a versatile, user-friendly system that could be employed for a magnitude of study protocols.

  17. Electrical system for pulse-width modulated control of a power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals and related operating methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welchko, Brian A [Torrance, CA

    2012-02-14

    Systems and methods are provided for pulse-width modulated control of power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals. An electrical system comprises an energy source and a motor. The motor has a first set of windings and a second set of windings, which are electrically isolated from each other. An inverter module is coupled between the energy source and the motor and comprises a first set of phase legs coupled to the first set of windings and a second set of phase legs coupled to the second set of windings. A controller is coupled to the inverter module and is configured to achieve a desired power flow between the energy source and the motor by modulating the first set of phase legs using a first carrier signal and modulating the second set of phase legs using a second carrier signal. The second carrier signal is phase-shifted relative to the first carrier signal.

  18. Electrical system using phase-shifted carrier signals and related operating methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welchko, Brian A; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2012-09-18

    An automotive drive system and methods for making the same are provided. The system includes a three-phase motor and an inverter module. The three-phase motor includes a first set of windings each having a first magnetic polarity; and a second set of windings each having a second magnetic polarity that is opposite the first magnetic polarity. The first set of windings being electrically isolated from the second set of windings. The inverter module includes a first set of phase legs and a second set of phase legs. Each one of the first set of phase legs is coupled to a corresponding phase of the first set of windings, and each one of the second set of phase legs is coupled to a corresponding phase of the second set of windings.

  19. Improved Fuzzy Logic System to Evaluate Milk Electrical Conductivity Signals from On-Line Sensors to Monitor Dairy Goat Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Zaninelli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and test a new fuzzy logic model for monitoring the udder health status (HS of goats. The model evaluated, as input variables, the milk electrical conductivity (EC signal, acquired on-line for each gland by a dedicated sensor, the bandwidth length and the frequency and amplitude of the first main peak of the Fourier frequency spectrum of the recorded milk EC signal. Two foremilk gland samples were collected from eight Saanen goats for six months at morning milking (lactation stages (LS: 0–60 Days In Milking (DIM; 61–120 DIM; 121–180 DIM, for a total of 5592 samples. Bacteriological analyses and somatic cell counts (SCC were used to define the HS of the glands. With negative bacteriological analyses and SCC < 1,000,000 cells/mL, glands were classified as healthy. When bacteriological analyses were positive or showed a SCC > 1,000,000 cells/mL, glands were classified as not healthy (NH. For each EC signal, an estimated EC value was calculated and a relative deviation was obtained. Furthermore, the Fourier frequency spectrum was evaluated and bandwidth length, frequency and amplitude of the first main peak were identified. Before using these indexes as input variables of the fuzzy logic model a linear mixed-effects model was developed to evaluate the acquired data considering the HS, LS and LS × HS as explanatory variables. Results showed that performance of a fuzzy logic model, in the monitoring of mammary gland HS, could be improved by the use of EC indexes derived from the Fourier frequency spectra of gland milk EC signals recorded by on-line EC sensors.

  20. Improved Fuzzy Logic System to Evaluate Milk Electrical Conductivity Signals from On-Line Sensors to Monitor Dairy Goat Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninelli, Mauro; Tangorra, Francesco Maria; Costa, Annamaria; Rossi, Luciana; Dell'Orto, Vittorio; Savoini, Giovanni

    2016-07-13

    The aim of this study was to develop and test a new fuzzy logic model for monitoring the udder health status (HS) of goats. The model evaluated, as input variables, the milk electrical conductivity (EC) signal, acquired on-line for each gland by a dedicated sensor, the bandwidth length and the frequency and amplitude of the first main peak of the Fourier frequency spectrum of the recorded milk EC signal. Two foremilk gland samples were collected from eight Saanen goats for six months at morning milking (lactation stages (LS): 0-60 Days In Milking (DIM); 61-120 DIM; 121-180 DIM), for a total of 5592 samples. Bacteriological analyses and somatic cell counts (SCC) were used to define the HS of the glands. With negative bacteriological analyses and SCC 1,000,000 cells/mL, glands were classified as not healthy (NH). For each EC signal, an estimated EC value was calculated and a relative deviation was obtained. Furthermore, the Fourier frequency spectrum was evaluated and bandwidth length, frequency and amplitude of the first main peak were identified. Before using these indexes as input variables of the fuzzy logic model a linear mixed-effects model was developed to evaluate the acquired data considering the HS, LS and LS × HS as explanatory variables. Results showed that performance of a fuzzy logic model, in the monitoring of mammary gland HS, could be improved by the use of EC indexes derived from the Fourier frequency spectra of gland milk EC signals recorded by on-line EC sensors.

  1. Neurite, a finite difference large scale parallel program for the simulation of electrical signal propagation in neurites under mechanical loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián A García-Grajales

    Full Text Available With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite--explicit and implicit--were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon

  2. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure through guard cell-specific inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Toum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbes trigger stomatal closure through microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs. The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst synthesizes the polyketide toxin coronatine, which inhibits stomatal closure by MAMPs and the hormone abscisic acid (ABA. The mechanism by which coronatine, a jasmonic acid-isoleucine analog, achieves this effect is not completely clear. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are essential second messengers in stomatal immunity, therefore we investigated the possible effect of coronatine on their production. We found that coronatine inhibits NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production induced by ABA, and by the flagellin-derived peptide flg22. This toxin also inhibited NADPH oxidase-dependent stomatal closure induced by darkness, however it failed to prevent stomatal closure by exogenously applied H2O2 or by salicylic acid, which induces ROS production through peroxidases. Contrary to what was observed on stomata, coronatine did not affect the oxidative burst induced by flg22 in leaf discs. Additionally, we observed that in NADPH oxidase mutants atrbohd and atrbohd/f, as well as in guard cell ABA responsive but flg22 insensitive mutants mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3 and lecrk-VI.2-1, the inhibition of ABA stomatal responses by both coronatine and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium was markedly reduced. Interestingly, coronatine still impaired ABA-induced ROS synthesis in mpk3, mpk6, npr1-3 and lecrk-VI.2-1, suggesting a possible feedback regulation of ROS on other guard cell ABA signalling elements in these mutants. Altogether our results show that inhibition of NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS synthesis in guard cells plays an important role during endophytic colonization by Pst through stomata.

  3. The fractionation of spoken language understanding by measuring electrical and magnetic brain signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagoort, Peter

    2008-03-12

    This paper focuses on what electrical and magnetic recordings of human brain activity reveal about spoken language understanding. Based on the high temporal resolution of these recordings, a fine-grained temporal profile of different aspects of spoken language comprehension can be obtained. Crucial aspects of speech comprehension are lexical access, selection and semantic integration. Results show that for words spoken in context, there is no 'magic moment' when lexical selection ends and semantic integration begins. Irrespective of whether words have early or late recognition points, semantic integration processing is initiated before words can be identified on the basis of the acoustic information alone. Moreover, for one particular event-related brain potential (ERP) component (the N400), equivalent impact of sentence- and discourse-semantic contexts is observed. This indicates that in comprehension, a spoken word is immediately evaluated relative to the widest interpretive domain available. In addition, this happens very quickly. Findings are discussed that show that often an unfolding word can be mapped onto discourse-level representations well before the end of the word. Overall, the time course of the ERP effects is compatible with the view that the different information types (lexical, syntactic, phonological, pragmatic) are processed in parallel and influence the interpretation process incrementally, that is as soon as the relevant pieces of information are available. This is referred to as the immediacy principle.

  4. [Simulation Analysis of the Pulse Signal on the Electricity Network of Cardiovascular System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yin, Yanfei; Zhang, Defa; Wang, Menghong; Bi, Yongqiang

    2015-12-01

    Pulse waves contain abundant physiological and pathological information of human body. Research of the relationship between pulse wave and human cardiovascular physiological parameters can not only help clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, but also contribute to develop many new medical instruments. Based on the traditional double elastic cavity model, the human cardiovascular system was established by using the electric network model in this paper. The change of wall pressure and blood flow in artery was simulated. And the influence of the peripheral resistance and vessel compliance to the distribution of blood flow in artery was analyzed. The simulation results were compared with the clinical monitoring results to predict the physiological and pathological state of human body. The result showed that the simulation waveform of arterial wall pressure and blood flow was stabile after the second cardiac cycle. With the increasing of peripheral resistance, the systolic blood pressure of artery increased, the diastolic blood pressure had no significant change, and the pulse pressure of artery increased gradually. With the decreasing of vessel compliance, the vasoactivity became worse and the pulse pressure increased correspondingly. The simulation results were consistent with the clinical monitoring results. The increasing of peripheral resistance and decreasing of vascular compliance indicated that the incidence of hypertension and atherosclerosis was increased.

  5. Management of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Cranny, Jodie A; Wallace, Ann; Rogers, Helen J; Hughes, Sophie C; Hegarty, Anne M; Zaitoun, Halla

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulceration is common and may present in childhood. Causes of recurrent oral ulceration are numerous and there may be an association with underlying systemic disease. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common underlying diagnosis in children. The discomfort of oral ulcers can impact negatively on quality of life of a child, interfering with eating, speaking and may result in missed school days. The role of the general dental practitioner is to identify patients who can be treated with simple measures in primary dental care and those who require assessment and treatment in secondary care. Management may include topical agents for symptomatic relief, topical corticosteroids and, in severe recalcitrant cases, systemic agents may be necessary.

  6. Haematological parameters and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nabiha Farasat; Saeed, Mohammad; Chaudhary, Saima; Khan, Nabiha Farasat

    2013-02-01

    To find out the relationship between recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) with deficiencies of haemoglobin, haematocrit, serum vitamin B12, serum Ferritin and red blood cells (RBC) Folate level. An analytical cross-sectional study. Department of Oral Health Sciences, Shaikh Zayed Federal Postgraduate Medical Complex, Lahore, from February to July 2008. Sixty consecutive subjects with active RAS were taken as the aphthous group; 60 age and gender matched subjects without RAS were as the Non-Aphthous group. Five milliliter blood was taken from both groups to evaluate the levels of serum B12, and RBC Folate through radio immuno assay and serum ferritin with enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay tests. Complete blood count was carried out to determine the level of haemoglobin and haematocrit in both groups. Proportion of subjects with lower values was compared using 2 text of proportions with significance at p aphthous group.

  7. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães; Amaral, Fabrício-Rezende

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved in RAS development. In the present paper we reviewed all previous studies that investigated the association between RAS and H. pylori. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) databases was made of articles published up until July 2015 using the following keywords: Helicobacter Pylori or H. pylori and RAS or Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Fifteen experimental studies that addressed the relationship between infection with H. pylori and the presence of RAS and three reviews, including a systematic review and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The studies reviewed used different methods to assess this relationship, including PCR, nested PCR, culture, ELISA and urea breath test. A large variation in the number of patients included in each study, as well as inclusion criteria and laboratorial methods was observed. H. pylori can be detected in the oral mucosa or ulcerated lesion of some patients with RAS. The quality of the all studies included in this review was assessed using levels of evidence based on the University of Oxford's Center for Evidence Based Medicine Criteria. Although the eradication of the infection may affect the clinical course of the oral lesions by undetermined mechanisms, RAS ulcers are not associated with the presence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and there is no evidence that H. pylori infection drives RAS development.

  8. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide on stomatal characteristics and carbon isotope ratio of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes originating from an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera, H Iroja U; De Costa, W A Janendra M; Woodward, F Ian; Lake, Janice A; Ranwala, Sudheera M W

    2017-01-01

    Stomatal functioning regulates the fluxes of CO2 and water vapor between vegetation and atmosphere and thereby influences plant adaptation to their habitats. Stomatal traits are controlled by external environmental and internal cellular signaling. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of CO2 enrichment (CE) on stomatal density (SD)-related properties, guard cell length (GCL) and carbon isotope ratio (δ(13) C) of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes originating from a wide altitudinal range [50-1260 m above sea level (asl)], and grown at 400 and 800 ppm [CO2 ], and thereby elucidate the possible adaptation and acclimation responses controlling stomatal traits and water use efficiency (WUE). There was a highly significant variation among ecotypes in the magnitude and direction of response of stomatal traits namely, SD and stomatal index (SI) and GCL, and δ(13) C to CE, which represented a short-term acclimation response. A majority of ecotypes showed increased SD and SI with CE with the response not depending on the altitude of origin. Significant ecotypic variation was shown in all stomatal traits and δ(13) C at each [CO2 ]. At 400 ppm, means of SD, SI and GCL for broad altitudinal ranges, i.e. low (400 m), increased with increasing altitude, which represented an adaptation response to decreased availability of CO2 with altitude. δ(13) C was negatively correlated to SD and SI at 800 ppm but not at 400 ppm. Our results highlight the diversity in the response of key stomatal characters to CE and altitude within the germplasm of A. thaliana and the need to consider this diversity when using A. thaliana as a model plant. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  9. An ancestral stomatal patterning module revealed in the non-vascular land plant Physcomitrella patens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Caspar C.; Kamisugi, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    The patterning of stomata plays a vital role in plant development and has emerged as a paradigm for the role of peptide signals in the spatial control of cellular differentiation. Research in Arabidopsis has identified a series of epidermal patterning factors (EPFs), which interact with an array of membrane-localised receptors and associated proteins (encoded by ERECTA and TMM genes) to control stomatal density and distribution. However, although it is well-established that stomata arose very early in the evolution of land plants, until now it has been unclear whether the established angiosperm stomatal patterning system represented by the EPF/TMM/ERECTA module reflects a conserved, universal mechanism in the plant kingdom. Here, we use molecular genetics to show that the moss Physcomitrella patens has conserved homologues of angiosperm EPF, TMM and at least one ERECTA gene that function together to permit the correct patterning of stomata and that, moreover, elements of the module retain function when transferred to Arabidopsis. Our data characterise the stomatal patterning system in an evolutionarily distinct branch of plants and support the hypothesis that the EPF/TMM/ERECTA module represents an ancient patterning system. PMID:27407102

  10. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  11. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodribb, Timothy J; McAdam, Scott A M

    2013-01-01

    Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+)-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+)-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+)-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  12. Surface Laplacian of scalp electrical signals and independent component analysis resolve EMG contamination of electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, S P; DeLosAngeles, D; Lewis, T W; Powers, D M W; Whitham, E M; Willoughby, J O; Pope, K J

    2015-09-01

    The serious impact of electromyogram (EMG) contamination of electroencephalogram (EEG) is well recognised. The objective of this research is to demonstrate that combining independent component analysis with the surface Laplacian can eliminate EMG contamination of the EEG, and to validate that this processing does not degrade expected neurogenic signals. The method involves sequential application of ICA, using a manual procedure to identify and discard EMG components, followed by the surface Laplacian. The extent of decontamination is quantified by comparing processed EEG with EMG-free data that was recorded during pharmacologically induced neuromuscular paralysis. The combination of the ICA procedure and the surface Laplacian, with a flexible spherical spline, results in a strong suppression of EMG contamination at all scalp sites and frequencies. Furthermore, the ICA and surface Laplacian procedure does not impair the detection of well-known, cerebral responses; alpha activity with eyes-closed; ERP components (N1, P2) in response to an auditory oddball task; and steady state responses to photic and auditory stimulation. Finally, more flexible spherical splines increase the suppression of EMG by the surface Laplacian. We postulate this is due to ICA enabling the removal of local muscle sources of EMG contamination and the Laplacian transform being insensitive to distant (postural) muscle EMG contamination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  14. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV's broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV's neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Overexpression of the Mg-chelatase H subunit in guard cells confers drought tolerance via promotion of stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomo eTsuzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-chelatase H subunit (CHLH has been shown to mediate chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as plastid-to-nucleus and abscisic acid (ABA-mediated signaling. A recent study using a novel CHLH mutant, rtl1, indicated that CHLH specifically affects ABA-induced stomatal closure, but also that CHLH did not serve as an ABA receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the molecular mechanism by which CHLH engages in ABA-mediated signaling in guard cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined CHLH function in guard cells and explored whether CHLH expression might influence stomatal aperture. Incubation of rtl1 guard cell protoplasts with ABA induced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B, as also observed in wild-type (WT cells, indicating that CHLH did not affect the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Earlier, ABA was reported to inhibit blue light (BL-mediated stomatal opening, at least in part through dephosphorylating/inhibiting guard cell H+-ATPase (which drives opening. Therefore, we immunohistochemically examined the phosphorylation status of guard cell H+-ATPase. Notably, ABA inhibition of BL-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was impaired in rtl1 cells, suggesting that CHLH influences not only ABA-induced stomatal closure but also inhibition of BL-mediated stomatal opening by ABA. Next, we generated CHLH-GFP-overexpressing plants using CER6 promoter, which induces gene expression in the epidermis including guard cells. CHLH-transgenic plants exhibited a closed stomata phenotype even when brightly illuminated. Moreover, plant growth experiments conducted under water-deficient conditions showed that CHLH transgenic plants were more tolerant of drought than WT plants. In summary, we show that CHLH is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture in response to ABA, but not in ABA-induced gene expression, and that manipulation of stomatal aperture via overexpression of CHLH in guard cells improves plant

  16. Role of Sucrose in Emerging Mechanisms of Stomatal Aperture Regulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outlaw, W. H.

    2000-09-15

    Focused on the second of 2 hypotheses that were proposed for testing that transpiration rate determines the extent to which suc accumulates in the GC wall providing a mechanism for regulating stomatal aperture size.

  17. Experiences of a Multidisciplinary Course on Geo-Signal Processing from a DSP Perspective Offered in Electrical Engineering at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the experience gained in, and the efforts made toward, introducing and implementing a new course in the challenging and important area of geophysical signal processing at the Electrical Engineering (EE) Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The new course,…

  18. Ethylene mediates brassinosteroid-induced stomatal closure via Gα protein-activated hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenyu; Qi, Cheng; Ren, Hongyan; Huang, Aixia; Hei, Shumei; She, Xiaoping

    2015-04-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential for plant growth and development; however, whether and how they promote stomatal closure is not fully clear. In this study, we report that 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), a bioactive BR, induces stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by triggering a signal transduction pathway including ethylene synthesis, the activation of Gα protein, and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) production. EBR initiated a marked rise in ethylene, H(2)O(2) and NO levels, necessary for stomatal closure in the wild type. These effects were abolished in mutant bri1-301, and EBR failed to close the stomata of gpa1 mutants. Next, we found that both ethylene and Gα mediate the inductive effects of EBR on H(2)O(2) and NO production. EBR-triggered H(2)O(2) and NO accumulation were canceled in the etr1 and gpa1 mutants, but were strengthened in the eto1-1 mutant and the cGα line (constitutively overexpressing the G protein α-subunit AtGPA1). Exogenously applied H(2)O(2) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) rescued the defects of etr1-3 and gpa1 or etr1 and gpa1 mutants in EBR-induced stomatal closure, whereas the stomata of eto1-1/AtrbohF and cGα/AtrbohF or eto1-1/nia1-2 and cGα/nia1-2 constructs had an analogous response to H(2)O(2) or SNP as those of AtrbohF or Nia1-2 mutants. Moreover, we provided evidence that Gα plays an important role in the responses of guard cells to ethylene. Gα activator CTX largely restored the lesion of the etr1-3 mutant, but ethylene precursor ACC failed to rescue the defects of gpa1 mutants in EBR-induced stomatal closure. Lastly, we demonstrated that Gα-activated H(2)O(2) production is required for NO synthesis. EBR failed to induce NO synthesis in mutant AtrbohF, but it led to H(2)O(2) production in mutant Nia1-2. Exogenously applied SNP rescued the defect of AtrbohF in EBR-induced stomatal closure, but H(2)O(2) did not reverse the lesion of EBR-induced stomatal closure in Nia1-2. Together, our

  19. Whole-tree water use efficiency is decreased by ambient ozone and not affected by O3-induced stomatal sluggishness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutomo Hoshika

    Full Text Available Steady-state and dynamic gas exchange responses to ozone visible injury were investigated in an ozone-sensitive poplar clone under field conditions. The results were translated into whole tree water loss and carbon assimilation by comparing trees exposed to ambient ozone and trees treated with the ozone-protectant ethylenediurea (EDU. Steady-state stomatal conductance and photosynthesis linearly decreased with increasing ozone visible injury. Dynamic responses simulated by severing of a leaf revealed that stomatal sluggishness increased until a threshold of 5% injury and was then fairly constant. Sluggishness resulted from longer time to respond to the closing signal and slower rate of closing. Changes in photosynthesis were driven by the dynamics of stomata. Whole-tree carbon assimilation and water loss were lower in trees exposed to ambient O(3 than in trees protected by EDU, both under steady-state and dynamic conditions. Although stomatal sluggishness is expected to increase water loss, lower stomatal conductance and premature leaf shedding of injured leaves aggravated O(3 effects on whole tree carbon gain, while compensating for water loss. On average, WUE of trees exposed to ambient ozone was 2-4% lower than that of EDU-protected control trees in September and 6-8% lower in October.

  20. A pulsing electric field (PEF) increases human chondrocyte proliferation through a transduction pathway involving nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Robert J; Gordon, Stephen L; Kronberg, James; Ganey, Timothy; Pilla, Arthur A

    2008-06-01

    A potential treatment modality for joint pain due to cartilage degradation is electromagnetic fields (EMF) that can be delivered, noninvasively, to chondrocytes buried within cartilage. A pulsed EMF in clinical use for recalcitrant bone fracture healing has been modified to be delivered as a pulsed electric field (PEF) through capacitive coupling. It was the objective of this study to determine whether the PEF signal could have a direct effect on chondrocytes in vitro. This study shows that a 30-min PEF treatment can increase DNA content of chondrocyte monolayer by approximately 150% at 72 h poststimulus. Studies intended to explore the biological mechanism showed this PEF signal increased nitric oxide measured in culture medium and cGMP measured in cell extract within the 30-min exposure period. Increasing calcium in the culture media or adding the calcium ionophore A23187, without PEF treatment, also significantly increased short-term nitric oxide production. The inhibitor W7, which blocks calcium/calmodulin, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in both nitric oxide and cGMP. The inhibitor L-NAME, which blocks nitric oxide synthase, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in nitric oxide, cGMP, and DNA content. An inhibitor of guanylate cyclase (LY83583) blocked the PEF-stimulated increase in cGMP and DNA content. A nitric oxide donor, when present for only 30 min, increased DNA content 72 h later. Taken together, these results suggest the transduction pathway for PEF-stimulated chondrocyte proliferation involves nitric oxide and the production of nitric oxide may be the result of a cascade that involves calcium, calmodulin, and cGMP production. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. The acclimation of Tilia cordata stomatal opening in response to light, and stomatal anatomy to vegetational shade and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasamaa, Krõõt; Aphalo, Pedro José

    2017-02-01

    Stomatal anatomical traits and rapid responses to several components of visible light were measured in Tilia cordata Mill. seedlings grown in an open, fully sunlit field (C-set), or under different kinds of shade. The main questions were: (i) stomatal responses to which visible light spectrum regions are modified by growth-environment shade and (ii) which separate component of vegetational shade is most effective in eliciting the acclimation effects of the full vegetational shade. We found that stomatal opening in response to red or green light did not differ between the plants grown in the different environments. Stomatal response to blue light was increased (in comparison with that of C-set) in the leaves grown in full vegetational shade (IABW-set), in attenuated UVAB irradiance (AB-set) or in decreased light intensity (neutral shade) plus attenuated UVAB irradiance (IAB-set). In all sets, the addition of green light-two or four times stronger-into induction light barely changed the rate of the blue-light-stimulated stomatal opening. In the AB-set, stomatal response to blue light equalled the strong IABW-set response. In attenuated UVB-grown leaves, stomatal response fell midway between IABW- and C-set results. Blue light response by neutral shade-grown leaves did not differ from that of the C-set, and the response by the IAB-set did not differ from that of the AB-set. Stomatal size was not modified by growth environments. Stomatal density and index were remarkably decreased only in the IABW- and IAB-sets. It was concluded that differences in white light responses between T. cordata leaves grown in different light environments are caused only by their different blue light response. Differences in stomatal sensitivity are not dependent on altered stomatal anatomy. Attenuated UVAB irradiance is the most efficient component of vegetational shade in stimulating acclimation of stomata, whereas decreased light intensity plays a minor role. © The Author 2016. Published

  2. Helicobacter pylori DNA in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victória, Júnia Maria Netto; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Silva, Jeane de Fátima Correia; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2003-04-01

    Considering not only the fact that recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and stomach ulcers are immunologically mediated ulcers associated with Helicobacter pylori, but also the recent evidence that anaemia can be associated with both diseases, and the discovery of H. pylori in the oral mucosa led us to hypothesize that this bacteria may be related to RAS pathogenesis. Thirty-six consecutive subjects affected by minor and major forms of RAS and 48 healthy volunteers were included in the present study. The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect the presence of H. pylori in the oral lesion, the normal contralateral mucosa of patients affected by RAS and the oral mucosa of control subjects. The chi2- and Fisher's tests were used for statistical analysis. No association between RAS lesions and H. pylori was observed. However, 14 out of 36 (38.9%) of the patients with RAS were found to show the presence of H. pylori DNA in the lesion and/or contralateral mucosa. Sixteen out of 48 (33.3%) of the patients without RAS (control subjects) were positive (P > 0.05). The present study does not give support to the assumption that H. pylori could be involved in RAS development.

  3. Oxidative stress and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagan, Jose; Saez, Guillermo; Tormos, Carmen; Gavalda, Carmen; Sanchis, Jose M; Bagan, Leticia; Scully, Crispian

    2014-11-01

    This study analyzed the oxidative stress status in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) in the presence and absence of active ulceration. Oxidative stress was analyzed in peripheral mononuclear cells of 28 RAS patients with active ulceration and 29 controls. A further blood sample was collected from nine subjects randomly selected from the 28 RAS cases, during the period in which the patients did not have active oral ulceration. The reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were measured in these samples. The mean MDA and GSSG levels were significantly higher in patients with active RAS than in the controls, while GSH was lower in the RAS group (p < 0.01). There was a nonsignificant tendency toward higher MDA and GSSG levels in patients with major RAS compared with minor RAS. On comparing the serum findings in the nine RAS patients in the presence and absence of lesions, the presence of ulceration was associated with even higher MDA and GSSG levels and lower GSH concentrations (p < 0.05) CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress was detected in our RAS patients.

  4. Psychological stress and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Barros Gallo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is the most common type of ulcerative disease of the oral mucosa. Despite its worldwide occurrence and the extensive amount of research that has been devoted to the subject, the etiology of RAS remains unclear. Nevertheless, several hereditary, nutritional, infectious and psychological factors have been associated with RAS. The aim of this case-control study was to assess the influence of psychological stress on the manifestation of RAS. METHOD: Fifty patients were enrolled in the trial. Twenty-five RAS patients constituted the study group and another 25 non-RAS patients who were similarly matched for sex, age and socioeconomic status constituted the control group. Each patient was evaluated in terms of the four domains of stress (emotional, physical, social and cognitive using an internationally validated questionnaire, which was comprised of 59 items and measured the frequency and intensity of stress symptoms. The RAS group was interviewed during an active RAS episode. Completed questionnaires were submitted to proper analytical software and interpreted by an expert psychologist. RESULTS: There was a higher level of psychological stress among RAS group patients when compared to the control group (P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress may play a role in the manifestation of RAS; it may serve as a trigger or a modifying factor rather than being a cause of the disease.

  5. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiomara Serpa-Romero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent aphthosus stomatitis is an alteration of the oral mucosa in some cases associated with depression of the immune system that affects the tissue response at the level of the epithelium, triggering repetitive clinical picture of small and medium ulcers (3-5 mm which necrotic presented erythematous background and lasting no more than 15 days. The picture becomes recurrent, symptomatic, compromising the health of the patient who consults again with the same characteristics in oral cavity. The literature associates the process with hormonal changes, trauma, prolonged intake of medications, and stress. A case of female patient 53, who attends the service of dentistry to present multiple oral thrush that hard to swallow, drooling and feverish marked presents in Santa Marta, at the Center for Implantology and Oral Rehabilitation. According to the interrogation and clinical examination it is associated with a reactive inflammatory process caused by the intake of drugs to treat infectious or viral process, which is given the presumptive diagnosis of erythema drug. Any medication intake was suspended and additional tests are ordered antinuclear antibodies

  6. Electrical vs manual acupuncture stimulation in a rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome: different effects on muscle and fat tissue insulin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Johansson

    Full Text Available In rats with dihydrotestosterone (DHT-induced polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, repeated low-frequency electrical stimulation of acupuncture needles restores whole-body insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation causing muscle contractions and manual stimulation causing needle sensation have different effects on insulin sensitivity and related signaling pathways in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, with electrical stimulation being more effective in DHT-induced PCOS rats. From age 70 days, rats received manual or low-frequency electrical stimulation of needles in abdominal and hind limb muscle five times/wk for 4-5 wks; controls were handled but untreated rats. Low-frequency electrical stimulation modified gene expression (decreased Tbc1d1 in soleus, increased Nr4a3 in mesenteric fat and protein expression (increased pAS160/AS160, Nr4a3 and decreased GLUT4 by western blot and increased GLUT4 expression by immunohistochemistry in soleus muscle; glucose clearance during oral glucose tolerance tests was unaffected. Manual stimulation led to faster glucose clearance and modified mainly gene expression in mesenteric adipose tissue (increased Nr4a3, Mapk3/Erk, Adcy3, Gsk3b, but not protein expression to the same extent; however, Nr4a3 was reduced in soleus muscle. The novel finding is that electrical and manual muscle stimulation affect glucose homeostasis in DHT-induced PCOS rats through different mechanisms. Repeated electrical stimulation regulated key functional molecular pathways important for insulin sensitivity in soleus muscle and mesenteric adipose tissue to a larger extent than manual stimulation. Manual stimulation improved whole-body glucose tolerance, an effect not observed after electrical stimulation, but did not affect molecular signaling pathways to the same extent as electrical stimulation. Although more functional signaling pathways related to insulin sensitivity

  7. Multivitamin therapy for recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Choquette, Linda E.; Feinn, Richard S.; Zawistowski, Harriet; Latortue, Marie C.; Kelly, Edward T.; Baccaglini, Lorena

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a painful condition of unknown etiology, affecting more than 2.5 billion people worldwide. Vitamin deficiencies have been implicated as a possible cause. Methods The authors conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-arm, double-masked, placebo-controlled study to examine the effect of daily multivitamin supplementation on the number and duration of RAS episodes. The authors randomly assigned 160 adults who had a validated history of at least three episodes of idiopathic minor RAS within the previous 12 months to one of two groups: the first group (n = 83) received a once-daily multivitamin containing 100 percent of the U.S. reference daily intake (RDI) of essential vitamins, and the second group (n = 77) received once-daily placebo for up to 365 days. Results The results showed no significant difference in the mean number of new RAS episodes between the multivitamin (4.19 episodes) and placebo (4.60 episodes) arms during the study period (P = .69). The mean duration of new RAS episodes also was similar for the multivitamin (8.66 days) and placebo (8.99 days) arms (P = .60). Furthermore, the authors found no differences between the two arms with regard to mouth pain, normalcy of diet or compliance with the study medication regimen. Conclusion Daily multivitamin supplementation, with the RDI of essential vitamins, did not result in a reduction in the number or duration of RAS episodes. Clinical Implications Clinicians should not recommend multi-vitamin supplementation routinely as prophylaxis for RAS. PMID:22467697

  8. Caloric restriction protects against electrical kindling of the amygdala by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Victor Phillips-Farfan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR has been shown to possess antiepileptic properties; however its mechanism of action is poorly understood. CR might inhibit the activity of the mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling cascade, which seems to participate crucially in the generation of epilepsy. Thus, we investigated the effect of CR on the mTOR pathway and whether CR modified epilepsy generation due to electrical amygdala kindling. The former was studied by analyzing the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B and the ribosomal protein S6. The mTOR cascade is regulated by energy and by insulin levels, both of which may be changed by CR; thus we investigated if CR altered the levels of energy substrates in the blood or the level of insulin in plasma. Finally, we studied if CR modified the expression of genes that encode proteins participating in the mTOR pathway. CR increased the after-discharge threshold and tended to reduce the after-discharge duration, indicating an anti-convulsive action. CR diminished the phosphorylation of protein kinase B and ribosomal protein S6, suggesting an inhibition of the mTOR cascade. However, CR did not change glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate or insulin levels; thus the effects of CR were independent from them. Interestingly, CR also did not modify the expression of any investigated gene. The results suggest that the anti-epileptic effect of CR may be partly due to inhibition of the mTOR pathway.

  9. Gain of function of stomatal movements in rooting Vitis vinifera L. plants: regulation by H(2)O(2) is independent of ABA before the protruding of roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, B Jorge; Carvalho, Luísa C; Ferreira, Jaime; Amâncio, Sara

    2007-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), namely superoxide radical (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are generated when plant tissues endure a variety of environmental stresses, including light stress. The extremely short life times of ROS makes the study of their production in planta very difficult. The use of ROS-specific tracer dyes, 3-3' diaminobenzidine and nitroblue tetrazolium, together with high-resolution imaging provides the opportunity to identify sites of photooxidative stress response by ROS accumulation. This technique was applied to grapevine during the first 7 days after transfer from in vitro to ex vitro under an irradiance 4-fold higher than in vitro. ROS accumulation was detected in the first days of analysis, which gradually decreased to levels comparable to greenhouse leaves. (O2(-)) was uniformly distributed while H(2)O(2) accumulated preferentially in veins, wounds and stomatal guard and surrounding cells. To evaluate the role of H(2)O(2 )in stomatal functioning and its crosstalk with abscisic acid (ABA) we focused on the percentage of coloured structures, stomatal aperture and ABA concentration. We propose that the high H(2)O(2) level triggered by increased light is responsible for the activation of a signalling pathway over stomatal cells, in a process apparently irrespective of ABA regulation prior to root protrusion. This could explain the gain of function of a low yet consistent percentage of stomatal cells, essential for plant survival during the ontogenic period in analysis.

  10. [CORRELATION MATRIX OF CHARACTERISTICS OF CHRONIC RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koridze, Kh; Aladashvili, L; Taboridze, I

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present work is to study the correlation between the risk factors of chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The research was conducted on 62 patients between ages of 40 and 70 years at Tbilisi Hospital for Veterans of War. The analysis was carried out by Spearman's Rank Correlation method using the statistical package SPSS 11.5. We investigated: harmful habits, professional factors, background and accompanying illnesses, pathology of teeth, focal infection, emotional stress, genetic factors. Correlation matrix between the significant risk factors of chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is defined. Multiple correlations have the following factors: industrial dust, focal infections, emotional stress, anemia. Correlation diagram of etiological factors of chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is helpful for providing professional and expert services.

  11. Incidence of Helicobacter Pylori in oral aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to determine probable HP infection in oral aphthous samples by RUT in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Materials and Methods: This in vivo cross-sectional study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Swami Devi Dayal Dental College and Hospital according to the ethical standards. A total of 30 patients with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis and 20 healthy control groups were included in the study. Results: Out of 30 patients with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis, including 17 male and 13 female patients, with mean age of 47 and 38 years respectively, 21 patients (70% were RUT (positive. Out of 20 healthy control groups, 12 males and 8 females, 2 (10% were RUT (positive [Table 1]. Conclusion: HP may play a role in the etiology of RAS; also it is likely that RUT may be rapid and reliable for investigation of HP in RAS lesions.

  12. Treatment of radiation- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnel, S.B.; Blakeslee, D.B.; Oswald, S.G.; Barnes, M. (Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Aurora, CO (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Severe stomatitis is a common problem encountered during either radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Most therapeutic regimens are empirical, with no scientific basis. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of various topical solutions in the treatment of radiation- or chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Eighteen patients were entered into a prospective double-blinded study to test several topical solutions: (1) viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine; (2) dyclonine hydrochloride 1.0% (Dyclone); (3) kaolin-pectin solution, diphenhydramine plus saline (KBS); and (4) a placebo solution. Degree of pain relief, duration of relief, side effects, and palatability were evaluated. The results showed that Dyclone provided the most pain relief. Dyclone and viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine provided the longest pain relief, which averaged 50 minutes This study provides objective data and defines useful guidelines for treatment of stomatitis.

  13. ABA-Mediated Stomatal Response in Regulating Water Use during the Development of Terminal Drought in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Saradadevi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available End-of-season drought or “terminal drought,” which occurs after flowering, is considered the most significant abiotic stress affecting crop yields. Wheat crop production in Mediterranean-type environments is often exposed to terminal drought due to decreasing rainfall and rapid increases in temperature and evapotranspiration during spring when wheat crops enter the reproductive stage. Under such conditions, every millimeter of extra soil water extracted by the roots benefits grain filling and yield and improves water use efficiency (WUE. When terminal drought develops, soil dries from the top, exposing the top part of the root system to dry soil while the bottom part is in contact with available soil water. Plant roots sense the drying soil and produce signals, which on transmission to shoots trigger stomatal closure to regulate crop water use through transpiration. However, transpiration is linked to crop growth and productivity and limiting transpiration may reduce potential yield. While an early and high degree of stomatal closure affects photosynthesis and hence biomass production, a late and low degree of stomatal closure exhausts available soil water rapidly which results in yield losses through a reduction in post-anthesis water use. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA is considered the major chemical signal involved in stomatal regulation. Wheat genotypes differ in their ability to produce ABA under drought and also in their stomatal sensitivity to ABA. In this viewpoint article we discuss the possibilities of exploiting genotypic differences in ABA response to soil drying in regulating the use of water under terminal drought. Root density distribution in the upper drying layers of the soil profile is identified as a candidate trait that can affect ABA accumulation and subsequent stomatal closure. We also examine whether leaf ABA can be designated as a surrogate characteristic for improved WUE in wheat to sustain grain yield under

  14. ABA-Mediated Stomatal Response in Regulating Water Use during the Development of Terminal Drought in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saradadevi, Renu; Palta, Jairo A.; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.

    2017-01-01

    End-of-season drought or “terminal drought,” which occurs after flowering, is considered the most significant abiotic stress affecting crop yields. Wheat crop production in Mediterranean-type environments is often exposed to terminal drought due to decreasing rainfall and rapid increases in temperature and evapotranspiration during spring when wheat crops enter the reproductive stage. Under such conditions, every millimeter of extra soil water extracted by the roots benefits grain filling and yield and improves water use efficiency (WUE). When terminal drought develops, soil dries from the top, exposing the top part of the root system to dry soil while the bottom part is in contact with available soil water. Plant roots sense the drying soil and produce signals, which on transmission to shoots trigger stomatal closure to regulate crop water use through transpiration. However, transpiration is linked to crop growth and productivity and limiting transpiration may reduce potential yield. While an early and high degree of stomatal closure affects photosynthesis and hence biomass production, a late and low degree of stomatal closure exhausts available soil water rapidly which results in yield losses through a reduction in post-anthesis water use. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is considered the major chemical signal involved in stomatal regulation. Wheat genotypes differ in their ability to produce ABA under drought and also in their stomatal sensitivity to ABA. In this viewpoint article we discuss the possibilities of exploiting genotypic differences in ABA response to soil drying in regulating the use of water under terminal drought. Root density distribution in the upper drying layers of the soil profile is identified as a candidate trait that can affect ABA accumulation and subsequent stomatal closure. We also examine whether leaf ABA can be designated as a surrogate characteristic for improved WUE in wheat to sustain grain yield under terminal drought

  15. Guard cell ABA and CO2 signaling network updates and Ca2+ sensor priming hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Maria; Siegel, Robert S; Young, Jared; Hashimoto, Mimi; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian I

    2006-12-01

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of plants enable gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere, a process vital to plant life. Pairs of specialized guard cells surround and control stomatal apertures. Stomatal closing is induced by abscisic acid (ABA) and elevated CO(2) concentrations. Recent advances have been made in understanding ABA signaling and in characterizing CO(2) transduction mechanisms and CO(2) signaling mutants. In addition, models of Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent signaling in guard cells have been developed and a new hypothesis has been formed in which physiological stimuli are proposed to prime Ca(2+) sensors, thus enabling specificity in Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction.

  16. Stomatal Opening Involves Polar, Not Radial, Stiffening Of Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ross; Woolfenden, Hugh; Baillie, Alice; Amsbury, Sam; Carroll, Sarah; Healicon, Eleanor; Sovatzoglou, Spyros; Braybrook, Sioban; Gray, Julie E; Hobbs, Jamie; Morris, Richard J; Fleming, Andrew J

    2017-10-09

    It has long been accepted that differential radial thickening of guard cells plays an important role in the turgor-driven shape changes required for stomatal pore opening to occur [1-4]. This textbook description derives from an original interpretation of structure rather than measurement of mechanical properties. Here we show, using atomic force microscopy, that although mature guard cells display a radial gradient of stiffness, this is not present in immature guard cells, yet young stomata show a normal opening response. Finite element modeling supports the experimental observation that radial stiffening plays a very limited role in stomatal opening. In addition, our analysis reveals an unexpected stiffening of the polar regions of the stomata complexes, both in Arabidopsis and other plants, suggesting a widespread occurrence. Combined experimental data (analysis of guard cell wall epitopes and treatment of tissue with cell wall digesting enzymes, coupled with bioassay of guard cell function) plus modeling lead us to propose that polar stiffening reflects a mechanical, pectin-based pinning down of the guard cell ends, which restricts increase of stomatal complex length during opening. This is predicted to lead to an improved response sensitivity of stomatal aperture movement with respect to change of turgor pressure. Our results provide new insight into the mechanics of stomatal function, both negating an established view of the importance of radial thickening and providing evidence for a significant role for polar stiffening. Improved stomatal performance via altered cell-wall-mediated mechanics is likely to be of evolutionary and agronomic significance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetoelectric coupling study in multiferroic Pb(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3 ceramics through small and large electric signal standard measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Oscar; Font, Reynaldo; Portelles, Jorge; Siqueiros, Jesús M.

    2011-05-01

    Multifunctional multiferroic materials such as the single phase compound Pb(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3 (PFN), where ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic order coexist, are very promising and have great interest from the academic and technological points of view. In this work, coupling of the ferroelectric and magnetic moments is reported. For this study, a combination of the small signal response using the impedance spectroscopy technique and the electromechanical resonance method with the large signal response through standard ferroelectric hysteresis measurement, has been used with and without an applied magnetic field. The measurements to determine the electrical properties of the ceramic were performed as functions of the bias and poling electric fields. A simultaneous analysis of the complex dielectric constant ɛ˜, impedance Z˜, electric modulus M˜, admittance Ỹ, and the electromechanical parameters and coupling factors is presented. The results are correlated with a previous study of structural, morphological, small signal dielectric frequency-temperature response, and the ferroelectric hysteretic, magnetic and magnetodielectric behaviors. The observed shifts of the resonance and antiresonance frequency values can be associated with change of the ferroelectric domain size favored by the readjustment of the oxygen octahedron when the magnetic field is applied. From P-E hysteresis loops obtained without and with an external applied magnetic field, a dc magnetoelectric coupling effect with maximum value of 4 kV/cm T (400 mV/cm Oe) was obtained.

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Survival of CD169+ Cells Promotes Immune Activation during Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain...... defense against viral pathogens. CD169(+) macrophages are shown to activate innate and adaptive immunity via "enforced virus replication" a controlled amplification of virus particles. However, factors regulating the CD169(+) macrophages remain to be studied. In this paper, we show that after Vesicular...... stomatitis virus infection, phagocytes produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) which signals via TNFR1 and promote "enforced virus replication" in CD169(+) macrophages. Consequently, lack of TNF or TNFR1 resulted in defective immune activation and VSV clearance....

  19. Modeling stomatal conductance and ozone uptake of Fagus crenata grown under different nitrogen loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuchi, Fumika; Kinose, Yoshiyuki; Matsumura, Tomoe; Kanomata, Tomoaki; Uehara, Yui; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    A multiplicative stomatal conductance model was constructed to estimate stomatal O3 uptake of Fagus crenata exposed to O3 under different N loads to the soil. Our stomatal conductance model included environmental functions such as the stomatal responses of F. crenata to diurnal changes, chronic O3 stress (AOT0), acute O3 stress (O3 concentration), and nitrogen load to soil. The model could explain 62% of the variability in stomatal conductance. We suggest therefore that stomatal closure induced by O3 and N load-induced soil acidification must be taken into account in developing a stomatal conductance model for estimating stomatal O3 uptake for future risk assessment of O3 impact on Japanese forest tree species such as F. crenata. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of Stomatal Aperture by Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Kenji, Omasa; Morio, Onoe; Division of Engineering The National Institute for Environmental Studies; Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo

    1984-01-01

    We developed a new digital image processing technique for exactly measuring the degree of stomatal opening, that is, the ratio of the width to the maximum length of a stomatal pore, and the pore area. We applied this technique to evaluate responses to SO_2 of neighboring stomata in a small region of an intact attached leaf, with the following results: 1) The pore region could be exactly extracted even when the original digital image was of poor quality. The standard errors in the evaluation o...

  1. Optimal Stomatal Behaviour Around the World: Synthesis of a Global Stomatal Conductance Database and Scaling from Leaf to Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. S.; Medlyn, B. E.; Duursma, R.; Prentice, I. C.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration and a key element of the global water cycle, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycles, a global scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. We present a unique database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We employed a model of optimal stomatal conductance to assess differences in stomatal behaviour, and estimated the model slope coefficient, g1, which is directly related to the marginal carbon cost of water, for each dataset. We found that g1 varies considerably among PFTs, with evergreen savanna trees having the largest g1 (least conservative water use), followed by C3 grasses and crops, angiosperm trees, gymnosperm trees, and C4 grasses. Amongst angiosperm trees, species with higher wood density had a higher marginal carbon cost of water, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model. There was an interactive effect between temperature and moisture availability on g1: for wet environments, g1 was largest in high temperature environments, indicated by high mean annual temperature during the period when temperature above 0oC (Tm), but it did not vary with Tm across dry environments. We examine whether these differences in leaf-scale behaviour are reflected in ecosystem-scale differences in water-use efficiency. These findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of stomatal conductance across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of productivity and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.

  2. Stomatal and pavement cell density linked to leaf internal CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santrůček, Jiří; Vráblová, Martina; Simková, Marie; Hronková, Marie; Drtinová, Martina; Květoň, Jiří; Vrábl, Daniel; Kubásek, Jiří; Macková, Jana; Wiesnerová, Dana; Neuwithová, Jitka; Schreiber, Lukas

    2014-08-01

    Stomatal density (SD) generally decreases with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, Ca. However, SD is also affected by light, air humidity and drought, all under systemic signalling from older leaves. This makes our understanding of how Ca controls SD incomplete. This study tested the hypotheses that SD is affected by the internal CO2 concentration of the leaf, Ci, rather than Ca, and that cotyledons, as the first plant assimilation organs, lack the systemic signal. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus), beech (Fagus sylvatica), arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and garden cress (Lepidium sativum) were grown under contrasting environmental conditions that affected Ci while Ca was kept constant. The SD, pavement cell density (PCD) and stomatal index (SI) responses to Ci in cotyledons and the first leaves of garden cress were compared. (13)C abundance (δ(13)C) in leaf dry matter was used to estimate the effective Ci during leaf development. The SD was estimated from leaf imprints. SD correlated negatively with Ci in leaves of all four species and under three different treatments (irradiance, abscisic acid and osmotic stress). PCD in arabidopsis and garden cress responded similarly, so that SI was largely unaffected. However, SD and PCD of cotyledons were insensitive to Ci, indicating an essential role for systemic signalling. It is proposed that Ci or a Ci-linked factor plays an important role in modulating SD and PCD during epidermis development and leaf expansion. The absence of a Ci-SD relationship in the cotyledons of garden cress indicates the key role of lower-insertion CO2 assimilation organs in signal perception and its long-distance transport. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Spatial heterogeneity in stomatal features during leaf elongation: an analysis using Rosa hybrida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Heuvelink, E.; Carvalho, S.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Within-leaf heterogeneity in stomatal traits poses a key uncertainty in determining a representative value for the whole leaf. Accounting for this heterogeneity, we studied stomatal initiation on expanding leaves and estimated stomatal conductance (gs) of mature leaves. The entire lamina was

  4. A new discrete dynamic model of ABA-induced stomatal closure predicts key feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Biswa R.; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Zañudo, Jorge G. T.; Zhu, Mengmeng; Osman, Karim; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2017-01-01

    Stomata, microscopic pores in leaf surfaces through which water loss and carbon dioxide uptake occur, are closed in response to drought by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). This process is vital for drought tolerance and has been the topic of extensive experimental investigation in the last decades. Although a core signaling chain has been elucidated consisting of ABA binding to receptors, which alleviates negative regulation by protein phosphatases 2C (PP2Cs) of the protein kinase OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) and ultimately results in activation of anion channels, osmotic water loss, and stomatal closure, over 70 additional components have been identified, yet their relationships with each other and the core components are poorly elucidated. We integrated and processed hundreds of disparate observations regarding ABA signal transduction responses underlying stomatal closure into a network of 84 nodes and 156 edges and, as a result, established those relationships, including identification of a 36-node, strongly connected (feedback-rich) component as well as its in- and out-components. The network’s domination by a feedback-rich component may reflect a general feature of rapid signaling events. We developed a discrete dynamic model of this network and elucidated the effects of ABA plus knockout or constitutive activity of 79 nodes on both the outcome of the system (closure) and the status of all internal nodes. The model, with more than 1024 system states, is far from fully determined by the available data, yet model results agree with existing experiments in 82 cases and disagree in only 17 cases, a validation rate of 75%. Our results reveal nodes that could be engineered to impact stomatal closure in a controlled fashion and also provide over 140 novel predictions for which experimental data are currently lacking. Noting the paucity of wet-bench data regarding combinatorial effects of ABA and internal node activation, we experimentally confirmed several

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-associated stomatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers-Doets, Christine B.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Treister, Nathaniel S.; Epstein, Joel B.; Arends, Anniek B. P.; Wiersma, Diede R.; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Logan, Richard M.; van Erp, Nielka P.; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-01-01

    With the recent introduction of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in oncology, distinct cutaneous and oral adverse events have been identified. In fact, stomatitis and rash are documented as the most frequent and potentially dose-limiting side effects. Clinically, mTOR

  6. Detection of salivary interleukin-2 in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, R; Thubashini, M; Sundharam, B Sivapatha

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to estimate and compare salivary interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis, among healthy controls and their variation with age and sex. Saliva was collected from 60 patients within the age range of 16-60 years which included 30 patients (17 Females and 13 Males) with recurrent aphthous stomatitis and healthy control group consisted of 30 participants (18 Females and 12 Males). IL-2 estimation was done in both the groups using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis of the data was done using Independent 't' test. The results showed increased salivary IL-2 levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis compared to the healthy controls. The IL-2 levels were also increased in patients with the age group of 16-30 years compared to other age groups. Similar increase of IL-2 was also seen in female patients. Age related and sex related alterations of IL-2 in recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients were observed.

  7. mechanisms of drought resistance in grain ii:.stomatal regulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    whereby photosythesis was reduced by 75% in common bean but only by 20% in chickpea. Significant ... induced stomatal closure, thereby a decrease in the ... 7 or 15 days at soil water content of 40% (-0.15 MPa. SWP). ... chamber were kept constant with a light intensity ... determination of highway distances on maps. At.

  8. Influence of climate variables on Cyperus papyrus stomatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyperus papyrus forms highly productive wetlands in tropical Africa, but the environmental control of transpirational water loss in wetlands is poorly understood. The influence of climate variables on papyrus stomatal conductance in dry and wet seasons of the year was investigated in a wetland in Kampala, Uganda, ...

  9. Effects of Moisture and Mycorrhiza on Stomatal Conductance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Both the ecto and endo mycorrhizae significantly (P<0.05)affected the Stomatal Conductance and Xylem Pressure Potential of the plant even under stressed conditions. The use of mycorrhiza is thus recommended as a strategy for efficient water utilization and water conservation. KEYWORDS: Faidherbia albida, mycorrhiza, ...

  10. Linking stomatal sensitivity and whole-tree hydraulic architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. McCulloh; David R. Woodruff

    2012-01-01

    Despite the complexity of the relationship between stomatal sensitivity, water loss and vulnerability to embolism, the goal of teasing apart the subtleties is a necessary one. As Litvak et al. (2012) mention, determining transpiration patterns based on vulnerability to embolism would be much easier than the lengthy and potentially expensive processes involved in sap...

  11. Improvement of herpetic stomatitis therapy in patients with chronic tonsillitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepilin А.V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the clinical and pathogenetic efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis. Materials and methods: Medical examination and treatment of 60 patients have been carried out. The marker of endogenous intoxication, infectious severity and immunity has been investigated. Results. It has been established that use of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis has allowed to decrease infectious severity in par-odontal recess and evidence of local inflammation, to normalize immunity indices and reduce the level of endogenous intoxication that has been liable for acceleration of recuperation processes and lowering of frequency of stomatitis recurrences. Conclusion. The clinical efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis conditioned by the decreasing of activity of local inflammatory process according to the reducing of level pro-inflammatory cytokines, infectious burden of the mouth cavity, endogenous intoxication

  12. Comparison of different stomatal conductance algorithms for ozone flux modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büker, P.; Emberson, L.D.; Ashmore, M.R.; Gerosa, G.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Massman, W.J.; Müller, J.; Nikolov, N.; Novak, K.; Oksanen, E.; Torre, de la D.; Tuovinen, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    A multiplicative and a semi-mechanistic, BWB-type [Ball, J.T., Woodrow, I.E., Berry, J.A., 1987. A model predicting stomatal conductance and its contribution to the control of photosynthesis under different environmental conditions. In: Biggens, J. (Ed.), Progress in Photosynthesis Research, vol.

  13. Comparison of different stomatal conductance algorithms for ozone flux modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Buker; L.D. Emberson; M. R. Ashmore; H. M. Cambridge; C. M. Jacobs; W. J. Massman; J. Muller; N. Nikolov; K. Novak; E. Oksanen; M. Schaub; D. de la Torre

    2007-01-01

    A multiplicative and a semi-mechanistic, BWB-type [Ball, J.T., Woodrow, I.E., Berry, J.A., 1987. A model predicting stomatal conductance and its contribution to the control of photosynthesis under different environmental conditions. In: Biggens, J. (Ed.), Progress in Photosynthesis Research, vol. IV. Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, pp. 221-224.] algorithm for calculating...

  14. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-06

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  15. Memory-like behavior as a feature of electrical signal transmission in melanin-like bio-polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrico, M.; Ambrico, P. F.; Ligonzo, T.; Cardone, A.; Cicco, S. R.; Lavizzera, A.; Augelli, V.; Farinola, G. M.

    2012-06-01

    The memory-like behavior of melanin biopolymer under electrical stimuli is shown through electrical transport characterization performed on melanin based metal insulator semiconductor structures on silicon. The presence of a memory window and retention behavior is verified by capacitance-voltage read outs before and after the application of voltage pulses. Interestingly, these phenomena occur without the presence of metallic nanoclusters enclosed in the melanin matrix. Charge trapping is considered the main mechanism responsible for the melanin memory-like character. The inability to erase the memory window has been ascribed to the permanent polarization effect during the application of the voltage pulse.

  16. Electrical Excitation of the Pulmonary Venous Musculature May Contribute to the Formation of the Last Component of the High Frequency Signal of the P Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Abe, MD

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary veins (PVs have been shown to play an important role in the induction and perpetuation of focal AF. Fifty-one patients with AF, and 24 patients without AF as control subjects, were enrolled in this study. Signal-averaged P-wave recording was performed, and the filtered P wave duration (FPD, the root-mean-square voltage for the last 20, 30 and 40 ms (RMS20, 30, and 40, respectively were compared. In 7 patients with AF, these parameters were compared before and after the catheter ablation. The FPD was significantly longer and the RMS20 was smaller in the patients with AF than those without AF. Because RMS30 was widely distributed between 2 and 10 µV, the AF group was sub-divided into two groups; Group 1 was comprised of the patients with an RMS30 ≧5.0 µV, and group 2, <5.0 µV. In group 1, short-coupled PACs were more frequently documented on Holter monitoring, and exercise testing more readily induced AF. After successful electrical disconnection between the LA and PVs, each micropotential parameter was significantly attenuated. These results indicate that the high frequency signal amplitude of the last component of the P wave is relatively high in patients with AF triggered by focal repetitive excitations most likely originating from the PVs. That is, attenuation by the LA-PV electrical isolation, and thus the high frequency P signals of the last component, may contain the electrical excitation of the PV musculature.

  17. Joint inversion of satellite-detected tidal and magnetospheric signals constrains electrical conductivity and water content of the upper mantle and transition zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Munch, F. D.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new global electrical conductivity model of Earth's mantle. The model was derived by using a novel methodology, which is based on inverting satellite magnetic field measurements from different sources simultaneously. Specifically, we estimated responses of magnetospheric origin...... and ocean tidal magnetic signals from the most recent Swarm and CHAMP data. The challenging task of properly accounting for the ocean effect in the data was addressed through full three-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations. We show that simultaneous inversion of magnetospheric and tidal magnetic...

  18. Feeding behavior of the stink bug Bagrada hilaris is changed by the electrical signals applied during EPG recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeding behavior of piercing-sucking insects is most rigorously studied using eletropenetrography (EPG). This technique utilizes an electrical circuit to record waveforms caused by voltage fluctuations when a wired insect inserts its stylet into an electrified plant. Past researchers have asserted t...

  19. Joint inversion of satellite-detected tidal and magnetospheric signals constrains electrical conductivity and water content of the upper mantle and transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayver, A. V.; Munch, F. D.; Kuvshinov, A. V.; Khan, A.; Sabaka, T. J.; Tøffner-Clausen, L.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new global electrical conductivity model of Earth's mantle. The model was derived by using a novel methodology, which is based on inverting satellite magnetic field measurements from different sources simultaneously. Specifically, we estimated responses of magnetospheric origin and ocean tidal magnetic signals from the most recent Swarm and CHAMP data. The challenging task of properly accounting for the ocean effect in the data was addressed through full three-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations. We show that simultaneous inversion of magnetospheric and tidal magnetic signals results in a model with much improved resolution. Comparison with laboratory-based conductivity profiles shows that obtained models are compatible with a pyrolytic composition and a water content of 0.01 wt % and 0.1 wt % in the upper mantle and transition zone, respectively.

  20. Modelling of root ABA synthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration and potato production under water saving irrigation regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plauborg, Finn; Abrahamsen, Per; Gjettermann, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Application of water saving irrigation strategies in agriculture has become increasingly important. Both modelling and experimental work are needed to gain more insights into the biological and physical mechanisms in the soil-plant system, which regulates water flow in the system and plays...... a central role in reducing crop transpiration. This paper presented a mechanistic model (Daisy) developed based on data obtained in the SAFIR project on measured leaf gas exchange and soil water dynamics in irrigated potato crops grown in a semi-field environment subjected to different irrigation regimes....... Experimental data was compared to simulated results from the new enhanced Daisy model which include modelling 2D soil water flow, abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and its effect on stomatal conductance and hence on transpiration and assimilation, and finally crop yield. The results demonstrated that the enhanced...

  1. [Treatment of chronic aphthous stomatitis combined with duodenal ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudchenko, M A; Skrypnikova, T P; Dudchenko, M A

    2014-01-01

    It is currently proved ulcerous stomatitis and duodenal ulcer to have common pathogenetic infectious link (the most studied agent being Helicobacter pylori) by concominant decrease of local and general immunity with hyperoxidation events. Eighty patients (44 female and 36 male aged 15-60) with chronic aphthous stomatitis (AS) combined with duodenal ulcer were included in the study and divided in two equal groups according to treatment received (control group of 40 patients was treated according to conventional scheme, while in 40 patients a new formulation Vipromak was added to treatment protocol). The symptoms of AS tend to resolve faster in vipromak group thus proving its efficiency in treatment of AS and duodenal ulcer.

  2. Remission of severe aphthous stomatitis of celiac disease with etanercept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease triggered by gluten-containing foods (wheat, barley and rye) in genetically predisposed individuals. We present a patient with celiac disease complicated by severe aphthous stomatitis resulting in impairing swallowing, chewing and speaking. This led to weight loss, psychosocial problems as well as inability to perform her work. A variety of topical and systemic medications used resulted in either no improvement or only partial alleviation of the patient’s symptoms. After informed consent, etanercept was initiated and resulted in complete remission of aphthous stomatitis, decrease in arthralgia and fatigue and considerable improvement in her quality of life. The use of newer biological agents for selected and severe manifestations of celiac disease may lead to improved morbidity in these patients, but more studies are needed to determine long-term efficacy as well as safety of these drugs in the mucosal and/or systemic complications of this disease. PMID:24365222

  3. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: Diagnosis and Management in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian Hudson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (canker sores is a very common oral condition that remains incompletely understood. Presentation has been well-classified into minor, major or herpetiform subcategories based on clinical features, but exact etiology is unknown. Because etiology is unclear, treatments are primarily empiric and aimed at symptom reduction rather than prevention or cure. However, there are several methods, both topical and systemic, that can be easily and affordably utilized in the primary care setting.

  4. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: Diagnosis and Management in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Jillian Hudson

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (canker sores) is a very common oral condition that remains incompletely understood. Presentation has been well-classified into minor, major or herpetiform subcategories based on clinical features, but exact etiology is unknown. Because etiology is unclear, treatments are primarily empiric and aimed at symptom reduction rather than prevention or cure. However, there are several methods, both topical and systemic, that can be easily and affordably utilized in the ...

  5. Increasing stomatal conductance in response to rising atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, C; Batke, S P; Yiotis, C; Caballero, R; Soh, W K; Murray, M; McElwain, J C

    2018-01-31

    Studies have indicated that plant stomatal conductance (gs) decreases in response to elevated atmospheric CO2, a phenomenon of significance for the global hydrological cycle. However, gs increases across certain CO2 ranges have been predicted by optimization models. The aim of this work was to demonstrate that under certain environmental conditions, gs can increase in response to elevated CO2. Using (1) an extensive, up-to-date synthesis of gs responses in free air CO2 enrichment (FACE)experiments, (2) in situ measurements across four biomes showing dynamic gs responses to a CO2 rise of ~50 ppm (characterizing the change in this greenhouse gas over the past three decades) and (3) a photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model, it is demonstrated that gs can in some cases increase in response to increasing atmospheric CO2. Field observations are corroborated by an extensive synthesis of gs responses in FACE experiments showing that 11.8 % of gs responses under experimentally elevated CO2 are positive. They are further supported by a strong data-model fit (r2 = 0.607) using a stomatal optimization model applied to the field gs dataset. A parameter space identified in the Farquhar-Ball-Berry photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model confirms field observations of increasing gs under elevated CO2 in hot dry conditions. Contrary to the general assumption, positive gs responses to elevated CO2, although relatively rare, are a feature of woody taxa adapted to warm, low-humidity conditions, and this response is also demonstrated in global simulations using the Community Land Model (CLM4). The results contradict the over-simplistic notion that global vegetation always responds with decreasing gs to elevated CO2, a finding that has important implications for predicting future vegetation feedbacks on the hydrological cycle at the regional level.

  6. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Valery Z Grdzelishvili

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a sa...

  7. Ozone treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a double blinded study

    OpenAIRE

    AL-Omiri, Mahmoud K.; Mohannad Alhijawi; AlZarea, Bader K.; Ra’ed S. Abul Hassan; Edward Lynch

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of ozone to treat recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). Consecutive sixty-nine participants with RAS were recruited into this non-randomized double blind, controlled cohort observational study (test group). A control group of 69 RAS patients who matched test group with age and gender was recruited. RAS lesions in test group were exposed to ozone in air for 60?seconds while controls received only air. Ulcer size and pain were recorded for each participant at...

  8. Oral exfoliative cytology in female reverse smokers having stomatitis nicotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C R; Sarma, P R; Kameswari, V R

    1975-01-01

    1. The Karyopyknotic index of the palatal and lingual mucosa is increased in female reverse smokers when compared to non-smoking females. 2. The Karyopyknotic index of the buccal mucosa did not show any change in female reverse smokers when compared to non-smoking females. 3. The Karyopyknotic index did not show any change with age in the non-smoking females. 4. Very few cases show epithelial atypia in palatal smears from female reverse smokers having stomatitis nicotina.

  9. Evaluation of Denture Stomatitis in Croatian Adult Population

    OpenAIRE

    Ćelić, R.; Knezović Zlatarić, D.; Baučić, I.

    2001-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is often found under the removable partial dentures (RPDs). There are many factors influencing it, such as patient’s age and gender, smoking habits, denture age, denture material, denture wearing habits, denture hygiene habits, oral hygiene instruction, denture cleanness and denture plaque accumulation. The aim of this study was to find out the influence these factors have on the prevalence of DS under RPDs and complete dentures (CDs). A total of 200 pat...

  10. Silver nitrate cauterization: a treatment option for aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu Özler, Gül

    2014-07-01

    In this study we compared silver nitrate cautery with placebo to assess the effect of silver nitrate cautery in aphthous stomatitis for pain relief and healing time. In this study, sixty-five patients with aphthous stomatitis were assessed. Silver nitrate sticks were used in group A (treatment group) and placebo sticks were used for group B (control group). Change in the severity of pain, change in the size of the ulcers, healing time, side effects of the procedure were assessed. Although the mean value of pain scores before the procedure was similar in both of the groups, there were statistically significant differences between two groups after the procedure on the first to the seventh day. On the seventh day after the procedure, the ulcers were completely reepithelialized in 21 patients (60%) in the treatment group and in 10 patients (32%) in the placebo group. The difference was statistically significant (p aphthous stomatitis. Also this treatment shortens the healing time of ulcers. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral mucosa and therapy of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landová, Hana; Daněk, Zdeněk; Gajdziok, Jan; Vetchý, David; Stembírek, Jan

    2013-02-01

    Oral mucosa is one of the specific surfaces of the human body, which is permanently exposed to external factors related with food intake, breathing and speaking processes, which can lead to the onset of some problems. Disorders of the oral mucosa are a group of diseases, affecting, in the course of life, the majority of the population. Many of the oral mucosa ailments are manifested by lesions. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common of these diseases. Despite much clinical and research attention, its causes remain poorly understood and treatment is only symptomatic. RAS is reported to affect up to 25% of the population worldwide. Topical or systemic therapy (corticosteroids, antiseptics, anti-inflamatory drugs, immunomodulating agents, etc.) can be used for treatment of RAS-associated symptoms. In general, topical therapy should be preferred due to the smaller drug load of the organism. In both cases, the active substance has to be in suitable dosage form. Recently, besides the conventional ways of application (rinses), the main disadvantage of which is the short time of resistance in the oral cavity, mucoadhesive dosage forms are used. The aim of this article is to give a theoretical overview of the oral mucosa topic and its most frequent disease - recurrent aphthous stomatitis in terms of various types of the disease classification, diagnosis and therapy, and in terms of the usage of various types of active substances and medical forms. oral mucosa recurrent aphthous stomatitis therapy mucoadhesive dosage forms.

  12. Ozone exposure and stomatal sluggishness in different plant physiognomic classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paoletti, Elena, E-mail: e.paoletti@ipp.cnr.i [IPP-CNR, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Grulke, Nancy E. [US Forest Service, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Gas exchange responses to static and variable light were tested in three species: snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, two cultivars), California black oak (Quercus kelloggii), and blue oak (Q. douglasii). The effects of 1-month (snap beans) and 2-month (oaks) O{sub 3} (ozone) exposure (70 ppb over 8 h per day in open-top chambers) were investigated. A delay in stomatal responses (i.e., 'sluggish' responses) to variable light was found to be both an effect of O{sub 3} exposure and a reason for increased O{sub 3} sensitivity in snap bean cultivars, as it implied higher O{sub 3} uptake during times of disequilibrium. Sluggishness increased the time to open (thus limiting CO{sub 2} uptake) and close stomata (thus increasing transpirational water loss) after abrupt changes in light level. Similar responses were shown by snap beans and oaks, suggesting that O{sub 3}-induced stomatal sluggishness is a common trait among different plant physiognomic classes. - Sluggish stomatal responses are suggested to be both an effect of O{sub 3} exposure and a reason of increased O{sub 3} sensitivity in plants.

  13. Moderate water stress causes different stomatal and non-stomatal changes in the photosynthetic functioning of Phaseolus vulgaris L. genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, J C; Zlatev, Z S; Leitão, A E; Pais, I P; Fortunato, A S; Lidon, F C

    2014-01-01

    The impact of moderate water deficit on the photosynthetic apparatus of three Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivars, Plovdiv 10 (P10), Dobrudjanski Ran (DR) and Prelom (Prel), was investigated. Water shortage had less impact on leaf hydration, RWC (predawn and midday) and predawn water potential in Prel. RWC and Ψ(p) were more reduced in P10, while there was no osmotic adjustment in any cultivar. Although drought drastically reduced stomatal opening in P10 and DR, reduced A(max) indicated non-stomatal limitations that contributed to the negligible P(n). These limitations were on potential thylakoid electron transport rates of PSI and II, pointing to photosystem functioning as a major limiting step in photosynthesis. This agrees with decreases in actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)'/F(m)'), quantum yield of photosynthetic non-cyclic electron transport (ϕ(e)) and energy-driven photochemical events (q(P)), although the impact on these parameters would also include down-regulation processes. When compared to DR, Prel retained a higher functional state of the photosynthetic machinery, justifying reduced need for photoprotective mechanisms (non-photochemical quenching, zeaxanthin, lutein, β-carotene) and maintenance of the balance between energy capture and dissipative pigments. The highest increases in fructose, glucose, arabinose and sorbitol in Prel might be related to tolerance to a lower oxidative state. All cultivars had reduced A(max) due to daytime stomatal closure in well-watered conditions. Under moderate drought, Prel had highest tolerance, higher leaf hydration and maintenance of important photochemical use of energy. However, water shortage caused appreciable non-stomatal limitations to photosynthesis linked to regulation/imbalance at the metabolic level (and growth) in all cultivars. This included damage, as reflected in decreased potential photosystem functioning, pointing to higher sensitivity of photosynthesis to drought than is commonly assumed

  14. Diagnosis and management of recurrent herpetiform stomatitis and Behçet syndrome like recurrent aphthous stomatitis herpetiform type

    OpenAIRE

    Endah Ayu Tri Wulandari; Gus Permana Subita

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS) is a common inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa. The aetiology of RAS remains unclear, yet there are several predisposing factors which could be involved in the onset of the lesion. The herpetiform type of RAS appeared to be similar to recurrent oral Herpes Simplex infection and also could be part of Behçet Syndrome. This case report discussed a patient suffering from a herpetiform type of RAS with its clinical appearance resembling recurrent oral Her...

  15. CO2 sensing and CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance: advances and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Cawas; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Israelsson-Nordstrom, Maria; Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Guard cells form epidermal stomatal gas exchange valves in plants and regulate the aperture of stomatal pores in response to changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in leaves. Moreover, the development of stomata is repressed by elevated CO2 in diverse plant species. Evidence suggests that plants can sense CO2 concentration changes via guard cells and via mesophyll tissues in mediating stomatal movements. We review new discoveries and open questions on mechanisms mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements and CO2 modulation of stomatal development, which together function in CO2-regulation of stomatal conductance and gas exchange in plants. Research in this area is timely in light of the necessity of selecting and developing crop cultivars which perform better in a shifting climate. PMID:26482956

  16. Effect of SO/sub 2/ on stomatal aperture and sulfur uptake of woody angiosperm seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noland, T.L.; Kozlowski, T.T.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of SO/sub 2/ pollution on stomatal aperture and sulfur uptake varied with SO/sub 2/ dosage and plant species. Fumigation of Ulmus americana L. seedlings with 1 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 8 h inhibited stomatal closure and fumigation with 2 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 12 h induced stomatal closure. Sulfur uptake of fumigated Ulmus americana seedlings depended on stomatal aperture and was much higher in the light than in the dark. Fumigation of water-stressed Ginkgo biloba L. seedlings with 2 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 6.5 h tended to prevent stomatal closure. However, the effects of SO/sub 2/ on stomatal aperture were modulated and often overridden by environmental stresses such as low light intensity and drought.

  17. The electrical conductivity of the upper mantle and lithosphere from the magnetic signal due to ocean tidal flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnepf, Neesha Regmi; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Grayver, Alexander

    Oceans cover about seventy percent of the Earth and yet the overwhelming majority of seismological or electromagnetic (EM) observatories are found on continents. This provides a challenge for understanding composition, structure, and dynamics of Earth’s lithosphere and upper mantle in oceanic reg...... satellite and seafloor magnetic signals from the M2 ocean tide. With these data we also make an attempt to detect lateral variability of the Earth’s conductivity....

  18. Stomatitis-Related Pain in Women with Breast Cancer Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Fall-Dickson, Jane M.; Mock, Victoria; Berk, Ronald A.; Grimm, Patricia M.; Davidson, Nancy; Gaston-Johansson, Fannie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to describe stomatitis-related pain in women with breast cancer undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Hypotheses tested were that significant, positive relationships would exist between oral pain and stomatitis, state anxiety, depression, and alteration in swallowing. Stomatitis, sensory dimension of oral pain, and state anxiety were hypothesized to most accurately predict oral pain overall intensity. Thirty-two ...

  19. Responses of leaf stomatal density to water status and its relationship with photosynthesis in a grass

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2008-01-01

    Responses of plant leaf stomatal conductance and photosynthesis to water deficit have been extensively reported; however, little is known concerning the relationships of stomatal density with regard to water status and gas exchange. The responses of stomatal density to leaf water status were determined, and correlation with specific leaf area (SLA) in a photosynthetic study of a perennial grass, Leymus chinensis, subjected to different soil moisture contents. Moderate water deficits had posit...

  20. Évaluation des caractéristiques des stomates chez le palmier à huile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les résultats ont montré que, sur la face inférieure des feuilles, la densité stomatique est plus importante chez le matériel adulte 50,32 stomates par mm2 que chez le matériel jeune 23,88 stomates par mm2 et, sur la face supérieure des feuilles, cette situation s'inverse 4,77 stomates par mm2 contre 9,21 stomates par mm2.

  1. Evolutionary association of stomatal traits with leaf vein density in Paphiopedilum, Orchidaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bao Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both leaf attributes and stomatal traits are linked to water economy in land plants. However, it is unclear whether these two components are associated evolutionarily. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In characterizing the possible effect of phylogeny on leaf attributes and stomatal traits, we hypothesized that a correlated evolution exists between the two. Using a phylogenetic comparative method, we analyzed 14 leaf attributes and stomatal traits for 17 species in Paphiopedilum. Stomatal length (SL, stomatal area (SA, upper cuticular thickness (UCT, and total cuticular thickness (TCT showed strong phylogenetic conservatism whereas stomatal density (SD and stomatal index (SI were significantly convergent. Leaf vein density was correlated with SL and SD whether or not phylogeny was considered. The lower epidermal thickness (LET was correlated positively with SL, SA, and stomatal width but negatively with SD when phylogeny was not considered. When this phylogenetic influence was factored in, only the significant correlation between SL and LET remained. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the hypothesis for correlated evolution between stomatal traits and vein density in Paphiopedilum. However, they do not provide evidence for an evolutionary association between stomata and leaf thickness. These findings lend insight into the evolution of traits related to water economy for orchids under natural selection.

  2. Evolutionary association of stomatal traits with leaf vein density in Paphiopedilum, Orchidaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Bao; Guan, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Juan-Juan; Cao, Kun-Fang; Hu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Both leaf attributes and stomatal traits are linked to water economy in land plants. However, it is unclear whether these two components are associated evolutionarily. In characterizing the possible effect of phylogeny on leaf attributes and stomatal traits, we hypothesized that a correlated evolution exists between the two. Using a phylogenetic comparative method, we analyzed 14 leaf attributes and stomatal traits for 17 species in Paphiopedilum. Stomatal length (SL), stomatal area (SA), upper cuticular thickness (UCT), and total cuticular thickness (TCT) showed strong phylogenetic conservatism whereas stomatal density (SD) and stomatal index (SI) were significantly convergent. Leaf vein density was correlated with SL and SD whether or not phylogeny was considered. The lower epidermal thickness (LET) was correlated positively with SL, SA, and stomatal width but negatively with SD when phylogeny was not considered. When this phylogenetic influence was factored in, only the significant correlation between SL and LET remained. Our results support the hypothesis for correlated evolution between stomatal traits and vein density in Paphiopedilum. However, they do not provide evidence for an evolutionary association between stomata and leaf thickness. These findings lend insight into the evolution of traits related to water economy for orchids under natural selection.

  3. Induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, Sébastien A; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan J; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-01-01

    Effective oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is dependent on the ability of replication-competent viruses to kill infected cancer cells. We previously showed that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines are highly heterogeneous in their permissiveness to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), in part due to differences in type I interferon (IFN) signaling. Here, using 10 human PDAC cell lines and three different VSV recombinants (expressing ΔM51 or wild type matrix protein), we examined cellular and viral factors affecting VSV-mediated apoptosis activation in PDACs. In most cell lines, VSVs activated both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways, and VSV-ΔM51 primarily activated the type II extrinsic pathway. In cells with defective IFN signaling, all VSV recombinants induced robust apoptosis, whereas VSV-ΔM51 was a more effective apoptosis activator in PDACs with virus-inducible IFN signaling. Three cell lines constitutively expressing high levels of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were resistant to apoptosis under most experimental conditions, even when VSV replication levels were dramatically increased by Jak inhibitor I treatment. Two of these cell lines also poorly activated apoptosis when treated with Fas activating antibody, suggesting a general defect in apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca2+ signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  5. Evaluation of the Fourier Frequency Spectrum Peaks of Milk Electrical Conductivity Signals as Indexes to Monitor the Dairy Goats' Health Status by On-Line Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninelli, Mauro; Agazzi, Alessandro; Costa, Annamaria; Tangorra, Francesco Maria; Rossi, Luciana; Savoini, Giovanni

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study is a further characterization of the electrical conductivity (EC) signal of goat milk, acquired on-line by EC sensors, to identify new indexes representative of the EC variations that can be observed during milking, when considering not healthy (NH) glands. Two foremilk gland samples from 42 Saanen goats, were collected for three consecutive weeks and for three different lactation stages (LS: 0-60 Days In Milking (DIM); 61-120 DIM; 121-180 DIM), for a total amount of 1512 samples. Bacteriological analyses and somatic cells counts (SCC) were used to define the health status of the glands. With negative bacteriological analyses and SCC 1,000,000 cells/mL, glands were classified as NH. For each milk EC signal, acquired on-line and for each gland considered, the Fourier frequency spectrum of the signal was calculated and three representative frequency peaks were identified. To evaluate data acquired a MIXED procedure was used considering the HS, LS and LS × HS as explanatory variables in the statistical model.Results showed that the studied frequency peaks had a significant relationship with the gland's health status. Results also explained how the milk EC signals' pattern change in case of NH glands. In fact, it is characterized by slower fluctuations (due to the lower frequencies of the peaks) and by an irregular trend (due to the higher amplitudes of all the main frequency peaks). Therefore, these frequency peaks could be used as new indexes to improve the performances of algorithms based on multivariate models which evaluate the health status of dairy goats through the use of gland milk EC sensors.

  6. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Aastha; Iyengar, Asha R; Patil, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety-related traits have been attributed to sequence variability in the genes coding for serotonin transmission in  the brain. Two alleles, termed long (L) and short (S) differing by 44 base pairs, are found in a polymorphism identified in the promoter region of serotonin transporter gene. The presence of the short allele  and SS and LS genotypes is found to be associated with the reduced expression of this gene decreasing the uptake of serotonin in the brain leading to various anxiety-related traits. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is an oral mucosal disease with varied etiology including the presence of stress, anxiety, and genetic influences. The present study aimed to determine this serotonin transporter gene polymorphism in patients with RAS and compare it with normal individuals. This study included 20 subjects with various forms of RAS and 20 normal healthy age- and gender-matched individuals. Desquamated oral mucosal cells were collected for DNA extraction and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for studying insertion/deletion in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region. Cross tabulations followed by Chi-square tests were performed to compare the significance of findings, P aphthous stomatitis (60%) and controls (40%). The total percentage of LS and SS genotypes and the frequency of S allele were found to be higher in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis as compared to the control group although a statistically significant correlation could not be established, P = 0.144 and 0.371, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, occurrence of RAS was not found to be associated with polymorphic promoter region in serotonin transporter gene.

  7. Modelling annual pasture dynamics: Application to stomatal ozone deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Ignacio; Bermejo, Victoria; Elvira, Susana; Sanz, Javier; Gimeno, Benjamín S.; Alonso, Rocío

    2010-07-01

    Modelling ozone (O 3) deposition for impact risk assessment is still poorly developed for herbaceous vegetation, particularly for Mediterranean annual pastures. High inter-annual climatic variability in the Mediterranean area makes it difficult to develop models characterizing gas exchange behaviour and air pollutant absorption suitable for risk assessment. This paper presents a new model to estimate stomatal conductance (g s) of Trifolium subterraneum, a characteristic species of dehesa pastures. The MEDPAS (MEDiterranean PAStures) model couples 3 modules estimating soil water content (SWC), vegetation growth and gs. The gs module is a reparameterized version of the stomatal component of the EMEP DO 3SE O 3 deposition model. The MEDPAS model was applied to two contrasting years representing typical dry and humid springs respectively and with different O 3 exposures. The MEDPAS model reproduced realistically the gs seasonal and inter-annual variations observed in the field. SWC was identified as the major driver of differences across years. Despite the higher O 3 exposure in the dry year, meteorological conditions favoured 2.1 times higher gs and 56 day longer growing season in the humid year compared to the dry year. This resulted in higher ozone fluxes absorbed by T. subterraneum in the humid year. High inter-family variability was found in gas exchange rates, therefore limiting the relevance of single species O 3 deposition flux modelling for dehesa pastures. Stomatal conductance dynamics at the canopy level need to be considered for more accurate O 3 flux modelling for present and future climate scenarios in the Mediterranean area.

  8. Stomatal density and metabolic determinants mediate salt stress adaptation and water use efficiency in basil (Ocimum basilicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Giancarlo; Vallone, Simona; Orsini, Francesco; Paradiso, Roberta; De Pascale, Stefania; Negre-Zakharov, Florence; Maggio, Albino

    2012-11-15

    Increasing salinity tolerance and water-use efficiency in crop plants are two major challenges that agriculture must face in the next decades. Many physiological mechanisms and molecular components mediating crop response to environmental stresses have been identified. However, the functional inter-links between stress adaptation responses have not been completely understood. Using two basil cultivars (Napoletano and Genovese) with contrasting ability to respond to salt stress, here we demonstrate that reduced stomatal density, high ascorbate level and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity coordinately contribute to improve basil adaptation and water use efficiency (WUE) in saline environment. The constitutively reduced stomatal density was associated with a "delayed" accumulation of stress molecules (and growth inhibiting signals) such as abscisic acid (ABA) and proline, in the more tolerant Genovese. Leaf volatile profiling also revealed cultivar-specific patterns, which may suggest a role for the volatile phenylpropanoid eugenol and monoterpenes in conferring stress tolerance via antioxidant and signalling functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Controlling stomatal aperture in semi-arid regions-The dilemma of saving water or being cool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, M M; Costa, J M; Zarrouk, O; Pinheiro, C; Lopes, C M; Pereira, J S

    2016-10-01

    Stomatal regulation of leaf gas exchange with the atmosphere is a key process in plant adaptation to the environment, particularly in semi-arid regions with high atmospheric evaporative demand. Development of stomata, integrating internal signaling and environmental cues sets the limit for maximum diffusive capacity of stomata, through size and density and is under a complex genetic control, thus providing multiple levels of regulation. Operational stomatal conductance to water vapor and CO2 results from feed-back and/or feed-forward mechanisms and is the end-result of a plethora of signals originated in leaves and/or in roots at each moment. CO2 assimilation versus water vapor loss, proposed to be the subject of optimal regulation, is species dependent and defines the water use efficiency (WUE). WUE has been a topic of intense research involving areas from genetics to physiology. In crop plants, especially in semi-arid regions, the question that arises is how the compromise of reducing transpiration to save water will impact on plant performance through leaf temperature. Indeed, plant transpiration by providing evaporative cooling, is a major component of the leaf energy balance. In this paper we discuss the dilemma of 'saving water or being cool' bringing about recent findings from molecular genetics, to development and physiology of stomata. The question of 'how relevant is screening for high/low WUE in crops for semi-arid regions, where drought and heat co-occur' is discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. STOMATITIS AFTOSA REKUREN DAN GANGGUAN FUNGSI OVARIUM (Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Soetiarto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is a common disease of undefine etiology. Many studies have been conducted but the result remain unsatisfied. Fortunately some predisposing factors have been identified and one of predisposing factors is hormonal imbalance. The cases report showed that RAS in ovary disorder and disappear after ovary was amputated, and a case of infertility. IN case of RAS with hormone imbalance as predisposing factor, it is suggested to consider the condition of ovary. This suggestion is based on fact that ovary is producing hormone (estrogen, progesteron whihc influence to oral mucous.

  11. A hydraulic signal in root-to-shoot signalling of water shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, Alexander; Weiler, Elmar W; Steudle, Ernst; Grill, Erwin

    2007-10-01

    Photosynthesis and biomass production of plants are controlled by the water status of the soil. Upon soil drying, plants can reduce water consumption by minimizing transpiration through stomata, the closable pores of the leaf. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) mediates stomatal closure, and is the assigned signal for communicating water deficit from the root to the shoot. However, our study does not support ABA as the proposed long-distance signal. The shoot response to limited soil water supply is not affected by the capacity to generate ABA in the root; however, the response does require ABA biosynthesis and signalling in the shoot. Soil water stress elicits a hydraulic response in the shoot, which precedes ABA signalling and stomatal closure. Attenuation of the hydraulic response in various plants prevented long-distance signalling of water stress, consistent with root-to-shoot communication by a hydraulic signal.

  12. Effects of ozone-induced stomatal closure on ozone uptake and its changes due to leaf age in sun and shade leaves of Siebold's beech

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Watanabe, Makoto; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    An estimation of stomatal ozone uptake for the assessment of ozone risks in forest trees can be modified by ozone-induced stomatal closure. We thus examined a seasonal course of stomatal conductance in sun and shade leaves of Siebold's beech native to northern Japan (Fagus crenata) grown under free-air ozone exposure. A performance of multiplicative stomatal conductance model was also tested, when considering ozone-induced stomatal closure into the model. Ozone caused stomatal closure in both...

  13. Herbivore perception decreases photosynthetic carbon assimilation and reduces stomatal conductance by engaging 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, mitogen-activated protein kinase 4 and cytokinin perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Canales, Ivan D; Meldau, Stefan; Zavala, Jorge A; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-07-01

    Herbivory-induced changes in photosynthesis have been documented in many plant species; however, the complexity of photosynthetic regulation and analysis has thwarted progress in understanding the mechanism involved, particularly those elicited by herbivore-specific elicitors. Here, we analysed the early photosynthetic gas exchange responses in Nicotiana attenuata plants after wounding and elicitation with Manduca sexta oral secretions and the pathways regulating these responses. Elicitation with M. sexta oral secretions rapidly decreased photosynthetic carbon assimilation (A C ) in treated and systemic (untreated, vascularly connected) leaves, which were associated with changes in stomatal conductance, rather than with changes in Rubisco activity and 1-5 ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate turnover. Phytohormone profiling and gas exchange analysis of oral secretion-elicited transgenic plants altered in phytohormone regulation, biosynthesis and perception, combined with micrografting techniques, revealed that the local photosynthetic responses were mediated by 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, while the systemic responses involved interactions among jasmonates, cytokinins and abscisic acid signalling mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase 4. The analysis also revealed a role for cytokinins interacting with mitogen-activated protein kinase 4 in CO 2 -mediated stomatal regulation. Hence, oral secretions, while eliciting jasmonic acid-mediated defence responses, also elicit 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid-mediated changes in stomatal conductance and A C , an observation illustrating the complexity and economy of the signalling that regulates defence and carbon assimilation pathways in response to herbivore attack. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Nitric oxide is involved in dehydration/drought tolerance in Poncirus trifoliata seedlings through regulation of antioxidant systems and stomatal response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qi-Jun; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a component of the repertoire of signals implicated in plant responses to environmental stimuli. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exogenous application of NO-releasing donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) on dehydration and drought tolerance of Poncirus trifoliata. The endogenous NO level was enhanced by SNP pretreatment, but decreased by L-NAME, in the hydroponic or potted plants with or without stresses. Under dehydration, leaves from the SNP-treated hydroponic seedlings displayed less water loss, lower electrolyte leakage and reactive oxygen species accumulation, higher antioxidant enzyme activities and smaller stomatal apertures as compared with the control (treated with water). In addition, pretreatment of the potted plants with SNP resulted in lower electrolyte leakage, higher chlorophyll content, smaller stomatal conductance and larger photosynthetic rate relative to the control. By contrast, the inhibitor treatment changed these physiological attributes or phenotypes in an opposite way. These results indicate that NO in the form of SNP enhanced dehydration and drought tolerance, whereas the inhibitor makes the leaves or plants more sensitive to the stresses. The stress tolerance by NO might be ascribed to a combinatory effect of modulation of stomatal response and activation of the antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, NO is involved in dehydration and drought tolerance of P. trifoliata, implying that manipulation of this signal molecule may provide a practical approach to combat the environmental stresses.

  15. Evaluation of the Fourier Frequency Spectrum Peaks of Milk Electrical Conductivity Signals as Indexes to Monitor the Dairy Goats’ Health Status by On-Line Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninelli, Mauro; Agazzi, Alessandro; Costa, Annamaria; Tangorra, Francesco Maria; Rossi, Luciana; Savoini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is a further characterization of the electrical conductivity (EC) signal of goat milk, acquired on-line by EC sensors, to identify new indexes representative of the EC variations that can be observed during milking, when considering not healthy (NH) glands. Two foremilk gland samples from 42 Saanen goats, were collected for three consecutive weeks and for three different lactation stages (LS: 0–60 Days In Milking (DIM); 61–120 DIM; 121–180 DIM), for a total amount of 1512 samples. Bacteriological analyses and somatic cells counts (SCC) were used to define the health status of the glands. With negative bacteriological analyses and SCC 1,000,000 cells/mL, glands were classified as NH. For each milk EC signal, acquired on-line and for each gland considered, the Fourier frequency spectrum of the signal was calculated and three representative frequency peaks were identified. To evaluate data acquired a MIXED procedure was used considering the HS, LS and LS × HS as explanatory variables in the statistical model.Results showed that the studied frequency peaks had a significant relationship with the gland’s health status. Results also explained how the milk EC signals’ pattern change in case of NH glands. In fact, it is characterized by slower fluctuations (due to the lower frequencies of the peaks) and by an irregular trend (due to the higher amplitudes of all the main frequency peaks). Therefore, these frequency peaks could be used as new indexes to improve the performances of algorithms based on multivariate models which evaluate the health status of dairy goats through the use of gland milk EC sensors. PMID:26307993

  16. Evaluation of the Fourier Frequency Spectrum Peaks of Milk Electrical Conductivity Signals as Indexes to Monitor the Dairy Goats’ Health Status by On-Line Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Zaninelli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is a further characterization of the electrical conductivity (EC signal of goat milk, acquired on-line by EC sensors, to identify new indexes representative of the EC variations that can be observed during milking, when considering not healthy (NH glands. Two foremilk gland samples from 42 Saanen goats, were collected for three consecutive weeks and for three different lactation stages (LS: 0–60 Days In Milking (DIM; 61–120 DIM; 121–180 DIM, for a total amount of 1512 samples. Bacteriological analyses and somatic cells counts (SCC were used to define the health status of the glands. With negative bacteriological analyses and SCC < 1,000,000 cells/mL, glands were classified as healthy. When bacteriological analyses were positive or showed a SCC > 1,000,000 cells/mL, glands were classified as NH. For each milk EC signal, acquired on-line and for each gland considered, the Fourier frequency spectrum of the signal was calculated and three representative frequency peaks were identified. To evaluate data acquired a MIXED procedure was used considering the HS, LS and LS × HS as explanatory variables in the statistical model.Results showed that the studied frequency peaks had a significant relationship with the gland’s health status. Results also explained how the milk EC signals’ pattern change in case of NH glands. In fact, it is characterized by slower fluctuations (due to the lower frequencies of the peaks and by an irregular trend (due to the higher amplitudes of all the main frequency peaks. Therefore, these frequency peaks could be used as new indexes to improve the performances of algorithms based on multivariate models which evaluate the health status of dairy goats through the use of gland milk EC sensors.

  17. Application of a topical biomimetic electrical signaling technology to photo-aging: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a galvanic zinc-copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantalat, Jeannette; Bruning, Elizabeth; Sun, Ying; Liu, Jue-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The first signs of facial skin photo-aging often occur in the skin of the periorbital area and include sagging, loss of firmness and definition, and sallowness. Epidermal wounds have been shown to alter the trans-epithelial electrical potential creating an electric signal that directs cell migration in epithelial wound healing; this electric field declines sharply with age. A topical galvanic zinc-copper complex, which couples elemental zinc and copper to create a biomimetic electric field, has demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity and extracellular matrix improvement in vitro, including collagen and elastin production. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a galvanic zinc-copper complex on photo-aging parameters in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. In this eight-week study, women (40-65 years) with mild to moderate photo-aging were randomized to use placebo or 1 of 3 galvanic zinc-copper complex compositions (gel and activating moisturizer). Efficacy evaluations included clinical grading, specialized clinical imaging, and subject self-assessments performed at baseline, 15-30 minutes after product application and after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Tolerability was based on adverse events and clinical grading of irritation. Significance was set at P?0.05 versus baseline and between treatment groups. The study was completed by 124 women. Compositions containing the galvanic zinc-copper complex showed statistically significant clinical improvements versus placebo and baseline rapidly (15-30 min) after application and through week 8. Clinical grading showed significant improvement versus placebo in skin radiance and under-eye dark circles 15-30 minutes after first application with continued improvement through week 8, and in overall photo-damage, fine lines, lifted appearance of the eyes, and under-eye wrinkles starting after two weeks and continuing through week 8. Test compositions were well tolerated. This galvanic zinc-copper complex

  18. Les caractéristiques des stomates des feuilles de Ficus benjamina L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The main objective of this study is to assess the potential of Ficus benjamina stomata to be used as indicators of local air pollution. Methodology: Stomatal prints were taken from the species of study in the vicinity of roads, in residential and industrial areas and parks. Density, pore surface and stomatal resistance ...

  19. Clinical importance of celiac disease in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaşar, Sirin; Yaşar, Bülent; Abut, Evren; Aşiran Serdar, Zehra

    2012-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common disease of the oral mucosa that is characterized by recurrent, painful ulcers of unknown etiology. The association between celiac disease and recurrent aphthous stomatitis has been evaluated in several studies, but variable results have been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The study group consisted of 82 patients, all of whom had a history of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The control group included 82 patients who did not have aphthous stomatitis. Patients were screened for IgA anti-endomysial antibodies, IgG anti-endomysial antibodies, IgA anti-gliadin antibodies, and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies. Patients with positive serology underwent endoscopic biopsies of the duodenal mucosa. Patients in both groups were also questioned regarding gastrointestinal symptoms. One patient (1.2%) out of 82 in the study group was diagnosed with celiac disease by biopsy. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, heartburn and regurgitation were determined to be of higher incidence in the study group (paphthous stomatitis and celiac disease and that screening recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients for celiac disease has little clinical value. Additionally, regurgitation of gastric acid to the oral cavity may precipitate the formation of aphthous stomatitis.

  20. Familial cases of periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masao; Watanabe, Aika; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Oyazato, Yoshinobu; Kamioka, Ichiro; Murase, Masanori; Ishida, Akihito; Sakai, Hidemasa; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    We report three familial cases of periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis syndrome, including a pair of monozygotic twins and their mother. It suggests that periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis syndrome may have a certain monogenetic background. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic analysis of differences in stomatal guard cell lengths of bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталия Петровна Ламари

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Variation in stomatal guard cell length of parental cultivars and its inheritance in F1 and F2 hybrids have been studied after crossing between contrast genotypes of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Analysis of F2 populations has shown the action of three non-allelic genes in control of stomatal guard cell length of parental cultivars

  2. [The laser therapy and laser acupunture of patients with chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaĭlova, R I; Terekhova, N V; Zemskaia, E A; Melkadze, N

    1992-01-01

    Laser therapy and laser acupuncture of the biologically active sites were administered to 24 patients with chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The biologically active sites were selected individually with due consideration for the underlying somatic condition. Good results were achieved in the patients with the fibrous form of chronic aphthous stomatitis. Secretory and serum immunoglobulin levels were monitored over the course of laser treatment.

  3. Stomatal response characteristics of Tradescantia virginiana grown at high relative air humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei Nejad, A.; Meeteren, van U.

    2005-01-01

    Plants produced at high relative air humidity (RH) show poor control of water loss after transferring to low RH, a phenomenon which is thought to be due to their stomatal behaviour. The stomatal anatomy and responses of moderate (55%) and high (90%) RH grown Tradescantia virginiana plants to

  4. Cultivar Differences in the Stomatal Characteristics of Cut Roses Grown at High Relative Humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Tapia, A.; Heuvelink, E.; Pinto De Carvalho, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    High relative air humidity (RH>85%) during cultivation is known to reduce the vase life of cut roses, but the magnitude of such effect is cultivar dependent. The reasons behind this genotypic variation are not yet known. In this study, the stomatal density and stomatal responses to two closing

  5. Moderate salinity improves stomatal functioning in rose plants grown at high relative air humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, Dália R.A.; Vasconcelos, Marta W.; Lee, Sang; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Heuvelink, Ep; Pinto de Carvalho, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Plants grown at high relative air humidity (RH ≥ 85%) show hampered stomatal closure in response to closing stimuli. We hypothesized that a moderate salinity during growth could trigger a stress response and stimulate stomatal functioning due to an increased leaf abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]).

  6. Canopy Transpiration and Stomatal Responses to Prolonged Drought by a Dominant Desert Species in Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxing Gu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semiarid lands, canopy transpiration and its dynamics depend largely on stomatal sensitivity to drought. In this study, the sap flow of a dominant species, Haloxylon ammodendron growing in Central Asian deserts, was monitored using Granier-type sensors, from which the canopy stomatal conductance was derived. The responses of canopy transpiration and stomatal conductance to environmental variables during the second half of the growing season, when annual prolonged drought occurred, was analyzed for four continuous years, from 2013 to 2016. A soil water content (SWC of 3% was identified as the lower soil water threshold for this species, below which the plant lost the ability for stomatal regulation on water loss and suffered the risk of mortality. Above this threshold, the sensitivity of canopy transpiration to vapor pressure deficit, VPD (K, was linearly correlated with SWC, which mainly resulted from different stomatal behaviors at varying drought intensities. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD (m/Gsref increased linearly with soil moisture deficit, inducing a shift from more anisohydric to a more isohydric stomatal behavior. The flexibility of stomatal behavior regarding soil drought was one key element facilitating the survival of H. ammodendron in such an extreme dry environment.

  7. Comparison of different stomatal conductance algorithms for ozone flux modelling [Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Buker; L. D. Emberson; M. R. Ashmore; G. Gerosa; C. Jacobs; W. J. Massman; J. Muller; N. Nikolov; K. Novak; E. Oksanen; D. De La Torre; J. -P. Tuovinen

    2006-01-01

    The ozone deposition model (D03SE) that has been developed and applied within the EMEP photooxidant model (Emberson et al., 2000, Simpson et al. 2003) currently estimates stomatal ozone flux using a stomatal conductance (gs) model based on the multiplicative algorithm initially developed by Jarvis (1976). This model links gs to environmental and phenological parameters...

  8. Comorbidity of recurrent aphthous stomatitis and polyps ventriculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokupec, Josipa Sanja Gruden; Lukenda, Dolores Biocina

    2013-03-01

    As it is known, many diseases of gastric system cause changes in the oral cavity, with either pathological findings or subjective impressions. When these changes are of pathological nature, the most common finding is recurrent aphthous stomatitis on the tongue, which emerges as a consequence of gastric diseases. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a disorder characterised by recurrent ulcerations limited to the oral mucosa, without any other signs of diseases. According to their clinical form, they may be big, small and hyperform. Etiology of recurrent aphthae is genetic predisposition, systemic diseases (virus, certain vitamin deficiency, gastric disorders), and autoimmune disorder and psychogenesis. The symptoms include a prodromal burning sensation and ulceration emerging within 24-48 hours as round symmetrical lesions inflicting the entire oral cavity except for palate and gingiva. Polyps ventriculi are tumours on the gastric mucosa. They can lie on a broad background or hang on the stem, and may be both individual and clustered at the same time. They are more common with elderly male population. They may have a malignant alteration. According to WHO, they have been classified as hyperplastic and neoplastic polyps. Etiology of polyps is atrophic gastritis or H. pylori.

  9. Triamcinolone Acetonide Oromucoadhesive Paste for Treatment of Aphthous Stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Hamishehkar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to prepare the optimized oral paste formulation of Triamcinolone acetonide intended to be used in aphtous stomatitis. Methods: Plastibases were prepared using mineral oil and polyethylene (95:5. Oral paste formulations were prepared with different mixtures of three hydrocolloids solids, including gelatin, pectin and sodium carboxymethylcellulose, with different ratios, as well as Plastibase. Long-term and short-term stability of prepared formulations were studied in the case of color and consistency of pastes. Franz diffusion cell and dialysis membrane were employed for release study. Release data were fitted in the kinetic models to find out the mechanism of drug release. Results: Formulation containing 60% plastibase, 3.3% pectin, 6.6% gelatin and 30% carboxymethylcellulose showed desired durability of adhesion, spreadability and rheology property in healthy volunteers and was compared with reference formulation (Adcortyl® in the case of release profile. Although, optimized formulation and Adcortyl followed the Higuchi and first order release kinetics respectively, optimized formulation showed similar release profile to reference formulation. Conclusion: Optimized oral paste formulation of Triamcinolone Acetonide showed similar characteristics with reference formulation and could be used as an effective drug delivery system for the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

  10. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nora S; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, the most common periodic disorder of childhood, presents with the cardinal symptoms of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis typically before age 5. This review presents the recent literature on PFAPA and summarizes key findings in the pathogenesis, evaluation, and treatment of the disease. Theories surrounding the pathogenesis of PFAPA include a faulty innate immunologic response in conjunction with dysregulated T-cell activation. A potential genetic link is also under consideration. Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene variants have been implicated and appear to modify disease severity. In individuals with the heterozygous variant, PFAPA episodes are milder and shorter in duration. Diagnostic criteria include the traditional clinical signs, in addition to the following biomarkers: elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of elevated procalcitonin, vitamin D, CD64, mean corpuscular volume, and other nonspecific inflammatory mediators in the absence of an infectious explanation for fever. Treatment of PFAPA includes tonsillectomy, a single dose of corticosteroids, and, most recently, interleukin 1 blockers such as anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab. Tonsillectomy remains the only permanent treatment modality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stomatal design principles in synthetic and real leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Haaning, Katrine S; Boyce, C Kevin; Jensen, Kaare H

    2016-11-01

    Stomata are portals in plant leaves that control gas exchange for photosynthesis, a process fundamental to life on Earth. Gas fluxes and plant productivity depend on external factors such as light, water and CO2 availability and on the geometrical properties of the stoma pores. The link between stoma geometry and environmental factors has informed a wide range of scientific fields-from agriculture to climate science, where observed variations in stoma size and density are used to infer prehistoric atmospheric CO2 content. However, the physical mechanisms and design principles responsible for major trends in stomatal patterning are not well understood. Here, we use a combination of biomimetic experiments and theory to rationalize the observed changes in stoma geometry. We show that the observed correlations between stoma size and density are consistent with the hypothesis that plants favour efficient use of space and maximum control of dynamic gas conductivity, and that the capacity for gas exchange in plants has remained constant over at least the last 325 Myr. Our analysis provides a new measure to gauge the relative performance of species based on their stomatal characteristics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Denture-Related Stomatitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Maciąg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral inflammation, such as periodontitis, can lead to endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis, and vascular dysfunction. The relationship between vascular dysfunction and other common forms of oral infections such as denture-related stomatitis (DRS is unknown. Similar risk factors predispose to both conditions including smoking, diabetes, age, and obesity. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate endothelial function and major vascular disease risk factors in 44 consecutive patients with dentures with clinical and microbiological features of DRS (n=20 and without DRS (n=24. While there was a tendency for higher occurrence of diabetes and smoking, groups did not differ significantly in respect to major vascular disease risk factors. Groups did not differ in main ambulatory blood pressure, total cholesterol, or even CRP. Importantly, flow mediated dilatation (FMD was significantly lower in DRS than in non-DRS subjects, while nitroglycerin induced vasorelaxation (NMD or intima-media thickness (IMT was similar. Interestingly, while triglyceride levels were normal in both groups, they were higher in DRS subjects, although they did not correlate with either FMD or NMD. Conclusions. Denture related stomatitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in elderly patients with dentures. This is in part related to the fact that diabetes and smoking increase risk of both DRS and cardiovascular disease.

  13. Stomatal Responses to CO2 in Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, Sarah M.; Zeiger, Eduardo

    1985-01-01

    A role of the guard cell chloroplasts in the CO2 response of stomata was investigated through a comparison of the leaf gas exchange characteristics of two closely related orchids: Paphiopedilum harrisianum, which lacks guard cell chloroplasts and Phragmipedium longifolium, which has chlorophyllous guard cells. Leaves of both species had an apparent quantum yield for assimilation of about 0.05, with photosynthesis saturating at 0.300 to 0.400 millimoles per square meter per second. CO2 curves were obtained by measuring steady-state assimilation and stomatal conductance under 0.180 or 0.053 millimoles per square meter per second white light, or darkness, at 0 to 400 microliters per liter ambient CO2. The response of assimilation to changes in CO2 was similar in the two species, but the response of conductance was consistently weaker in Paphiopedilum than in Phragmipedium. The data suggest involvement of guard cell chloroplasts in the stomatal response to CO2 and in the coupling of assimilation and conductance in the intact leaf. PMID:16664075

  14. Effects of CO2 Concentration on Leaf Photosynthesis and Stomatal Conductance of Potatoes Grown Under Different Irradiance Levels and Photoperiods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Fitzpatrick, A. H.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cvs. Russet Burbank, Denali, and Norland, were grown in environmental rooms controlled at approx 350 micro mol/mol (ambient during years 1987/1988) and 1000 micro mol/mol (enriched) CO2 concentrations. Plants and electric lamps were arranged to provide two irradiance zones, 400 and 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and studies were repeated using two photoperiods (12-h light / 12-h dark and continuous light). Leaf photosynthetic rates and leaf stomatal conductance were measured using fully expanded, upper canopy leaves at weekly intervals throughout growth (21 through 84 days after transplanting). Increasing the CO2 from approx 350 to 1000 micro mol/mol under the 12-h photoperiod increased leaf photosynthetic rates by 39% at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and 27% at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Increasing the CO2 from approx 350 to 1000 micro mol/mol under continuous light decreased leaf photosynthetic rates by 7% at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and 13% at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Increasing the CO2 from approx 350 to 1000 micro mol/mol under the 12-h photoperiod plants decreased stomatal conductance by an average of 26% at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF and 42% at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Under continuous light, CO2 enrichment resulted in a small increase (2%) of stomatal conductance at 400 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF, and a small decrease (3%) at 800 micro mol/mol/square m/S PPF. Results indicate that CO2 enrichment under the 12-h photoperiod showed the expected increase in photosynthesis and decrease in stomatal conductance for a C3 species like potato, but the decreases in leaf photosynthetic rates and minimal effect on conductance from CO2 enrichment under continuous light were not expected. The plant leaves under continuous light showed more chlorosis and some rusty flecking versus plants under the 12-h photoperiod, suggesting the continuous light was more stressful on the plants. The increased

  15. Exploring the Molecular Mechanism and Biomarker of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Based on Gene Expression Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Shang; Jinwei, Zhang; Qiang, Zhang; Jianwei, Shang; Weijun, Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common chronic oral diseases with morbidity ranging from 5% to 20%. The pathogenesis is still not fully understood though immune dysregulation and local trauma have been implicated and the curative effect that can be achieved through current therapy is mainly to alleviate the pain. So, the understanding of its molecular mechanisms can allow the prevention and treatment of RAS at the molecular level. 14 normal tissues and 14 ulcerated tissues were subjected to Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array transcriptome analysis. Then, Gene Set Expression Analysis and Gene Pattern tools were carried out to determine the gene expression differences between normal and ulcerated tissues. qRT-PCR was used to validate the expression level of identified genes in 10 normal and 10 ulcerated tissues. We obtained a total of 1379 DEGs with adjPval 1 including 1052 up-regulated genes and 327 down-regulated genes. 4 GO terms and 4 KEGG pathways were screened out by comparing the genomewide gene set expression patterns of normal and ulcerated tissues. 7 genes involved in RAS were identified from the VEGF signaling pathway. Present findings demonstrated that several immune processes have a deep impact on RAS and a number of genes involved in the VEGF signaling pathway may be critical mediators or participators in the pathogenesis of RAS.

  16. Modeling of Stomatal Conductance for Estimating Ozone Uptake of Fagus crenata Under Experimentally Enhanced Free-air Ozone Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Watanabe, Makoto; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We examined a performance of the multiplicative stomatal conductance model to estimate the stomatal ozone uptake for Fagus crenata. Parameterization of the model was carried out by in-situ measurements in a free-air ozone exposure experiment. The model performed fairly well under ambient conditions, with low ozone concentration. However, the model overestimated stomatal conductance under enhanced ozone condition due to ozone-induced stomatal closure. A revised model that included a parameter ...

  17. Role and interrelationship of Gα protein, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide in ultraviolet B-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun-Min; Ma, Xian-Ge; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Tie-Feng; Xu, Fei-Fei; Chen, Yi-Ping; Liu, Xiao; Yue, Ming

    2013-03-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins have been shown to transmit ultraviolet B (UV-B) signals in mammalian cells, but whether they also transmit UV-B signals in plant cells is not clear. In this paper, we report that 0.5 W m(-2) UV-B induces stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by eliciting a cascade of intracellular signaling events including Gα protein, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and nitric oxide (NO). UV-B triggered a significant increase in H2O2 or NO levels associated with stomatal closure in the wild type, but these effects were abolished in the single and double mutants of AtrbohD and AtrbohF or in the Nia1 mutants, respectively. Furthermore, we found that UV-B-mediated H2O2 and NO generation are regulated by GPA1, the Gα-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. UV-B-dependent H2O2 and NO accumulation were nullified in gpa1 knockout mutants but enhanced by overexpression of a constitutively active form of GPA1 (cGα). In addition, exogenously applied H2O2 or NO rescued the defect in UV-B-mediated stomatal closure in gpa1 mutants, whereas cGα AtrbohD/AtrbohF and cGα nia1 constructs exhibited a similar response to AtrbohD/AtrbohF and Nia1, respectively. Finally, we demonstrated that Gα activation of NO production depends on H2O2. The mutants of AtrbohD and AtrbohF had impaired NO generation in response to UV-B, but UV-B-induced H2O2 accumulation was not impaired in Nia1. Moreover, exogenously applied NO rescued the defect in UV-B-mediated stomatal closure in the mutants of AtrbohD and AtrbohF. These findings establish a signaling pathway leading to UV-B-induced stomatal closure that involves GPA1-dependent activation of H2O2 production and subsequent Nia1-dependent NO accumulation.

  18. Combining sap flow and eddy covariance approaches to derive stomatal and non-stomatal O{sub 3} fluxes in a forest stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, A.J. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising- Weihenstephan (Germany); Cieslik, S. [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy); Metzger, U. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising- Weihenstephan (Germany); Wieser, G. [Federal Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Dept. of Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Rennweg 1, A - 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Matyssek, R., E-mail: matyssek@wzw.tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising- Weihenstephan (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Stomatal O{sub 3} fluxes to a mixed beech/spruce stand (Fagus sylvatica/Picea abies) in Central Europe were determined using two different approaches. The sap flow technique yielded the tree-level transpiration, whereas the eddy covariance method provided the stand-level evapotranspiration. Both data were then converted into stomatal ozone fluxes, exemplifying this novel concept for July 2007. Sap flow-based stomatal O{sub 3} flux was 33% of the total O{sub 3} flux, whereas derivation from evapotranspiration rates in combination with the Penman-Monteith algorithm amounted to 47%. In addition to this proportional difference, the sap flow-based assessment yielded lower levels of stomatal O{sub 3} flux and reflected stomatal regulation rather than O{sub 3} exposure, paralleling the daily courses of canopy conductance for water vapor and eddy covariance-based total stand-level O{sub 3} flux. The demonstrated combination of sap flow and eddy covariance approaches supports the development of O{sub 3} risk assessment in forests from O{sub 3} exposure towards flux-based concepts. - Combined tree sap flow and eddy covariance-based methodologies yield stomatal O{sub 3} flux as 33% in total stand flux.

  19. Ultraviolet-B-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis Is Regulated by the UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 Photoreceptor in a Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mechanism1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossi, Vanesa; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Jenkins, Gareth I.; Cassia, Raúl O.

    2014-01-01

    UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) signaling involves CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) transcription factor, and the closely related HY5 HOMOLOG. Some UV-B responses mediated by UVR8 are also regulated by nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive molecule that orchestrates a wide range of processes in plants. In this study, we investigated the participation of the UVR8 pathway and its interaction with NO in UV-B-induced stomatal movements in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Stomata in abaxial epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ecotype Landsberg erecta closed in response to increasing UV-B fluence rates, with maximal closure after 3-h exposure to 5.46 μmol m–2 s–1 UV-B. Both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and NO increased in response to UV-B, and stomatal closure was maintained by NO up to 24 h after the beginning of exposure. Stomata of plants expressing bacterial NO dioxygenase, which prevents NO accumulation, did not close in response to UV-B, although H2O2 still increased. When the uvr8-1 null mutant was exposed to UV-B, stomata remained open, irrespective of the fluence rate. Neither NO nor H2O2 increased in stomata of the uvr8-1 mutant. However, the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione induced closure of uvr8-1 stomata to the same extent as in the wild type. Experiments with mutants in UVR8 signaling components implicated CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, HY5, and HY5 HOMOLOG in UV-B-induced stomatal closure. This research provides evidence that the UVR8 pathway regulates stomatal closure by a mechanism involving both H2O2 and NO generation in response to UV-B exposure. PMID:24586043

  20. Stomatal function, density and pattern, and CO2 assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana tmm1 and sdd1-1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vráblová, M; Vrábl, D; Hronková, M; Kubásek, J; Šantrůček, J

    2017-09-01

    Stomata modulate the exchange of water and CO2 between plant and atmosphere. Although stomatal density is known to affect CO2 diffusion into the leaf and thus photosynthetic rate, the effect of stomatal density and patterning on CO2 assimilation is not fully understood. We used wild types Col-0 and C24 and stomatal mutants sdd1-1 and tmm1 of Arabidopsis thaliana, differing in stomatal density and pattern, to study the effects of these variations on both stomatal and mesophyll conductance and CO2 assimilation rate. Anatomical parameters of stomata, leaf temperature and carbon isotope discrimination were also assessed. Our results indicate that increased stomatal density enhanced stomatal conductance in sdd1-1 plants, with no effect on photosynthesis, due to both unchanged photosynthetic capacity and decreased mesophyll conductance. Clustering (abnormal patterning formed by clusters of two or more stomata) and a highly unequal distribution of stomata between the adaxial and abaxial leaf sides in tmm1 mutants also had no effect on photosynthesis. Except at very high stomatal densities, stomatal conductance and water loss were proportional to stomatal density. Stomatal formation in clusters reduced stomatal dynamics and their operational range as well as the efficiency of CO2 transport. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  1. The effect of pulsed electric fields on the electrotactic migration of human neural progenitor cells through the involvement of intracellular calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Edin, Fredrik; Li, Hao; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are required for the physiological control of the central nervous system development. Application of the direct current EFs to neural stem cells has been studied for the possibility of stem cell transplantation as one of the therapies for brain injury. EFs generated within the nervous system are often associated with action potentials and synaptic activity, apparently resulting in a pulsed current in nature. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pulsed EF, which can reduce the cytotoxicity, on the migration of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs). We applied the mono-directional pulsed EF with a strength of 250mV/mm to hNPCs for 6h. The migration distance of the hNPCs exposed to pulsed EF was significantly greater compared with the control not exposed to the EF. Pulsed EFs, however, had less of an effect on the migration of the differentiated hNPCs. There was no significant change in the survival of hNPCs after exposure to the pulsed EF. To investigate the role of Ca 2+ signaling in electrotactic migration of hNPCs, pharmacological inhibition of Ca 2+ channels in the EF-exposed cells revealed that the electrotactic migration of hNPCs exposed to Ca 2+ channel blockers was significantly lower compared to the control group. The findings suggest that the pulsed EF induced migration of hNPCs is partly influenced by intracellular Ca 2+ signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. AMLEXANOX 5% SEBAGAI MODALITAS TERAPI STOMATITIS AFTOSA REKUREN TERKINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusmawati Rusmawati

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS is characterized by painful recurring ulceration of oral mucosa and is the most common oral ulcerative disease. The specific etiology of the disease remains unknown. This situation makes the therapy of RAS difficult and uncertain. This article will discuss the effectiveness and the safety of amlexanox 5% in relieving the symptoms and accelerate heling in RAS lesions. Amlexanox 5% is a new drug used topically in treatment of RAS. The mechanism of action by which alexanox accelerates healing of RAS in unknown. Clnincal study of efficacy amlexanox 5% has been demonstrated significantly accelerate healing and reduce pain of RAS, compared to amlexanox 1% vehicle and no treatment. 5% amlexanox oral paste has an advantageous pharmacological activity to accelerate healing and reduce the pain of RAS, thus it can be used as one of the modality in this therapy.

  3. Allergic contact stomatitis caused by acrylic monomer in a denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutis, D; Freeman, S

    2001-08-01

    A 71-year-old edentulous man developed a severely painful red mouth at sites of contact with a new denture. Patch testing showed allergy to samples of the denture material and to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Patch testing to methyl methacrylate was negative. Prolonged boiling of the denture resulted in reversal of his symptoms and samples of this fully cured denture material produced negative patch tests. While allergy to acrylates is a rare cause of stomatitis, this possibility must be considered in patients presenting with oral symptoms. Material safety data sheets are unreliable in providing information regarding the type of acrylate present in the material. Hence, patch testing should be performed with a battery of acrylate allergens as well as with small samples of the denture material.

  4. Effect of bedtime on recurrent aphthous stomatitis in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruiyang; Chen, Hong; Zhou, Tengfei; Chen, Xiyan; Wang, Chaoling; Chen, Yijin; Rao, Songlin; Ge, Lin; Lin, Mei

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we conducted a questionnaire-based survey at Sichuan University to investigate the potential effects of bedtime on recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). An anonymous self-designed questionnaire was adopted to investigate the association between bedtime and RAS in college students at Sichuan University. Statistical analyses were used to identify risk factors for RAS and to explore the relationship between bedtime and RAS. One thousand six students were investigated. High frequency of colds (odds ratio [OR] 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-3.10; P factors for RAS recurrence, but family history, stress, bad relationships with roommates, and gastrointestinal disease were not. Moreover, increased frequency of bedtime after 11 p.m. (τ > 0; P 0; P factor but both its frequency and cumulative time were also associated with severity of RAS in college students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stomatal design principles in synthetic and real leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwieniecki, Maciej A.; Haaning, Katrine S; Boyce, C. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Stomata are portals in plant leaves that control gas exchange for photosynthesis, a process fundamental to life on Earth. Gas fluxes and plant productivity depend on external factors such as light, water and CO2 availability and on the geometrical properties of the stoma pores. The link between...... stoma geometry and environmental factors has informed a wide range of scientific fields-from agriculture to climate science, where observed variations in stoma size and density are used to infer prehistoric atmospheric CO2 content. However, the physical mechanisms and design principles responsible...... efficient use of space and maximum control of dynamic gas conductivity, and that the capacity for gas exchange in plants has remained constant over at least the last 325 Myr. Our analysis provides a new measure to gauge the relative performance of species based on their stomatal characteristics....

  6. Does smoking really protect from recurrent aphthous stomatitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faleh A Sawair

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Faleh A SawairFaculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, JordanPurpose: To study the effect of smoking on the prevalence of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS and to examine whether intensity and duration of smoking influence RAS lesions.Subjects and methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a random sample of 1000 students of The University of Jordan, Amman, between May and September 2008. Sociodemographic factors and details about smoking habits and RAS in last 12 months were collected.Results: Annual prevalence (AP of RAS was 37.1%. Tobacco use was common among students: 30.2% were current smokers and 2.8% were exsmokers. AP was not significantly influenced by students’ age, gender, marital status, college, and household income but was significantly affected by place of living (P = 0.02 and presence of chronic diseases (P = 0.03. No significant difference in AP of RAS was found between smokers and nonsmokers. Cigarette smokers who smoked heavily and for a longer period of time had significantly less AP of RAS when compared to moderate smokers and those who smoked for a shorter period of time. The protective effect of smoking was only noticed when there was heavy cigarette smoking (>20 cigarettes/day (P = 0.021 or smoking for long periods of time (>5 years (P = 0.009. Nevertheless, no significant associations were found between intensity or duration of smoking and clinical severity of RAS lesions.Conclusion: The “protective effect” of smoking on RAS was dose- and time-dependent. When lesions are present, smoking had no effect on RAS severity.Keywords: recurrent aphthous stomatitis, smoking, prevalence

  7. Genetic variation in circadian regulation of nocturnal stomatal conductance enhances carbon assimilation and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resco de Dios, Víctor; Loik, Michael E; Smith, Renee; Aspinwall, Michael J; Tissue, David T

    2016-01-01

    Circadian resonance, whereby a plant's endogenous rhythms are tuned to match environmental cues, has been repeatedly shown to be adaptive, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Concomitantly, the adaptive value of nocturnal transpiration in C3 plants remains unknown because it occurs without carbon assimilation. These seemingly unrelated processes are interconnected because circadian regulation drives temporal patterns in nocturnal stomatal conductance, with maximum values occurring immediately before dawn for many species. We grew individuals of six Eucalyptus camaldulensis genotypes in naturally lit glasshouses and measured sunset, predawn and midday leaf gas exchange and whole-plant biomass production. We tested whether sunrise anticipation by the circadian clock and subsequent increases in genotype predawn stomatal conductance led to rapid stomatal opening upon illumination, ultimately affecting genotype differences in carbon assimilation and growth. We observed faster stomatal responses to light inputs at sunrise in genotypes with higher predawn stomatal conductance. Moreover, early morning and midday stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation, leaf area and total plant biomass were all positively correlated with predawn stomatal conductance across genotypes. Our results lead to the novel hypothesis that genotypic variation in the circadian-regulated capacity to anticipate sunrise could be an important factor underlying intraspecific variation in tree growth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Changes in stomatal traits and the covariation with other leaf traits along an altitude transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Ge, Jianping; Wang, Qiufeng; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Zhiwei

    2014-05-01

    Stomatal traits and their responses to the external environment have been intensively studied for individual plant species. However, little is known about general stomatal patterns along environmental gradients in a broad, interspecific context or about the relationship between stomatal traits and other leaf traits. Here, we measured the stomatal and leaf traits, including stomatal density (SD), stomatal length (SL), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf area (LA), leaf thickness (LT) and nitrogen concentration (mass- and area- base, Nmass and Narea) of 158 plant species along an altitudinal gradient on Changbai Mountain, China. Our results revealed that SD decreased and SL increased significantly with altitude for tree species, although no clear elevational trends were observed in SD and SL across species (including tree, shrub, and herbaceous plants). Plant growth forms (PGFs) were the most important driver of variation in SD and SL, and the contributions of the mean annual temperature, precipitation and soil water content were weak. In addition, a covarying relationship between stomatal and other leaf traits was observed, although this relationship changed with elevation. These findings reflect that the adaptive strategies of plant ecophysiological traits may be complex for alpine environmental gradients, combining the short-term plasticity to environmental changes and long-term convergent evolution.

  9. Stomatal limitation to carbon gain in Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) and its reversal by blue light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Grivet, C.; Assmann, S.M.; Dietzer, G.F.; Hannegan, M.W.

    1985-02-01

    Leaves from Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) having achlorophyllous stomata, show reduced levels of stomatal conductance when irradiated with red light, as compared with either the related, chlorophyllous genus Phragmipedium or with their response to blue light. These reduced levels of stomatal conductance, and the failure of isolated Paphiopedilum stomata to open under red irradiation indicates that the small stomatal response measured in the intact leaf under red light is indirect. The overall low levels of stomatal conductance observed in Paphiopedilum leaves under most growing conditions and their capacity to increase stomatal conductance in response to blue light suggested that growth and carbon gain in Paphiopedilum could be enhanced in a blue light-enriched environment. To test that hypothesis, plants of Paphiopedilum acmodontum were grown in controlled growth chambers under daylight fluorescent light, with or without blue light supplementation. Blue light enrichment resulted in significantly higher growth rates over a 3 to 4 week growing period, with all evidence indicating that the blue light effect was a stomatal response. Manipulations of stomatal properties aimed at long-term carbon gains could have agronomic applications.

  10. Stomatal Limitation to Carbon Gain in Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) and Its Reversal by Blue Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, E; Grivet, C; Assmann, S M; Deitzer, G F; Hannegan, M W

    1985-02-01

    Leaves from Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) having achlorophyllous stomata, show reduced levels of stomatal conductance when irradiated with red light, as compared with either the related, chlorophyllous genus Phragmipedium or with their response to blue light. These reduced levels of stomatal conductance, and the failure of isolated Paphiopedilum stomata to open under red irradiation indicates that the small stomatal response measured in the intact leaf under red light is indirect.The overall low levels of stomatal conductance observed in Paphiopedilum leaves under most growing conditions and their capacity to increase stomatal conductance in response to blue light suggested that growth and carbon gain in Paphiopedilum could be enhanced in a blue light-enriched environment. To test that hypothesis, plants of Paphiopedilum acmodontum were grown in controlled growth chambers under daylight fluorescent light, with or without blue light supplementation. Total photosynthetic photon flux density was kept constant in both conditions. Blue light enrichment resulted in significantly higher growth rates-of up to 77%-over a 3 to 4 week growing period, with all evidence indicating that the blue light effect was a stomatal response. Manipulations of stomatal properties aimed at long-term carbon gains could have agronomic applications.

  11. Stomatal Limitation to Carbon Gain in Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) and Its Reversal by Blue Light 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Eduardo; Grivet, C.; Assmann, Sarah M.; Deitzer, Gerald F.; Hannegan, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Leaves from Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) having achlorophyllous stomata, show reduced levels of stomatal conductance when irradiated with red light, as compared with either the related, chlorophyllous genus Phragmipedium or with their response to blue light. These reduced levels of stomatal conductance, and the failure of isolated Paphiopedilum stomata to open under red irradiation indicates that the small stomatal response measured in the intact leaf under red light is indirect. The overall low levels of stomatal conductance observed in Paphiopedilum leaves under most growing conditions and their capacity to increase stomatal conductance in response to blue light suggested that growth and carbon gain in Paphiopedilum could be enhanced in a blue light-enriched environment. To test that hypothesis, plants of Paphiopedilum acmodontum were grown in controlled growth chambers under daylight fluorescent light, with or without blue light supplementation. Total photosynthetic photon flux density was kept constant in both conditions. Blue light enrichment resulted in significantly higher growth rates—of up to 77%—over a 3 to 4 week growing period, with all evidence indicating that the blue light effect was a stomatal response. Manipulations of stomatal properties aimed at long-term carbon gains could have agronomic applications. PMID:16664074

  12. A rate equation model of stomatal responses to vapour pressure deficit and drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanahan ST

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stomata respond to vapour pressure deficit (D – when D increases, stomata begin to close. Closure is the result of a decline in guard cell turgor, but the link between D and turgor is poorly understood. We describe a model for stomatal responses to increasing D based upon cellular water relations. The model also incorporates impacts of increasing levels of water stress upon stomatal responses to increasing D. Results The model successfully mimics the three phases of stomatal responses to D and also reproduces the impact of increasing plant water deficit upon stomatal responses to increasing D. As water stress developed, stomata regulated transpiration at ever decreasing values of D. Thus, stomatal sensitivity to D increased with increasing water stress. Predictions from the model concerning the impact of changes in cuticular transpiration upon stomatal responses to increasing D are shown to conform to experimental data. Sensitivity analyses of stomatal responses to various parameters of the model show that leaf thickness, the fraction of leaf volume that is air-space, and the fraction of mesophyll cell wall in contact with air have little impact upon behaviour of the model. In contrast, changes in cuticular conductance and membrane hydraulic conductivity have significant impacts upon model behaviour. Conclusion Cuticular transpiration is an important feature of stomatal responses to D and is the cause of the 3 phase response to D. Feed-forward behaviour of stomata does not explain stomatal responses to D as feedback, involving water loss from guard cells, can explain these responses.

  13. Ultrastructure and development of non-contiguous stomatal clusters and helicocytic patterning in Begonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudall, Paula J; Julier, Adele C M; Kidner, Catherine A

    2017-11-23

    Helicocytic stomata are characterized by an inward spiral of mesogenous cells surrounding a central stomatal pore. They represent a relatively rare feature that occurs in some drought-tolerant angiosperm species. In some Begonia species with thick leaves, the stomata are not only helicocytic but also clustered into groups that are spaced apart by at least one cell. This paper presents a detailed ontogenetic study of this characteristic non-contiguous stomatal patterning in a developmental and phylogenetic context. Light microscopy and both scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine stomatal development in several species of Begonia. Published reports of stomatal development in Begonia and other angiosperms were reviewed to provide a comprehensive discussion of the evolution of stomatal patterning. Helicocytic stomata develop from meristemoids that undergo a series of oriented asymmetric divisions to produce a spiral of mesogene stomatal lineage ground cells (SLGCs) surrounding a stoma. A clear developmental similarity between anisocytic and helicocytic stomata is positively correlated with the number of iterations of amplifying divisions that result in SLGCs. Stomatal clusters develop from asymmetric divisions in neighbouring SLGCs. Within each cluster, non-contiguous spacing of meristemoids is maintained by asymmetric divisions oriented away from each developing meristemoid. Formation of non-contiguous stomatal clusters in Begonia relies on two primary developmental factors in the epidermis: an inwardly spiralling series of amplifying divisions that result in helicocytic stomata, and the development of a variable number of meristemoids from neighbouring SLGCs within each cluster. Optimization of these features on an angiosperm phylogeny indicates that the occurrence of amplifying divisions could be pre-adaptive for these factors. Both factors have been thoroughly studied in terms of developmental genetics in Arabidopsis, suggesting gene

  14. A comparison of two stomatal conductance models for ozone flux modelling using data from two Brassica species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Op de Beeck, M., E-mail: maarten.opdebeeck@ua.ac.b [Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Department of Biology, Universiteitsplein 1, 2160 Wilrijk (Belgium); De Bock, M., E-mail: maarten.debock@ua.ac.b [Research Group of Molecular Plant Physiology and Biotechnology, University of Antwerp, Campus Groenenborger, Department of Biology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Vandermeiren, K., E-mail: kavan@var.fgov.b [Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre (VAR), Leuvensesteenweg 17, 3080 Tervuren (Belgium); Temmerman, L. de, E-mail: ludet@var.fgov.b [Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre (VAR), Leuvensesteenweg 17, 3080 Tervuren (Belgium); Ceulemans, R., E-mail: reinhart.ceulemans@ua.ac.b [Research Group of Plant and Vegetation Ecology, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Department of Biology, Universiteitsplein 1, 2160 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2010-10-15

    In this study we tested and compared a multiplicative stomatal model and a coupled semi-empirical stomatal-photosynthesis model in their ability to predict stomatal conductance to ozone (g{sub st}) using leaf-level data from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck). For oilseed rape, the multiplicative model and the coupled model were able to explain 72% and 73% of the observed g{sub st} variance, respectively. For broccoli, the models were able to explain 53% and 51% of the observed g{sub st} variance, respectively. These results support the coupled semi-empirical stomatal-photosynthesis model as a valid alternative to the multiplicative stomatal model for O{sub 3} flux modelling, in terms of predictive performance. - A multiplicative stomatal model and a coupled semi-empirical stomatal-photosynthesis model performed equally well when tested against leaf-level data for oilseed rape and broccoli.

  15. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: topical treatment with minocycline and other evidence-based agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Tetracycline is known as an effective agent in the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. A less-known treatment option for this pathology is minocycline. Many articles have been published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding about recurrent aphthous stomatitis, however, this is the first article published in the journal that concentrates on the evidence-based data of minocycline as a promising agent to treat this pathology in what some scientific reports indicate to be a more efficacious manner than tetracycline. Few options to compound topical preparations based on minocycline and other evidence-based agents are proposed in the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

  16. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Tae-Houn

    2010-05-04

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms.

  17. Combining sap flow and eddy covariance approaches to derive stomatal and non-stomatal O3 fluxes in a forest stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, A J; Cieslik, S; Metzger, U; Wieser, G; Matyssek, R

    2010-06-01

    Stomatal O3 fluxes to a mixed beech/spruce stand (Fagus sylvatica/Picea abies) in Central Europe were determined using two different approaches. The sap flow technique yielded the tree-level transpiration, whereas the eddy covariance method provided the stand-level evapotranspiration. Both data were then converted into stomatal ozone fluxes, exemplifying this novel concept for July 2007. Sap flow-based stomatal O3 flux was 33% of the total O3 flux, whereas derivation from evapotranspiration rates in combination with the Penman-Monteith algorithm amounted to 47%. In addition to this proportional difference, the sap flow-based assessment yielded lower levels of stomatal O3 flux and reflected stomatal regulation rather than O3 exposure, paralleling the daily courses of canopy conductance for water vapor and eddy covariance-based total stand-level O3 flux. The demonstrated combination of sap flow and eddy covariance approaches supports the development of O3 risk assessment in forests from O3 exposure towards flux-based concepts. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Consistent allometric scaling of stomatal sizes and densities across taxonomic ranks and geologic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H. J.; Price, C. A.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Dekker, S. C.; Veneklaas, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Stomatal pores on plants leaves are an important link in the chain of processes that determine biosphere fluxes of water and carbon. Stomatal density (i.e. the number of stomata per area) and the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture are particularly relevant traits in this context because they determine the theoretical maximum diffusive stomatal conductance (gsmax) and thereby set an upper limit for leaf gas exchange. Observations on (sub)fossil leaves revealed that changes in stomatal densities are anti-correlated with changes in stomatal sizes at developmental and evolutionary timescales. Moreover, this anti-correlation appears consistently within single species, across multiple species in the extant plant community and at evolutionary time scales. The consistency of the relation between stomatal densities and sizes suggests that common mechanisms constrain the adaptation of these traits across the plant community. In an attempt to identify such potential generic constraints, we investigated the allometry between stomatal densities and sizes in the extant plant community and across geological time. As the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture is typically derived from the length of the stomatal pore, we considered the allometric scaling of pore length (lp) with stomatal density (Ds) as the power law: lp = k . Dsa in which k is a normalization constant and the exponent a is the slope of the scaling relation. Our null-hypothesis predicts that stomatal density and pore length scale along a constant slope of -1/2 based on a scale-invariant relation between pore length and the distance between neighboring pores. Our alternative hypothesis predicts a constant slope of -1 based on the idea that stomatal density and pore length scale along an invariant gsmax. To explore these scaling hypotheses in the extant plant community we compiled a dataset of combined observations of stomatal density and pore length on 111 species from published literature and new

  19. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Brodribb

    Full Text Available Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  20. 14-3-3 proteins in guard cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie eCotelle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses.

  1. The histidine kinase AHK5 integrates endogenous and environmental signals in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Desikan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Stomatal guard cells monitor and respond to environmental and endogenous signals such that the stomatal aperture is continually optimised for water use efficiency. A key signalling molecule produced in guard cells in response to plant hormones, light, carbon dioxide and pathogen-derived signals is hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. The mechanisms by which H(2O(2 integrates multiple signals via specific signalling pathways leading to stomatal closure is not known.Here, we identify a pathway by which H(2O(2, derived from endogenous and environmental stimuli, is sensed and transduced to effect stomatal closure. Histidine kinases (HK are part of two-component signal transduction systems that act to integrate environmental stimuli into a cellular response via a phosphotransfer relay mechanism. There is little known about the function of the HK AHK5 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we report that in addition to the predicted cytoplasmic localisation of this protein, AHK5 also appears to co-localise to the plasma membrane. Although AHK5 is expressed at low levels in guard cells, we identify a unique role for AHK5 in stomatal signalling. Arabidopsis mutants lacking AHK5 show reduced stomatal closure in response to H(2O(2, which is reversed by complementation with the wild type gene. Over-expression of AHK5 results in constitutively less stomatal closure. Abiotic stimuli that generate endogenous H(2O(2, such as darkness, nitric oxide and the phytohormone ethylene, also show reduced stomatal closure in the ahk5 mutants. However, ABA caused closure, dark adaptation induced H(2O(2 production and H(2O(2 induced NO synthesis in mutants. Treatment with the bacterial pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP flagellin, but not elf peptide, also exhibited reduced stomatal closure and H(2O(2 generation in ahk5 mutants.Our findings identify an integral signalling function for AHK5 that acts to integrate multiple signals via H(2O(2 homeostasis and is independent of ABA

  2. Effect of two percent turmeric extract gel on minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nurdiana Nurdiana; Shamini Krishnasamy

    2017-01-01

    Minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is recurrent oral ulcer with clinical features of shallow ulcer, round or oval shape, measuring less than 10 mm, covered with yellowish white pseudomembrane and surrounded by erythematous halo...

  3. Evaluation of the therapeutic effects of Aloe vera gel on minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Babaee

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: It seems likely that A.V. 2% oral gel is not only effective in decreasing the recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients′ pain score and wound size but also decreases the aphthous wound healing period.

  4. Periodic fever accompanied by aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis syndrome (PFAPA syndrome) in adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Padeh, Shai; Stoffman, Nava; Berkun, Yackov

    2008-01-01

    The new syndrome, known as PFAPA, of periodic fever characterized by abrupt onset of fever, malaise, aphthous stomatitis, tonsillitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy has been described only in pediatric patients...

  5. Serum cytokine profile and clinicopathological findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Røn; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine if clinical and histopathological variables in patients with oral lichen planus (OLP), oral lichenoid lesions (OLL), and generalized stomatitis display different cytokine profiles and if concomitant contact allergy influences this profile. Forty...

  6. The effect of dietary habits on the development of the recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bassel Tarakji; Kusai Baroudi; Yaser Kharma

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim was to assess the relationship between the dietary habits and development of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Materials and Methods: Two groups (30 patients with RAS who have been following dietary habits and not associated with systemic disease or hematologic abnormalities, and the control group consist of 28 patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis). Results: A Mann-Whitney test (P>0.05) shows no significance difference between the patients with RAS and the control g...

  7. Les caractéristiques des stomates des feuilles de Ficus benjamina L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    25 mars 2014 ... mm² d'épiderme (Hetherington & Woodward, 2003). La densité des stomates augmente avec l'intensité de la pollution de l'air en indiquant les zones les plus polluées et les zones les moins polluées (Woodward et al., 1995). La résistance des stomates (RS) exprime la mesure de l'inhibition de la diffusion ...

  8. Protective effect of new hygienic means on the oral mucous tunic at radial stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ієвлєва, Юлія Валеріївна

    2015-01-01

    The radial stomatitis development is the one of the main problems in patients who underwent radial therapy of the malignant tumors in head and neck region that impedes the effective antitumor treatment. The means of prophylaxis and local treatment of radial injuries are not always effective.Aim of research. The determination of effectiveness of the new hygienic means based on antimatters on the state of oral mucous tunic at the radial stomatitis.Materials and methods of research. Experiments ...

  9. Stomatal VPD response: there is more to the story than ABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilo, Ebe; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Jalakas, Pirko; Parik, Helen; Tulva, Ingmar; Rasulov, Bakhtier; Kilk, Kalle; Kollist, Hannes

    2017-10-06

    Guard cells shrink and close stomatal pores when air humidity decreases, i.e. when the difference between the vapor pressures of leaf and atmosphere (VPD) increases. The role of abscisic acid (ABA) in VPD-induced stomatal closure has been studied using ABA-related mutants that respond to VPD in some studies and not in others. The importance of ABA biosynthesis in guard cells versus vasculature for the whole-plant stomatal regulation is also unclear. Here we show that Arabidopsis lines carrying mutations in different steps of ABA biosynthesis as well as pea wilty and tomato flacca ABA-deficient mutants had higher stomatal conductance compared to wildtype plants. To characterize the role of ABA production in different cells, we generated transgenic plants where ABA biosynthesis was rescued in guard cells or phloem companion cells of an ABA-deficient mutant. In both cases, the whole-plant stomatal conductance, stunted growth phenotype and leaf ABA level were restored to wildtype values, pointing to the redundancy of ABA sources and to the effectiveness of leaf ABA transport. All ABA-deficient lines closed their stomata rapidly and extensively in response to high VPD, whereas plants with mutated protein kinase OST1 showed stunted VPD-induced responses. Another strongly ABA-insensitive mutant defective in the six ABA PYR/RCAR receptors, responded to changes in VPD in both directions strongly and symmetrically, indicating that its VPD-induced closure could be passive hydraulic. We discuss that both the VPD-induced passive hydraulic stomatal closure and the stomatal VPD-regulation of ABA-deficient mutants may be conditional on the initial pretreatment stomatal conductance. {copyright, serif} 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Level of Denture Cleanliness Influences the Presence of Denture Stomatitis on Maxillary Denture Bearing-Mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Winatty Krisma; Martha Mozartha; Rani Purba

    2014-01-01

    Plaque accumulation on internal surface of denture is a common problem among removable denture wearers. Poor denture cleanliness can increase colonization of Candida albicans and cause inflammatory reaction of denture-bearing mucosa, i.e. denture stomatitis. Objective: To find out the effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment at Poliklinik Gigi RSMH Palembang and to...

  11. Anamnestic findings from patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratel, John; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral disorder with a prevalence varying between 5% and 66%. RAS appears in three forms; minor, major and herpetiform. The aetiology is unknown.The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between specific anamnestic information and different types of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). A group of 177 patients (mean age = 42.8 years; SD = 14.3; range 17-79 years) participated. Data were collected from a structured interview, consisting of 22 questions. Information about i) health status and medication, ii) predisposing factors, iii) RAS experience, iv) previous treatment methods and v) brand of toothpaste was collected. Sixty-eight per cent of the patients were healthy and 44% of the patients were not taking any medication. Forty-one per cent of the patients did not have any apprehension of the reason for their RAS, while stress (15.8%) was the most common apprehended aetiological factor. Sixty-two per cent had one to three minor ulcers at one time. Forty-eight per cent reported having had a major aphthous ulcer at least once.The most frequent symptom reported was pain (53.7%), followed by a smarting sensation (18.6%) and tenderness (4%). The most common treatment for RAS was Zendium™ toothpaste/mouthrinse (28%), followed by corticosteroids (25%). Fifty-four per cent of the patients experienced no relief from the treatment. When toothpaste habits were investigated, Zendium™ was used by 32% of the patients and toothpaste containing sodium-lauryl-sulfatase was used by 32%.There was no positive correlation between the use of Zendium™ toothpaste and the relief of symptoms or the size, number or frequency of the aphthous ulcers. Sixty-four per cent of the patients had never smoked, while 7% were smokers. No positive correlation was found when age, gender, allergy, medication and smoking were correlated to the frequency, number and size of the aphthous ulcers. In conclusion, we found that the aetiology behind

  12. Lassa-vesicular stomatitis chimeric virus safely destroys brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N; Cepko, Connie; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2015-07-01

    High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We tested a series of

  13. Transcription co-activator Arabidopsis ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3) regulates water-use efficiency and drought tolerance by modulating stomatal density and improving root architecture by the transrepression of YODA (YDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lai-Sheng; Yao, Shun-Qiao

    2015-09-01

    One goal of modern agriculture is the improvement of plant drought tolerance and water-use efficiency (WUE). Although stomatal density has been linked to WUE, the causal molecular mechanisms and engineered alternations of this relationship are not yet fully understood. Moreover, YODA (YDA), which is a MAPKK kinase gene, negatively regulates stomatal development. BR-INSENSITIVE 2 interacts with phosphorylates and inhibits YDA. However, whether YDA is modulated in the transcriptional level is still unclear. Plants lacking ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3) activity have high drought stress tolerance because of low stomatal densities and improved root architecture. Such plants also exhibit enhanced WUE through declining transpiration without a demonstrable reduction in biomass accumulation. AN3 negatively regulated YDA expression at the transcriptional level by target-gene analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that AN3 was associated with a region of the YDA promoter in vivo. YDA mutation significantly decreased the stomatal density and root length of an3 mutant, thus proving the participation of YDA in an3 drought tolerance and WUE enhancement. These components form an AN3-YDA complex, which allows the integration of water deficit stress signalling into the production or spacing of stomata and cell proliferation, thus leading to drought tolerance and enhanced WUE. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Type III interferon attenuates a vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guayasamin, Ryann C; Reynolds, Tracy D; Wei, Xin; Fujiwara, Mai; Robek, Michael D

    2014-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been extensively studied as a vaccine vector and oncolytic agent. Nevertheless, safety concerns have limited its widespread use in humans. The type III lambda interferon (IFN-λ) family of cytokines shares common signaling pathways with the IFN-α/β family and thus evokes similar antiviral activities. However, IFN-λ signals through a distinct receptor complex that is expressed in a cell type-specific manner, which restricts its activity to epithelial barriers, particularly those corresponding to the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. In this study, we determined how IFN-λ expression from recombinant VSV would influence vector replication, spread, and immunogenicity. We demonstrate that IFN-λ expression severely attenuates VSV in cell culture. In vivo, IFN-λ limits VSV replication in the mouse lung after intranasal administration and reduces virus spread to other organs. Despite this attenuation, however, the vector retains its capacity to induce protective CD8 T cell and antibody responses after a single immunization. These findings demonstrate a novel method of viral vector attenuation that could be used in both vaccine and oncolytic virus applications. Viruses such as VSV that are used as vaccine vectors can induce protective T cell and antibody responses after a single dose. Additionally, IFN-λ is a potent antiviral agent that has certain advantages for clinical use compared to IFN-α/β, such as fewer patient side effects. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-λ attenuates VSV replication and spread following intranasal virus delivery but does not reduce the ability of VSV to induce potent protective immune responses. These findings demonstrate that the type III IFN family may have widespread applicability for improving the safety and efficacy of viral vaccine and oncolytic vectors. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Predicting photosynthesis and transpiration responses to ozone: decoupling modeled photosynthesis and stomatal conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lombardozzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants exchange greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and water with the atmosphere through the processes of photosynthesis and transpiration, making them essential in climate regulation. Carbon dioxide and water exchange are typically coupled through the control of stomatal conductance, and the parameterization in many models often predict conductance based on photosynthesis values. Some environmental conditions, like exposure to high ozone (O3 concentrations, alter photosynthesis independent of stomatal conductance, so models that couple these processes cannot accurately predict both. The goals of this study were to test direct and indirect photosynthesis and stomatal conductance modifications based on O3 damage to tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera in a coupled Farquhar/Ball-Berry model. The same modifications were then tested in the Community Land Model (CLM to determine the impacts on gross primary productivity (GPP and transpiration at a constant O3 concentration of 100 parts per billion (ppb. Modifying the Vcmax parameter and directly modifying stomatal conductance best predicts photosynthesis and stomatal conductance responses to chronic O3 over a range of environmental conditions. On a global scale, directly modifying conductance reduces the effect of O3 on both transpiration and GPP compared to indirectly modifying conductance, particularly in the tropics. The results of this study suggest that independently modifying stomatal conductance can improve the ability of models to predict hydrologic cycling, and therefore improve future climate predictions.

  16. Quantification of stomatal uptake of ionic solutes using a new model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichert, T; Burkhardt, J

    2001-04-01

    Evidence for stomatal uptake of solutes by leaves without the application of surfactants or pressure has recently been provided (Eichert et al., 1998). In the present study, experimental conditions were refined in that the water potential was held at Allium porrum, Commelina communis and Sedum telephium. Uptake increased with humidity, stomatal aperture and stomatal density. It was restricted to stomatal areas, and was especially high below the rims of drying droplets. Again, penetration of stomatal pores was observed. Uptake was strongly correlated with the number of penetrated stomata, although usually less than 10% of the stomata contributed to uptake. The number of stomata that had been penetrated was highly variable, increasing extremely significantly with the number of repeated drying/ wetting cycles. These results indicate that stomatal uptake can be a major pathway for the foliar uptake of ionic solutes. It is a dynamic process, depending on environmental conditions and history of the residues on the leaf, aspects that had been neglected in previous concepts.

  17. Expression of Arabidopsis hexokinase in citrus guard cells controls stomatal aperture and reduces transpiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitsan eLugassi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hexokinase (HXK is a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing. It has recently been shown that HXK in guard cells mediates stomatal closure and coordinates photosynthesis with transpiration in the annual species tomato and Arabidopsis. To examine the role of HXK in the control of the stomatal movement of perennial plants, we generated citrus plants that express Arabidopsis HXK1 (AtHXK1 under KST1, a guard cell-specific promoter. The expression of KST1 in the guard cells of citrus plants has been verified using GFP as a reporter gene. The expression of AtHXK1 in the guard cells of citrus reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration with no negative effect on the rate of photosynthesis, leading to increased water-use efficiency. The effects of light intensity and humidity on stomatal behavior were examined in rooted leaves of the citrus plants. The optimal intensity of photosynthetically active radiation and lower humidity enhanced stomatal closure of AtHXK1-expressing leaves, supporting the role of sugar in the regulation of citrus stomata. These results suggest that HXK coordinates photosynthesis and transpiration and stimulates stomatal closure not only in annual species, but also in perennial species.

  18. Salicaceae Endophytes Modulate Stomatal Behavior and Increase Water Use Efficiency in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungmin Rho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial and yeast endophytes isolated from the Salicaceae family have been shown to promote growth and alleviate stress in plants from different taxa. To determine the physiological pathways through which endophytes affect plant water relations, we investigated leaf water potential, whole-plant water use, and stomatal responses of rice plants to Salicaceae endophyte inoculation under CO2 enrichment and water deficit. Daytime stomatal conductance and stomatal density were lower in inoculated plants compared to controls. Leaf ABA concentrations increased with endophyte inoculation. As a result, transpirational water use decreased significantly with endophyte inoculation while biomass did not change or slightly increased. This response led to a significant increase in cumulative water use efficiency at harvest. Different endophyte strains produced the same results in host plant water relations and stomatal responses. These stomatal responses were also observed under elevated CO2 conditions, and the increase in water use efficiency was more pronounced under water deficit conditions. The effect on water use efficiency was positively correlated with daily light integrals across different experiments. Our results provide insights on the physiological mechanisms of plant-endophyte interactions involving plant water relations and stomatal functions.

  19. Brazilian Green Propolis Compared to Miconazole Gel in the Treatment of Candida-Associated Denture Stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermínia Marques Capistrano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of Brazilian green propolis in comparison to miconazole gel in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Methods. Forty-five denture stomatitis patients, with palatal mucosa erythema levels classified according to Newtons’s criteria and with positive culture to Candida spp., were randomly divided into three treatment groups: 15 received miconazole gel 2%, 15 received propolis gel 2,5%, and 15 received propolis 24% for mouthwash. After four daily use lasting two weeks, they were reexamined for the denture stomatitis degree and for a second culture of Candida. The Wilcoxon’s test was applied to compare the results of clinical classification of the denture stomatitis and the Candida spp. colonies numbers, before and after each treatment. The Kruskall-Wallis’s test was used to compare efficacy among the three treatment groups. Results. There were a significant reduction or complete remission of denture stomatitis (P0.05. Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis has a similar effect as miconazole in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis being an alternative in the therapeutics of this condition.

  20. Level of Denture Cleanliness Influences the Presence of Denture Stomatitis on Maxillary Denture Bearing-Mucosa

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    Winatty Krisma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plaque accumulation on internal surface of denture is a common problem among removable denture wearers. Poor denture cleanliness can increase colonization of Candida albicans and cause inflammatory reaction of denture-bearing mucosa, i.e. denture stomatitis. Objective: To find out the effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment at Poliklinik Gigi RSMH Palembang and to investigate the denture hygiene habits of removable denture wearers. Methods: Thirty subjects participated in this study. Denture cleanliness level was assessed with disclosing solution to disclose denture plaque on internal surface of maxillary denture. Cleanliness level was graded according to Budtz-Jorgensen. Intraoral examination was done to determine any visible signs of denture stomatitis. Data referring to denture hygiene habits of removable denture wearers was collected from interview using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the Komolgorov-Smirnov test. Results: Result of the study showed that 40% subjects had poor upper denture cleanliness. Denture stomatitis was observed on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in 43.3% subjects. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed that there was a significant effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa (p<0.05. Conclusion: Denture cleanliness level influence the occurence of denture stomatitis on maxillary denture bearing-mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment.

  1. The effect of ascorbate on minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, K; Kurata, T; Yashiro, M; Tsuge, M; Ohtsuki, S; Morishima, T

    2010-03-01

    Minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis (MRAS) is a common, painful and inflammatory ailment of the oral cavity with juvenile onset and unknown aetiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of ascorbate (vitamin C) to reduce the frequency of MRAS and severity of pain. Sixteen MRAS patients (9 boys and 7 girls: mean age, 12.0 +/- 2.4 years old) were assigned to take an oral dosage of 2000 mg/m(2)/day ascorbate. Their baseline frequency of outbreaks and the level of pains were compared during the treatment; in addition, a crossover clinical trial was performed. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes play a role in the pathogenesis, and then superoxide anion production was evaluated in prior to ascorbate treatment. The data indicated a statistically significant 50% reduction in oral ulcer outbreaks and a decline of pain level. Neutrophils were primed for superoxide anion production in the patients with MRAS. Ascorbate may modulate the generation of reactive oxygen species and augment neutrophil apoptosis, which could prevent neutrophil-mediated inflammation. Ascorbate seems to be effective, but the findings of our study were preliminary and it should be re-evaluated with a larger randomized controlled clinical trials.

  2. Management strategies for HIV-associated aphthous stomatitis.

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    Kerr, A Ross; Ship, Jonathan A

    2003-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common oral mucosal disorder found in men and women of all ages, races, and geographic regions. There are three forms of the lesions (minor, major, and herpetiform), with major aphthous ulcers causing significant pain and potential for scarring. In HIV-infected individuals, these ulcers occur more frequently, last longer, and produce more painful symptoms than in immunocompetent persons. In addition, they may be associated with similar ulcerations involving the esophagus, rectum, anus, and genitals. The diagnosis of HIV-induced RAS requires a careful history of the condition, and a thorough extra- and intra-oral examination. Oral mucosal biopsies are required for non-healing ulcers in order to exclude the possibility of deep fungal infections, viral infections, and neoplasms. The cause of the ulcers in HIV-positive persons has not been elucidated--local diseases, genetic, immunologic, and infectious factors all probably play a role. The goals of current treatments are to promote ulcer healing, to reduce ulcer duration and pain while maintaining nutritional intake, and to prevent or diminish the frequency of recurrence. Initial therapy for infrequent RAS recurrences includes over-the-counter topical protective and analgesic products. Initial therapy for frequent RAS outbreaks requires topical anesthetics, binding agents, and corticosteroids. Major RAS and non-healing minor or herpetiform RAS may require intralesional corticosteroids and systemic prednisone. Second-line immunomodulators for frequent and non-healing ulcers includes thalidomide and other immunomodulators.

  3. The oral microbiota of patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

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    Maria Bankvall

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Specific pathogenic bacteria have been implicated in recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS, a chronic inflammatory condition characterised by ulcerations in the oral mucosa. However, the aetiology behind this condition still remains unclear. Objective: The buccal microbiota of patients with RAS was compared to that of control subjects to investigate its potential role for this condition. Design: Buccal swabs were obtained from non-ulcerative areas of 60 patients, of whom 42 patients had lesions at the time of sampling, and 60 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Bacterial DNA was extracted and analysed by Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, using enzymatic digestion of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA gene, yielding a series of peaks, each representing a bacterial taxon. Results: Two peaks, 60 and 489, were more prevalent in patients with RAS than controls. Conversely, peaks 58 and 490 were less common in patients than controls. When the patients were divided into subgroups, we found that the observed differences in peak-pattern were related to the presence of lesions during sampling. Conclusions: The microbiota of the non-inflamed buccal mucosa differed between patients and controls. The differences were most pronounced in patients who presented with lesions during sampling, suggesting that a disturbance in the normal buccal microbiota triggers the presence of lesions or that presence of lesions alters the microbiota.

  4. Subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

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    Sereflican, M; Sereflican, B; Dagistan, E; Goksugur, N; Kizildag, B

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent aphtous stomatitis (RAS) is an inflammatory oral mucosal disease. It has been known that inflammatory cascade plays important role in the atherosclerotic process. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between subclinical atherosclerotic findings and a systemic inflammatory disease, RAS. In total, 32 patients with RAS were matched with 30 control subjects on the basis of age, sex, and major cardiovascular risk factors. Laboratory parameters including lipid profiles were determined for patients and controls. B-mode ultrasonography was used to assess carotid extra-medial thickness (cEMT) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Both cEMT and cIMT in the RAS group were significantly higher than in the control group (P = 0.002 and 0.013, respectively). There was a significant positive correlation between cIMT and cEMT (r = 0.381, P = 0.034). cIMT was positively correlated with age, triglyceride levels, and systolic blood pressure, while cEMT was positively correlated with age in patients with RAS. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study to evaluate cEMT and cIMT in patients with RAS. This study presents morphological evidence of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with RAS. Further studies investigating the relationship between atherosclerosis and RAS are needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The oral microbiota of patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

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    Bankvall, Maria; Sjöberg, Fei; Gale, Gita; Wold, Agnes; Jontell, Mats; Östman, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Background Specific pathogenic bacteria have been implicated in recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), a chronic inflammatory condition characterised by ulcerations in the oral mucosa. However, the aetiology behind this condition still remains unclear. Objective The buccal microbiota of patients with RAS was compared to that of control subjects to investigate its potential role for this condition. Design Buccal swabs were obtained from non-ulcerative areas of 60 patients, of whom 42 patients had lesions at the time of sampling, and 60 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Bacterial DNA was extracted and analysed by Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, using enzymatic digestion of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA gene, yielding a series of peaks, each representing a bacterial taxon. Results Two peaks, 60 and 489, were more prevalent in patients with RAS than controls. Conversely, peaks 58 and 490 were less common in patients than controls. When the patients were divided into subgroups, we found that the observed differences in peak-pattern were related to the presence of lesions during sampling. Conclusions The microbiota of the non-inflamed buccal mucosa differed between patients and controls. The differences were most pronounced in patients who presented with lesions during sampling, suggesting that a disturbance in the normal buccal microbiota triggers the presence of lesions or that presence of lesions alters the microbiota. PMID:25626771

  6. Treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis major with metronidazole and ciprofloxacin

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    M. Jusri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS are painful oral ulcerations that recur from days to months or even years. It represents the most common lesion of the oral mucosa with prevalence ranging from 15% to 30%. Although the clinical characteristics of RAS are well defined, the precise etiopathogenesis of RAS remains unclear. Since the etiology of RAS remains unknown, there is no definitive treatment. RAS responds quite well to the use of topical or systemic antiinflammatory drugs, particularly corticosteroids. Purpose: The objective of this paper is to discuss the treatment of RAS with secondary infection. Case: This paper reported a case of 22-year-old man with multiple oral ulcers that did not heal for 7 months. Case Management: These ulcers were diagnosed as RAS major with secondary infection that caused by normal oral flora (aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and treated with metronidazole (topical and oral and ciprofloxacin (oral. These lesions healed in 3 weeks with scars. Conclusion: Large ulcer without signs of malignancy that contaminated with normal oral flora will delayed in healing, but with rational treatment RAS mayor with secondary infection has good prognosis.

  7. Efficacy of alum for treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieian, Nasrin; Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Moghadamnia, Aliakbar; Jazayeri, Mina; Seif-Rabiee, Mohammadali; Salmanzadeh, Mina; Radi, Shahrbanoo

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common painful ulcers of oral mucosal which can cause many sufferings. Treatment of RAS often includes administration of corticosteroids, analgesics and regulators of the immune system. However, considering the side effects of these medications, even their topical application must be done with caution. Alum is used in traditional medicine for treatment of oral ulcers without significant side effect. This study sought to assess the effect of topical application of alum on aphthous ulcers. This clinical randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted on 50 females aged 21 to 27 years. Mucosal adhesive patches were prepared in two forms of basic and 7% alum-containing patches. Subjects in two groups of case and control randomly received the mucosal adhesive patches containing alum and the basic patches, respectively three times in five days. Duration of recovery, changes in size of lesion and severity of pain were recorded. Data were entered into SPSS Version 16 and analyzed using t-test. The average period of full recovery was 7.52 days in the case and 12.2 days in the control groups; which was significantly different (paphthous lesions, severity of pain and expedite the recovery of patients with RAS.

  8. Validation of Anamnestic Diagnostic Criteria for Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaglini, Lorena; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Serrano, Giselle; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is characterized by painful recurrent oral ulcers and is typically diagnosed via history and clinical examination. Our aim was to validate a set of anamnestic diagnostic criteria (RASDX) to increase the accuracy of RAS diagnosis, particularly when a clinical examination is not feasible. METHODS Participants were enrolled during an unmatched case-control study. RASDX consisted of an initial phone screening using standardized questionnaires and recognition of RAS photos in the clinic. The proportion of agreement with an examination by an oral medicine expert was calculated. RESULTS A total of 115 participants were scheduled for a clinical diagnostic visit and 11 were withdrawn. The remaining 104 participants were aged 18–50 years, 54% female, 64% White and 20% Hispanic. Of these, all 49 controls with negative RASDX had no clinical ulcers. Of the 54 cases diagnosed with RAS by RASDX, 53 were clinically confirmed to have RAS lesions (99% agreement; exact 1-sided 95% CI=95–100%). CONCLUSIONS RASDX, based on a combination of history and photograph recognition, was highly accurate compared to a diagnosis that employed an oral examination. PMID:23106421

  9. Asymmetric packaging of polymerases within vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Jeffery; Tang, Xiaolin; Landesman, Michael B. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Ruedas, John B. [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Ghimire, Anil [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Gudheti, Manasa V. [Vutara, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Perrault, Jacques [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Jorgensen, Erik M. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Gerton, Jordan M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Bioengineering, University of Utah (United States); Saffarian, Saveez, E-mail: saffarian@physics.utah.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •The VSV polymerases (L proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •The VSV phosphoproteins (P proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •Each VSV virion packages a variable number of P and L proteins. -- Abstract: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic negative sense single-stranded RNA virus. The bullet-shape appearance of the virion results from tightly wound helical turns of the nucleoprotein encapsidated RNA template (N-RNA) around a central cavity. Transcription and replication require polymerase complexes, which include a catalytic subunit L and a template-binding subunit P. L and P are inferred to be in the cavity, however lacking direct observation, their exact position has remained unclear. Using super-resolution fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on single VSV virions, we show that L and P are packaged asymmetrically towards the blunt end of the virus. The number of L and P proteins varies between individual virions and they occupy 57 ± 12 nm of the 150 nm central cavity of the virus. Our finding positions the polymerases at the opposite end of the genome with respect to the only transcriptional promoter.

  10. A review on the oxidative stress in recurrent aphtous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehryari Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: The purpose of the present study was to review the studies regarding serological and salivary oxidant / antioxidant status in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS.   Materials and Methods: The literature was searched using key words RAS, Antioxidants, Saliva, Hematinic (s and Hematinic Acid in the last 10 years, particularly the recent 3 years (2010-2013. At total of 37 clinical trials, 18 case-control articles were selected and evaluated; fulfilling the requirements as the RAS patients having at least 3 oral aphthous attack per year. The exclusion criteria included systemic as well as periodontal diseases, iron deficiency associated anemia, medication usage and smoking.   Conclusion: Almost all lipid-peroxidation studies in serum and saliva were manifested by an increase of malondialdehyde (MDA concentration in RAS patients compared with controls. This would indicate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the etiology of the disease. Serum trace elements (Zn, Se were reduced and Cu was increased in RAS patients in comparison with control individuals. A decreased serum superoxide dismutase (SOD and an increased salivary SOD were observed in all RAS patients. Catalase (CAT and uric acid (UA analyses were non-inclusive. Levels of paraoxonase and arylesterase as well as antioxidant vitamins (A, E, C were lower in RAS patients than that of controls.

  11. Ozone treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a double blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Alhijawi, Mohannad; AlZarea, Bader K; Abul Hassan, Ra'ed S; Lynch, Edward

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of ozone to treat recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). Consecutive sixty-nine participants with RAS were recruited into this non-randomized double blind, controlled cohort observational study (test group). A control group of 69 RAS patients who matched test group with age and gender was recruited. RAS lesions in test group were exposed to ozone in air for 60 seconds while controls received only air. Ulcer size and pain were recorded for each participant at baseline and daily for 15 days. Ulcer duration was determined by recording the time taken for ulcers to disappear. The main outcome measures were pain due to the ulcer, ulcer size and ulcer duration. 138 RAS participants (69 participants and 69 controls) were analyzed. Ulcer size was reduced starting from the second day in test group and from the fourth day in controls (p ≤ 0.004). Pain levels were reduced starting from the first day in the test group and from the third day in controls (p ≤ 0.001). Ulcer duration, ulcer size after day 2 and pain levels were more reduced in the test group. In conclusion, application of ozone on RAS lesions for 60 seconds reduced pain levels and enhanced ulcers' healing by reducing ulcers' size and duration.

  12. A photosynthesis-based two-leaf canopy stomatal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model with single-layer sunlit and shaded leaf canopy scaling is implemented and evaluated in a diagnostic box model with the Pleim-Xiu land surface model (PX LSM) and ozone deposition model components taken directly from the meteorology and air quality modeling system—WRF/CMAQ (Weather Research and Forecast model and Community Multiscale Air Quality model). The photosynthesis-based model for PX LSM (PX PSN) is evaluated at a FLUXNET site for implementation against different parameterizations and the current PX LSM approach with a simple Jarvis function (PX Jarvis). Latent heat flux (LH) from PX PSN is further evaluated at five FLUXNET sites with different vegetation types and landscape characteristics. Simulated ozone deposition and flux from PX PSN are evaluated at one of the sites with ozone flux measurements. Overall, the PX PSN simulates LH as well as the PX Jarvis approach. The PX PSN, however, shows distinct advantages over the PX Jarvis approach for grassland that likely result from its treatment of C3 and C4 plants for CO2 assimilation. Simulations using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) leaf area index (LAI) rather than LAI measured at each site assess how the model would perform with grid averaged data used in WRF/CMAQ. MODIS LAI estimates degrade model performance at all sites but one site having exceptionally old and tall trees. Ozone deposition velocity and ozone flux along with LH

  13. Molecular architecture of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmeh, Amal A; Schenk, Andreas D; Danek, Eric I; Kranzusch, Philip J; Liang, Bo; Walz, Thomas; Whelan, Sean P J

    2010-11-16

    Nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses initiate infection by delivering into the host cell a highly specialized RNA synthesis machine comprising the genomic RNA completely encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein and associated with the viral polymerase. The catalytic core of this protein-RNA complex is a 250-kDa multifunctional large (L) polymerase protein that contains enzymatic activities for nucleotide polymerization as well as for each step of mRNA cap formation. Working with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of NNS RNA viruses, we used negative stain electron microscopy (EM) to obtain a molecular view of L, alone and in complex with the viral phosphoprotein (P) cofactor. EM analysis, combined with proteolytic digestion and deletion mapping, revealed the organization of L into a ring domain containing the RNA polymerase and an appendage of three globular domains containing the cap-forming activities. The capping enzyme maps to a globular domain, which is juxtaposed to the ring, and the cap methyltransferase maps to a more distal and flexibly connected globule. Upon P binding, L undergoes a significant rearrangement that may reflect an optimal positioning of its functional domains for transcription. The structural map of L provides new insights into the interrelationship of its various domains, and their rearrangement on P binding that is likely important for RNA synthesis. Because the arrangement of conserved regions involved in catalysis is homologous, the structural insights obtained for VSV L likely extend to all NNS RNA viruses.

  14. Modeling of stomatal conductance to estimate stomatal ozone uptake by Fagus crenata, Quercus serrata, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Betula platyphylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinose, Yoshiyuki; Azuchi, Fumika; Uehara, Yui; Kanomata, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To construct stomatal conductance models and estimate stomatal O3 uptake for Fagus crenata, Quercus serrata, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Betula platyphylla, stomatal conductance (gs) was measured in seedlings of the four tree species. Better estimates of gs were made by incorporating the acute effects of O3 on gs into the models and the models could explain 34-52% of the variability in gs. Although the O3 concentration was relatively high in spring from April to May, COU of F. crenata, Q. serrata and Q. mongolica var. crispula were relatively low and the ratios of COU in spring to total COU in one year were 16.8% in all tree species because of low gs limited mainly by leaf pre-maturation and/or low temperature. The COU of B. platyphylla were relatively high mainly because of rapid leaf maturation and lower optimal temperature for stomatal opening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnosis and management of recurrent herpetiform stomatitis and Behçet syndrome like recurrent aphthous stomatitis herpetiform type

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    Endah Ayu Tri Wulandari

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS is a common inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa. The aetiology of RAS remains unclear, yet there are several predisposing factors which could be involved in the onset of the lesion. The herpetiform type of RAS appeared to be similar to recurrent oral Herpes Simplex infection and also could be part of Behçet Syndrome. This case report discussed a patient suffering from a herpetiform type of RAS with its clinical appearance resembling recurrent oral Herpes Simplex infection and Behçet syndrome. Initial treatment was undertaken based on the empirical treatment, yet the respond was not satisfactory. Then, laboratory tests were undertaken, including complete blood count, the total population of T lymphocyte, B lymphocyte, T helper, T suppressor, NK cells, T helper/T suppressor ratio, C3, C4, IgG, IgA, and IgM. These tests showed that there were immune and hematinic deficiency condition. Nevertheless, the clinical appearance, laboratory findings and consultation did not support the diagnosis of recurrent oral Herpes Simplex infection and Behçet Syndrome, thus, enhancing the definite diagnosis of the herpetiform type of RAS with immune and hematinic deficiency as the underlying condition. Based on the definite diagnosis, treatment plan was then revised to target the underlying condition.

  16. Scaling of stomatal size and density optimizes allocation of leaf epidermal space for gas exchange in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo Jan; Price, Charles A.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C.; Franks, Peter J.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2015-04-01

    Stomata on plant leaves are key traits in the regulation of terrestrial fluxes of water and carbon. The basic morphology of stomata consists of a diffusion pore and two guard cells that regulate the exchange of CO2 and water vapour between the leaf interior and the atmosphere. This morphology is common to nearly all land plants, yet stomatal size (defined as the area of the guard cell pair) and stomatal density (the number of stomata per unit area) range over three orders of magnitude across species. Evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is driven by selection pressure on the anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax), which determines the operational range of leaf gas exchange. Despite the importance of stomata traits for regulating leaf gas exchange, a quantitative understanding of the relation between adaptation of gsmax and the underlying co-evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is still lacking. Here we develop a theoretical framework for a scaling relationship between stomatal sizes and densities within the constraints set by the allocation of epidermal space and stomatal gas exchange. Our theory predicts an optimal scaling relationship that maximizes gsmax and minimizes epidermal space allocation to stomata. We test whether stomatal sizes and densities reflect this optimal scaling with a global compilation of stomatal trait data on 923 species reflecting most major clades. Our results show optimal scaling between stomatal sizes and densities across all species in the compiled data set. Our results also show optimal stomatal scaling across angiosperm species, but not across gymnosperm and fern species. We propose that the evolutionary flexibility of angiosperms to adjust stomatal sizes underlies their optimal allocation of leaf epidermal space to gas exchange.

  17. Impact of revascularization of coronary chronic total occlusion on left ventricular function and electrical stability: analysis by speckle tracking echocardiography and signal-averaged electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomi, Yohei; Okamura, Atsunori; Iwakura, Katsuomi; Date, Motoo; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Koyama, Yasushi; Inoue, Koichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Fujii, Kenshi

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the mechanisms of effects of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) from two different aspects: left ventricular (LV) systolic function assessed by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D-STE) and electrical stability evaluated by late potential on signal-averaged electrocardiogram (SAECG). We conducted a prospective observational study with consecutive CTO-PCI patients. 2D-STE and SAECG were performed before PCI, and after 1-day and 3-months of procedure. 2D-STE computed global longitudinal strain (GLS) and regional longitudinal strain (RLS) in CTO area, collateral blood-supplying donor artery area, and non-CTO/non-donor area. A total of 37 patients (66 ± 11 years, 78% male) were analyzed. RLS in CTO and donor areas and GLS were significantly improved 1-day after the procedure, but these improvements diminished during 3 months. The improvement of RLS in donor area remained significant after 3-months the index procedure (pre-PCI -13.4 ± 4.8% vs. post-3M -15.1 ± 4.5%, P = 0.034). RLS in non-CTO/non-donor area and LV ejection fraction were not influenced. Mitral annulus velocity was improved at 3-month follow-up (5.0 ± 1.4 vs. 5.6 ± 1.7 cm/s, P = 0.049). Before the procedure, 12 patients (35%) had a late potential. All components of the late potential (filtered QRS duration, root-mean-square voltage in the terminal 40 ms, and duration of the low amplitude signal <40 μV) were not improved. CTO-PCI improved RLS in the donor area at 3-month follow-up without changes of LV ejection fraction. Although higher prevalence of late potential in the current population compared to healthy population was observed, late potential as a surrogate of arrhythmogenic substrate was not influenced by CTO-PCI.

  18. Stomatal cell wall composition: distinctive structural patterns associated with different phylogenetic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtein, Ilana; Shelef, Yaniv; Marom, Ziv; Zelinger, Einat; Schwartz, Amnon; Popper, Zoë A.; Bar-On, Benny

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims Stomatal morphology and function have remained largely conserved throughout ∼400 million years of plant evolution. However, plant cell wall composition has evolved and changed. Here stomatal cell wall composition was investigated in different vascular plant groups in attempt to understand their possible effect on stomatal function. Methods A renewed look at stomatal cell walls was attempted utilizing digitalized polar microscopy, confocal microscopy, histology and a numerical finite-elements simulation. The six species of vascular plants chosen for this study cover a broad structural, ecophysiological and evolutionary spectrum: ferns (Asplenium nidus and Platycerium bifurcatum) and angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Commelina erecta) with kidney-shaped stomata, and grasses (angiosperms, family Poaceae) with dumbbell-shaped stomata (Sorghum bicolor and Triticum aestivum). Key Results Three distinct patterns of cellulose crystallinity in stomatal cell walls were observed: Type I (kidney-shaped stomata, ferns), Type II (kidney-shaped stomata, angiosperms) and Type III (dumbbell-shaped stomata, grasses). The different stomatal cell wall attributes investigated (cellulose crystallinity, pectins, lignin, phenolics) exhibited taxon-specific patterns, with reciprocal substitution of structural elements in the end-walls of kidney-shaped stomata. According to a numerical bio-mechanical model, the end walls of kidney-shaped stomata develop the highest stresses during opening. Conclusions The data presented demonstrate for the first time the existence of distinct spatial patterns of varying cellulose crystallinity in guard cell walls. It is also highly intriguing that in angiosperms crystalline cellulose appears to have replaced lignin that occurs in the stomatal end-walls of ferns serving a similar wall strengthening function. Such taxon-specific spatial patterns of cell wall components could imply different biomechanical functions, which in turn

  19. Stomatal cell wall composition: distinctive structural patterns associated with different phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtein, Ilana; Shelef, Yaniv; Marom, Ziv; Zelinger, Einat; Schwartz, Amnon; Popper, Zoë A; Bar-On, Benny; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Stomatal morphology and function have remained largely conserved throughout ∼400 million years of plant evolution. However, plant cell wall composition has evolved and changed. Here stomatal cell wall composition was investigated in different vascular plant groups in attempt to understand their possible effect on stomatal function. A renewed look at stomatal cell walls was attempted utilizing digitalized polar microscopy, confocal microscopy, histology and a numerical finite-elements simulation. The six species of vascular plants chosen for this study cover a broad structural, ecophysiological and evolutionary spectrum: ferns ( Asplenium nidus and Platycerium bifurcatum ) and angiosperms ( Arabidopsis thaliana and Commelina erecta ) with kidney-shaped stomata, and grasses (angiosperms, family Poaceae) with dumbbell-shaped stomata ( Sorghum bicolor and Triticum aestivum ). Three distinct patterns of cellulose crystallinity in stomatal cell walls were observed: Type I (kidney-shaped stomata, ferns), Type II (kidney-shaped stomata, angiosperms) and Type III (dumbbell-shaped stomata, grasses). The different stomatal cell wall attributes investigated (cellulose crystallinity, pectins, lignin, phenolics) exhibited taxon-specific patterns, with reciprocal substitution of structural elements in the end-walls of kidney-shaped stomata. According to a numerical bio-mechanical model, the end walls of kidney-shaped stomata develop the highest stresses during opening. The data presented demonstrate for the first time the existence of distinct spatial patterns of varying cellulose crystallinity in guard cell walls. It is also highly intriguing that in angiosperms crystalline cellulose appears to have replaced lignin that occurs in the stomatal end-walls of ferns serving a similar wall strengthening function. Such taxon-specific spatial patterns of cell wall components could imply different biomechanical functions, which in turn could be a consequence of differences in

  20. Clinical study on thermography, as modern investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosif, Laura; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora; Murariu-Măgureanu, Cătălina; Preoteasa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is an infectious inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, with frequent recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess the use of infrared thermography as investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis (as inflammatory disorder of the maxillary denture bearing area), by comparing disease and non-disease groups. An observational study was conducted on maxillary edentulous patients treated by acrylic dentures, with and without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Diagnostic test methods used were clinical examination for denture stomatitis and conventional microbiological culture method for oral candidiasis. Thermography analysis of the maxillary denture bearing area was made using the ThermaCAM PM350 infrared camera (Inframetrics, Flir Systems) and ThermaGram Pro 95 software, data being acquired by usage of standard protocol of thermographic registrations. The sample included 52 patients, 21 with and 31 without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. The temperature of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area was found to be statistically significantly higher in Candida-associated denture stomatitis (mean 36.20°C), compared to healthy oral mucosa (mean 34.85°C). The thermal threshold value of 35.44°C was identified as best differentiating a pathological from normal state of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area. In conclusion, infrared thermography, a rapid non-invasive investigation method, has the premises to bring valuable data in inflammatory disorders of the maxillary denture bearing area, as Candida-associated denture stomatitis that may be used for screening, diagnostic or monitoring purposes.

  1. Contrasting responses of leaf stomatal characteristics to climate change: a considerable challenge to predict carbon and water cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2017-09-01

    Stomata control the cycling of water and carbon between plants and the atmosphere; however, no consistent conclusions have been drawn regarding the response of stomatal frequency to climate change. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of 1854 globally obtained data series to determine the response of stomatal frequency to climate change, which including four plant life forms (over 900 species), at altitudes ranging from 0 to 4500 m and over a time span of more than one hundred thousand years. Stomatal frequency decreased with increasing CO2 concentration and increased with elevated temperature and drought stress; it was also dependent on the species and experimental conditions. The response of stomatal frequency to climate change showed a trade-off between stomatal control strategies and environmental factors, such as the CO2 concentration, temperature, and soil water availability. Moreover, threshold effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on stomatal frequency were detected, indicating that the response of stomatal density to increasing CO2 concentration will decrease over the next few years. The results also suggested that the stomatal index may be more reliable than stomatal density for determination of the historic CO2 concentration. Our findings indicate that the contrasting responses of stomata to climate change bring a considerable challenge in predicting future water and carbon cycles. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Elevated CO2-Induced Responses in Stomata Require ABA and ABA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Caspar; Peng, Kai; Movahedi, Mahsa; Dunn, Jessica A; Walker, Heather J; Liang, Yun-Kuan; McLachlan, Deirdre H; Casson, Stuart; Isner, Jean Charles; Wilson, Ian; Neill, Steven J; Hedrich, Rainer; Gray, Julie E; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2015-10-19

    An integral part of global environment change is an increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) [1]. Increased [CO2] reduces leaf stomatal apertures and density of stomata that plays out as reductions in evapotranspiration [2-4]. Surprisingly, given the importance of transpiration to the control of terrestrial water fluxes [5] and plant nutrient acquisition [6], we know comparatively little about the molecular components involved in the intracellular signaling pathways by which [CO2] controls stomatal development and function [7]. Here, we report that elevated [CO2]-induced closure and reductions in stomatal density require the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby adding a new common element to these signaling pathways. We also show that the PYR/RCAR family of ABA receptors [8, 9] and ABA itself are required in both responses. Using genetic approaches, we show that ABA in guard cells or their precursors is sufficient to mediate the [CO2]-induced stomatal density response. Taken together, our results suggest that stomatal responses to increased [CO2] operate through the intermediacy of ABA. In the case of [CO2]-induced reductions in stomatal aperture, this occurs by accessing the guard cell ABA signaling pathway. In both [CO2]-mediated responses, our data are consistent with a mechanism in which ABA increases the sensitivity of the system to [CO2] but could also be explained by requirement for a CO2-induced increase in ABA biosynthesis specifically in the guard cell lineage. Furthermore, the dependency of stomatal [CO2] signaling on ABA suggests that the ABA pathway is, in evolutionary terms, likely to be ancestral. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Candida-associated denture stomatitis: new insights

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    Tatiana Pereira-Cenci

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite therapeutic progress, opportunistic oral fungal infectious diseases have increased in prevalence, especially in denture wearers. The combination of entrapment of yeast cells in irregularities in denture-base and denture-relining materials, poor oral hygiene and several systemic factors is the most probable cause for the onset of this infectious disease. Hence colonization and growth on prostheses by Candida species are of clinical importance. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss several key factors controlling the adhesion of Candida species which are relevant to denture-associated stomatitis. Although there is some consensus on the role of surface properties, studies on several other factors, as the use of denture liners, salivary properties and yeast-bacterial interactions, have shown contradictory findings. A comprehensive fundamental understanding is hampered by conflicting findings due to the large variations in experimental protocols, while other factors have never been thoroughly studied. Surface free energy and surface roughness control the initial adherence, but temporal changes have not been reported. Neither have in vivo studies shown if the substratum type is critical in dictating biofilm accumulation during longer periods in the oral environment. The contribution of saliva is unclear due to factors like variations in its collection and handling. Initial findings have disclosed that also bacteria are crucial for the successful establishment of Candida in biofilms, but the clinical significance of this observation is yet to be confirmed. In conclusion, there is a need to standardize experimental procedures, to bridge the gap between laboratory and in vivo methodologies and findings and - in general - to thoroughly investigate the factors that modulate the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of denture-base materials and the oral mucosa of patients subjected to Candida infections. Information on how

  4. Enzymatic antioxidants status in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zichuan; Li, Shan; Fang, Huiqing

    2017-10-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) has been thought to play a main role in the etiopathogenesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), which is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases characterized by recurrent and painful oral ulcers. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the enzymatic antioxidants status in patients with RAS in the active stage and remission stage. Ninety-seven patients with idiopathic minor RAS and 102 race-, age- and gender-matched healthy individuals were recruited. All these subjects were allocated to three groups: RAS patients with active lesion (group A); the same patients in group A in the remission stage of RAS (group B); and healthy individuals without RAS (group C). Following an overnight fast, blood samples were obtained. The serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) were measured by the spectrophotometric method. Independent-samples t-test and paired t-test were performed for statistical evaluation. The serum levels of SOD, GSHPx, and CAT (83.9 ± 17.1 U/ml, 6687.2 ± 2629.2 U/ml, 1789.7 ± 593.8 U/l) were found to be significantly lower in group A as compared to those of group B (99.8 ± 11.1 U/ml, 9364.1 ± 1607.9 U/ml, 2789.1 ± 1113.4 U/l; P 0.05). Our results indicate that enzymatic antioxidant defense system is impaired in RAS patients with active lesion and seems to play a crucial role in its pathogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Silver nitrate cautery in aphthous stomatitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidaee, M R; Taheri, A; Mansoori, P; Ghodsi, S Z

    2005-09-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful, recurrent disease of the oral mucous membrane. Silver nitrate sticks have been used for a long time to provide pain relief for the duration of an aphthous ulceration, with only one application. Silver nitrate causes chemical cauterization and increases the depth of injury. To study the effect of chemical cautery with silver nitrate in reducing pain of aphthous ulceration and to determine if this treatment shortens or prolongs healing. In a randomized, patient-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 97 patients with painful minor oral aphthous ulceration were randomized to receive silver nitrate cautery or placebo. The severity of pain was rated on a three-category scale (severe, mild, none) and was recorded each day until the seventh day after the procedure. The lesion size was recorded at the time of the procedure and on the seventh day afterwards. In the treatment group, the ulcer was gently painted with a silver nitrate stick until it turned white. In the placebo group, the ulcer was gently painted with a placebo stick. In the treatment group, 33 of 47 patients (70%) evaluated and in the placebo group, four of 38 patients (11%) evaluated had reduction in severity of pain 1 day after the procedure. The difference was statistically significant (P aphthous ulceration without significantly shortening or prolonging healing time. We did not observe any side-effects in our study. The effect is rapid and lasts for the duration of the lesion. The treatment is simple and cost-effective in patients with infrequent recurrences.

  6. Mucosal and salivary microbiota associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Yun Sik; Baek, Keum Jin; Yoon, Seok-Hwan; Park, Hee Kyung; Choi, Youngnim

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disorder of unclear etiopathogenesis. Although recent studies of the oral microbiota by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have suggested that imbalances in the oral microbiota may contribute to the etiopathogenesis of RAS, no specific bacterial species associated with RAS have been identified. The present study aimed to characterize the microbiota in the oral mucosa and saliva of RAS patients in comparison with control subjects at the species level. The bacterial communities of the oral mucosa and saliva from RAS patients with active lesions (RAS, n = 18 for mucosa and n = 8 for saliva) and control subjects (n = 18 for mucosa and n = 7 for saliva) were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. There were no significant differences in the alpha diversity between the controls and the RAS, but the mucosal microbiota of the RAS patients showed increased inter-subject variability. A comparison of the relative abundance of each taxon revealed decreases in the members of healthy core microbiota but increases of rare species in the mucosal and salivary microbiota of RAS patients. Particularly, decreased Streptococcus salivarius and increased Acinetobacter johnsonii in the mucosa were associated with RAS risk. A dysbiosis index, which was developed using the relative abundance of A. johnsonii and S. salivarius and the regression coefficients, correctly predicted 83 % of the total cases for the absence or presence of RAS. Interestingly, A. johnsonii substantially inhibited the proliferation of gingival epithelial cells and showed greater cytotoxicity against the gingival epithelial cells than S. salivarius. RAS is associated with dysbiosis of the mucosal and salivary microbiota, and two species associated with RAS have been identified. This knowledge may provide a diagnostic tool and new targets for therapeutics for RAS.

  7. A Retrospective Evaluation of Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

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    Filiz Topaloğlu Demir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the factors in the etiology of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS and to evaluate patients in the terms of RAS associated systemic disorders especially Behçet’s disease. Methods: Patients with RAS, who were followed up in Bartın State Hospital Dermatology Clinic between July 2013 and April 2015, were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 123 patients (86 female, 37 male were included in this study. Thirteen (106% patients were children. The mean age of patients was 34.5±14.7 years (range: 8-69 years. Minor aphthous somatitis was the most frequent clinical type (68.3%. Family history was positive in 52.8% of patients. The triggering factors in the etiology of RAS were stress (54.5%, trauma (40.2%, gingivitis (29.3%, food (9.8%, medicines (5.7%, menstruation in female patients (3.3%, and throat infections (2.4%. Nutritional deficiencies were found in 39% of patients. There was a statistically significant difference in attack frequency (p=0.017 and throat infection history (p=0.029 between adults and pediatric patients. Fourteen (11.4% patients were diagnosed with Behçet’s disease. When we compared the RAS patients diagnosed with Behçet’s disease and the other RAS patients, a significant difference was found in pathergy test (p<0.001 and ferritin levels (p=0.020. Conclusion: Patients with RAS should be followed up for a long time for systemic disorders, especially for Behçet’s disease, accompanying RAS.

  8. Mucosal Microbiome in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, K.; Lowe, T.; Meharg, C.; Berry, S.H.; Foley, J.; Hold, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS—namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation

  9. Clinical assessment of disease severity in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappuni, Anwar R; Kovacevic, Tatjana; Shirlaw, Penelope J; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2013-09-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in many parts of the world. However, there is very limited published clinical evidence for the therapies used in this condition. This could be partly due to the difficulty in evaluating the efficacy of oral ulcer treatment objectively. In this paper, we present a method for assessing and monitoring the severity of oral ulcers before and after treatment. Six ulcer characteristics, number, size, duration, ulcer-free period, site and pain, were used to generate an ulcer severity score (USS). The scores for 223 RAS patients were determined, and 79 were scored again after 3-month therapy with topical betamethasone. The scores for the minor RAS group were between 18 and 43 (mean 29.2 ± 5.3). The mean score in the major ulcers group (range: 28-60, mean 39.9 ± 6.1) was significantly greater than in the minor group (P < 0.001). The herpetiform recurrent ulcers score range was wide (range: 18-57, mean 36.6 ± 8.4). The mean severity score decreased significantly after treatment (P < 0.001). The USS was indicative of the disease activity in recurrent oral ulceration. It helped in assessing the efficacy of therapy, as the change in the numerical score reflected the change in ulcer severity in response to treatment. This tool may well prove to be of value in clinical management, research and in clinical trials. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Redistributive properties of the vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfman, W.B.; Perrault, J. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The template for transcription of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) genome consists of a negative-strand RNA (approximately 11 kb) tightly associated with approximately 1250 copies of the nucleocapsid or N protein (N-RNA template). The interaction between the virion-associated polymerase and this template was probed with a novel assay using purified N-RNA complexes added to detergent-disrupted uv-irradiated standard virions or unirradiated defective interfering (DI) particles. In contrast to the well-known stability of assembled cellular transcription complexes, the VSV polymerase copied exogenously added templates efficiently and yielded products indistinguishable from control virus transcription. Addition of uv-irradiated N-RNA templates to unirradiated virus effectively competed for transcription of endogenous template indicating that most or all of the polymerase can freely redistribute. Furthermore preincubation of virus and added templates at high ionic strength to solubilize L and NS polymerase proteins did not release additional active enzyme for redistribution. Pretranscription of virus also had little or no effect on redistributed activity indicating that polymerase complexes are capable of multiple rounds of synthesis beginning at the 3' end promoter. Unexpectedly, titration with saturating amounts of added N-RNA showed that active polymerase complexes are only in slight excess relative to template in standard or DI particles despite the large surplus of packaged L and NS polypeptides. Moreover, added standard virus templates competed equally well for the redistributing polymerase from DI particles or standard virus indicating no significant polymerase-binding preference for interfering templates. These findings bear important implications regarding mechanisms of VSV transcription and replication.

  11. Inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, J.J.; Wagner, R.R.

    1981-04-01

    DNA synthesis in mouse myeloma (MPC-11) cells and L cells was rapidly and progressively inhibited by infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). No significant difference in cellular DNA synthesis inhibition was noted between synchronized and unsynchronized cells, nor did synchronized cells vary in their susceptibility to VSV infection after release from successive thymidine and hydroxyurea blocks. Cellular RNA synthesis was inhibited to about the same extent as DNA synthesis, but cellular protein synthesis was less affected by VSV at the same multiplicity of infection. The effect of VSV on cellular DNA synthesis could not be attributed to degradation of existing DNA or to decreased uptake of deoxynucleoside triphosphates, nor were DNA polymerase and thymidine kinase activities significantly different in VSV-infected and uninfected cell extracts. Analysis by alkaline sucrose gradients of DNA in pulse-labeled uninfected and VSV-infected cells indicated that VSV infection did not appear to influence DNA chain elongation. Cellular DNA synthesis was not significantly inhibited by infection with the VSV polymerase mutant tsG114(I) at the restrictive temperature or by infection with defective-interfering VSV DI-011 (5' end of the genome), but DI-HR-LT (3' end of genome) exhibited initially rapid but not prolonged inhibition of MPC-11 cell DNA synthesis. DNA synthesis inhibitory activity of wild-type VSV was only slowly and partially inactivated by very large doses of UV irradiation. These data suggest that, as in the effect of VSV on cellular RNA synthesis inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by VSV requires transcription of a small segment of the viral genome.

  12. Periodic fever associated with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvsgaard, Nini; Mikkelsen, Torben; Korsholm, Jakob; Veirum, Jens Erik; Herlin, Troels

    2012-07-01

    The periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is a non-hereditary idiopathic febrile syndrome belonging to the group of autoinflammatory diseases. PFAPA does not cause long-lasting sequelae. An early diagnosis provides treatment possibilities for the patient and comfort to the family. This study is a retrospective review of the medical records of patients diagnosed with PFAPA and admitted to our clinic from January 1999 to January 2010 (n = 31). The study population (n = 31) consisted of 21 males and ten females: 30 Caucasians and 1 Asian. Normal growth was seen in 30 patients. The median age at onset was 33 months. The mean duration of fever episodes was 4.45 days (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.92-4.98 days), and the mean duration of intervals between fever episodes was 29.66 days (95% CI: 25.31-34.01 days). Concomitantly with the fever, all patients had characteristic symptoms. All patients were asymptomatic in between their fever episodes. Prodromal symptoms were seen in 12 patients. Oral prednisolone was used in 24 patients and caused immediate fever reduction in 87.5%. A reduction in the duration of the asymptomatic interval after treatment was seen in 75.0%. Tonsillectomy was performed in 20 of the 31 patients causing cessation of fever episodes in 70%. Fever episodes continued in 15%, and the postoperative status remained unknown in the last 15%. Spontaneous resolution was seen in four patients. The diagnostic delay had a median duration of 28 months (range 2-160 months). The long diagnostic delay of PFAPA gives cause for concern and it indicates a need for greater awareness of the disease so that the diagnosis may be made earlier. not relevant. not relevant.

  13. Stomatal characterization of five species of the genus Vanilla.

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    Delfino Reyes-López

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to characterize the stomata of five species of vanilla. Throughout 2012, leaf samples of V. planifolia G. Jackson, V. pompona Schiede, V. indora Schiede, V. insignis Ames and V. odorota Presl were taken from the vanilla germplasm bank at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla. The stomata size was obtained considering their length and width, as well as the index and stomata number of the abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces in a randomized complete block design with three replications. V. pompona Schiede and V. inodora Schiede showed the highest stomatal index with 8713 and 8246 stomata per mm2, respectively, followed by V. odorata Presl with 4412 stomata per mm2. V. insignis Ames and V. planifolia G. Jackson showed the lowest stomata index with 2968 and 1378 stomata per mm2, respectively, in the abaxial leaf surface, these differences were statistically significant (P≤0.05. According to the position of the leaf stomata, V. planifolia G. Jackson and V. inodora Schiede can be considered to be hypostomatics since they showed stomata only in the abaxial leaf surface. V. insignis Ames, V. inodora Schiede and V. odorata Presl. can be considered to be anfiestomatic because they showed stomata in both the abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces. V. inodora Schiede had smaller stomata compared with the other species.That is an important feature to be included in the genetic improvement of the genus Vanilla, because due to climate change, temperature will increase and precipitation will decrease, so Vainilla will require more efficient genotypes for water use.

  14. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

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    Anıl Gülsel Bahalı

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The purpose of this study was to obtain data that may provide an insight into the etiopathogenesis of recurrent aphtous stomatitis (RAS by the way of analysing the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients who had been diagnosed with RAS. Materials and Metods: The patients, who were diagnosed with RAS in the dermatology outpatient clinic, between May 2007 and May 2010, were evaluated retrospectively. The data including sociodemografic and clinical characteristics, and treatment options were recorded. Results: A hundred patients (68 women, 32 men were included in this study. The average age was 40±13.6 years. RAS was more common in patients with middle-income and low education. The most common type of RAS was minor aphtous ulcers (88%. The lesions were most frequently seen on the lateral side of the tongue (34% and cheek (34%. Sixty percent of patients had a positive family history. Some factors such as biting (12%, tooth brushing (18%, dental disease presence (82%, food (39%, menstruation (10.3%, stress (76%, iron deficiency (16.7%, vitamin B12 deficiency (22.4%, low serum ferritin levels (18%, and seasonal variability (32% showed positive correlation with RAS. A negative correlation was found between RAS and smoking. Forty-nine percent of patients had used alternative therapies in addition to drug therapy. The most frequently used alternative method was consumption of sumac (26.5%. Conlucions: In contrast to the literature, our study found that RAS is started in the third decade of life and, approximately 50% of patients prefered alternative treatment methods, particularly sumac. Nowadays, discussions about the etiopathogenesis of RAS continue. In this study, we found that different sociodemographic and clinical factors may be associated with the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Our study will be followed by further studies using prospective design to identify the the etiopathogenesis of RAS.

  15. Field acquisition system of signals produced by 60 Hz electric power distribution networks; Sistema de aquisicao em campo de sinais produzidos por redes eletricas de 60 Hz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arasaki, Arnaldo Takashi

    1996-12-31

    Signal acquisition and analysis problems generally require expensive instruments whose utilization may be optimized through the use of portable signal acquisition modules with signal storage capability. Signals could be registered where they are generated and then analyzed properly in a laboratory far away. A portable acquisition module is developed after studying promising solutions such as direct analog storage, analog-to-digital binary conversion and delta modulation of the collected signals. Since some years ago, a solid state non-volatile analog memory has been commercially available and it was chosen in this portable module design. It also provides low power consumption, turning out to be interesting to signal acquisition and storage applications. This work also presents the portable acquisition module results. (author) 100 refs., 48 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Modelling stomatal conductance in Acacia caven: A two way approach to understand vapor fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, N.; Meza, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration fluxes from semi arid ecosystems show a strong interannual variability and dependence on water availability. Usually this variable is regarded as very small but at local scale could substantially affect water balance at basin level. Climate Change scenarios for these regions are a source of concern as they project an increase in temperature, leading to a greater atmospheric water demand. In addition, precipitation is expected to decrease, increasing pressure for this kind of ecosystems. At a plant level, a rise on the actual atmospheric CO2 concentration is expected to improve photosynthetic performance and water use efficiency. However, as stomatal conductance is the main pathway for water vapor flux, from the leaf to the atmosphere, and CO2 entrance to the substomatal cavity, a larger control of the stomatal opening, due to a severe water control lost from the plant, could lead to shortages in net assimilation, jeopardizing the behavior of Semi Arid ecosystems as natural carbon sinks. Stoma is also one of the main lock of the soil-plant-water continuum, thus finally controlling the rate of soil water depletion. Its modeling presents a key role in determining future groundwater availability and net ecosystem exchange. There are several approaches for stomatal conductance modeling, from mechanistic models, based on the physiological functioning of the stomata, to empirical models where the stomatal behavior is correlated with environmental conditions. We modeled stomatal conductance for a Chilean typical Mediterranean Savannanh, dominated by Acacia caven, comparing two different empirical approaches. We used a Shuttleworth and Wallace model for sparse canopies combined with an inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. This model allowed us to link stomatal conductance to evapotranspiration. The second approach was based on a multiplicative model for stomatal conductance based on environmental limitation, following Jarvis's model

  17. Molecular Determinants of Susceptibility to Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackham, Aaron U; Northrup, Scott A; Willingham, Mark; Sirintrapun, Joseph; Russell, Greg B; Lyles, Douglas S; Stewart, John H

    2014-01-01

    Background M protein mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (M51R-VSV) has oncolytic properties against many cancers. However, some cancer cells are resistant to M51R-VSV. Herein, we evaluate the molecular determinants of VSV resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Methods Cell viability and the effect of β-interferon (IFN) was analyzed using MTS assay. Gene expression was evaluated via microarray analysis. Cell infectability was measured by flow cytometry. Xenografts were established in athymic nude mice and treated with intratumoral M51R-VSV. Results Four of five pancreatic cancer cell lines were sensitive to M51R-VSV, while Panc03.27 cells remained resistant (81±3% viability 72-hours after single cycle infection). Comparing sensitive MiaPaCa2 to resistant Panc03.27 cells, significant differences in gene expression was found relating to IFN signaling (p=2×10-5), viral entry (p=3×10-4) and endocytosis (p=7×10-4). MiaPaCa2 cells permitted high levels of VSV infection, while Panc03.27 cells were capable of resisting VSV cell entry even at high MOIs. Extrinsic β-IFN overcame apparent defects in IFN-mediated pathways in MiaPaCa2 cells conferring VSV resistance. In contrast, β-IFN decreased cell viability in Panc3.27 cells suggesting intact anti-viral mechanisms. VSV treated xenografts exhibited reduced tumor growth relative to controls in both MiaPaCa2 (1423 ± 345% vs 164 ± 136%, pVSV treated Panc03.27 xenografts. Conclusions Inhibition of VSV endocytosis and intact IFN-mediated defenses are responsible for M51R-VSV resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. M51R-VSV treatment appears to induce anti-tumor cellular immunity in vivo which may expand its clinical efficacy. PMID:24252853

  18. Interference of CD40L-mediated tumor immunotherapy by oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galivo, Feorillo; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Thanarajasingam, Uma; Jevremovic, Dragan; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Thompson, Jill; Kottke, Timothy; Barber, Glen N; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard G

    2010-04-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy can be achieved in two ways: (1) by exploiting an innate ability of certain viruses to selectively replicate in tumor tissues, and (2) by using viruses to deliver toxic or immunostimulatory genes to tumors. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) selectively replicates in tumors lacking adequate type I interferon response. The efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy using VSV against B16 melanomas in C57BL/6 mice is dependent on CD8(+) T and natural killer cells. Because immunotherapies that prime specific CD8(+) T cells against melanocyte/melanoma antigens can generate significant therapeutic responses, we hypothesized that engineering VSV to express the potent T cell costimulatory molecule CD40 ligand (VSV-CD40L) would enhance virotherapy with concomitant priming of melanoma-specific T cells. However, we observed no difference in antitumor efficacy between the parental VSV-GFP and VSV-CD40L. In contrast, intratumoral injection of a replication-defective adenovirus expressing CD40L (Ad-CD40L) consistently produced significantly greater therapy than either replication-competent VSV-GFP or VSV-CD40L. The Ad-CD40L-mediated tumor regressions were associated with specific T cell responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), which took several days to develop, whereas VSV-CD40L rapidly induced high levels of T cell activation without specificity for TAAs. These data suggest that the high levels of VSV-associated immunogenicity distracted immune responses away from priming of tumor-specific T cells, even in the presence of potent costimulatory signals. In contrast, a replication-defective Ad-CD40L allowed significant priming of T cells directed against TAAs. These observations suggest that an efficiently primed antitumor T cell response can produce similar, if not better, therapy against an established melanoma compared with intratumoral injection of a replication-competent oncolytic virus.

  19. Salivary mucin MUC7 oligosaccharides in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zad, Mikael; Flowers, Sarah A; Bankvall, Maria; Jontell, Mats; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of recurrent aphthous stomatitis remains unknown. In this study, we investigate the composition of oligosaccharides from mucin MUC7 in recurrent aphthous stomatitis as these heavily O-glycosylated mucins confer many of saliva's protective properties such as defence against mucosal pathogens. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected from six individuals, three with recurrent aphthous stomatitis and three corresponding sibling, without this condition. Oligosaccharides from salivary MUC7 were isolated and analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The types of oligosaccharides identified in the patients and control subjects were similar; however, statistical evaluation indicated semi-quantitative differences between specific oligosaccharide classes. These changes focused on a reduction in terminal glycan residues including fucosylation, sialylation and sulfation on galactose. This study was able to show differential MUC7 glycosylation in the patients suggesting functional changes to salivary mucins in this condition. The terminal glycans altered in disease have been shown to be important for a range of immunological and bacterial binding roles. Further investigation of these epitopes in a larger study may provide critical insights into the pathology of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. MUC7 glycosylation is altered in recurrent aphthous stomatitis. This may change the protective properties of this mucin against mucosal pathogens, which may effect this condition.

  20. Correlation between histocompatibility antigens and recurrent aphthous stomatitis in the Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Niels Salles Willo; Weber, Raimar; Monteiro, Francisco; Kalil, Jorge; Miziara, Ivan Dieb

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common oral mucosa disorder that affects 20% of the world's population, characterized by recurring painful ulcers in the mouth. The diagnosis is primarily based on the patient's clinical history. Inheritance may pose as a risk factor for the disease; however, the studies available are inconclusive as to the results attained, and they vary according to the population studied. to typify class I and class II HLA molecules and to assess how frequent these molecules are present in the Brazilian population with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis, compared to healthy controls. In this prospective, cross-sectional and investigative study, thirty one patients with diagnostic hypothesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis were seen from February of 2004 to May of 2006. We obtained the DNA from those patients who matched the inclusion criteria and typified their HLA by PCR. In those patients with Recurrent Minor Aphthous Stomatitis we found statistically significant occurrences of HLA-A33 and HLA-B35. HLA-A33 and HLA-B35 may be associated with recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis in the Brazilian's population.

  1. INTERMEDIATE UVEITIS ASSOCIATED WITH PERIODIC FEVER, APHTHOUS STOMATITIS, PHARYNGITIS, AND CERVICAL ADENITIS SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rene Y; Shakoor, Akbar; Bohnsack, John; Vitale, Albert T

    2017-05-29

    To report two novel cases of intermediate uveitis associated with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis syndrome. Observational case reports and review of the literature. Both patients in this report had an established diagnosis of Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis syndrome before the onset of ocular inflammation. Infectious and noninfectious systemic conditions known to be associated with intermediate uveitis were excluded. Intermediate uveitis was confirmed clinically in both patients by the presence of vitritis, snowballs, and peripheral snowbanks in the region of the pars plana. Both cases had a course characterized by recurrent inflammation; in which systemic steroid treatment, and in one case, immunomodulatory therapy was necessary. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis syndrome is an auto-inflammatory fever disorder in childhood. Although other auto-inflammatory disorders such as, Blau syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, and Behcets disease have been associated with various forms of uveitis, Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis has never been reported to be associated with any type of ocular inflammation. We describe for the first time, two cases of Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis syndrome presenting with intermediate uveitis.

  2. Zinc deficiency in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozler, G S

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common disease of the oral mucosa, affecting 20 per cent of the general population.1 However, the aetiology of this disease is unknown. This is the first controlled study to compare zinc levels in recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients with those of a well-matched, healthy, control population. Twenty-five patients with a history of recurrent aphthous stomatitis and 25 healthy people (control group) took part in the study. Patients aged between 20 and 40 years with recurrent oral aphthous ulcers less than 1 cm in diameter were included. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy and lactation, systemic disease (ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, Behçet's disease), any current medication (topical or systemic), dental surgery during the previous month and deficiencies in iron, folic acid or vitamin B1, B2, B6 or B12. Serum zinc levels were compared between patient and control groups. Zinc deficiency was detected in 28 per cent of recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients and in 4 per cent of controls. The mean serum zinc level in the patient group was significantly lower than in the control group. These results suggest an association between zinc deficiency and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

  3. Differential Effects of Ozone Exposure on Carbon Assimilation and Stomatal Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardozzi, D.; Bonan, G. B.; Levis, S.; Sparks, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Humans are indirectly increasing concentrations of surface ozone through industrial processes. Ozone is known to have negative impacts on plants, including reductions in crop yields, plant growth, and visible leaf injury. Ozone directly influences photosynthesis via two mechanisms: 1) the oxidation of cellular components (i.e., influencing leaf internal biochemistry and transport) and 2) altering stomatal functioning, ultimately changing conductance. Carbon exchange at the leaf level is governed by both conductance and carboxylation processes, but water exchange depends primarily on the size of the stomatal aperture. Thus, the possibility exists that ozone exposure will differentially affect plant-mediated carbon and water fluxes. Further, these differential effects of ozone are not explicitly expressed in most modeling efforts. We investigated how ozone changes both stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation using controlled open-top chamber experiments and then incorporated our experimental findings into modified Farquhar and Ball-Berry based photosynthesis and stomatal conductance models. In experiments, we observed carbon assimilation and conductance decreases in response to ozone. However, the decrease in carbon assimilation was larger than the decrease in conductance to water vapor, thereby changing the relationship between carbon gain and water loss at the leaf level. In addition, the relationship between photosynthesis and transpiration weakened significantly after 12 weeks of ozone exposure, suggesting a decoupling of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. We used this information to modify biochemical parameters in the Farquhar model and the Ball-Berry coefficient to determine whether these models are able to simulate plant performance under ozone exposure.

  4. Exposure to moderate concentrations of tropospheric ozone impairs tree stomatal response to carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onandia, Gabriela [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, P. O. Box 461, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, Department of Microbiology and Ecology, University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Olsson, Anna-Karin; Barth, Sabine [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, P. O. Box 461, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); King, John S. [Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, Campus Box 8002, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Uddling, Johan, E-mail: johan.uddling@dpes.gu.se [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, P. O. Box 461, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2011-10-15

    With rising concentrations of both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and tropospheric ozone (O{sub 3}), it is important to better understand the interacting effects of these two trace gases on plant physiology affecting land-atmosphere gas exchange. We investigated the effect of growth under elevated CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3}, singly and in combination, on the primary short-term stomatal response to CO{sub 2} concentration in paper birch at the Aspen FACE experiment. Leaves from trees grown in elevated CO{sub 2} and/or O{sub 3} exhibited weaker short-term responses of stomatal conductance to both an increase and a decrease in CO{sub 2} concentration from current ambient level. The impairement of the stomatal CO{sub 2} response by O{sub 3} most likely developed progressively over the growing season as assessed by sap flux measurements. Our results suggest that expectations of plant water-savings and reduced stomatal air pollution uptake under rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} may not hold for northern hardwood forests under concurrently rising tropospheric O{sub 3}. - Exposure to moderate concentrations of tropospheric ozone impairs stomatal CO{sub 2} responsiveness of birch in the Aspen FACE experiment.

  5. Stomatal and non-stomatal limitations on leaf carbon assimilation in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings under natural conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranda, I.; Rodriguez-Calcerrada, J.; Robson, T. M.; Cano, F. J.; Alte, L.; Sanchez-Gomez, D.

    2012-07-01

    Limitations to diffusion and biochemical factors affecting leaf carbon uptake were analyzed in young beech seedlings (Fagus sylvtica L.) growing in natural gaps of a beech-wood at the southern limit of the species. Half of the seedlings received periodic watering in addition to natural rainfall to reduce the severity of the summer drought. Plant water status was evaluated by measuring predawn water potential. Basic biochemical parameters were inferred from chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis-CO{sub 2} curves (A-C{sub c}) under saturating light. The curves were established on three dates during the summer months. The main variables studied included: stomatal and mesophyll conductance to CO{sub 2} (g{sub s} and g{sub m} respectively), maximum velocity of carboxylation (V{sub c}max) and maximum electron transport capacity (J{sub m}ax). The gm was estimated by two methodologies: the curve-fitting and J constant methods. Seedlings withstood moderate water stress, as the leaf predawn water potential ({Psi}{sub p}d) measured during the study was within the range -0.2 to -0.5 MPa. Mild drought caused gs and gm to decrease only slightly in response to {Psi}{sub p}d. However both diffusional parameters explained most of the limitations to CO{sub 2} uptake. In addition, it should be highlighted that biochemical limitations, prompted by V{sub c}max and J{sub m}ax, were related mainly to ontogenic factors, without any clear relationship with drought under the moderate water stress experienced by beech seedlings through the study. The results may help to further understanding of the functional mechanisms influencing the carbon fixation capacity of beech seedlings under natural conditions. (Author) 68 refs.

  6. Investigations on a Flaps-Like Disease of Cattle (’Benign Flaps,’ Stomatitis Papulosa Bovis Specifica) (Untersuchungen uber eine Maulseucheahnliche Erkrankung des Rindes (’Gutartige Maulseuche,’ Stomatitis Papulosa Bovis Specifica))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomatitis papulosa infections of cattle can be differentiated from so-called sporadic aphtha and from aphthous fever. Stomatitis papulosa can be...distinguished from both diseases by the absence of blisters and pustules. Moreover, it can also be differentiated from aphthous fever in that it involves only the oral cavity and not the skin and hooves.

  7. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Roen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine if patients with oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis and concomitant contact allergy have more frequent and severe xerostomia, lower unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva and citric-acid-stimulated parotid saliva flow rates, and higher...... of xerostomia, clinical examination, sialometry, mucosal biopsy and contact allergy testing. RESULTS: Nineteen patients had oral lichen planus, 19 patients had oral lichenoid lesions and 11 patients had generalised stomatitis. 38.8% had contact allergy. Xerostomia was significantly more common and severe...... in the chewing stimulated saliva samples from patients when compared to healthy controls. The differences were not significant and they were irrespective of the presence of contact allergy. CONCLUSION: Xerostomia is prevalent in patients with oral lichen planus, lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis...

  8. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Røn; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Background: To examine if patients with oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis and concomitant contact allergy have more frequent and severe xerostomia, lower unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva and citric-acid-stimulated parotid saliva flow rates, and higher......, clinical examination, sialometry, mucosal biopsy and contact allergy testing. Results: 19 patients had oral lichen planus, 19 patients had oral lichenoid lesions and 11 patients had generalised stomatitis. 38.8% had contact allergy. Xerostomia was significantly more common and severe in patients (46...... in the chewing stimulated saliva samples from patients when compared to healthy controls. The differences were not significant and they were irrespective of the presence of contact allergy. Conclusion: Xerostomia is prevalent in patients with oral lichen planus, lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis...

  9. Ulcerative Uremic Stomatitis - Review of the Literature and A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantala Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uremic Stomatitis (US represents a comparatively uncommon intraoral complication seen, mostly, in cases of end-stage renal disease or undiagnosed or untreated chronic renal failure. Its frequency has diminished due to the advent of renal dialysis. Clinically uremic stomatitis is characterized by the presence of painful plaques and crusts that are usually distributed on the buccal and labial mucosa, dorsal or ventral surface of the tongue, gingiva, and floor of the mouth. Ultimate treatment consists of improvement of blood urea concentration and underlying renal failure is supported by enhancement of oral hygiene with antiseptic mouthwashes and antimicrobial/antifungal agents, if necessary. Here we report a rare case of ulcerative type of uremic stomatitis occurring in a patient of chronic renal failure due to sudden relapse of uremia and reviewed the possible pathophysiology of oral symptoms of chronic renal failure.

  10. Guard cell sensory systems: recent insights on stomatal responses to light, abscisic acid, and CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, Sarah M; Jegla, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    By controlling the opening and closure of the stomatal pores through which gas exchange occurs, guard cells regulate two of the most important plant physiological processes: photosynthesis and transpiration. Accordingly, guard cells have evolved exquisite sensory systems. Here we summarize recent literature on guard cell sensing of light, drought (via the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA)), and CO2. New advances in our understanding of how guard cells satisfy the energetic and osmotic requirements of stomatal opening and utilize phosphorylation to regulate the anion channels and aquaporins involved in ABA-stimulated stomatal closure are highlighted. Omics and modeling approaches are providing new information that will ultimately allow an integrated understanding of guard cell physiology. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Solar Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    ARCO Solar manufactures PV Systems tailored to a broad variety of applications. PV arrays are routinely used at remote communications installations to operate large microwave repeaters, TV and radio repeaters rural telephone, and small telemetry systems that monitor environmental conditions. Also used to power agricultural water pumping systems, to provide electricity for isolated villages and medical clinics, for corrosion protection for pipelines and bridges, to power railroad signals, air/sea navigational aids, and for many types of military systems. ARCO is now moving into large scale generation for utilities.

  12. Gluten sensitivity enteropathy in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davatchi Fereydoun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gluten sensitive enteropathy (GSE is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing grains in susceptible individuals. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS may be the sole manifestation of GSE. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of gluten sensitivity enteropathy (GSE in a large group of patients with RAS and assess the efficacy of gluten free diet (GFD on the improvement of aphthous lesions in those who were diagnosed with GSE. Methods Two hundred and forty seven patients with RAS were included. The patients had at least three aphthous attacks per year. Patients were screened by IgA anti-endomysial antibody (EMA, IgA anti tissue transglutaminase (TTG and serum IgA level. Those with a positive serology underwent endoscopic biopsies of the duodenal mucosa and patients with negative serology were excluded. The diagnosis of GSE was based on a positive serological test and abnormal duodenal histology. For patients with GSE, gluten free diet was recommended. Results Six out of 247 RAS patients had positive TTG test alone, and one had positive EMA and TTG. All 7 patients with positive serologic tests underwent duodenal biopsies. Histological findings were compatible with GSE in all of them (Marsh I in four patients, Marsh II in two patients and Marsh IIIB in one another.. The mean age of GSE patients was 27.42 ± 10.56 (range, 13 to 40 years old. They were suffering from RAS for an average duration of 4.5 years. All of the 7 GSE patients had not responded to the routine anti-aphthae medications, including topical corticosteroids, tetracycline and colchicine. Four patients who adhered to a strict gluten-free diet showed noticeable improvement in their aphthous lesions over a period of 6 months. Conclusion A significant minority (e.g. 2.83% of RAS patients have GSE. This could be compared with the 0.9% prevalence of GSE in the general population of Iran. This study suggests that evaluation

  13. The grapevine guard cell-related VvMYB60 transcription factor is involved in the regulation of stomatal activity and is differentially expressed in response to ABA and osmotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conti Lucio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under drought, plants accumulate the signaling hormone abscisic acid (ABA, which induces the rapid closure of stomatal pores to prevent water loss. This event is trigged by a series of signals produced inside guard cells which finally reduce their turgor. Many of these events are tightly regulated at the transcriptional level, including the control exerted by MYB proteins. In a previous study, while identifying the grapevine R2R3 MYB family, two closely related genes, VvMYB30 and VvMYB60 were found with high similarity to AtMYB60, an Arabidopsis guard cell-related drought responsive gene. Results Promoter-GUS transcriptional fusion assays showed that expression of VvMYB60 was restricted to stomatal guard cells and was attenuated in response to ABA. Unlike VvMYB30, VvMYB60 was able to complement the loss-of-function atmyb60-1 mutant, indicating that VvMYB60 is the only true ortholog of AtMYB60 in the grape genome. In addition, VvMYB60 was differentially regulated during development of grape organs and in response to ABA and drought-related stress conditions. Conclusions These results show that VvMYB60 modulates physiological responses in guard cells, leading to the possibility of engineering stomatal conductance in grapevine, reducing water loss and helping this species to tolerate drought under extreme climatic conditions.

  14. Biomedical signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Akay, Metin

    1994-01-01

    Sophisticated techniques for signal processing are now available to the biomedical specialist! Written in an easy-to-read, straightforward style, Biomedical Signal Processing presents techniques to eliminate background noise, enhance signal detection, and analyze computer data, making results easy to comprehend and apply. In addition to examining techniques for electrical signal analysis, filtering, and transforms, the author supplies an extensive appendix with several computer programs that demonstrate techniques presented in the text.

  15. Canopy Stomatal Conductance Unlocks Partitioning of Ecosystem-Atmosphere Carbon and Water Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R. A.; Munger, J. W.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Stomata are a key nexus in biosphere-atmosphere interactions: the gateway for both carbon gain and water loss by plant canopies. Accurate quantification of canopy stomatal conductance enables partitioning of both evapotranspiration (ET) and net ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE)—the latter via CO2 isotope flux measurements. To those ends, we determined the behavior of canopy stomatal conductance in a temperate deciduous forest based on heat and water vapor flux measurements, and validated that determination based on uptake of carbonyl sulfide, which also passes through the stomata. We found that the canopy stomatal conductance followed a simple empirical function of leaf area index, light intensity, diffuse light fraction, and leaf-air water vapor gradient. The dependence on light intensity was highly linear, in contrast to the leaf scale, and in contrast to the behavior of canopy photosynthesis. Using canopy stomatal conductance, we partitioned ET and found that evaporation in this ecosystem peaks at the time of the year when soils are driest and atmospheric vapor pressure deficit is low—because soil temperature is an important driver. As stomatal conductance impacts not only the rate of photosynthesis but also the fractionation of carbon isotopes by photosynthesis, we were also able to combine canopy stomatal conductance with CO2 isotope flux measurements in order to partition NEE. We found that: (1) canopy respiration is much less during the day than at night, likely due to the inhibition of leaf respiration by light (that is, the Kok effect), and (2) canopy photosynthetic light-use efficiency does not decline through the summer, in contrast to standard estimates. These results clarify how leaf-level physiological dynamics impact ecosystem-atmosphere gas exchange, and demonstrate the utility of combining multiple tracers to constrain the processes underlying that exchange.

  16. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  17. Stomata prioritize their responses to multiple biotic and abiotic signal inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Ou

    Full Text Available Stomata are microscopic pores in leaf epidermis that regulate gas exchange between plants and the environment. Being natural openings on the leaf surface, stomata also serve as ports for the invasion of foliar pathogenic bacteria. Each stomatal pore is enclosed by a pair of guard cells that are able to sense a wide spectrum of biotic and abiotic stresses and respond by precisely adjusting the pore width. However, it is not clear whether stomatal responses to simultaneously imposed biotic and abiotic signals are mutually dependent on each other. Here we show that a genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain DH5α could trigger stomatal closure in Vicia faba, an innate immune response that might depend on NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS burst. DH5α-induced stomatal closure could be abolished or disguised under certain environmental conditions like low [CO2], darkness, and drought, etc. Foliar spraying of high concentrations of ABA could reduce stomatal aperture in high humidity-treated faba bean plants. Consistently, the aggressive multiplication of DH5α bacteria in Vicia faba leaves under high humidity could be alleviated by exogenous application of ABA. Our data suggest that a successful colonization of bacteria on the leaf surface is correlated with stomatal aperture regulation by a specific set of environmental factors.

  18. Stomatal kinetics and photosynthetic gas exchange along a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric regulation of plant water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick C. Meinzer; Duncan D. Smith; David R. Woodruff; Danielle E. Marias; Katherine A. McCulloh; Ava R. Howard; Alicia L. Magedman

    2017-01-01

    Species’ differences in the stringency of stomatal control of plant water potential represent a continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviours. However, little is known about how quasi-steady-state stomatal regulation of water potential may relate to dynamic behaviour of stomata and photosynthetic gas exchange in species operating at different positions along this...

  19. Calculated chiral and magneto-electric dichroic signals for copper metaborate (CuB(2)O(4)) in an applied magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, Stephen W; Staub, Urs

    2009-04-08

    Expressions for dichroic signals in terms of electron multipoles have been used to analyse optical data gathered on a crystal of copper metaborate in the presence of a magnetic field. Calculated signals comply with the established crystal and magnetic structures of CuB(2)O(4), and respect the global symmetries of parity-even and parity-odd dichroic signals in full. We have success in describing five different experiments in total. The claim by Saito et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 117402) that they observe magnetic control of crystal chirality in one of their five experiments is challenged.

  20. Hypofunction of the Sympathetic Nervous System as a Possible Etiologic Cause of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Present, Steven I; Check, Jerome H

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common disorder of the oral mucosa. The symptoms can range from a minor nuisance to severe forms that can be extremely debilitating. Two cases of chronic aphthous stomatitis are described. The patients sought help to ameliorate vasomotor symptoms. A diagnosis of sympathetic nervous system hypofunction was established. Treatment was aimed at restoring normal sympathetic function by the administration of dextroamphetamine sulfate. Since the patients have been on the amphetamine salts, neither their vasomotor symptoms nor their aphthous lesions have returned. Hypofunction of the sympathetic nervous system should be considered as a possible etiologic factor in patients with recurrent oral ulcers when not associated with known systemic diseases.

  1. Plasticity in stomatal size and density of potato leaves under different irrigation and phosphorus regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yanqi; Yan, Fei; Cui, Xiaoyong

    2014-01-01

    The morphological features of stomata including their size and density could be modulated by environmental cues; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, the effect of different irrigation and phosphorus (P) regimes on stomatal size (SS) and stomatal density (SD) of potato...... leaves was investigated. The plants were grown in split-root pots under two P fertilization rates (viz., 0 and 100mgkg-1 soil, denoted as P0 and P1, respectively) and subjected to full (FI), deficit (DI), and partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation regimes. Results showed that SS and SD were...

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Generated by l-Cysteine Desulfhydrase Acts Upstream of Nitric Oxide to Modulate Abscisic Acid-Dependent Stomatal Closure1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuffi, Denise; Álvarez, Consolación; Laspina, Natalia; Gotor, Cecilia; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mata, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a well-studied regulator of stomatal movement. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a small signaling gas molecule involved in key physiological processes in mammals, has been recently reported as a new component of the ABA signaling network in stomatal guard cells. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), H2S is enzymatically produced in the cytosol through the activity of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES1). In this work, we used DES1 knockout Arabidopsis mutant plants (des1) to study the participation of DES1 in the cross talk between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) in the ABA-dependent signaling network in guard cells. The results show that ABA did not close the stomata in isolated epidermal strips of des1 mutants, an effect that was restored by the application of exogenous H2S. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that ABA induces DES1 expression in guard cell-enriched RNA extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, stomata from isolated epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ABA receptor mutant pyrabactin-resistant1 (pyr1)/pyrabactin-like1 (pyl1)/pyl2/pyl4 close in response to exogenous H2S, suggesting that this gasotransmitter is acting downstream, although acting independently of the ABA receptor cannot be ruled out with this data. However, the Arabidopsis clade-A PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE2C mutant abscisic acid-insensitive1 (abi1-1) does not close the stomata when epidermal strips were treated with H2S, suggesting that H2S required a functional ABI1. Further studies to unravel the cross talk between H2S and NO indicate that (1) H2S promotes NO production, (2) DES1 is required for ABA-dependent NO production, and (3) NO is downstream of H2S in ABA-induced stomatal closure. Altogether, data indicate that DES1 is a unique component of ABA signaling in guard cells. PMID:25266633

  3. Arabidopsis Phospholipase C3 is Involved in Lateral Root Initiation and ABA Responses in Seed Germination and Stomatal Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wijk, Ringo van; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Roels, Wendy; Schooten, Bas van; Vermeer, Joop E M; Zarza, Xavier; Guardia, Aisha; Scuffi, Denise; García-Mata, Carlos; Laha, Debabrata; Williams, Phoebe; Willems, Leo A J; Ligterink, Wilco; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Gillaspy, Glenda; Schaaf, Gabriel; Haring, Michel A; Laxalt, Ana M; Munnik, Teun

    2017-12-22

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is well known for its role in animal signaling, where it generates the second messengers, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) by hydrolyzing the minor phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) upon receptor stimulation. In plants, PLC's role is still unclear, especially because the primary targets of these second messengers are lacking, i.e. the ligand-gated Ca2+ channel and protein kinase C, but also because PIP2 levels are extremely low. Nonetheless, the Arabidopsis genome encodes 9 PLCs. We used a reversed-genetic approach to explore PLC's function in Arabidopsis and report here that PLC3 is required for proper root development, seed germination and stomatal opening. Two independent knock-down mutants, plc3-2 and plc3-3, were found to exhibit reduced lateral root densities by 10-20%. Mutant seeds germinated slower but were less sensitive to ABA to prevent germination. Guard cells of plc3 were also compromised in ABA-dependent stomatal closure. Promoter-GUS analyses confirmed PLC3 expression in guard cells and germinating seeds, and revealed that the majority is expressed in vascular tissue, most likely phloem companion cells, i.e. in roots, leaves and flowers. In vivo 32Pi-labeling revealed that ABA stimulated the formation of PIP2 in germinating seeds and guard cell-enriched leaf peels, which was significantly reduced in plc3 mutants. Overexpression of PLC3 had no effect on root system architecture or seed germination, but increased the plant's tolerance to drought. Our results provide genetic evidence for PLC's involvement in plant development and ABA signaling, and confirm earlier observations that overexpression increases drought tolerance. Potential molecular mechanisms for the above observations are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Results of the Study of Helminths-Carrying as a Comorbidity in Children with Herpetic Stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Suerkulov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the helminths-carrying in children with herpetic stomatitis according to the data of the department of maxillofacial surgery of the National center of mother and child welfare, and determines the relationship of oral diseases with disorders of various parts of the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Irreversible fate commitment in the Arabidopsis stomatal lineage requires a Fama and Retinoblastoma-related module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matos, J.L.; Lau, O.S.; Hachez, C.; Cruz-Ramirez, A.; Scheres, B.; Bergmann, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    The presumed totipotency of plant cells leads to questions about how specific stem cell lineages and terminal fates could be established. In the Arabidopsis stomatal lineage, a transient self-renewing phase creates precursors that differentiate into one of two epidermal cell types, guard cells or

  6. Co-ordination of hydraulic and stomatal conductances across light qualities in cucumber leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savvides, A.; Fanourakis, D.; Ieperen, van W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term effects of light quality on leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) and stomatal conductance (gs) were studied in cucumber, and their joint impact on leaf photosynthesis in response to osmotic-induced water stress was assessed. Plants were grown under low intensity monochromatic red (R, 640

  7. Global CO2 rise leads to reduced maximum stomatal conductance in Florida vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertsma, E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314841814; de Boer, H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314411089; Dekker, S.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203449827; Dilcher, D.L.; Lotter, A.F.; Wagner-Cremer, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/173870783

    2011-01-01

    A principle response of C3 plants to increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (CO2) is to reduce transpirational water loss by decreasing stomatal conductance (gs) and simultaneously increase assimilation rates. Via this adaptation, vegetation has the ability to alter hydrology and climate.

  8. Fulminant presentation of oral mucosal leishmaniasis as severe stomatitis and periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, M. H. T.; Stijnis, C.; Nolte, J. W.; Bart, A.; Croonen, S. L.; de Lange, J.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2018-01-01

    This case report shows an atypical presentation of mucosal leishmaniasis infantum in the oral cavity resulting in severe stomatitis and periodontitis. The patient was immunocompromised because of rheumatoid arthritis for which he used prednisone and methotrexate. He was treated with intravenous

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  10. Comparison of arabidopsis stomatal density mutants indicates variation in water stress responses and potential epistatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneka S. Lawson; Paula M. Pijut; Charles H. Michler

    2014-01-01

    Recent physiological analysis of Arabidopsis stomatal density (SD) mutants indicated that SD was not the major factor controlling aboveground biomass accumulation. Despite the general theory that plants with fewer stomata have limited biomass acquisition capabilities, epf1 and several other Arabidopsis mutants varied significantly in leaf fresh...

  11. Using Plant Temperature to Evaluate the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Soil Moisture Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Han Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant temperature is an indicator of stomatal conductance, which reflects soil moisture stresses. We explored the relationship between plant temperature and soil moisture to optimize irrigation schedules in a water-stress experiment using Firmiana platanifolia (L. f. Marsili in an incubator. Canopy temperature, leaf temperature, and stomatal conductance were measured using thermal imaging and a porometer. The results indicated that (1 stomatal conductance decreased with declines in soil moisture, and reflected average canopy temperature; (2 the variation of the leaf temperature distribution was a reliable indicator of soil moisture stress, and the temperature distribution in severely water-stressed leaves exhibited greater spatial variation than that in the presence of sufficient irrigation; (3 thermal indices (Ig and crop water stress index (CWSI were theoretically proportional to stomatal conductance (gs, Ig was certified to have linearity relationship with gs and CWSI have a logarithmic relationship with gs, and both of the two indices can be used to estimate soil moisture; and (4 thermal imaging data can reflect water status irrespective of long-term water scarcity or lack of sudden rainfall. This study applied thermal imaging methods to monitor plants and develop adaptable irrigation scheduling, which are important for the formulation of effective and economical agriculture and forestry policy.

  12. Optimal stomatal conductance in relation to photosynthesis in climatically contrasting Eucalyptus species under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroult, Arnaud; Lin, Yan-Shih; Bourne, Aimee; Medlyn, Belinda E; Ellsworth, David S

    2013-02-01

    Models of stomatal conductance (g(s)) are based on coupling between g(s) and CO(2) assimilation (A(net)), and it is often assumed that the slope of this relationship ('g(1) ') is constant across species. However, if different plant species have adapted to different access costs of water, then there will be differences in g(1) among species. We hypothesized that g(1) should vary among species adapted to different climates, and tested the theory and its linkage to plant hydraulics using four Eucalyptus species from different climatic origins in a common garden. Optimal stomatal theory predicts that species from sub-humid zones have a lower marginal water cost of C gain, hence lower g(1) than humid-zone species. In agreement with the theory that g(1) is related to tissue carbon costs for water supply, we found a relationship between wood density and g(1) across Eucalyptus species of contrasting climatic origins. There were significant reductions in the parameter g(1) during drought in humid but not sub-humid species, with the latter group maintaining g(1) in drought. There are strong differences in stomatal behaviour among related tree species in agreement with optimal stomatal theory, and these differences are consistent with the economics involved in water uptake and transport for carbon gain. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Stomatal vs. genome size in angiosperms: the somatic tail wagging the genomic dog?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodgson, J.G.; Sharafi, M.; Jalili, A.; Diaz, S.; Montserrat-Marti, G.; Palmer, C.; Cerabolini, B.; Pierce, S.; Hamzehee, B.; Asri, Y.; Jamzad, Z.; Wilson, P.; Zarrinkamar, F.; Raven, J.; Band, S.R.; Basconcelo, S.; Bogard, A.; Carter, G.; Charles, M.; Castro-Diez, P.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Funes, G.; Jones, M.; Khoshnevis, M.; Perez-Harguindeguy, N.; Perez-Rontome, M.C.; Shirvany, F.A.; Vendramini, F.; Yazdani, S.; Abbas-Azimi, R.; Boustani, S.; Dehghan, M.; Hynd, F.A.; Kowsary, E.; Kazemi-Saeed, F.; Siavash, B.; Villar-Salvador, P.; Cragie, R.; Naqinezhad, A.; Romo-Diez, A.; De Torres Espuny, L.; Simmons, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size is a function, and the product, of cell volume. As such it is contingent on ecological circumstance. The nature of 'this ecological circumstance' is, however, hotly debated. Here, we investigate for angiosperms whether stomatal size may be this 'missing link': the

  14. Aerobic bacteria in oral cavity of Lancehead snakes (Bothrops atrox with stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Castro Pereira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stomatitis is a common disease found on snake farms, and Gram-negative bacilli are the main etiological agents that play an important role as secondary sources of viral or parasitic infections. The purpose of this work was to identify the aerobic bacteria in the oral cavity of Bothrops atrox with stomatitis. Samples for microbiological examination were collected from 12 snakes bred on a commercial snake farm for venom extraction. Samples of the secretion in the oral cavity of each serpent presenting stomatitis were collected from fang sheath, using a cotton swab with sterile alginate. The samples were incubated and cultured on Petri dishes containing blood agar and XLD agar using the agar depletion technique. Bacterial growth occurred in all analyzed samples collected from the oral cavity of Bothrops atrox with stomatitis, and some of the samples contained more than one microorganism. The following Gram-negative bacteria were isolated: Escherichia coli (26.31%, Citrobacter spp. (21.05%, Proteus spp. (15.78% and Salmonella spp. (10.52%. The only Gram-positive bacterium that was isolated was Staphylococcus spp., which was present in 26.31% of the analyzed samples.

  15. Effect of cold storage on stomatal functionality, water relations and flower performance in cut roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, Ernst J.; Paillart, Maxence J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Symptoms of water stress are the most frequent cause for the “end of vase life” in prior stored roses. It was hypothesized that dark storage may alter the stomatal functionality and may cause water balance problems during the subsequent vase life period. The effect of short- and long-term storage

  16. Stomatal conductance, canopy temperature, and leaf area index estimation using remote sensing and OBIA techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Panda; D.M. Amatya; G. Hoogenboom

    2014-01-01

    Remotely sensed images including LANDSAT, SPOT, NAIP orthoimagery, and LiDAR and relevant processing tools can be used to predict plant stomatal conductance (gs), leaf area index (LAI), and canopy temperature, vegetation density, albedo, and soil moisture using vegetation indices like normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) or soil adjusted...

  17. Effect of Relative Air Himidity on the Stomatal Functionality in Fully Developed Leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Matkaris, N.; Heuvelink, E.; Carvalho, S.M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that stomata developed under long-term high relative air humidity (RH =85%) are malfunctional, resulting in a poor control of water loss. Yet, little is known about the dynamics of stomatal adaptation to moderate RH, and the possibilities to improve or reverse the

  18. Stomatal design principles for gas exchange in synthetic and real leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Haaning, Katrine; Boyce, C. Kevin; Zwieniecki, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    Stomata are portals in plant leaves that control gas exchange for photosynthesis, a process fundamental to life on Earth. Gas fluxes and plant productivity depend on external factors such as light, water, and CO2 availability and on geometric properties of the stomata pores. The link between stomata geometry and environmental factors have informed a wide range of scientific fields - from agriculture to climate science, where observed variations in stomata size and density is used to infer prehistoric atmospheric CO2 content. However, the physical mechanisms and design principles responsible for major trends in stomatal patterning, are not well understood. Here we use a combination of biomimetic experiments and theory to rationalize the observed changes in stomatal geometry. We show that the observed correlations between stomatal size and density are consistent with the hypothesis that plants favor efficient use of space and maximum control of dynamic gas conductivity, and - surprisingly - that the capacity for gas exchange in plants has remained constant over at least the last 325 million years. Our analysis provides a new measure to gauge the relative performance of species based on their stomatal characteristics. Supported by the Carlsberg Foundation (2013-01-0449), VILLUM FONDEN (13166) and the National Science Foundation (EAR-1024041).

  19. Dynamics of adaptation of stomatal behaviour to moderate or high relative air humidity in Tradescantia virginiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei Nejad, A.; Meeteren, van U.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was used to measure stomatal closure in response to desiccation of Tradescantia virginiana leaves grown under high (90%) and moderate (55%) relative humidities (RHs), or transferred between these humidities. Stomata in leaves grown at high RH were less responsive to

  20. Stomatal response characteristics as affected by long-term elevated humidity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Restriction of leaf water loss, by stomatal closure, is decisive for plant survival, especially under conditions of water deficit. This sensitivity of stomata to low water potential is attenuated by high relative air humidity (RH ≥ 85%) during growth, which impedes the plant’s ability to

  1. TNF-mediated survival of CD169(+) cells promotes immune activation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain ...

  2. Evaluating stomatal models and their atmospheric drought response in a land surface scheme: A multibiome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauer, Jürgen; Werner, Christiane; Zaehle, Sönke

    2015-10-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key variable in Earth system models as it regulates the transfer of carbon and water between the terrestrial biosphere and the lower atmosphere. Various approaches have been developed that aim for a simple representation of stomatal regulation applicable at the global scale. These models differ, among others, in their response to atmospheric humidity, which induces stomatal closure in a dry atmosphere. In this study, we compared the widely used empirical Ball-Berry and Leuning stomatal conductance models to an alternative empirical approach, an optimization-based approach, and a semimechanistic hydraulic model. We evaluated these models using evapotranspiration (ET) and gross primary productivity (GPP) observations derived from eddy covariance measurements at 56 sites across multiple biomes and climatic conditions. The different models were embedded in the land surface model JSBACH. Differences in performance across plant functional types or climatic conditions were small, partly owing to the large variations in the observational data. The models yielded comparable results at low to moderate atmospheric drought but diverged under dry atmospheric conditions, where models with a low sensitivity to air humidity tended to overestimate gs. The Ball-Berry model gave the best fit to the data for most biomes and climatic conditions, but all evaluated approaches have proven adequate for use in land surface models. Our findings further encourage future efforts toward a vegetation-type-specific parameterization of gs to improve the modeling of coupled terrestrial carbon and water dynamics.

  3. Adjustments in hydraulic architecture of Pinus palustris maintain similar stomatal conductance in xerix and mesic habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.N. Addington; L.A. Donovan; R.J. Mitchell; J.M. Vose; S.D. Pecot; S.B. Jack; U.G. Hacke; J.S. Sperry; R. Oren

    2006-01-01

    We investigated relationships between whole-tree hydranlic architecture and stomatal conductance in Pinus palustris Mill. (longleaf pine) across habitats that differed in soil properties and habitat structure. Trees occupying a xeric habitat (characterized by sandy, well-drained soils, higher nitrogen availability and lower overstory tree density)...

  4. Gaseous NO2 effects on stomatal behavior, photosynthesis and respiration of hybrid poplar leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we used poplar as a model plant and investigated the effects of gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2, 4 microliter per liter) on stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, dark- and photorespiration of Populus alba x Populus berolinensis hybrid leaves using the photosynthesis system and scanning...

  5. Oral hygiene habits, denture plaque, presence of yeasts and stomatitis in institutionalised elderly in Lothian, Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C; Cumming, C

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation between oral hygiene habits, denture plaque, presence of yeasts and stomatitis in institutionalised elderly. A sample of 201 residents, 48-99 yr of age (mean age 82 yr), was selected from four different institutions in Lothian, Scotland...

  6. Clustered Stomates in "Begonia": An Exercise in Data Collection & Statistical Analysis of Biological Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Joann M.; Korn, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a laboratory exercise in data collection and statistical analysis in biological space using clustered stomates on leaves of "Begonia" plants. The exercise can be done in middle school classes by students making their own slides and seeing imprints of cells, or at the high school level through collecting data of…

  7. The response of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance to rising [CO2]: mechanisms and environmental interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Rogers, Alistair

    2007-03-01

    This review summarizes current understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the response of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance to elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]), and examines how downstream processes and environmental constraints modulate these two fundamental responses. The results from free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments were summarized via meta-analysis to quantify the mean responses of stomatal and photosynthetic parameters to elevated [CO2]. Elevation of [CO2] in FACE experiments reduced stomatal conductance by 22%, yet, this reduction was not associated with a similar change in stomatal density. Elevated [CO2] stimulated light-saturated photosynthesis (Asat) in C3 plants grown in FACE by an average of 31%. However, the magnitude of the increase in Asat varied with functional group and environment. Functional groups with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)-limited photosynthesis at elevated [CO2] had greater potential for increases in Asat than those where photosynthesis became ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RubP)-limited at elevated [CO2]. Both nitrogen supply and sink capacity modulated the response of photosynthesis to elevated [CO2] through their impact on the acclimation of carboxylation capacity. Increased understanding of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which plants respond to elevated [CO2], and the feedback of environmental factors upon them, will improve our ability to predict ecosystem responses to rising [CO2] and increase our potential to adapt crops and managed ecosystems to future atmospheric [CO2].

  8. Acidic mist reduces foliar membrane-associated calcium and impairs stomatal responsiveness in red spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borer, C. H.; DeHayes, D. H. [University of Vermont, Rubinstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, Burlington, VT (United States); Schaberg, P. G. [USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station, South Burlington, VT (United States)

    2005-06-01

    The possibility of impairment of stomatal responsiveness due to acidic mist-induced depletion of foliar membrane calcium (mCa) was investigated by exposing red spruce seedlings to either pH 3.0 or pH 5.0 mist treatments for one growing season. Foliar nutrition was assessed following each treatment, and declines in stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis were measured on current year shoots following stem excision. Seedlings subjected to pH 3.0 acidic mist treatment had reduced mCa, and exhibited impaired stomatal function, including a smaller maximum aperture, slower closure, increased lag time between stomatal closure and photosynthetic decline following experimental water stress, relative to seedling treated with pH 5.0 acidic mist. The evidence supports the hypothesis that anthropogenetically caused depletion of mCa may disrupt physiological processes that depend on foliar Ca, in the process reducing the plants ability to respond adaptively to environmental stresses. 69 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  9. A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae effector, XopR, associates with receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases and suppresses PAMP-triggered stomatal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangfeng; Sun, Jianhang; Fan, Fenggui; Tan, Zhaoyun; Zou, Yanmin; Lu, Dongping

    2016-09-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) play important roles in plant immunity signaling; thus, many are hijacked by pathogen effectors to promote successful pathogenesis. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the causal agent of rice leaf blight disease. The strain PXO99A has 18 non-TAL (transcription activation-like) effectors; however, their mechanisms of action and host target proteins remain largely unknown. Although the effector XopR from the Xoo strain MAFF311018 was shown to suppress PAMP-triggered immune responses in Arabidopsis, its target has not yet been identified. Here, we show that PXO99A XopR interacts with BIK1 at the plasma membrane. BIK1 is a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase (RLCK) belonging to the RLK family of proteins and mediates PAMP-triggered stomatal immunity. In turn, BIK1 phosphorylates XopR. Furthermore, XopR suppresses PAMP-triggered stomatal closure in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing XopR. In addition, XopR is able to associate with RLCKs other than BIK1. These results suggest that XopR likely suppresses plant immunity by targeting BIK1 and other RLCKs.

  10. Assessment of serum enzymatic antioxidant levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ishita; Shetti, Arvind; Keluskar, Vaishali; Bagewadi, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disorder characterized by recurrent, painful oral aphthae. Despite extensive research, the exact etiology of RAS remains elusive. Recently oxidant-antioxidant imbalance of the body has been implicated in the pathogenesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the enzymatic antioxidant levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Materials and Methods. The serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were measured in 30 patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis and compared to the control group, which included 30 healthy subjects. Student's t-test was performed for statistical evaluation. Results. The mean levels of superoxide dismutase (130.2 ± 15.94 U/mL) and glutathione peroxidase (3527.93 ± 488.32 U/L) were found to be significantly lower in study group as compared to control group (211.9 ± 20.93 U/mL, 8860.93 ± 1105.31 U/L, resp.) (P = 0.000) while level of catalase in study group was significantly higher when compared to control group (10981.00 ± 1018.07 U/mL versus 9764.00 ± 1621.19 U/mL) (P = 0.000). Conclusion. Enzymatic antioxidant system is impaired in recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients and seems to play a crucial role in its pathogenesis.

  11. Assessment of Serum Enzymatic Antioxidant Levels in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is a common oral mucosal disorder characterized by recurrent, painful oral aphthae. Despite extensive research, the exact etiology of RAS remains elusive. Recently oxidant-antioxidant imbalance of the body has been implicated in the pathogenesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the enzymatic antioxidant levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Materials and Methods. The serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT were measured in 30 patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis and compared to the control group, which included 30 healthy subjects. Student’s t-test was performed for statistical evaluation. Results. The mean levels of superoxide dismutase (130.2 ± 15.94 U/mL and glutathione peroxidase (3527.93 ± 488.32 U/L were found to be significantly lower in study group as compared to control group (211.9 ± 20.93 U/mL, 8860.93 ± 1105.31 U/L, resp. (P=0.000 while level of catalase in study group was significantly higher when compared to control group (10981.00 ± 1018.07 U/mL versus 9764.00 ± 1621.19 U/mL (P=0.000. Conclusion. Enzymatic antioxidant system is impaired in recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients and seems to play a crucial role in its pathogenesis.

  12. Ultrastructure of stomatal development in early-divergent angiosperms reveals contrasting patterning and pre-patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudall, Paula J.; Knowles, Emma V. W.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Angiosperm stomata consistently possess a pair of guard cells, but differ between taxa in the patterning and developmental origin of neighbour cells. Developmental studies of phylogenetically pivotal taxa are essential as comparative yardsticks for understanding the evolution of stomatal development. Methods We present a novel ultrastructural study of developing stomata in leaves of Amborella (Amborellales), Nymphaea and Cabomba (Nymphaeales), and Austrobaileya and Schisandra (Austrobaileyales), representing the three earliest-divergent lineages of extant angiosperms (the ANITA-grade). Key Results Alternative developmental pathways occur in early-divergent angiosperms, resulting partly from differences in pre-patterning and partly from the presence or absence of highly polarized (asymmetric) mitoses in the stomatal cell lineage. Amplifying divisions are absent from ANITA-grade taxa, indicating that ostensible similarities with the stomatal patterning of Arabidopsis are superficial. In Amborella, ‘squared’ pre-patterning occurs in intercostal regions, with groups of four protodermal cells typically arranged in a rectangle; most guard-mother cells are formed by asymmetric division of a precursor cell (the mesoperigenous condition) and are typically triangular or trapezoidal. In contrast, water-lily stomata are always perigenous (lacking asymmetric divisions). Austrobaileya has occasional ‘giant’ stomata. Conclusions Similar mature stomatal phenotypes can result from contrasting morphogenetic factors, although the results suggest that paracytic stomata are invariably the product of at least one asymmetric division. Loss of asymmetric divisions in stomatal development could be a significant factor in land plant evolution, with implications for the diversity of key structural and physiological pathways. PMID:23969762

  13. Seasonal stomatal behavior of a common desert shrub and the influence of plant neighbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Heather; Ogle, Kiona

    2015-02-01

    Stomata simultaneously regulate plant carbon gain and water loss, and patterns of stomatal conductance (g(s)) provide insight into water use strategies. In arid systems, g(s) varies seasonally based on factors such as water availability and temperature. Moreover, the presence and species identity of neighboring plants likely affects g(s) of the focal plant by altering available soil water and microclimate conditions. We investigated stomatal behavior in Larrea tridentata, a drought-tolerant, evergreen shrub occurring throughout the arid southwestern United States. We measured g(s) in Larrea over multiple seasons in the presence of neighbors representing different woody species. The data were analyzed in the context of a commonly used phenomenological model that relates g(s) to vapor pressure deficit (D) to understand spatial and temporal differences in stomatal behavior. We found that g(s) in Larrea was affected by neighborhood association, and these effects varied seasonally. The greatest effect of neighborhood association on g(s) occurred during the winter period, where Larrea growing alone (without neighbors) had higher g(s) compared to Larrea growing with neighbors. Larrea's stomatal sensitivity to D and reference conductance (i.e., g(s) at D = 1 kPa) also differed significantly among different neighbor associations. Random effects indicated reference g(s) varied over short time scales (daily), while stomatal sensitivity showed little daily or seasonal variation, but was notably affected by neighbor associations such that neighboring species, especially trees, reduced Larrea's sensitivity to D. Overall, seasonal dynamics and neighborhood conditions appear critical to understanding temporal and spatial variation in Larrea's physiological behavior.

  14. Ozone exposure causes a decoupling of conductance and photosynthesis: implications for the Ball-Berry stomatal conductance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardozzi, Danica; Sparks, Jed P; Bonan, Gordon; Levis, Samuel

    2012-07-01

    Industrialization has significantly altered atmospheric chemistry by increasing concentrations of chemicals such as nitrogen oxides (NO( x )) and volatile organic carbon, which react in the presence of sunlight to produce tropospheric ozone (O(3)). Ozone is a powerful oxidant that causes both visual and physiological damage to plants, impairing the ability of the plant to control processes like photosynthesis and transpiration. Damage to photosynthesis and stomatal conductance does not always occur at the same rate, which generates a problem when using the Ball-Berry model to predict stomatal conductance because the calculations directly rely on photosynthesis rates. The goals of this work were to develop a modeling framework to modify Ball-Berry stomatal conductance predictions independently of photosynthesis and to test the framework using experimental data. After exposure to elevated O(3) in open-top chambers, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in tulip poplar changed at different rates through time. We were able to accurately model observed photosynthetic and stomatal conductance responses to chronic O(3) exposure in a Ball-Berry framework by adjusting stomatal conductance in addition to photosynthesis. This led to a significant improvement in the modeled ability to predict both photosynthesis and stomatal conductance responses to O(3).

  15. Relationships between stomatal behavior, xylem vulnerability to cavitation and leaf water relations in two cultivars of Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, Sergio; Nardini, Andrea; Farinelli, Daniela; Palliotti, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Current understanding of physiological mechanisms governing stomatal behavior under water stress conditions is still incomplete and controversial. It has been proposed that coordination of stomatal kinetics with xylem vulnerability to cavitation [vulnerability curve (VC)] leads to different levels of isohydry/anisohydry in different plant species/cultivars. In this study, this hypothesis is tested in Vitis vinifera cultivars displaying contrasting stomatal behavior under drought stress. The cv Montepulciano (MP, near-isohydric) and Sangiovese (SG, anisohydric) were compared in terms of stomatal response to leaf and stem water potential, as possibly correlated to different petiole hydraulic conductivity (k(petiole)) and VC, as well as to leaf water relations parameters. MP leaves showed almost complete stomatal closure at higher leaf and stem water potentials than SG leaves. Moreover, MP petioles had higher maximum k(petiole) and were more vulnerable to cavitation than SG. Water potential at the turgor loss point was higher in MP than in SG. In SG, the percentage reduction of stomatal conductance (PLg(s)) under water stress was almost linearly correlated with corresponding percentage loss of k(petiole) (PLC), while in MP PLg(s) was less influenced by PLC. Our results suggest that V. vinifera near-isohydric and anisohydric genotypes differ in terms of xylem vulnerability to cavitation as well as in terms of k(petiole) and that the coordination of these traits leads to their different stomatal responses under water stress conditions. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Susceptibility profile of Candida spp. isolated from humans and dogs with stomatitis to the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. form a part of human and animal oral cavity flora. However Candida spp. is the main cause of dental related stomatitis in humans and stomatitis in dogs. Stomatitis treatment implies the use of azoles and polyenes to which yeasts build up resistance. The research is directed to the use of natural compounds such as essential oils. The aim of this paper is to define the antifungal activity of thyme oil on 15 clinical strains of Candida spp., isolated from humans and dogs and to determine if there is a difference in susceptibility between human and dog isolates. Sampling in patients with stomatitis was done by swabbing the denture or oral mucosa swab while sampling in dogs was done by swabbing the oral cavity mucosa after stomatitis has been diagnosed. In order to investigate the antifungal activity of thyme oil in vitro, microdilution method was used. Thyme oil expressed antifungal effects on all investigated strains. Also, our data show that the values of minimum fungicide concentration (MFC and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC are lower in human strains. Explanation is that in most cases, stomatitis in humans is asymptomatic and thus not treated, so Candida strains have not developed resistance. On the other hand, stomatitis in dogs is followed by a marked clinical picture and treated is by antimicotics (mostly by azoles, therefore resistant Candida strains are more likely to occur.

  17. A steady-state stomatal model of balanced leaf gas exchange, hydraulics and maximal source-sink flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölttä, Teemu; Lintunen, Anna; Chan, Tommy; Mäkelä, Annikki; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2017-07-01

    Trees must simultaneously balance their CO2 uptake rate via stomata, photosynthesis, the transport rate of sugars and rate of sugar utilization in sinks while maintaining a favourable water and carbon balance. We demonstrate using a numerical model that it is possible to understand stomatal functioning from the viewpoint of maximizing the simultaneous photosynthetic production, phloem transport and sink sugar utilization rate under the limitation that the transpiration-driven hydrostatic pressure gradient sets for those processes. A key feature in our model is that non-stomatal limitations to photosynthesis increase with decreasing leaf water potential and/or increasing leaf sugar concentration and are thus coupled to stomatal conductance. Maximizing the photosynthetic production rate using a numerical steady-state model leads to stomatal behaviour that is able to reproduce the well-known trends of stomatal behaviour in response to, e.g., light, vapour concentration difference, ambient CO2 concentration, soil water status, sink strength and xylem and phloem hydraulic conductance. We show that our results for stomatal behaviour are very similar to the solutions given by the earlier models of stomatal conductance derived solely from gas exchange considerations. Our modelling results also demonstrate how the 'marginal cost of water' in the unified stomatal conductance model and the optimal stomatal model could be related to plant structural and physiological traits, most importantly, the soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance and soil moisture. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. ALA Inhibits ABA-induced Stomatal Closure via Reducing H2O2 and Ca2+ Levels in Guard Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuyan; Liu, Longbo; Chen, Linghui; Wang, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a newly proved natural plant growth regulator, is well known to improve plant photosynthesis under both normal and stressful conditions. However, its underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Stomatal closure is one of the major limiting factors for photosynthesis and abscisic acid (ABA) is the most important hormone in provoking stomatal closing. Here, we showed that ALA significantly inhibited ABA-induced stomatal closure using wild-type and ALA-overproducing transgenic Arabidopsis (YHem1). We found that ALA decreased ABA-induced H2O2 and cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in guard cells with stomatal bioassay, laser-scanning confocal microscopy and pharmacological methods. The inhibitory effect of ALA on ABA-induced stomatal closure was similar to that of AsA (an important reducing substrate for H2O2 removal), CAT (a H2O2-scavenging enzyme), DPI (an inhibitor of the H2O2-generating NADPH oxidase), EGTA (a Ca-chelating agent), and AlCl3 (an inhibitor of calcium channel). Furthermore, ALA inhibited exogenous H2O2- or Ca2+-induced stomatal closure. Taken together, we conclude that ALA inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure via reducing H2O2, probably by scavenging, and Ca2+ levels in guard cells. Moreover, the inhibitive effect of ALA on ABA-induced stomatal closure was further confirmed in the whole plant. Finally, we demonstrated that ALA inhibits stomatal closing, but significantly improves plant drought tolerance. Our results provide valuable information for the promotion of plant production and development of a sustainable low-carbon society. PMID:27148309

  19. FF-LYNX: Fast and flexible electrical links for data acquisition and distribution of Timing, Trigger and Control signals in future High Energy Physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, G. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Castaldi, R. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fanucci, L. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Magazzu, G., E-mail: Guido.Magazzu@pi.infn.i [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Saponara, S.; Tongiani, C. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Verdini, P.G. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The FF-LYNX project aims at the definition of a flexible protocol that can handle both the distribution of Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) signals and the data acquisition in future High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. The implementation of this protocol in digital interfaces designed and produced in standard CMOS technologies (130 and/or 90 nm) and available as 'IP cores' is also foreseen.

  20. FF-LYNX: Fast and flexible electrical links for data acquisition and distribution of Timing, Trigger and Control signals in future High Energy Physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, G.; Castaldi, R.; Fanucci, L.; Magazzú, G.; Saponara, S.; Tongiani, C.; Verdini, P. G.

    2010-05-01

    The FF-LYNX project aims at the definition of a flexible protocol that can handle both the distribution of Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) signals and the data acquisition in future High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. The implementation of this protocol in digital interfaces designed and produced in standard CMOS technologies (130 and/or 90 nm) and available as "IP cores" is also foreseen.

  1. Reactive Carbonyl Species Mediate ABA Signaling in Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Okuma, Eiji; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Biswas, Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-12-01

    Drought is responsible for a massive reduction in crop yields. In response to drought, plants synthesize the hormone ABA, which induces stomatal closure, thus reducing water loss. In guard cells, ABA triggers production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is mediated by NAD(P)H oxidases. The production of ROS is a key factor for ABA-induced stomatal closure, but it remains to be clarified how the production of ROS is transduced into downstream signaling components in guard cells. We investigated roles of reactive carbonyl species (RCS) in ABA-induced stomatal closure using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) overexpressing Arabidopsis 2-alkenal reductase (AER-OE), which scavenges RCS. ABA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced accumulation of RCS including acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal in wild-type tobacco but not in AER-OE. Stomatal closure and RCS accumulation in response to ABA and H2O2 were inhibited in AER-OE unlike in the wild type, while ABA-induced H2O2 production in guard cells was observed in AER-OE as well as in the wild type. Moreover, ABA inhibited inward-rectifying K(+) channels in wild-type guard cells but not in AER-OE guard cells. These results suggest that RCS is involved in ABA-induced stomatal closure and functions downstream of H2O2 production in the ABA signaling pathway in guard cells. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Immune system and zinc are associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. An assessment using a network-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Rivera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this research was to identify genes, proteins and processes from the biomedical information published on recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS using network-based foci. Methods: The clinical context was defined using MeSH terms for RAS and biomarkers, combined with words associated with risk. A set of protein coding genes was prioritized using the Génie web server and classified with PANTHER. For defining biologically relevant proteins, protein-protein interaction networks were constructed using Reactome database and Cytoscape. Top 20 proteins were then subjected to functional enrichment using STRING. Results: From 1,075,576 gene-abstract links, 1,491 genes were prioritized. Proteins were related to signaling molecule proteins (n=221, receptor proteins (n=221 and nucleic acid binding proteins (n=169. The network constructed with these proteins included 3,963 nodes and functional analysis showed that main processes involved immune system and zinc ion binding function. Conclusions: For the first time, bioinformatics tools were used for integrating pathways and networks associated with RAS. Molecules and processes associated with immune system recur robustly in all analyzed information. The molecular zinc ion binding function could be an area for exploring more specific and effective therapeutic interventions.

  3. Ruxolitinib and Polycation Combination Treatment Overcomes Multiple Mechanisms of Resistance of Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, Sébastien A; Droby, Gaith N; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-08-15

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a promising oncolytic virus (OV). Although VSV is effective against a majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell (PDAC) cell lines, some PDAC cell lines are highly resistant to VSV, and the mechanisms of resistance are still unclear. JAK1/2 inhibitors (such as ruxolitinib and JAK inhibitor I) strongly stimulate VSV replication and oncolysis in all resistant cell lines but only partially improve the susceptibility of resistant PDACs to VSV. VSV tumor tropism is generally dependent on the permissiveness of malignant cells to viral replication rather than on receptor specificity, with several ubiquitously expressed cell surface molecules playing a role in VSV attachment to host cells. However, as VSV attachment to PDAC cells has never been tested before, here we examined if it was possibly inhibited in resistant PDAC cells. Our data show a dramatically weaker attachment of VSV to HPAF-II cells, the most resistant human PDAC cell line. Although sequence analysis of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) mRNA did not reveal any amino acid substitutions in this cell line, HPAF-II cells displayed the lowest level of LDLR expression and dramatically lower LDL uptake. Treatment of cells with various statins strongly increased LDLR expression levels but did not improve VSV attachment or LDL uptake in HPAF-II cells. However, LDLR-independent attachment of VSV to HPAF-II cells was dramatically improved by treating cells with Polybrene or DEAE-dextran. Moreover, combining VSV with ruxolitinib and Polybrene or DEAE-dextran successfully broke the resistance of HPAF-II cells to VSV by simultaneously improving VSV attachment and replication.IMPORTANCE Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is an anticancer approach that uses viruses that selectively infect and kill cancer cells. This study focuses on oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Although VSV is effective against most PDAC

  4. Effects of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbonic anhydrase on stomatal conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakir, D.; Stimler, K.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The potential use of COS as tracer of the gross, one-way, CO2 flux into plants is based on its co-diffusion with CO2 into leaves without outflux stimulated research on COS-CO2 interactions during leaf gas exchange. We carried out gas exchange measurements of COS and CO2 in 22 plant species representing deciduous and evergreen trees, grasses, and shrubs, under a range of light intensities and ambient COS concentrations, using mid IR laser spectroscopy. A narrow range in the normalized ratio of the net uptake rates of COS (As) and CO2 (Ac; As/Ac*[CO2]/[COS]) was observed, with a mean value of 1.61±0.26. These results reflect the dominance of stomatal conductance over both COS and CO2 uptake, imposing a relatively constant ratio between the two fluxes (except under low light conditions when CO2, but not COS, metabolism is light limited). A relatively constant ratio under common ambient conditions will facilitate the application of COS as a tracer of gross photosynthesis from leaf to global scales. However, its effect on stomatal conductance may require a special attention. Increasing COS concentrations between 250 and 2800 pmol mol-1 (enveloping atmospheric levels) seems to stimulate stomatal conductance. We examined the stimulation of conductance by COS in a range of species and show that there is a large variation with some species showing almost no response while others are highly responsive (up to doubling stomatal conductance). Using C3 and C4 plants with antisense lines abolishing carbonic anhydrase activity, we show that the activity of this enzyme is essential for both the uptake of COS and the enhancement of stomatal conductance by COS. Since carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the conversion of COS to CO2 and H2S it seems likely that the stomata are responding to H2S produced in the mesophyll. In all natural species examined the uptake of COS and CO2 were highly correlated, and there was no relationship between the sensitivity of stomata and the rate of COS uptake

  5. Assessing stomatal response to live bacterial cells using whole leaf imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrakar, Reejana; Melotto, Maeli

    2010-10-02

    Stomata are natural openings in the plant epidermis responsible for gas exchange between plant interior and environment. They are formed by a pair of guard cells, which are able to close the stomatal pore in response to a number of external factors including light intensity, carbon dioxide concentration, and relative humidity (RH). The stomatal pore is also the main route for pathogen entry into leaves, a crucial step for disease development. Recent studies have unveiled that closure of the pore is effective in minimizing bacterial disease development in Arabidopsis plants; an integral part of plant innate immunity. Previously, we have used epidermal peels to assess stomatal response to live bacteria (Melotto et al. 2006); however maintaining favorable environmental conditions for both plant epidermal peels and bacterial cells has been challenging. Leaf epidermis can be kept alive and healthy with MES buffer (10 mM KCl, 25 mM MES-KOH, pH 6.15) for electrophysiological experiments of guard cells. However, this buffer is not appropriate for obtaining bacterial suspension. On the other hand, bacterial cells can be kept alive in water which is not proper to maintain epidermal peels for long period of times. When an epidermal peel floats on water, the cells in the peel that are exposed to air dry within 4 hours limiting the timing to conduct the experiment. An ideal method for assessing the effect of a particular stimulus on guard cells should present minimal interference to stomatal physiology and to the natural environment of the plant as much as possible. We, therefore, developed a new method to assess stomatal response to live bacteria in which leaf wounding and manipulation is greatly minimized aiming to provide an easily reproducible and reliable stomatal assay. The protocol is based on staining of intact leaf with propidium iodide (PI), incubation of staining leaf with bacterial suspension, and observation of leaves under laser scanning confocal microscope

  6. Changes in cytosolic pH and calcium of guard cells precede stomatal movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, H R; Gehring, C A; Parish, R W

    1992-03-01

    Stomatal opening is induced by indoleacetic acid (IAA), cytokinins, and fusicoccin (FC), whereas stomatal closure is induced by abscisic acid (ABA). To test the effect of these growth regulators on guard cell cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) and pH (pHcyt), epidermal strips were taken from the lower side of leaves of the orchid Paphiopedilum tonsum and were loaded with acetomethoxy-esterified forms of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 or the pH indicator 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)carboxyfluorescein. Basal [Ca2+]cyt ranged from 0.05 to 0.3 M and was 0.22 +/- 0.015 (n = 21). Increases in both [Ca2+]cyt and pHcyt were observed in guard cells after application of 10-100 M ABA to open stomata, and these preceded stomatal closure. The increase in [Ca2+]cyt ranged from 1.5- to 3-fold and was seen in 7 of 10 experiments. Guard cell alkalinization began within 2 min of ABA treatment and continued for the next 8 min. The increase ranged from 0.04 to 0.3 pH unit and was seen in 13 of 14 experiments. Guard cell [Ca2+]cyt increased, whereas pHcyt decreased after treatment of closed stomata with IAA, kinetin, or FC. In response to 50-100 M IAA, [Ca2+]cyt increased 1.5- to 2-fold in all cases, and pHcyt decreased 0.2-0.4 unit within 5 min in 7 experiments. Within 12 min, 10-100 M kinetin caused [Ca2+]cyt to increase in 28 of 34 experiments (1.3- to 2.5-fold) and pHcyt fell 0.1-0.4 unit in 15 of 17 treatments. The response to 10-50 M FC was similar in both time and magnitude. These results show that stomatal opening is accompanied by an increase in [Ca2+]cyt and cytosolic acidification in the guard cells, whereas stomatal closure is preceded by an increase in [Ca2+]cyt and cytosolic alkalinization in the guard cells. The order of these events is still uncertain, but changes in pHcyt are correlated with stomatal movement, and these changes may be an important factor in the regulation of guard cell movement.

  7. VSV infection is sensed by Drosophila, attenuates nutrient signaling, and thereby activates antiviral autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Sara

    2009-10-01

    Innate immune mechanisms are the first line of defense against pathogens including viruses. This work identifies autophagy, an innate intracellular degradative pathway, as antiviral against Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) in Drosophila. VSV is sensed by cells via the surface glycoprotein leading to the attenuation of the nutrient signaling pathway thereby activating an antiviral autophagic program.

  8. Root respiratory burst oxidase homologue-dependent H2O2 production confers salt tolerance on a grafted cucumber by controlling Na+ exclusion and stomatal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mengliang; Huang, Yuan; Sun, Shitao; Sun, Jingyu; Cao, Haishun; Shabala, Sergey; Bie, Zhilong

    2017-11-14

    Plant salt tolerance can be improved by grafting onto salt-tolerant rootstocks. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we used a range of physiological and molecular techniques to study responses of self-grafted and pumpkin-grafted cucumber plants exposed to 75 mM NaCl stress. Pumpkin grafting significantly increased the salt tolerance of cucumber plants, as revealed by higher plant dry weight, chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), and lower leaf Na+ content. Salinity stress resulted in a sharp increase in H2O2 production, reaching a peak 3 h after salt treatment in the pumpkin-grafted cucumber. This enhancement was accompanied by elevated relative expression of respiratory burst oxidase homologue (RBOH) genes RbohD and RbohF and a higher NADPH oxidase activity. However, this increase was much delayed in the self-grafted plants, and the difference between the two grafting combinations disappeared after 24 h. The decreased leaf Na+ content of pumpkin-grafted plants was achieved by higher Na+ exclusion in roots, which was driven by the Na+/H+ antiporter energized by the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, as evidenced by the higher plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity and higher transcript levels for PMA and SOS1. In addition, early stomatal closure was also observed in the pumpkin-grafted cucumber plants, reducing water loss and maintaining the plant's hydration status. When pumpkin-grafted plants were pretreated with an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium (DPI), the H2O2 level decreased significantly, to the level found in self-grafted plants, resulting in the loss of the salt tolerance. Inhibition of the NADPH oxidase-mediated H2O2 signaling in the root also abolished a rapid stomatal closure in the pumpkin-grafted plants. We concluded that the pumpkin-grafted cucumber plants increase their salt tolerance via a mechanism involving the root-sourced respiratory burst

  9. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L

    2015-01-16

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60years, functional studies of Na(V)s have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic Na(V)s have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNa(V)s as templates for drug development efforts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A Diagnostic Challenge for Primary Care Physicians: PFAPA Syndrome (Periodic Fevers With Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, And Adenitis)

    OpenAIRE

    Çelikcan G et al.

    2012-01-01

    PFAPA, characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis, is a non-hereditary syndrome. Admission with stomatitis, fever, pharyngitis and adenitis is known to hold an important place in the pediatric patient population of family medicine practice. Our objective with this review is to provide information about PFAPA syndrome, which is not yet well-recognized by primary care physicians. PFAPA is a non-common disorder,...

  11. Dynamics of canopy stomatal conductance, transpiration, and evaporation in a temperate deciduous forest, validated by carbonyl sulfide uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, Richard; Commane, Róisín; Munger, J. William; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Saleska, Scott R.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Stomatal conductance influences both photosynthesis and transpiration, thereby coupling the carbon and water cycles and affecting surface-atmosphere energy exchange. The environmental response of stomatal conductance has been measured mainly on the leaf scale, and theoretical canopy models are relied on to upscale stomatal conductance for application in terrestrial ecosystem models and climate prediction. Here we estimate stomatal conductance and associated transpiration in a temperate deciduous forest directly on the canopy scale via two independent approaches: (i) from heat and water vapor exchange and (ii) from carbonyl sulfide (OCS) uptake. We use the eddy covariance method to measure the net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of OCS, and we use a flux-gradient approach to separate canopy OCS uptake from soil OCS uptake. We find that the seasonal and diurnal patterns of canopy stomatal conductance obtained by the two approaches agree (to within ±6 % diurnally), validating both methods. Canopy stomatal conductance increases linearly with above-canopy light intensity (in contrast to the leaf scale, where stomatal conductance shows declining marginal increases) and otherwise depends only on the diffuse light fraction, the canopy-average leaf-to-air water vapor gradient, and the total leaf area. Based on stomatal conductance, we partition evapotranspiration (ET) and find that evaporation increases from 0 to 40 % of ET as the growing season progresses, driven primarily by rising soil temperature and secondarily by rainfall. Counterintuitively, evaporation peaks at the time of year when the soil is dry and the air is moist. Our method of ET partitioning avoids concerns about mismatched scales or measurement types because both ET and transpiration are derived from eddy covariance data. Neither of the two ecosystem models tested predicts the observed dynamics of evaporation or transpiration, indicating that ET partitioning such as that provided here is needed to further

  12. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly A. Novick; Chelcy F. Miniat; James M. Vose

    2016-01-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion–tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a ‘demand limitation’ driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) ‘hydraulic limitation’ of water movement from the roots to the leaves...

  13. Ferns are less dependent on passive dilution by cell expansion to coordinate leaf vein and stomatal spacing than angiosperms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline R Carins Murphy

    Full Text Available Producing leaves with closely spaced veins is a key innovation linked to high rates of photosynthesis in angiosperms. A close geometric link between veins and stomata in angiosperms ensures that investment in enhanced venous water transport provides the strongest net carbon return to the plant. This link is underpinned by "passive dilution" via expansion of surrounding cells. However, it is not known whether this 'passive dilution' mechanism is present in plant lineages other than angiosperms and is another key feature of the angiosperms' evolutionary success. Consequently, we sought to determine whether the 'passive dilution' mechanism is; (i exclusive to the angiosperms, (ii a conserved mechanism that evolved in the common ancestor of ferns and angiosperms, or (iii has evolved continuously over time. To do this we first we assessed the plasticity of vein and stomatal density and epidermal cell size in ferns in response to light environment. We then compared the relationships between these traits found among ferns with modelled relationships that assume vein and stomatal density respond passively to epidermal cell expansion, and with those previously observed in angiosperms. Vein density, stomatal density and epidermal cell size were linked in ferns with remarkably similar relationships to those observed in angiosperms, except that fern leaves had fewer veins per stomata. However, plasticity was limited in ferns and stomatal spacing was dependent on active stomatal differentiation as well as passive cell expansion. Thus, ferns (like angiosperms appear to coordinate vein and stomatal density with epidermal cell expansion to some extent to maintain a constant ratio between veins and stomata in the leaf. The different general relationships between vein density and stomatal density in ferns and angiosperms suggests the groups have different optimum balances between the production of vein tissue dedicated to water supply and stomatal tissue for gas

  14. Assessment of immediate pain relief with laser treatment in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad R, Shesha; Pai, Anuradha

    2013-08-01

    To compare immediate pain relief, healing time between minor recurrent aphthous ulcers treated with a single session of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and a placebo. A prospective clinical study was performed on 25 patients with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Pretreatment pain levels were recorded using a numerical rating scale. Ulcers were randomized to either receive treatment or placebo. Pain levels were assessed immediately after treatment and after 24 h. Healing was assessed on days 3 and 4, and once every 2 days thereafter for 2 weeks. Mean pain scores in the laser group were significantly reduced immediately after treatment (0.68 ± 0.6) compared with pretreatment (8.48 ± 0.71; P recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) provides immediate pain relief sustained over 24 h, along with accelerated healing time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of dietary habits on the development of the recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakji, Bassel; Baroudi, Kusai; Kharma, Yaser

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to assess the relationship between the dietary habits and development of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Two groups (30 patients with RAS who have been following dietary habits and not associated with systemic disease or hematologic abnormalities, and the control group consist of 28 patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis). A Mann-Whitney test (P>0.05) shows no significance difference between the patients with RAS and the control group. Both groups eating similar food such as cheese, cow's milk, tea, lemon, coffee, orange, apple, yoghurt, and tomato, spicy food, but the patients with RAS ate specific foods containing (pH) like; oranges and lemons more frequently than the control group. Dietary habits have no important role in development of RAS but can lay a minor role in the pathogenesis of RAS either by causing hypersensitivity or by deficiency of some vitamins and minerals.

  16. The effect of dietary habits on the development of the recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakji, Bassel; Baroudi, Kusai; Kharma, Yaser

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim was to assess the relationship between the dietary habits and development of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Materials and Methods: Two groups (30 patients with RAS who have been following dietary habits and not associated with systemic disease or hematologic abnormalities, and the control group consist of 28 patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis). Results: A Mann–Whitney test (P>0.05) shows no significance difference between the patients with RAS and the control group. Both groups eating similar food such as cheese, cow's milk, tea, lemon, coffee, orange, apple, yoghurt, and tomato, spicy food, but the patients with RAS ate specific foods containing (pH) like; oranges and lemons more frequently than the control group. Conclusion: Dietary habits have no important role in development of RAS but can lay a minor role in the pathogenesis of RAS either by causing hypersensitivity or by deficiency of some vitamins and minerals. PMID:23271837

  17. Preparation and clinical application of indomethacin gel for medical treatment of stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momo, Kenji; Shiratsuchi, Tatsuko; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Hashizaki, Kaname; Saito, Yoshihiro; Makimura, Mizue; Ogawa, Naotake

    2005-05-01

    The preparation and clinical applications of indomethacin (IM) gel were investigated in the treatment of stomatitis resulting from chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer. IM gel was prepared by adding various water-soluble polymers [hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), etc.] to IM aqueous solution. The release rate of IM from IM gels was found to decrease with increasing polymer concentration and viscosity and to follow a first-order reaction rate equation. The release rate of IM from the IM gel with HPC was decreased gradually with increasing polymer concentration and to be easily controllable compared with gels with other polymers. The time before pain relief occurred after application of the IM gel was slightly shorter and the duration of pain relief was longer compared with the IM aqueous solution. It was confirmed that IM gel is useful in the treatment of stomatitis.

  18. Electricity Customers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page discusses key sectors and how they use electricity. Residential, commercial, and industrial customers each account for roughly one-third of the nation’s electricity use. The transportation sector also accounts for a small fraction of electricity.

  19. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Prashant S; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F; Hahn, Michael G; Mansfield, Shawn D; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-10-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. The effect of extract of Punica granatum var. pleniflora for treatment of minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gavanji, Shahin; Larki, Behrouz; Bakhtari, Azizollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Herbal drugs are considered alternative agents and have been used for several years around the world. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common problems recognized by dentists and skin specialists. This problem is characterized by recurring, painful, small oral mucosal ulcers with a round or oval aspect that mostly appear in keratinized mucosa, cheeks, and on the surface of the mouth under the tongue. Methods: In our experiment, the alcoholic and water extra...

  1. Family History in Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthiram, Kalpana; Nesbitt, Emily; Morgan, Thomas; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to describe family history and inheritance patterns in patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome. We performed a case-control study to compare the family histories of patients with PFAPA recruited from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and matched healthy control subjects from a pediatric primary care practice in Nashville, Tennessee, by using a structured questionnaire. Characteristics of paired case subjects, control subjects, and their family members were compared by using McNemar's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Eighty PFAPA index case subjects and 80 control subjects were recruited. Eighteen PFAPA case subjects (23%) had ≥1 family member with PFAPA. Parents of PFAPA index case subjects were more likely to have recurrent pharyngitis (36% vs 16%; P aphthous stomatitis (46% vs 28%; P = .002) compared with parents of control subjects. Siblings of case subjects had a higher prevalence of PFAPA (10% vs 2%; P = .04), recurrent pharyngitis (24% vs 10%; P = .03), and recurrent aphthous stomatitis (27% vs 7%; P = .003) compared with siblings of control subjects. A portion of PFAPA case subjects seems to be familial, implying an inherited genetic predisposition to the disorder and/or shared environmental exposures. First-degree relatives (parents and siblings) of patients with PFAPA have a higher prevalence of recurrent pharyngitis and aphthous stomatitis than relatives of control subjects, which suggests that these disorders represent reduced penetrance phenotypes of PFAPA. Further characterization of the genetics and inflammatory profiles of these patients and their relatives is warranted. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on the clinical course of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taş, Didem Arslan; Yakar, Tolga; Sakalli, Hakan; Serin, Ender

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is one of the most common lesions of oral mucosa. Helicobacter pylori is suggested as one of the etiological agents of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Here, we conduct a study for evaluating the impact of H. pylori eradication on clinical course of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Forty-six patients with minor aphthous lesions were enrolled. The number of RAS lesions at last 6 months and vitamin B(12) levels were recorded. All patients were detected for H. pylori with endoscopic biopsy. H. pylori was positive in 30 patients and negative in 16 patients. H. pylori-positive 30 patients received eradication therapy. Three months after therapy, patients were re-evaluated with urea breath test; 18 patients were negative (eradicated), and the remainders (12 patients) were positive (non-eradicated) for H. pylori. 6 months after eradication, vitamin B(12) levels and number of aphthous lesions at 6 months were recorded. Vitamin B(12) levels were significantly increased in H. pylori-eradicated group (P = 0.001), whereas no significant change was found in non-eradicated group (P = 0.638). Mean number of aphthous lesions (per 6 months) of H. pylori-eradicated group was significantly decreased after eradication (P = 0.0001); in the non-eradicated group, no significant change was found (P = 0.677). In Hp-positive group, number of RAS lesions and vitamin B(12) levels were negatively correlated when evaluated both before and after eradication. This study provides evidence to support the beneficial effect of H. pylori eradication in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The underlying mechanism might be the increase in vitamin B(12) levels after eradication. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Current Diagnosis and Treatment Models of Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Lymphadenitis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşenur Paç Kısaarslan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical lymphadenitis (PFAPA syndrome is the most frequent cause of periodic fever in childhood. The pathogenesis of PFAPA is still unknown. Differantial diagnosis must be made with cyclic neutropenia and other autoinflammatory diseases. Because PFAPA is self limiting and benign, there is no certain treatment model. Treatment options must be specific to the patient, with a strong family and doctor relationship.

  4. Etiopathogenesis of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis and the Role of Immunologic Aspects: Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ślebioda, Zuzanna; Szponar, Elżbieta; Kowalska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS; recurrent aphthous ulcers; canker sores) belongs to the group of chronic, inflammatory, ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. Up to now, the etiopathogenesis of this condition remains unclear; it is, however, considered to be multifactorial. The results of currently performed studies indicate that genetically mediated disturbances of the innate and acquired immunity play an important role in the disease development. Factors that modify the immunologic res...

  5. Neurovirulence properties of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors in non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. Erik; Nasar, Farooq; Coleman, John W.; Price, Roger E; Javadian, Ali; Draper, Kenneth; Lee, Margaret; Reilly, Patricia A.; Clarke, David K.; Hendry, R. Michael; Udem, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Although vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) neurovirulence and pathogenicity in rodents have been well studied, little is known about VSV pathogenicity in non-human primates. To address this question, we measured VSV viremia, shedding, and neurovirulence in macaques. Following intranasal inoculation, macaques shed minimal recombinant VSV (rVSV) in nasal washes for one day post-inoculation; viremia was not detected. Following intranasal inoculation of macaques, wild type (wt) VSV, rVSV, and two ...

  6. Protective efficacy of a recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Minmin; Ge, Jinying; Li, Xiaofang; Chen, Weiye; Wang, Xijun; Wen, Zhiyuan; Bu, Zhigao

    2016-01-01

    Background Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes severe losses to the animal husbandry industry. In this study, a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the glycoprotein (G) of VSV (rL-VSV-G) was constructed and its pathogenicity and immune protective efficacy in mouse were evaluated. Results In pathogenicity evaluation test, the analysis of the viral distribution in mouse organs and body weight change showed that rL-VSV-G was safe in mice. In immune protection assay, the reco...

  7. Pseudotype formation of murine leukemia virus with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Emi, N; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K

    1991-01-01

    Mixed infection of a cell by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and retroviruses results in the production of progeny virions bearing the genome of one virus encapsidated by the envelope proteins of the other. The mechanism for the phenomenon of pseudotype formation is not clear, although specific recognition of a viral envelope protein by the nucleocapsid of an unrelated virus is presumably involved. In this study, we used Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vectors encoding...

  8. Production of vesicular stomatitis virus by antigen- or mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and continuous lymphoblastoid lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowski, M.; Feldman, J.D.; Kano, S.; Bloom, B.R.

    1973-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore at the ultrastructural level the nature of the cells engaged in the production of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in different lymphoid cell populations, particularly after stimulation with several different agents. Specifically, we have examined (a) lymph node cells from guinea pigs with delayed hypersensitivity activated by specific antigen, (b) murine spleen cells activated by selective B cell and T cell mitogens, and (c) cells of human and murine continuous lymphoblastoid or lymphoma lines.

  9. Modelling stomatal ozone flux and deposition to grassland communities across Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, M.R. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ma512@york.ac.uk; Bueker, P. [Stockholm Environment Institute at York, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Emberson, L.D. [Stockholm Environment Institute at York, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Terry, A.C. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Toet, S. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Regional scale modelling of both ozone deposition and the risk of ozone impacts is poorly developed for grassland communities. This paper presents new predictions of stomatal ozone flux to grasslands at five different locations in Europe, using a mechanistic model of canopy development for productive grasslands to generate time series of leaf area index and soil water potential as inputs to the stomatal component of the DO{sub 3}SE ozone deposition model. The parameterisation of both models was based on Lolium perenne, a dominant species of productive pasture in Europe. The modelled seasonal time course of stomatal ozone flux to both the whole canopy and to upper leaves showed large differences between climatic zones, which depended on the timing of the start of the growing season, the effect of soil water potential, and the frequency of hay cuts. Values of modelled accumulated flux indices and the AOT40 index showed a five-fold difference between locations, but the locations with the highest flux differed depending on the index used; the period contributing to the accumulation of AOT40 did not always coincide with the modelled period of active ozone canopy uptake. Use of a fixed seasonal profile of leaf area index in the flux model produced very different estimates of annual accumulated total canopy and leaf ozone flux when compared with the flux model linked to a simulation of canopy growth. Regional scale model estimates of both the risks of ozone impacts and of total ozone deposition will be inaccurate unless the effects of climate and management in modifying grass canopy growth are incorporated. - Modelled stomatal flux of ozone to productive grasslands in Europe shows different spatial and temporal variation to AOT40, and is modified by management and soil water status.

  10. Stomatal sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit relates to climate of origin in Eucalyptus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Aimee E; Haigh, Anthony M; Ellsworth, David S

    2015-03-01

    Selecting plantation species to balance water use and production requires accurate models for predicting how species will tolerate and respond to environmental conditions. Although interspecific variation in water use occurs, species-specific parameters are rarely incorporated into physiologically based models because often the appropriate species parameters are lacking. To determine the physiological control over water use in Eucalyptus, five stands of Eucalyptus species growing in a common garden were measured for sap flux rates and their stomatal response to vapour pressure deficit (D) was assessed. Maximal canopy conductance and whole-canopy stomatal sensitivity to D and reduced water availability were lower in species originating from more arid climates of origin than those from humid climates. Species from humid climates showed a larger decline in maximal sap flux density (JSmax) with reduced water availability, and a lower D at which stomatal closure occurred than species from more arid climates, implying larger sensitivity to water availability and D in these species. We observed significant (P < 0.05) correlations of species climate of origin with mean vessel diameter (R(2) = 0.90), stomatal sensitivity to D (R(2) = 0.83) and the size of the decline in JSmax to restricted water availability (R(2) = 0.94). Thus aridity of climate of origin appears to have a selective role in constraining water-use response among the five Eucalyptus plantation species. These relationships emphasize that within this congeneric group of species, climate aridity constrains water use. These relationships have implications for species choices for tree plantation success against drought-induced losses and the ability to manage Eucalyptus plantations against projected changes in water availability and evaporation in the future. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  12. Stomatal acclimation to vapour pressure deficit doubles transpiration of small tree seedlings with warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchin, Renée M.; Broadhead, Alice A.; Bostic, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Future climate change is expected to increase temperature (T) and atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in many regions, but the effect of persistent warming on plant stomatal behaviour is highly uncertain. We investigated the effect of experimental warming of 1.9-5.1 °C and increased VPD of ...... with increasing VPD and may necessitate revision of current models based on this assumption....

  13. Genital ulcers as an unusual sign of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome: a novel symptom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Ming; Wang, Chih-Chien; Lai, Chi-Chieh; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Huang, Wei-Hsuan; Cheng, Shin-Nan

    2011-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome, which is characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis, is of unknown etiology and manifests usually before 5 years of age. A patient with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome simultaneously presenting with genital ulcers has not been reported previously. We describe a 12-year-old Chinese girl with a 2-year history of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome who exhibited vulvar ulcers accompanying an episode of febrile periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, and cervical adenopathy. Although during a 1-year follow-up this girl did not manifest typical symptoms/signs of Behçet's disease except recurrent oral aphthae and genital ulcers, it is possible that periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngotonsillitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome and Behçet's disease could have overlapping manifestations. Furthermore, this report would add to the evidence of a wide variation in the clinical symptomatology of PFAPA syndrome. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Decreased levels of salivary prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Wang, C Y; Patel, M; Feng, J; Milles, M; Wang, S L

    1995-12-01

    Prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor are two important cytoprotective compounds in saliva. This study investigated their salivary levels in controls and individuals with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The development of recurrent aphthous stomatitis was divided into three stages: (1) early active stage (mucosal redness); (2) active stage (mucosal ulceration); (3) convalescent stage. Unstimulated mixed saliva was collected from each volunteer. Salivary prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their levels (mean +/- SEM) were significantly lower during the active stage of ulceration as compared to the control: (a) for prostaglandin E2, 200 +/- 55 versus 73 +/- 11 pg/mg salivary protein (p stomatitis. The prostaglandin E2 concentration decreased significantly during the active stage of ulceration, and then increased significantly during the convalescent stage. However, the recovery of salivary epidermal growth factor after the ulceration was slower than that of the prostaglandin E2. It is suggested that the diminution of prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor in the saliva may be associated with the ulcer development.

  15. INFLUENCE OF OZONE THERAPY ON ORAL TISSUE IN MODELING OF CHRONIC RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, I; Kravchenko, L; Khotimska, Yu; Nazaryan, R; Gargin, V

    2017-03-01

    Chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis (CRAS) belongs to the group of chronic, inflammatory, ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ozone on the morphofunctional peculiarities of the soft tissues in modeling chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis. We performed experimental investigation for study of the morpho-functional state of tissues of the oral mucosa in CRAS with using of previously proposed and widely used modeling scheme with ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide. Two groups of animals were formed (Dutch rabbits, males, aging three-month, weighting 2-2.4 kg). Group of 8 animals with obtained mucosal changes was our comparison group. Other group of 8 animals with obtained mucosal changes was treated by ozone therapy. Histological investigation has been performed. Microscopical examination of tissue had shown that ozone therapy reduces inflammation and edema and is useful in wound healing in soft tissue as disappearance of necrobiotic processes, epithelialization of aphthous defect, growth of akantotic bands, pronounced reducing of inflammatory cells and changing of cellular ratio (with of neutrophils part from 38.30±2.46% to 6.34±0.63%, eosinophils from 5.49±0.23% to 2.87±0.05%), restoration of the cellular layers of the epithelium, moderately pronounced sclerosis of the papillary layer of the lamina propria. Described results allow to conclude that correction of tissual changes in chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis could be obtained with ozone therapy using.

  16. The influence of climate change on stomatal ozone flux to a mountain Norway spruce forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapletal, Miloš; Pretel, Jan; Chroust, Petr; Cudlín, Pavel; Edwards-Jonášová, Magda; Urban, Otmar; Pokorný, Radek; Czerný, Radek; Hůnová, Iva

    2012-10-01

    Daily stomatal ozone flux to a mountain Norway spruce forest stand at the Bily Kriz experimental site in the Beskydy Mts. (Czech Republic) was modelled using a multiplicative model during the 2009 growing season. The multiplicative model was run with meteorological data for the growing season 2009 and ALADIN-CLIMATE/CZ model data for the 2030 growing season. The exceedance of the flux-based critical level of O(3) (Phytotoxic Ozone Dose) might be lower for Norway spruce at the Bily Kriz experimental site in a future climate (around 2030), due to increased stomatal closure induced by climate change, even when taking into account increased tropospheric background O(3) concentration. In contrast, exceedance of the concentration-based critical level (AOT40) of O(3) will increase with the projected increase in background O(3) concentration. Ozone concentration and stomatal flux of ozone significantly decreased NEP under both present and future climatic conditions, especially under high intensities of solar radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) uptake by vegetation controlled by atmospheric concentrations and plant stomatal aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Suarez, I. G.; Meixner, F. X.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exchange between the atmosphere and five European tree species was investigated in the laboratory using a dynamic branch enclosure system (consisting of two cuvettes) and a highly specific NO2 analyzer. NO2 measurements were performed with a sensitive gas phase chemiluminescence NO detector combined with a NO2 specific (photolytic) converter, both from Eco-Physics (Switzerland). This highly specific detection system excluded bias from other nitrogen compounds. Investigations were performed at two light intensities (Photosynthetic Active Radiation, PAR, 450 and 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and NO2 concentrations between 0 and 5 ppb. Ambient parameters (air temperature and relative humidity) were held constant. The data showed dominant NO2 uptake by the respective tree species under all conditions. The results did not confirm the existence of a compensation point within a 95% confidence level, though we cannot completely exclude emission of NO2 under very low atmospheric concentrations. Induced stomatal stricture, or total closure, by changing light conditions, as well as by application of the plant hormone ABA (Abscisic Acid) caused a corresponding decrease of NO2 uptake. No loss of NO2 to plant surfaces was observed under stomatal closure and species dependent differences in uptake rates could be clearly related to stomatal behavior.

  18. THERAPEUTIC ALTERNATIVES OF NATURAL COMPOUNDS IN TREATMENT OF CANDIDA-ASSOCIATED DENTURE STOMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Petrović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory reaction affecting denture wearers, multifactorial etiology, which is usually associated with Candida species, particularly Candida albicans. The treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS is difficult and complex due to its multifactorial etiology, common recurrences, as well as the lack of antifungal drug efficacy. This review aims to critically discuss several key factors affecting adhesion and biofilm formation of Candida species on acrylic surface, as well as the use of herbs, proposed as an alternative in the treatment of CADS. Many factors affect adhesion and biofilm formation of Candida spp. on acrylic surfaces, such as surface roughness of the inner surface of the prosthesis, salivary pellicle, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Having in mind that denture stomatitis is a common disease in total denture wearer, that it is most common in fungal etiology and that biofilm development increases yeast resistance, application of non-synthetic, completely natural substances, such as essential oils and extracts, may be suggested as a promising alternative for treatment of CADS.

  19. Recalibrating the Ginkgo Stomatal Index Proxy for Past CO2 with Herbarium Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, G. D.; Retallack, G.

    2015-12-01

    The stomatal index of plant cuticles is inversely related to atmospheric CO2 concentrations, as calibrated from greenhouse experiments and herbarium specimens. Such calibration data for Ginkgo biloba are available for the ongoing rise in atmospheric CO2 and for high levels of CO2 anticipated in the future, but lacking for low CO2 levels of preindustrial and glacial ages. The oldest modern specimen that we have been able to obtain consists of leaf fragments collected in 1829 and provided by Arne Anderberg from the Swedish Natural History Museum. The specimen was labeled "Argentina", but also "Hortus Botanicus Augustinus", a garden founded in 1638 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Ginkgo has a very thin cuticle that is difficult to prepare, but images very similar to cuticular preparation can be obtained by backscatter SEM imagery. We also obtained secondary SEM images of the same areas and counted 13 images with 6,184 cells from five leaf fragments. Our analyses yield a stomatal index of 10.9 ± 0.9 % for an atmospheric CO2 of 286 ppm, as determined by ice core data from Ciais and Sabine for IPCC-2013. This value is lower than from previous calibration curves for this level of CO2 and changes their curvature. With additional late nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century leaves, we can improve both the precision and lower limits of the transfer function for atmospheric CO2 from Ginkgo stomatal index last revised in 2009.

  20. A small physiological electric field mediated responses of extravillous trophoblasts derived from HTR8/SVneo cells: involvement of activation of focal adhesion kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zhang

    Full Text Available Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells.

  1. Metamaterial Combining Electric- and Magnetic-Dipole-Based Configurations for Unique Dual-Band Signal Enhancement in Ultrahigh-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rita; Webb, Andrew

    2017-10-11

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI and MRS) are both widely used techniques in medical diagnostics and research. One of the major thrusts in recent years has been the introduction of ultrahigh-field magnets in order to boost the sensitivity. Several MRI studies have examined further potential improvements in sensitivity using metamaterials, focusing on single frequency applications. However, metamaterials have yet to reach a level that is practical for routine MRI use. In this work, we explore a new metamaterial implementation for MRI, a dual-nuclei resonant structure, which can be used for both proton and heteronuclear magnetic resonance. Our approach combines two configurations, one based on a set of electric dipoles for the low frequency band, and the second based on a set of magnetic dipoles for the high frequency band. We focus on the implementation of a dual-nuclei metamaterial for phosphorus and proton imaging and spectroscopy at an ultrahigh-field strength of 7 T. In vivo scans using this flexible and compact structure show that it locally enhances both the phosphorus and proton transmit and receive sensitivities.

  2. Biomedical signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquillo, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Signals and Systems is meant to accompany a one-semester undergraduate signals and systems course. It may also serve as a quick-start for graduate students or faculty interested in how signals and systems techniques can be applied to living systems. The biological nature of the examples allows for systems thinking to be applied to electrical, mechanical, fluid, chemical, thermal and even optical systems. Each chapter focuses on a topic from classic signals and systems theory: System block diagrams, mathematical models, transforms, stability, feedback, system response, control, time

  3. CO2-induced decrease of canopy stomatal conductance of mature conifer and broadleaved trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor-ngern, P.; Oren, R.; Ward, E. J.; Palmroth, S.; McCarthy, H. R.; domec, J.

    2013-12-01

    Together with canopy leaf area, mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS) controls forest-atmosphere exchanges of energy and mass. Expectations for stomatal response to elevated atmospheric [CO2] (CO2E) based on seedling studies range from large decreases of conductance in foliage of broadleaved species to little or no response in conifers. These responses are not directly translatable to forest canopies, and their underlying mechanisms are ill-defined. The uncertainty of canopy-scale stomatal response to CO2E reduces confidence in modeled predictions of future forest productivity and carbon sequestration, and of partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux. Thus, debates on the potential effects of CO2E-induced stomatal closure continue. We used a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in a 27-year-old, 25 m tall forest, to generate a whole-canopy CO2-response and test whether canopy-scale GS response to CO2E of widely distributed, fast growing shade-intolerant species, Pinus taeda (L.) and co-occurring broadleaved species dominated by Liquidambar styraciflua (L.), was indirectly affected by slow changes such as hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, as opposed to quickly responding to CO2 concentrations in the leaf-internal air space. Our results show indirect CO2E-induced reductions of GS of 10% and 30%, respectively, and no signs of a direct stomatal response even as CO2E was pushed to 685 μmol mol-1 (~1.8 of ambient). Modeling the effect of CO2E on the water, energy and carbon cycles of forests must consider slow-response indirect mechanisms producing large variation in the reduction of GS, such as the previously observed inconsistent CO2E effect on canopy leaf area and plant hydraulics. Moreover, the new generation of CO2E studies in forests must allow indirect effects caused by, e.g., hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, to play out. Such acclimation will be particularly prolonged in slowly developing ecosystems, such

  4. The Use of Signal-Transduction and Metabolic Pathways to Predict Human Disease Targets from Electric and Magnetic Fields Using in vitro Data in Human Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Fred; Portier, Christopher J.; Chang, Xiaoqing; Mevissen, Meike

    2016-01-01

    Using in vitro data in human cell lines, several research groups have investigated changes in gene expression in cellular systems following exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) and radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF). For ELF EMF, we obtained five studies with complete microarray data and three studies with only lists of significantly altered genes. Likewise, for RF EMF, we obtained 13 complete microarray datasets and 5 limited datasets. Plausible linkages between exposure to ELF and RF EMF and human diseases were identified using a three-step process: (a) linking genes associated with classes of human diseases to molecular pathways, (b) linking pathways to ELF and RF EMF microarray data, and (c) identifying associations between human disease and EMF exposures where the pathways are significantly similar. A total of 60 pathways were associated with human diseases, mostly focused on basic cellular functions like JAK–STAT signaling or metabolic functions like xenobiotic metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes. ELF EMF datasets were sporadically linked to human diseases, but no clear pattern emerged. Individual datasets showed some linkage to cancer, chemical dependency, metabolic disorders, and neurological disorders. RF EMF datasets were not strongly linked to any disorders but strongly linked to changes in several pathways. Based on these analyses, the most promising area for further research would be to focus on EMF and neurological function and disorders. PMID:27656641

  5. The Use of Signal-Transduction and Metabolic Pathways to Predict Human Disease Targets from Electric and Magnetic Fields Using in vitro Data in Human Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Fred; Portier, Christopher J; Chang, Xiaoqing; Mevissen, Meike

    2016-01-01

    Using in vitro data in human cell lines, several research groups have investigated changes in gene expression in cellular systems following exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) and radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF). For ELF EMF, we obtained five studies with complete microarray data and three studies with only lists of significantly altered genes. Likewise, for RF EMF, we obtained 13 complete microarray datasets and 5 limited datasets. Plausible linkages between exposure to ELF and RF EMF and human diseases were identified using a three-step process: (a) linking genes associated with classes of human diseases to molecular pathways, (b) linking pathways to ELF and RF EMF microarray data, and (c) identifying associations between human disease and EMF exposures where the pathways are significantly similar. A total of 60 pathways were associated with human diseases, mostly focused on basic cellular functions like JAK-STAT signaling or metabolic functions like xenobiotic metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes. ELF EMF datasets were sporadically linked to human diseases, but no clear pattern emerged. Individual datasets showed some linkage to cancer, chemical dependency, metabolic disorders, and neurological disorders. RF EMF datasets were not strongly linked to any disorders but strongly linked to changes in several pathways. Based on these analyses, the most promising area for further research would be to focus on EMF and neurological function and disorders.

  6. Estimación de las componentes simétricas instantáneas de señales eléctricas usando filtros sintonizados Instantaneous symmetrical components estimation of electrical signals using tuned filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann F Petit Suárez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se propone un algoritmo basado en filtros sintonizados para extraer las componentes instantáneas de secuencia positiva, negativa y cero (+,-,0 de señales de tensión y/o corrientes desequilibradas y distorsionadas. El trabajo se encuentra justificado en la necesidad de disponer de nuevos algoritmos que puedan ser utilizados en la medición de parámetros que afectan a la calidad de la energía eléctrica con el fin de diagnosticar y compensar las perturbaciones presentes en las señales de tensión y/o corriente. El desempeño del algoritmo es evaluado mediante simulaciones en Matlab/Simulink y por medio de su implementación en tiempo real en la tarjeta de desarrollo dSPACE 1104. Los resultados obtenidos muestran la eficacia del algoritmo propuesto.In this paper a new algorithm based on tuned filters to extract the positive, negative and zero sequence instantaneous components of distorted and unbalanced electrical signals is shown. The new algorithm can be used in applications such as signal parameter estimation, power quality analysis and it can be useful for estimating the reference signal of some compensation devices used to improve the power quality. The algorithm performance is evaluated by simulations in Matlab/Simulink and through its implementation in real time on a dSPACE 1104 development board. In addition, the experimental setup results show an outstanding performance.

  7. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura 78 (AtATL78) mediates ABA-dependent ROS signaling in response to drought stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Soo Jin; Oh, Tae Rin

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed a variety of complicated responses to cope with drought, one of the most challenging environmental stresses. As a quick response, plants rapidly inhibit stomatal opening under the control of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, in order to preserve water. Here, we report...... that Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, mediates the ABA-dependent stomatal closure. In contrast to wild-type plants, the stomatal closure was fully impaired in atatl78 mutant plants even in the presence of exogenous ABA and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Besides, under high...... concentrations of Ca(2+), a down-stream signaling molecule of ABA signaling pathway, atatl78 mutant plants successfully closed the pores. Furthermore, AtATL78 protein indirectly associated with catalases and the deficiency of AtATL78 led the reduction of catalase activity and H2O2, implying the function of At...

  8. Electric response in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagovets, Tymofiy V.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the electric response of superfluid helium that arises in the presence of a second sound standing wave. It was found that the signal of the electric response is observed in a narrow range of second sound excitation power. The linear dependence of the signal amplitude has been derived at low excitation power, however, above some critical power, the amplitude of the signal is considerably decreased. It was established that the rapid change of the electric response is not associated with a turbulent regime generated by the second sound wave. A model of the appearance of the electric response as a result of the oscillation of electron bubbles in the normal fluid velocity field in the second sound wave is presented. Possible explanation for the decrease of the electric response are presented.

  9. Prognostic significance of electrical alternans versus signal averaged electrocardiography in predicting the outcome of electrophysiological testing and arrhythmia-free survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoundas, A. A.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Ruskin, J. N.; Garan, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the accuracy of signal averaged electrocardiography (SAECG) and measurement of microvolt level T wave alternans as predictors of susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. DESIGN: Analysis of new data from a previously published prospective investigation. SETTING: Electrophysiology laboratory of a major referral hospital. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: 43 patients, not on class I or class III antiarrhythmic drug treatment, undergoing invasive electrophysiological testing had SAECG and T wave alternans measurements. The SAECG was considered positive in the presence of one (SAECG-I) or two (SAECG-II) of three standard criteria. T wave alternans was considered positive if the alternans ratio exceeded 3.0. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Inducibility of sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation during electrophysiological testing, and 20 month arrhythmia-free survival. RESULTS: The accuracy of T wave alternans in predicting the outcome of electrophysiological testing was 84% (p antiarrhythmic agents. The accuracy of T wave alternans in predicting the outcome of arrhythmia-free survival was 86% (p < 0.030). Neither SAECG-I (accuracy 65%; p < 0.21) nor SAECG-II (accuracy 71%; p < 0.48) was a statistically significant predictor of arrhythmia-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: T wave alternans was a highly significant predictor of the outcome of electrophysiological testing and arrhythmia-free survival, while SAECG was not a statistically significant predictor. Although these results need to be confirmed in prospective clinical studies, they suggest that T wave alternans may serve as a non-invasive probe for screening high risk populations for malignant ventricular arrhythmias.

  10. Prognostic significance of electrical alternans versus signal averaged electrocardiography in predicting the outcome of electrophysiological testing and arrhythmia-free survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoundas, A. A.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Ruskin, J. N.; Garan, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the accuracy of signal averaged electrocardiography (SAECG) and measurement of microvolt level T wave alternans as predictors of susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. DESIGN: Analysis of new data from a previously published prospective investigation. SETTING: Electrophysiology laboratory of a major referral hospital. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: 43 patients, not on class I or class III antiarrhythmic drug treatment, undergoing invasive electrophysiological testing had SAECG and T wave alternans measurements. The SAECG was considered positive in the presence of one (SAECG-I) or two (SAECG-II) of three standard criteria. T wave alternans was considered positive if the alternans ratio exceeded 3.0. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Inducibility of sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation during electrophysiological testing, and 20 month arrhythmia-free survival. RESULTS: The accuracy of T wave alternans in predicting the outcome of electrophysiological testing was 84% (p data were available in 36 patients while not on class I or III antiarrhythmic agents. The accuracy of T wave alternans in predicting the outcome of arrhythmia-free survival was 86% (p < 0.030). Neither SAECG-I (accuracy 65%; p < 0.21) nor SAECG-II (accuracy 71%; p < 0.48) was a statistically significant predictor of arrhythmia-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: T wave alternans was a highly significant predictor of the outcome of electrophysiological testing and arrhythmia-free survival, while SAECG was not a statistically significant predictor. Although these results need to be confirmed in prospective clinical studies, they suggest that T wave alternans may serve as a non-invasive probe for screening high risk populations for malignant ventricular arrhythmias.

  11. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrical Impendance Tomography (EIT) utilizes a series of electrodes in a circumferential band-like device feeding these signals to a portable computer that...

  12. The role and interactions of cytosolic alkalization and hydrogen peroxide in ultraviolet B-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Ge, Xiao-Min; Wu, Mi-Mi; Li, Xuan; He, Jun-Min

    2014-02-01

    Cytosolic alkalization has been shown to function as a key player in multiple stimuli-induced stomatal closure, but its role and relationship with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in ultraviolet B (UV-B)-induced stomatal closure remains unknown. In this paper, by stomatal bioassay and laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we observed that 0.5 W m(-2) UV-B induced cytosolic alkalization and H2O2 production in guard cells while inducing stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Butyrate (a weak acid) reduced the cytosolic pH/H2O2 production and prevented stomatal closure by UV-B. Methylamine (a weak base) induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure while enhancing the cytosolic alkalization in guard cells under light alone. The rise in cytosolic pH of wild-type guard cells on exposure to UV-B was evident at 15 min and substantial at 45 min while H2O2 production started to largely increase after 60 min. The failure of UV-B-induced H2O2 production in AtrbohD/F guard cells did not affect the changes of guard cell pH during the first 60 min of UV-B radiation, but largely suppressed cytosolic alkalization after 60 min of UV-B radiation. These results indicate that cytosolic alkalization mediates UV-B-induced stomatal closure via activating H2O2 production and that H2O2 production can feedback-enhance cytosolic alkalization in Arabidopsis guard cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Glycine soja 14-3-3 protein GsGF14o participates in stomatal and root hair development and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Luo, Xiao; Sun, Mingzhe; Chen, Chao; Ding, Xiaodong; Wang, Xuedong; Yang, Shanshan; Yu, Qingyue; Jia, Bowei; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that 14-3-3 proteins are key regulators of multiple stress signal transduction cascades. However, the biological functions of soybean 14-3-3 proteins, especially in plant drought response, are not yet known. In this study, we characterized a Glycine soja 14-3-3 gene, GsGF14o, which is involved in plant development and drought response. GsGF14o expression was greatly induced by drought stress, as evidenced by the quantitative real-time PCR and β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity analysis. GsGF14o overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in decreased drought tolerance during seed germination and seedling growth. Furthermore, silencing of AtGF14µ, the most homologous 14-3-3 gene of GsGF14o, led to enhanced drought tolerance at both the seed germination and seedling stage. Unexpectedly, GsGF14o transgenic lines showed reduced water loss and transpiration rates compared with wild-type plants, which was demonstrated to be the consequence of the decreased stomatal size. At the same time, the smaller stomata due to GsGF14o overexpression led to a relatively slow net photosynthesis rate, which led to a growth penalty under drought stress. We further demonstrated that GsGF14o overexpression caused deficits in root hair formation and development, and thereby reduced the water intake capacity of the transgenic root system. In addition, GsGF14o overexpression down-regulated the transcript levels of drought-responsive marker genes. Finally, we also investigated the tissue-specific accumulation of GsGF14o by using a GUS activity assay. Collectively, the results presented here confirm that GsGF14o plays a dual role in drought stress responses through its involvement in the regulation of stomatal size and root hair development.

  14. [The evaluation of serum vitamin B12, folic acid and hemoglobin levels in patients with recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aynali, Giray; Ozkan, Mustafa; Aynali, Ayşe; Ceyhan, Betül; Armağan, Hakan; Yarıktaş, Murat; Doğan, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the serum levels of hemoglobin, vitamin B12 and folic acid in patients with recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis. Between June 2010 and January 2012, a total of 112 patients including 57 with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (study group; 30 males 27 females; mean age 36.7±13.9 years; range 13 to 74 years) and 45 with chronic tinnitus patients without recurrent aphthous stomatitis (control group; 18 males 27 females; mean age 39.7±15.1 years; range 20 to 80 years) who were admitted to our clinic were included in this study. The serum hemoglobin, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels of the patients were measured and statistically compared. There was no significant difference in serum levels of hemoglobin and folic acid between the groups. Serum levels of vitamin B12 were significantly lower in the study group, compared to the control group (paphthous stomatitis. Vitamin B12 supplements may be added to the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

  15. Reconstruction of palaeoatmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities of various beech plants (Fagaceae): testing and application of a mechanistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, M.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Konrad, W.

    2006-12-01

    A mechanistic model (Konrad &Roth-Nebelsick a, in prep.) was applied for the reconstruction of atmospheric carbon dioxide using stomatal densities and photosynthesis parameters of extant and fossil Fagaceae. The model is based on an approach which couples diffusion and the biochemical process of photosynthesis. Atmospheric CO2 is calculated on the basis of stomatal diffusion and photosynthesis parameters of the considered taxa. The considered species include the castanoid Castanea sativa, two quercoids Quercus petraea and Quercus rhenana and an intermediate species Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis. In the case of Quercus petraea literature data were used. Stomatal data of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis, Quercus rhenana and Castanea sativa were determined by the authors. Data of the extant Castanea sativa were collected by applying a peeling method and by counting of stomatal densities on the digitalized images of the peels. Additionally, isotope data of leaf samples of Castanea sativa were determined to estimate the ratio of intercellular to ambient carbon dioxide. The CO2 values calculated by the model (on the basis of stomatal data and measured or estimated biochemical parameters) are in good agreement with literature data, with the exception of the Late Eocene. The results thus demonstrate that the applied approach is principally suitable for reconstructing palaeoatmospheric CO2.

  16. Enamel defects and aphthous stomatitis in celiac and healthy subjects: Systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri, Michele; Tofani, Elena; Defraia, Efisio; Giuntini, Veronica; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to compare the presence of enamel defects and aphthous stomatitis between celiac patients and healthy controls. A systematic review of articles selected from MEDLINE, EMBASE and Google Scholar was performed by two independent operators. Additional studies hand-searched and found in the principal dental and gastroenterology journals were included. Only controlled studies on celiac patients compared to healthy subjects were included. Independent extraction of articles by 2 authors using predefined data fields, including study quality indicators. In total, the celiac patients had greater frequency of enamel defects (odds ratio=5.69, 95%CI from 3.47 to 9.33, Pceliac patients had greater frequency of aphthous stomatitis (odds ratio=3.79, 95%CI from 2.67 to 5.39, Pceliac disease was associated with both enamel defects and aphthous stomatitis. The odds ratio estimates, however, should be interpreted with caution due to the high risk of bias showed by all the studies. In adults, the association between celiac disease and enamel defects or aphthous stomatitis was unclear because very few studies were performed on this population. The presence of enamel defects and/or aphthous stomatitis in a child affected by other typical or atypical symptoms of celiac disease represents an indication for further diagnostic exams for celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in osmotic adjustment, foliar abscisic acid dynamics, and stomatal regulation between an isohydric and anisohydric woody angiosperm during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Rachael H; Tar