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Sample records for electric field 3d

  1. 3D Modeling of Electric Fields in the LUX Detector

    OpenAIRE

    LUX Collaboration; Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.

    2017-01-01

    This work details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) electric field model for the LUX detector. The detector took data during two periods of searching for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) searches. After the first period completed, a time-varying non-uniform negative charge developed in the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panels that define the radial boundary of the detector's active volume. This caused electric field variations in the detector in time, depth and azimuth, g...

  2. 3D modeling of electric fields in the LUX detector

    OpenAIRE

    Akerib, DS; Alsum, S; Araújo, HM; Bai, X; Bailey, AJ; Balajthy, J; Beltrame, P; Bernard, EP; Bernstein, A; Biesiadzinski, TP; Boulton, EM; Brás, P; Byram, D; Cahn, SB; Carmona-Benitez, MC

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab. This work details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) electric field model for the LUX detector. The detector took data to search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) during two periods. After the first period completed, a time-varying non-uniform negative charge developed in the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panels that define the radial boundary of the detector's active volume. This caused electric field variations in the de...

  3. 3D modeling of electric fields in the LUX detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Fallon, S. R.; Fan, A.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2017-11-01

    This work details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) electric field model for the LUX detector. The detector took data to search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) during two periods. After the first period completed, a time-varying non-uniform negative charge developed in the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panels that define the radial boundary of the detector's active volume. This caused electric field variations in the detector in time, depth and azimuth, generating an electrostatic radially-inward force on electrons on their way upward to the liquid surface. To map this behavior, 3D electric field maps of the detector's active volume were generated on a monthly basis. This was done by fitting a model built in COMSOL Multiphysics to the uniformly distributed calibration data that were collected on a regular basis. The modeled average PTFE charge density increased over the course of the exposure from -3.6 to -5.5 μC/m2. From our studies, we deduce that the electric field magnitude varied locally while the mean value of the field of ~200 V/cm remained constant throughout the exposure. As a result of this work the varying electric fields and their impact on event reconstruction and discrimination were successfully modeled.

  4. 3D electric field calculation with surface charge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an outline and some examples of three dimensional electric field calculations with a computer code developed at NIRS. In the code, a surface charge method is adopted because of it's simplicity in the mesh establishing procedure. The charge density in a triangular mesh is assumed to distribute with a linear function of the position. The electric field distribution is calculated for a pair of drift tubes with the focusing fingers on the opposing surfaces. The field distribution in an acceleration gap is analyzed with a Fourier-Bessel series expansion method. The calculated results excellently reproduces the measured data with a magnetic model. (author)

  5. Effect of rotating electric field on 3D complex (dusty) plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörner, L.; Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Kroll, M.; Schablinski, J.; Block, D.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of rotating electric field on 3D particle clusters suspended in rf plasma was studied experimentally. Spheroidal clusters were suspended inside a glass box mounted on the lower horizontal rf electrode, with gravity partially balanced by thermophoretic force. Clusters rotated in the horizontal plane, in response to rotating electric field that was created inside the box using conducting coating on its inner surfaces ("rotating wall" technique). Cluster rotation was always in the direction of applied field and had a shear in the vertical direction. The angular speed of rotation was 104-107 times lower than applied frequency. The experiment is compared to a recent theory.

  6. AC electric field induced dipole-based on-chip 3D cell rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhal, Prateek; Chase, J Geoffrey; Gaynor, Paul; Oback, Björn; Wang, Wenhui

    2014-08-07

    The precise rotation of suspended cells is one of the many fundamental manipulations used in a wide range of biotechnological applications such as cell injection and enucleation in nuclear transfer (NT) cloning. Noticeably scarce among the existing rotation techniques is the three-dimensional (3D) rotation of cells on a single chip. Here we present an alternating current (ac) induced electric field-based biochip platform, which has an open-top sub-mm square chamber enclosed by four sidewall electrodes and two bottom electrodes, to achieve rotation about the two axes, thus 3D cell rotation. By applying an ac potential to the four sidewall electrodes, an in-plane (yaw) rotating electric field is generated and in-plane rotation is achieved. Similarly, by applying an ac potential to two opposite sidewall electrodes and the two bottom electrodes, an out-of-plane (pitch) rotating electric field is generated and rolling rotation is achieved. As a prompt proof-of-concept, bottom electrodes were constructed with transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) using the standard lift-off process and the sidewall electrodes were constructed using a low-cost micro-milling process and then assembled to form the chip. Through experiments, we demonstrate rotation of bovine oocytes of ~120 μm diameter about two axes, with the capability of controlling the rotation direction and the rate for each axis through control of the ac potential amplitude, frequency, and phase shift, and cell medium conductivity. The maximum observed rotation rate reached nearly 140° s⁻¹, while a consistent rotation rate reached up to 40° s⁻¹. Rotation rate spectra for zona pellucida-intact and zona pellucida-free oocytes were further compared and found to have no effective difference. This simple, transparent, cheap-to-manufacture, and open-top platform allows additional functional modules to be integrated to become a more powerful cell manipulation system.

  7. 3-D modelling the electric field due to ocean tidal flow and comparison with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvshinov, A.; Junge, A.; Utada, H.

    2006-01-01

    The tidal motion of the ocean water through the ambient magnetic field, generates secondary electric field. This motionally induced electric field can be detected in the sea or inland and has a potential for electrical soundings of the Earth. A first goal of the paper is to gain an understanding...... that in some coastal regions the amplitudes of the electric field can reach 100 mV/km and 10 mV/km for M2 and O1 tides respectively. The changes of lithosphere resistance produce detectable changes in the tidal electric signals. We show that our predictions are in a good agreement with observations....... of the global distribution of the electric signal due to tidal ocean flow. We simulate the electric signals for two tidal constituents - lunar semidiurnal (M2) and diurnal (O1) tides. We assume a realistic Earth's conductivity model with a surface thin shell and 1-D mantle underneath. Simulations demonstrate...

  8. Methodology for Time-Domain Estimation of Storm-Time Electric Fields Using the 3D Earth Impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbert, A.; Balch, C. C.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Egbert, G. D.; Love, J. J.; Rigler, E. J.; Fujii, I.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic storms can induce geoelectric fields in the Earth's electrically conducting interior, interfering with the operations of electric-power grid industry. The ability to estimate these electric fields at Earth's surface in close to real-time and to provide local short-term predictions would improve the ability of the industry to protect their operations. At any given time, the electric field at the Earth's surface is a function of the time-variant magnetic activity (driven by the solar wind), and the local electrical conductivity structure of the Earth's crust and mantle. For this reason, implementation of an operational electric field estimation service requires an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort between space science, real-time space weather operations, and solid Earth geophysics. We highlight in this talk an ongoing collaboration between USGS, NOAA, NASA, Oregon State University, and the Japan Meteorological Agency, to develop algorithms that can be used for scenario analyses and which might be implemented in a real-time, operational setting. We discuss the development of a time domain algorithm that employs discrete time domain representation of the impedance tensor for a realistic 3D Earth, known as the discrete time impulse response (DTIR), convolved with the local magnetic field time series, to estimate the local electric field disturbances. The algorithm is validated against measured storm-time electric field data collected in the United States and Japan. We also discuss our plans for operational real-time electric field estimation using 3D Earth impedances.

  9. Development of 3 D Electric Field Analysis Program under Power System Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, S. H.; Lee, K. C.; Lee, J. B.; Ha, T. H. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Recently, as the effects of electric fields on animals, human beings and sensitive equipment have been reported, the study on electric fields has become more important. Transmission lines and substation among power facilities are dominant parts related to electrical environment. Electric field analysis of transmission line has been made using image charge method or CSM since 1970`s, however electric field analysis in substation has been rarely studied due to the complexity of three dimensional evaluation of an electric field in substation. For the rather complicated and time-consuming three-dimensional electric field calculation in the vicinity of transmission lines and substations, this study proposes an effective numerical calculation method based on Charge Simulation Method(CSM). In order to represent non-uniform charge distribution on an electrode better, it is subdivided into small segments with linear charge density. Each segment with linear charge density can be easily represented by a generalized finite line type of charge whose expressions for potential and electric field were analytically derived and which was named {sup f}inite slant line charge in this study. As for the arrangement of small segments of a subdivided electrode, it has been found that unequally spaced arrangement method is superior to equally spaced one. In order to arrange segments fast and effectively, effective formulas were derived from multiple regression analysis of many simulations. The proposed method is applied to the electric field calculation around the transmission lines with significant change in direction and substation busbars. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  10. Detailed 3D models of the induced electric field of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T

    2007-01-01

    Previous models neglected contributions from current elements spanning the full geometric extent of wires in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coils. A detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry is shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of electric field (E-field) models. Modeling E-field dependence based on the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured) where simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured)

  11. Detailed 3D models of the induced electric field of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2007-05-21

    Previous models neglected contributions from current elements spanning the full geometric extent of wires in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coils. A detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry is shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of electric field (E-field) models. Modeling E-field dependence based on the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured) where simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured)

  12. Stochastic Acceleration in Turbulent Electric Fields Generated by 3D Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, Marco; Isliker, Heinz; Vlahos, Loukas

    2006-01-01

    Electron and proton acceleration in three-dimensional electric and magnetic fields is studied through test particle simulations. The fields are obtained by a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetic reconnection in slab geometry. The nonlinear evolution of the system is characterized by the growth of many unstable modes and the initial current sheet is fragmented with formation of small scale structures. We inject at random points inside the evolving current sheet a Maxwellian distribution of particles. In a relatively short time (less than a millisecond) the particles develop a power-law tail. The acceleration is extremely efficient and the electrons absorb a large percentage of the available energy in a small fraction of the characteristic time of the MHD simulation, suggesting that resistive MHD codes are unable to represent the full extent of particle acceleration

  13. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  14. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-06-21

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  15. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  16. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  17. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  18. Macro-/Micro-Controlled 3D Lithium-Ion Batteries via Additive Manufacturing and Electric Field Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Liang, Xinhua; Liou, Frank; Park, Jonghyun

    2018-01-30

    This paper presents a new concept for making battery electrodes that can simultaneously control macro-/micro-structures and help address current energy storage technology gaps and future energy storage requirements. Modern batteries are fabricated in the form of laminated structures that are composed of randomly mixed constituent materials. This randomness in conventional methods can provide a possibility of developing new breakthrough processing techniques to build well-organized structures that can improve battery performance. In the proposed processing, an electric field (EF) controls the microstructures of manganese-based electrodes, while additive manufacturing controls macro-3D structures and the integration of both scales. The synergistic control of micro-/macro-structures is a novel concept in energy material processing that has considerable potential for providing unprecedented control of electrode structures, thereby enhancing performance. Electrochemical tests have shown that these new electrodes exhibit superior performance in their specific capacity, areal capacity, and life cycle.

  19. 3D electrical conductivity tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Revil, A.; Byrdina, S.; Coperey, A.; Gailler, L.; Grobbe, N.; Viveiros, F.; Silva, C.; Jougnot, D.; Ghorbani, A.; Hogg, C.; Kiyan, D.; Rath, V.; Heap, M. J.; Grandis, H.; Humaida, H.

    2018-05-01

    Electrical conductivity tomography is a well-established galvanometric method for imaging the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution. We characterize the conductivity distribution of a set of volcanic structures that are different in terms of activity and morphology. For that purpose, we developed a large-scale inversion code named ECT-3D aimed at handling complex topographical effects like those encountered in volcanic areas. In addition, ECT-3D offers the possibility of using as input data the two components of the electrical field recorded at independent stations. Without prior information, a Gauss-Newton method with roughness constraints is used to solve the inverse problem. The roughening operator used to impose constraints is computed on unstructured tetrahedral elements to map complex geometries. We first benchmark ECT-3D on two synthetic tests. A first test using the topography of Mt. St Helens volcano (Washington, USA) demonstrates that we can successfully reconstruct the electrical conductivity field of an edifice marked by a strong topography and strong variations in the resistivity distribution. A second case study is used to demonstrate the versatility of the code in using the two components of the electrical field recorded on independent stations along the ground surface. Then, we apply our code to real data sets recorded at (i) a thermally active area of Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming, USA), (ii) a monogenetic dome on Furnas volcano (the Azores, Portugal), and (iii) the upper portion of the caldera of Kīlauea (Hawai'i, USA). The tomographies reveal some of the major structures of these volcanoes as well as identifying alteration associated with high surface conductivities. We also review the petrophysics underlying the interpretation of the electrical conductivity of fresh and altered volcanic rocks and molten rocks to show that electrical conductivity tomography cannot be used as a stand-alone technique due to the non-uniqueness in

  20. External control of the Drosophila melanogaster egg to imago development period by specific combinations of 3D low-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Vladimir I; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We report that the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the Drosophila melanogaster, and the imago longevity, are both controllable by combinations of external 3-dimensional (3D) low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (LFEMFs). Both these periods may be reduced or increased by applying an appropriate configuration of external 3D LFEMFs. We report that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes correlates with the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the respective eggs. We infer that metabolic processes in both eggs and imago are either accelerated (resulting in reduced time periods) or slowed down (resulting in increased time periods). We propose that external 3D LFEMFs induce electric currents in live systems as well as mechanical vibrations on sub-cell, whole-cell and cell-group levels. These external fields induce media polarization due to ionic motion and orientation of electric dipoles that could moderate the observed effects. We found that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes is affected by action of 3D LFEMFs on the respective eggs in the embryonic development period (EDP). We interpret this effect as resulting from changes in the regulation mechanism of metabolic processes in D. melanogaster eggs, inherited by the resulting imagoes. We also tested separate effects of either 3D electric or 3D magnetic fields, which were significantly weaker.

  1. 3D Printing Electrically Small Spherical Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2013-01-01

    3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations.......3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations....

  2. A combined vector potential-scalar potential method for FE computation of 3D magnetic fields in electrical devices with iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential based finite-element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based formulations for computation of three-dimensional magnetostatic fields is introduced. In this method, the curl-component of the magnetic field intensity is computed by a reduced magnetic vector potential. This field intensity forms the basic of a forcing function for a global magnetic scalar potential solution over the entire volume of the region. This method allows one to include iron portions sandwiched in between conductors within partitioned current-carrying subregions. The method is most suited for large-scale global-type 3-D magnetostatic field computations in electrical devices, and in particular rotating electric machinery.

  3. Development of tool for simulating the effect of radial electric fields on Ion-Temperature-Gradient modes in 3D configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Lars

    2003-03-01

    The heat flux level observed in magnetic plasma confinement experiments such as tokamaks is much higher than what can be explained from neoclassical theory. There is a strong interest in the controlled nuclear fusion community to fully understand this phenomenon, called anomalous transport. One idea is that radial electric fields play a key role in the stabilization process of the electrostatic instabilities called micro instabilities that are considered responsible for the anomalous heat flux. This work studies the effect of a static ad-hoc radial electric field on microinstabilities, especially the ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode, within the frame of a global 3D gyrokinetic model. This will make it possible to extend the simulations done in tokamaks and helically symmetric systems to fully 313 magnetic configurations. Technically the work consists of extending the 3D gyrokinetic code Euterpe to also include the effect of the drifts induced by an imposed radial electrostatic potential. Simulations are performed in tokamak and helically symmetric configurations. The results indicate that this modified version of Euterpe can be used in studying more complex 3D fusion devices

  4. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  5. Regulation of adipose-tissue-derived stromal cell orientation and motility in 2D- and 3D-cultures by direct-current electrical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Long, Haiyan; Ren, Xiaomei; Ma, Kunlong; Xiao, Zhenghua; Wang, Ying; Guo, Yingqiang

    2017-02-01

    Cell alignment and motility play a critical role in a variety of cell behaviors, including cytoskeleton reorganization, membrane-protein relocation, nuclear gene expression, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Direct current electric field (EF) in vitro can direct many types of cells to align vertically to EF vector. In this work, we investigated the effects of EF stimulation on rat adipose-tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) in 2D-culture on plastic culture dishes and in 3D-culture on various scaffold materials, including collagen hydrogels, chitosan hydrogels and poly(L-lactic acid)/gelatin electrospinning fibers. Rat ADSCs were exposed to various physiological-strength EFs in a homemade EF-bioreactor. Changes of morphology and movements of cells affected by applied EFs were evaluated by time-lapse microphotography, and cell survival rates and intracellular calcium oscillations were also detected. Results showed that EF facilitated ADSC morphological changes, under 6 V/cm EF strength, and that ADSCs in 2D-culture aligned vertically to EF vector and kept a good cell survival rate. In 3D-culture, cell galvanotaxis responses were subject to the synergistic effect of applied EF and scaffold materials. Fast cell movement and intracellular calcium activities were observed in the cells of 3D-culture. We believe our research will provide some experimental references for the future study in cell galvanotaxis behaviors. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  6. Optimization of 3D Field Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nikolas; Zhu, Caoxiang

    2017-10-01

    Recent progress in 3D tokamak modeling is now leveraged to create a conceptual design of new external 3D field coils for the DIII-D tokamak. Using the IPEC dominant mode as a target spectrum, the Finding Optimized Coils Using Space-curves (FOCUS) code optimizes the currents and 3D geometry of multiple coils to maximize the total set's resonant coupling. The optimized coils are individually distorted in space, creating toroidal ``arrays'' containing a variety of shapes that often wrap around a significant poloidal extent of the machine. The generalized perturbed equilibrium code (GPEC) is used to determine optimally efficient spectra for driving total, core, and edge neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque and these too provide targets for the optimization of 3D coil designs. These conceptual designs represent a fundamentally new approach to 3D coil design for tokamaks targeting desired plasma physics phenomena. Optimized coil sets based on plasma response theory will be relevant to designs for future reactors or on any active machine. External coils, in particular, must be optimized for reliable and efficient fusion reactor designs. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Regularisation of 3D Signed Distance Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Signed 3D distance fields are used a in a variety of domains. From shape modelling to surface registration. They are typically computed based on sampled point sets. If the input point set contains holes, the behaviour of the zero-level surface of the distance field is not well defined...... Cholesky factorisation. It is demonstrated that the zero-level surface will act as a membrane after the proposed regularisation. This effectively closes holes in a predictable way. Finally, the performance of the method is tested with a set of synthetic point clouds of increasing complexity....

  8. Investigation of voltages and electric fields in silicon semi 3D radiation detectors using Silvaco/ATLAS simulation tool and a scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Palviainen, T; Tuuva, T; Eranen, S; Härkönen, J; Luukka, P; Tuovinen, E

    2006-01-01

    The structure of silicon semi three-dimensional radiation detector is simulated on purpose to find out its electrical characteristics such as the depletion voltage and electric field. Two-dimensional simulation results are compared to voltage and electric field measurements done by a scanning electron microscope.

  9. Design and fabrication of a 3D-structured gold film with nanopores for local electric field enhancement in the pore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant-Jacob, James A; Zin Oo, Swe; Carpignano, Francesca; Brocklesby, William S; Melvin, Tracy; Boden, Stuart A; Charlton, Martin D B

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensionally structured gold membrane films with nanopores of defined, periodic geometries are designed and fabricated to provide the spatially localised enhancement of electric fields by manipulation of the plasmons inside nanopores. Square nanopores of different size and orientation relative to the pyramid are considered for films in aqueous and air environments, which allow for control of the position of electric fields within the structure. Designs suitable for use with 780 nm light were created. Here, periodic pyramidal cavities produced by potassium hydroxide etching to the {111} planes of (100) silicon substrates are used as templates for creating a periodic, pyramidal structured, free-standing thin gold film. Consistent with the findings from the theoretical studies, a nano-sized hole of 50 nm square was milled through the gold film at a specific location in the cavity to provide electric field control which can subsequently used for enhancement of fluorescence or Raman scattering of molecules in the nanopore. (paper)

  10. Design and fabrication of a 3D-structured gold film with nanopores for local electric field enhancement in the pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Jacob, James A.; Zin Oo, Swe; Carpignano, Francesca; Boden, Stuart A.; Brocklesby, William S.; Charlton, Martin D. B.; Melvin, Tracy

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensionally structured gold membrane films with nanopores of defined, periodic geometries are designed and fabricated to provide the spatially localised enhancement of electric fields by manipulation of the plasmons inside nanopores. Square nanopores of different size and orientation relative to the pyramid are considered for films in aqueous and air environments, which allow for control of the position of electric fields within the structure. Designs suitable for use with 780 nm light were created. Here, periodic pyramidal cavities produced by potassium hydroxide etching to the {111} planes of (100) silicon substrates are used as templates for creating a periodic, pyramidal structured, free-standing thin gold film. Consistent with the findings from the theoretical studies, a nano-sized hole of 50 nm square was milled through the gold film at a specific location in the cavity to provide electric field control which can subsequently used for enhancement of fluorescence or Raman scattering of molecules in the nanopore.

  11. 3-D magnetic field calculations for wiggglers using MAGNUS-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissanetzky, S.; Tompkins, P.

    1988-01-01

    The recent but steady trend toward increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of wigglers and undulators, of which tapered wigglers, hybrid structures, laced electromagnetic wigglers, magnetic cladding, twisters and magic structures are examples, has caused a need for reliable 3-D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic systems in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D Group of Programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3-D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of Magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, linear or nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors of any shape in space. The magnetic properties of permanent magnets are described by the complete nonlinear demagnetization curve as provided by the manufacturer, or, at the user's choice, by a simpler approximation involving the coercive force, the residual induction and the direction of magnetization. The ferromagnetic materials are described by a magnetization table and an accurate interpolation relation. An internal library with properties of common industrial steels is available. The conductors are independent of the mesh and are described in terms of conductor elements from an internal library

  12. 3D reconstruction based on light field images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong; Wu, Chunhong; Liu, Yunluo; Fu, Dongmei

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposed a method of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scene from two light field images capture by Lytro illium. The work was carried out by first extracting the sub-aperture images from light field images and using the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) for feature registration on the selected sub-aperture images. Structure from motion (SFM) algorithm is further used on the registration completed sub-aperture images to reconstruct the three-dimensional scene. 3D sparse point cloud was obtained in the end. The method shows that the 3D reconstruction can be implemented by only two light field camera captures, rather than at least a dozen times captures by traditional cameras. This can effectively solve the time-consuming, laborious issues for 3D reconstruction based on traditional digital cameras, to achieve a more rapid, convenient and accurate reconstruction.

  13. LC-lens array with light field algorithm for 3D biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Pai; Hsieh, Po-Yuan; Hassanfiroozi, Amir; Martinez, Manuel; Javidi, Bahram; Chu, Chao-Yu; Hsuan, Yun; Chu, Wen-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, liquid crystal lens (LC-lens) array was utilized in 3D bio-medical applications including 3D endoscope and light field microscope. Comparing with conventional plastic lens array, which was usually placed in 3D endoscope or light field microscope system to record image disparity, our LC-lens array has higher flexibility of electrically changing its focal length. By using LC-lens array, the working distance and image quality of 3D endoscope and microscope could be enhanced. Furthermore, the 2D/3D switching ability could be achieved if we turn off/on the electrical power on LClens array. In 3D endoscope case, a hexagonal micro LC-lens array with 350um diameter was placed at the front end of a 1mm diameter endoscope. With applying electric field on LC-lens array, the 3D specimen would be recorded as from seven micro-cameras with different disparity. We could calculate 3D construction of specimen with those micro images. In the other hand, if we turn off the electric field on LC-lens array, the conventional high resolution 2D endoscope image would be recorded. In light field microscope case, the LC-lens array was placed in front of the CMOS sensor. The main purpose of LC-lens array is to extend the refocusing distance of light field microscope, which is usually very narrow in focused light field microscope system, by montaging many light field images sequentially focusing on different depth. With adjusting focal length of LC-lens array from 2.4mm to 2.9mm, the refocusing distance was extended from 1mm to 11.3mm. Moreover, we could use a LC wedge to electrically shift the optics axis and increase the resolution of light field.

  14. 3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso GeothermalField

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2007-04-23

    -dimensional conductivitymodel. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data was carried out using 2D MTimaging. An initial 3D conductivity model was constructed from a seriesof 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric fieldmeasurements (Zyx impedance elements) along several measurementtransects. This model was then refined through a 3D inversion process.This model shows the controlling geological structures possiblyinfluencing well production at Coso and correlations with mapped surfacefeatures such as faults and regional geoelectric strike. The 3D modelalso illustrates the refinement in positioning of conductivity contactswhen compared to isolated 2D inversion transects. The conductivity modelhas also been correlated with microearthquake locations, well fluidproduction intervals and most importantly with an acoustic and shearvelocity model derived by Wu and Lees (1999). This later correlationshows the near-vertical high conductivity structure on the eastern flankof the producing field is also a zone of increased acoustic velocity andincreased Vp/Vs ratio bounded by mapped fault traces. South of theDevil's Kitchen is an area of high geothermal well density, where highlyconductive near surface material is interpreted as a clay cap alterationzone manifested from the subsurface geothermal fluids and relatedgeochemistry. Beneath the clay cap, however, the conductivity isnondescript, whereas the Vp/Vs ratio is enhanced over the productionintervals. It is recommended that more MT data sites be acquired to thesouthwest of the Devil's Kitchen area to better refine the conductivitymodel in that area.

  15. 3D quantum gravity and effective noncommutative quantum field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidel, Laurent; Livine, Etera R

    2006-06-09

    We show that the effective dynamics of matter fields coupled to 3D quantum gravity is described after integration over the gravitational degrees of freedom by a braided noncommutative quantum field theory symmetric under a kappa deformation of the Poincaré group.

  16. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Moeller, Knut; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT. (paper)

  17. Magnetic field computations for ISX using GFUN-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between measured magnetic fields and the magnetic fields calculated by the three-dimensional computer program GFUN-3D for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX). Several iron models are considered ranging in sophistication from 50 to 222 tetrahedra iron elements. The effects of air gaps and the efforts made to simulate effects of grain orientation and packing factor are detailed. The results obtained are compared with the measured magnetic fields, and explanations are presented to account for the variations which occur

  18. Contribution of 3-D electrical resistivity tomography for landmines detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Metwaly

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Landmines are a type of inexpensive weapons widely used in the pre-conflicted areas in many countries worldwide. The two main types are the metallic and non-metallic (mostly plastic landmines. They are most commonly investigated by magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR, and metal detector (MD techniques. These geophysical techniques however have significant limitations in resolving the non-metallic landmines and wherever the host materials are conductive. In this work, the 3-D electric resistivity tomography (ERT technique is evaluated as an alternative and/or confirmation detection system for both landmine types, which are buried in different soil conditions and at different depths. This can be achieved using the capacitive resistivity imaging system, which does not need direct contact with the ground surface. Synthetic models for each case have been introduced using metallic and non-metallic bodies buried in wet and dry environments. The inversion results using the L1 norm least-squares optimization method tend to produce robust blocky models of the landmine body. The dipole axial and the dipole equatorial arrays tend to have the most favorable geometry by applying dynamic capacitive electrode and they show significant signal strength for data sets with up to 5% noise. Increasing the burial depth relative to the electrode spacing as well as the noise percentage in the resistivity data is crucial in resolving the landmines at different environments. The landmine with dimension and burial depth of one electrode separation unit is over estimated while the spatial resolutions decrease as the burial depth and noise percentage increase.

  19. 3D deformation field throughout the interior of materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Huiqing; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2013-09-01

    This report contains the one-year feasibility study for our three-year LDRD proposal that is aimed to develop an experimental technique to measure the 3D deformation fields inside a material body. In this feasibility study, we first apply Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) algorithm to pre-existing in-situ Xray Computed Tomography (XCT) image sets with pure rigid body translation. The calculated displacement field has very large random errors and low precision that are unacceptable. Then we enhance these tomography images by setting threshold of the intensity of each slice. DVC algorithm is able to obtain accurate deformation fields from these enhanced image sets and the deformation fields are consistent with the global mechanical loading that is applied to the specimen. Through this study, we prove that the internal markers inside the pre-existing tomography images of aluminum alloy can be enhanced and are suitable for DVC to calculate the deformation field throughout the material body.

  20. 3D Electric Waveforms of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.

    2018-01-01

    Electric fields provide the major coupling between the turbulence of the solar wind and particles. A large part of the turbulent spectrum of fluctuations in the solar wind is thought to be kinetic Alfvén waves; however, whistlers have recently been found to be important. In this article, we attempt to determine the mode identification of individual waveforms using the three-dimensional antenna system of the SWaves experiments on the STEREO spacecraft. Samples are chosen using waveforms with an apparent periodic structure, selected visually. The short antennas of STEREO respond to density fluctuations and to electric fields. Measurement of four quantities using only three antennas presents a problem. Methods to overcome or to ignore this difficulty are presented. We attempt to decide whether the waveforms correspond to the whistler mode or the Alfvén mode by using the direction of rotation of the signal. Most of the waveforms are so oblique—nearly linearly polarized—that the direction cannot be determined. However, about one third of the waveforms can be identified, and whistlers and Alfvén waves are present in roughly equal numbers. The selected waveforms are very intense but intermittent and are orders of magnitude stronger than the average, yet their accumulated signal accounts for a large fraction of the average. The average, however, is supposed to be the result of a turbulent mixture of many waves, not short coherent events. This presents a puzzle for future work.

  1. Field applications of the channel network model, CHAN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khademi, B.; Gylling, B.; Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1998-01-01

    The Channel Network model and its computer implementation, CHAN3D, was developed to simulate fluid flow and transport of solutes in fractured media. The model has been used to interpret field experiments of flow and transport in small and in large scale. It may also be used for safety assessments of repositories for nuclear and other hazardous wastes. In this case, CHAN3D has been coupled to a compartment model, NUCTRAN, to describe the near field of the repository. The model is based on field observations, which indicate that the flow and solute transport take place in a three-dimensional network of connected channels. The channels have very different properties and they are generated in the model from observed stochastic distributions. This allows us to represent the large heterogeneity of the flow distribution commonly observed in fractured media. Solute transport is modelled considering advection and rock interactions such as matrix diffusion and sorption within the interior of the rock. Objects such as fracture zones, tunnels and release sources can be incorporated in the model

  2. DIRECT DETECTION OF THE HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELD GEOMETRY FROM 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF PROMINENCE KNOT TRAJECTORIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapiór, Maciej; Martinez-Gómez, David, E-mail: zapior.maciek@gmail.com [Physics Department, University of the Balearic Islands, Cra. de Valldemossa, km 7.5. Palma (Illes Balears), E-07122 (Spain)

    2016-02-01

    Based on the data collected by the Vacuum Tower Telescope located in the Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands, we analyzed the three-dimensional (3D) motion of so-called knots in a solar prominence of 2014 June 9. Trajectories of seven knots were reconstructed, giving information of the 3D geometry of the magnetic field. Helical motion was detected. From the equipartition principle, we estimated the lower limit of the magnetic field in the prominence to ≈1–3 G and from the Ampère’s law the lower limit of the electric current to ≈1.2 × 10{sup 9} A.

  3. Direct Detection of the Helical Magnetic Field Geometry from 3D Reconstruction of Prominence Knot Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapiór, Maciej; Martínez-Gómez, David

    2016-02-01

    Based on the data collected by the Vacuum Tower Telescope located in the Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands, we analyzed the three-dimensional (3D) motion of so-called knots in a solar prominence of 2014 June 9. Trajectories of seven knots were reconstructed, giving information of the 3D geometry of the magnetic field. Helical motion was detected. From the equipartition principle, we estimated the lower limit of the magnetic field in the prominence to ≈1-3 G and from the Ampère’s law the lower limit of the electric current to ≈1.2 × 109 A.

  4. 3D print of polymer bonded rare-earth magnets, and 3D magnetic field scanning with an end-user 3D printer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, C.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Groenefeld, M.; Muthsam, O.; Schuschnigg, S.; Sirak, K.; Thanhoffer, R.; Teliban, I.; Vogler, C.; Windl, R.; Suess, D.

    2016-10-01

    3D print is a recently developed technique, for single-unit production, and for structures that have been impossible to build previously. The current work presents a method to 3D print polymer bonded isotropic hard magnets with a low-cost, end-user 3D printer. Commercially available isotropic NdFeB powder inside a PA11 matrix is characterized, and prepared for the printing process. An example of a printed magnet with a complex shape that was designed to generate a specific stray field is presented, and compared with finite element simulation solving the macroscopic Maxwell equations. For magnetic characterization, and comparing 3D printed structures with injection molded parts, hysteresis measurements are performed. To measure the stray field outside the magnet, the printer is upgraded to a 3D magnetic flux density measurement system. To skip an elaborate adjusting of the sensor, a simulation is used to calibrate the angles, sensitivity, and the offset of the sensor. With this setup, a measurement resolution of 0.05 mm along the z-axes is achievable. The effectiveness of our calibration method is shown. With our setup, we are able to print polymer bonded magnetic systems with the freedom of having a specific complex shape with locally tailored magnetic properties. The 3D scanning setup is easy to mount, and with our calibration method we are able to get accurate measuring results of the stray field.

  5. Electrical properties study under radiation of the 3D-open-shell-electrode detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manwen Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 3D-Open-Shell-Electrode Detector (3DOSED is proposed and the structure is optimized, it is important to study 3DOSED’s electrical properties to determine the detector’s working performance, especially in the heavy radiation environments, like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC and it’s upgrade, the High Luminosity (HL-LHC at CERN. In this work, full 3D technology computer-aided design (TCAD simulations have been done on this novel silicon detector structure. Simulated detector properties include the electric field distribution, the electric potential distribution, current-voltage (I-V characteristics, capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristics, charge collection property, and full depletion voltage. Through the analysis of calculations and simulation results, we find that the 3DOSED’s electric field and potential distributions are very uniform, even in the tiny region near the shell openings with little perturbations. The novel detector fits the designing purpose of collecting charges generated by particle/light in a good fashion with a well defined funnel shape of electric potential distribution that makes these charges drifting towards the center collection electrode. Furthermore, by analyzing the I-V, C-V, charge collection property and full depletion voltage, we can expect that the novel detector will perform well, even in the heavy radiation environments.

  6. Electric-dipole allowed and intercombination transitions among the 3d5, 3d44s and 3d44p levels of Fe IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Oscillator strengths and transition rates for the electric-dipole (E1) allowed and intercombination transitions among 3d 5 , 3d 4 4s and 3d 4 4p levels of Fe IV are calculated using the CIV3 code of Hibbert and coworkers. Using the Hartree-Fock functions up to 3d orbitals we have also optimized 4s, 4p, 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p and 5d orbitals of which 4s and 4p are taken to be spectroscopic and the remaining orbitals represent corrections to the spectroscopic orbitals or the correlation effects. The J-dependent levels of 108 LS states are included in the calculation and the relativistic effects are accounted for via the Breit-Pauli operator. Configurations are chosen in two steps: (a) two promotions were allowed from the 3p, 3d, 4s and 4p subshells, using all the orbitals; and (b) selective promotions from the 3s subshell are included, but only to the 3s and 4s orbitals. The ab initio fine-structure levels are then fine tuned to reproduce observed energy levels as closely as possible, and the resulting wavefunctions are used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition rates for all possible E1 transitions. For many of these transitions, the present results show good agreement between the length and velocity forms while for some transitions, some large disagreements are found with other available results. The complete list of weighted oscillator strengths, transition rates, and line strengths for transitions among the fine structure levels of the three lowest configurations are presented in ascending order of wavelength.

  7. Particle trajectories in full 3D flow field of turbomachinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Z.G.; Huang, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Particle trajectory prediction is important for particulate laden flow turbomachinery as it helps to understand the cause of erosion phenomena and to improve the design of blade passages. In this paper, on the basis of previous works, particle trajectories in turbine stages are predicted in connection with full 3D gas flow field solved by time marching method. The secondary flow effect is also partially considered by assuming a total pressure distribution at the inlet of the moving blade row. The results show that passage vortex due to secondary flow will cause upward and downward divergence of particle trajectories at the rear part of near blade pressure surface which is evidenced by the real appearance of eroded trace on turbine blade after long period of operation

  8. Advanced prior modeling for 3D bright field electron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreehari, Suhas; Venkatakrishnan, S. V.; Drummy, Lawrence F.; Simmons, Jeffrey P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Many important imaging problems in material science involve reconstruction of images containing repetitive non-local structures. Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) could in principle exploit such redundancies through the selection of a log prior probability term. However, in practice, determining such a log prior term that accounts for the similarity between distant structures in the image is quite challenging. Much progress has been made in the development of denoising algorithms like non-local means and BM3D, and these are known to successfully capture non-local redundancies in images. But the fact that these denoising operations are not explicitly formulated as cost functions makes it unclear as to how to incorporate them in the MBIR framework. In this paper, we formulate a solution to bright field electron tomography by augmenting the existing bright field MBIR method to incorporate any non-local denoising operator as a prior model. We accomplish this using a framework we call plug-and-play priors that decouples the log likelihood and the log prior probability terms in the MBIR cost function. We specifically use 3D non-local means (NLM) as the prior model in the plug-and-play framework, and showcase high quality tomographic reconstructions of a simulated aluminum spheres dataset, and two real datasets of aluminum spheres and ferritin structures. We observe that streak and smear artifacts are visibly suppressed, and that edges are preserved. Also, we report lower RMSE values compared to the conventional MBIR reconstruction using qGGMRF as the prior model.

  9. 3D stroke rehabilitation using electrical stimulation and robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Daisy; Cai, Zhonglun; Meadmore, Katie; Hughes, Anne-Marie; Freeman, Christopher; Burridge, Jane; Rogers, E

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and foremost cause of adult disability in the UK. A third of the surviving patients suffer from some degree of motor disability and depend on others to undertake daily activities. Conventional rehabilitation can mitigate this disability, but only 5% of the severely paralysed patients regain full upper limb function. Past studies have shown evidence of more effective technologies such as rehabilitation robotics and functional electrical stimulation (F...

  10. Electrical Characterization of 3D Au Microelectrodes for Use in Retinal Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Seo, Jong-Mo; Chung, Hum; Cho, Dong-Il Dan

    2015-06-17

    In order to provide high-quality visual information to patients who have implanted retinal prosthetic devices, the number of microelectrodes should be large. As the number of microelectrodes is increased, the dimensions of each microelectrode must be decreased, which in turn results in an increased microelectrode interface impedance and decreased injection current dynamic range. In order to improve the trade-off envelope between the number of microelectrodes and the current injection characteristics, a 3D microelectrode structure can be used as an alternative. In this paper, the electrical characteristics of 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes were investigated. In order to examine the effects of the structural difference, 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes with different base areas but similar effective surface areas were fabricated and evaluated. Interface impedances were measured and similar dynamic ranges were obtained for both 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes. These results indicate that more electrodes can be implemented in the same area if 3D designs are used. Furthermore, the 3D Au microelectrodes showed substantially enhanced electrical durability characteristics against over-injected stimulation currents, withstanding electrical currents that are much larger than the limit measured for 2D microelectrodes of similar area. This enhanced electrical durability property of 3D Au microelectrodes is a new finding in microelectrode research, and makes 3D microelectrodes very desirable devices.

  11. Electrical Characterization of 3D Au Microelectrodes for Use in Retinal Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide high-quality visual information to patients who have implanted retinal prosthetic devices, the number of microelectrodes should be large. As the number of microelectrodes is increased, the dimensions of each microelectrode must be decreased, which in turn results in an increased microelectrode interface impedance and decreased injection current dynamic range. In order to improve the trade-off envelope between the number of microelectrodes and the current injection characteristics, a 3D microelectrode structure can be used as an alternative. In this paper, the electrical characteristics of 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes were investigated. In order to examine the effects of the structural difference, 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes with different base areas but similar effective surface areas were fabricated and evaluated. Interface impedances were measured and similar dynamic ranges were obtained for both 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes. These results indicate that more electrodes can be implemented in the same area if 3D designs are used. Furthermore, the 3D Au microelectrodes showed substantially enhanced electrical durability characteristics against over-injected stimulation currents, withstanding electrical currents that are much larger than the limit measured for 2D microelectrodes of similar area. This enhanced electrical durability property of 3D Au microelectrodes is a new finding in microelectrode research, and makes 3D microelectrodes very desirable devices.

  12. Low-Cost Energy-Efficient 3-D Nano-Spikes-Based Electric Cell Lysis Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Riaz, Kashif

    2017-05-04

    Electric cell lysis (ECL) is a promising technique to be integrated with portable lab-on-a-chip without lysing agent due to its simplicity and fast processing. ECL is usually limited by the requirements of high power/voltage and costly fabrication. In this paper, we present low-cost 3-D nano-spikes-based ECL (NSP-ECL) chips for efficient cell lysis at low power consumption. Highly ordered High-Aspect-Ratio (HAR). NSP arrays with controllable dimensions were fabricated on commercial aluminum foils through scalable and electrochemical anodization and etching. The optimized multiple pulse protocols with minimized undesirable electrochemical reactions (gas and bubble generation), common on micro parallel-plate ECL chips. Due to the scalability of fabrication process, 3-D NSPs were fabricated on small chips as well as on 4-in wafers. Phase diagram was constructed by defining critical electric field to induce cell lysis and for cell lysis saturation Esat to define non-ECL and ECL regions for different pulse parameters. NSP-ECL chips have achieved excellent cell lysis efficiencies ηlysis (ca 100%) at low applied voltages (2 V), 2~3 orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional systems. The energy consumption of NSP-ECL chips was 0.5-2 mJ/mL, 3~9 orders of magnitude lower as compared with the other methods (5J/mL-540kJ/mL). [2016-0305

  13. Group field theory formulation of 3D quantum gravity coupled to matter fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Ryan, James

    2006-01-01

    We present a new group field theory describing 3D Riemannian quantum gravity coupled to matter fields for any choice of spin and mass. The perturbative expansion of the partition function produces fat graphs coloured with SU(2) algebraic data, from which one can reconstruct at once a three-dimensional simplicial complex representing spacetime and its geometry, like in the Ponzano-Regge formulation of pure 3D quantum gravity, and the Feynman graphs for the matter fields. The model then assigns quantum amplitudes to these fat graphs given by spin foam models for gravity coupled to interacting massive spinning point particles, whose properties we discuss

  14. Dynamic scattering theory for dark-field electron holography of 3D strain fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubk, Axel; Javon, Elsa; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Gatel, Christophe; Hÿtch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark-field electron holography maps strain in crystal lattices into reconstructed phases over large fields of view. Here we investigate the details of the lattice strain-reconstructed phase relationship by applying dynamic scattering theory both analytically and numerically. We develop efficient analytic linear projection rules for 3D strain fields, facilitating a straight-forward calculation of reconstructed phases from 3D strained materials. They are used in the following to quantify the influence of various experimental parameters like strain magnitude, specimen thickness, excitation error and surface relaxation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 3D design and electric simulation of a silicon drift detector using a spiral biasing adapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu-yun; Xiong, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Center for Semiconductor Particle and photon Imaging Detector, Development and Fabrication, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Li, Zheng, E-mail: zhengli58@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Center for Semiconductor Particle and photon Imaging Detector, Development and Fabrication, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China)

    2016-09-21

    The detector system of combining a spiral biasing adapter (SBA) with a silicon drift detector (SBA-SDD) is largely different from the traditional silicon drift detector (SDD), including the spiral SDD. It has a spiral biasing adapter of the same design as a traditional spiral SDD and an SDD with concentric rings having the same radius. Compared with the traditional spiral SDD, the SBA-SDD separates the spiral's functions of biasing adapter and the p–n junction definition. In this paper, the SBA-SDD is simulated using a Sentaurus TCAD tool, which is a full 3D device simulation tool. The simulated electric characteristics include electric potential, electric field, electron concentration, and single event effect. Because of the special design of the SBA-SDD, the SBA can generate an optimum drift electric field in the SDD, comparable with the conventional spiral SDD, while the SDD can be designed with concentric rings to reduce surface area. Also the current and heat generated in the SBA are separated from the SDD. To study the single event response, we simulated the induced current caused by incident heavy ions (20 and 50 μm penetration length) with different linear energy transfer (LET). The SBA-SDD can be used just like a conventional SDD, such as X-ray detector for energy spectroscopy and imaging, etc. - Highlights: • The separation of the spiral biasing adapter and SDD is a new concept. • The distribution of the electric potential is symmetrical around the axis through the anode. • The region with higher electron concentrations defines the drift channel.

  16. The effect of z-binding yarns on the electrical properties of 3D woven composites

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr; Yudhanto, Arief; Lubineau, Gilles; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistance monitoring (ERM) has been used to study the effect of the z-binding yarns on the initial electrical resistance (ER) and its change of three architectures of 3D woven carbon fibre composites namely (orthogonal “ORT”, layer

  17. Estimation of 3-D conduction velocity vector fields from cardiac mapping data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, A R; Bayly, P V; Zhang, S; Walcott, G P; Ideker, R E; Smith, W M

    2000-08-01

    A method to estimate three-dimensional (3-D) conduction velocity vector fields in cardiac tissue is presented. The speed and direction of propagation are found from polynomial "surfaces" fitted to space-time (x, y, z, t) coordinates of cardiac activity. The technique is applied to sinus rhythm and paced rhythm mapped with plunge needles at 396-466 sites in the canine myocardium. The method was validated on simulated 3-D plane and spherical waves. For simulated data, conduction velocities were estimated with an accuracy of 1%-2%. In experimental data, estimates of conduction speeds during paced rhythm were slower than those found during normal sinus rhythm. Vector directions were also found to differ between different types of beats. The technique was able to distinguish between premature ventricular contractions and sinus beats and between sinus and paced beats. The proposed approach to computing velocity vector fields provides an automated, physiological, and quantitative description of local electrical activity in 3-D tissue. This method may provide insight into abnormal conduction associated with fatal ventricular arrhythmias.

  18. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes

  19. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  20. Contribution to the ATLAS B-field 3D model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Titkova, I.V.; Nessi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The results from the simplified Tile-Cal B-field models calculations are presented. The effects of glue gaps, end plates, front plates, laminated iron layer near girder, 2 mm iron layers between tiles have been estimated. An interpretation of the existing field measurements of the TileCal segments is fulfilled. Some proposals for the general ATLAS B-field map calculation are given. 12 refs., 10 figs

  1. Electrical performance analysis of HTS synchronous motor based on 3D FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, S.K.; Kwon, Y.K.; Kim, H.M.; Lee, J.D.; Kim, Y.C.; Park, G.S.

    2010-01-01

    A 1-MW class superconducting motor with High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) field coil is analyzed and tested. This machine is a prototype to make sure applicability aimed at generator and industrial motor applications such as blowers, pumps and compressors installed in large plants. This machine has the HTS field coil made of Bi-2223 HTS wire and the conventional copper armature (stator) coils cooled by water. The 1-MW class HTS motor is analyzed by 3D electromagnetic Finite Element Method (FEM) to get magnetic field distribution, self and mutual inductance, and so forth. Especially excitation voltage (Back EMF) is estimated by using the mutual inductance between armature and field coils and compared with experimental result. Open and short circuit tests were conducted in generator mode while a 1.1-MW rated induction machine was rotating the HTS machine. Electrical parameters such as mutual inductance and synchronous inductance are deduced from these tests and also compared with the analysis results from FEM.

  2. 3D Distance Fields: A Survey of Techniques and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Mark; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Sramek, Milos

    2006-01-01

    the distance field is signed, we may also determine if the point is internal or external to objects within the domain. The distance field has been found to be a useful construction within the areas of Computer Vision, Physics and Computer Graphics. This paper serves as a timely exposition of methods...

  3. Monitoring percolation of a conductive tracer, as a proxy for nitrate transport, through glacial till and fractured sandstone in the vadose zone underlying a potato field, using 3D cross-hole electrical resistivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Butler, K. E.; Serban, D.; Petersen, B.; Grimmett, M.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrate is a necessary nutrient for crops, but high surface water and groundwater concentrations can negatively affect aquatic ecosystem and human health. At AAFC-AAC Harrington Research Farm (PEI, Canada), 3D cross-hole electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is being used to investigate the percolation of a conductive tracer (KCl) through a 17 m thick vadose zone as a proxy for the transport of nitrate under natural recharge conditions. The objectives are to investigate the effect of heterogeneity on transport pathways and infer how long it would take for changes in farming practices at the surface to affect nitrate loading to the underlying aquifer. The resistivity array consists of 96 permanently installed electrodes - 24 at 0.68 m spacing in each of three 16 m deep boreholes arranged in a triangle with 9 m sides, and 24 at 1 m spacing buried in shallow trenches connecting the boreholes. A background survey revealed five sub-horizontal layers of alternating resistivity in general agreement with the geology of 6 m soil and glacial till overburden overlying interbedded sandstone and shaley sandstone layers. On March 27th, 2015, 1.1 m of snow was removed from a 15.2 m2 area positioned symmetrically inside the triangular array and 100 kg of granular KCl was distributed on the ground surface. The removed snow was immediately replaced to await the spring thaw. Post-tracer surveys indicate tracer had percolated to depths of 1 m, 1.2 m, 3.0 m and 3.5 m by the 4th, 26th, 30th, and 46th days after tracer application. Its movement slowed significantly by early May, 2015, with the end of snow melt. Tracer spread laterally very slowly through the summer and early fall, 2015, but has remained within the triangular array. The shallow conductivity anomaly produced by the tracer diminished significantly over the winter and spring of 2016 but showed little evidence of bulk matrix flow below 3.5 m depth. It is speculated that fractures in the glacial till, too thin to be resolved by

  4. Conformal FDTD modeling of 3-D wake fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurgens, T.G.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    Many computer codes have been written to model wake fields. Here the authors describe the use of the Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain (CFDTD) method to model the wake fields generated by a rigid beam traveling through various accelerating structures. The non-cylindrical symmetry of some of the problems considered here requires the use of a three dimensional code. In traditional FDTD codes, curved surfaces are approximated by rectangular steps. The errors introduced in wake field calculations by such an approximation can be reduced by increasing the mesh size, therefore increasing the cost of computing. Another approach, validated here, deforms Ampere and Faraday contours near a media interface so as to conform to the interface. These improvements so as to conform to the interface. These improvements to the FDTD method result in better accuracy of the fields at asymptotically no computational cost. This method is also capable of modeling thin wires as found in beam profile monitors, and slots and cracks as found in resistive wall monitors

  5. Dynamic scattering theory for dark-field electron holography of 3D strain fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubk, Axel; Javon, Elsa; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Gatel, Christophe; Hÿtch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark-field electron holography maps strain in crystal lattices into reconstructed phases over large fields of view. Here we investigate the details of the lattice strain–reconstructed phase relationship by applying dynamic scattering theory both analytically and numerically. We develop efficient analytic linear projection rules for 3D strain fields, facilitating a straight-forward calculation of reconstructed phases from 3D strained materials. They are used in the following to quantify the influence of various experimental parameters like strain magnitude, specimen thickness, excitation error and surface relaxation. - Author-Highlights: • We derive a simple dynamic scattering formalism for dark field electron holography based on a perturbative two-beam theory. • The formalism facilitates the projection of 3D strain fields by a simple weighting integral. • The weighted projection depends analytically on the diffraction order, the excitation error and the specimen thickness. • The weighting integral formalism represents an important prerequisite towards the development of tomographic strain reconstruction techniques

  6. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-01-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ''splatting'' scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ''flow volume'' of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity

  7. Examples of 3-D field calculations using GFUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Magnets are described that were calculated using GFUN. A four-step procedure is used to calculate magnets using GFUN. First, the interactive TSO system is used to draw the geometry of the magnet on a Tektronix 4012 graphic display unit. When the geometry is correct, it is stored on a disc file that is shared by the batch computers 3033 and 195. A file JCL and data can be created on TSO and submitted to the batch computers to calculate the magnetization of the steel tetrahedron elements. The results of this approx. 1 hour batch job are stored on disc. In the same job, or in a separate one, the fields can be calculated at desired points and stored on a shared disc. The fourth step is to plot these fields interactively in TSO

  8. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  9. Resolving stellar populations with crowded field 3D spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamann, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new method of extracting the spectra of stars from observations of crowded stellar fields with integral field spectroscopy (IFS). Our approach extends the well-established concept of crowded field photometry in images into the domain of 3-dimensional spectroscopic datacubes. The main features of our algorithm follow. (1) We assume that a high-fidelity input source catalogue already exists, e.g. from HST data, and that it is not needed to perform sophisticated source detection in the IFS data. (2) Source positions and properties of the point spread function (PSF) vary smoothly between spectral layers of the datacube, and these variations can be described by simple fitting functions. (3) The shape of the PSF can be adequately described by an analytical function. Even without isolated PSF calibrator stars we can therefore estimate the PSF by a model fit to the full ensemble of stars visible within the field of view. (4) By using sparse matrices to describe the sources, the problem of extracting the spectra of many stars simultaneously becomes computationally tractable. We present extensive performance and validation tests of our algorithm using realistic simulated datacubes that closely reproduce actual IFS observations of the central regions of Galactic globular clusters. We investigate the quality of the extracted spectra under the effects of crowding with respect to the resulting signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) and any possible changes in the continuum level, as well as with respect to absorption line spectral parameters, radial velocities, and equivalent widths. The main effect of blending between two nearby stars is a decrease in the S/N in their spectra. The effect increases with the crowding in the field in a way that the maximum number of stars with useful spectra is always ~0.2 per spatial resolution element. This balance breaks down when exceeding a total source density of one significantly detected star per resolution element. We also explore the

  10. 3D fingerprint imaging system based on full-field fringe projection profilometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shujun; Zhang, Zonghua; Zhao, Yan; Dai, Jie; Chen, Chao; Xu, Yongjia; Zhang, E.; Xie, Lili

    2014-01-01

    As an unique, unchangeable and easily acquired biometrics, fingerprint has been widely studied in academics and applied in many fields over the years. The traditional fingerprint recognition methods are based on the obtained 2D feature of fingerprint. However, fingerprint is a 3D biological characteristic. The mapping from 3D to 2D loses 1D information and causes nonlinear distortion of the captured fingerprint. Therefore, it is becoming more and more important to obtain 3D fingerprint information for recognition. In this paper, a novel 3D fingerprint imaging system is presented based on fringe projection technique to obtain 3D features and the corresponding color texture information. A series of color sinusoidal fringe patterns with optimum three-fringe numbers are projected onto a finger surface. From another viewpoint, the fringe patterns are deformed by the finger surface and captured by a CCD camera. 3D shape data of the finger can be obtained from the captured fringe pattern images. This paper studies the prototype of the 3D fingerprint imaging system, including principle of 3D fingerprint acquisition, hardware design of the 3D imaging system, 3D calibration of the system, and software development. Some experiments are carried out by acquiring several 3D fingerprint data. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed 3D fingerprint imaging system.

  11. 3-D explosions: a meditation on rotation (and magnetic fields)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. C.

    This is the text of an introduction to a workshop on asymmetric explosions held in Austin in June, 2003. The great progress in supernova research over thirty-odd years is briefly reviewed. The context in which the meeting was called is then summarized. The theoretical success of the intrinsically multidimensional delayed detonation paradigm in explaining the nature of Type Ia supernovae coupled with new techniques of observations in the near IR and with spectropolarimetry promise great advances in understanding binary progenitors, the explosion physics, and the ever more accurate application to cosmology. Spectropolarimetry has also revealed the strongly asymmetric nature of core collapse and given valuable perspectives on the supernova - gamma-ray burst connection. The capability of the magneto-rotational instability to rapidly create strong toroidal magnetic fields in the core collapse ambiance is outlined. This physics may be the precursor to driving MHD jets that play a role in asymmetric supernovae. Welcome to the brave new world of three-dimensional explosions!

  12. A Unified 3D Mesh Segmentation Framework Based on Markov Random Field

    OpenAIRE

    Z.F. Shi; L.Y. Lu; D. Le; X.M. Niu

    2012-01-01

    3D Mesh segmentation has become an important research field in computer graphics during the past decades. Many geometry based and semantic oriented approaches for 3D mesh segmentation has been presented. In this paper, we present a definition of mesh segmentation according to labeling problem. Inspired by the Markov Random Field (MRF) based image segmentation, we propose a new framework of 3D mesh segmentation based on MRF and use graph cuts to solve it. Any features of 3D mesh can be integra...

  13. Ray calibration and phase mapping for structured-light-field 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zewei; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang; Gao, Bruce Z

    2018-03-19

    In previous work, we presented a structured light field (SLF) method combining light field imaging with structured illumination to perform multi-view depth measurement. However, the previous work just accomplishes depth rather than 3D reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a novel active method involving ray calibration and phase mapping, to achieve SLF 3D reconstruction. We performed the ray calibration for the first time to determine each light field ray with metric spatio-angular parameters, making the SLF realize multi-view 3D reconstruction. Based on the ray parametric equation, we further derived the phase mapping in the SLF that spatial coordinates can be directly mapped from phase. A flexible calibration strategy was correspondently designed to determine mapping coefficients for each light field ray, achieving high-efficiency SLF 3D reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method was suitable for high-efficiency multi-view 3D reconstruction in the SLF.

  14. Visualization research of 3D radiation field based on Delaunay triangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Changji; Chen Yuqing; Li Shiting; Zhu Bo

    2011-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of the three dimensional partition, the triangulation of discrete date sets is improved by the method of point-by-point insertion. The discrete data for the radiation field by theoretical calculation or actual measurement is restructured, and the continuous distribution of the radiation field data is obtained. Finally, the 3D virtual scene of the nuclear facilities is built with the VR simulation techniques, and the visualization of the 3D radiation field is also achieved by the visualization mapping techniques. It is shown that the method combined VR and Delaunay triangulation could greatly improve the quality and efficiency of 3D radiation field visualization. (authors)

  15. Study of filled dolines by using 3D stereo image processing and electrical resistivity imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Breg Valjavec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with doline degradation due to uncontrolled waste dumping in the past in the Logatec Polje in Slovenia. It introduces a concept for determining 3D geometric characteristics (shape, depth, radius, area, and volume of formerly concave landforms (i.e., recently filled dolines by using a combination of two methods: (1 photogrammetric stereo processing of archival aerial photographs and (2 electrical resistivity imaging (ERI. To represent, visualize, and study the characteristics of the former surface morphology (i.e., the dolines before they were filled, a digital terrain model (DTM for 1972 (DTM1972 was made using digital photogrammetry processing of five sequential archival aerial photographs (1972, © GURS. DTM1972 was visually and quantitatively compared with the DTM5 of the recent surface morfology (DTM5, © GURS, 2006 in order to define areas of manmade terrain differences. In general, a circular area with a higher terrain difference is an indicator of a filled doline. The calculated terrain differences also indicate the thickness of buried waste material. Three case-study dolines were selected for 3D geometric analysis and tested in the field using ERI. ERI was used to determine the genetic type of the original doline, to confirm that the buried material in the doline is actually waste, and to ascertain opportunities for further study of water pollution due to waste leakage. Based on a comparison among the ERI sections obtained using various electrode arrays, it was concluded that the basins are actually past concave landforms (i.e., dolines filled with mixed waste material having the lowest resistivity value (bellow 100 ohm-m, which differs measurably from the surrounding natural materials. The resistivity of hard stacked limestone is higher (above 1,000 ohm-m than resistivity of cracked carbonate rocks with cracks filled with loamy clay sediments while in loamy alluvial sediment resistivity falls below 150 ohm

  16. A multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system for real-time 2D and 3D imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunjie; Jia, Jiabin

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a configurable, fast multi-frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography (mfEIT) system for real-time 2D and 3D imaging, particularly for biomedical imaging. The system integrates 32 electrode interfaces and the current frequency ranges from 10 kHz to 1 MHz. The system incorporates the following novel features. First, a fully adjustable multi-frequency current source with current monitoring function is designed. Second, a flexible switching scheme is developed for arbitrary sensing configuration and a semi-parallel data acquisition architecture is implemented for high-frame-rate data acquisition. Furthermore, multi-frequency digital quadrature demodulation is accomplished in a high-capacity Field Programmable Gate Array. At last, a 3D imaging software, visual tomography, is developed for real-time 2D and 3D image reconstruction, data analysis, and visualization. The mfEIT system is systematically tested and evaluated from the aspects of signal to noise ratio (SNR), frame rate, and 2D and 3D multi-frequency phantom imaging. The highest SNR is 82.82 dB on a 16-electrode sensor. The frame rate is up to 546 fps at serial mode and 1014 fps at semi-parallel mode. The evaluation results indicate that the presented mfEIT system is a powerful tool for real-time 2D and 3D imaging.

  17. Electric fields and electrical insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    2002-01-01

    The adoption of a field-theoretical approach to problems arising in the framework of electrical insulation is discussed with reference to six main topics, which have been addressed over the last 30 years. These include uniform field electrodes, Green's differential equation, electrode surface...... roughness, induced charge, electrostatic probes, and partial discharge transients, together with several follow-on aspects. Each topic is introduced and thereafter the progress achieved through the use of a field-theoretical approach is reviewed. Because the topics cover a wide spectrum of conditions......, it is amply demonstrated that such an approach can lead to significant progress in many areas of electrical insulation....

  18. Electric Field Imaging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NDE historically has focused technology development in propagating wave phenomena with little attention to the field of electrostatics and emanating electric fields....

  19. 3D Electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of an artificial tracer injected within the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzé, Clémence; Pessel, Marc; Durand, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    Due to the high complexity level of hyporheic flow paths, hydrological and biogeochemical processes which occur in this mixing place are not fully understood yet. Some previous studies made in flumes show that hyporheic flow is strongly connected to the streambed morphology and sediment heterogeneity . There is still a lack of practical field experiment considering a natural environment and representation of natural streambed heterogeneities will be always limited in laboratories. The purpose of this project is to propose an innovative method using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring of an artificial tracer injection directly within the streambed sediments in order to visualize the water pathways within the hyporheic zone. Field experiment on a small stream was conducted using a plastic tube as an injection piezometer and home-made electrodes strips arranged in a rectangular form made of 180 electrodes (15 strips of 12 electrodes each). The injection of tracer (NaCl) lasted approximatively 90 minutes, and 24h monitoring with increasing step times was performed. The physical properties of the water are controlled by CTD probes installed upstream and downstream within the river. Inverse time-lapse tomographs show development and persistence of a conductive water plume around the injection point. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments (clay and overlying loess), the tracer movement is barely visible, as it dilutes gradually in the pore water. Impact of boundary conditions on inversion results can lead to significant differences on images, especially in the shallow part of the profiles. Preferential paths of transport are not highlighted here, but this experiment allows to follow spatially and temporarily the evolution of the tracer in a complex natural environment .

  20. RFID Antenna Near-field Characterization Using a New 3D Magnetic Field Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassem Jomaa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the design of a new 3D magnetic field (H-field probe with a near-field scanning system is presented, then the near electromagnetic fields radiated by a Library RFID system is characterized. The proposed system is developed in order to determine the magnetic near-field emitted by electronic devices. The designed isotropic H-field probe consists of three orthogonal and identical loops each of diameter of 6 mm having 3 turns. The antenna factor of the designed probe is presented for a frequency range from 10 MHz to 1 GHz. The designed probe is tested and validated using a standard passive circuit as a device under test. An RFID reader antenna is also designed and simulated on HFSS (high frequency structural simulator and the radiated magnetic field, obtained by simulations, is then compared to the real measured one above the fabricated circuit. The obtained levels are checked if they satisfy the European and ICNIRP Electromagnetic Fields Guidelines.

  1. Electrical impedance tomography in 3D using two electrode planes: characterization and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Justin; Adler, Andy

    2016-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) uses body surface electrical stimulation and measurements to create conductivity images; it shows promise as a non-invasive technology to monitor the distribution of lung ventilation. Most applications of EIT have placed electrodes in a 2D ring around the thorax, and thus produced 2D cross-sectional images. These images are unable to distinguish out-of-plane contributions, or to image volumetric effects. Volumetric EIT can be calculated using multiple electrode planes and a 3D reconstruction algorithm. However, while 3D reconstruction algorithms are available, little has been done to understand the performance of 3D EIT in terms of the measurement configurations available. The goal of this paper is to characterize the phantom and in vivo performance of 3D EIT with two electrode planes. First, phantom measurements are used to measure the reconstruction characteristics of seven stimulation and measurement configurations. Measurements were then performed on eight healthy volunteers as a function of body posture, postures, and with various electrode configurations. Phantom results indicate that 3D EIT using two rings of electrodes provides reasonable resolution in the electrode plane but low vertical resolution. For volunteers, functional EIT images are created from inhalation curve features to analyze the effect of posture (standing, sitting, supine and decline) on regional lung behaviour. An ability to detect vertical changes in lung volume distribution was shown for two electrode configurations. Based on tank and volunteer results, we recommend the use of the 'square' stimulation and measurement pattern for two electrode plane EIT.

  2. A cross-platform solution for light field based 3D telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gengkun; Xiang, Wei; Pickering, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Current telehealth services are dominated by conventional 2D video conferencing systems, which are limited in their capabilities in providing a satisfactory communication experience due to the lack of realism. The "immersiveness" provided by 3D technologies has the potential to promote telehealth services to a wider range of applications. However, conventional stereoscopic 3D technologies are deficient in many aspects, including low resolution and the requirement for complicated multi-camera setup and calibration, and special glasses. The advent of light field (LF) photography enables us to record light rays in a single shot and provide glasses-free 3D display with continuous motion parallax in a wide viewing zone, which is ideally suited for 3D telehealth applications. As far as our literature review suggests, there have been no reports of 3D telemedicine systems using LF technology. In this paper, we propose a cross-platform solution for a LF-based 3D telemedicine system. Firstly, a novel system architecture based on LF technology is established, which is able to capture the LF of a patient, and provide an immersive 3D display at the doctor site. For 3D modeling, we further propose an algorithm which is able to convert the captured LF to a 3D model with a high level of detail. For the software implementation on different platforms (i.e., desktop, web-based and mobile phone platforms), a cross-platform solution is proposed. Demo applications have been developed for 2D/3D video conferencing, 3D model display and edit, blood pressure and heart rate monitoring, and patient data viewing functions. The demo software can be extended to multi-discipline telehealth applications, such as tele-dentistry, tele-wound and tele-psychiatry. The proposed 3D telemedicine solution has the potential to revolutionize next-generation telemedicine technologies by providing a high quality immersive tele-consultation experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electric Current Filamentation Induced by 3D Plasma Flows in the Solar Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickeler, Dieter H.; Karlický, Marian; Kraus, Michaela [Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České Republiky, v.v.i., Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Wiegelmann, Thomas, E-mail: dieter.nickeler@asu.cas.cz [Max-Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2017-03-10

    Many magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere evolve rather slowly, so they can be assumed as (quasi-)static or (quasi-)stationary and represented via magnetohydrostatic (MHS) or stationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, respectively. While exact 3D solutions would be desired, they are extremely difficult to find in stationary MHD. We construct solutions with magnetic and flow vector fields that have three components depending on all three coordinates. We show that the noncanonical transformation method produces quasi-3D solutions of stationary MHD by mapping 2D or 2.5D MHS equilibria to corresponding stationary MHD states, that is, states that display the same field-line structure as the original MHS equilibria. These stationary MHD states exist on magnetic flux surfaces of the original 2D MHS states. Although the flux surfaces and therefore also the equilibria have a 2D character, these stationary MHD states depend on all three coordinates and display highly complex currents. The existence of geometrically complex 3D currents within symmetric field-line structures provides the basis for efficient dissipation of the magnetic energy in the solar corona by ohmic heating. We also discuss the possibility of maintaining an important subset of nonlinear MHS states, namely force-free fields, by stationary flows. We find that force-free fields with nonlinear flows only arise under severe restrictions of the field-line geometry and of the magnetic flux density distribution.

  4. A 360-degree floating 3D display based on light field regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinxing; Liu, Xu; Li, Haifeng; Zheng, Zhenrong; Wang, Han; Peng, Yifan; Shen, Weidong

    2013-05-06

    Using light field reconstruction technique, we can display a floating 3D scene in the air, which is 360-degree surrounding viewable with correct occlusion effect. A high-frame-rate color projector and flat light field scanning screen are used in the system to create the light field of real 3D scene in the air above the spinning screen. The principle and display performance of this approach are investigated in this paper. The image synthesis method for all the surrounding viewpoints is analyzed, and the 3D spatial resolution and angular resolution of the common display zone are employed to evaluate display performance. The prototype is achieved and the real 3D color animation image has been presented vividly. The experimental results verified the representability of this method.

  5. Modeling and simulating the adaptive electrical properties of stochastic polymeric 3D networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigala, R; Smerieri, A; Camorani, P; Schüz, A; Erokhin, V

    2013-01-01

    Memristors are passive two-terminal circuit elements that combine resistance and memory. Although in theory memristors are a very promising approach to fabricate hardware with adaptive properties, there are only very few implementations able to show their basic properties. We recently developed stochastic polymeric matrices with a functionality that evidences the formation of self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) networks of memristors. We demonstrated that those networks show the typical hysteretic behavior observed in the ‘one input-one output’ memristive configuration. Interestingly, using different protocols to electrically stimulate the networks, we also observed that their adaptive properties are similar to those present in the nervous system. Here, we model and simulate the electrical properties of these self-assembled polymeric networks of memristors, the topology of which is defined stochastically. First, we show that the model recreates the hysteretic behavior observed in the real experiments. Second, we demonstrate that the networks modeled indeed have a 3D instead of a planar functionality. Finally, we show that the adaptive properties of the networks depend on their connectivity pattern. Our model was able to replicate fundamental qualitative behavior of the real organic 3D memristor networks; yet, through the simulations, we also explored other interesting properties, such as the relation between connectivity patterns and adaptive properties. Our model and simulations represent an interesting tool to understand the very complex behavior of self-assembled memristor networks, which can finally help to predict and formulate hypotheses for future experiments. (paper)

  6. The effect of z-binding yarns on the electrical properties of 3D woven composites

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr

    2017-09-28

    Electrical resistance monitoring (ERM) has been used to study the effect of the z-binding yarns on the initial electrical resistance (ER) and its change of three architectures of 3D woven carbon fibre composites namely (orthogonal “ORT”, layer-to-layer “LTL” and angle interlock “AI”) when tested in tension. Specimens are loaded in on-axis “warp” and off-axis “45°” directions. In-situ ERM is achieved using the four-probe technique. Monotonic and cyclic “load/unload” tests are performed to investigate the effect of piezo-resistivity and residual plasticity on resistance variation. The resistance increase for the off-axis loaded specimens (∼90%) is found to be higher than that of their on-axis counterparts (∼20%). In the case of cyclic testing, the resistance increase upon unloading is irreversible which suggests permanent damage presence not piezo-resistive effect. At the moment, it is difficult to obtain a direct correlation between resistance variation and damage in 3D woven composites due to the complexity of the conduction path along the three orthogonal directions, however this study demonstrates the potential of using ERM for damage detection in 3D woven carbon fibre-based composites and highlights the challenges that need to be overcome to establish ERM as a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technique for such material systems.

  7. 3D pressure field in lipid membranes and membrane-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Risselada, H Jelger; Louhivuori, Martti

    2009-01-01

    We calculate full 3D pressure fields for inhomogeneous nanoscale systems using molecular dynamics simulation data. The fields represent systems with increasing level of complexity, ranging from semivesicles and vesicles to membranes characterized by coexistence of two phases, including also...... a protein-membrane complex. We show that the 3D pressure field is distinctly different for curved and planar bilayers, the pressure field depends strongly on the phase of the membrane, and that an integral protein modulates the tension and elastic properties of the membrane....

  8. Rehand: Realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Ryo; Higashihara, Takanori; Ogasawara, Tsukasa; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Myoelectric prosthetic hands provide an appearance with five fingers and a grasping function to forearm amputees. However, they have problems in weight, appearance, and cost. This paper reports on the Rehand, a realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer. It provides a realistic appearance that is same as the cosmetic prosthetic hand and a grasping function. A simple link mechanism with one linear actuator for grasping and 3D printed parts achieve low cost, light weight, and ease of maintenance. An operating system based on a distance sensor provides a natural operability equivalent to the myoelectric control system. A supporter socket allows them to wear the prosthetic hand easily. An evaluation using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) demonstrated that an amputee was able to operate various objects and do everyday activities with the Rehand.

  9. 3D splint prototype system for applications in muscular rehab by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña-Martínez, M. I.; Guzmán-González, J. V.; Barajas-González, O. G.; Guzman-Ramos, V.; García-Garza, A. K.; González-García, R. B.; García-Ramírez, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    It is quite common that patients with ligamentous ruptures, tendonitis, tenosynovitis or sprains are foreseen the use of ad hoc splints for a swift recovery. In this paper, we propose a rehabilitation split that is focused on upper-limb injuries. By considering that upper-limb patient shows a set of different characteristics, our proposal personalizes and prints the splint custom made though a digital model that is generated by a 3D commercial scanner. To fabricate the 3D scanned model the Stereolithography material (SLA) is considered due to the properties that this material offers. In order to complement the recovery process, an electronic system is implemented within the splint design. This system generates a set of pulses for a fix period of time that focuses mainly on a certain group of muscles to allow a fast recovery process known as Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Principle (TENS).

  10. Visualising electricity demand: use and users of a 3D chart from the 1950s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Cliff

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Showing electricity demand by the hour, day, month and year, this 3D chart offers a rich visualisation of energy data in the UK from the years 1951–54. Acquired by the Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester, the object is significant as a tangible record of past practice, both of the electricity supply industry and its consumers. In this paper, we offer a close inspection of the object, and following its clues, we generate ideas about the chart’s use and users. In addition to commenting on the rhythmic patterning of daily and seasonal loads, we reflect on the role of the object at the time of its construction, in terms of forecasting, price-setting and load-shifting, and lobbying and demonstration. The object literally materialises electricity demand, providing a distinctive 3D representation, and in so doing prompting questions about how demand changes over time, and in time, and how our practices of everyday life constitute this demand. We conclude by offering a new interpretation of the object as a tool, as well as historical data.

  11. Earth's electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    The earth becomes charged during thunderstorm activity and discharges through the weak conducting atmosphere. Balloon and rocket studies infer that a high altitude electric field penetrates virtually unattenuated through the atmosphere, at least as far as balloon heights. The field has two primary sources. At low and mid latitudes, interaction between the earth's magnetic field and the neutral wind creates electric fields. At latitudes above 60 0 , the high altitude electrical structure is dominated by the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetic field. The auroral light is emitted by atmospheric atoms and molecules excited by electrons with potentials of many thousands volts. The potentials are induced by the solar wind. Recent satellite data shows that the electrons get this energy by passing through a localized electric field about 6000 km above the auroral zone. Several rocket and satellite experiments used to study the earth's electric field are discussed

  12. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, Maxim [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Airapetian, Vladimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States); NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Lin, Haosheng, E-mail: vladimir.airapetian@nasa.gov [College of Natural Sciences, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Pukalani, HI (United States)

    2016-08-09

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 R{sub ⊙} using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 Å band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below ~2.5 R{sub ⊙}. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  13. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Kramar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131 to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4 R_odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 AA band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $sim 2.5 R_odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  14. Monitoring CO2 migration in a shallow sand aquifer using 3D crosshole electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xianjin; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crosshole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, western Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for detection of small electrical conductivity (EC) changes during the first 2....... The combined HBB and VBB data sets were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for cancellation of coherent noises and enhanced resolution of small changes. ERT detected the small bulk EC changes (resistive gaseous CO2. The primary factors that control...... bulk EC changes may be caused by limited and variable ERT resolution, low ERT sensitivity to resistive anomalies and uncalibrated CO2 gas saturation. ERT data show a broader CO2 plume while water sample EC had higher fine-scale variability. Our ERT electrode configuration can be optimized for more...

  15. 2D and 3D reconstructions in acousto-electric tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter; Kunyansky, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    We propose and test stable algorithms for the reconstruction of the internal conductivity of a biological object using acousto-electric measurements. Namely, the conventional impedance tomography scheme is supplemented by scanning the object with acoustic waves that slightly perturb the conductivity and cause the change in the electric potential measured on the boundary of the object. These perturbations of the potential are then used as the data for the reconstruction of the conductivity. The present method does not rely on 'perfectly focused' acoustic beams. Instead, more realistic propagating spherical fronts are utilized, and then the measurements that would correspond to perfect focusing are synthesized. In other words, we use synthetic focusing. Numerical experiments with simulated data show that our techniques produce high-quality images, both in 2D and 3D, and that they remain accurate in the presence of high-level noise in the data. Local uniqueness and stability for the problem also hold. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. 2D and 3D reconstructions in acousto-electric tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter

    2011-04-18

    We propose and test stable algorithms for the reconstruction of the internal conductivity of a biological object using acousto-electric measurements. Namely, the conventional impedance tomography scheme is supplemented by scanning the object with acoustic waves that slightly perturb the conductivity and cause the change in the electric potential measured on the boundary of the object. These perturbations of the potential are then used as the data for the reconstruction of the conductivity. The present method does not rely on \\'perfectly focused\\' acoustic beams. Instead, more realistic propagating spherical fronts are utilized, and then the measurements that would correspond to perfect focusing are synthesized. In other words, we use synthetic focusing. Numerical experiments with simulated data show that our techniques produce high-quality images, both in 2D and 3D, and that they remain accurate in the presence of high-level noise in the data. Local uniqueness and stability for the problem also hold. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Efficient 3D porous microstructure reconstruction via Gaussian random field and hybrid optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z; Chen, W; Burkhart, C

    2013-11-01

    Obtaining an accurate three-dimensional (3D) structure of a porous microstructure is important for assessing the material properties based on finite element analysis. Whereas directly obtaining 3D images of the microstructure is impractical under many circumstances, two sets of methods have been developed in literature to generate (reconstruct) 3D microstructure from its 2D images: one characterizes the microstructure based on certain statistical descriptors, typically two-point correlation function and cluster correlation function, and then performs an optimization process to build a 3D structure that matches those statistical descriptors; the other method models the microstructure using stochastic models like a Gaussian random field and generates a 3D structure directly from the function. The former obtains a relatively accurate 3D microstructure, but computationally the optimization process can be very intensive, especially for problems with large image size; the latter generates a 3D microstructure quickly but sacrifices the accuracy due to issues in numerical implementations. A hybrid optimization approach of modelling the 3D porous microstructure of random isotropic two-phase materials is proposed in this paper, which combines the two sets of methods and hence maintains the accuracy of the correlation-based method with improved efficiency. The proposed technique is verified for 3D reconstructions based on silica polymer composite images with different volume fractions. A comparison of the reconstructed microstructures and the optimization histories for both the original correlation-based method and our hybrid approach demonstrates the improved efficiency of the approach. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Electrical characterization of FBK small-pitch 3D sensors after γ-ray, neutron and proton irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Mendicino, R.; Seidel, S.; Sultan, D. M. S.

    2017-11-01

    In view of applications in the tracking detectors at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), we have developed a new generation of 3D pixel sensors featuring small-pitch (50 × 50 or 25 × 100 μ m2) and thin active layer (~ 100 μ m). Owing to the very short inter-electrode distance (~ 30 μ m), charge trapping effects can be strongly mitigated, making these sensors extremely radiation hard. However, the downscaled sensor structure also lends itself to high electric fields as the bias voltage is increased, motivating investigation of leakage current increase in order to prevent premature electrical breakdown due to impact ionization. In order to assess the characteristics of heavily irradiated samples, using 3D diodes as test devices, we have carried out a dedicated campaign that included several irradiations (γ -rays, neutrons, and protons) at different facilities. In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization of a subset of the irradiated samples, also in comparison to their pre-irradiation properties. Results demonstrate that hadron irradiated devices can be safely operated at a voltage high enough to allow for full depletion (hence high efficiency) also at the maximum fluence foreseen at the HL-LHC.

  19. Electrically heated 3D-macro cellular SiC structures for ignition and combustion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgenhauer, Ralf; Rambacher, Patrick; Schlier, Lorenz; Volkert, Jochen; Travitzky, Nahum; Greil, Peter; Weclas, Miroslaw

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D-printed macro cellular SiC structure. • Directly integrated electrically heated ignition element used in combustion reactor. • Experimental investigation of the ignition process. - Abstract: The paper describes different aspects of porous combustion reactor operation especially at cold start conditions. Under cold start conditions it is necessary to increase the internal energy of the combustion reactor, to accumulate enough energy inside its solid phase and to reach at least the ignition temperature on the reactors inner surface. The most practicable method to preheat a cold porous reactor is to use its surface as a flame holder and to apply free flame combustion as a heat source for the preheating process. This paper presents a new electrically heated ignition element, which gets integrated in a three dimensional macro-cellular SiSiC reactor structure. For the development of the ignition element it was assumed, that the element is made of the same material as the combustion reactor itself and is fully integrated within the three-dimensional macro-cellular structure of the combustion reactor. Additive manufacturing like three-dimensional (3D) printing permits the production of regular SiSiC structures with constant strut thickness and a defined current flow path. To get a controlled temperature distribution on the ignition element it is necessary to control the current density distribution in the three-dimensional macro-cellular reactor structure. The ignition element used is designed to be an electrical resistance in an electric current system, converting flowing current into heat with the goal to get the highest temperature in the ignition region (glow plug). First experiments show that the ignition element integrated in a combustion reactor exhibits high dynamics and can be heated to the temperatures much above 1000 °C in a very short time (approx. 800 ms) for current of I = 150 A.

  20. An Investigation of the 3D Electrical Resistivity Structure in the Chingshui Geothermal Area, NE Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chingshui geothermal area southwest of the Ilan plain is identified as a western extension of the Okinawa Trough in the northern Taiwan subduction system. Numerous geophysical, geological and geochemical investigations have been conducted since the 1970s by the Industrial Technology Research Institute, the Chinese Petroleum Corporation of Taiwan and the National Science Council of Taiwan. These studies indicated that the Chingshui stream is one of the largest geothermal areas for electricity generation in Taiwan. However, the power generation efficiency has not met initial expectations. Magnetotelluric (MT data analyses show that the Chingshui geothermal region is a geologically complex area. A full three-dimensional (3D inversion was therefore applied to reprocess the MT data and provide the detailed electrical structure beneath the Chingshui geothermal region. The 3D geoelectrical model displays an improved image that clearly delineates the Chingshui geothermal system geometry. Two conductive anomalies are imaged that possibly indicate high potential areas for geothermal energy in the Chingshui geothermal system. One of the potential areas is located in the eastern part of the Chingshui Fault at shallow depths. A significant conductive anomaly is associated with high heat flow and fluid content situations southwest of the geothermal manifest area at depth. A higher interconnected fluid indicates that this area contains the highest potential for geothermal energy in the Chingshui geothermal system.

  1. Pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of pulsed electric fields (PEF) was first proposed in 1967 to change the behavior or microorganisms. The electric field phenomenon was identified as membrane rupture theory in the 1980s. Increasing the membrane permeability led to the application of PEF assisted extraction of cellular co...

  2. Imaging an off-axis volcanic field in the Main Ethiopian Rift using 3-D magnetotellurics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebert, J.; Whaler, K. A.; Fisseha, S.; Hogg, C.

    2017-12-01

    In active continental rifts, asthenospheric upwelling and crustal thinning result in the ascent of melt through the crust to the surface. In the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), most volcanic activity is located in magmatic segments in the rift centre, but there are areas of significant off-axis magmatism as well. The Butajira volcanic field is part of the Silti Debre Zeyt Fault (SDZF) zone in the western Main Ethiopian Rift. It is characterized by densely clustered volcanic vents (mostly scoria cones) and by limited seismic activity, which is mainly located along the big border faults that form the edge of a steep escarpment. Seismic P-Wave tomography reveals a crustal low velocity anomaly in this area. We present newly collected Magnetotelluric (MT) data to image the electrical conductivity structure of the area. We deployed 12 LMT instruments and 27 broadband stations in the western flank of the rift to further investigate the along-rift and depth extent of a highly conductive region under the SDZF which was previously identified by MT data collected on the central volcano Aluto and along a cross-rift transverse. This large conductor was interpreted as potential pathways for magma and fluid in the crust. MT Stations were positioned in five NW-SE running 50 km long profiles, covering overall 100km along the rift and providing good coverage for a 3-D inversion of the data to image this enigmatic area of the MER.

  3. MR Imaging of the Internal Auditory Canal and Inner Ear at 3T: Comparison between 3D Driven Equilibrium and 3D Balanced Fast Field Echo Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Hyung Jin; Yim, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lee, Ji Won [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To compare the use of 3D driven equilibrium (DRIVE) imaging with 3D balanced fast field echo (bFFE) imaging in the assessment of the anatomic structures of the internal auditory canal (IAC) and inner ear at 3 Tesla (T). Thirty ears of 15 subjects (7 men and 8 women; age range, 22 71 years; average age, 50 years) without evidence of ear problems were examined on a whole-body 3T MR scanner with both 3D DRIVE and 3D bFFE sequences by using an 8-channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil. Two neuroradiologists reviewed both MR images with particular attention to the visibility of the anatomic structures, including four branches of the cranial nerves within the IAC, anatomic structures of the cochlea, vestibule, and three semicircular canals. Although both techniques provided images of relatively good quality, the 3D DRIVE sequence was somewhat superior to the 3D bFFE sequence. The discrepancies were more prominent for the basal turn of the cochlea, vestibule, and all semicircular canals, and were thought to be attributed to the presence of greater magnetic susceptibility artifacts inherent to gradient-echo techniques such as bFFE. Because of higher image quality and less susceptibility artifacts, we highly recommend the employment of 3D DRIVE imaging as the MR imaging choice for the IAC and inner ear

  4. Dielectrics in electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur G

    2003-01-01

    Discover nontraditional applications of dielectric studies in this exceptionally crafted field reference or text for seniors and graduate students in power engineering tracks. This text contains more than 800 display equations and discusses polarization phenomena in dielectrics, the complex dielectric constant in an alternating electric field, dielectric relaxation and interfacial polarization, the measurement of absorption and desorption currents in time domains, and high field conduction phenomena. Dielectrics in Electric Fields is an interdisciplinary reference and text for professionals and students in electrical and electronics, chemical, biochemical, and environmental engineering; physical, surface, and colloid chemistry; materials science; and chemical physics.

  5. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  6. Motion field estimation for a dynamic scene using a 3D LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-09-09

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  7. Motion Field Estimation for a Dynamic Scene Using a 3D LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingquan Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  8. The point-spread function measure of resolution for the 3-D electrical resistivity experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenborger, Greg A.; Routh, Partha S.

    2009-02-01

    The solution appraisal component of the inverse problem involves investigation of the relationship between our estimated model and the actual model. However, full appraisal is difficult for large 3-D problems such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). We tackle the appraisal problem for 3-D ERT via the point-spread functions (PSFs) of the linearized resolution matrix. The PSFs represent the impulse response of the inverse solution and quantify our parameter-specific resolving capability. We implement an iterative least-squares solution of the PSF for the ERT experiment, using on-the-fly calculation of the sensitivity via an adjoint integral equation with stored Green's functions and subgrid reduction. For a synthetic example, analysis of individual PSFs demonstrates the truly 3-D character of the resolution. The PSFs for the ERT experiment are Gaussian-like in shape, with directional asymmetry and significant off-diagonal features. Computation of attributes representative of the blurring and localization of the PSF reveal significant spatial dependence of the resolution with some correlation to the electrode infrastructure. Application to a time-lapse ground-water monitoring experiment demonstrates the utility of the PSF for assessing feature discrimination, predicting artefacts and identifying model dependence of resolution. For a judicious selection of model parameters, we analyse the PSFs and their attributes to quantify the case-specific localized resolving capability and its variability over regions of interest. We observe approximate interborehole resolving capability of less than 1-1.5m in the vertical direction and less than 1-2.5m in the horizontal direction. Resolving capability deteriorates significantly outside the electrode infrastructure.

  9. Energization and Transport in 3D Kinetic Simulations of MMS Magnetopause Reconnection Site Encounters with Varying Guide Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, A.; Daughton, W. S.; Ohia, O.; Chen, L. J.; Liu, Y. H.

    2017-12-01

    We present 3D fully kinetic simulations of asymmetric reconnection with plasma parameters matching MMS magnetopause diffusion region crossings with varying guide fields of 0.1 [Burch et al., Science (2016)], 0.4 [Chen et al. JGR (2017)], and 1 [Burch and Phan, GRL (2016] of the reconnecting sheath field. Strong diamagnetic drifts across the magnetopause current sheet drive lower-hybrid drift instabilities (LHDI) over a range of wavelengths [Daughton, PoP (2003); Roytershteyn et al., PRL (2012)] that develop into a turbulent state. Magnetic field tracing diagnostics are employed to characterize the turbulent magnetic geometry and to evaluate the global reconnection rate. The contributions to Ohm's law are evaluated field line by field line, including time-averaged diagnostics that allow the quantification of anomalous resistivity and viscosity. We examine how fluctuating electric fields and chaotic magnetic field lines contribute to particle mixing across the separatrix, and we characterize the accelerated electron distributions that form under varying magnetic shear or guide field. The LHDI turbulence is found to strongly enhance transport and parallel electron heating in 3D compared to 2D, particularly along the magnetospheric separatrix [Le et al., GRL (2017)]. The PIC simulation results are compared to MMS observations.

  10. Electrical and optical 3D modelling of light-trapping single-photon avalanche diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianzhe; Zang, Kai; Morea, Matthew; Xue, Muyu; Lu, Ching-Ying; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Qiang; Kamins, Theodore I.; Harris, James S.

    2018-02-01

    Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been widely used to push the frontier of scientific research (e.g., quantum science and single-molecule fluorescence) and practical applications (e.g., Lidar). However, there is a typical compromise between photon detection efficiency and jitter distribution. The light-trapping SPAD has been proposed to break this trade-off by coupling the vertically incoming photons into a laterally propagating mode while maintaining a small jitter and a thin Si device layer. In this work, we provide a 3D-based optical and electrical model based on practical fabrication conditions and discuss about design parameters, which include surface texturing, photon injection position, device area, and other features.

  11. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Alexandra Paun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20–40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  12. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Dinescu, Maria; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo

    2018-02-07

    We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20-40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase) production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  13. 3D elastic-orthorhombic anisotropic full-waveform inversion: Application to field OBC data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    For the purpose of extracting higher resolution information from a 3D field data set, we apply a 3D elastic orthorhombic (ORT) anisotropic full waveform inversion (FWI) to hopefully better represent the physics of the Earth. We utilize what we consider as the optimal parameterization for surface acquired seismic data over a potentially orthorhombic media. This parameterization admits the possibility of incorporating a hierarchical implementation moving from higher anisotropy symmetry to lower ones. From the analysis of the radiation pattern of this new parameterization, we focus the inversion of the 3D data on the parameters that may have imprint on the data with minimal tradeoff, and as a result we invert for the horizontal P-wave velocity model, an ε1 model, its orthorhombic deviation, and the shear wave velocity. The inverted higher resolution models provide reasonable insights of the medium.

  14. 3D elastic-orthorhombic anisotropic full-waveform inversion: Application to field OBC data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2016-09-06

    For the purpose of extracting higher resolution information from a 3D field data set, we apply a 3D elastic orthorhombic (ORT) anisotropic full waveform inversion (FWI) to hopefully better represent the physics of the Earth. We utilize what we consider as the optimal parameterization for surface acquired seismic data over a potentially orthorhombic media. This parameterization admits the possibility of incorporating a hierarchical implementation moving from higher anisotropy symmetry to lower ones. From the analysis of the radiation pattern of this new parameterization, we focus the inversion of the 3D data on the parameters that may have imprint on the data with minimal tradeoff, and as a result we invert for the horizontal P-wave velocity model, an ε1 model, its orthorhombic deviation, and the shear wave velocity. The inverted higher resolution models provide reasonable insights of the medium.

  15. 3D Magnetic field modeling of a new superconducting synchronous machine using reluctance network method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelouaz, Moussa; Ouazir, Youcef; Hadjout, Larbi; Mezani, Smail; Lubin, Thiery; Berger, Kévin; Lévêque, Jean

    2018-05-01

    In this paper a new superconducting inductor topology intended for synchronous machine is presented. The studied machine has a standard 3-phase armature and a new kind of 2-poles inductor (claw-pole structure) excited by two coaxial superconducting coils. The air-gap spatial variation of the radial flux density is obtained by inserting a superconducting bulk, which deviates the magnetic field due to the coils. The complex geometry of this inductor usually needs 3D finite elements (FEM) for its analysis. However, to avoid a long computational time inherent to 3D FEM, we propose in this work an alternative modeling, which uses a 3D meshed reluctance network. The results obtained with the developed model are compared to 3D FEM computations as well as to measurements carried out on a laboratory prototype. Finally, a 3D FEM study of the shielding properties of the superconducting screen demonstrates the suitability of using a diamagnetic-like model of the superconducting screen.

  16. Using the CAVE virtual-reality environment as an aid to 3-D electromagnetic field computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Levine, D.; Huang, M.; Papka, M.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major problems in three-dimensional (3-D) field computation is visualizing the resulting 3-D field distributions. A virtual-reality environment, such as the CAVE, (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) is helping to overcome this problem, thus making the results of computation more usable for designers and users of magnets and other electromagnetic devices. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the CAVE, the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW), an insertion device being designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now being commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), wa made visible, along with its fields and beam orbits. Other uses of the CAVE in preprocessing and postprocessing computation for electromagnetic applications are also discussed

  17. Tests of a 3D Self Magnetic Field Solver in the Finite Element Gun Code MICHELLE

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Eric M

    2005-01-01

    We have recently implemented a prototype 3d self magnetic field solver in the finite-element gun code MICHELLE. The new solver computes the magnetic vector potential on unstructured grids. The solver employs edge basis functions in the curl-curl formulation of the finite-element method. A novel current accumulation algorithm takes advantage of the unstructured grid particle tracker to produce a compatible source vector, for which the singular matrix equation is easily solved by the conjugate gradient method. We will present some test cases demonstrating the capabilities of the prototype 3d self magnetic field solver. One test case is self magnetic field in a square drift tube. Another is a relativistic axisymmetric beam freely expanding in a round pipe.

  18. Critical Point Cancellation in 3D Vector Fields: Robustness and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skraba, Primoz; Rosen, Paul; Wang, Bei; Chen, Guoning; Bhatia, Harsh; Pascucci, Valerio

    2016-02-29

    Vector field topology has been successfully applied to represent the structure of steady vector fields. Critical points, one of the essential components of vector field topology, play an important role in describing the complexity of the extracted structure. Simplifying vector fields via critical point cancellation has practical merit for interpreting the behaviors of complex vector fields such as turbulence. However, there is no effective technique that allows direct cancellation of critical points in 3D. This work fills this gap and introduces the first framework to directly cancel pairs or groups of 3D critical points in a hierarchical manner with a guaranteed minimum amount of perturbation based on their robustness, a quantitative measure of their stability. In addition, our framework does not require the extraction of the entire 3D topology, which contains non-trivial separation structures, and thus is computationally effective. Furthermore, our algorithm can remove critical points in any subregion of the domain whose degree is zero and handle complex boundary configurations, making it capable of addressing challenging scenarios that may not be resolved otherwise. We apply our method to synthetic and simulation datasets to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  19. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Kiran Adhikarla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work.

  20. Exploring direct 3D interaction for full horizontal parallax light field displays using leap motion controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-04-14

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work.

  1. Monitoring of In-Situ Remediation By Time Lapse 3D Geo-Electric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanli, A. I.; Tildy, P.; Neducza, B.; Nagy, P.; Hegymegi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Injection of chemical oxidant solution to degrade the subsurface contaminants can be used for hydrocarbon contamination remediation. In this study, we developed a non-destructive measurement strategy to monitor oxidative in-situ remediation processes. The difficulties of the presented study originate from the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations. Due to the effect of conductive groundwater and the high clay content of the targeted layer and the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations, a site specific synthetic modelling is necessary for measurement design involving the results of preliminary 2D ERT measurements, electrical conductivity measurements of different active agents and expected resistivity changes calculated by soil resistivity modelling. Because of chemical biodegradation, the results of soil resistivity modelling have suggested that the reagent have complex effects on contaminated soils. As a result the plume of resistivity changes caused by the injected agent was determined showing strong fracturing effect because of the high pressure of injection. 3D time-lapse geo-electric measurements were proven to provide a usable monitoring tool for in-situ remediation as a result of our sophisticated tests and synthetic modelling.

  2. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    interpretation. Geometry and location of ERT profiles on the Puy de Dôme volcano allow to compute 3D inversion models of the electrical resistivity distribution with a new inversion code. This code uses tetrahedrons to discretize the 3D model and uses also a conventional Gauss-Newton inversion scheme combined to an Occam regularisation to process the data. It allows to take into account all the data information and prevents the construction of 3D artefacts present in conventional 2D inversion results. Inversion results show a strong electrical resistivity heterogeneity of the entire dome. Underlying volcanic edifices are clearly identified below the lava dome. Generally speaking, the flanks of the volcano show high resistivity values, and the summit part is more conductive but also very heterogeneous.

  3. Regional 3-D Modeling of Ground Geoelectric Field for the Northeast United States due to Realistic Geomagnetic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivannikova, E.; Kruglyakov, M.; Kuvshinov, A. V.; Rastaetter, L.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Ngwira, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    During extreme space weather events electric currents in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere experience large variations, which leads to dramatic intensification of the fluctuating magnetic field at the surface of the Earth. According to Faraday's law of induction, the fluctuating geomagnetic field in turn induces electric field that generates harmful currents (so-called "geomagnetically induced currents"; GICs) in grounded technological systems. Understanding (via modeling) of the spatio-temporal evolution of the geoelectric field during enhanced geomagnetic activity is a key consideration in estimating the hazard to technological systems from space weather. We present the results of ground geoelectric field modeling for the Northeast United States, which is performed with the use of our novel numerical tool based on integral equation approach. The tool exploits realistic regional three-dimensional (3-D) models of the Earth's electrical conductivity and realistic global models of the spatio-temporal evolution of the magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems responsible for geomagnetic disturbances. We also explore in detail the manifestation of the coastal effect (anomalous intensification of the geoelectric field near the coasts) in this region.

  4. Methodology for time-domain estimation of storm time geoelectric fields using the 3-D magnetotelluric response tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbert, Anna; Balch, Christopher C.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Egbert, Gary D.; Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Fujii, Ikuko

    2017-07-01

    Geoelectric fields at the Earth's surface caused by magnetic storms constitute a hazard to the operation of electric power grids and related infrastructure. The ability to estimate these geoelectric fields in close to real time and provide local predictions would better equip the industry to mitigate negative impacts on their operations. Here we report progress toward this goal: development of robust algorithms that convolve a magnetic storm time series with a frequency domain impedance for a realistic three-dimensional (3-D) Earth, to estimate the local, storm time geoelectric field. Both frequency domain and time domain approaches are presented and validated against storm time geoelectric field data measured in Japan. The methods are then compared in the context of a real-time application.

  5. Efficient 3D Volume Reconstruction from a Point Cloud Using a Phase-Field Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darae Jeong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an explicit hybrid numerical method for the efficient 3D volume reconstruction from unorganized point clouds using a phase-field method. The proposed three-dimensional volume reconstruction algorithm is based on the 3D binary image segmentation method. First, we define a narrow band domain embedding the unorganized point cloud and an edge indicating function. Second, we define a good initial phase-field function which speeds up the computation significantly. Third, we use a recently developed explicit hybrid numerical method for solving the three-dimensional image segmentation model to obtain efficient volume reconstruction from point cloud data. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of the proposed method, we perform various numerical experiments.

  6. Casting the Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstruction Tools in 3D Using the MHD Bifrost Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Loukitcheva, Maria [Physics Department, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, NJ, 07102-1982 (United States); Anfinogentov, Sergey; Mysh’yakov, Ivan [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISZF), Lermontov st., 126a, Irkutsk, 664033 (Russian Federation); Stupishin, Alexey [Saint Petersburg State University, 7/9 Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg, 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-10

    Quantifying the coronal magnetic field remains a central problem in solar physics. Nowadays, the coronal magnetic field is often modeled using nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) reconstructions, whose accuracy has not yet been comprehensively assessed. Here we perform a detailed casting of the NLFFF reconstruction tools, such as π -disambiguation, photospheric field preprocessing, and volume reconstruction methods, using a 3D snapshot of the publicly available full-fledged radiative MHD model. Specifically, from the MHD model, we know the magnetic field vector in the entire 3D domain, which enables us to perform a “voxel-by-voxel” comparison of the restored and the true magnetic fields in the 3D model volume. Our tests show that the available π -disambiguation methods often fail in the quiet-Sun areas dominated by small-scale magnetic elements, while they work well in the active region (AR) photosphere and (even better) chromosphere. The preprocessing of the photospheric magnetic field, although it does produce a more force-free boundary condition, also results in some effective “elevation” of the magnetic field components. This “elevation” height is different for the longitudinal and transverse components, which results in a systematic error in absolute heights in the reconstructed magnetic data cube. The extrapolations performed starting from the actual AR photospheric magnetogram are free from this systematic error, while other metrics are comparable with those for extrapolations from the preprocessed magnetograms. This finding favors the use of extrapolations from the original photospheric magnetogram without preprocessing. Our tests further suggest that extrapolations from a force-free chromospheric boundary produce measurably better results than those from a photospheric boundary.

  7. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Alexandra Paun; Roxana Cristina Popescu; Bogdan Stefanita Calin; Cosmin Catalin Mustaciosu; Maria Dinescu; Catalin Romeo Luculescu

    2018-01-01

    We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experime...

  8. Resistivity imaging of Aluto-Langano geothermal field using 3-D magnetotelluric inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkose, Biruk Abera; Mizunaga, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) method is a widely used geophysical method in geothermal exploration. It is used to image subsurface resistivity structures from shallow depths up to several kilometers of depth. Resistivity imaging using MT method in high-enthalpy geothermal systems is an effective tool to identify conductive clay layers that cover the geothermal systems and to detect a potential reservoir. A resistivity model is vital for deciding the location of pilot and production sites at the early stages of a geothermal project. In this study, a 3-D resistivity model of Aluto-Langano geothermal field was constructed to map structures related to a geothermal resource. The inversion program, ModEM was used to recover the 3-D resistivity model of the study area. The 3-D inversion result revealed the three main resistivity structures: a high-resistivity surface layer related to unaltered volcanic rocks at shallow depth, underlain by a conductive zone associated with the presence of conductive clay minerals, predominantly smectite. Beneath the conductive layer, the resistivity increases gradually to higher values related to the formation of high-temperature alteration minerals such as chlorite and epidote. The resistivity model recovered from 3-D inversion in Aluto-Langano corresponds very well to the conceptual model for high-enthalpy volcanic geothermal systems. The conductive clay cap is overlying the resistive propylitic upflow zone as confirmed by the geothermal wells in the area.

  9. Re: 3D Printing: A Revolutionary Advance for the Field of Urology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Neu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 3D bioprinting based on thermal inkjet has great potential to develop promising approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for organ replacement. With layer by layer assembly, 3D tissues with complex structures can be printed using scanned CT or MRI images. The traditional tissueengineering approach of seeding the isolated cells to the pre-formed solid and rigid scaffolds was introduced in 1993 by Langer and Vacanti. With the thermal inkjet printers, the viability of printed mammalian cells at the different cell concentrations were varying from 85-95%. Bioprinting is flexible in that it can accommodate abroad variety of materials including organ-specific cells, blood vessels, smooth muscle and endothelial cells. With the 3D bioprinters, vascular or nevre systems can be enabled simultaneously during the organ construction with digital control. The research field of tissueengineering has seen explosive growth over the past five years where testing is stil primarily limited to animal specimens. In the literature, A. Atala and et al. demostared the power of 3D printing in thefield of urology. Especially, at the endstage of renal disease and bladder dysfunctions, tissue enginnering will be hopeful for the part of alternative treatment modality in nearfuture.

  10. Determination of ICRF antenna fields in the vicinity of a 3-D Faraday shield structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P M; Rothe, K E; Whealton, J H; Shepard, T D [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1990-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) magnetostatic analysis developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been used to calculate the electromagnetic transmission properties of representative Faraday shield designs. The analysis uses the long-wavelength approximation to obtain a 3-D Laplace solution for the magnetic scalar potential over one poloidal period of the Faraday shield, from which the complete magnetic field distribution may be obtained. Once the magnetic field distributions in the presence and absence of a Faraday shield are known, the flux transmission coefficient can be found, as well as any change in the distributed inductance of the current strap. The distrbuted capacitance of the strap can be found from an analogous 3-D electrostatic calculation, enabling the phase velocity of the slow-wave structure to be determined. Power dissipation in the shield may be estimated by equating the surface current on a perfect conductor with the surface magnetic field and using this surface current in conjunction with the finite conductivities of the shield materials to obtain the power distribution due to eddy current heating. (orig.).

  11. 3D Field Modifications of Core Neutral Fueling In the EMC3-EIRENE Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Ian; Frerichs, Heinke; Schmitz, Oliver; Ahn, Joon-Wook; Canal, Gustavo; Evans, Todd; Feng, Yuehe; Kaye, Stanley; Maingi, Rajesh; Soukhanovskii, Vsevolod

    2017-10-01

    The application of 3-D magnetic field perturbations to the edge plasmas of tokamaks has long been seen as a viable way to control damaging Edge Localized Modes (ELMs). These 3-D fields have also been correlated with a density drop in the core plasmas of tokamaks; known as `pump-out'. While pump-out is typically explained as the result of enhanced outward transport, degraded fueling of the core may also play a role. By altering the temperature and density of the plasma edge, 3-D fields will impact the distribution function of high energy neutral particles produced through ion-neutral energy exchange processes. Starved of the deeply penetrating neutral source, the core density will decrease. Numerical studies carried out with the EMC3-EIRENE code on National Spherical Tokamak eXperiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) equilibria show that this change to core fueling by high energy neutrals may be a significant contributor to the overall particle balance in the NSTX-U tokamak: deep core (Ψ funded by the US Department of Energy under Grant DE-SC0012315.

  12. Progressive attenuation fields: Fast 2D-3D image registration without precomputation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Russakoff, Daniel B.; Denzler, Joachim; Mori, Kensaku; Maurer, Calvin R. Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Computation of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images is the rate-limiting step in most current intensity-based algorithms for the registration of three-dimensional (3D) images to two-dimensional (2D) projection images. This paper introduces and evaluates the progressive attenuation field (PAF), which is a new method to speed up DRR computation. A PAF is closely related to an attenuation field (AF). A major difference is that a PAF is constructed on the fly as the registration proceeds; it does not require any precomputation time, nor does it make any prior assumptions of the patient pose or limit the permissible range of patient motion. A PAF effectively acts as a cache memory for projection values once they are computed, rather than as a lookup table for precomputed projections like standard AFs. We use a cylindrical attenuation field parametrization, which is better suited for many medical applications of 2D-3D registration than the usual two-plane parametrization. The computed attenuation values are stored in a hash table for time-efficient storage and access. Using clinical gold-standard spine image data sets from five patients, we demonstrate consistent speedups of intensity-based 2D-3D image registration using PAF DRRs by a factor of 10 over conventional ray casting DRRs with no decrease of registration accuracy or robustness

  13. An approach to 3D magnetic field calculation using numerical and differential algebra methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.; Brady, V.O.

    1992-01-01

    Motivated by the need for new means for specification and determination of 3D fields that are produced by electromagnetic lens elements in the region interior to coil windings and seeking to obtain techniques that will be convenient for accurate conductor placement and dynamical study of particle motion, we have conveniently gene the representation of a 2D magnetic field to 3D. We have shown that the 3 dimensioal magnetic field components of a multipole magnet in the curl-fire divergence-fire region near the axis r=0 can be derived from one dimensional functions A n (z) and their derivatives (part 1). In the region interior to coil windings of accelerator magnets the three spatial components of magnet fields can be expressed in terms of ''harmonic components'' proportional to functions sin (nθ) or cos (nθ) of the azimuthal angle. The r,z dependence of any such component can then be expressed in terms of powers of r times functions A n (z) and their derivatives. For twodimensional configurations B z of course is identically zero, the derivatives of A n (z) vanish, and the harmonic components of the transverse field then acquire a simple proportionality B r,n ∝ r n-1 sin (nθ),B θ,n ∝ r n-1 cos (nθ), whereas in a 3-D configuration the more complex nature of the field gives rise to additional so-called ''psuedomultipole'' components as judged by additional powers of r required in the development of the field. Computation of the 3-D magnetic field arising at a sequence of field points, as a direct result of a specified current configuration or coil geometry, can be calculated explicitly through use of the Biot-Savart law and from such data the coefficients can then be derived for a general development of the type indicated above. We indicate, discuss, and illustrate two means by which this development may be performed

  14. A New Energy-Based Method for 3-D Finite-Element Nonlinear Flux Linkage computation of Electrical Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for computation of the nonlinear flux linkage in 3-D finite-element models (FEMs) of electrical machines. Accurate computation of the nonlinear flux linkage in 3-D FEM is not an easy task. Compared to the existing energy-perturbation method, the new technique......-perturbation method. The new method proposed is validated using experimental results on two different permanent magnet machines....

  15. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skelton, Rosalind E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 9, Observatory, Cape Town 7935 (South Africa); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Förster Schreiber, Natascha [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kriek, Mariska [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lundgren, Britt F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Magee, Daniel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Marchesini, Danilo, E-mail: ros@saao.ac.za [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin{sup 2} in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  16. 3D-HST WFC3-selected Photometric Catalogs in the Five CANDELS/3D-HST Fields: Photometry, Photometric Redshifts, and Stellar Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; van der Wel, Arjen; Bezanson, Rachel; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Fumagalli, Mattia; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Leja, Joel; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael V.; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Pacifici, Camilla; Patel, Shannon G.; Price, Sedona; Rix, Hans-Walter; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin2 in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu).

  17. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V.; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin 2 in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  18. A portable, low-cost, 3D-printed main magnetic field system for magnetic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iksung Kang

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a portable, low-cost, 3D-printed system for main magnetic field is proposed to suggest a solution for accessibility problems of current magnetic imaging systems, e.g. MRI scanner, their size and cost. The system consists of twelve pairs of NdFeB N35 permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array in a 3D-printed, cylindrical container based on FEM simulation results by COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4b. Its magnetic field homogeneity and field strength were measured by Hall sensors, WSH-135 XPAN2 by Wilson Semiconductor, and the container was printed by 3DISON H700 by Rokit. The system generated a 5-mm imaging quality FOV and main magnetic field of 120 mT with a 12 % error in the field strength. Also, a hundred dollar was enough for the manufacture of the system with a radius of 6 cm and height of 10 cm. Given the results, I believe the system will be useful for some magnetic imaging applications, e.g. EPRI and low-field MRI.

  19. 3D Finite Element Electrical Model of Larval Zebrafish ECG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowcombe, James; Dhillon, Sundeep Singh; Hurst, Rhiannon Mary; Egginton, Stuart; Müller, Ferenc; Sík, Attila; Tarte, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of heart function in zebrafish larvae using electrocardiography (ECG) is a potentially useful tool in developing cardiac treatments and the assessment of drug therapies. In order to better understand how a measured ECG waveform is related to the structure of the heart, its position within the larva and the position of the electrodes, a 3D model of a 3 days post fertilisation (dpf) larval zebrafish was developed to simulate cardiac electrical activity and investigate the voltage distribution throughout the body. The geometry consisted of two main components; the zebrafish body was modelled as a homogeneous volume, while the heart was split into five distinct regions (sinoatrial region, atrial wall, atrioventricular band, ventricular wall and heart chambers). Similarly, the electrical model consisted of two parts with the body described by Laplace’s equation and the heart using a bidomain ionic model based upon the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. Each region of the heart was differentiated by action potential (AP) parameters and activation wave conduction velocities, which were fitted and scaled based on previously published experimental results. ECG measurements in vivo at different electrode recording positions were then compared to the model results. The model was able to simulate action potentials, wave propagation and all the major features (P wave, R wave, T wave) of the ECG, as well as polarity of the peaks observed at each position. This model was based upon our current understanding of the structure of the normal zebrafish larval heart. Further development would enable us to incorporate features associated with the diseased heart and hence assist in the interpretation of larval zebrafish ECGs in these conditions. PMID:27824910

  20. 3D ion velocity distribution function measurement in an electric thruster using laser induced fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, P. Q.; Jarrige, J.; Cucchetti, E.; Cannat, F.; Packan, D.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the full ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) by non-intrusive techniques can improve our understanding of the ionization processes and beam dynamics at work in electric thrusters. In this paper, a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) tomographic reconstruction technique is applied to the measurement of the IVDF in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster. A setup is developed to move the laser axis along two rotation axes around the measurement volume. The fluorescence spectra taken from different viewing angles are combined using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm to build the complete 3D (in phase space) time-averaged distribution function. For the first time, this technique is used in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster to measure the full distribution function of the xenon ions. Two examples of reconstructions are provided, in front of the thruster nose-cone and in front of the anode channel. The reconstruction reveals the features of the ion beam, in particular on the thruster axis where a toroidal distribution function is observed. These findings are consistent with the thruster shape and operation. This technique, which can be used with other LIF schemes, could be helpful in revealing the details of the ion production regions and the beam dynamics. Using a more powerful laser source, the current implementation of the technique could be improved to reduce the measurement time and also to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the distribution function.

  1. Bias field inconsistency correction of motion-scattered multislice MRI for improved 3D image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A; Corbett-Detig, James M; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-09-01

    A common solution to clinical MR imaging in the presence of large anatomical motion is to use fast multislice 2D studies to reduce slice acquisition time and provide clinically usable slice data. Recently, techniques have been developed which retrospectively correct large scale 3D motion between individual slices allowing the formation of a geometrically correct 3D volume from the multiple slice stacks. One challenge, however, in the final reconstruction process is the possibility of varying intensity bias in the slice data, typically due to the motion of the anatomy relative to imaging coils. As a result, slices which cover the same region of anatomy at different times may exhibit different sensitivity. This bias field inconsistency can induce artifacts in the final 3D reconstruction that can impact both clinical interpretation of key tissue boundaries and the automated analysis of the data. Here we describe a framework to estimate and correct the bias field inconsistency in each slice collectively across all motion corrupted image slices. Experiments using synthetic and clinical data show that the proposed method reduces intensity variability in tissues and improves the distinction between key tissue types.

  2. A 3D technique for simulation of irregular electron treatment fields using a digital camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassalow, Roustem; Sidhu, Narinder P.

    2003-01-01

    Cerrobend inserts, which define electron field apertures, are manufactured at our institution using perspex templates. Contours are reproduced manually on these templates at the simulator from the field outlines drawn on the skin or mask of a patient. A previously reported technique for simulation of electron treatment fields uses a digital camera to eliminate the need for such templates. However, avoidance of the image distortions introduced by non-flat surfaces on which the electron field outlines were drawn could only be achieved by limiting the application of this technique to surfaces which were flat or near flat. We present a technique that employs a digital camera and allows simulation of electron treatment fields contoured on an anatomical surface of an arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) shape, such as that of the neck, extremities, face, or breast. The procedure is fast, accurate, and easy to perform

  3. 3D structure and conductive thermal field of the Upper Rhine Graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymark, Jessica; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Bär, Kristian; Stiller, Manfred; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Kracht, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) was formed as part of the European Cenozoic Rift System in a complex extensional setting. At present-day, it has a large socioeconomic relevance as it provides a great potential for geothermal energy production in Germany and France. For the utilisation of this energy resource it is crucial to understand the structure and the observed temperature anomalies in the rift basin. In the framework of the EU-funded "IMAGE" project (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration), we apply a data-driven numerical modelling approach to quantify the processes and properties controlling the spatial distribution of subsurface temperatures. Typically, reservoir-scale numerical models are developed for predictions on the subsurface hydrothermal conditions and for reducing the risk of drilling non-productive geothermal wells. One major problem related to such models is setting appropriate boundary conditions that define, for instance, how much heat enters the reservoir from greater depths. Therefore, we first build a regional lithospheric-scale 3D structural model, which covers not only the entire URG but also adjacent geological features like the Black Forest and the Vosges Mountains. In particular, we use a multidisciplinary dataset (e.g. well data, seismic reflection data, existing structural models, gravity) to construct the geometries of the sediments, the crust and the lithospheric mantle that control the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity and radiogenic heat production and hence temperatures. By applying a data-based and lithology-dependent parameterisation of this lithospheric-scale 3D structural model and a 3D finite element method, we calculate the steady-state conductive thermal field for the entire region. Available measured temperatures (down to depths of up to 5 km) are considered to validate the 3D thermal model. We present major characteristics of the lithospheric-scale 3D structural model and results of the 3D

  4. 3D study in modelling in static regime of a bi facial polycrystalline solar cell under intense light and under a constant magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZOUNGRANA Martial

    2010-01-01

    In this work we propose a three-dimensional (3D) study of magnetic field, light concentration and electron gradient concentration electric field respective influences on bi facial polycrystalline silicon solar cell behaviour. The hold account of these parameters in our study leads to the new expressions of continuity equations, electric and electronic parameters. On the basis of these equations, grain size, grain boundary recombination velocity, magnetic field and light intensity effects on carriers density, photocurrent, photovoltage, electric and electronic parameters are analysed. We finally propose an equivalent electric model of bi facial polycrystalline silicon solar cell under magnetic field. According to this model, electric parameters expressions was established (shunt and series resistances, space charge zone capacity ) and we study magnetic field, grain size, grain boundary recombination velocity and light concentration influences on these parameters.(Author) [fr

  5. Hairy Slices: Evaluating the Perceptual Effectiveness of Cutting Plane Glyphs for 3D Vector Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew H; Butkiewicz, Thomas; Ware, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional vector fields are common datasets throughout the sciences. Visualizing these fields is inherently difficult due to issues such as visual clutter and self-occlusion. Cutting planes are often used to overcome these issues by presenting more manageable slices of data. The existing literature provides many techniques for visualizing the flow through these cutting planes; however, there is a lack of empirical studies focused on the underlying perceptual cues that make popular techniques successful. This paper presents a quantitative human factors study that evaluates static monoscopic depth and orientation cues in the context of cutting plane glyph designs for exploring and analyzing 3D flow fields. The goal of the study was to ascertain the relative effectiveness of various techniques for portraying the direction of flow through a cutting plane at a given point, and to identify the visual cues and combinations of cues involved, and how they contribute to accurate performance. It was found that increasing the dimensionality of line-based glyphs into tubular structures enhances their ability to convey orientation through shading, and that increasing their diameter intensifies this effect. These tube-based glyphs were also less sensitive to visual clutter issues at higher densities. Adding shadows to lines was also found to increase perception of flow direction. Implications of the experimental results are discussed and extrapolated into a number of guidelines for designing more perceptually effective glyphs for 3D vector field visualizations.

  6. Spatio-temporal interpolation of soil water, temperature, and electrical conductivity in 3D + T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasch, C.K.; Hengl, Tom; Gräler, Benedikt; Meyer, Hanna; Magney, T.S.; Brown, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes a framework for modeling dynamic soil properties in 3-dimensions and time (3D + T) using soil data collected with automated sensor networks as a case study. Two approaches to geostatistical modeling and spatio-temporal predictions are described: (1) 3D + T predictive modeling

  7. 3D Cloud Field Prediction using A-Train Data and Machine Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Validation of cloud process parameterizations used in global climate models (GCMs) would greatly benefit from observed 3D cloud fields at the size comparable to that of a GCM grid cell. For the highest resolution simulations, surface grid cells are on the order of 100 km by 100 km. CloudSat/CALIPSO data provides 1 km width of detailed vertical cloud fraction profile (CFP) and liquid and ice water content (LWC/IWC). This work utilizes four machine learning algorithms to create nonlinear regressions of CFP, LWC, and IWC data using radiances, surface type and location of measurement as predictors and applies the regression equations to off-track locations generating 3D cloud fields for 100 km by 100 km domains. The CERES-CloudSat-CALIPSO-MODIS (C3M) merged data set for February 2007 is used. Support Vector Machines, Artificial Neural Networks, Gaussian Processes and Decision Trees are trained on 1000 km of continuous C3M data. Accuracy is computed using existing vertical profiles that are excluded from the training data and occur within 100 km of the training data. Accuracy of the four algorithms is compared. Average accuracy for one day of predicted data is 86% for the most successful algorithm. The methodology for training the algorithms, determining valid prediction regions and applying the equations off-track is discussed. Predicted 3D cloud fields are provided as inputs to the Ed4 NASA LaRC Fu-Liou radiative transfer code and resulting TOA radiances compared to observed CERES/MODIS radiances. Differences in computed radiances using predicted profiles and observed radiances are compared.

  8. Metric-like formalism for matter fields coupled to 3D higher spin gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Ippei; Nakayama, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    The action integral for a matter system composed of 0- and 2-forms, C and Bμν, topologically coupled to 3D spin-3 gravity is considered first in the frame-like formalism. The field C satisfies an equation of motion, \\partial _{\\mu } \\, C+A_{\\mu } \\, C-C \\, \\bar{A}_{\\mu }=0, where Aμ and \\bar{A}_{\\mu } are the Chern-Simons gauge fields. With a suitable gauge fixing of a new local symmetry and diffeomorphism, only one component of Bμν, say Bϕr, remains non-vanishing and satisfies \\partial _{\\mu } \\, B_{\\phi r}+\\bar{A}_{\\mu } \\, B_{\\phi r}-B_{\\phi r} \\, A_{\\mu }=0. These equations are the same as those for 3D (free) Vasiliev scalars, C and \\tilde{C}. The spin connection is eliminated by solving the equation of motion for the total action, and it is shown that in the resulting metric-like formalism, (BC)2 interaction terms are induced because of the torsion. The world-volume components of the matter field, C0, Cμ and C(μν), are introduced by contracting the local-frame index of C with those of the inverse vielbeins, E_a^{\\mu } and E_a^{(\\mu \

  9. Topology optimized and 3D printed polymer-bonded permanent magnets for a predefined external field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, C.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Pfaff, C.; Kriwet, J.; Groenefeld, M.; Teliban, I.; Vogler, C.; Suess, D.

    2017-08-01

    Topology optimization offers great opportunities to design permanent magnetic systems that have specific external field characteristics. Additive manufacturing of polymer-bonded magnets with an end-user 3D printer can be used to manufacture permanent magnets with structures that had been difficult or impossible to manufacture previously. This work combines these two powerful methods to design and manufacture permanent magnetic systems with specific properties. The topology optimization framework is simple, fast, and accurate. It can also be used for the reverse engineering of permanent magnets in order to find the topology from field measurements. Furthermore, a magnetic system that generates a linear external field above the magnet is presented. With a volume constraint, the amount of magnetic material can be minimized without losing performance. Simulations and measurements of the printed systems show very good agreement.

  10. 3D vector distribution of the electro-magnetic fields on a random gold film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canneson, Damien; Berini, Bruno; Buil, Stéphanie; Hermier, Jean-Pierre; Quélin, Xavier

    2018-05-01

    The 3D vector distribution of the electro-magnetic fields at the very close vicinity of the surface of a random gold film is studied. Such films are well known for their properties of light confinement and large fluctuations of local density of optical states. Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations, we show that it is possible to determine the local orientation of the electro-magnetic fields. This allows us to obtain a complete characterization of the fields. Large fluctuations of their amplitude are observed as previously shown. Here, we demonstrate large variations of their direction depending both on the position on the random gold film, and on the distance to it. Such characterization could be useful for a better understanding of applications like the coupling of point-like dipoles to such films.

  11. TE/TM alternating direction scheme for wake field calculation in 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorodnov, Igor [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 8, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: zagor@temf.de; Weiland, Thomas [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 8, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-03-01

    In the future, accelerators with very short bunches will be used. It demands developing new numerical approaches for long-time calculation of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of relativistic bunches. The conventional FDTD scheme, used in MAFIA, ABCI and other wake and PIC codes, suffers from numerical grid dispersion and staircase approximation problem. As an effective cure of the dispersion problem, a numerical scheme without dispersion in longitudinal direction can be used as it was shown by Novokhatski et al. [Transition dynamics of the wake fields of ultrashort bunches, TESLA Report 2000-03, DESY, 2000] and Zagorodnov et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 191 (2003) 525]. In this paper, a new economical conservative scheme for short-range wake field calculation in 3D is presented. As numerical examples show, the new scheme is much more accurate on long-time scale than the conventional FDTD approach.

  12. TOMOGRAFÍA DE RESISTIVIDAD ELÉCTRICA 3D EN LA CATEDRAL DE MORELIA, MÉXICO (3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography in Morelia Cathedral, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Cifuentes-Nava

    2017-12-01

    results from survey using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (TRE-3D carried out in 2014, 2016 and 2017, in Morelia Cathedral and along its northern front. The survey identified the location of deep structures which cannot be explained by geological context, suggesting the existence of a variety of subterranean structures of anthropogenic origin. The TRE-3D used in this study combines conventional and unconventional methodologies to offer insights into the distribution of subterranean structures at Morelia Cathedral, in accordance with both oral traditions and documented history.

  13. Impact of the layout on the electrical characteristics of double-sided silicon 3D sensors fabricated at FBK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povoli, M., E-mail: povoli@disi.unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) (Italy); Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento, TN (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) (Italy); Giacomini, G.; Mattedi, F.; Vianello, E.; Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento, TN (Italy)

    2013-01-21

    We report on experimental results and TCAD simulations addressing the impact of layout on the electrical characteristics of double-sided 3D diodes fabricated at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento, Italy. Simulations are found to accurately reproduce the device characteristics, thus explaining the basic mechanisms governing the breakdown behavior and capacitance of different devices and providing useful hints for layout optimization.

  14. Impact of the layout on the electrical characteristics of double-sided silicon 3D sensors fabricated at FBK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoli, M.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Giacomini, G.; Mattedi, F.; Vianello, E.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on experimental results and TCAD simulations addressing the impact of layout on the electrical characteristics of double-sided 3D diodes fabricated at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento, Italy. Simulations are found to accurately reproduce the device characteristics, thus explaining the basic mechanisms governing the breakdown behavior and capacitance of different devices and providing useful hints for layout optimization.

  15. Comparison between 3D dynamics filter technique, field-in-field, electronic compensator in breast cancer; Comparacao entre tecnica 3D com filtro dinamico, field-in-field e compensacao eletronica para cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Cassia; Silva, Leonardo P.; Martins, Lais P.; Garcia, Paulo L.; Santos, Maira R.; Bastista, Delano V.S.; Vieira, Anna Myrian M.T.L.; Rocha, Igor M., E-mail: cassiatr@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    The radiotherapy has been used in a wild scale in breast cancer treatment. With this high demand, new technologies have been developed to improve the dose distribution in the target while reducing the dose delivered in critical organs. In this study, performed with one clinical case, three planning were done for comparison: 3D technique with dynamic filter, 3D with field-in-field technique (forward-planned IMRT) and 3D technique using electronic compensator (ECOMP). The planning were done with a 6MV photon beam using the Eclipse software, version 8.6 (Varian Medical Systems). The PTV was drawn covering the whole breast and the critical organs were: the lung on the irradiated side, the heart, the contralateral breast and the anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The planning using the compensator technique permitted more homogeneous dose distribution in the target volume. The V20 value of the lung on the irradiated side was 8,3% for the electronic compensator technique, 8,9% for the field-in-field technique and 8,2% for the dynamic filter technique. For the heart the dose range was 15.7 - 139.9 cGy, 16.3 - 148.4 cGy for the dynamic filter technique and 19.6 - 157.0 cGy for the field-in-field technique. The dose gradient was 11% with compensator electronic, 15% dynamic filter technique and 13% with field-in-field. The application of electronic technique in breast cancer treatment allows better dose distribution while reduces dose in critical organs, but in the same time requires a quality assurance. (author)

  16. Electricity Generation with the Novel 3D Electrode from Swim Wastewater in a Dual-chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Mei-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The swine wastewater has the characteristics of high concentration of organic matter, suspended solids and more high ammonia nitrogen, odor, complex pollution ingredient and large emissions. Microbial fuel cells (MFC is an electrochemical and biological systems related to chemical energy into electrical energy. A two-chambered cubic microbial fuel cell was used to evaluate the effect of a novel 3D electrode which made of iron and copper on the electricity generation. The swine wastewater containing total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD 3300±300 mg/L was used as the feedstock in anode chamber, and the potassium ferricyanide was used as electron acceptor in cathode chamber. The MFC reactor was incubated with the initial pH 7.0 in a air-shaker with a temperature (ca. 35°C and 100 rpm in fed-batch mode. A fixed external resistance (R of 100 Ω was connected between the electrodes and the closed circuit potentials of the MFCs were recorded every 2 min. The results show that using iron 3D electrode has the peak electricity generation of 176 mV at the first two day and maintained the stable electricity voltage of 110 mV during the 5th to 15th days. The COD removal efficiency could reach 80%. Using copper 3D electrode only can generate the peak electricity of 33.1 mV and stable electricity of 27 mV with the COD removal efficiency of 70%.

  17. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  18. Towards Automated Large-Scale 3D Phenotyping of Vineyards under Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Rose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In viticulture, phenotypic data are traditionally collected directly in the field via visual and manual means by an experienced person. This approach is time consuming, subjective and prone to human errors. In recent years, research therefore has focused strongly on developing automated and non-invasive sensor-based methods to increase data acquisition speed, enhance measurement accuracy and objectivity and to reduce labor costs. While many 2D methods based on image processing have been proposed for field phenotyping, only a few 3D solutions are found in the literature. A track-driven vehicle consisting of a camera system, a real-time-kinematic GPS system for positioning, as well as hardware for vehicle control, image storage and acquisition is used to visually capture a whole vine row canopy with georeferenced RGB images. In the first post-processing step, these images were used within a multi-view-stereo software to reconstruct a textured 3D point cloud of the whole grapevine row. A classification algorithm is then used in the second step to automatically classify the raw point cloud data into the semantic plant components, grape bunches and canopy. In the third step, phenotypic data for the semantic objects is gathered using the classification results obtaining the quantity of grape bunches, berries and the berry diameter.

  19. Three dimensional field computation software package DE3D and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Mingwu; Zhang Tianjue; Yan Weili

    1992-07-01

    A software package, DE3D that can be run on PC for three dimensional electrostatic and magnetostatic field analysis has been developed in CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy). Two scalar potential method and special numerical techniques have made the code with high precision. It can be used for electrostatic and magnetostatic fields computations with complex boundary conditions. In the most cases, the result accuracy is better than 1% comparing with the measured. In some situations, the results are more acceptable than the other codes because some tricks are used for the current integral. Typical examples, design of a cyclotron magnet and magnetic elements on its beam transport line, given in the paper show how the program helps the designer to improve the design of the product. The software package could bring advantages to the producers and designers

  20. Full-field wrist pulse signal acquisition and analysis by 3D Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Su, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Xiaohai; Gao, Zeren; Wu, Shangquan; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2017-11-01

    Pulse diagnosis is an essential part in four basic diagnostic methods (inspection, listening, inquiring and palpation) in traditional Chinese medicine, which depends on longtime training and rich experience, so computerized pulse acquisition has been proposed and studied to ensure the objectivity. To imitate the process that doctors using three fingertips with different pressures to feel fluctuations in certain areas containing three acupoints, we established a five dimensional pulse signal acquisition system adopting a non-contacting optical metrology method, 3D digital image correlation, to record the full-field displacements of skin fluctuations under different pressures. The system realizes real-time full-field vibration mode observation with 10 FPS. The maximum sample frequency is 472 Hz for detailed post-processing. After acquisition, the signals are analyzed according to the amplitude, pressure, and pulse wave velocity. The proposed system provides a novel optical approach for digitalizing pulse diagnosis and massive pulse signal data acquisition for various types of patients.

  1. Gauge-invariant scalar and field strength correlators in 3d

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Mikko

    1998-01-01

    Gauge-invariant non-local scalar and field strength operators have been argued to have significance, e.g., as a way to determine the behaviour of the screened static potential at large distances, as order parameters for confinement, as input parameters in models of confinement, and as gauge-invariant definitions of light constituent masses in bound state systems. We measure such "correlators" in the 3d pure SU(2) and SU(2)+Higgs models on the lattice. We extract the corresponding mass parameters and discuss their scaling and physical interpretation. We find that the finite part of the MS-bar scheme mass measured from the field strength correlator is large, more than half the glueball mass. We also determine the non-perturbative contribution to the Debye mass in the 4d finite T SU(2) gauge theory with a method due to Arnold and Yaffe, finding $\\delta m_D\\approx 1.06(4)g^2T$.

  2. Thickness and clearance visualization based on distance field of 3D objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatomo Inui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method for visualizing the thickness and clearance of 3D objects in a polyhedral representation. The proposed method uses the distance field of the objects in the visualization. A parallel algorithm is developed for constructing the distance field of polyhedral objects using the GPU. The distance between a voxel and the surface polygons of the model is computed many times in the distance field construction. Similar sets of polygons are usually selected as close polygons for close voxels. By using this spatial coherence, a parallel algorithm is designed to compute the distances between a cluster of close voxels and the polygons selected by the culling operation so that the fast shared memory mechanism of the GPU can be fully utilized. The thickness/clearance of the objects is visualized by distributing points on the visible surfaces of the objects and painting them with a unique color corresponding to the thickness/clearance values at those points. A modified ray casting method is developed for computing the thickness/clearance using the distance field of the objects. A system based on these algorithms can compute the distance field of complex objects within a few minutes for most cases. After the distance field construction, thickness/clearance visualization at a near interactive rate is achieved.

  3. Dissolved organic carbon--contaminant interaction descriptors found by 3D force field calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, H A J; Krop, H B; Parsons, J R; Tambach, T; Kubicki, J D

    2002-03-01

    Enthalpies of transfer at 300 K of various partitioning processes were calculated in order to study the suitability of 3D force fields for the calculation of partitioning constants. A 3D fulvic acid (FA) model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was built in a MM+ force field using AMI atomic charges and geometrical optimization (GO). 3,5-Dichlorobiphenyl (PCB14), 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (PCB15), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (PPDDT) and 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine (Atrazine) were inserted into different sites and their interaction energies with FA were calculated. Energies of hydration were calculated and subtracted from FA-contaminant interactions of selected sites. The resulting values for the enthalpies of transfer from water to DOC were 2.8, -1.4, -6.4 and 0.0 kcal/mol for PCB 14, PCB15, PPDDT and Atrazine, respectively. The value of PPDDT compared favorably with the experimental value of -5.0 kcal/mol. Prior to this, the method was studied by the calculation of the enthalpies of vaporization and aqueous solution using various force fields. In the MM + force field GO predicted enthalpies of vaporization deviated by +0.7 (PCB14), +3.6 (PCB15) and -0.7 (PPDDT)kcal/mol from experimental data, whereas enthalpies of aqueous solution deviated by -3.6 (PCB14), +5.8 (PCB15) and +3.7 (PPDDT) kcal/mol. Only for PCB14 the wrong sign of this enthalpy value was predicted. Potential advantages and limitations of the approach were discussed.

  4. Casting the Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstructions with Magnetic Field Constraints above the Photosphere in 3D Using MHD Bifrost Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, G. D.; Anfinogentov, S.; Loukitcheva, M.; Mysh'yakov, I.; Stupishin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring and modeling coronal magnetic field, especially above active regions (ARs), remains one of the central problems of solar physics given that the solar coronal magnetism is the key driver of all solar activity. Nowadays the coronal magnetic field is often modelled using methods of nonlinear force-free field reconstruction, whose accuracy has not yet been comprehensively assessed. Given that the coronal magnetic probing is routinely unavailable, only morphological tests have been applied to evaluate performance of the reconstruction methods and a few direct tests using available semi-analytical force-free field solution. Here we report a detailed casting of various tools used for the nonlinear force-free field reconstruction, such as disambiguation methods, photospheric field preprocessing methods, and volume reconstruction methods in a 3D domain using a 3D snapshot of the publicly available full-fledged radiative MHD model. We take advantage of the fact that from the realistic MHD model we know the magnetic field vector distribution in the entire 3D domain, which enables us to perform "voxel-by-voxel" comparison of the restored magnetic field and the true magnetic field in the 3D model volume. Our tests show that the available disambiguation methods often fail at the quiet sun areas, where the magnetic structure is dominated by small-scale magnetic elements, while they work really well at the AR photosphere and (even better) chromosphere. The preprocessing of the photospheric magnetic field, although does produce a more force-free boundary condition, also results in some effective `elevation' of the magnetic field components. The effective `elevation' height turns out to be different for the longitudinal and transverse components of the magnetic field, which results in a systematic error in absolute heights in the reconstructed magnetic data cube. The extrapolation performed starting from actual AR photospheric magnetogram (i.e., without preprocessing) are

  5. 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Mise-à-la-Masse Method as Tools for the Characterization of Vine Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaga, J.; Mary, B.; Peruzzo, L.; Schmutz, M.; Wu, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.; Cassiani, G.

    2017-12-01

    The interest on non-invasive geophysical monitoring of soil properties and root architecture is rapidly growing. Despite this, few case studies exist concerning vineyards, which are economically one of the leading sectors of agriculture. In this study, we integrate different geophysical methods in order to gain a better imaging of the vine root system, with the aim of quantifying root development, a key factor to understand roots-soil interaction and water balance. Our test site is a vineyard located in Bordeaux (France), where we adopted the Mise-a-la-Masse method (MALM) and micro-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) on the same 3D electrode configuration. While ERT is a well-established technique to image changes in soil moisture content by root activity, MALM is a relatively new approach in this field of research. The idea is to inject current directly in the plant trunk and verify the resulting voltage distribution in the soil, as an effect of current distribution through the root system. In order to distinguish the root effect from other phenomena linked to the soil heterogeneities, we conducted and compared MALM measurements acquired through injecting current into the stem and into the soil near the stem. Moreover, the MALM data measured in the field were compared with numerical simulations to improve the confidence in the interpretation. Differences obtained between the stem and soil injection clearly validated the assumption that the whole root system is acting as a current pathway, thus highlighting the locations at depth where current is entering the soil from the fine roots. The simulation results indicated that the best fit is obtained through considering distributed sources with depth, reflecting a probable root zone area. The root location and volume estimated using this procedure are in agreement with vineyard experimental evidence. This work suggests the promising application of electrical methods to locate and monitor root systems. Further

  6. An electric field in a gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpaz, Amos

    2005-01-01

    The behaviour of an electric field in a gravitational field is analysed. It is found that due to the mass (energy) of the electric field, it is subjected to gravity and it falls in the gravitational field. This fall curves the electric field, a stress force (a reaction force) is created, and the interaction of this reaction force with the static charge gives rise to the creation of radiation

  7. 3D Flow Field Measurements using Aerosol Correlation Velocimetry, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AeroMancer Technologies proposes to develop a 3D Global Lidar Airspeed Sensor (3D-LGAS) using Aerosol Correlation Velocimetry for standoff sensing of high-resolution...

  8. 3D Flow Field Measurements using Aerosol Correlation Velocimetry, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AeroMancer Technology proposes to develop a 3D Lidar Global Airspeed Sensor (3D-GLAS) for remote optical sensing of three-component airspeeds in wind tunnel...

  9. Fine resolution 3D temperature fields off Kerguelen from instrumented penguins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrassin, Jean-Benoît; Park, Young-Hyang; Le Maho, Yvon; Bost, Charles-André

    2004-12-01

    The use of diving animals as autonomous vectors of oceanographic instruments is rapidly increasing, because this approach yields cost-efficient new information and can be used in previously poorly sampled areas. However, methods for analyzing the collected data are still under development. In particular, difficulties may arise from the heterogeneous data distribution linked to animals' behavior. Here we show how raw temperature data collected by penguin-borne loggers were transformed to a regular gridded dataset that provided new information on the local circulation off Kerguelen. A total of 16 king penguins ( Aptenodytes patagonicus) were equipped with satellite-positioning transmitters and with temperature-time-depth recorders (TTDRs) to record dive depth and sea temperature. The penguins' foraging trips recorded during five summers ranged from 140 to 600 km from the colony and 11,000 dives >100 m were recorded. Temperature measurements recorded during diving were used to produce detailed 3D temperature fields of the area (0-200 m). The data treatment included dive location, determination of the vertical profile for each dive, averaging and gridding of those profiles onto 0.1°×0.1° cells, and optimal interpolation in both the horizontal and vertical using an objective analysis. Horizontal fields of temperature at the surface and 100 m are presented, as well as a vertical section along the main foraging direction of the penguins. Compared to conventional temperature databases (Levitus World Ocean Atlas and historical stations available in the area), the 3D temperature fields collected from penguins are extremely finely resolved, by one order finer. Although TTDRs were less accurate than conventional instruments, such a high spatial resolution of penguin-derived data provided unprecedented detailed information on the upper level circulation pattern east of Kerguelen, as well as the iron-enrichment mechanism leading to a high primary production over the Kerguelen

  10. Impact of helical boundary conditions on nonlinear 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veranda, M; Bonfiglio, D; Cappello, S; Chacón, L; Escande, D F

    2013-01-01

    Helical self-organized reversed-field pinch (RFP) regimes emerge both numerically—in 3D visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations—and experimentally, as in the RFX-mod device at high current (I P above 1 MA). These states, called quasi-single helicity (QSH) states, are characterized by the action of a MHD mode that impresses a quasi-helical symmetry to the system, thus allowing a high degree of magnetic chaos healing. This is in contrast with the multiple helicity (MH) states, where magnetic fluctuations create a chaotic magnetic field degrading the confinement properties of the RFP. This paper reports an extensive numerical study performed in the frame of 3D visco-resistive MHD which considers the effect of helical magnetic boundary conditions, i.e. of a finite value of the radial magnetic field at the edge (magnetic perturbation, MP). We show that the system can be driven to a selected QSH state starting from both spontaneous QSH and MH regimes. In particular, a high enough MP can force a QSH helical self-organization with a helicity different from the spontaneous one. Moreover, MH states can be turned into QSH states with a selected helicity. A threshold in the amplitude of MP is observed above which is able to influence the system. Analysis of the magnetic topology of these simulations indicates that the dominant helical mode is able to temporarily sustain conserved magnetic structures in the core of the plasma. The region occupied by conserved magnetic surfaces increases reducing secondary modes' amplitude to experimental-like values. (paper)

  11. PIV measurement of the flow field in a domestic refrigerator model: Comparison with 3D simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amara, S.; Laguerre, O.; Flick, D. [UMR Genie Industriel Alimentaire (Cemagref-AgroParisTech-INRA) - Cemagref, Parc de Tourvoie, BP 44, 92185 Antony Cedex (France); Charrier-Mojtabi, M.-C.; Lartigue, B. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Laboratoire PHASE, E.A. 3208, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2008-12-15

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements of flow field due to natural convection in a parallelepipedic enclosure representing a domestic refrigerator model (scale 1) have been undertaken in order to determine the thickness of the hydrodynamic boundary layers and to study the flow motions depending on the boundary conditions applied on the vertical walls. One of the vertical walls is maintained at a negative and constant temperature either on the totality or on one part of its surface: this wall acts as the evaporator. The other walls are in contact with external air at constant temperature. The velocity measurements have been made in the symmetry plane of the enclosure. Unsteady recirculations have been observed at the bottom of the cavity. The influence of both the temperature and the dimension of the cold wall has been studied. Numerical simulations using CFD software (Fluent) have been then performed. In the numerical model, we assumed that the temperature of the evaporator is constant while an uniform global heat transfer coefficient has been used to describe the heat exchange with the external air at constant temperature. We considered laminar 3D flows and took into account the heat transfer by radiation between the different walls of the cavity. The results obtained with the 3D numerical simulations are in quite good agreement with the experimental airflow measurements using the PIV technique. (author)

  12. Active heat pulse sensing of 3-D-flow fields in streambeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Eddie W.; Shanafield, Margaret A.; Noorduijn, Saskia; McCallum, James; Lewandowski, Jörg; Batelaan, Okke

    2018-03-01

    Profiles of temperature time series are commonly used to determine hyporheic flow patterns and hydraulic dynamics in the streambed sediments. Although hyporheic flows are 3-D, past research has focused on determining the magnitude of the vertical flow component and how this varies spatially. This study used a portable 56-sensor, 3-D temperature array with three heat pulse sources to measure the flow direction and magnitude up to 200 mm below the water-sediment interface. Short, 1 min heat pulses were injected at one of the three heat sources and the temperature response was monitored over a period of 30 min. Breakthrough curves from each of the sensors were analysed using a heat transport equation. Parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis was undertaken using the differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) algorithm, an adaption of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, to estimate the flux and its orientation. Measurements were conducted in the field and in a sand tank under an extensive range of controlled hydraulic conditions to validate the method. The use of short-duration heat pulses provided a rapid, accurate assessment technique for determining dynamic and multi-directional flow patterns in the hyporheic zone and is a basis for improved understanding of biogeochemical processes at the water-streambed interface.

  13. Electron acceleration in the Solar corona - 3D PiC code simulations of guide field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio

    2017-04-01

    The efficient electron acceleration in the solar corona detected by means of hard X-ray emission is still not well understood. Magnetic reconnection through current sheets is one of the proposed production mechanisms of non-thermal electrons in solar flares. Previous works in this direction were based mostly on test particle calculations or 2D fully-kinetic PiC simulations. We have now studied the consequences of self-generated current-aligned instabilities on the electron acceleration mechanisms by 3D magnetic reconnection. For this sake, we carried out 3D Particle-in-Cell (PiC) code numerical simulations of force free reconnecting current sheets, appropriate for the description of the solar coronal plasmas. We find an efficient electron energization, evidenced by the formation of a non-thermal power-law tail with a hard spectral index smaller than -2 in the electron energy distribution function. We discuss and compare the influence of the parallel electric field versus the curvature and gradient drifts in the guiding-center approximation on the overall acceleration, and their dependence on different plasma parameters.

  14. 3D stochastic inversion and joint inversion of potential fields for multi scale parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipour, Pejman

    In this thesis we present the development of new techniques for the interpretation of potential field (gravity and magnetic data), which are the most widespread economic geophysical methods used for oil and mineral exploration. These new techniques help to address the long-standing issue with the interpretation of potential fields, namely the intrinsic non-uniqueness inversion of these types of data. The thesis takes the form of three papers (four including Appendix), which have been published, or soon to be published, in respected international journals. The purpose of the thesis is to introduce new methods based on 3D stochastical approaches for: 1) Inversion of potential field data (magnetic), 2) Multiscale Inversion using surface and borehole data and 3) Joint inversion of geophysical potential field data. We first present a stochastic inversion method based on a geostatistical approach to recover 3D susceptibility models from magnetic data. The aim of applying geostatistics is to provide quantitative descriptions of natural variables distributed in space or in time and space. We evaluate the uncertainty on the parameter model by using geostatistical unconditional simulations. The realizations are post-conditioned by cokriging to observation data. In order to avoid the natural tendency of the estimated structure to lay near the surface, depth weighting is included in the cokriging system. Then, we introduce algorithm for multiscale inversion, the presented algorithm has the capability of inverting data on multiple supports. The method involves four main steps: i. upscaling of borehole parameters (It could be density or susceptibility) to block parameters, ii. selection of block to use as constraints based on a threshold on kriging variance, iii. inversion of observation data with selected block densities as constraints, and iv. downscaling of inverted parameters to small prisms. Two modes of application are presented: estimation and simulation. Finally, a novel

  15. 3D Printed Scintillators For Use in Field Emission Detection and Other Nuclear Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficenec, Karen

    2015-10-01

    In accelerator cavities, field emission electrons - electrons that get stripped away from the cavity walls due to the high electromagnetic field necessary to accelerate the main beam - are partially accelerated and can crash into the cavity walls, adding to the heat-load of the cryogenic system. Because these field electrons emit gamma rays when bent by the electromagnetic field, a scintillator, if made to fit the cavity enclosure, can detect their presence. Eliminating the waste of subtractive manufacturing techniques and allowing for the production of unique, varied shapes, 3D printing of scintillators may allow for an efficient detection system. UV light is used to start a chemical polymerization process that links the monomers of the liquid resin together into larger, intertwined molecules, forming the solid structure. Each shape requires slightly different calibration of its optimal printing parameters, such as slice thickness and exposure time to UV light. Thus far, calibration parameters have been optimized for cylinders of 20 mm diameter, cones of 30 mm diameter and 30 mm height, rectangular prisms 30 by 40 by 10 mm, and square pyramids 20 mm across. Calibration continues on creating holes in the prints (for optical fibers), as well as shapes with overhangs. Scintill This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1405857.

  16. 3D-QSAR Investigation of Synthetic Antioxidant Chromone Derivatives by Molecular Field Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraporn Ungwitayatorn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of 7-hydroxy, 8-hydroxy and 7,8-dihydroxy synthetic chromone derivatives was evaluated for their DPPH free radical scavenging activities. A training set of 30 synthetic chromone derivatives was subject to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR studies using molecular field analysis (MFA. The substitutional requirements for favorable antioxidant activity were investigated and a predictive model that could be used for the design of novel antioxidants was derived. Regression analysis was carried out using genetic partial least squares (G/PLS method. A highly predictive and statistically significant model was generated. The predictive ability of the developed model was assessed using a test set of 5 compounds (r2pred = 0.924. The analyzed MFA model demonstrated a good fit, having r2 value of 0.868 and crossvalidated coefficient r2cv value of 0.771.

  17. Hyperspectral interferometry for single-shot absolute measurement of 3-D shape and displacement fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz P. D.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method that we call Hyperspectral Interferometry (HSI to resolve the 2π phase unwrapping problem in the analysis of interferograms recorded with a narrow-band light source. By using a broad-band light source and hyperspectral imaging system, a set of interferograms at different wavenumbers are recorded simultaneously on a high resolution image sensor. These are then assembled to form a three-dimensional intensity distribution. By Fourier transformation along the wavenumber axis, an absolute optical path difference is obtained for each pixel independently of the other pixels in the field of view. As a result, interferograms with spatially distinct regions are analysed as easily as continuous ones. The approach is illustrated with a HSI system to measure 3-D profiles of optically smooth or rough surfaces. Compared to existing profilometers able to measure absolute path differences, the single shot nature of the approach provides greater immunity from environmental disturbance.

  18. Toward 3-D E-field visualization in laser-produced plasma by polarization-spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2004-01-01

    A 3-D volume radiator such as laser-produced plasma (LPP) plumes is observed in the form of a 2-D projection of its radiative structure. The traditional approach to 3-D structure reconstruction relies on multiple projections but is not suitable as a general method for unsteady radiating objects. We have developed a general method for 3-D structure reconstruction for LPP plumes in stages of increasing complexity. We have chosen neutral gas-confined LPP plumes from an aluminum target immersed in high-density argon because the plasma experiences Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We make use of two time-resolved, mutually orthogonal side views of a LPP plume and a front-view snapshot. No symmetry assumptions are needed. Two scaling relations are invoked that connects the plasma temperature and pressure to local specific intensity at selected wavelength(s). Two mutually-orthogonal lateral luminosity views of the plume at each known distance from the target surface are compared with those computed from the trial specific intensity profiles and the scaling relations. The luminosity error signals are minimized to find the structure. The front-view snapshot is used to select the initial trial profile and as a weighting function for allocation of the error signal into corrections for specific intensities from the plasma cells along the line of sight. Full Saha equilibrium for multiple stages of ionization is treated, together with the self-absorption, in the computation of the luminosity. We show the necessary optics for determination of local electric fields through polarization-resolved imaging. (author)

  19. Formulation, stability and application of a semi-coupled 3-D four-field algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, R.F.; Siebert, B.W.; Cope, W.K.; Foster, N.F.; Antal, S.P.; Ettorre, S.M.

    1996-06-01

    A new 3-D four-field algorithm has been developed to predict general two-phase flows. Ensemble averaged transport equations of mass, momentum, energy and turbulence transport are solved for each field (continuous liquid, continuous vapor, disperse liquid, disperse vapor). This four-field structure allows for analysis of adiabatic and boiling systems which contain flow regimes from bubbly through annular. Interfacial mass, momentum, turbulence and heat transfer models provide coupling between phases. A new semi-coupled implicit method is utilized to solve the set of 25 equations which arise in the formulation. In this paper, three important component numerical strategies employed in the method are summarized. These include: (1) incorporation of interfacial momentum force terms in the control volume face flux reconstruction, (2) phase coupling at the linear solver level, and in the pressure-velocity coupling itself and (3) a multi-step Jacobi block correction scheme for efficient solution of the pressure-Poisson equation. The necessity/effectiveness of these strategies is demonstrated in applications to realistic engineering flows. Though some heated flow test cases are considered, the particular numerics discussed here are germane to adiabatic flows with and without mass transfer

  20. Influence of external 3D magnetic fields on helical equilibrium and plasma flow in RFX-mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovesan, P; Bonfiglio, D; Bonomo, F; Cappello, S; Carraro, L; Cavazzana, R; Gobbin, M; Marrelli, L; Martin, P; Martines, E; Momo, B; Piron, L; Puiatti, M E; Soppelsa, A; Valisa, M; Zanca, P; Zaniol, B

    2011-01-01

    A spontaneous transition to a helical equilibrium with an electron internal transport barrier is observed in RFX-mod as the plasma current is raised above 1 MA (Lorenzini R et al 2009 Nature Phys. 5 570). The helical magnetic equilibrium can be controlled with external three-dimensional (3D) magnetic fields applied by 192 active coils, providing proper helical boundary conditions either rotating or static. The persistence of the helical equilibrium is strongly increased in this way. A slight reduction in the energy confinement time of about 15% is observed, likely due to the increased plasma-wall interaction associated with the finite radial magnetic field imposed at the edge. A global helical flow develops in these states and is expected to play a role in the helical self-organization. In particular, its shear may contribute to the ITB formation and is observed to increase with the externally applied radial field. The possible origins of this flow, from nonlinear visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and/or ambipolar electric fields, will be discussed.

  1. Electrical conductivity and piezoresistive response of 3D printed thermoplastic polyurethane/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohimer, Cameron J.; Petrossian, Gayaneh; Ameli, Amir; Mo, Changki; Pötschke, Petra

    2018-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is an emerging field experiencing rapid growth. This paper presents a feasibility study of using fused-deposition modeling (FDM) techniques with smart materials to fabricate objects with sensing and actuating capabilities. The fabrication of objects with sensing typically requires the integration and assembly of multiple components. Incorporating sensing elements into a single FDM process has the potential to significantly simplify manufacturing. The integration of multiple materials, especially smart materials and those with multi-functional properties, into the FDM process is challenging and still requires further development. Previous works by the authors have demonstrated a good printability of thermoplastic polyurethane/multiwall carbon nanotubes (TPU/MWCNT) while maintaining conductivity and piezoresistive response. This research explores the effects of layer height, nozzle temperature, and bed temperature on the electrical conductivity and piezoresistive response of printed TPU/MWCNT nanocomposites. An impedance analyzer was used to determine the conductivity of printed samples under different printing conditions from 5Hz-13MHz. The samples were then tested under compression loads to measure the piezoresistive response. Results show the conductivity and piezoresistive response are only slightly affected by the print parameters and they can be largely considered independent of the print conditions within the examined ranges of print parameters. This behavior simplifies the printing process design for TPU/MWCNT complex structures. This work demonstrates the possibility of manufacturing embedded and multidirectional flexible strain sensors using an inexpensive and versatile method, with potential applications in soft robotics, flexible electronics, and health monitoring.

  2. Autoblocking dose-limiting normal structures within a radiation treatment field: 3-D computer optimization of 'unconventional' field arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Brian A.; Cullip, Timothy J.; Rosenman, Julian G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To demonstrate that one can obtain a homogeneous dose distribution within a specified gross tumor volume (GTV) while severely limiting the dose to a structure surrounded by that tumor volume. We present three clinical examples below. Materials and Methods: Using planning CT scans from previously treated patients, we designed variety of radiation treatment plans in which the dose-critical normal structure was blocked, even if it meant blocking some of the tumor. To deal with the resulting dose inhomogeneities within the tumor, we introduced 3D compensation. Examples presented here include (1) blocking the spinal cord segment while treating an entire vertebral body, (2) blocking both kidneys while treating the entire peritoneal cavity, and (3) blocking one parotid gland while treating the oropharynx in its entirety along with regional nodes. A series of multiple planar and non-coplanar beam templates with automatic anatomic blocking and field shaping were designed for each scenario. Three-dimensional compensators were designed that gave the most homogeneous dose-distribution for the GTV. For each beam, rays were cast from the beam source through a 2D compensator grid and out through the tumor. The average tumor dose along each ray was then used to adjust the compensator thickness over successive iterations to achieve a uniform average dose. DVH calculations for the GTV, normal structures, and the 'auto-blocked' structure were made and used for inter-plan comparisons. Results: These optimized treatment plans successfully decreased dose to the dose-limiting structure while at the same time preserving or even improving the dose distribution to the tumor volume as compared to traditional treatment plans. Conclusion: The use of 3D compensation allows one to obtain dose distributions that are, theoretically, at least, far superior to those in common clinical use. Sensible beam templates, auto-blocking, auto-field shaping, and 3D compensators form a

  3. Electrical and Mechanical Properties of 3D-Printed Graphene-Reinforced Epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Brett G.; Hmeidat, Nadim S.; Pack, Robert C.; Heres, Maximilian F.; Sangoro, Joshua R.

    2018-03-01

    Recent developments in additive manufacturing have demonstrated the potential for thermoset polymer feedstock materials to achieve high strength, stiffness, and functionality through incorporation of structural and functional filler materials. In this work, graphene was investigated as a potential filler material to provide rheological properties necessary for direct-write three-dimensional (3D) printing and electrostatic discharge properties to the printed component. The rheological properties of epoxy/graphene mixtures were characterized, and printable epoxy/graphene inks formulated. Sheet resistance values for printed epoxy/graphene composites ranged from 0.67 × 102 Ω/sq to 8.2 × 103 Ω/sq. The flexural strength of printed epoxy/graphene composites was comparable to that of cast neat epoxy ( 80 MPa), suggesting great potential for these new materials in multifunctional 3D-printed devices.

  4. GPS tomography: validation of reconstructed 3-D humidity fields with radiosonde profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shangguan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor plays an important role in meteorological applications; GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ therefore developed a tomographic system to derive 3-D distributions of the tropospheric water vapor above Germany using GPS data from about 300 ground stations. Input data for the tomographic reconstructions are generated by the Earth Parameter and Orbit determination System (EPOS software of the GFZ, which provides zenith total delay (ZTD, integrated water vapor (IWV and slant total delay (STD data operationally with a temporal resolution of 2.5 min (STD and 15 min (ZTD, IWV. The water vapor distribution in the atmosphere is derived by tomographic reconstruction techniques. The quality of the solution is dependent on many factors such as the spatial coverage of the atmosphere with slant paths, the spatial distribution of their intersections and the accuracy of the input observations. Independent observations are required to validate the tomographic reconstructions and to get precise information on the accuracy of the derived 3-D water vapor fields. To determine the quality of the GPS tomography, more than 8000 vertical water vapor profiles at 13 German radiosonde stations were used for the comparison. The radiosondes were launched twice a day (at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC in 2007. In this paper, parameters of the entire profiles such as the wet refractivity, and the zenith wet delay have been compared. Before the validation the temporal and spatial distribution of the slant paths, serving as a basis for tomographic reconstruction, as well as their angular distribution were studied. The mean wet refractivity differences between tomography and radiosonde data for all points vary from −1.3 to 0.3, and the root mean square is within the range of 6.5–9. About 32% of 6803 profiles match well, 23% match badly and 45% are difficult to classify as they match only in parts.

  5. GPS tomography. Validation of reconstructed 3-D humidity fields with radiosonde profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shangguan, M.; Bender, M.; Ramatschi, M.; Dick, G.; Wickert, J. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), Potsdam (Germany); Raabe, A. [Leipzig Institute for Meteorology (LIM), Leipzig (Germany); Galas, R. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. for Geodesy and Geoinformation Sciences

    2013-11-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in meteorological applications; GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) therefore developed a tomographic system to derive 3-D distributions of the tropospheric water vapor above Germany using GPS data from about 300 ground stations. Input data for the tomographic reconstructions are generated by the Earth Parameter and Orbit determination System (EPOS) software of the GFZ, which provides zenith total delay (ZTD), integrated water vapor (IWV) and slant total delay (STD) data operationally with a temporal resolution of 2.5 min (STD) and 15 min (ZTD, IWV). The water vapor distribution in the atmosphere is derived by tomographic reconstruction techniques. The quality of the solution is dependent on many factors such as the spatial coverage of the atmosphere with slant paths, the spatial distribution of their intersections and the accuracy of the input observations. Independent observations are required to validate the tomographic reconstructions and to get precise information on the accuracy of the derived 3-D water vapor fields. To determine the quality of the GPS tomography, more than 8000 vertical water vapor profiles at 13 German radiosonde stations were used for the comparison. The radiosondes were launched twice a day (at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC) in 2007. In this paper, parameters of the entire profiles such as the wet refractivity, and the zenith wet delay have been compared. Before the validation the temporal and spatial distribution of the slant paths, serving as a basis for tomographic reconstruction, as well as their angular distribution were studied. The mean wet refractivity differences between tomography and radiosonde data for all points vary from -1.3 to 0.3, and the root mean square is within the range of 6.5-9. About 32% of 6803 profiles match well, 23% match badly and 45% are difficult to classify as they match only in parts.

  6. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian Wellmann, J.; Thiele, Sam T.; Lindsay, Mark D.; Jessell, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilize the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  7. Design and testing of indigenous cost effective three dimensional radiation field analyser (3D RFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K M; Pichandi, A; Nehru, R M; Ravikumar, M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study is to design and validate an indigenous three dimensional Radiation Field Analyser (3D RFA). The feed system made for X, Y and Z axis movements is of lead screw with deep ball bearing mechanism made up of stain less steel driven by stepper motors with accuracy less than 0.5 mm. The telescopic column lifting unit was designed using linear actuation technology for lifting the water phantom. The acrylic phantom with dimensions of 800 x 750 x 570 mm was made with thickness of 15 mm. The software was developed in visual basic programming language, classified into two types, viz. beam analyzer software and beam acquisition software. The premeasurement checks were performed as per TG 106 recommendations. The physical parameters of photon PDDs such as Dmax, D10, D20 and Quality Index (QI), and the electron PDDs such as R50, Rp, E0, Epo and X-ray contamination values can be obtained instantaneously by using the developed RFA system. Also the results for profile data such as field size, central axis deviation, penumbra, flatness and symmetry calculated according to various protocols can be obtained for both photon and electron beams. The result of PDDs for photon beams were compared with BJR25 supplement values and the profile data were compared with TG 40 recommendation. The results were in agreement with standard protocols.

  8. Measurements of 3D velocity and scalar field for a film-cooled airfoil trailing edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Michael J.; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K. [Stanford University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The 3D velocity and concentration fields have been measured for flow in a pressure side cutback trailing edge film cooling geometry consisting of rectangular film cooling slots separated by tapered lands. The velocity field was measured using conventional magnetic resonance velocimetry, and the concentration distribution was measured with a refined magnetic resonance concentration technique that yields experimental uncertainties for the concentration between 5 and 6%. All experiments were performed in water. A separation bubble behind the slot lip entrains coolant and promotes rapid turbulent mixing at the upper edge of the coolant jet. Vortices from inside the slot feed channel and on the upper sides of the lands rapidly distort the initially rectangular shape of the coolant stream and sweep mainstream flow toward the airfoil surface. The vortices also prevent any coolant from reaching the upper surfaces of the land. At the trailing edge, a second separation region exists in the blunt trailing edge wake. The flow forms suction side streaks behind the land tips, as well as streaks behind the slot centers on the pressure side. The peak coolant concentrations in the streaks remain above 25% through the end of the measurement domain, over 30 slot heights downstream. (orig.)

  9. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  10. 3D Photo Mosaicing of Tagiri Shallow Vent Field by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Toshihiro; Kondo, Hayato; Ura, Tamaki; Sakamaki, Takashi; Mizushima, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Masao

    Although underwater visual observation is an ideal method for detailed survey of seafloors, it is currently a costly process that requires the use of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) or Human Occupied Vehicles (HOVs), and can cover only a limited area. This paper proposes an innovative method to navigate an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to create both 2D and 3D photo mosaics of seafloors with high positioning accuracy without using any vision-based matching. The vehicle finds vertical pole-like acoustic reflectors to use as positioning landmarks using a profiling sonar based on a SLAM (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) technique. These reflectors can be either artificial or natural objects, and so the method can be applied to shallow vent fields where conventional acoustic positioning is difficult, since bubble plumes can also be used as landmarks as well as artificial reflectors. Path-planning is performed in real-time based on the positions and types of landmarks so as to navigate safely and stably using landmarks of different types (artificial reflector or bubble plume) found at arbitrary times and locations. Terrain tracker switches control reference between depth and altitude from the seafloor based on a local map of hazardous area created in real-time using onboard perceptual sensors, in order to follow rugged terrains at an altitude of 1 to 2 meters, as this range is ideal for visual observation. The method was implemented in the AUV Tri-Dog 1 and experiments were carried out at Tagiri vent field, Kagoshima Bay in Japan. The AUV succeeded in fully autonomous observation for more than 160 minutes to create a photo mosaic with an area larger than 600 square meters, which revealed the spatial distribution of detailed features such as tube-worm colonies, bubble plumes and bacteria mats. A fine bathymetry of the same area was also created using a light-section ranging system mounted on the vehicle. Finally a 3 D representation of the environment was

  11. Investigation of gas–solids flow in a circulating fluidized bed using 3D electrical capacitance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Mingxu; Ye, Jiamin; Wang, Haigang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2016-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of gas–solids flow in the bottom of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) are complicated. Three-dimensional (3D) electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) has been used to investigate the hydrodynamics in risers of different shapes. Four different ECT sensors with 12 electrodes each are designed according to the dimension of risers, including two circular ECT sensors, a square ECT sensor and a rectangular ECT sensor. The electrodes are evenly arranged in three planes to obtain capacitance in different heights and to reconstruct the 3D images by linear back projection (LBP) algorithm. Experiments were carried out on the four risers using sands as the solids material. The capacitance and differential pressure are measured under the gas superficial velocity from 0.6 m s −1 to 3.0 m s −1 with a step of 0.2 m s −1 . The flow regime is investigated according to the solids concentration and differential pressure. The dynamic property of bubbling flows is analyzed theoretically and the performance of the 3D ECT sensors is evaluated. The experimental results show that 3D ECT can be used in the CFB with different risers to predict the hydrodynamics of gas–solids bubbling flows. (paper)

  12. Wave Phase-Sensitive Transformation of 3d-Straining of Mechanical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, I. N.; Speranskiy, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    It is the area of research of oscillatory processes in elastic mechanical systems. Technical result of innovation is creation of spectral set of multidimensional images which reflect time-correlated three-dimensional vector parameters of metrological, and\\or estimated, and\\or design parameters of oscillations in mechanical systems. Reconstructed images of different dimensionality integrated in various combinations depending on their objective function can be used as homeostatic profile or cybernetic image of oscillatory processes in mechanical systems for an objective estimation of current operational conditions in real time. The innovation can be widely used to enhance the efficiency of monitoring and research of oscillation processes in mechanical systems (objects) in construction, mechanical engineering, acoustics, etc. Concept method of vector vibrometry based on application of vector 3D phase- sensitive vibro-transducers permits unique evaluation of real stressed-strained states of power aggregates and loaded constructions and opens fundamental innovation opportunities: conduct of continuous (on-line regime) reliable monitoring of turboagregates of electrical machines, compressor installations, bases, supports, pipe-lines and other objects subjected to damaging effect of vibrations; control of operational safety of technical systems at all the stages of life cycle including design, test production, tuning, testing, operational use, repairs and resource enlargement; creation of vibro-diagnostic systems of authentic non-destructive control of anisotropic characteristics of materials resistance of power aggregates and loaded constructions under outer effects and operational flaws. The described technology is revolutionary, universal and common for all branches of engineering industry and construction building objects.

  13. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  14. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report

  15. Energetic fitness: Field metabolic rates assessed via 3D accelerometry complement conventional fitness metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grémillet, David; Lescroël, Amelie; Ballard, Grant; Dugger, Katie M.; Massaro, Melanie; Porzig, Elizabeth L.; Ainley, David G.

    2018-01-01

    Evaluating the fitness of organisms is an essential step towards understanding their responses to environmental change. Connections between energy expenditure and fitness have been postulated for nearly a century. However, testing this premise among wild animals is constrained by difficulties in measuring energy expenditure while simultaneously monitoring conventional fitness metrics such as survival and reproductive output.We addressed this issue by exploring the functional links between field metabolic rate (FMR), body condition, sex, age and reproductive performance in a wild population.We deployed 3D accelerometers on 115 Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae during four breeding seasons at one of the largest colonies of this species, Cape Crozier, on Ross Island, Antarctica. The demography of this population has been studied for the past 18 years. From accelerometry recordings, collected for birds of known age and breeding history, we determined the vector of the dynamic body acceleration (VeDBA) and used it as a proxy for FMR.This allowed us to demonstrate relationships among FMR, a breeding quality index (BQI) and body condition. Notably, we found a significant quadratic relationship between mean VeDBA during foraging and BQI for experienced breeders, and individuals in better body condition showed lower rates of energy expenditure.We conclude that using FMR as a fitness component complementary to more conventional fitness metrics will yield greater understanding of evolutionary and conservation physiology.

  16. Runaway electron mitigation by 3D fields in the ASDEX-Upgrade experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbin, M.; Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Marrelli, L.; Nocente, M.; Papp, G.; Pautasso, G.; Piovesan, P.; Valisa, M.; Carnevale, D.; Esposito, B.; Giacomelli, L.; Gospodarczyk, M.; McCarthy, P. J.; Martin, P.; Suttrop, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Teschke, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-01-01

    Disruption-generated runaway electron (RE) beams represent a severe threat for tokamak plasma-facing components in high current devices like ITER, thus motivating the search of mitigation techniques. The application of 3D fields might aid this purpose and recently was investigated also in the ASDEX Upgrade experiment by using the internal active saddle coils (termed B-coils). Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with dominant toroidal mode number n = 1 have been applied by the B-coils, in a RE specific scenario, before and during disruptions, which are deliberately created via massive gas injection. The application of RMPs affects the electron temperature profile and seemingly changes the dynamics of the disruption; this results in a significantly reduced current and lifetime of the generated RE beam. A similar effect is observed also in the hard-x-ray (HXR) spectrum, associated to RE emission, characterized by a partial decrease of the energy content below 1 MeV when RMPs are applied. The strength of the observed effects strongly depends on the upper-to-lower B-coil phasing, i.e. on the poloidal spectrum of the applied RMPs, which has been reconstructed including the plasma response by the code MARS-F. A crude vacuum approximation fails in the interpretation of the experimental findings: despite the relatively low β (< 0.5 % ) of these discharges, a modest amplification (factor of 2) of the edge kink response occurs, which has to be considered to explain the observed suppression effects.

  17. Coherence holography by achromatic 3-D field correlation of generic thermal light with an imaging Sagnac shearing interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Ezawa, Takahiro; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2012-08-27

    We propose a new technique for achromatic 3-D field correlation that makes use of the characteristics of both axial and lateral magnifications of imaging through a common-path Sagnac shearing interferometer. With this technique, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, 3-D image reconstruction of coherence holography with generic thermal light. By virtue of the achromatic axial shearing implemented by the difference in axial magnifications in imaging, the technique enables coherence holography to reconstruct a 3-D object with an axial depth beyond the short coherence length of the thermal light.

  18. Towards 3C-3D digital holographic fluid velocity vector field measurement—tomographic digital holographic PIV (Tomo-HPIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, J; Atkinson, C

    2008-01-01

    Most unsteady and/or turbulent flows of geophysical and engineering interest have a highly three-dimensional (3D) complex topology and their experimental investigation is in pressing need of quantitative velocity measurement methods that are robust and can provide instantaneous 3C-3D velocity field data over a significant volumetric domain of the flow. This paper introduces and demonstrates a new method that uses multiple digital CCD array cameras to record in-line digital holograms of the same volume of seed particles from multiple orientations. This technique uses the same basic equipment as Tomo-PIV minus the camera lenses, it overcomes the depth-of-field problem of digital in-line holography and does not require the complex optical calibration of Tomo-PIV. The digital sensors can be oriented in an optimal manner to overcome the depth-of-field limitation of in-line holograms recorded using digital CCD or CMOS array cameras, resulting in a 3D reconstruction of the seed particles within the volume of interest, which can subsequently be analysed using 3D cross-correlation PIV analysis to yield a 3C-3D velocity field. A demonstration experiment of Tomo-HPIV using uniform translation with nominally 11 µm diameter seed particles shows that the 3D displacement derived from 3D cross-correlation Tomo-HPIV analysis can be measured within 5% of the imposed uniform translation, where the imposed uniform translation has an estimated standard uncertainty of 4.3%. So this paper proposes a multi-camera digital holographic imaging 3C-3D PIV method, which is identified as tomographic digital holographic PIV or Tomo-HPIV

  19. Electric fields in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falthammar, C.G.

    1989-01-01

    Electric field measurements on the satellites GEOS-1, GEOS-2, ISEE-1, and Viking have extended the empirical knowledge of electric fields in space so as to include the outer regions of the magnetosphere. While the measurements confirm some of the theoretically expected properties of the electric fields, they also reveal unexpected features and a high degree of complexity and variability. The existence of a magnetospheric dawn-to-dusk electric field, as expected on the basis of extrapolation from low altitude measurements, is confirmed in an average sense. However, the actual field exhibits large spatial and temporal variations, including strong fields of inductive origin. At the magnetopause, the average (dawn-to-dusk directed) tangential electric field component is typically obscured by irregular fluctuations of larger amplitude. The magnetic-field aligned component of the electric field, which is of particular importance for ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and for auroral acceleration, is even now very difficult to measure directly. However, the data from electric field measurements provide further support for the conclusion, based on a variety of evidence, that a non-vanishing magnetic-field aligned electric field exists in the auroral acceleration region

  20. Low-Cost Energy-Efficient 3-D Nano-Spikes-Based Electric Cell Lysis Chips

    KAUST Repository

    Riaz, Kashif; Leung, Siu; Fan, Zhiyong; Lee, Yi-Kuen

    2017-01-01

    Electric cell lysis (ECL) is a promising technique to be integrated with portable lab-on-a-chip without lysing agent due to its simplicity and fast processing. ECL is usually limited by the requirements of high power/voltage and costly fabrication

  1. 2D and 3D Subsurface Geo-electrical Resistivity Imaging of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    2018-04-12

    Apr 12, 2018 ... heavy metals is rare through ingestion or dermal contact, but it is possible. ... Earth). Experimental: Electrical Resistivity Tomography. (ERT) survey was ... hence the area is prone to a good age of leach material that has been ...

  2. 2D and 3D impellers of centrifugal compressors - advantages, shortcomings and fields of application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galerkin, Y.; Reksrin, A.; Drozdov, A.

    2017-08-01

    The simplified equations are presented for calculation of inlet dimensions and velocity values for impellers with three-dimensional blades located in axial and radial part of an impeller (3D impeller) and with two-dimensional blades in radial part (2D). Considerations concerning loss coefficients of 3D and 2D impellers at different design flow rate coefficients are given. The tendency of reduction of potential advantages of 3D impellers at medium and small design flow rate coefficients is shown. The data on high-efficiency compressors and stages with 2D impellers coefficients designed by the authors are presented. The reached efficiency level of 88 - 90% makes further increase of efficiency by the application of 3D impellers doubtful. CFD-analysis of stage candidates with medium flow rate coefficient with 3D and 2D impellers revealed specific problems. In some cases the constructive advantage of a 2D impeller is smaller hub ratio. It makes possible the reaching of higher efficiency. From other side, there is a positive tendency of gas turbine drive RPM increase. 3D impellers have no alternative for stages with high flow rate coefficients matching high-speed drive.

  3. 3-D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 2: Forecasting warm conveyor belt situations for aircraft-based field campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Grams, C. M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present the application of interactive 3-D visualization of ensemble weather predictions to forecasting warm conveyor belt situations during aircraft-based atmospheric research campaigns. Motivated by forecast requirements of the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 campaign, a method to predict 3-D probabilities of the spatial occurrence of warm conveyor belts has been developed. Probabilities are derived from Lagrangian particle trajectories computed on the forecast wind fields of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system. Integration of the method into the 3-D ensemble visualization tool Met.3D, introduced in the first part of this study, facilitates interactive visualization of WCB features and derived probabilities in the context of the ECMWF ensemble forecast. We investigate the sensitivity of the method with respect to trajectory seeding and forecast wind field resolution. Furthermore, we propose a visual analysis method to quantitatively analyse the contribution of ensemble members to a probability region and, thus, to assist the forecaster in interpreting the obtained probabilities. A case study, revisiting a forecast case from T-NAWDEX-Falcon, illustrates the practical application of Met.3D and demonstrates the use of 3-D and uncertainty visualization for weather forecasting and for planning flight routes in the medium forecast range (three to seven days before take-off).

  4. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Dynamic Applications & Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2017-01-01

    The technology and methods for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field made be used for volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology (e-Sensor) and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasi-static generator), and current e- Sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-Sensor) are discussed. Critical design elements of current linear and real-time two-dimensional (2D) measurement systems are highlighted, and the development of a three dimensional (3D) EFI system is presented. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. Recent work demonstrates that phonons may be used to create and annihilate electric dipoles within structures. Phonon induced dipoles are ephemeral and their polarization, strength, and location may be quantitatively characterized by EFI providing a new subsurface Phonon-EFI imaging technology. Results from real-time imaging of combustion and ion flow, and their measurement complications, will be discussed. Extensions to environment, Space and subterranean applications will be presented, and initial results for quantitative characterizing material properties are shown. A wearable EFI system has been developed by using fundamental EFI concepts. These new EFI capabilities are demonstrated to characterize electric charge distribution creating a new field of study embracing areas of interest including electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation, manufacturing quality control, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, combustion science, on-orbit space potential, container inspection, remote characterization of electronic circuits and level of activation, dielectric morphology of

  5. Analysis of mitigating measures during steam/hydrogen distributions in nuclear reactor containments with the 3D field code gasflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.; Travis, J.R.; Haytcher, E.A.; Wilkening, H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports on the recent model additions to the 3D field code GASFLOW and on validation and application analyses for steam/hydrogen transport with inclusion of mitigation measures. The results of the 3D field simulation of the HDR test E11.2 are summarized. Results from scoping analyses that simulate different modes of CO2 inertization for conditions from the HDR test T31.5 are presented. The last part discusses different ways of recombiner modeling during 3D distribution simulations and gives the results from validation calculations for the HDR recombiner test E11.8.1 and the Battelle test MC3. The results demonstrate that field code simulations with computer codes like GASFLOW are feasible today for complex containment geometries and that they are necessary for a reliable prediction of hydrogen/steam distribution and mitigation effects. (author)

  6. 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity monitoring of injected CO2 in a shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph A. J.A.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 surface electrodes on a 126 m × 20 m grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis for data quality and noise estimation. A baseline...... inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface and glacial sands below 5 m depth. Time-lapse inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can follow the CO2 plume as it spreads and moves with the groundwater...

  7. Application of the weighted total field-scattering field technique to 3D-PSTD light scattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuai; Gao, Taichang; Liu, Lei; Li, Hao; Chen, Ming; Yang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    PSTD (Pseudo Spectral Time Domain) is an excellent model for the light scattering simulation of nonspherical aerosol particles. However, due to the particularity of its discretization form of the Maxwell's equations, the traditional Total Field/Scattering Field (TF/SF) technique for FDTD (Finite Differential Time Domain) is not applicable to PSTD, and the time-consuming pure scattering field technique is mainly applied to introduce the incident wave. To this end, the weighted TF/SF technique proposed by X. Gao is generalized and applied to the 3D-PSTD scattering model. Using this technique, the incident light can be effectively introduced by modifying the electromagnetic components in an inserted connecting region between the total field and the scattering field region with incident terms, where the incident terms are obtained by weighting the incident field by a window function. To optimally determine the thickness of connection region and the window function type for PSTD calculations, their influence on the modeling accuracy is firstly analyzed. To further verify the effectiveness and advantages of the weighted TF/SF technique, the improved PSTD model is validated against the PSTD model equipped with pure scattering field technique in both calculation accuracy and efficiency. The results show that, the performance of PSTD seems to be not sensitive to variation of window functions. The number of the connection layer required decreases with the increasing of spatial resolution, where for spatial resolution of 24 grids per wavelength, a 6-layer region is thick enough. The scattering phase matrices and integral scattering parameters obtained by the improved PSTD show an excellent consistency with those well-tested models for spherical and nonspherical particles, illustrating that the weighted TF/SF technique can introduce the incident precisely. The weighted TF/SF technique shows higher computational efficiency than pure scattering technique.

  8. Electric field gradients in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, G.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the recent works on electric field gradient in metals is given. The main emphasis is put on the temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in nonmagnetic metals. Some methods of investigation of this effect using nuclear probes are described. One of them is nuclear accoustic resonance method. (S.B.)

  9. Cryosurgery with pulsed electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte S Daniels

    Full Text Available This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused

  10. Cryosurgery with Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Charlotte S.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF) was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused PEFs could be used to

  11. Field Trial Results of a 14-channel GPR Integrated with a U.S. Program for 3-D Utility Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspach, James H.

    2013-04-01

    utilities were mostly undetectable. Through a ground-truthing program of test holes to expose utilities, the depth values derived from the enhanced GPR were fairly consistent and within 15 cm of actual depth. The incomplete underground picture determined by the enhanced GPR reinforces previous studies that show that the mapping of existing underground utilities is a multi-tool effort that takes highly trained and skilled field technicians and data interpreters. The addition of a new GPR tool is valuable in determining continuous depth profiles of imaged utilities. A second and significant benefit is the interpretation of other geotechnical data that benefit project designers. This might include showing geometry, location, intensity, and depths of either areas of anomalies, or of known structures, such as paving thickness, substrate thickness, voids, water table, soil lenses, boulders, bedrock, and so forth. The Florida Department of Transportation has decided to take advantage of this new technology and has entered into an experimental contract with Cardno TBE to incorporate several enhanced GPR arrays with traditional utility detection tools. The goal of this contract will be to provide a 3-D model of existing underground utilities for use in automated construction. The GPR 3-D data model will be melded with conventional subsurface utility engineering and mapping practices and will be required to follow the ASCE 38 standard for utility data reliability.

  12. Segmentation of Image Data from Complex Organotypic 3D Models of Cancer Tissues with Markov Random Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sean; Guyon, Laurent; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Toriseva, Mervi; Åkerfelt, Malin; Nees, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Organotypic, three dimensional (3D) cell culture models of epithelial tumour types such as prostate cancer recapitulate key aspects of the architecture and histology of solid cancers. Morphometric analysis of multicellular 3D organoids is particularly important when additional components such as the extracellular matrix and tumour microenvironment are included in the model. The complexity of such models has so far limited their successful implementation. There is a great need for automatic, accurate and robust image segmentation tools to facilitate the analysis of such biologically relevant 3D cell culture models. We present a segmentation method based on Markov random fields (MRFs) and illustrate our method using 3D stack image data from an organotypic 3D model of prostate cancer cells co-cultured with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). The 3D segmentation output suggests that these cell types are in physical contact with each other within the model, which has important implications for tumour biology. Segmentation performance is quantified using ground truth labels and we show how each step of our method increases segmentation accuracy. We provide the ground truth labels along with the image data and code. Using independent image data we show that our segmentation method is also more generally applicable to other types of cellular microscopy and not only limited to fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Segmentation of Image Data from Complex Organotypic 3D Models of Cancer Tissues with Markov Random Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Robinson

    Full Text Available Organotypic, three dimensional (3D cell culture models of epithelial tumour types such as prostate cancer recapitulate key aspects of the architecture and histology of solid cancers. Morphometric analysis of multicellular 3D organoids is particularly important when additional components such as the extracellular matrix and tumour microenvironment are included in the model. The complexity of such models has so far limited their successful implementation. There is a great need for automatic, accurate and robust image segmentation tools to facilitate the analysis of such biologically relevant 3D cell culture models. We present a segmentation method based on Markov random fields (MRFs and illustrate our method using 3D stack image data from an organotypic 3D model of prostate cancer cells co-cultured with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. The 3D segmentation output suggests that these cell types are in physical contact with each other within the model, which has important implications for tumour biology. Segmentation performance is quantified using ground truth labels and we show how each step of our method increases segmentation accuracy. We provide the ground truth labels along with the image data and code. Using independent image data we show that our segmentation method is also more generally applicable to other types of cellular microscopy and not only limited to fluorescence microscopy.

  14. 3D assembly of carbon nanotubes for fabrication of field-effect transistors through nanomanipulation and electron-beam-induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ning; Shi, Qing; Wang, Huaping; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (3D CNTFETs) possess predictable characteristics that rival those of planar CNTFETs and Si-based MOSFETs. However, due to the lack of a reliable assembly technology, they are rarely reported on, despite the amount of attention they receive. To address this problem, we propose the novel concept of a 3D CNTFET and develop its assembly strategy based on nanomanipulation and the electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) technique inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In particular, the electrodes in our transistor design are three metallic cuboids of the same size, and their front, top and back surfaces are all wrapped up in CNTs. The assembly strategy is employed to build the structure through a repeated basic process of pick-up, placement, fixing and cutting of CNTs. The pick-up and placement is performed through one nanomanipulator with four degrees of freedom. Fixing is carried out through the EBID technique so as to improve the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the CNT/electrodes connection. CNT cutting is undertaken using the typical method of electrical breakdown. Experimental results showed that two CNTs were successfully assembled on the front sides of the cubic electrodes. This validates our assembly method for the 3D CNTFET. Also, when contact resistance was measured, tens of kilohms of resistance was observed at the CNT-EBID deposition-FET electrodes junction.. This manifests the electrical reliability of our assembly strategy. (paper)

  15. Study of Ion Beam Forming Process in Electric Thruster Using 3D FEM Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Jin, Xiaolin; Hu, Quan; Li, Bin; Yang, Zhonghai

    2015-11-01

    There are two algorithms to simulate the process of ion beam forming in electric thruster. The one is electrostatic steady state algorithm. Firstly, an assumptive surface, which is enough far from the accelerator grids, launches the ion beam. Then the current density is calculated by theory formula. Secondly these particles are advanced one by one according to the equations of the motions of ions until they are out of the computational region. Thirdly, the electrostatic potential is recalculated and updated by solving Poisson Equation. At the end, the convergence is tested to determine whether the calculation should continue. The entire process will be repeated until the convergence is reached. Another one is time-depended PIC algorithm. In a global time step, we assumed that some new particles would be produced in the simulation domain and its distribution of position and velocity were certain. All of the particles that are still in the system will be advanced every local time steps. Typically, we set the local time step low enough so that the particle needs to be advanced about five times to move the distance of the edge of the element in which the particle is located.

  16. 3D analytical field calculation using triangular magnet segments applied to a skewed linear permanent magnet actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.L.G.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Lomonova, E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents novel analytical expressions which describe the 3D magnetic field of arbitrarily magnetized triangular-shaped charged surfaces. These versatile expressions are suitable to model triangularshaped permanent magnets and can be expanded to any polyhedral shape. Many applications are

  17. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best…

  18. 3D Analytical field calculation using triangular magnet segments applied to a skewed linear permanent magnet actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.L.G.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Lomonova, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents novel analytical expressions which describe the 3D magnetic field of arbitrarily magnetized triangular-shaped charged surfaces. These versatile expressions are suitable to model triangularshaped permanent magnets and can be expanded to any polyhedral shape. Many applications are

  19. Wind field re-construction of 3D Wake measurements from a turbine-installed scanning lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Herges, Tommy; Astrup, Poul

    High-resolution wake flow measurements obtained from a turbine-mounted scanning lidar have been obtained from 1D to 5D behind a V27 test turbine. The measured line-of-sight projected wind speeds have, in connection with a fast CFD wind field reconstruction model, been used to generate 3D wind fie...

  20. Comparison between 3D conventional techniques, field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation for mantle fields planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Lais P.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Trindade, Cassia; Garcia, Paulo L.; Santos, Maira R.; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2012-01-01

    External radiotherapy treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma over diaphragm region requires large radiation fields with protections applied to larynx, humerus head and lungs. The size and shape of the field, which covers different depths, make it difficult to distribute a homogeneous dose. Techniques such as field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation may be used to make dose homogeneous and compensate the obliquity from the tissue. Three types of planning were performed for diagnose of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma: one plan with two fields, AP-PA (AP plan), another with four fields field-in- field (FF plan), and a third one with two fields and electronic tissue compensation (ETC plan). Results showed better gradient, cover of PTV and dose distribution for the ETC plan, besides the advantage from this technique of does not require protection blocks. In the meanwhile, AP and FF plans require simpler dosimetry and fewer MU. Related to the uniformity of dose distribution, AP plan showed hot areas in the neck region, FF plan showed hot areas in the shoulder region and ETC plan showed most uniform distribution without hot areas. The electronic tissue compensation is a useful tool for large and shaped fields as the mantle field, however higher MU and complex dosimetry should be taken in account. (author)

  1. Monitoring a pilot CO2 injection experiment in a shallow aquifer using 3D cross-well electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Lassen, R. N.; Looms, M. C.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for monitoring the two opposing effects from gas-phase and dissolved CO2 in a shallow unconfined siliciclastic aquifer. Dissolved CO2 increases water electrical conductivity (EC) while gas phase CO2 reduce EC. We injected 45kg of CO2 into a shallow aquifer for 48 hours. ERT data were collected for 50 hours following CO2 injection. Four ERT monitoring boreholes were installed on a 5m by 5m square grid and each borehole had 24 electrodes at 0.5 m electrode spacing at depths from 1.5 m to 13 m. ERT data were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for bulk EC. 3D ERT successfully detected the CO2 plume distribution and growth in the shallow aquifer. We found that the changes of bulk EC were dominantly positive following CO2 injection, indicating that the effect of dissolved CO2 overwhelmed that of gas phase CO2. The pre-injection baseline resistivity model clearly showed a three-layer structure of the site. The electrically more conductive glacial sand layer in the northeast region are likely more permeable than the overburden and underburden and CO2 plumes were actually confined in this layer. Temporal bulk EC increase from ERT agreed well with water EC and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar data. ERT monitoring offers a competitive advantage over water sampling and GPR methods because it provides 3D high-resolution temporal tomographic images of CO2 distribution and it can also be automated for unattended operation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL IM release#: LLNL-PROC-657944.

  2. Electric fields in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faelthammar, C.G.

    1989-12-01

    The electric field plays an important role in the complex plasma system called the magnetosphere. In spite of this, direct measurement of this quantity are still scarce except in its lowest-altitude part, i.e. the ionosphere. The large scale ionospheric electric field has been determined from measurement on the ground and in low satellite orbit. For most of the magnetosphere, our concepts of the electric field have mostly been based on theoretical considerations and extrapolations of the ionspheric electric field. Direct, in situ, electric field measurements in the outer parts of the magnetosphere have been made only relatively recently. A few satellite missions. most recently the Viking mission, have extended the direct empirical knowledge so as to include major parts of the magnetosphere. These measurements have revealed a number of unexpected features. The actual electric field has been found to have unexpectedly strong space and time variations, which reflect the dynamic nature of the system. Examples are give of measured electric fields in the plasmasphere, the plasmasheet, the neutral sheet, the magnetotail, the flanks of the magnetosphere, the dayside magnetopause and the auroral acceleration region. (author)

  3. Multimodal and synthetic aperture approach to full-field 3D shape and displacement measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawińska, M.; Sitnik, R.

    2017-08-01

    Recently most of the measurement tasks in industry, civil engineering and culture heritage applications require archiving, characterization and monitoring of 3D objects and structures and their performance under changing conditions. These requirements can be met if multimodal measurement (MM) strategy is applied. It rely on effective combining structured light method and 3D digital image correlation with laser scanning/ToF, thermal imaging, multispectral imaging and BDRF measurements. In the case of big size and/or complicated objects MM have to be combined with hierarchical or synthetic aperture (SA) measurements. The new solutions in MM and SA strategies are presented and their applicability is shown at interesting cultural heritage and civil engineering applications.

  4. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    Introduction After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) disaster (04.26.1986) a huge amount (over 2000 sq. km) of nuclear wastes appeared within so-called "Cher- nobyl Exclusion Zone" (CEZ). At present there are not enough storage facilities in the Ukraine for safe disposal of nuclear wastes and hazardous chemical wastes. The urgent problem now is safe isolation of these dangerous wastes. According to the developed state program of radioactive waste management, the construction of a na- tional storage facility of nuclear wastes is planned. It is also possible to create regional storage facilities for hazardous chemical wastes. The region of our exploration cov- ers the eastern part of the Korosten Plutone and its slope, reaching the CNPP. 3D Space-Time Surface Imaging of Geophysical Fields. There are only three direct meth- ods of stress field reconstruction in present practice, namely the field investigations based on the large-scale fracturing tests, petrotectonic and optical polarization meth- ods. Unfortunately, all these methods are extremely laborious and need the regular field tests, which is difficult to conduct in the areas of anisotropic rock outcrops. A compilation of magnetic and gravity data covering the CNPP area was carried out as a prelude to an interpretation study. More than thirty map products were generated from magnetic, gravity and geodesy data to prepare the 3D Space-Time Surface Images (3D STSI). Multi-layer topography and geophysic surfaces included: total magnetic intensity, isostatically-corrected Bouguer gravity, aspect and slope, first and second derivatives, vertical and horizontal curvature, histogram characteristics and space cor- relation coefficients between the gradient fields. Many maps shows the first and sec- ond derivatives of the potential fields, with the results of lineament (edge) structure detection superimposed. The lineament or edges of the potential fields are located from maximal gradient in many directions

  5. Development of 3-D Mechanical Models of Electric Circuits and Their Effect on Students' Understanding of Electric Potential Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing physical concepts through models is an essential method in many sciences. While students are mostly proficient in handling mathematical aspects of problems, they frequently lack the ability to visualize and interpret abstract physical concepts in a meaningful way. In this paper, initially the electric circuits and related concepts were…

  6. Helical variation of density profiles and fluctuations in the tokamak pedestal with applied 3D fields and implications for confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Shafer, M. W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lyons, B. C.; McKee, G. R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wingen, A.; Zeng, L.

    2018-05-01

    Small 3D perturbations to the magnetic field in DIII-D ( δB /B ˜2 ×10-4 ) result in large modulations of density fluctuation amplitudes in the pedestal, which are shown using Doppler backscattering measurements to vary by a factor of 2. Helical perturbations of equilibrium density within flux surfaces have previously been observed in the pedestal of DIII-D plasmas when 3D fields are applied and were correlated with density fluctuation asymmetries in the pedestal. These intra-surface density and pressure variations are shown through two fluid MHD modeling studies using the M3D-C1 code to be due to the misalignment of the density and temperature equilibrium iso-surfaces in the pedestal region. This modeling demonstrates that the phase shift between the two iso-surfaces corresponds to the diamagnetic direction of the two species, with the mass density surfaces shifted in the ion diamagnetic direction relative to the temperature and magnetic flux iso-surfaces. The resulting pedestal density, potential, and turbulence asymmetries within flux surfaces near the separatrix may be at least partially responsible for several poorly understood phenomena that occur with the application of 3D fields in tokamaks, including density pump out and the increase in power required to transition from L- to H-mode.

  7. Compartmentalization of the Coso East Flank geothermal field imaged by 3-D full-tensor MT inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nathaniel J.; Kaven, Joern; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Previous magnetotelluric (MT) studies of the high-temperature Coso geothermal system in California identified a subvertical feature of low resistivity (2–5 Ohm m) and appreciable lateral extent (>1 km) in the producing zone of the East Flank field. However, these models could not reproduce gross 3-D effects in the recorded data. We perform 3-D full-tensor inversion and retrieve a resistivity model that out-performs previous 2-D and 3-D off-diagonal models in terms of its fit to the complete 3-D MT data set as well as the degree of modelling bias. Inclusion of secondary Zxx and Zyy data components leads to a robust east-dip (60†) to the previously identified conductive East Flank reservoir feature, which correlates strongly with recently mapped surface faults, downhole well temperatures, 3-D seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity. We perform synthetic forward modelling to test the best-fit dip of this conductor using the response at a nearby MT station. We interpret the dipping conductor as a fractured and fluidized compartment, which is structurally controlled by an unmapped blind East Flank fault zone.

  8. A 3D-printed polymer micro-gripper with self-defined electrical tracks and thermal actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alblalaihid, Khalid; Overton, James; Lawes, Simon; Kinnell, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a simple fabrication process that allows for isolated metal tracks to be easily defined on the surface of 3D printed micro-scale polymer components. The process makes use of a standard low cost conformal sputter coating system to quickly deposit thin film metal layers on to the surface of 3D printed polymer micro parts. The key novelty lies in the inclusion of inbuilt masking features, on the surface of the polymer parts, to ensure that the conformal metal layer can be effectively broken to create electrically isolated metal features. The presented process is extremely flexible, and it is envisaged that it may be applied to a wide range of sensor and actuator applications. To demonstrate the process a polymer micro-scale gripper with an inbuilt thermal actuator is designed and fabricated. In this work the design methodology for creating the micro-gripper is presented, illustrating how the rapid and flexible manufacturing process allows for fast cycle time design iterations to be performed. In addition the compatibility of this approach with traditional design and analysis techniques such as basic finite element simulation is also demonstrated with simulation results in reasonable agreement with experimental performance data for the micro-gripper. (paper)

  9. A 3D-printed polymer micro-gripper with self-defined electrical tracks and thermal actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alblalaihid, Khalid; Overton, James; Lawes, Simon; Kinnell, Peter

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a simple fabrication process that allows for isolated metal tracks to be easily defined on the surface of 3D printed micro-scale polymer components. The process makes use of a standard low cost conformal sputter coating system to quickly deposit thin film metal layers on to the surface of 3D printed polymer micro parts. The key novelty lies in the inclusion of inbuilt masking features, on the surface of the polymer parts, to ensure that the conformal metal layer can be effectively broken to create electrically isolated metal features. The presented process is extremely flexible, and it is envisaged that it may be applied to a wide range of sensor and actuator applications. To demonstrate the process a polymer micro-scale gripper with an inbuilt thermal actuator is designed and fabricated. In this work the design methodology for creating the micro-gripper is presented, illustrating how the rapid and flexible manufacturing process allows for fast cycle time design iterations to be performed. In addition the compatibility of this approach with traditional design and analysis techniques such as basic finite element simulation is also demonstrated with simulation results in reasonable agreement with experimental performance data for the micro-gripper.

  10. Polymer Coatings in 3D-Printed Fluidic Device Channels for Improved Cellular Adherence Prior to Electrical Lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bethany C; Anderson, Kari B; Meisel, Jayda E; McNitt, Megan I; Spence, Dana M

    2015-06-16

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a polyjet-based three-dimensional (3D)-printed fluidic device where poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) or polystyrene (PS) were used to coat the sides of a fluidic channel within the device to promote adhesion of an immobilized cell layer. The device was designed using computer-aided design software and converted into an .STL file prior to printing. The rigid, transparent material used in the printing process provides an optically transparent path to visualize endothelial cell adherence and supports integration of removable electrodes for electrical cell lysis in a specified portion of the channel (1 mm width × 0.8 mm height × 2 mm length). Through manipulation of channel geometry, a low-voltage power source (500 V max) was used to selectively lyse adhered endothelial cells in a tapered region of the channel. Cell viability was maintained on the device over a 5 day period (98% viable), though cell coverage decreased after day 4 with static media delivery. Optimal lysis potentials were obtained for the two fabricated device geometries, and selective cell clearance was achieved with cell lysis efficiencies of 94 and 96%. The bottleneck of unknown surface properties from proprietary resin use in fabricating 3D-printed materials is overcome through techniques to incorporate PDMS and PS.

  11. Comparison of 2D and 3D magnetic field analysis of single-phase shaded pole induction motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Dalcali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There has always been doubt on the accuracy of 2D analysis of small electric machines. To investigate the validity of this doubt, in this present work a small uni-coil shaded-pole induction motor is analyzed in 2D and 3D and the results are compared. In order to maintain the paper size as compact, the analysis is limited to the air-gap flux density distribution, variation of the main winding inductance against current and the force acting on the rotor body; which are the important components of the motor performance. It is found that although 3D analysis consumes several times more computing time and storage space, improvement achieved in performance by use of 3D analysis is not very significant. % rms difference between the two cases is obtained as 0.76% for the main winding inductance and 0.59% for the force acting on the rotor body. Also the air-gap flux density distribution obtained from the two types of analysis is found to be very close to each other. Therefore it is concluded that despite more computing time, more storage requirements and more human effort in the case of 3D analysis, the degree of improvement is not proportionally rewarding, and hence, 2D analysis is sufficient for the analysis of small machines.

  12. 3D accelerator magnet calculations using MAGNUS-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissanetzky, S.; Miao, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The steady trend towards increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of accelerator magnets has caused a need for reliable 3D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic system in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D family of programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors. MAGNUS-3D uses the finite element method and the two-scalar-potentials formulation of Maxwell's equations to obtain the solution, which can then be used interactively to obtain tables of field components at specific points or lines, plots of field lines, function graphs representing a field component plotted against a coordinate along any line in space (such as the beam line), and views of the conductors, the mesh and the magnetic bodies. The magnetic quantities that can be calculated include the force or torque on conductors or magnetic parts, the energy, the flux through a specified surface, line integrals of any field component along any line in space, and the average field or potential harmonic coefficients. We describe the programs with emphasis placed on their use for accelerator magnet design, and present an advanced example of actual calculations. (orig.)

  13. The Photogrammetric Survey Methodologies Applied to Low Cost 3d Virtual Exploration in Multidisciplinary Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palestini, C.; Basso, A.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, an increase in international investment in hardware and software technology to support programs that adopt algorithms for photomodeling or data management from laser scanners significantly reduced the costs of operations in support of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality, designed to generate real-time explorable digital environments integrated to virtual stereoscopic headset. The research analyzes transversal methodologies related to the acquisition of these technologies in order to intervene directly on the phenomenon of acquiring the current VR tools within a specific workflow, in light of any issues related to the intensive use of such devices , outlining a quick overview of the possible "virtual migration" phenomenon, assuming a possible integration with the new internet hyper-speed systems, capable of triggering a massive cyberspace colonization process that paradoxically would also affect the everyday life and more in general, on human space perception. The contribution aims at analyzing the application systems used for low cost 3d photogrammetry by means of a precise pipeline, clarifying how a 3d model is generated, automatically retopologized, textured by color painting or photo-cloning techniques, and optimized for parametric insertion on virtual exploration platforms. Workflow analysis will follow some case studies related to photomodeling, digital retopology and "virtual 3d transfer" of some small archaeological artifacts and an architectural compartment corresponding to the pronaus of Aurum, a building designed in the 1940s by Michelucci. All operations will be conducted on cheap or free licensed software that today offer almost the same performance as their paid counterparts, progressively improving in the data processing speed and management.

  14. 3D-HST: A Wide-field Grism Spectroscopic Survey with the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Kriek, Mariska; Nelson, Erica; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Bezanson, Rachel; da Cunha, Elisabete; Erb, Dawn K.; Fan, Xiaohui; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Illingworth, Garth D.; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Lundgren, Britt; Magee, Dan; Marchesini, Danilo; McCarthy, Patrick; Momcheva, Ivelina; Muzzin, Adam; Quadri, Ryan; Steidel, Charles C.; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Williams, Anna

    2012-06-01

    We present 3D-HST, a near-infrared spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope for studying the physical processes that shape galaxies in the distant universe. 3D-HST provides rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of ~7000 galaxies at 1 < z < 3.5, the epoch when ~60% of all star formation took place, the number density of quasars peaked, the first galaxies stopped forming stars, and the structural regularity that we see in galaxies today must have emerged. 3D-HST will cover three quarters (625 arcmin2) of the CANDELS Treasury survey area with two orbits of primary WFC3/G141 grism coverage and two to four orbits with the ACS/G800L grism in parallel. In the IR, these exposure times yield a continuum signal-to-noise ratio of ~5 per resolution element at H 140 ~ 23.1 and a 5σ emission-line sensitivity of ~5 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 for typical objects, improving by a factor of ~2 for compact sources in images with low sky background levels. The WFC3/G141 spectra provide continuous wavelength coverage from 1.1 to 1.6 μm at a spatial resolution of ~0farcs13, which, combined with their depth, makes them a unique resource for studying galaxy evolution. We present an overview of the preliminary reduction and analysis of the grism observations, including emission-line and redshift measurements from combined fits to the extracted grism spectra and photometry from ancillary multi-wavelength catalogs. The present analysis yields redshift estimates with a precision of σ(z) = 0.0034(1 + z), or σ(v) ≈ 1000 km s-1. We illustrate how the generalized nature of the survey yields near-infrared spectra of remarkable quality for many different types of objects, including a quasar at z = 4.7, quiescent galaxies at z ~ 2, and the most distant T-type brown dwarf star known. The combination of the CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys will provide the definitive imaging and spectroscopic data set for studies of the 1 < z < 3.5 universe until the launch of the James Webb Space

  15. Dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated with coplanar field and 3D conformal radiotherapy with noncoplanar field for postocular invasion tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenyong, Tu; Lu, Liu; Jun, Zeng; Weidong, Yin; Yun, Li

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a dosimetric optimization effort aiming to compare noncoplanar field (NCF) on 3 dimensions conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and coplanar field (CF) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for postocular invasion tumor. We performed a planning study on the computed tomography data of 8 consecutive patients with localized postocular invasion tumor. Four fields NCF 3D-CRT in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0-10 degrees , 30-45 degrees , 240-270 degrees , and 310-335 degrees degrees were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume. The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view. The same constraints were prepared with between CF IMRT optimization and NCF 3D-CRT treatment. The maximum point doses (D max) for the different optic pathway structures (OPS) with NCF 3D-CRT treatment should differ in no more than 3% from those with the NCF IMRT plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for all targets and organ at risk (OAR) with both treatment techniques. Plans with NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT constraints on target dose in homogeneity were computed, as well as the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) in the target volume. The PTV coverage was optimal with both NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plans in the 8 tumor sites. No difference was noted between the two techniques for the average D(max) and D(min) dose. NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT will yield similar results on CI. However, HI was a significant difference between NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plan (p 3D-CRT versus CF IMRT set-up is very slight. NCF3D-CRT is one of the treatment options for postocular invasion tumor. However, constraints for OARs are needed. 2010 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebled, J.M.; Yedra, Ll.; Estrade, S.; Portillo, J.; Peiro, F.

    2011-01-01

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49 o to -61 o at intervals of 2 o and with a precession angle of 0.6 o in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: → Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. → Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. → Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. → Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  17. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebled, J.M. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Yedra, Ll. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Estrade, S.; Portillo, J. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT-UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Peiro, F., E-mail: francesca.peiro@ub.edu [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49{sup o} to -61{sup o} at intervals of 2{sup o} and with a precession angle of 0.6{sup o} in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: {yields} Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. {yields} Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. {yields} Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. {yields} Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  18. Electric Field Fluctuations in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Dayton; Limmer, David; Chandler, David

    2013-03-01

    Charge transfer in solution, such as autoionization and ion pair dissociation in water, is governed by rare electric field fluctuations of the solvent. Knowing the statistics of such fluctuations can help explain the dynamics of these rare events. Trajectories short enough to be tractable by computer simulation are virtually certain not to sample the large fluctuations that promote rare events. Here, we employ importance sampling techniques with classical molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water to study statistics of electric field fluctuations far from their means. We find that the distributions of electric fields located on individual water molecules are not in general gaussian. Near the mean this non-gaussianity is due to the internal charge distribution of the water molecule. Further from the mean, however, there is a previously unreported Bjerrum-like defect that stabilizes certain large fluctuations out of equilibrium. As expected, differences in electric fields acting between molecules are gaussian to a remarkable degree. By studying these differences, though, we are able to determine what configurations result not only in large electric fields, but also in electric fields with long spatial correlations that may be needed to promote charge separation.

  19. 3D Ground Penetrating Radar to Detect Tree Roots and Estimate Root Biomass in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Zhu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to detect coarse tree root and to estimate root biomass in the field by using an advanced 3D Ground Penetrating Radar (3D GPR system. This study obtained full-resolution 3D imaging results of tree root system using 500 MHz and 800 MHz bow-tie antennas, respectively. The measurement site included two larch trees, and one of them was excavated after GPR measurements. In this paper, a searching algorithm, based on the continuity of pixel intensity along the root in 3D space, is proposed, and two coarse roots whose diameters are more than 5 cm were detected and delineated correctly. Based on the detection results and the measured root biomass, a linear regression model is proposed to estimate the total root biomass in different depth ranges, and the total error was less than 10%. Additionally, based on the detected root samples, a new index named “magnitude width” is proposed to estimate the root diameter that has good correlation with root diameter compared with other common GPR indexes. This index also provides direct measurement of the root diameter with 13%–16% error, providing reasonable and practical root diameter estimation especially in the field.

  20. 3D-HST: A WIDE-FIELD GRISM SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, Gabriel B.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Nelson, Erica; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Lundgren, Britt; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon; Labbé, Ivo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Kriek, Mariska; Erb, Dawn K.; Fan, Xiaohui; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Dan

    2012-01-01

    We present 3D-HST, a near-infrared spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope for studying the physical processes that shape galaxies in the distant universe. 3D-HST provides rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of ∼7000 galaxies at 1 2 ) of the CANDELS Treasury survey area with two orbits of primary WFC3/G141 grism coverage and two to four orbits with the ACS/G800L grism in parallel. In the IR, these exposure times yield a continuum signal-to-noise ratio of ∼5 per resolution element at H 140 ∼ 23.1 and a 5σ emission-line sensitivity of ∼5 × 10 –17 erg s –1 cm –2 for typical objects, improving by a factor of ∼2 for compact sources in images with low sky background levels. The WFC3/G141 spectra provide continuous wavelength coverage from 1.1 to 1.6 μm at a spatial resolution of ∼0.''13, which, combined with their depth, makes them a unique resource for studying galaxy evolution. We present an overview of the preliminary reduction and analysis of the grism observations, including emission-line and redshift measurements from combined fits to the extracted grism spectra and photometry from ancillary multi-wavelength catalogs. The present analysis yields redshift estimates with a precision of σ(z) = 0.0034(1 + z), or σ(v) ≈ 1000 km s –1 . We illustrate how the generalized nature of the survey yields near-infrared spectra of remarkable quality for many different types of objects, including a quasar at z = 4.7, quiescent galaxies at z ∼ 2, and the most distant T-type brown dwarf star known. The combination of the CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys will provide the definitive imaging and spectroscopic data set for studies of the 1 < z < 3.5 universe until the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  1. Comparison between 3D conventional techniques, field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation for mantle fields planning; Comparacao entre tecnica 3D convencional, field-in-field e compensacao eletronica para planejamento de manto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Lais P.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Trindade, Cassia; Garcia, Paulo L.; Santos, Maira R.; Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: pm.lais@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    External radiotherapy treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma over diaphragm region requires large radiation fields with protections applied to larynx, humerus head and lungs. The size and shape of the field, which covers different depths, make it difficult to distribute a homogeneous dose. Techniques such as field-in-field and electronic tissue compensation may be used to make dose homogeneous and compensate the obliquity from the tissue. Three types of planning were performed for diagnose of nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma: one plan with two fields, AP-PA (AP plan), another with four fields field-in- field (FF plan), and a third one with two fields and electronic tissue compensation (ETC plan). Results showed better gradient, cover of PTV and dose distribution for the ETC plan, besides the advantage from this technique of does not require protection blocks. In the meanwhile, AP and FF plans require simpler dosimetry and fewer MU. Related to the uniformity of dose distribution, AP plan showed hot areas in the neck region, FF plan showed hot areas in the shoulder region and ETC plan showed most uniform distribution without hot areas. The electronic tissue compensation is a useful tool for large and shaped fields as the mantle field, however higher MU and complex dosimetry should be taken in account. (author)

  2. Mixed model phase evolution for correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity effects in 3D quantitative gradient echo-based MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatnassi, Chemseddine; Boucenna, Rachid; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 3D gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), strong field gradients B0macro are visually observed at air/tissue interfaces. At low spatial resolution in particular, the respective field gradients lead to an apparent increase in intravoxel dephasing, and subsequently, to signal...... loss or inaccurate R2* estimates. If the strong field gradients are measured, their influence can be removed by postprocessing. METHODS: Conventional corrections usually assume a linear phase evolution with time. For high macroscopic gradient inhomogeneities near the edge of the brain...

  3. 3D palmprint and hand imaging system based on full-field composite color sinusoidal fringe projection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Huang, Shujun; Xu, Yongjia; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Nan; Xiao, Yanjun

    2013-09-01

    Palmprint and hand shape, as two kinds of important biometric characteristics, have been widely studied and applied to human identity recognition. The existing research is based mainly on 2D images, which lose the third-dimensional information. The biological features extracted from 2D images are distorted by pressure and rolling, so the subsequent feature matching and recognition are inaccurate. This paper presents a method to acquire accurate 3D shapes of palmprint and hand by projecting full-field composite color sinusoidal fringe patterns and the corresponding color texture information. A 3D imaging system is designed to capture and process the full-field composite color fringe patterns on hand surface. Composite color fringe patterns having the optimum three fringe numbers are generated by software and projected onto the surface of human hand by a digital light processing projector. From another viewpoint, a color CCD camera captures the deformed fringe patterns and saves them for postprocessing. After compensating for the cross talk and chromatic aberration between color channels, three fringe patterns are extracted from three color channels of a captured composite color image. Wrapped phase information can be calculated from the sinusoidal fringe patterns with high precision. At the same time, the absolute phase of each pixel is determined by the optimum three-fringe selection method. After building up the relationship between absolute phase map and 3D shape data, the 3D palmprint and hand are obtained. Color texture information can be directly captured or demodulated from the captured composite fringe pattern images. Experimental results show that the proposed method and system can yield accurate 3D shape and color texture information of the palmprint and hand shape.

  4. Visualization of induced electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, van A.P.J.

    2005-01-01

    A cylindrical electrolytic tank between a set of Helmholtz coils provides a classroom demonstration of induced, nonconservative electric fields. The field strength is measured by a sensor consisting of a pair of tiny spheres immersed in the liquid. The sensor signal depends on position, frequency,

  5. 3D galaxy clustering with future wide-field surveys: Advantages of a spherical Fourier-Bessel analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys are extremely promising to help in addressing the major challenges of cosmology, in particular in understanding the nature of the dark universe. The strength of these surveys, naturally described in spherical geometry, comes from their unprecedented depth and width, but an optimal extraction of their three-dimensional information is of utmost importance to best constrain the properties of the dark universe. Aims: Although there is theoretical motivation and novel tools to explore these surveys using the 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) power spectrum of galaxy number counts Cℓ(k,k'), most survey optimisations and forecasts are based on the tomographic spherical harmonics power spectrum C(ij)_ℓ. The goal of this paper is to perform a new investigation of the information that can be extracted from these two analyses in the context of planned stage IV wide-field galaxy surveys. Methods: We compared tomographic and 3D SFB techniques by comparing the forecast cosmological parameter constraints obtained from a Fisher analysis. The comparison was made possible by careful and coherent treatment of non-linear scales in the two analyses, which makes this study the first to compare 3D SFB and tomographic constraints on an equal footing. Nuisance parameters related to a scale- and redshift-dependent galaxy bias were also included in the computation of the 3D SFB and tomographic power spectra for the first time. Results: Tomographic and 3D SFB methods can recover similar constraints in the absence of systematics. This requires choosing an optimal number of redshift bins for the tomographic analysis, which we computed to be N = 26 for zmed ≃ 0.4, N = 30 for zmed ≃ 1.0, and N = 42 for zmed ≃ 1.7. When marginalising over nuisance parameters related to the galaxy bias, the forecast 3D SFB constraints are less affected by this source of systematics than the tomographic constraints. In addition, the rate of increase of the

  6. Low-Cost, High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    low- cost and high-throughput was a key element proposed for this project, which we believe will be of significant benefit to the patients suffering...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0272 TITLE: Low- Cost , High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI...STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s

  7. Low Cost, High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    greater gas polarizations and production amounts/ throughputs- benefiting in particular from the advent of com- pact, high-power, relatively low- cost ...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0271 TITLE: Low- Cost , High-Throughput 3-D Pulmonary Imager Using Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents and Low-Field MRI...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the

  8. Relativistic quantum Hall conductivity for 3D and 2D electron plasma in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Felipe, R.; Perez Martinez, A.; Perez-Rojas, H.

    1990-05-01

    The complete antisymmetric form of the conductivity tensor in the static limit, as well as the expression for the Hall conductivity, is obtained for the relativistic 3D and 2D electron gas in a magnetic field. The non-relativistic 2D limit is also discussed. The typical step form of the 2D Hall conductivity at zero temperature is obtained under the simple hypothesis of constancy of the chemical potential. (author). 6 refs, 1 fig

  9. Pulsed and streamer discharges in air above breakdown electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Sun (Anbang); H.J. Teunissen (Jannis); U. M. Ebert (Ute)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractA 3D particle model is developed to investigate the streamer formation in electric fields above the breakdown threshold, in atmospheric air (1bar, 300 Kelvin). Adaptive particle management, adaptive mesh refinement and parallel computing techniques are used in the code. Photoionization

  10. Synaptic Effects of Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Asif

    Learning and sensory processing in the brain relies on the effective transmission of information across synapses. The strength and efficacy of synaptic transmission is modifiable through training and can be modulated with noninvasive electrical brain stimulation. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), specifically, induces weak intensity and spatially diffuse electric fields in the brain. Despite being weak, electric fields modulate spiking probability and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. These effects critically depend on the direction of the electric field relative to the orientation of the neuron and on the level of endogenous synaptic activity. TES has been used to modulate a wide range of neuropsychiatric indications, for various rehabilitation applications, and cognitive performance in diverse tasks. How can a weak and diffuse electric field, which simultaneously polarizes neurons across the brain, have precise changes in brain function? Designing therapies to maximize desired outcomes and minimize undesired effects presents a challenging problem. A series of experiments and computational models are used to define the anatomical and functional factors leading to specificity of TES. Anatomical specificity derives from guiding current to targeted brain structures and taking advantage of the direction-sensitivity of neurons with respect to the electric field. Functional specificity originates from preferential modulation of neuronal networks that are already active. Diffuse electric fields may recruit connected brain networks involved in a training task and promote plasticity along active synaptic pathways. In vitro, electric fields boost endogenous synaptic plasticity and raise the ceiling for synaptic learning with repeated stimulation sessions. Synapses undergoing strong plasticity are preferentially modulated over weak synapses. Therefore, active circuits that are involved in a task could be more susceptible to stimulation than inactive circuits

  11. 3D pore-type digital rock modeling of natural gas hydrate for permafrost and numerical simulation of electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huaimin; Sun, Jianmeng; Lin, Zhenzhou; Fang, Hui; Li, Yafen; Cui, Likai; Yan, Weichao

    2018-02-01

    Natural gas hydrate is being considered as an alternative energy source for sustainable development and has become a focus of research throughout the world. In this paper, based on CT scanning images of hydrate reservoir rocks, combined with the microscopic distribution of hydrate, a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model was used to construct 3D hydrate digital rocks of different distribution types, and the finite-element method was used to simulate their electrical characteristics in order to study the influence of different hydrate distribution types, hydrate saturation and formation of water salinity on electrical properties. The results show that the hydrate digital rocks constructed using the DLA model can be used to characterize the microscopic distribution of different types of hydrates. Under the same conditions, the resistivity of the adhesive hydrate digital rock is higher than the cemented and scattered type digital rocks, and the resistivity of the scattered hydrate digital rock is the smallest among the three types. Besides, the difference in the resistivity of the different types of hydrate digital rocks increases with an increase in hydrate saturation, especially when the saturation is larger than 55%, and the rate of increase of each of the hydrate types is quite different. Similarly, the resistivity of the three hydrate types decreases with an increase in the formation of water salinity. The single distribution hydrate digital rock constructed, combined with the law of microscopic distribution and influence of saturation on the electrical properties, can effectively improve the accuracy of logging identification of hydrate reservoirs and is of great significance for the estimation of hydrate reserves.

  12. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head–neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone–cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation. (paper)

  13. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  14. Can symmetry transitions of complex fields enable 3-d control of fluid vorticity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solis, Kyle Jameson [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Methods of inducing vigorous noncontact fluid flow are important to technologies involving heat and mass transfer and fluid mixing, since they eliminate the need for moving parts, pipes and seals, all of which compromise system reliability. Unfortunately, traditional noncontact flow methods are few, and have limitations of their own. We have discovered two classes of fields that can induce fluid vorticity without requiring either gravity or a thermal gradient. The first class we call Symmetry-Breaking Rational Fields. These are triaxial fields comprised of three orthogonal components, two ac and one dc. The second class is Rational Triad Fields, which differ in that all three components are alternating. In this report we quantify the induced vorticity for a wide variety of fields and consider symmetry transitions between these field types. These transitions give rise to orbiting vorticity vectors, a technology for non-contact, non-stationary fluid mixing.

  15. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose...... the injection start. During these 120days, the CO2 migrates about 25m in the expected groundwater flow direction. Water electrical conductivity (EC) sampling using small screens in 29 wells allows for very good verification of the ERT results. Water EC and ERT results generally agree very well, with the water...

  16. High-quality and interactive animations of 3D time-varying vector fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeland, Anders; Elboth, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present an interactive texture-based method for visualizing three-dimensional unsteady vector fields. The visualization method uses a sparse and global representation of the flow, such that it does not suffer from the same perceptual issues as is the case for visualizing dense representations. The animation is made by injecting a collection of particles evenly distributed throughout the physical domain. These particles are then tracked along their path lines. At each time step, these particles are used as seed points to generate field lines using any vector field such as the velocity field or vorticity field. In this way, the animation shows the advection of particles while each frame in the animation shows the instantaneous vector field. In order to maintain a coherent particle density and to avoid clustering as time passes, we have developed a novel particle advection strategy which produces approximately evenly-spaced field lines at each time step. To improve rendering performance, we decouple the rendering stage from the preceding stages of the visualization method. This allows interactive exploration of multiple fields simultaneously, which sets the stage for a more complete analysis of the flow field. The final display is rendered using texture-based direct volume rendering.

  17. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  18. Millimeter radiation from a 3D model of the solar atmosphere. II. Chromospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukitcheva, M.; White, S. M.; Solanki, S. K.; Fleishman, G. D.; Carlsson, M.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: We use state-of-the-art, three-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the quiet solar atmosphere to carry out detailed tests of chromospheric magnetic field diagnostics from free-free radiation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths (mm/submm). Methods: The vertical component of the magnetic field was deduced from the mm/submm brightness spectra and the degree of circular polarization synthesized at millimeter frequencies. We used the frequency bands observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) as a convenient reference. The magnetic field maps obtained describe the longitudinal magnetic field at the effective formation heights of the relevant wavelengths in the solar chromosphere. Results: The comparison of the deduced and model chromospheric magnetic fields at the spatial resolution of both the model and current observations demonstrates a good correlation, but has a tendency to underestimate the model field. The systematic discrepancy of about 10% is probably due to averaging of the restored field over the heights contributing to the radiation, weighted by the strength of the contribution. On the whole, the method of probing the longitudinal component of the magnetic field with free-free emission at mm/submm wavelengths is found to be applicable to measurements of the weak quiet-Sun magnetic fields. However, successful exploitation of this technique requires very accurate measurements of the polarization properties (primary beam and receiver polarization response) of the antennas, which will be the principal factor that determines the level to which chromospheric magnetic fields can be measured. Conclusions: Consequently, high-resolution and high-precision observations of circularly polarized radiation at millimeter wavelengths can be a powerful tool for producing chromospheric longitudinal magnetograms.

  19. Validation and evaluation of measuring methods for the 3D documentation of external injuries in the field of forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Buße, Kirsten; Campana, Lorenzo; Schyma, Christian

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurement techniques are gaining importance in many areas. The latest developments brought more cost-effective, user-friendly, and faster technologies onto the market. Which 3D techniques are suitable in the field of forensic medicine and what are their advantages and disadvantages? This wide-ranging study evaluated and validated various 3D measurement techniques for the forensic requirements. High-tech methods as well as low-budget systems have been tested and compared in terms of accuracy, ease of use, expenditure of time, mobility, cost, necessary knowhow, and their limitations. Within this study, various commercial measuring systems of the different techniques were tested. Based on the first results, one measuring system was selected for each technique, which appeared to be the most suitable for the forensic application or is already established in forensic medicine. A body of a deceased, a face and an injury of a living person, and a shoe sole were recorded by 11 people with different professions and previous knowledge using the selected systems. The results were assessed and the personal experiences were evaluated using a questionnaire. In addition, precision investigations were carried out using test objects. The study shows that the hand-held scanner and photogrammetry are very suitable for the 3D documentation of forensic medical findings. Their moderate acquisition costs and easy operation could lead to more frequent application in forensic medicine in the future. For special applications, the stripe-light scanner still has its justification due to its high precision, the flexible application area, and the high reliability. The results show that, thanks to the technological advances, the 3D measurement technology will have more and more impact on the routine of the forensic medical examination.

  20. Mapping 3D breast lesions from full-field digital mammograms using subject-specific finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E.; Oliver, A.; Diaz, O.; Diez, Y.; Gubern-Mérida, A.; Martí, R.; Martí, J.

    2017-03-01

    Patient-specific finite element (FE) models of the breast have received increasing attention due to the potential capability of fusing images from different modalities. During the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to X-ray mammography registration procedure, the FE model is compressed mimicking the mammographic acquisition. Subsequently, suspicious lesions in the MRI volume can be projected into the 2D mammographic space. However, most registration algorithms do not provide the reverse information, avoiding to obtain the 3D geometrical information from the lesions localized in the mammograms. In this work we introduce a fast method to localize the 3D position of the lesion within the MRI, using both cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic projections, indexing the tetrahedral elements of the biomechanical model by means of an uniform grid. For each marked lesion in the Full-Field Digital Mammogram (FFDM), the X-ray path from source to the marker is calculated. Barycentric coordinates are computed in the tetrahedrons traversed by the ray. The list of elements and coordinates allows to localize two curves within the MRI and the closest point between both curves is taken as the 3D position of the lesion. The registration errors obtained in the mammographic space are 9.89 +/- 3.72 mm in CC- and 8.04 +/- 4.68 mm in MLO-projection and the error in the 3D MRI space is equal to 10.29 +/- 3.99 mm. Regarding the uniform grid, it is computed spending between 0.1 and 0.7 seconds. The average time spent to compute the 3D location of a lesion is about 8 ms.

  1. Cryogenic STM in 3D vector magnetic fields realized through a rotatable insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, C; Yim, C M; McLaren, M; Wahl, P

    2017-09-01

    Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) performed in vector magnetic fields promises atomic scale imaging of magnetic structure, providing complete information on the local spin texture of a sample in three dimensions. Here, we have designed and constructed a turntable system for a low temperature STM which in combination with a 2D vector magnet provides magnetic fields of up to 5 T in any direction relative to the tip-sample geometry. This enables STM imaging and spectroscopy to be performed at the same atomic-scale location and field-of-view on the sample, and most importantly, without experiencing any change on the tip apex before and after field switching. Combined with a ferromagnetic tip, this enables us to study the magnetization of complex magnetic orders in all three spatial directions.

  2. Computation of 3-D magnetostatic fields using a reduced scalar potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, O.; Preis, K.; Vrisk, G.; Richter, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents some improvements to the finite element computation of static magnetic fields in three dimensions using a reduced magnetic scalar potential. New methods are described for obtaining an edge element representation of the rotational part of the magnetic field from a given source current distribution. In the case when the current distribution is not known in advance, a boundary value problem is set up in terms of a current vector potential. An edge element representation of the solution can be directly used in the subsequent magnetostatic calculation. The magnetic field in a D.C. arc furnace is calculated by first determining the current distribution in terms of a current vector potential. A three dimensional problem involving a permanent magnet as well as a coil is solved and the magnetic field in some points is compared with measurement results

  3. GRILLIX. A 3D turbulence code for magnetic fusion devices based on a field line map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegmeir, Andreas Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The complex geometry in the scrape-off layer of tokamaks poses problems to existing turbulence codes. The usually employed field aligned coordinates become ill defined at the separatrix. Therefore the parallel code GRILLIX was developed, which is based on a field line map. This allows simulations in additional complex geometries, especially across the separatrix. A new discretisation, based on the support operator method, for the highly anisotropic diffusion was developed and applied to a simple turbulence model (Hasegawa-Wakatani).

  4. Multiscale 3D characterization with dark-field x-ray microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simons, Hugh; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen; Ahl, Sonja Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Dark-field x-ray microscopy is a new way to three-dimensionally map lattice strain and orientation in crystalline matter. It is analogous to dark-field electron microscopy in that an objective lens magnifies diffracting features of the sample; however, the use of high-energy synchrotron x-rays me......, multiscale phenomena in situ is a key step toward formulating and validating multiscale models that account for the entire heterogeneity of materials....

  5. Integrated 3D Reservoir/Fault Property Modelling Aided Well Planning and Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery in a Niger Delta Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onyeagoro, U. O.; Ebong, U. E.; Nworie, E. A.

    2002-01-01

    The large and varied portfolio of assets managed by oil companies requires quick decision-making and the deployment of best in class technologies in asset management. Timely decision making and the application of the best technologies in reservoir management are however sometimes in conflict due to large time requirements of the latter.Optimizing the location of development wells is critical to account for variable fluid contact movements and pressure interference effects between wells, which can be significant because of the high permeability (Darcy range) of Niger Delta reservoirs. With relatively high drilling costs, the optimization of well locations necessitates a good realistic static and dynamic 3D reservoir description, especially in the recovery of remaining oil and oil rim type of reservoirs.A detailed 3D reservoir model with fault properties was constructed for a Niger delta producing field. This involved the integration of high quality 3D seismic, core, petrophysics, reservoir engineering, production and structural geology data to construct a realistic 3D reservoir/fault property model for the field. The key parameters considered during the construction of the internal architecture of the model were the vertical and horizontal reservoir heterogeneities-this controls the fluid flow within the reservoir. In the production realm, the fault thickness and fault permeabilities are factors that control the impedance of fluid flow across the fault-fault transmissibility. These key internal and external reservoir/structural variables were explicitly modeled in a 3D modeling software to produce different realizations and manage the uncertainties.The resulting 3D reservoir/fault property model was upscaled for simulation purpose such that grid blocks along the fault planes have realistic transmissibility multipliers of 0 to 1 attached to them. The model was also used in the well planner to optimize the positioning of a high angle deviated well that penetrated

  6. 3D wake measurements from a scanning wind lidar in combination with a fast wind field reconstruction model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Herges, T. G.; Astrup, Poul

    2017-01-01

    University of Denmark. The purpose of the SpinnerLidar measurements at SWIFT is to measure the response of a V27 turbine wake to varying inflow conditions and turbine operating states. Although our fast scanning SpinnerLidar is able to measure the line-of-sight projected wind speed at up to 400 points per......-Stokes CFD code “Lincom Cyclop-buster model,”3 the corresponding 3D wind vector field (u, v, w) can be reconstructed under constraints for conservation of mass and momentum. The resulting model calculated line-of-sight projections of the 3D wind velocity vectors will become consistent with the line...

  7. Dynamical system of scalar field from 2-dimension to 3-D and its cosmological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Wei [Shanghai Normal University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); The Shanghai Key Lab for Astrophysics, Shanghai (China); Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tu, Hong [Shanghai Normal University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); The Shanghai Key Lab for Astrophysics, Shanghai (China); Huang, Jiasheng [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Shu, Chenggang [The Shanghai Key Lab for Astrophysics, Shanghai (China)

    2016-09-15

    We give the three-dimensional dynamical autonomous systems for most of the popular scalar field dark energy models including (phantom) quintessence, (phantom) tachyon, K-essence, and general non-canonical scalar field models, change the dynamical variables from variables (x, y, λ) to observable related variables (w{sub φ}, Ω{sub φ}, λ), and show the intimate relationships between those scalar fields that the three-dimensional system of K-essence can reduce to (phantom) tachyon, general non-canonical scalar field can reduce to (phantom) quintessence and K-essence can also reduce to (phantom) quintessence for some special cases. For the applications of the three-dimensional dynamical systems, we investigate several special cases and give the exactly dynamical solutions in detail. In the end of this paper, we argue that it is more convenient and also has more physical meaning to express the differential equations of dynamical systems in (w{sub φ}, Ω{sub φ}, λ) instead of variables (x, y, λ) and to investigate the dynamical system in three dimensions instead of two dimensions. We also raise a question about the possibility of the chaotic behavior in the spatially flat single scalar field FRW cosmological models in the presence of ordinary matter. (orig.)

  8. 3-D near-field imaging of guided modes in nanophotonic waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziegler Jed I.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly evanescent waveguides with a subwavelength core thickness present a promising lab-on-chip solution for generating nanovolume trapping sites using overlapping evanescent fields. In this work, we experimentally studied Si3N4 waveguides whose sub-wavelength cross-sections and high aspect ratios support fundamental and higher order modes at a single excitation wavelength. Due to differing modal effective indices, these co-propagating modes interfere and generate beating patterns with significant evanescent field intensity. Using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM, we map the structure of these beating modes in three dimensions. Our results demonstrate the potential of NSOM to optimize waveguide design for complex field trapping devices. By reducing the in-plane width, the population of competing modes decreases, resulting in a simplified spectrum of beating modes, such that waveguides with a width of 650 nm support three modes with two observed beats. Our results demonstrate the potential of NSOM to optimize waveguide design for complex field trapping devices.

  9. Flyweight, Superelastic, Electrically Conductive, and Flame-Retardant 3D Multi-Nanolayer Graphene/Ceramic Metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Lin, Dong; Deng, Biwei; Xu, Xiang; Nian, Qiong; Jin, Shengyu; Leedy, Kevin D; Li, Hui; Cheng, Gary J

    2017-07-01

    A ceramic/graphene metamaterial (GCM) with microstructure-derived superelasticity and structural robustness is achieved by designing hierarchical honeycomb microstructures, which are composited with two brittle constituents (graphene and ceramic) assembled in multi-nanolayer cellular walls. Attributed to the designed microstructure, well-interconnected scaffolds, chemically bonded interface, and coupled strengthening effect between the graphene framework and the nanolayers of the Al 2 O 3 ceramic (NAC), the GCM demonstrates a sequence of multifunctional properties simultaneously that have not been reported for ceramics and ceramics-matrix-composite structures, such as flyweight density, 80% reversible compressibility, high fatigue resistance, high electrical conductivity, and excellent thermal-insulation/flame-retardant performance simultaneously. The 3D well-ordered graphene aerogel templates are strongly coupled with the NAC by the chemically bonded interface, exhibiting mutual strengthening, compatible deformability, and a linearly dependent relationship between the density and Young's modulus. Considerable size effects of the ceramic nanolayers on the mechanical properties are revealed in these ceramic-based metamaterials. The designed hierarchical honeycomb graphene with a fourth dimensional control of the ceramic nanolayers on new ways to scalable fabrication of advanced multifunctional ceramic composites with controllable design suggest a great potential in applications of flexible conductors, shock/vibration absorbers, thermal shock barriers, thermal insulation/flame-retardant skins, and porous microwave-absorbing coatings. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Magnetic field decoupling and 3D-2D crossover in Nb/Cu multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasnov, V.M.; Kovalev, A.E.; Oboznov, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    magnetic field and by the multiply branched I-V curves caused by flux-flow of Josephson vortices in the stacked superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor junctions composing the multilayer. By measurements across layers the ''breaking field'' at which the proximity induced superconductivity in the normal...... layers of superconductor-normal-metal (Nb/Cu) multilayers is destroyed was observed directly. A dimensionality diagram in the (H-T) plane was deduced from our data. Reasons for complication of the ''Fraunhofer pattern,'' I-c(H), in ''long'' multilayers are discussed....

  11. Skin dose in longitudinal and transverse linac-MRIs using Monte Carlo and realistic 3D MRI field models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanloo, A; Burke, B; Warkentin, B; Tadic, T; Rathee, S; Kirkby, C; Santos, D M; Fallone, B G

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient skin dose. To accurately quantify the magnitude of changes in skin dose, the authors use Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate realistic 3D magnetic field models of longitudinal and transverse linac-MR systems. Finite element method (FEM) is used to generate complete 3D magnetic field maps for 0.56 T longitudinal and transverse linac-MR magnet assemblies, as well as for representative 0.5 and 1.0 T Helmholtz MRI systems. EGSnrc simulations implementing these 3D magnetic fields are performed. The geometry for the BEAMnrc simulations incorporates the Varian 600C 6 MV linac, magnet poles, the yoke, and the magnetic shields of the linac-MRIs. Resulting phase-space files are used to calculate the central axis percent depth-doses in a water phantom and 2D skin dose distributions for 70 μm entrance and exit layers using DOSXYZnrc. For comparison, skin doses are also calculated in the absence of magnetic field, and using a 1D magnetic field with an unrealistically large fringe field. The effects of photon field size, air gap (longitudinal configuration), and angle of obliquity (transverse configuration) are also investigated. Realistic modeling of the 3D magnetic fields shows that fringe fields decay rapidly and have a very small magnitude at the linac head. As a result, longitudinal linac-MR systems mostly confine contaminant electrons that are generated in the air gap and have an insignificant effect on electrons produced further upstream. The increase in the skin dose for the longitudinal configuration compared to the zero B-field case varies from ∼1% to ∼14% for air gaps of 5-31 cm, respectively. (All dose changes are reported as a % of D(max).) The increase is also field-size dependent, ranging from ∼3% at 20 × 20 cm(2) to ∼11% at 5 × 5 cm(2). The small changes in skin dose are in contrast to significant increases that are

  12. Zwei-Dreibein Gravity : A Two-Frame-Field Model of 3D Massive Gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; de Haan, Sjoerd; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Townsend, Paul K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a generally covariant and parity-invariant two-frame field ("zwei-dreibein") action for gravity in three space-time dimensions that propagates two massive spin-2 modes, unitarily, and we use Hamiltonian methods to confirm the absence of unphysical degrees of freedom. We show how

  13. Retrieving 3D Wind Field from Phased Array Radar Rapid Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous two-dimensional simple adjoint method for retrieving horizontal wind field from a time sequence of single-Doppler scans of reflectivity and/or radial velocity is further developed into a new method to retrieve both horizontal and vertical winds at high temporal and spatial resolutions. This new method performs two steps. First, the horizontal wind field is retrieved on the conical surface at each tilt (elevation angle of radar scan. Second, the vertical velocity field is retrieved in a vertical cross-section along the radar beam with the horizontal velocity given from the first step. The method is applied to phased array radar (PAR rapid scans of the storm winds and reflectivity in a strong microburst event and is shown to be able to retrieve the three-dimensional wind field around a targeted downdraft within the storm that subsequently produced a damaging microburst. The method is computationally very efficient and can be used for real-time applications with PAR rapid scans.

  14. Extraction of 3D Information from Circular Array Measurements for Auralization with Wave Field Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, D.; Hörchens, L.; Grond, P.

    2007-01-01

    The state of the art of wave field synthesis (WFS) systems is that they can reproduce sound sources and secondary (mirror image) sources with natural spaciousness in a horizontal plane, and thus perform satisfactory 2D auralization of an enclosed space, based on multitrace impulse response data

  15. Lessons in modern digital field geology: Open source software, 3D techniques, and the new world of digital mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, Terry; Hurtado, Jose; Langford, Richard; Serpa, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Although many geologists refuse to admit it, it is time to put paper-based geologic mapping into the historical archives and move to the full potential of digital mapping techniques. For our group, flat map digital geologic mapping is now a routine operation in both research and instruction. Several software options are available, and basic proficiency with the software can be learned in a few hours of instruction and practice. The first practical field GIS software, ArcPad, remains a viable, stable option on Windows-based systems. However, the vendor seems to be moving away from ArcPad in favor of mobile software solutions that are difficult to implement without GIS specialists. Thus, we have pursued a second software option based on the open source program QGIS. Our QGIS system uses the same shapefile-centric data structure as our ArcPad system, including similar pop-up data entry forms and generic graphics for easy data management in the field. The advantage of QGIS is that the same software runs on virtually all common platforms except iOS, although the Android version remains unstable as of this writing. A third software option we are experimenting with for flat map-based field work is Fieldmove, a derivative of the 3D-capable program Move developed by Midland Valley. Our initial experiments with Fieldmove are positive, particularly with the new, inexpensive (potential for communicating the complexity of key exposures. For example, in studies of metamorphic structures we often search for days to find "Rosetta Stone" outcrops that display key geometric relationships. While conventional photographs rarely can capture the essence of the field exposure, capturing a true 3D representation of the exposure with multiple photos from many orientations can solve this communication problem. As spatial databases evolve these 3D models should be readily importable into the database.

  16. Electrophoresis in strong electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barany, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of non-linear electrophoresis (ef) that can be detected in strong electric fields (several hundred V/cm) are considered. The first ("classical" non-linear ef) is due to the interaction of the outer field with field-induced ionic charges in the electric double layer (EDL) under conditions, when field-induced variations of electrolyte concentration remain to be small comparatively to its equilibrium value. According to the Shilov theory, the non-linear component of the electrophoretic velocity for dielectric particles is proportional to the cubic power of the applied field strength (cubic electrophoresis) and to the second power of the particles radius; it is independent of the zeta-potential but is determined by the surface conductivity of particles. The second one, the so-called "superfast electrophoresis" is connected with the interaction of a strong outer field with a secondary diffuse layer of counterions (space charge) that is induced outside the primary (classical) diffuse EDL by the external field itself because of concentration polarization. The Dukhin-Mishchuk theory of "superfast electrophoresis" predicts quadratic dependence of the electrophoretic velocity of unipolar (ionically or electronically) conducting particles on the external field gradient and linear dependence on the particle's size in strong electric fields. These are in sharp contrast to the laws of classical electrophoresis (no dependence of V(ef) on the particle's size and linear dependence on the electric field gradient). A new method to measure the ef velocity of particles in strong electric fields is developed that is based on separation of the effects of sedimentation and electrophoresis using videoimaging and a new flowcell and use of short electric pulses. To test the "classical" non-linear electrophoresis, we have measured the ef velocity of non-conducting polystyrene, aluminium-oxide and (semiconductor) graphite particles as well as Saccharomice cerevisiae yeast cells as a

  17. Microstickies agglomeration by electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaotang Tony; Hsieh, Jeffery S

    2016-01-01

    Microstickies deposits on both paper machine and paper products when it agglomerates under step change in ionic strength, pH, temperature and chemical additives. These stickies increase the down time of the paper mill and decrease the quality of paper. The key property of microstickies is its smaller size, which leads to low removal efficiency and difficulties in measurement. Thus the increase of microstickies size help improve both removal efficiency and reduce measurement difficulty. In this paper, a new agglomeration technology based on electric field was investigated. The electric treatment could also increase the size of stickies particles by around 100 times. The synergetic effect between electric field treatment and detacky chemicals/dispersants, including polyvinyl alcohol, poly(diallylmethylammonium chloride) and lignosulfonate, was also studied.

  18. Rapid, topology-based particle tracking for high-resolution measurements of large complex 3D motion fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohak; Leggett, Susan E; Landauer, Alexander K; Wong, Ian Y; Franck, Christian

    2018-04-03

    Spatiotemporal tracking of tracer particles or objects of interest can reveal localized behaviors in biological and physical systems. However, existing tracking algorithms are most effective for relatively low numbers of particles that undergo displacements smaller than their typical interparticle separation distance. Here, we demonstrate a single particle tracking algorithm to reconstruct large complex motion fields with large particle numbers, orders of magnitude larger than previously tractably resolvable, thus opening the door for attaining very high Nyquist spatial frequency motion recovery in the images. Our key innovations are feature vectors that encode nearest neighbor positions, a rigorous outlier removal scheme, and an iterative deformation warping scheme. We test this technique for its accuracy and computational efficacy using synthetically and experimentally generated 3D particle images, including non-affine deformation fields in soft materials, complex fluid flows, and cell-generated deformations. We augment this algorithm with additional particle information (e.g., color, size, or shape) to further enhance tracking accuracy for high gradient and large displacement fields. These applications demonstrate that this versatile technique can rapidly track unprecedented numbers of particles to resolve large and complex motion fields in 2D and 3D images, particularly when spatial correlations exist.

  19. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Uysal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles.

  20. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, D.; Freivogel, B.; Iqbal, N.

    2015-01-01

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a

  1. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  2. Isosurface Display of 3-D Scalar Fields from a Meteorological Model on Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    facets to four, we have chosen to adopt and implement a revised method discussed and made available by Bourke (1994), which can accommodate up to...five facets for a given grid cube. While the published code from Bourke (1994) is in the public domain, it was originally implemented in the C...and atmospheric temperatures. 17 4. References Bourke , P. Polygonising a Scalar Field. http://paulbourke.net/geometry/polygonise

  3. Numerical Simulation of 3D Solid-Liquid Turbulent Flow in a Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pump: Flow Field Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baocheng Shi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For numerically simulating 3D solid-liquid turbulent flow in low specific speed centrifugal pumps, the iteration convergence problem caused by complex internal structure and high rotational speed of pump is always a problem for numeral simulation researchers. To solve this problem, the combination of three measures of dynamic underrelaxation factor adjustment, step method, and rotational velocity control means according to residual curves trends of operating parameters was used to improve the numerical convergence. Numeral simulation of 3D turbulent flow in a low specific speed solid-liquid centrifugal pump was performed, and the results showed that the improved solution strategy is greatly helpful to the numerical convergence. Moreover, the 3D turbulent flow fields in pumps have been simulated for the bottom ash-particles with the volume fraction of 10%, 20%, and 30% at the same particle diameter of 0.1 mm. The two-phase calculation results are compared with those of single-phase clean water flow. The calculated results gave the main region of the abrasion of the impeller and volute casing and improve the hydraulic design of the impeller in order to decrease the abrasion and increase the service life of the pump.

  4. 2D-3D registration for cranial radiation therapy using a 3D kV CBCT and a single limited field-of-view 2D kV radiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munbodh, Reshma; Knisely, Jonathan Ps; Jaffray, David A; Moseley, Douglas J

    2018-05-01

    We present and evaluate a fully automated 2D-3D intensity-based registration framework using a single limited field-of-view (FOV) 2D kV radiograph and a 3D kV CBCT for 3D estimation of patient setup errors during brain radiotherapy. We evaluated two similarity measures, the Pearson correlation coefficient on image intensity values (ICC) and maximum likelihood measure with Gaussian noise (MLG), derived from the statistics of transmission images. Pose determination experiments were conducted on 2D kV radiographs in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left lateral (LL) views and 3D kV CBCTs of an anthropomorphic head phantom. In order to minimize radiation exposure and exclude nonrigid structures from the registration, limited FOV 2D kV radiographs were employed. A spatial frequency band useful for the 2D-3D registration was identified from the bone-to-no-bone spectral ratio (BNBSR) of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) computed from the 3D kV planning CT of the phantom. The images being registered were filtered accordingly prior to computation of the similarity measures. We evaluated the registration accuracy achievable with a single 2D kV radiograph and with the registration results from the AP and LL views combined. We also compared the performance of the 2D-3D registration solutions proposed to that of a commercial 3D-3D registration algorithm, which used the entire skull for the registration. The ground truth was determined from markers affixed to the phantom and visible in the CBCT images. The accuracy of the 2D-3D registration solutions, as quantified by the root mean squared value of the target registration error (TRE) calculated over a radius of 3 cm for all poses tested, was ICC AP : 0.56 mm, MLG AP : 0.74 mm, ICC LL : 0.57 mm, MLG LL : 0.54 mm, ICC (AP and LL combined): 0.19 mm, and MLG (AP and LL combined): 0.21 mm. The accuracy of the 3D-3D registration algorithm was 0.27 mm. There was no significant difference in mean TRE for the 2D-3D registration

  5. Dosimetric Comparison Between Intensity-Modulated with Coplanar Field and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Noncoplanar Field for Postocular Invasion Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Wenyong; Liu Lu; Zeng Jun; Yin Weidong; Li Yun

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a dosimetric optimization effort aiming to compare noncoplanar field (NCF) on 3 dimensions conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and coplanar field (CF) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for postocular invasion tumor. We performed a planning study on the computed tomography data of 8 consecutive patients with localized postocular invasion tumor. Four fields NCF 3D-CRT in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0-10 deg., 30-45 deg., 240-270 deg., and 310-335 deg. degrees were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume. The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view. The same constraints were prepared with between CF IMRT optimization and NCF 3D-CRT treatment. The maximum point doses (D max) for the different optic pathway structures (OPS) with NCF 3D-CRT treatment should differ in no more than 3% from those with the NCF IMRT plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for all targets and organ at risk (OAR) with both treatment techniques. Plans with NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT constraints on target dose in homogeneity were computed, as well as the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) in the target volume. The PTV coverage was optimal with both NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plans in the 8 tumor sites. No difference was noted between the two techniques for the average D max and D min dose. NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT will yield similar results on CI. However, HI was a significant difference between NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plan (p < 0.001). Physical endpoints for target showed the mean target dose to be low in the CF IMRT plan, caused by a large target dose in homogeneity (p < 0.001). The impact of NCF 3D-CRT versus CF IMRT set-up is very slight. NCF3D-CRT is one of the treatment options for postocular invasion tumor. However, constraints for OARs are needed.

  6. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  7. On-fiber 3D printing of photonic crystal fiber tapers for mode field diameter conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Bertoncini, Andrea; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar Palanisamy; Liberale, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The large mismatch between the Mode Field Diameter (MFD) of conventional single-mode fibers (SMFs) and the MFD of highly nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs), that can be down to 1.5 μm, or Large Mode Area PCF, that can be up to 25 μm, would require a substantial fiber mode size rescaling in order to allow an efficient direct coupling between PCFs and SMFs. Over the years different solutions have been proposed, as fiber splicing of SMF to PCF. However these procedures are not straightforward, as they involve developing special splicing recipes, and can affect PCF optical properties at the splice interface [1].

  8. On-fiber 3D printing of photonic crystal fiber tapers for mode field diameter conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Bertoncini, Andrea

    2017-11-02

    The large mismatch between the Mode Field Diameter (MFD) of conventional single-mode fibers (SMFs) and the MFD of highly nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs), that can be down to 1.5 μm, or Large Mode Area PCF, that can be up to 25 μm, would require a substantial fiber mode size rescaling in order to allow an efficient direct coupling between PCFs and SMFs. Over the years different solutions have been proposed, as fiber splicing of SMF to PCF. However these procedures are not straightforward, as they involve developing special splicing recipes, and can affect PCF optical properties at the splice interface [1].

  9. 3D-Audio Matting, Postediting, and Rerendering from Field Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lemaitre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach to real-time spatial rendering of realistic auditory environments and sound sources recorded live, in the field. Using a set of standard microphones distributed throughout a real-world environment, we record the sound field simultaneously from several locations. After spatial calibration, we segment from this set of recordings a number of auditory components, together with their location. We compare existing time delay of arrival estimation techniques between pairs of widely spaced microphones and introduce a novel efficient hierarchical localization algorithm. Using the high-level representation thus obtained, we can edit and rerender the acquired auditory scene over a variety of listening setups. In particular, we can move or alter the different sound sources and arbitrarily choose the listening position. We can also composite elements of different scenes together in a spatially consistent way. Our approach provides efficient rendering of complex soundscapes which would be challenging to model using discrete point sources and traditional virtual acoustics techniques. We demonstrate a wide range of possible applications for games, virtual and augmented reality, and audio visual post production.

  10. Hubble Goes IMAX: 3D Visualization of the GOODS Southern Field for a Large Format Short Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, F. J.; Stoke, J. M.; Albert, L. J.; Bacon, G. T.; Barranger, C. L.; Feild, A. R.; Frattare, L. M.; Godfrey, J. P.; Levay, Z. G.; Preston, B. S.; Fletcher, L. M.; GOODS Team

    2003-12-01

    The Office of Public Outreach at the Space Telescope Science Institute is producing a several minute IMAX film that will have its world premiere at the January 2004 AAS meeting. The film explores the rich tapestry of galaxies in the GOODS Survey Southern Field in both two and three dimensions. This poster describes the visualization efforts from FITS files through the galaxy processing pipeline to 3D modelling and the rendering of approximately 100 billion pixels. The IMAX film will be shown at a special session at Fernbank Science Center, and the video will be shown at the STScI booth.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of wrist MRI at 3.0T - Comparison between isotropic 3D turbo spin echo and isotropic 3D fast field echo and 2D turbo spin echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jin Young; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to various joints. However, comparison for image quality between isotropic 3D MRI and two-dimensional (2D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence of the wrist at a 3T MR system has not been investigated. Purpose: To compare the image quality of isotropic 3D MRI including TSE intermediate-weighted (VISTA) sequence and fast field echo (FFE) sequence with 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequence of the wrist joint at 3.0 T. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in 10 wrists of 10 healthy volunteers with isotropic 3D sequences (VISTA and FFE) and 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequences at 3.0 T. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained by imaging phantom and noise-only image. Contrast ratios (CRs) were calculated between fluid and cartilage, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and the scapholunate ligament. Two radiologists independently assessed the visibility of TFCC, carpal ligaments, cartilage, tendons and nerves with a four-point grading scale. Statistical analysis to compare CRs (one way ANOVA with a Tukey test) and grades of visibility (Kruskal-Wallis test) between three sequences and those for inter-observer agreement (kappa analysis) were performed. Results: The SNR of 2D TSE (46.26) was higher than those of VISTA (23.34) and 3D FFE (19.41). CRs were superior in 2D TSE than VISTA (P = 0.02) for fluid-cartilage and in 2D TSE than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for fluid-TFCC. The visibility was best in 2D TSE (P < 0.01) for TFCC and in VISTA (P = 0.01) for scapholunate ligament. The visibility was better in 2D TSE and 3D FFE (P 0.04) for cartilage and in VISTA than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for TFCC. The inter-observer agreement for the visibility of anatomic structures was moderate or substantial. Conclusion: Image quality of 2D TSE was superior to isotropic 3D MR imaging for cartilage, and TFCC. 3D FFE has better visibility for cartilage than VISTA and VISTA has superior visibility for

  12. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of wrist MRI at 3.0T - Comparison between isotropic 3D turbo spin echo and isotropic 3D fast field echo and 2D turbo spin echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jee Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chungang Univ. Hospital, School of Medicine, Chungang Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ. (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: ycyoon@skku.edu; Jung, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Saint Paul' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong-Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to various joints. However, comparison for image quality between isotropic 3D MRI and two-dimensional (2D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence of the wrist at a 3T MR system has not been investigated. Purpose: To compare the image quality of isotropic 3D MRI including TSE intermediate-weighted (VISTA) sequence and fast field echo (FFE) sequence with 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequence of the wrist joint at 3.0 T. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in 10 wrists of 10 healthy volunteers with isotropic 3D sequences (VISTA and FFE) and 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequences at 3.0 T. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained by imaging phantom and noise-only image. Contrast ratios (CRs) were calculated between fluid and cartilage, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and the scapholunate ligament. Two radiologists independently assessed the visibility of TFCC, carpal ligaments, cartilage, tendons and nerves with a four-point grading scale. Statistical analysis to compare CRs (one way ANOVA with a Tukey test) and grades of visibility (Kruskal-Wallis test) between three sequences and those for inter-observer agreement (kappa analysis) were performed. Results: The SNR of 2D TSE (46.26) was higher than those of VISTA (23.34) and 3D FFE (19.41). CRs were superior in 2D TSE than VISTA (P = 0.02) for fluid-cartilage and in 2D TSE than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for fluid-TFCC. The visibility was best in 2D TSE (P < 0.01) for TFCC and in VISTA (P = 0.01) for scapholunate ligament. The visibility was better in 2D TSE and 3D FFE (P 0.04) for cartilage and in VISTA than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for TFCC. The inter-observer agreement for the visibility of anatomic structures was moderate or substantial. Conclusion: Image quality of 2D TSE was superior to isotropic 3D MR imaging for cartilage, and TFCC. 3D FFE has better visibility for cartilage than VISTA and VISTA has superior visibility for

  13. Quantitative Comparison of Ternary Eutectic Phase-Field Simulations with Analytical 3D Jackson-Hunt Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Philipp; Kellner, Michael; Hötzer, Johannes; Nestler, Britta

    2018-02-01

    For the analytical description of the relationship between undercoolings, lamellar spacings and growth velocities during the directional solidification of ternary eutectics in 2D and 3D, different extensions based on the theory of Jackson and Hunt are reported in the literature. Besides analytical approaches, the phase-field method has been established to study the spatially complex microstructure evolution during the solidification of eutectic alloys. The understanding of the fundamental mechanisms controlling the morphology development in multiphase, multicomponent systems is of high interest. For this purpose, a comparison is made between the analytical extensions and three-dimensional phase-field simulations of directional solidification in an ideal ternary eutectic system. Based on the observed accordance in two-dimensional validation cases, the experimentally reported, inherently three-dimensional chain-like pattern is investigated in extensive simulation studies. The results are quantitatively compared with the analytical results reported in the literature, and with a newly derived approach which uses equal undercoolings. A good accordance of the undercooling-spacing characteristics between simulations and the analytical Jackson-Hunt apporaches are found. The results show that the applied phase-field model, which is based on the Grand potential approach, is able to describe the analytically predicted relationship between the undercooling and the lamellar arrangements during the directional solidification of a ternary eutectic system in 3D.

  14. A three-step calibration method for tri-axial field sensors in a 3D magnetic digital compass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaoning; Zhao, Ta; Zhou, Zhijian; Cheng, Defu

    2017-01-01

    In a 3D magnetic compass, it is important to calibrate the tri-axial magnetometers and accelerometers so the compass will provide accurate heading and attitude information. Previous researchers have used two methods to calibrate these two field sensors separately, i.e. the classic independent ellipsoid fitting method and the independent dot product invariant method, respectively. Both methods are easy to use, and no highly accurate, external equipment is required. However, self-calibration with ellipsoid fitting has the disadvantage that it interfuses an orthogonal matrix, and the dot product invariant method requires the use of pre-calibrated internal field sensors, which may be unavailable in many cases. In this paper, we have introduced and unified an error model of two tri-axial field sensors. Accordingly, the orthogonal matrix caused by ellipsoid fitting was mathematically proved to be the combination of two sources, the mounting misalignment and the rotation misalignment. Moreover, a new method, which we call optimal resultant vector, was proposed to further calibrate multi-sensor systems on the basis of ellipsoid fitting and dot product invariant methods, establishing a new, three-step calibration method. The superiority of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art approaches were demonstrated by simulations and a 3D compass experiment. (paper)

  15. Closed-Form Algorithm for 3-D Near-Field OFDM Signal Localization under Uniform Circular Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaolong; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Xin; Wei, Xizhang

    2018-01-14

    Due to its widespread application in communications, radar, etc., the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal has become increasingly urgent in the field of localization. Under uniform circular array (UCA) and near-field conditions, this paper presents a closed-form algorithm based on phase difference for estimating the three-dimensional (3-D) location (azimuth angle, elevation angle, and range) of the OFDM signal. In the algorithm, considering that it is difficult to distinguish the frequency of the OFDM signal's subcarriers and the phase-based method is always affected by errors of the frequency estimation, this paper employs sparse representation (SR) to obtain the super-resolution frequencies and the corresponding phases of subcarriers. Further, as the phase differences of the adjacent sensors including azimuth angle, elevation angle and range parameters can be expressed as indefinite equations, the near-field OFDM signal's 3-D location is obtained by employing the least square method, where the phase differences are based on the average of the estimated subcarriers. Finally, the performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by several simulations.

  16. Extraction of 3D velocity and porosity fields from GeoPET data sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Kulenkampff, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactive Transport; Eichelbaum, S. [Nemtics Visualization, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    Geoscientific process monitoring with positron emission tomography (GeoPET) is proven to be applicable for quantitative tomographic transport process monitoring in natural geological materials. We benchmarked GeoPET by inversely fitting a numerical finite element model to a diffusive transport experiment in Opalinus clay. The obtained effective diffusion coefficients, D{sub e}, parallel and D{sub e}, perpendicular to, are well in line with data from literature. But more complex, heterogeneous migration, and flow patterns cannot be similarly evaluated by inverse fitting using optimization tools. Alternatively, we started developing an algorithm that allows the quantitative extraction of velocity and porosity fields, v{sub i=x,y,z} (x,y,z) and n(x,y,z) from GeoPET time series, c{sub PET}(x,y,z,t). They may serve as constituent data sets for reactive transport modelling.

  17. Automated fault extraction and classification using 3-D seismic data for the Ekofisk field development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signer, C.; Nickel, M.; Randen, T.; Saeter, T.; Soenneland, H.H.

    1998-12-31

    Mapping of fractures is important for the prediction of fluid flow in many reservoir types. The fluid flow depends mainly on the efficiency of the reservoir seals. Improved spatial mapping of the open and closed fracture systems will allow a better prediction of the fluid flow pattern. The primary objectives of this paper is to present fracture characterization at the reservoir scale combined with seismic facies mapping. The complexity of the giant Ekofisk field on the Norwegian continental shelf provides an ideal framework for testing the validity and the applicability of an automated seismic fault and fracture detection and mapping tool. The mapping of the faults can be based on seismic attribute grids, which means that attribute-responses related to faults are extracted along key horizons which were interpreted in the reservoir interval. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  18. High-contrast 3D image acquisition using HiLo microscopy with an electrically tunable lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Katrin; Smolarski, André; Fischer, Andreas; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Stürmer, Moritz; Wallrabe, Ulricke; Czarske, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We present a HiLo microscope with an electrically tunable lens for high-contrast three-dimensional image acquisition. HiLo microscopy combines wide field and speckled illumination images to create optically sectioned images. Additionally, the depth-of-field is not fixed, but can be adjusted between wide field and confocal-like axial resolution. We incorporate an electrically tunable lens in the HiLo microscope for axial scanning, to obtain three-dimensional data without the need of moving neither the sample nor the objective. The used adaptive lens consists of a transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane into which an annular piezo bending actuator is embedded. A transparent fluid is filled between the membrane and the glass substrate. When actuated, the piezo generates a pressure in the lens which deflects the membrane and thus changes the refractive power. This technique enables a large tuning range of the refractive power between 1/f = (-24 . . . 25) 1/m. As the NA of the adaptive lens is only about 0.05, a fixed high-NA lens is included in the setup to provide high resolution. In this contribution, the scan properties and capabilities of the tunable lens in the HiLo microscope are analyzed. Eventually, exemplary measurements are presented and discussed.

  19. Reconstruction of Magnetic Field Surfaces of the NOVILLO Tokamak by means of the 3D-MAPTOR Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez-Alarcon, Esteban; Herrera-Velazquez, J. Julio E.

    2008-01-01

    A 3-D code has been developed in order to simulate the magnetic field lines in circular cross-section tokamaks. The toroidal magnetic field can be obtained from the individual fields of circular coils arranged around the torus, or alternatively, as a ripple-less field, as well as the vertical field coils, and divertor-like coils. The poloidal field is provided by a given toroidal current density profile. Proposing initial conditions for a magnetic filed line, it is integrated along the toroidal angle coordinate, and the Poincare maps can be obtained at any desired cross section plane along the torus. Following this procedure, the code allows to explore the necessary current values for the existence of magnetic field surfaces, allowing for deviations from axial symmetry, such as ripple effects. Therefore it is a good design instrument, in which different parameters and arrangements of coils can be tested. On the other hand, the current signals from experimental devices can be used in order to reconstruct the behaviour of the magnetic field surfaces, including the q(r) profiles. The reconstruction properties of the code are shown in this work

  20. Accuracy and reliability of noninvasive stroke volume monitoring via ECG-gated 3D electrical impedance tomography in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Martin; Adler, Andy; Riedel, Thomas; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Solà, Josep

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume (SV) are parameters of key clinical interest. Many techniques exist to measure CO and SV, but are either invasive or insufficiently accurate in clinical settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has been suggested as a noninvasive measure of SV, but inconsistent results have been reported. Our goal is to determine the accuracy and reliability of EIT-based SV measurements, and whether advanced image reconstruction approaches can help to improve the estimates. Data were collected on ten healthy volunteers undergoing postural changes and exercise. To overcome the sensitivity to heart displacement and thorax morphology reported in previous work, we used a 3D EIT configuration with 2 planes of 16 electrodes and subject-specific reconstruction models. Various EIT-derived SV estimates were compared to reference measurements derived from the oxygen uptake. Results revealed a dramatic impact of posture on the EIT images. Therefore, the analysis was restricted to measurements in supine position under controlled conditions (low noise and stable heart and lung regions). In these measurements, amplitudes of impedance changes in the heart and lung regions could successfully be derived from EIT using ECG gating. However, despite a subject-specific calibration the heart-related estimates showed an error of 0.0 ± 15.2 mL for absolute SV estimation. For trending of relative SV changes, a concordance rate of 80.9% and an angular error of −1.0 ± 23.0° were obtained. These performances are insufficient for most clinical uses. Similar conclusions were derived from lung-related estimates. Our findings indicate that the key difficulty in EIT-based SV monitoring is that purely amplitude-based features are strongly influenced by other factors (such as posture, electrode contact impedance and lung or heart conductivity). All the data of the present study are made publicly available for further investigations. PMID:29373611

  1. submitter A High Precision 3D Magnetic Field Scanner for Small to Medium Size Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bergsma, F; Garnier, F; Giudici, P A

    2016-01-01

    A bench to measure the magnetic field of small to-medium-sized magnets with high precision was built. It uses a small-sized head with three orthogonal Hall probes, supported on a long pole at continuous movement during measurement. The head is calibrated in three dimensions by rotation over the full solid angle in a special device. From 0 to 2.5 T, the precision is ±0.2 mT in all components. The spatial range is 1 × 1 × 2 m with precision of ±0.02 mm. The bench and its controls are lightweight and easy to transport. The head can penetrate through small apertures and measure as close as 0.5 mm from the surface of a magnet. The bench can scan complicated grids in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, steered by a simple text file on an accompanying PC. The raw data is online converted to magnetic units and stored in a text file.

  2. 3D electrical image in area contaminated by hydrocarbons at the Cubatao, Brazil, industrial pole; Imageamento eletrico 3D em area contaminada por hidrocarbonetono no polo industrial de Cubatao - SP, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baessa, Marcus Paulus Martins [Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo Americo Miguez de Mello, CENPES, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: marcus.baessa@petrobras.br; Oliva, Andresa; Kiang, Chang Hung [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)], E-mails: aoliva@rc.unesp.br, chang@rc.unesp.br

    2010-12-15

    This work presents the results of geophysical surveys performed over an oil contaminated site in the Polo Industrial de Cubatao - Sao Paulo. The aim is to characterize geoelectrical signatures associated to hydrocarbon presence in order to delimit and calculate the volume of the contaminated area. For this study were used Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) and 3D Electrical Imaging for characterization of geology and geoelectrical response of the contaminant. The results showed that the hydrocarbon presence is associated to conductive anomalies due to products from biodegradation. The conductive anomalies are disseminated over the area, totalizing 1365.3 m3 volume. This volume, however, corresponds only to the residual phase contaminants, since it was not possible to map free-phase hydrocarbons. (author)

  3. Field monitoring of rail squats using 3D ultrasonic mapping technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaewunruen, S.; Ishida, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rail squats and studs are typically classified as the propagation of any cracks .that have grown longitudinally through the subsurface. Some of the cracks could propagate to the bottom of rails transversely, which have branched from the initial longitudinal cracks with a depression of rail surface. The rail defects are commonly referred to as 'squats' when they were initiated from a damage layer caused by rolling contact fatigue, and as 'studs' when they were associated with a white etching layer caused by the transformation from pearlitic steel due to friction heat generated by wheel sliding or excessive traction. Such above-mentioned rail defects have been often observed in railway tracks catered for either light passenger or heavy freight traffics and for low, medium or high speed trains all over the world for over 60 years except some places such as sharp curves where large wear takes place under severe friction between the wheel flange and rail gauge face. It becomes a much-more significant issue when the crack grows and sometimes flakes off the rail (by itself or by insufficient rail grinding), resulting in a rail surface irregularity. Such rail surface defects induce wheel/rail impact and large amplitude vibration of track structure and poor ride quality. In Australia, Europe, and Japan, rail squats/studs have occasionally turned into broken rails. The root cause and preventive solution to this defect are still under investigation from the fracture mechanics and material sciences point of view. Some patterns of squat/stud development related to both curve and tangent track geometries have been observed and squat growth has been monitored for individual squats using ultrasonic mapping techniques. This paper highlights the field monitoring of squat/stud distribution and its growth. Squat/stud growth has been detected and scanned using the ultrasonic measurement device on a grid applied to the rail surface. The depths of crack paths at each grid node form a

  4. Field monitoring of rail squats using 3D ultrasonic mapping technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaewunruen, S., E-mail: sakdirat.kaewunruen@transport.nsw.gov.au [NSW, Transport, Sydney (Australia); Ishida, M., E-mail: ishida-mk@n-koei.jp [Nippon Koei Co. Ltd., Railway Div., Railway Engineering Dept., Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Rail squats and studs are typically classified as the propagation of any cracks .that have grown longitudinally through the subsurface. Some of the cracks could propagate to the bottom of rails transversely, which have branched from the initial longitudinal cracks with a depression of rail surface. The rail defects are commonly referred to as 'squats' when they were initiated from a damage layer caused by rolling contact fatigue, and as 'studs' when they were associated with a white etching layer caused by the transformation from pearlitic steel due to friction heat generated by wheel sliding or excessive traction. Such above-mentioned rail defects have been often observed in railway tracks catered for either light passenger or heavy freight traffics and for low, medium or high speed trains all over the world for over 60 years except some places such as sharp curves where large wear takes place under severe friction between the wheel flange and rail gauge face. It becomes a much-more significant issue when the crack grows and sometimes flakes off the rail (by itself or by insufficient rail grinding), resulting in a rail surface irregularity. Such rail surface defects induce wheel/rail impact and large amplitude vibration of track structure and poor ride quality. In Australia, Europe, and Japan, rail squats/studs have occasionally turned into broken rails. The root cause and preventive solution to this defect are still under investigation from the fracture mechanics and material sciences point of view. Some patterns of squat/stud development related to both curve and tangent track geometries have been observed and squat growth has been monitored for individual squats using ultrasonic mapping techniques. This paper highlights the field monitoring of squat/stud distribution and its growth. Squat/stud growth has been detected and scanned using the ultrasonic measurement device on a grid applied to the rail surface. The depths of crack paths at each

  5. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  6. 3D electromagnetic design and electrical characteristics analysis of a 10-MW-class hightemperature superconducting synchronous generator for wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Park, S. I.; Le, T. D.; Kim, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the general electromagnetic design process of a 10-MW-class high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous generator that is intended to be utilized for large scale offshore wind generator is discussed. This paper presents three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic design proposal and electrical characteristic analysis results of a 10-MW-class HTS synchronous generator for wind power. For more detailed design by reducing the errors of a two-dimensional (2D) design owing to leakage flux in air-gap, we redesign and analyze the 2D conceptual electromagnetic design model of the HTS synchronous generator using 3D finite element analysis (FEA) software. Then electrical characteristics which include the no-load and full-load voltage of generator, harmonic contents of these two load conditions, voltage regulation and losses of generator are analyzed by commercial 3D FEA software.

  7. Fast, large field-of-view, telecentric optical-CT scanning system for 3D radiochromic dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A; Oldham, M, E-mail: ast5@duke.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2010-11-01

    We describe initial experiences with an in-house, fast, large field-of-view optical-CT telecentric scanner (the Duke Large field of view Optical-CT Scanner (DLOS)). The DLOS system is designed to enable telecentric optical-CT imaging of dosimeters up to 24 cm in diameter with a spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 3}, in approximately 10 minutes. These capabilities render the DLOS system a unique device at present. The system is a scaled up version of early prototypes in our lab. This scaling introduces several challenges, including the accurate measurement of a greatly increased range of light attenuation within the dosimeter, and the need to reduce even minor reflections and scattered light within the imaging chain. We present several corrections and techniques that enable accurate, low noise, 3D dosimetery with the DLOS system.

  8. Toward acquiring comprehensive radiosurgery field commissioning data using the PRESAGE/optical-CT 3D dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clift, Corey; Thomas, Andrew; Chang Zheng; Oldham, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Adamovics, John [Department of Chemistry, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States); Das, Indra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: cclift@montefiore.org

    2010-03-07

    Achieving accurate small field dosimetry is challenging. This study investigates the utility of a radiochromic plastic PRESAGE read with optical-CT for the acquisition of radiosurgery field commissioning data from a Novalis Tx system with a high-definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC). Total scatter factors (S{sub c,p}), beam profiles, and penumbrae were measured for five different radiosurgery fields (5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using a commercially available optical-CT scanner (OCTOPUS, MGS Research). The percent depth dose (PDD), beam profile and penumbra of the 10 mm field were also measured using a higher resolution in-house prototype CCD-based scanner. Gafchromic EBT film was used for independent verification. Measurements of S{sub c,p} made with PRESAGE and film agreed with mini-ion chamber commissioning data to within 4% for every field (range 0.2-3.6% for PRESAGE, and 1.6-3.6% for EBT). PDD, beam profile and penumbra measurements made with the two PRESAGE/optical-CT systems and film showed good agreement with the high-resolution diode commissioning measurements with a competitive resolution (0.5 mm pixels). The in-house prototype optical-CT scanner allowed much finer resolution compared with previous applications of PRESAGE. The advantages of the PRESAGE (registered) system for small field dosimetry include 3D measurements, negligible volume averaging, directional insensitivity, an absence of beam perturbations, energy and dose rate independence.

  9. Toward acquiring comprehensive radiosurgery field commissioning data using the PRESAGE/optical-CT 3D dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clift, Corey; Thomas, Andrew; Chang Zheng; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Das, Indra

    2010-01-01

    Achieving accurate small field dosimetry is challenging. This study investigates the utility of a radiochromic plastic PRESAGE read with optical-CT for the acquisition of radiosurgery field commissioning data from a Novalis Tx system with a high-definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC). Total scatter factors (S c,p ), beam profiles, and penumbrae were measured for five different radiosurgery fields (5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using a commercially available optical-CT scanner (OCTOPUS, MGS Research). The percent depth dose (PDD), beam profile and penumbra of the 10 mm field were also measured using a higher resolution in-house prototype CCD-based scanner. Gafchromic EBT film was used for independent verification. Measurements of S c,p made with PRESAGE and film agreed with mini-ion chamber commissioning data to within 4% for every field (range 0.2-3.6% for PRESAGE, and 1.6-3.6% for EBT). PDD, beam profile and penumbra measurements made with the two PRESAGE/optical-CT systems and film showed good agreement with the high-resolution diode commissioning measurements with a competitive resolution (0.5 mm pixels). The in-house prototype optical-CT scanner allowed much finer resolution compared with previous applications of PRESAGE. The advantages of the PRESAGE (registered) system for small field dosimetry include 3D measurements, negligible volume averaging, directional insensitivity, an absence of beam perturbations, energy and dose rate independence.

  10. Toward acquiring comprehensive radiosurgery field commissioning data using the PRESAGE®/ optical-CT 3D dosimetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Corey; Thomas, Andrew; Adamovics, John; Chang, Zheng; Das, Indra; Oldham, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Achieving accurate small field dosimetry is challenging. This study investigates the utility of a radiochromic plastic PRESAGE® read with optical-CT for the acquisition of radiosurgery field commissioning data from a Novalis Tx system with a high-definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC). Total scatter factors (Sc, p), beam profiles, and penumbrae were measured for five different radiosurgery fields (5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using a commercially available optical-CT scanner (OCTOPUS, MGS Research). The percent depth dose (PDD), beam profile and penumbra of the 10 mm field were also measured using a higher resolution in-house prototype CCD-based scanner. Gafchromic EBT® film was used for independent verification. Measurements of Sc, p made with PRESAGE® and film agreed with mini-ion chamber commissioning data to within 4% for every field (range 0.2-3.6% for PRESAGE®, and 1.6-3.6% for EBT). PDD, beam profile and penumbra measurements made with the two PRESAGE®/optical-CT systems and film showed good agreement with the high-resolution diode commissioning measurements with a competitive resolution (0.5 mm pixels). The in-house prototype optical-CT scanner allowed much finer resolution compared with previous applications of PRESAGE®. The advantages of the PRESAGE® system for small field dosimetry include 3D measurements, negligible volume averaging, directional insensitivity, an absence of beam perturbations, energy and dose rate independence.

  11. Geometrically undistorted MRI in the presence of field inhomogeneities using compressed sensing accelerated broadband 3D phase encoded turbo spin-echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gorp, Jetse S; Bakker, Chris J G; Bouwman, Job G; Zijlstra, Frank; Seevinck, Peter R; Smink, Jouke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential of compressed sensing (CS) accelerated broadband 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (3D-PE-TSE) for the purpose of geometrically undistorted imaging in the presence of field inhomogeneities. To achieve this goal 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE sequences with broadband rf pulses and dedicated undersampling patterns were implemented on a clinical scanner. Additionally, a 3D multi-spectral spin-echo (ms3D-SE) sequence was implemented for reference purposes. First, we demonstrated the influence of susceptibility induced off-resonance effects on the spatial encoding of broadband 3D-SE, ms3D-SE, 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE using a grid phantom containing a titanium implant (Δχ = 182 ppm) with x-ray CT as a gold standard. These experiments showed that the spatial encoding of 3D-PE-(T)SE was unaffected by susceptibility induced off-resonance effects, which caused geometrical distortions and/or signal hyper-intensities in broadband 3D-SE and, to a lesser extent, in ms3D-SE frequency encoded methods. Additionally, an SNR analysis was performed and the temporally resolved signal of 3D-PE-(T)SE sequences was exploited to retrospectively decrease the acquisition bandwidth and obtain field offset maps. The feasibility of CS acceleration was studied retrospectively and prospectively for the 3D-PE-SE sequence using an existing CS algorithm adapted for the reconstruction of 3D data with undersampling in all three phase encoded dimensions. CS was combined with turbo-acceleration by variable density undersampling and spherical stepwise T 2 weighting by randomly sorting consecutive echoes in predefined spherical k-space layers. The CS-TSE combination resulted in an overall acceleration factor of 60, decreasing the original 3D-PE-SE scan time from 7 h to 7 min. Finally, CS accelerated 3D-PE-TSE in vivo images of a titanium screw were obtained within 10 min using a micro-coil demonstrating the feasibility of geometrically undistorted MRI near severe

  12. EDITORIAL: 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, Richard

    2011-08-01

    This annual workshop on MHD Stability Control has been held since 1996 with a focus on understanding and developing control of MHD instabilities for future fusion reactors. The workshop generally covers a wide range of stability topics: from disruptions, to tearing modes, error fields, ELMs, resistive wall modes (RWMs) and ideal MHD. It spans many device types, particularly tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches, to pull out commonalities in the physics and improve understanding. In 2010 the workshop was held on 15-17 November at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and was combined with the annual US-Japan MHD Workshop. The theme was `3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control', with a focus on multidisciplinary sessions exploring issues of plasma response to 3D fields, the manifestation of such fields in the plasma, and how they influence stability. This has been a topic of renewed interest, with utilisation of 3D fields for ELM control now planned in ITER, and a focus on the application of such fields for error field correction, disruption avoidance, and RWM control. Key issues included the physics of the interaction, types of coils and harmonic spectra needed to control instabilities, and subsidiary effects such as braking (or rotating) the plasma. More generally, a wider range of issues were discussed including RWM physics, tearing mode physics, disruption mitigation, ballooning stability, the snowflake divertor concept, and the line tied pinch! A novel innovation to the meeting was a panel discussion session, this year on Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity, which ran well; more will be tried next year. In this special section of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion we present several of the invited and contributed papers from the 2010 workshop, which have been subject to the normal refereeing procedures of the journal. These papers give a sense of the exceptional quality of the presentations at this workshop, all of which may be found at http

  13. W7-X vacuum and finite-β magnetic field structure resolved with the HINT 3D equilibrium code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Merkel, P.; Nuehrenberg, J.; Schwenn, U.

    1994-01-01

    The 3D equilibrium code HINT allows the direct investigation of finite-β effects on sizes and phases of islands in genuinely 3D configurations like the W7-X stellarator planned by the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik in Germany. The code does not require the existence of nested flux surfaces. This, in contrast to the inverse formulation used in the VMEC code, leads to a considerably more complex computational goal. The HINT code combines some crucial features reducing the numerical problems and the computational effort to such an extent as to allow computation of 3D equilibria at finite-β with magnetic islands. The code is based on a two-step procedure: Starting from a given B and an initial pressure, the iteration technique for the pressure advancement is differencing in an artificial time with an explicit 4th order scheme, or - alternatively for resolving the island topology - field lines starting from all gridpoints are followed long enough to allow pressure equalization along these. B.∇p 0, for fixed B. In a second step, p is kept fixed and B is advanced with an artificial time for solving ∇p - jxB = 0 under the constraint of vanishing toroidal current J. The differential equations are discretized in space with 4th order difference approximations on an Eulerian grid spanned by a rectangular box whose toroidal rotation law follows the W7-X geometry. The two sub-iteration steps are repeated until the force balance is satisfied to an appropriate accuracy. The boundaries (where the boundary conditions are prescribed) are far enough away from the last closed magnetic surface, thus guaranteeing the motion of the plasma column not being constrained by the boundary conditions. Due to the stellarator symmetry in the toroidal direction only half of an equilibrium period is computed, using modified periodic boundary conditions guaranteeing the 4th order of the spatial discretization. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  14. Tri-Dimensional Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT-3D) Technique, an Efficient Tool to Unveil the Subsoil of Archaeological Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, R. E.; Vargas, D.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J. E.; Tejero, A.

    2014-12-01

    Three-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography techniques (ERT-3D) have demonstrated to be an efficient tool to study the subsurface of areas of archaeological interest by special arrays designed to 'illuminate' the subsoil beneath the structure under study. 'L'- and 'Corner'-arrays are applied to design alternative electrode geometries, which attempt to cover the subsurface with enough resistivity observations underneath the studied target. Two examples are presented where novel geometries can be applied to investigate the subsoil of two important pyramids in Mexico. First, the archaeological site of Cuicuilco is studied. The area is found towards the southern portion of the Mexican Basin. This pyramid presents a circular structure of 110 m in diameter and a total height of 25 m. The region is partially covered by the lava flows that came from an eruptive event form the Xitle Volcano 1500 years ago. The geophysical study was carried out at the base of the pyramid. 48 electrodes were deployed along a circular transect, with an electrode separation of 5.4 m. A total of 1716 apparent resistivity observations were measured. The inverted model computed is obtained with an investigation depth of 30 m, approximately (Figure 1, in color). A resistive anomaly can be observed towards the central portion of the model. This anomaly can be associated to a burial chamber, excavated by the archaeologists. The second example corresponds to the pyiramid El Castillo, located in the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, in the southern lowlands of Mexico, within the Yucatan Peninsula. Previous GPR studies carried out within the pyramid's Plaza provided evidences of a buried tunnel excavated within the limestone rocks. Such feature seemed to run beneath the eastern flank of the pyramide. The geophysical study was carried out by employing 96 flat-surface electrodes, which surrounded the edifice forming a square geometry. A total of 5,350 apparent resistivity observations were

  15. Selection of candidate wells and optimization of conformance treatment design in the Barrancas Field using a 3D conformance simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosta, Dante; Elitseche, Luis [Repsol YPF (Argentina); Gutierrez, Mauricio; Ansah, Joe; Everett, Don [Halliburton Argentina S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    Minimizing the amount of unwanted water production is an important goal at the Barrancas field. This paper describes a selection process for candidate injection wells that is part of a pilot conformance project aimed at improving vertical injection profiles, reducing water cut in producing wells, and improving ultimate oil recovery from this field. The well selection process is based on a review of limited reservoir information available for this field to determine inter-well communications. The methodology focuses on the best use of available information, such as production and injection history, well intervention files, open hole logs and injectivity surveys. After the candidate wells were selected and potential water injection channels were identified, conformance treatment design and future performance of wells in the selected pilot area were evaluated using a new 3 -D conformance simulator, developed specifically for optimization of the design and placement of unwanted fluid shut-off treatments. Thus, when acceptable history match ing of the pilot area production was obtained, the 3 -D simulator was used to: evaluate the required volume of selected conformance treatment fluid; review expected pressures and rates during placement;. model temperature behavior; evaluate placement techniques, and forecast water cut reduction and incremental oil recovery from the producers in this simulated section of the pilot area. This paper outlines a methodology for selecting candidate wells for conformance treatments. The method involves application of several engineering tools, an integral component of which is a user-friendly conformance simulator. The use of the simulator has minimized data preparation time and allows the running of sensitivity cases quickly to explore different possible scenarios that best represent the reservoir. The proposed methodology provides an efficient means of identifying conformance problems and designing optimized solutions for these individual

  16. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated.

  17. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Song; Huang, Shiyong; Zhou, Meng; Ni, Binbin; Deng, Xiaohua

    2018-03-01

    It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection). In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg). Once the amplitude of a guide field exceeds 0.3 times the asymptotic magnetic field B0, the traditional bipolar Hall electric field is clearly replaced by a tripolar electric field, which consists of a newly emerged electric field and the bipolar Hall electric field. The newly emerged electric field is a convective electric field about one ion inertial length away from the neutral sheet. It arises from the disappearance of the Hall electric field due to the substantial modification of the magnetic field and electric current by the imposed guide field. The peak magnitude of this new electric field increases linearly with the increment of guide field strength. Possible applications of these results to space observations are also discussed.

  18. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection. In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg. Once the amplitude of a guide field exceeds 0.3 times the asymptotic magnetic field B0, the traditional bipolar Hall electric field is clearly replaced by a tripolar electric field, which consists of a newly emerged electric field and the bipolar Hall electric field. The newly emerged electric field is a convective electric field about one ion inertial length away from the neutral sheet. It arises from the disappearance of the Hall electric field due to the substantial modification of the magnetic field and electric current by the imposed guide field. The peak magnitude of this new electric field increases linearly with the increment of guide field strength. Possible applications of these results to space observations are also discussed.

  19. End-to-end simulation of the C-ADS injector Ⅱ with a 3-D field map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhijun; He Yuan; Li Chao; Wang Wangsheng; Liu Shuhui; Jia Huan; Xu Xianbo; Chen Ximeng

    2013-01-01

    The Injector II, one of the two parallel injectors of the high-current superconducting proton driver linac for the China Accelerator-Driven System (C-ADS) project, is being designed and constructed by the Institute of Modern Physics. At present, the design work for the injector is almost finished. End-to-end simulation has been carried out using the TRACK multiparticle simulation code to check the match between each acceleration section and the performance of the injector as a whole. Moreover, multiparticle simulations with all kinds of errors and misalignments have been performed to define the requirements of each device. The simulation results indicate that the lattice design is robust. In this paper, the results of end-to-end simulation and error simulation with a 3-D field map are presented. (authors)

  20. The Schouten tensor as a connection in the unfolding of 3D conformal higher-spin fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basile, Thomas [Group of Mechanics and Gravitation, Physique théorique et mathématique,University of Mons - UMONS,20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Unité Mixte de Recherche du CNRS,Fédération de Recherche Denis Poisson, Université François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Bonezzi, Roberto; Boulanger, Nicolas [Group of Mechanics and Gravitation, Physique théorique et mathématique,University of Mons - UMONS,20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2017-04-11

    A first-order differential equation is provided for a one-form, spin-s connection valued in the two-row, width-(s−1) Young tableau of GL(5). The connection is glued to a zero-form identified with the spin-s Cotton tensor. The usual zero-Cotton equation for a symmetric, conformal spin-s tensor gauge field in 3D is the flatness condition for the sum of the GL(5) spin-s and background connections. This presentation of the equations allows to reformulate in a compact way the cohomological problem studied in https://arxiv.org/abs/1511.07389, featuring the spin-s Schouten tensor. We provide full computational details for spin 3 and 4 and present the general spin-s case in a compact way.

  1. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

    2001-06-01

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A

  2. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Eric H.; French, Don E.

    2001-01-01

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A

  3. A fast algorithm for forward-modeling of gravitational fields in spherical coordinates with 3D Gauss-Legendre quadrature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Guo, R.; Chen, L.

    2017-12-01

    Forward modeling of gravitational fields at large-scale requires to consider the curvature of the Earth and to evaluate the Newton's volume integral in spherical coordinates. To acquire fast and accurate gravitational effects for subsurface structures, subsurface mass distribution is usually discretized into small spherical prisms (called tesseroids). The gravity fields of tesseroids are generally calculated numerically. One of the commonly used numerical methods is the 3D Gauss-Legendre quadrature (GLQ). However, the traditional GLQ integration suffers from low computational efficiency and relatively poor accuracy when the observation surface is close to the source region. We developed a fast and high accuracy 3D GLQ integration based on the equivalence of kernel matrix, adaptive discretization and parallelization using OpenMP. The equivalence of kernel matrix strategy increases efficiency and reduces memory consumption by calculating and storing the same matrix elements in each kernel matrix just one time. In this method, the adaptive discretization strategy is used to improve the accuracy. The numerical investigations show that the executing time of the proposed method is reduced by two orders of magnitude compared with the traditional method that without these optimized strategies. High accuracy results can also be guaranteed no matter how close the computation points to the source region. In addition, the algorithm dramatically reduces the memory requirement by N times compared with the traditional method, where N is the number of discretization of the source region in the longitudinal direction. It makes the large-scale gravity forward modeling and inversion with a fine discretization possible.

  4. Electric field measurements in high pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitko, S.V.; Ochkin, V.N.; Serdyuchenko, A.Yu.; Tskhai, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Electric fields define a wide range of interactions and phenomena at different phases of matter both on micro- and macro-level. Investigation of electric fields behavior provides a key for understanding of these phenomena and their application

  5. Electrical field of electrical appliances versus distance: A preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, Nur Badariah Ahmad; Nordin, Farah Hani; Ismail, Fakaruddin Ali Ahmad; Alkahtani, Ammar Ahmed; Balasubramaniam, Nagaletchumi; Hock, Goh Chin; Shariff, Z A M

    2013-01-01

    Every household electrical appliance that is plugged in emits electric field even if it is not operating. The source where the appliance is plugged into and the components of household electrical appliance contribute to electric field emission. The electric field may cause unknown disturbance to the environment or also affect the human health and the effect might depends on the strength of the electric field emitted by the appliance. This paper will investigate the strength of the electric field emitted by four different electrical appliances using spectrum analyser. The strength will be captured at three different distances; (i) 1m (ii) 2m and (iii) 3m and analysis of the strength of the electrical field is done based on the three different distances. The measurement results show that the strength of the electric field is strongest when it is captured at 1m and the weakest at 3m from the electrical appliance. The results proved that the farther an object is located from the electrical appliance; the less effect the magnetic field has.

  6. Integrating geologic and engineering data into 3-D reservoir models: an example from norman wells field, NWT, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yose, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    A case study of the Norman Wells field will be presented to highlight the work-flow and data integration steps associated with characterization and modeling of a complex hydrocarbon reservoir. Norman Wells is a Devonian-age carbonate bank ('reef') located in the Northwest Territories of Canada, 60 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle. The reservoir reaches a maximum thickness of 130 meters in the reef interior and thins toward the basin due to depositional pinch outs. Norman Wells is an oil reservoir and is currently under a 5-spot water injection scheme for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). EOR strategies require a detailed understanding of how reservoir flow units, flow barriers and flow baffles are distributed to optimize hydrocarbon sweep and recovery and to minimize water handling. Reservoir models are routinely used by industry to characterize the 3-D distribution of reservoir architecture (stratigraphic layers, depositional facies, faults) and rock properties (porosity. permeability). Reservoir models are validated by matching historical performance data (e.g., reservoir pressures, well production or injection rates). Geologic models are adjusted until they produce a history match, and model adjustments are focused on inputs that have the greatest geologic uncertainty. Flow simulation models are then used to optimize field development strategies and to forecast field performance under different development scenarios. (author)

  7. Inhomogeneous electric field air cleaner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    For applications requiring the filtration of air contaminated with enriched uranium, plutonium or other transuranium compounds, it appears desirable to collect the material in a fashion more amenable to recovery than is now practical when material is collected on HEPA filters. In some instances, it may also be desirable to use an air cleaner of this type to substantially reduce the loading to which HEPA filters are subjected. A theoretical evaluation of such an air cleaner considers the interaction between an electrically neutral particle, dielectric or conducting, with an inhomogeneous electric field. An expression is derived for the force exerted on a particle in an electrode configuration of two concentric cylinders. Equations of motion are obtained for a particle suspended in a laminar flow of air passing through this geometry. An electrical quadrupole geometry is also examined and shown to be inferior to the cylindrical one. The results of two separate configurations of the single cell prototypes of the proposed air cleaner are described. These tests were designed to evaluate collection efficiencies using mono-disperse polystyrene latex and polydisperse NaCl aerosols. The advantages and problems of such systems in terms of a large scale air cleaning facility will be discussed

  8. Do neutrons feel electric fields?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Tony; Werner, Sam

    1991-01-01

    An accounts is given of the results of a co-operative research carried out at the University of Melbourne in Australia and the University of Missouri, Columbia in the United States on the physics of neutrons and their interactions as a test of fundamental principles in quantum mechanics and electrodynamics. In particular it comments on the verification of the Aharonov-Casher effect in electric as well as magnetic fields in the case of neutral particles. It was demonstrated that neutrons have a magnetic moment which precess and acquire phase shifts when exposed to magnetic fields. The sign of the measured phase shift agreed with the theoretical prediction and the magnitude was within one and a half standard deviations of it. 12 refs., 4 figs

  9. Development of Virtual Field Experiences for undergraduate geoscience using 3D models from aerial drone imagery and other data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchewski, B.; Dolphin, G.; Dutchak, A.; Cooper, J.

    2017-12-01

    In geoscience one must develop important skills related to data collection, analysis and interpretation in the field. The quadrupling of student enrollment in geoscience at the University of Calgary in recent years presents a unique challenge in providing field experience. With introductory classes ranging from 300-500 students, field trips are logistical impossibilities and the impact on the quality of student learning and engagement is major and negative. Field experience is fundamental to geoscience education, but is presently lacking prior to the third year curriculum. To mitigate the absence of field experience in the introductory curricula, we are developing a set of Virtual Field Experiences (VFEs) that approximate field experiences via inquiry-based exploration of geoscientific principles. We incorporate a variety of data into the VFEs including gigapan photographs, geologic maps and high resolution 3D models constructed from aerial drone imagery. We link the data using a web-based platform to support lab exercises guided by a set of inquiry questions. An important feature that distinguishes a VFE is that students explore the data in a nonlinear fashion to construct and revise models that explain the nature of the field site. The aim is to approximate an actual field experience rather than provide a virtual guided tour where the explanation of the site comes pre-packaged. Thus far, our group has collected data at three sites in Southern Alberta: Mt. Yamnuska, Drumheller environs and the North Saskatchewan River valley near the toe of the Saskatchewan Glacier. The Mt. Yamnuska site focusses on a prominent thrust fault in the front ranges of the Western Cordillera. The Drumheller environs site demonstrates the siliciclastic sedimentation and stratigraphy typical of southeastern Alberta. The Saskatchewan Glacier site highlights periglacial geomorphology and glacial recession. All three sites were selected because they showcase a broad range of geoscientific

  10. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  11. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  12. Characterization and 3D reservoir modelling of fluvial sandstones of the Williams Fork Formation, Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, Colorado, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranter, Matthew J; Vargas, Marielis F; Davis, Thomas L

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the stratigraphic characteristics and distribution of fluvial deposits of the Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation in a portion of Rulison Field and addresses 3D geologic modelling of reservoir sand bodies and their associated connectivity. Fluvial deposits include isolated and stacked point-bar deposits, crevasse splays and overbank (floodplain) mudrock. Within the Williams Fork Formation, the distribution and connectivity of fluvial sandstones significantly impact reservoir productivity and ultimate recovery. The reservoir sandstones are primarily fluvial point-bar deposits interbedded with shales and coals. Because of the lenticular geometry and limited lateral extent of the reservoir sandstones (common apparent widths of ∼500–1000 ft; ∼150–300 m), relatively high well densities (e.g. 10 acre (660 ft; 200 m) spacing) are often required to deplete the reservoir. Heterogeneity of these fluvial deposits includes larger scale stratigraphic variability associated with vertical stacking patterns and structural heterogeneities associated with faults that exhibit lateral and reverse offsets. The discontinuous character of the fluvial sandstones and lack of distinct marker beds in the middle and upper parts of the Williams Fork Formation make correlation between wells tenuous, even at a 10 acre well spacing. Some intervals of thicker and amalgamated sandstones within the middle and upper Williams Fork Formation can be correlated across greater distances. To aid correlation and for 3D reservoir modelling, vertical lithology proportion curves were used to estimate stratigraphic trends and define the stratigraphic zonation within the reservoir interval. Object-based and indicator-based modelling methods have been applied to the same data and results from the models were compared. Results from the 3D modelling indicate that sandstone connectivity increases with net-to-gross ratio and, at lower net-to-gross ratios (<30%), differences exist in

  13. Flame spread over inclined electrical wires with AC electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Lim, Seung J.; Park, Sun H.; Park, Jeong; Fujita, Osamu; Keel, Sang I.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Flame spread over polyethylene-insulated electrical wires was studied experimentally with applied alternating current (AC) by varying the inclination angle (θ), applied voltage (VAC), and frequency (fAC). For the baseline case with no electric field

  14. Alignment-independent comparison of binding sites based on DrugScore potential fields encoded by 3D Zernike descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisius, Britta; Gohlke, Holger

    2012-09-24

    Analyzing protein binding sites provides detailed insights into the biological processes proteins are involved in, e.g., into drug-target interactions, and so is of crucial importance in drug discovery. Herein, we present novel alignment-independent binding site descriptors based on DrugScore potential fields. The potential fields are transformed to a set of information-rich descriptors using a series expansion in 3D Zernike polynomials. The resulting Zernike descriptors show a promising performance in detecting similarities among proteins with low pairwise sequence identities that bind identical ligands, as well as within subfamilies of one target class. Furthermore, the Zernike descriptors are robust against structural variations among protein binding sites. Finally, the Zernike descriptors show a high data compression power, and computing similarities between binding sites based on these descriptors is highly efficient. Consequently, the Zernike descriptors are a useful tool for computational binding site analysis, e.g., to predict the function of novel proteins, off-targets for drug candidates, or novel targets for known drugs.

  15. Sea-town interactions over Marseille: 3D urban boundary layer and thermodynamic fields near the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonsu, A.; Pigeon, G.; Masson, V.; Moppert, C.

    2006-02-01

    3D numerical simulations with the Meso-NH atmospheric model including the Town Energy Balance urban parameterization, are conducted over the south-east of France and the one million inhabitants city of Marseille in the frameworks of the ESCOMPTE-UBL program. The geographic situation of the area is relatively complex, because of the proximity of the Mediterranean Sea and the presence of numerous massifs, inducing complex meteorological flows. The present work is focused on six days of the campaign, characterized by the development of strong summer sea-breeze circulations. A complete evaluation of the model is initially realized at both regional- and city-scales, by using the large available database. The regional evaluation shows a good behavior of the model, during the six days of simulation, either for the parameters near the surface or for the vertical profiles describing the structure of the atmosphere. The urban-scale evaluation indicates that the fine structure of the horizontal fields of air temperature above the city is correctly simulated by the model. A specific attention is then pointed to the 250-m horizontal resolution outputs, focused on the Marseille area, for two days of the campaign. From the study of the vertical structure of the Urban Boundary Layer and the thermodynamic fields near the surface, one underscores the important differences due to the regional and local flows, and the complex interactions that occur between the urban effects and the effects of sea breezes.

  16. Organic Field-Effect Transistors: A 3D Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the Current Characteristics in Micrometer-Sized Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan

    2017-01-16

    The electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are usually characterized by applying models initially developed for inorganic-based devices, which often implies the use of approximations that might be inappropriate for organic semiconductors. These approximations have brought limitations to the understanding of the device physics associated with organic materials. A strategy to overcome this issue is to establish straightforward connections between the macroscopic current characteristics and microscopic charge transport in OFETs. Here, a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that goes beyond both the conventional assumption of zero channel thickness and the gradual channel approximation to simulate carrier transport and current. Using parallel computing and a new algorithm that significantly improves the evaluation of electric potential within the device, this methodology allows the simulation of micrometer-sized OFETs. The current characteristics of representative OFET devices are well reproduced, which provides insight into the validity of the gradual channel approximation in the case of OFETs, the impact of the channel thickness, and the nature of microscopic charge transport.

  17. Organic Field-Effect Transistors: A 3D Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the Current Characteristics in Micrometer-Sized Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan; Li, Yuan; Li, Hong; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    The electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are usually characterized by applying models initially developed for inorganic-based devices, which often implies the use of approximations that might be inappropriate for organic semiconductors. These approximations have brought limitations to the understanding of the device physics associated with organic materials. A strategy to overcome this issue is to establish straightforward connections between the macroscopic current characteristics and microscopic charge transport in OFETs. Here, a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that goes beyond both the conventional assumption of zero channel thickness and the gradual channel approximation to simulate carrier transport and current. Using parallel computing and a new algorithm that significantly improves the evaluation of electric potential within the device, this methodology allows the simulation of micrometer-sized OFETs. The current characteristics of representative OFET devices are well reproduced, which provides insight into the validity of the gradual channel approximation in the case of OFETs, the impact of the channel thickness, and the nature of microscopic charge transport.

  18. Sistema de comercio electrónico para el sector textil: generar maniquíes 3D a partir de imágenes del sensor Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Olabarria Iñarra, Ibon

    2014-01-01

    Este proyecto consiste en analizar la viabilidad técnica un sistema de información para mejorar el comercio electrónico de compra –venta de ropa. El nuevo sistema de comercio electrónico ayudará al usuario a escoger el tamaño de la prenda con más precisión. El sistema consiste en calcular las medidas esenciales del cuerpo del cliente utilizando el dispositivo Kinect. Posteriormente, estas medidas se introducen en el programa Makehuman que genera un maniquí en 3D. Con la idea de que en el futu...

  19. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    It is well-known that the local seismic site effects may have a significant contribution to the intensity of damage and destruction (e.g., Hough et al., 1990; Regnier et al., 2000; Bonnefoy-Claudet et al., 2006; Haase et al., 2010). The thicknesses of sediments, which play a large role in amplification, usually are derived from seismic velocities. At the same time, thickness of sediments may be determined (or defined) on the basis of 3D combined gravity-magnetic modeling joined with available geological materials, seismic data and borehole section examination. Final result of such investigation is a 3D physical-geological model (PGM) reflecting main geological peculiarities of the area under study. Such a combined study needs in application of a reliable 3D mathematical algorithm of computation together with advanced methodology of 3D modeling. For this analysis the developed GSFC software was selected. The GSFC (Geological Space Field Calculation) program was developed for solving a direct 3-D gravity and magnetic prospecting problem under complex geological conditions (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2004). This program has been designed for computing the field of Δg (Bouguer, free-air or observed value anomalies), ΔZ, ΔX, ΔY , ΔT , as well as second derivatives of the gravitational potential under conditions of rugged relief and inclined magnetization. The geological space can be approximated by (1) three-dimensional, (2) semi-infinite bodies and (3) those infinite along the strike closed, L.H. non-closed, R.H. on-closed and open). Geological bodies are approximated by horizontal polygonal prisms. The program has the following main advantages (besides abovementioned ones): (1) Simultaneous computing of gravity and magnetic fields; (2) Description of the terrain relief by irregularly placed characteristic points; (3) Computation of the effect of the earth-air boundary by the method of selection directly in the process of interpretation; (4

  20. GPU-based, parallel-line, omni-directional integration of measured acceleration field to obtain the 3D pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    A PIV based method to reconstruct the volumetric pressure field by direct integration of the 3D material acceleration directions has been developed. Extending the 2D virtual-boundary omni-directional method (Omni2D, Liu & Katz, 2013), the new 3D parallel-line omni-directional method (Omni3D) integrates the material acceleration along parallel lines aligned in multiple directions. Their angles are set by a spherical virtual grid. The integration is parallelized on a Tesla K40c GPU, which reduced the computing time from three hours to one minute for a single realization. To validate its performance, this method is utilized to calculate the 3D pressure fields in isotropic turbulence and channel flow using the JHU DNS Databases (http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu). Both integration of the DNS acceleration as well as acceleration from synthetic 3D particles are tested. Results are compared to other method, e.g. solution to the Pressure Poisson Equation (e.g. PPE, Ghaemi et al., 2012) with Bernoulli based Dirichlet boundary conditions, and the Omni2D method. The error in Omni3D prediction is uniformly low, and its sensitivity to acceleration errors is local. It agrees with the PPE/Bernoulli prediction away from the Dirichlet boundary. The Omni3D method is also applied to experimental data obtained using tomographic PIV, and results are correlated with deformation of a compliant wall. ONR.

  1. Numerical experimental study on the 3-D flow field around a van with a dome for energy saving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dechang; Du Guangsheng; Wu Jingyi

    2005-01-01

    This work is focused on two ways of studying the reduction of the aerodynamic resistance of a van and the energy saving for a van with a dome. The first approach is the three dimensional (3-D) numerical simulation, and the other is the wind tunnel experiment. The relationship between the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance and the geometric parameters of the dome is obtained. We also analyzed the mechanism by which a dome can reduce the aerodynamic resistance acting on a van. Design for the improvement of a van can benefit from this work. The RNG k-ε turbulence models are adopted in the computation. The momentum method is used to calculate the coefficient of resistance. These have resulted in improvement of the computation accuracy. Flow maps drawn on the basis of the computed results can offer a reliable method to study the flow field around a van. The computed results can give a reference for study of the aerodynamic resistance reduction on a van for energy saving. The maximum decrease of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance is 21.5% after a dome is installed on a van. The experiment also proves that the calculation using RNG k-ε turbulence models is more accurate for such a separated fluid around a van. The error of the calculations using RNG k-ε turbulence models is decreased by 6% compared with that using standard k-ε turbulence models

  2. Finite Element Analysis of a 3D Moving Vacuum Arc for Transverse Magnetic Field Contacts Based on Gundlach's Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Chang-Seob; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Se-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A systematic numerical method for analyzing a 3D moving vacuum arc was proposed and tested in this research by using a transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact. The analysis was carried out by employing the finite element method and the experimental energy equation defined by Gundlach's formula. In the literature, the vacuum interrupter has been widely applied to medium-voltage switching circuits. TMF-type contacts use the Lorentz force density to move a high-temperature arc so as to prevent the contacts from being melted and damaged. The material erosion caused by the arc on the electrode's surface is an important process that results in the interruptive capabilities of these vacuum interrupters. In a classical arc model, to move the vacuum arc, it is required that the magneto-hydrodynamics be analyzed in the arc region at each step. However, with this approach convergence is difficult, resulting in a very time-consuming. Therefore, we propose a new technique to predict the behaviors of vacuum arc between two electrodes. This new approach adopts the experimental arc voltage equation between two electrodes defined by Gundlach's formula. We verify our proposed model by comparing its results with the arcing behaviors obtained from earlier experiments.

  3. A 3D Joint Simulation Platform for Multiband_A Case Study in the Huailai Soybean and Maize Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Qinhuo, L.; Du, Y.; Huang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Canopy radiation and scattering signal contains abundant vegetation information. One can quantitatively retrieve the biophysical parameters by building canopy radiation and scattering models and inverting them. Joint simulation of the 3D models for different spectral (frequency) domains may produce complementary advantages and improves the precision. However, most of the currently models were based on one or two spectral bands (e.g. visible and thermal inferred bands, or visible and microwave bands). This manuscript established a 3D radiation and scattering simulation system which can simulate the BRDF, DBT, and backscattering coefficient based on the same structural description. The system coupled radiosity graphic model, Thermal RGM model and coherent microwave model by Yang Du for VIS/NIR, TIR, and MW, respectively. The models simulating the leaf spectral characteristics, component temperatures and dielectric properties were also coupled into the joint simulation system to convert the various parameters into fewer but more unified parameters. As a demonstration of our system, we applied the established system to simulate a mixed field with soybeans and maize based on the Huailai experiment data in August, 2014. With the help of Xfrog software, we remodeled soybean and maize in ".obj" and ".mtl" format. We extracted the structure information of the soybean and maize by statistics of the ".obj" files. We did simulations on red, NIR, TIR, C and L band. The simulation results were validated by the multi-angular observation data of Huailai experiment. Also, the spacial distribution (horizontal and vertical), leaf area index (LAI), leaf angle distribution (LAD), vegetation water content (VWC) and the incident observation geometry were analyzed in details. Validated by the experiment data, we indicate that the simulations of multiband were quite well. Because the crops were planted in regular rows and the maize and soybeans were with different height, different LAI

  4. An Electric Field Test Using the MRI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiala, P.; Bartušek, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 7 (2008), s. 701-705 ISSN 1931-7360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : MRI * electric field * numerical modeling Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. 3D velocity field characterization of prosthetic heart valve with two different valve testers by means of stereo-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avenio, Giuseppe; Grigioni, Mauro; Daniele, Carla; Morbiducci, Umberto; Hamilton, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valves can be associated to mechanical loading of blood, potentially linked to complications (hemolysis and thrombogenicity) which can be clinically relevant. In order to test such devices in pulsatile mode, pulse duplicators (PDs) have been designed and built according to different concepts. This study was carried out to compare anemometric measurements made on the same prosthetic device, with two widely used PDs. The valve (a 27-mm bileaflet valve) was mounted in the aortic section of the PD. The Sheffield University PD and the RWTH Aachen PD were selected as physical models of the circulation. These two PDs differ mainly in the vertical vs horizontal realization, and in the ventricular section, which in the RWTH PD allows for storage of potential energy in the elastic walls of the ventricle. A glassblown aorta, realized according to the geometric data of the same anatomical district in healthy individuals, was positioned downstream of the valve, obtaining 1:1 geometric similarity conditions. A NaI-glycerol-water solution of suitable kinematic viscosity and, at the same time, the proper refractive index, was selected. The flow field downstream of the valve was measured by means of the stereo-PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique, capable of providing the complete 3D velocity field as well as the entire Reynolds stress tensor. The measurements were carried out at the plane intersecting the valve axis. A three-jet profile was clearly found in the plane crossing the leaflets, with both PDs. The extent of the typical recirculation zone in the Valsalva sinus was much larger in the RWTH PD, on account of the different duration of the swirling motion in the ventricular chamber, caused by the elasticity of the ventricle and its geometry. The comparison of the hemodynamical behaviour of the same bileaflet valve tested in two PDs demonstrated the role of the mock loop in affecting the valve performance.

  6. Electric fields in plasmas under pulsed currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsigutkin, K.; Doron, R.; Stambulchik, E.; Bernshtam, V.; Maron, Y.; Fruchtman, A.; Commisso, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Electric fields in a plasma that conducts a high-current pulse are measured as a function of time and space. The experiment is performed using a coaxial configuration, in which a current rising to 160 kA in 100 ns is conducted through a plasma that prefills the region between two coaxial electrodes. The electric field is determined using laser spectroscopy and line-shape analysis. Plasma doping allows for three-dimensional spatially resolved measurements. The measured peak magnitude and propagation velocity of the electric field is found to match those of the Hall electric field, inferred from the magnetic-field front propagation measured previously

  7. 3D hollow nanostructures as building blocks for multifunctional plasmonics

    KAUST Repository

    De Angelis, Francesco De; Malerba, Mario; Patrini, Maddalena; Miele, Ermanno; Das, Gobind; Toma, Andrea; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    We present an advanced and robust technology to realize 3D hollow plasmonic nanostructures which are tunable in size, shape, and layout. The presented architectures offer new and unconventional properties such as the realization of 3D plasmonic hollow nanocavities with high electric field confinement and enhancement, finely structured extinction profiles, and broad band optical absorption. The 3D nature of the devices can overcome intrinsic difficulties related to conventional architectures in a wide range of multidisciplinary applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. 3D hollow nanostructures as building blocks for multifunctional plasmonics

    KAUST Repository

    De Angelis, Francesco De

    2013-08-14

    We present an advanced and robust technology to realize 3D hollow plasmonic nanostructures which are tunable in size, shape, and layout. The presented architectures offer new and unconventional properties such as the realization of 3D plasmonic hollow nanocavities with high electric field confinement and enhancement, finely structured extinction profiles, and broad band optical absorption. The 3D nature of the devices can overcome intrinsic difficulties related to conventional architectures in a wide range of multidisciplinary applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Electric field control methods for foil coils in high-voltage linear actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van T.A.; Jansen, J.W.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes multiple electric field control methods for foil coils in high-voltage coreless linear actuators. The field control methods are evaluated using 2-D and 3-D boundary element methods. A comparison is presented between the field control methods and their ability to mitigate

  10. Two devices for atmospheric electric field measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombet, Andre; Hubert, Pierre.

    1977-02-01

    Two instruments installed at St Privat d'Allier for electric field measurement in connection with the rocket triggered lighting experiment program are described. The first one is a radioactive probe electrometer used as a warning device. The second is a field mill used for tape recording of electric field variation during the triggering events. Typical examples of such records are given [fr

  11. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fu; S. Huang; M. Zhou; B. Ni; X. Deng

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection). In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg). Once the amplit...

  12. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircrfaft Field Mill Data: Part II: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Mach, D. M.; Christian H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman M. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the Lagrange multiplier method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -1) and a 5 V m(sup -1) error in the mean fair-weather field function, the 3D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair-weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -l), the method retrieves the 3D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair-weather field estimate is typically within 1 V m(sup -1) of the true fair-weather field. Using this type of side constraint and data from fair-weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. Absolute calibration was completed using the pitch down method developed in Part I, and conventional analyses. The resulting calibration matrices were then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably in many respects with results derived from earlier (iterative) techniques of calibration.

  13. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 2; Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, W. J.; Mach, D. M.; Christian, H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory and "pitch down method" developed in Part I of this study are applied to complete the calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m and a 5 V/m error in the mean fair weather field function, the 3-D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m, the method retrieves the 3-D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair weather field estimate is typically within 1 V/m of the true fair weather field. Using this side constraint and data from fair weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. The resulting calibration matrix was then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably with the results obtained from earlier calibration analyses that were based on iterative techniques.

  14. Detailed landfill leachate plume mapping using 2D and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - with correlation to ionic strength measured in screens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurya, P.K.; Rønde, Vinni; Fiandaca, G.

    2017-01-01

    Leaching of organic and inorganic contamination from landfills is a serious environmental problem as surface water and aquifers are affected. In order to assess these risks and investigate the migration of leachate from the landfill, 2D and large scale 3D electrical resistivity tomography were used...... at a heavily contaminated landfill in Grindsted, Denmark. The inverted 2D profiles describe both the variations along the groundwater flow as well as the plume extension across the flow directions. The 3D inversion model shows the variability in the low resistivity anomaly pattern corresponding to differences...... in the ionic strength of the landfill leachate. Chemical data from boreholes agree well with the observations indicating a leachate plume which gradually sinks and increases in size while migrating from the landfill in the groundwater flow direction. Overall results show that the resistivity method has been...

  15. Electric fields in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, V.W.J.H.

    1975-01-01

    F-region drift velocities, measured by incoherent-scatter radar, were analyzed in terms of diurnal, seasonal, magnetic-activity, and solar-cycle effects. A comprehensive electric field model was developed that includes the effects of the E and F-region dynamos, magnetospheric sources, and ionospheric conductivities, for both the local and conjugate regions. The E-region dynamo dominates during the day, but at night the F-region and convection are more important. This model provides much better agreement with observations of the F-region drifts than previous models. Results indicate that larger magnitudes occur at night, and that daily variation is dominated by the diurnal mode. Seasonal variations in conductivities and thermospheric winds indicate a reversal in direction in the early morning during winter from south to northward. On magnetic perturbed days the drifts deviate rather strongly from the quiet days average, especially around 13 L.T. for the northward and 18 L.T. for the westward component

  16. UV cross-linkable graphene/poly(trimethylene carbonate) composites for 3D printing of electrically conductive scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sayyar, S.; Bjorninen, M.; Haimi, Suvi; Miettinen, S.; Gilmore, K.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Wallace, G.

    2016-01-01

    Conductive, flexible graphene/poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) composites were prepared. Addition of just 3 wt % graphene to PTMC oligomers functionalized with methacrylate end-groups followed by UV cross-linking resulted in more than 100% improvement in tensile strength and enhanced electrical

  17. UV Cross-Linkable Graphene/Poly(trimethylene Carbonate) Composites for 3D Printing of Electrically Conductive Scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sayyar, Sepidar; Bjorninen, Miina; Haimi, Suvi; Miettinen, Susanna; Gilmore, Kerry; Grijpma, Dirk; Wallace, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Conductive, flexible graphene/poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) composites were prepared. Addition of just 3 wt graphene to PTMC oligomers functionalized with methacrylate end-groups followed by UV cross-linking resulted in more than 100% improvement in tensile strength and enhanced electrical

  18. Direct current electric potential in an anisotropic half-space with vertical contact containing a conductive 3D body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ping

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed studies of anomalous conductors in otherwise homogeneous media have been modelled. Vertical contacts form common geometries in galvanic studies when describing geological formations with different electrical conductivities on either side. However, previous studies of vertical discontinuities have been mainly concerned with isotropic environments. In this paper, we deal with the effect on the electric potentials, such as mise-à-la-masse anomalies, due to a conductor near a vertical contact between two anisotropic regions. We also demonstrate the interactive effects when the conductive body is placed across the vertical contact. This problem is normally very difficult to solve by the traditional numerical methods. The integral equations for the electric potential in anisotropic half-spaces are established. Green's function is obtained using the reflection and transmission image method in which five images are needed to fit the boundary conditions on the vertical interface and the air-earth surface. The effects of the anisotropy of the environments and the conductive body on the electric potential are illustrated with the aid of several numerical examples.

  19. PIV Validation of 3D Multicomponent Model for Cold Spray Within Nitrogen and Helium Supersonic Flow Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan-Ur-Rab, M.; Zahiri, S. H.; Masood, S. H.; Jahedi, M.; Nagarajah, R.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the validation of a developed three-dimensional multicomponent model for cold spray process using two particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. The k- ɛ type 3D model developed for spherical titanium particles was validated with the measured titanium particle velocity within a nitrogen and helium supersonic jet. The 3D model predicted lower values of particle velocity than the PIV experimental study that used irregularly shaped titanium particles. The results of the 3D model were consistent with the PIV experiment that used spherical titanium powder. The 3D model simulation of particle velocity within the helium and nitrogen jet was coupled with an estimation of titanium particle temperature. This was achieved with the consideration of the fact that cold spray particle temperature is difficult and expensive to measure due to considerably lower temperature of particles than thermal spray. The model predicted an interesting pattern of particle size distribution with respect to the location of impact with a concentration of finer particles close to the jet center. It is believed that the 3D model outcomes for particle velocity, temperature and location could be a useful tool to optimize system design, deposition process and mechanical properties of the additively manufactured cold spray structures.

  20. Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Guignard, Jérémie; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J

    2015-01-01

    Holographic interferometric methods typically require the use of three sensitivity vectors in order to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information. Methods based on multiple directions of illumination have limited applications when studying biological tissues that have temporally varying responses such as the tympanic membrane (TM). Therefore, to measure 3-D displacements in such applications, the measurements along all the sensitivity vectors have to be done simultaneously. We propose a multiple-illumination directions approach to measure 3-D displacements from a single-shot hologram that contains displacement information from three sensitivity vectors. The hologram of an object of interest is simultaneously recorded with three incoherently superimposed pairs of reference and object beams. The incident off-axis angles of the reference beams are adjusted such that the frequency components of the multiplexed hologram are completely separate. Because of the differences in the directions and wavelengths of the reference beams, the positions of each reconstructed image corresponding to each sensitivity vector are different. We implemented a registration algorithm to accurately translate individual components of the hologram into a single global coordinate system to calculate 3-D displacements. The results include magnitudes and phases of 3-D sound-induced motions of a human cadaveric TM at several excitation frequencies showing modal and traveling wave motions on its surface.

  1. 3D ARCHITECTURAL VIDEOMAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Catanese

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D architectural mapping is a video projection technique that can be done with a survey of a chosen building in order to realize a perfect correspondence between its shapes and the images in projection. As a performative kind of audiovisual artifact, the real event of the 3D mapping is a combination of a registered video animation file with a real architecture. This new kind of visual art is becoming very popular and its big audience success testifies new expressive chances in the field of urban design. My case study has been experienced in Pisa for the Luminara feast in 2012.

  2. Herramientas SIG 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Feito Higueruela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Geographical Information Systems on several Archeology fields have been increasing during the last years. Recent avances in these technologies make possible to work with more realistic 3D models. In this paper we introduce a new paradigm for this system, the GIS Thetrahedron, in which we define the fundamental elements of GIS, in order to provide a better understanding of their capabilities. At the same time the basic 3D characteristics of some comercial and open source software are described, as well as the application to some samples on archeological researchs

  3. 3D-QSAR comparative molecular field analysis on opioid receptor antagonists: pooling data from different studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Youyi; Keenan, Susan M; Zhang, Qiang; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Welsh, William J

    2005-03-10

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models were constructed using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) on a series of opioid receptor antagonists. To obtain statistically significant and robust CoMFA models, a sizable data set of naltrindole and naltrexone analogues was assembled by pooling biological and structural data from independent studies. A process of "leave one data set out", similar to the traditional "leave one out" cross-validation procedure employed in partial least squares (PLS) analysis, was utilized to study the feasibility of pooling data in the present case. These studies indicate that our approach yields statistically significant and highly predictive CoMFA models from the pooled data set of delta, mu, and kappa opioid receptor antagonists. All models showed excellent internal predictability and self-consistency: q(2) = 0.69/r(2) = 0.91 (delta), q(2) = 0.67/r(2) = 0.92 (mu), and q(2) = 0.60/r(2) = 0.96 (kappa). The CoMFA models were further validated using two separate test sets: one test set was selected randomly from the pooled data set, while the other test set was retrieved from other published sources. The overall excellent agreement between CoMFA-predicted and experimental binding affinities for a structurally diverse array of ligands across all three opioid receptor subtypes gives testimony to the superb predictive power of these models. CoMFA field analysis demonstrated that the variations in binding affinity of opioid antagonists are dominated by steric rather than electrostatic interactions with the three opioid receptor binding sites. The CoMFA steric-electrostatic contour maps corresponding to the delta, mu, and kappa opioid receptor subtypes reflected the characteristic similarities and differences in the familiar "message-address" concept of opioid receptor ligands. Structural modifications to increase selectivity for the delta over mu and kappa opioid receptors have been predicted on the

  4. Mechano-electric feedback effects in a three-dimensional (3D model of the contracting cardiac ventricle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Amar

    Full Text Available Mechano-electric feedback affects the electrophysiological and mechanical function of the heart and the cellular, tissue, and organ properties. To determine the main factors that contribute to this effect, this study investigated the changes in the action potential characteristics of the ventricle during contraction. A model of stretch-activated channels was incorporated into a three-dimensional multiscale model of the contracting ventricle to assess the effect of different preload lengths on the electrophysiological behavior. The model describes the initiation and propagation of the electrical impulse, as well as the passive (stretch and active (contraction changes in the cardiac mechanics. Simulations were performed to quantify the relationship between the cellular activation and recovery patterns as well as the action potential durations at different preload lengths in normal and heart failure pathological conditions. The simulation results showed that heart failure significantly affected the excitation propagation parameters compared to normal condition. The results showed that the mechano-electrical feedback effects appear to be most important in failing hearts with low ejection fraction.

  5. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3...... important to appreciate the analysis. Before turning to the presentation of preliminary findings and a discussion of 3D digital modelling, it begins, however, with an outline of industry specific ICT strategic issues. Paper type. Multi-site field study...

  6. Radial electric fields for improved tokamak performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downum, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of externally-imposed radial electric fields on the fusion energy output, energy multiplication, and alpha-particle ash build-up in a TFTR-sized, fusing tokamak plasma is explored. In an idealized tokamak plasma, an externally-imposed radial electric field leads to plasma rotation, but no charge current flows across the magnetic fields. However, a realistically-low neutral density profile generates a non-zero cross-field conductivity and the species dependence of this conductivity allows the electric field to selectively alter radial particle transport

  7. Underwater electric field detection system based on weakly electric fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Wang, Tianyu; Wang, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Weakly electric fish sense their surroundings in complete darkness by their active electric field detection system. However, due to the insufficient detection capacity of the electric field, the detection distance is not enough, and the detection accuracy is not high. In this paper, a method of underwater detection based on rotating current field theory is proposed to improve the performance of underwater electric field detection system. First of all, we built underwater detection system based on the theory of the spin current field mathematical model with the help of the results of previous researchers. Then we completed the principle prototype and finished the metal objects in the water environment detection experiments, laid the foundation for the further experiments.

  8. Measurements of the superconducting fluctuations in optimally doped BaFe2−xNixAs2 under high magnetic fields: probing the 3D-anisotropic Ginzburg–Landau approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, R I; Ramos-Álvarez, A; Carballeira, C; Mosqueira, J; Vidal, F; Salem-Sugui, S Jr.; Alvarenga, A D; Zhang, Rui; Luo, Huiqian

    2014-01-01

    The superconducting fluctuations well inside the normal state of Fe-based superconductors were experimentally studied through the in-plane paraconductivity in several high-quality, optimally doped BaFe 2−x Ni x As 2 crystals. These measurements were performed in magnetic fields with amplitudes up to 14 T, and different orientations relative to the c-axis of the crystals (θ=0 ∘ , 53 ∘ , and 90 ∘ ). The results allowed a stringent check of the applicability of a recently proposed Ginzburg–Landau approach for the fluctuating electrical conductivity of three-dimensional (3D) anisotropic materials in the presence of finite applied magnetic fields. (papers)

  9. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value

  10. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  11. Stress field sensitivity analysis within Mesozoic successions in the Swiss Alpine foreland using 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Karsten; Hergert, Tobias; Heidbach, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The in situ stress conditions are of key importance for the evaluation of radioactive waste repositories. In stage two of the Swiss site selection program, the three siting areas of high-level radioactive waste are located in the Alpine foreland in northern Switzerland. The sedimentary succession overlays the basement, consisting of variscan crystalline rocks as well as partly preserved Permo-Carboniferous deposits in graben structures. The Mesozoic sequence represents nearly the complete era and is covered by Cenozoic Molasse deposits as well as Quaternary sediments, mainly in the valleys. The target horizon (designated host rock) is an >100 m thick argillaceous Jurassic deposit (Opalinus Clay). To enlighten the impact of site-specific features on the state of stress within the sedimentary succession, 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models with elasto-plastic rock properties are set up for three potential siting areas. The lateral extent of the models ranges between 12 and 20 km, the vertical extent is up to a depth of 2.5 or 5 km below sea level. The sedimentary sequence plus the basement are separated into 10 to 14 rock mechanical units. The Mesozoic succession is intersected by regional fault zones; two or three of them are present in each model. The numerical problem is solved with the finite element method with a resolution of 100-150 m laterally and 10-30 m vertically. An initial stress state is established for all models taking into account the depth-dependent overconsolidation ratio in Opalinus Clay in northern Switzerland. The influence of topography, rock properties, friction on the faults as well as the impact of tectonic shortening on the state of stress is investigated. The tectonic stress is implemented with lateral displacement boundary conditions, calibrated on stress data that are compiled in Northern Switzerland. The model results indicate that the stress perturbation by the topography is significant to depths greater than the relief contrast. The

  12. 3D Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Interaction Observed in Collocated MODIS and ASTER Images of Cumulus Cloud Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.

    2007-01-01

    3D aerosol-cloud interaction is examined by analyzing two images containing cumulus clouds in biomass burning regions in Brazil. The research consists of two parts. The first part focuses on identifying 3D clo ud impacts on the reflectance of pixel selected for the MODIS aerosol retrieval based purely on observations. The second part of the resea rch combines the observations with radiative transfer computations to identify key parameters in 3D aerosol-cloud interaction. We found that 3D cloud-induced enhancement depends on optical properties of nearb y clouds as well as wavelength. The enhancement is too large to be ig nored. Associated biased error in 1D aerosol optical thickness retrie val ranges from 50% to 140% depending on wavelength and optical prope rties of nearby clouds as well as aerosol optical thickness. We caution the community to be prudent when applying 1D approximations in comp uting solar radiation in dear regions adjacent to clouds or when usin g traditional retrieved aerosol optical thickness in aerosol indirect effect research.

  13. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  14. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2016-01-01

    The technology and techniques for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field may be used for (illuminating) volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology, electric field sensor (e-sensor), and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasistatic generator), and current e-sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-sensor) are discussed. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. This new EFI capability is demonstrated to reveal characterization of electric charge distribution, creating a new field of study that embraces areas of interest including electrostatic discharge mitigation, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, dielectric morphology of structures, inspection of containers, inspection for hidden objects, tether integrity, organic molecular memory, and medical diagnostic and treatment efficacy applications such as cardiac polarization wave propagation and electromyography imaging.

  15. Electric field mapping and auroral Birkeland currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, R.L.; Larson, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic field lines, electric fields and equipotentials have been mapped throughout the magnetosphere in the vicinity of strong Birkeland currents. It was found that a uniform electric field at either the ionospheric or the equatorial end of a field line can map to a highly structured field at the other end if strong Birkeland currents are located nearby. The initiation of sheet currents of the region 1 - region 2 scale size and intensity resulted in magnetic field line displacements of about 1/2 hour in local time between equatorial and ionospheric end points. As a result, a uniform dawn to dusk electric field at the equator mapped to an ionospheric electric field with strong inward pointing components in the dusk hemisphere. Similar distortions were produced by Birkeland currents associated with narrow east-west-aligned auroral arcs. A specific model for the auroral current system, based on ionospheric measurements during a large substorm, was used to study effects seen during disturbed periods. An iterative procedure was developed to generate a self-consistent current system even in the presence of highly twisted field lines. The measured ionospheric electric field was projected tot he equatorial plane in the presence of the model Birkeland current system. Several physical processes were seen to influence ionospheric and equatorial electric fields, and the associated plasma convection, during a substorm

  16. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E. J.; Park, J. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Ahn, J. W.; Berkery, J. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Canik, J. M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenwald, M.; Kim, K.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lore, J. D.; Menard, J. E.; Nazikian, R.; Shafer, M. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Reiman, A. H.; Rice, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sugiyama, L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Volpe, F.; Wang, Z. R.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10 -4 of the main axisymmetric field, such ''3D'' fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data

  17. Self-Sensing of Position-Related Loads in Continuous Carbon Fibers-Embedded 3D-Printed Polymer Structures Using Electrical Resistance Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Congcong; Yao, Xinhua; Shen, Hongyao; Fu, Jianzhong

    2018-03-27

    Condition monitoring in polymer composites and structures based on continuous carbon fibers show overwhelming advantages over other potentially competitive sensing technologies in long-gauge measurements due to their great electromechanical behavior and excellent reinforcement property. Although carbon fibers have been developed as strain- or stress-sensing agents in composite structures through electrical resistance measurements, the electromechanical behavior under flexural loads in terms of different loading positions still lacks adequate research, which is the most common situation in practical applications. This study establishes the relationship between the fractional change in electrical resistance of carbon fibers and the external loads at different loading positions along the fibers' longitudinal direction. An approach for real-time monitoring of flexural loads at different loading positions was presented simultaneously based on this relationship. The effectiveness and feasibility of the approach were verified by experiments on carbon fiber-embedded three-dimensional (3D) printed thermoplastic polymer beam. The error in using the provided approach to monitor the external loads at different loading positions was less than 1.28%. The study fully taps the potential of continuous carbon fibers as long-gauge sensory agents and reinforcement in the 3D-printed polymer structures.

  18. Self-Sensing of Position-Related Loads in Continuous Carbon Fibers-Embedded 3D-Printed Polymer Structures Using Electrical Resistance Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Luan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Condition monitoring in polymer composites and structures based on continuous carbon fibers show overwhelming advantages over other potentially competitive sensing technologies in long-gauge measurements due to their great electromechanical behavior and excellent reinforcement property. Although carbon fibers have been developed as strain- or stress-sensing agents in composite structures through electrical resistance measurements, the electromechanical behavior under flexural loads in terms of different loading positions still lacks adequate research, which is the most common situation in practical applications. This study establishes the relationship between the fractional change in electrical resistance of carbon fibers and the external loads at different loading positions along the fibers’ longitudinal direction. An approach for real-time monitoring of flexural loads at different loading positions was presented simultaneously based on this relationship. The effectiveness and feasibility of the approach were verified by experiments on carbon fiber-embedded three-dimensional (3D printed thermoplastic polymer beam. The error in using the provided approach to monitor the external loads at different loading positions was less than 1.28%. The study fully taps the potential of continuous carbon fibers as long-gauge sensory agents and reinforcement in the 3D-printed polymer structures.

  19. Assessment of the Efficiency of Consolidation Treatment through Injections of Expanding Resins by Geotechnical Tests and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The design and execution of consolidation treatment of settled foundations by means of injection of polyurethane expanding resins require a proper investigation of the state of the foundation soil, in order to better identify anomalies responsible for the instability. To monitor the injection process, a procedure has been developed, which involves, in combination with traditional geotechnical tests, the application of a noninvasive, geophysical technique based on the electrical resistivity, which is strongly sensitive to presence of water or voids. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography is a useful tool to produce effective 3D images of the foundation soils before, during, and after the injections. The achieved information allows designing the consolidation scheme and monitoring its effects on the treated volumes in real time. To better understand the complex processes induced by the treatment and to learn how variations of resistivity accompany increase of stiffness, an experiment was carried out in a full-scale test site. Injections of polyurethane expanding resin were performed as in real worksite conditions. Results confirm that the experimented approach by means of 3D resistivity imaging allows a reliable procedure of consolidation, and geotechnical tests demonstrate the increase of mechanical stiffness. PMID:26167521

  20. Nanomechanical electric and electromagnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datskos, Panagiotis George; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a system for detecting and analyzing at least one of an electric field and an electromagnetic field. The system includes a micro/nanomechanical oscillator which oscillates in the presence of at least one of the electric field and the electromagnetic field. The micro/nanomechanical oscillator includes a dense array of cantilevers mounted to a substrate. A charge localized on a tip of each cantilever interacts with and oscillates in the presence of the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a subsystem for recording the movement of the cantilever to extract information from the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a means of adjusting a stiffness of the cantilever to heterodyne tune an operating frequency of the system over a frequency range.

  1. 3D additive-manufactured nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds: Effect of the application mode of a time-dependent magnetic field on hMSCs behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo D'Amora

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of the application mode of a time-dependent magnetic field on the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs seeded on 3D additive-manufactured poly(ɛ-caprolactone/iron-doped hydroxyapatite (PCL/FeHA nanocomposite scaffolds.

  2. Extra high speed modified Lundell alternator parameters and open/short-circuit characteristics from global 3D-FE magnetic field solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1992-06-01

    The combined magnetic vector potential - magnetic scalar potential method of computation of 3D magnetic fields by finite elements, introduced in a companion paper, is used for global 3D field analysis and machine performance computations under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions for an example 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator, whose magnetic field is of intrinsic 3D nature. The computed voltages and currents under these machine test conditions were verified and found to be in very good agreement with corresponding test data. Results of use of this modelling and computation method in the study of a design alteration example, in which the stator stack length of the example alternator is stretched in order to increase voltage and volt-ampere rating, are given here. These results demonstrate the inadequacy of conventional 2D-based design concepts and the imperative of use of this type of 3D magnetic field modelling in the design and investigation of such machines.

  3. Extra high speed modified Lundell alternator parameters and open/short-circuit characteristics from global 3D-FE magnetic field solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined magnetic vector potential - magnetic scalar potential method of computation of 3D magnetic fields by finite elements, introduced in a companion paper, is used for global 3D field analysis and machine performance computations under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions for an example 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator, whose magnetic field is of intrinsic 3D nature. The computed voltages and currents under these machine test conditions were verified and found to be in very good agreement with corresponding test data. Results of use of this modelling and computation method in the study of a design alteration example, in which the stator stack length of the example alternator is stretched in order to increase voltage and volt-ampere rating, are given here. These results demonstrate the inadequacy of conventional 2D-based design concepts and the imperative of use of this type of 3D magnetic field modelling in the design and investigation of such machines.

  4. 3-D inversion of borehole-to-surface electrical data using a back-propagation neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Trong Long

    2009-08-01

    The "fluid-flow tomography", an advanced technique for geoelectrical survey based on the conventional mise-à-la-masse measurement, has been developed by Exploration Geophysics Laboratory at the Kyushu University. This technique is proposed to monitor fluid-flow behavior during water injection and production in a geothermal field. However data processing of this technique is very costly. In this light, this paper will discuss the solution to cost reduction by applying a neural network in the data processing. A case study in the Takigami geothermal field in Japan will be used to illustrate this. The achieved neural network in this case study is three-layered and feed-forward. The most successful learning algorithm in this network is the Resilient Propagation (RPROP). Consequently, the study advances the pragmatism of the "fluid-flow tomography" technique which can be widely used for geothermal fields. Accuracy of the solution is then verified by using root mean square (RMS) misfit error as an indicator.

  5. DenInv3D: a geophysical software for three-dimensional density inversion of gravity field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Ke, Xiaoping; Wang, Yong

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional density inversion software called DenInv3D that operates on gravity and gravity gradient data. The software performs inversion modelling, kernel function calculation, and inversion calculations using the improved preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm. In the PCG algorithm, due to the uncertainty of empirical parameters, such as the Lagrange multiplier, we use the inflection point of the L-curve as the regularisation parameter. The software can construct unequally spaced grids and perform inversions using such grids, which enables changing the resolution of the inversion results at different depths. Through inversion of airborne gradiometry data on the Australian Kauring test site, we discovered that anomalous blocks of different sizes are present within the study area in addition to the central anomalies. The software of DenInv3D can be downloaded from http://159.226.162.30.

  6. Evaluation of planar 3D electrical capacitance tomography: from single-plane to dual-plane configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Hsin-Yu; Qiu, Chang-Hua; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2015-01-01

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that is sensitive to the dielectric permittivity property of an object. Conventional ECT systems have a circular/cylindrical or rectangular geometry, in which the electrode plates are usually spaced equally around the tank. It is the most common configuration as it can be easily applied to industrial pipelines. However, under some circumstances, the full access to the imaging geometry may not be applicable due to the limitation of the process area. In those cases, and with limited access, planar ECT sensors can fit the process structure if access to only one side is possible. A single-plane ECT configuration has been proposed for such applications. However, the planar array often suffers from a lack of sensitivity and difficulty with depth detection. To better understand these limitations we investigate the imaging performance from the single-plane ECT to dual-plane ECT structure. The limitations and constraints of the planar configuration will also be discussed. Several experiments were conducted using both single-plane and dual-plane configurations to evaluate the potential applications. The initial results are promising, and the quality of the reconstructed images are compared with the real condition for process validation. (paper)

  7. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  8. Berry phases for 3D Hartree-type equations with a quadratic potential and a uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinets, F N; Shapovalov, A V; Trifonov, A Yu

    2007-01-01

    A countable set of asymptotic space-localized solutions is constructed for a 3D Hartree-type equation with a quadratic potential by the complex germ method in the adiabatic approximation. The asymptotic parameter is 1/T, where T >> 1 is the adiabatic evolution time. A generalization of the Berry phase of the linear Schroedinger equation is formulated for the Hartree-type equation. For the solutions constructed, the Berry phases are found in an explicit form

  9. Determination of 3D magnetic reluctivity tensor of soft magnetic composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Youguang; Zhu Jianguo; Lin Zhiwei; Zhong Jinjiang; Lu Haiyan; Wang Shuhong

    2007-01-01

    Soft magnetic composite (SMC) materials are especially suitable for construction of electrical machines with complex structures and three-dimensional (3D) magnetic fluxes. In the design and optimization of such 3D flux machines, the 3D vector magnetic properties of magnetic materials should be properly determined, modeled, and applied for accurate calculation of the magnetic field distribution, parameters, and performance. This paper presents the measurement of 3D vector magnetic properties and determination of 3D reluctivity tensor of SMC. The reluctivity tensor is a key factor for accurate numerical analysis of magnetic field in a 3D flux SMC motor

  10. Optimization of Pockels electric field in transverse modulated optical voltage sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yifan; Xu, Qifeng; Chen, Kun-Long; Zhou, Jie

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the possibilities of optimizing the Pockels electric field in a transverse modulated optical voltage sensor with a spherical electrode structure. The simulations show that due to the edge effect and the electric field concentrations and distortions, the electric field distributions in the crystal are non-uniform. In this case, a tiny variation in the light path leads to an integral error of more than 0.5%. Moreover, a 2D model cannot effectively represent the edge effect, so a 3D model is employed to optimize the electric field distributions. Furthermore, a new method to attach a quartz crystal to the electro-optic crystal along the electric field direction is proposed to improve the non-uniformity of the electric field. The integral error is reduced therefore from 0.5% to 0.015% and less. The proposed method is simple, practical and effective, and it has been validated by numerical simulations and experimental tests.

  11. ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS ELECTRIC AND GASOLINE-POWERED VEHICLES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, Richard A; Kavet, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Measurements were conducted to investigate electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) from 120 Hz to 10 kHz and 1.2 to 100 kHz in 9 electric or hybrid vehicles and 4 gasoline vehicles, all while being driven. The range of fields in the electric vehicles enclosed the range observed in the gasoline vehicles. Mean magnetic fields ranged from nominally 0.6 to 3.5 µT for electric/hybrids depending on the measurement band compared with nominally 0.4 to 0.6 µT for gasoline vehicles. Mean values of electric fields ranged from nominally 2 to 3 V m -1 for electric/hybrid vehicles depending on the band, compared with 0.9 to 3 V m -1 for gasoline vehicles. In all cases, the fields were well within published exposure limits for the general population. The measurements were performed with Narda model EHP-50C/EHP-50D EMF analysers that revealed the presence of spurious signals in the EHP-50C unit, which were resolved with the EHP-50D model. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Functional electrical stimulation mediated by iterative learning control and 3D robotics reduces motor impairment in chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meadmore Katie L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel stroke rehabilitation techniques that employ electrical stimulation (ES and robotic technologies are effective in reducing upper limb impairments. ES is most effective when it is applied to support the patients’ voluntary effort; however, current systems fail to fully exploit this connection. This study builds on previous work using advanced ES controllers, and aims to investigate the feasibility of Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning (SAIL, a novel upper limb stroke rehabilitation system which utilises robotic support, ES, and voluntary effort. Methods Five hemiparetic, chronic stroke participants with impaired upper limb function attended 18, 1 hour intervention sessions. Participants completed virtual reality tracking tasks whereby they moved their impaired arm to follow a slowly moving sphere along a specified trajectory. To do this, the participants’ arm was supported by a robot. ES, mediated by advanced iterative learning control (ILC algorithms, was applied to the triceps and anterior deltoid muscles. Each movement was repeated 6 times and ILC adjusted the amount of stimulation applied on each trial to improve accuracy and maximise voluntary effort. Participants completed clinical assessments (Fugl-Meyer, Action Research Arm Test at baseline and post-intervention, as well as unassisted tracking tasks at the beginning and end of each intervention session. Data were analysed using t-tests and linear regression. Results From baseline to post-intervention, Fugl-Meyer scores improved, assisted and unassisted tracking performance improved, and the amount of ES required to assist tracking reduced. Conclusions The concept of minimising support from ES using ILC algorithms was demonstrated. The positive results are promising with respect to reducing upper limb impairments following stroke, however, a larger study is required to confirm this.

  13. ESTIMATING ELECTRIC FIELDS FROM VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM SEQUENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G. H.; Welsch, B. T.; Abbett, W. P.; Bercik, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the electric field distribution on the Sun's photosphere is essential for quantitative studies of how energy flows from the Sun's photosphere, through the corona, and into the heliosphere. This electric field also provides valuable input for data-driven models of the solar atmosphere and the Sun-Earth system. We show how observed vector magnetogram time series can be used to estimate the photospheric electric field. Our method uses a 'poloidal-toroidal decomposition' (PTD) of the time derivative of the vector magnetic field. These solutions provide an electric field whose curl obeys all three components of Faraday's Law. The PTD solutions are not unique; the gradient of a scalar potential can be added to the PTD electric field without affecting consistency with Faraday's Law. We then present an iterative technique to determine a potential function consistent with ideal MHD evolution; but this field is also not a unique solution to Faraday's Law. Finally, we explore a variational approach that minimizes an energy functional to determine a unique electric field, a generalization of Longcope's 'Minimum Energy Fit'. The PTD technique, the iterative technique, and the variational technique are used to estimate electric fields from a pair of synthetic vector magnetograms taken from an MHD simulation; and these fields are compared with the simulation's known electric fields. The PTD and iteration techniques compare favorably to results from existing velocity inversion techniques. These three techniques are then applied to a pair of vector magnetograms of solar active region NOAA AR8210, to demonstrate the methods with real data. Careful examination of the results from all three methods indicates that evolution of the magnetic vector by itself does not provide enough information to determine the true electric field in the photosphere. Either more information from other measurements, or physical constraints other than those considered here are necessary to find

  14. Vacuum instability in a random electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krive, I.V.; Pastur, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of the vacuum on an intense spatially homogeneous random electric field is investigated. It is shown that a stochastic electric field always causes a breakdown of the boson vacuum, and the number of pairs of particles which are created by the electric field increases exponentially in time. For the choice of potential field in the form of a dichotomic random process we find in explicit form the dependence of the average number of pairs of particles on the time of the action of the source of the stochastic field. For the fermion vacuum the average number of pairs of particles which are created by the field in the lowest order of perturbation theory in the amplitude of the random field is independent of time

  15. Moderate and high intensity pulsed electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Timmermans, Rian Adriana Hendrika

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) processing has gained a lot of interest the last decades as mild processing technology as alternative to thermal pasteurisation, and is suitable for preservation of liquid food products such as fruit juices. PEF conditions typically applied at industrial scale for pasteurisation are high intensity pulsed electric fields aiming for minimal heat load, with an electric field strength (E) in the range of 15 − 20 kV/cm and pulse width (τ) between 2 − 20 μs. Alternativel...

  16. Numerical Study of Electric Field Enhanced Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2016-12-26

    Electric fields can be used to change and control flame properties, for example changing flame speed, enhancing flame stability, or reducing pollutant emission. The ions generated in flames are believed to play the primary role. Although experiments have been carried out to study electric field enhanced combustion, they are not sufficient to explain how the ions in a flame are affected by an electric field. It is therefore necessary to investigate the problem through numerical simulations. In the present work, the electric structure of stabilized CH4/air premixed flames at atmospheric pressure within a direct current field is studied using numerical simulations. This study consists of three parts. First, the transport equations are derived from the Boltzmann kinetic equation for each individual species. Second, a general method for computing the diffusivity and mobility of ions in a gas mixture is introduced. Third, the mechanisms for neutral and charged species are improved to give better predictions of the concentrations of charged species, based on experimental data. Following from this, comprehensive numerical results are presented, including the concentrations and fluxes of charged species, the distributions of the electric field and electric potential, and the electric current-voltage relation. Two new concepts introduced with the numerical results are the plasma sheath and dead zone in the premixed flame. A reactive plasma sheath and a Boltzmann relation sheath are discovered in the region near the electrodes. The plasma sheath penetrates into the flame gas when a voltage is applied, and penetrating further if the voltage is higher. The zone outside the region of sheath penetration is defined as the dead zone. With the two concepts, analytical solutions for the electric field, electric potential and current-voltage curve are derived. The solutions directly describe the electric structure of a premixed flame subject to a DC field. These analytical solutions

  17. Shallow Off-Shore Archaeological Prospection with 3-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography: The Case of Olous (Modern Elounda, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleanthis Simyrdanis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that nowadays as well as in the past the vast majority of human habitation and activities are mainly concentrated in littoral areas. Thus the increased attention to coastal zone management contributed to the development and implementation of shallow-water mapping approaches for capturing current environmental conditions. During the last decade, geophysical imaging techniques like electrical resistivity tomography (ERT have been used in mapping onshore buried antiquities in a non-destructive manner, contributing to cultural heritage management. Despite its increased implementation in mapping on-shore buried archaeological remains, ERT has minimal to non-existent employment for the understanding of the past dynamics in littoral and shallow off-shore marine environments. This work presents the results of an extensive ERT survey in investigating part of the Hellenistic to Byzantine submerged archaeological site of Olous, located on the north-eastern coast of Crete, Greece. A marine area of 7100 m2 was covered with 178 densely spaced ERT lines having a cumulative length of 8.3 km. A combination of submerged static and moving survey modes were used to document potential buried and submerged structures. The acquired data from the marine environment were processed with two-dimensional and three-dimensional inversion algorithms. A real time kinematic global navigation satellite system was used to map the visible submerged walls and compile the bathymetry model of the bay. The adaptation of ERT in reconstructing the underwater archaeological remains in a shallow marine environment presented specific methodological and processing challenges. The in situ experience from the archaeological site of Olous showed that ERT provided a robust method for mapping the submerged archaeological structures related to the ancient built environment (walls, buildings, roads, signifying at the same time the vertical stratigraphy of the submerged sediments

  18. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  19. 3D Modelling and monitoring of denervated muscle under Functional Electrical Stimulation treatment and associated bone structural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical rehabilitation method for patients who have permanent and non recoverable muscle denervation in the legs was developed in the frame of the European Project RISE. The technique is based on FES and the project results shows, in these severely disabled patients, restoration of muscle tissue and function. This study propose novel methods based on image processing technique and medical modelling to monitor growth in denervated muscle treated with FES. Geometrical and structural changes in muscle and bone are studied and modelled. Secondary effects on the bone mineral density produced by the stimulation treatment and due the elicited muscle contraction are also investigated. The restoration process in DDM is an important object of discussion since there isn’t yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms regulating growth in denervated muscle. This study approaches the problem from a macroscopic point of view, developing 3-dimensional models of the whole stimulated muscles and following changes in volume, geometry and density very accurately. The method is based on the acquisition of high resolution Spiral CT scans from patients who have long-term flaccid paraplegia and the use of special image processing tools allowing tissue discriminations and muscle segmentation. Three patients were measured at different points of time during 4 years of electrical stimulation treatment. In this study is quantitatively demonstrated the influences of FES treatment on the different quadriceps bellies. The rectus femoris muscle is positioned in the middle of the quadriceps and responds (in general better to stimulation. In a patient with abundant adipose tissue surrounding the quadriceps, rectus femoris almost doubled the volume during the FES treatment while in the other bellies the changes measured were minimal. The analysis of the density shows clearly a restoration of the muscular structure in the growing muscle. The remarkable increase of

  20. Analysis of Surface Electric Field Measurements from an Array of Electric Field Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, G.; Thayer, J. P.; Deierling, W.

    2016-12-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has operated an distributed array of over 30 electric field mills over the past 18 years, providing a unique data set of surface electric field measurements over a very long timespan. In addition to the electric field instruments there are many meteorological towers around KSC that monitor the local meteorological conditions. Utilizing these datasets we have investigated and found unique spatial and temporal signatures in the electric field data that are attributed to local meteorological effects and the global electric circuit. The local and global scale influences on the atmospheric electric field will be discussed including the generation of space charge from the ocean surf, local cloud cover, and a local enhancement in the electric field that is seen at sunrise.

  1. Electropumping of water with rotating electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; De Luca, Sergio; Todd, Billy

    2013-01-01

    exploiting the coupling of spin angular momentum to linear streaming momentum. A spatially uniform rotating electric field is applied to water molecules, which couples to their permanent electric dipole moments. The resulting molecular rotational momentum is converted into linear streaming momentum...

  2. Erythrocytes in alternating electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morariu, V.V.; Chifu, A.; Simplaceanu, T.; Frangopol, P.T.

    1983-02-01

    The elastic and inelastic deformation of erythrocytes induced by alternating fields and the suggestion that moderate field intensities (1.2 kV/cm) when continuously applied can cause lysis by a different mechanism compared to the action of short intense field pulses is presented. The different experimental conditions can be used to approach various properties of the membrane such as those related to the dielectric polarization of the membrane or to the interfacial polarization, leading to the inelastic deformation of the cells. (authors)

  3. 3D IBFV : Hardware-Accelerated 3D Flow Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D flow visualization problem in a

  4. 3D IBFV : hardware-accelerated 3D flow visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, A.C.; Wijk, van J.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique presented by van Wijk (2001) for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D

  5. Axial Field Electric Motor and Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cho, Chahee P

    2007-01-01

    .... A hybrid field, brushless, permanent magnet electric motor utilizing a rotor with two sets of permanent magnets oriented such that the flux produced by the two sets of magnets is perpendicular to each...

  6. Inductive electric field at the magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkila, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The electric field data for two crossings of the magnetopause by ISEE-1 on November 20, 1977, have been analyzed with high time resolution. In both cases the electric field has a negative dawn-dusk component in the boundary layer, so it must reverse somewhere within the current layer to the positive value outside. If there is a component parallel to the moving magnetopause current it is small, and by no means obvious. In the case of the exit crossing from the boundary layer to the magnetosheath the data show that the electric field vector is turning for about two seconds at roughly the satellite spin rate; this changing direction suggests that the electric field has a curl. Such a curl could be caused by a travelling localized perturbation of the magnetopause surface current associated with impulsive plasma transport through the magnetopause

  7. Numerical Study of Electric Field Enhanced Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Electric fields can be used to change and control flame properties, for example changing flame speed, enhancing flame stability, or reducing pollutant emission. The ions generated in flames are believed to play the primary role. Although experiments

  8. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  9. Particle creation in colour-electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjorn, J.; Hughes, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the Yang-Mills vacuum in a uniform colour-electric field is calculated using the method of Bogoliubov transformations. The result does not agree with that obtained by summation of the corresponding perturbation series. (orig.)

  10. 3D slicing of radiogenic heat production in Bahariya Formation, Tut oil field, North-Western Desert, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A

    2013-03-01

    A 3D block of radiogenic heat production was constructed from the subsurface total gamma ray logs of Bahariya Formation, Western Desert, Egypt. The studied rocks possess a range of radiogenic heat production varying from 0.21 μWm(-3) to 2.2 μWm(-3). Sandstone rocks of Bahariya Formation have higher radiogenic heat production than the average for crustal sedimentary rocks. The high values of density log of Bahariya Formation indicate the presence of iron oxides which contribute the uranium radioactive ores that increase the radiogenic heat production of these rocks. The average radiogenic heat production produced from the study area is calculated as 6.3 kW. The histogram and cumulative frequency analyses illustrate that the range from 0.8 to 1.2 μWm(-3) is about 45.3% of radiogenic heat production values. The 3D slicing of the reservoir shows that the southeastern and northeastern parts of the study area have higher radiogenic heat production than other parts. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diffraction-amalgamated grain boundary tracking for mapping 3D crystallographic orientation and strain fields during plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Kamiko, Takanobu; Tanabe, Yasuto; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Leclere, D.J.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Hirayama, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    By amalgamating the X-ray diffraction technique with the grain boundary tracking technique, a novel method, diffraction-amalgamated grain boundary tracking (DAGT), has been developed. DAGT is a non-destructive in-situ analysis technique for characterising bulk materials, which can be applied up to near the point of fracture. It provides information about local crystal orientations and detailed grain morphologies in three dimensions, together with high-density strain mapping inside grains. As it obtains the grain morphologies by utilising X-ray imaging instead of X-ray diffraction, which latter is typically vulnerable to plastic deformation, DAGT is a fairly robust technique for analysing plastically deforming materials. Texture evolution and localised deformation behaviours have here been successfully characterised in Al–Cu alloys, during tensile deformation of 27% in applied strain. The characteristic rotation behaviours of grains were identified, and attributed to the effects of interaction with adjacent grains on the basis of the 3D local orientation and plastic strain distributions. It has also been revealed that 3D strain distribution in grains is highly heterogeneous, which is not explained by known mechanisms such as simple incompatibility with adjacent grains or strain percolation through soft grains. It has been clarified that groups consisting of a few adjacent grains may deform coordinately, especially in shear and lateral deformation, and the characteristic deformation pattern is thereby formed on a mesoscopic scale.

  12. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New method for rotation molecular spectra in high electric fields. • Parametric resonances – new features in spectra. • New elementary excitations in polar solids from dipolar interaction (“dipolons”). • Discussion about a possible origin of the ferroelectricity from dipolar interactions. - Abstract: Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called “dipolons”); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  13. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Dynamic Applications: 2017 Research Award Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2017-01-01

    The technology and methods for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field may be used for illuminating volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology (e-Sensor) and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasi-static generator), and current e- Sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-Sensor) are discussed. Critical design elements of current linear and real-time two-dimensional (2D) measurement systems are highlighted, and the development of a three dimensional (3D) EFI system is presented. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. Recent work demonstrates that phonons may be used to create and annihilate electric dipoles within structures. Phonon induced dipoles are ephemeral and their polarization, strength, and location may be quantitatively characterized by EFI providing a new subsurface Phonon-EFI imaging technology. Initial results from real-time imaging of combustion and ion flow, and their measurement complications, will be discussed. These new EFI capabilities are demonstrated to characterize electric charge distribution creating a new field of study embracing areas of interest including electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, combustion science, on-orbit space potential, container inspection, remote characterization of electronic circuits and level of activation, dielectric morphology of structures, tether integrity, organic molecular memory, atmospheric science, and medical diagnostic and treatment efficacy applications such as cardiac polarization wave propagation and electromyography imaging.

  14. Myoelectric intuitive control and transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the forearm for vibrotactile sensation feedback applied to a 3D printed prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, Enrique I; Pino, Esteban J; Aqueveque, Pablo E

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development of a myoelectric prosthetic hand based on a 3D printed model. A myoelectric control strategy based on artificial neural networks is implemented on a microcontroller for online position estimation. Position estimation performance achieves a correlation index of 0.78. Also a study involving transcutaneous electrical stimulation was performed to provide tactile feedback. A series of stimulations with controlled parameters were tested on five able-body subjects. A single channel stimulator was used, positioning the electrodes 8 cm on the wrist over the ulnar and median nerve. Controlling stimulation parameters such as intensity, frequency and pulse width, the subjects were capable of distinguishing different sensations over the palm of the hand. Three main sensations where achieved: tickling, pressure and pain. Tickling and pressure were discretized into low, moderate and high according to the magnitude of the feeling. The parameters at which each sensation was obtained are further discussed in this paper.

  15. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  16. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal

  17. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  18. Soil process-oriented modelling of within-field variability based on high-resolution 3D soil type distribution maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönecke, Eric; Lück, Erika; Gründling, Ralf; Rühlmann, Jörg; Franko, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Today, the knowledge of within-field variability is essential for numerous purposes, including practical issues, such as precision and sustainable soil management. Therefore, process-oriented soil models have been applied for a considerable time to answer question of spatial soil nutrient and water dynamics, although, they can only be as consistent as their variation and resolution of soil input data. Traditional approaches, describe distribution of soil types, soil texture or other soil properties for greater soil units through generalised point information, e.g. from classical soil survey maps. Those simplifications are known to be afflicted with large uncertainties. Varying soil, crop or yield conditions are detected even within such homogenised soil units. However, recent advances of non-invasive soil survey and on-the-go monitoring techniques, made it possible to obtain vertical and horizontal dense information (3D) about various soil properties, particularly soil texture distribution which serves as an essential soil key variable affecting various other soil properties. Thus, in this study we based our simulations on detailed 3D soil type distribution (STD) maps (4x4 m) to adjacently built-up sufficient informative soil profiles including various soil physical and chemical properties. Our estimates of spatial STD are based on high-resolution lateral and vertical changes of electrical resistivity (ER), detected by a relatively new multi-sensor on-the-go ER monitoring device. We performed an algorithm including fuzzy-c-mean (FCM) logic and traditional soil classification to estimate STD from those inverted and layer-wise available ER data. STD is then used as key input parameter for our carbon, nitrogen and water transport model. We identified Pedological horizon depths and inferred hydrological soil variables (field capacity, permanent wilting point) from pedotransferfunctions (PTF) for each horizon. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon

  19. Midday reversal of equatorial ionospheric electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Rastogi

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the geomagnetic and ionospheric data at equatorial and low-latitude stations in India over the 20 year period 1956–1975 is described. The reversal of the electric field in the ionosphere over the magnetic equator during the midday hours indicated by the disappearance of the equatorial sporadic E region echoes on the ionograms is a rare phenomenon occurring on about 1% of time. Most of these events are associated with geomagnetically active periods. By comparing the simultaneous geomagnetic H field at Kodaikanal and at Alibag during the geomagnetic storms it is shown that ring current decreases are observed at both stations. However, an additional westward electric field is superimposed in the ionosphere during the main phase of the storm which can be strong enough to temporarily reverse the normally eastward electric field in the dayside ionosphere. It is suggested that these electric fields associated with the V×Bz electric fields originate at the magnetopause due to the interaction of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field.

  20. Magnetospheric electric fields and auroral oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Harri; Pedersen, Arne; Craven, John D.; Frank, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    DC electric field variations in a synchronous orbit (GEOS 2) during four substorms in the time sector 19 to 01 LT were investigated. Simultaneously, the imaging photometer on board DE 1 provided auroral images that are also utilized. Substorm onset is defined here as a sudden appearance of large electric fields. During the growth phase, the orientation of the electric field begins to oscillate some 30 min prior to onset. About 10 min before the onset GEOS 2 starts moving into a more tenuous plasma, probably due to a thinning of the current sheet. The onset is followed by a period of 10 to 15 min during which large electric fields occur. This interval can be divided into two intervals. During the first interval, which lasts 4 to 8 min, very large fields of 8 to 20 mV/m are observed, while the second interval contains relatively large fields (2 to 5 mV/m). A few min after the onset, the spacecraft returns to a plasma region of higher electron fluxes which are usually larger than before substorm. Some 30 min after onset, enhanced activity, lasting about 10 min, appears in the electric field. One of the events selected offers a good opportunity to study the formation and development of the Westward Traveling Surge (WST). During the traversal of the leading edge of the WTS (approximately 8 min) a stable wave mode at 5.7 mHz is detected.

  1. Midday reversal of equatorial ionospheric electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Rastogi

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the geomagnetic and ionospheric data at equatorial and low-latitude stations in India over the 20 year period 1956–1975 is described. The reversal of the electric field in the ionosphere over the magnetic equator during the midday hours indicated by the disappearance of the equatorial sporadic E region echoes on the ionograms is a rare phenomenon occurring on about 1% of time. Most of these events are associated with geomagnetically active periods. By comparing the simultaneous geomagnetic H field at Kodaikanal and at Alibag during the geomagnetic storms it is shown that ring current decreases are observed at both stations. However, an additional westward electric field is superimposed in the ionosphere during the main phase of the storm which can be strong enough to temporarily reverse the normally eastward electric field in the dayside ionosphere. It is suggested that these electric fields associated with the V×Bz electric fields originate at the magnetopause due to the interaction of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field.

  2. Electrically induced magnetic fields; a consistent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batell, Brian; Ferstl, Andrew

    2003-09-01

    Electromagnetic radiation exists because changing magnetic fields induce changing electric fields and vice versa. This fact often appears inconsistent with the way some physics textbooks solve particular problems using Faraday's law. These types of problems often ask students to find the induced electric field given a current that does not vary linearly with time. A typical example involves a long solenoid carrying a sinusoidal current. This problem is usually solved as an example or assigned as a homework exercise. The solution offered by many textbooks uses the approximation that the induced, changing electric field produces a negligible magnetic field, which is only valid at low frequencies. If this approximation is not explicitly acknowledged, then the solution appears inconsistent with the description of electromagnetic radiation. In other cases, when the problem is solved without this approximation, the electric and magnetic fields are derived from the vector potential. We present a detailed calculation of the electric and magnetic fields inside and outside the long solenoid without using the vector potential. We then offer a comparison of our solution and a solution given in an introductory textbook.

  3. 3D false color computed tomography for diagnosis and follow-up of permanent denervated human muscles submitted to home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Carraro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This report outlines the use of a customized false-color 3D computed tomography (CT protocol for the imaging of the rectus femoris of spinal cord injury (SCI patients suffering from complete and permanent denervation, as characterized by complete Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome. This muscle imaging method elicits the progression of the syndrome from initial atrophy to eventual degeneration, as well as the extent to which patients' quadriceps could be recovered during four years of home-based functional electrical stimulation (h-b FES. Patients were pre-selected from several European hospitals and functionally tested by, and enrolled in the EU Commission Shared Cost Project RISE (Contract n. QLG5-CT-2001-02191 at the Department of Physical Medicine, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Denervated muscles were electrically stimulated using a custom-designed stimulator, large surface electrodes, and customized progressive stimulation settings. Spiral CT images and specialized computational tools were used to isolate the rectus femoris muscle and produce 3D and 2D reconstructions of the denervated muscles. The cross sections of the muscles were determined by 2D Color CT, while muscle volumes were reconstructed by 3D Color CT. Shape, volume, and density changes were measured over the entirety of each rectus femoris muscle. Changes in tissue composition within the muscle were visualized by associating different colors to specified Hounsfield unit (HU values for fat, (yellow: [-200; -10], loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, (cyan: [-9; 40], and normal muscle, fascia and tendons included, (red: [41; 200]. The results from this analysis are presented as the average HU values within the rectus femoris muscle reconstruction, as well as the percentage of these tissues with respect to the total muscle volume. Results from this study demonstrate that h-b FES induces a compliance-dependent recovery of muscle volume and size of muscle fibers, as

  4. 3D False Color Computed Tomography for Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Permanent Denervated Human Muscles Submitted to Home-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Ugo; Edmunds, Kyle J; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    This report outlines the use of a customized false-color 3D computed tomography (CT) protocol for the imaging of the rectus femoris of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients suffering from complete and permanent denervation, as characterized by complete Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome. This muscle imaging method elicits the progression of the syndrome from initial atrophy to eventual degeneration, as well as the extent to which patients' quadriceps could be recovered during four years of home-based functional electrical stimulation (h-b FES). Patients were pre-selected from several European hospitals and functionally tested by, and enrolled in the EU Commission Shared Cost Project RISE (Contract n. QLG5-CT-2001-02191) at the Department of Physical Medicine, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Denervated muscles were electrically stimulated using a custom-designed stimulator, large surface electrodes, and customized progressive stimulation settings. Spiral CT images and specialized computational tools were used to isolate the rectus femoris muscle and produce 3D and 2D reconstructions of the denervated muscles. The cross sections of the muscles were determined by 2D Color CT, while muscle volumes were reconstructed by 3D Color CT. Shape, volume, and density changes were measured over the entirety of each rectus femoris muscle. Changes in tissue composition within the muscle were visualized by associating different colors to specified Hounsfield unit (HU) values for fat, (yellow: [-200; -10]), loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, (cyan: [-9; 40]), and normal muscle, fascia and tendons included, (red: [41; 200]). The results from this analysis are presented as the average HU values within the rectus femoris muscle reconstruction, as well as the percentage of these tissues with respect to the total muscle volume. Results from this study demonstrate that h-b FES induces a compliance-dependent recovery of muscle volume and size of muscle fibers, as evidenced by the

  5. The Polarization Signature of Photospheric Magnetic Fields in 3D MHD Simulations and Observations at Disk Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, C. [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Fabbian, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensytemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rezaei, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea S/N, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Puschmann, K. G., E-mail: cbeck@nso.edu [Alzenau (Germany)

    2017-06-10

    Before using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of the solar photosphere in the determination of elemental abundances, one has to ensure that the correct amount of magnetic flux is present in the simulations. The presence of magnetic flux modifies the thermal structure of the solar photosphere, which affects abundance determinations and the solar spectral irradiance. The amount of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere also constrains any possible heating in the outer solar atmosphere through magnetic reconnection. We compare the polarization signals in disk-center observations of the solar photosphere in quiet-Sun regions with those in Stokes spectra computed on the basis of 3D MHD simulations having average magnetic flux densities of about 20, 56, 112, and 224 G. This approach allows us to find the simulation run that best matches the observations. The observations were taken with the Hinode SpectroPolarimeter (SP), the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP), the Polarimetric Littrow Spectrograph (POLIS), and the GREGOR Fabry–Pèrot Interferometer (GFPI), respectively. We determine characteristic quantities of full Stokes profiles in a few photospheric spectral lines in the visible (630 nm) and near-infrared (1083 and 1565 nm). We find that the appearance of abnormal granulation in intensity maps of degraded simulations can be traced back to an initially regular granulation pattern with numerous bright points in the intergranular lanes before the spatial degradation. The linear polarization signals in the simulations are almost exclusively related to canopies of strong magnetic flux concentrations and not to transient events of magnetic flux emergence. We find that the average vertical magnetic flux density in the simulation should be less than 50 G to reproduce the observed polarization signals in the quiet-Sun internetwork. A value of about 35 G gives the best match across the SP, TIP, POLIS, and GFPI observations.

  6. 3D slicing of radiogenic heat production in Bahariya Formation, Tut oil field, North-Western Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Alfy, I.M.; Nabih, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D block of radiogenic heat production was constructed from the subsurface total gamma ray logs of Bahariya Formation, Western Desert, Egypt. The studied rocks possess a range of radiogenic heat production varying from 0.21 μWm −3 to 2.2 μWm −3 . Sandstone rocks of Bahariya Formation have higher radiogenic heat production than the average for crustal sedimentary rocks. The high values of density log of Bahariya Formation indicate the presence of iron oxides which contribute the uranium radioactive ores that increase the radiogenic heat production of these rocks. The average radiogenic heat production produced from the study area is calculated as 6.3 kW. The histogram and cumulative frequency analyses illustrate that the range from 0.8 to 1.2 μWm −3 is about 45.3% of radiogenic heat production values. The 3D slicing of the reservoir shows that the southeastern and northeastern parts of the study area have higher radiogenic heat production than other parts. - Highlights: ► Radiogenic heat production ranging from 0.21 to 2.25 μWm −3 averaging about 0.95 μWm −3 . ► High Stdev. 0.3 μWm −3 indicates a heterogenic distribution of (RHP) values. ► Statistically, the range from 0.8 to 1.2 μWm −3 is about 45.3 % of the values. ► A renew RHP which can be produced from the study area are calculated as 6.3 kW

  7. Detection of electric field around field-reversed configuration plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeyama, Taeko; Hiroi, Masanori; Nogi, Yasuyuki; Ohkuma, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    Electric-field probes consisting of copper plates are developed to measure electric fields in a vacuum region around a plasma. The probes detect oscillating electric fields with a maximum strength of approximately 100 V/m through a discharge. Reproducible signals from the probes are obtained with an unstable phase dominated by a rotational instability. It is found that the azimuthal structure of the electric field can be explained by the sum of an n=2 mode charge distribution and a convex-surface electron distribution on the deformed separatrix at the unstable phase. The former distribution agrees with that anticipated from the diamagnetic drift motions of plasma when the rotational instability occurs. The latter distribution suggests that an electron-rich plasma covers the separatrix.

  8. Hofstadter spectrum in electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunold, Alejandro; Torres, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The problem of Bloch electrons in two dimensions subjected to magnetic and intense electric fields is investigated. Magnetic translations, electric evolution, and energy translation operators are used to specify the solutions of the Schroedinger equation. For rational values of the magnetic flux quanta per unit cell and commensurate orientations of the electric field relative to the original lattice, an extended superlattice can be defined and a complete set of mutually commuting space-time symmetry operators is obtained. Dynamics of the system is governed by a finite difference equation that exactly includes the effects of: an arbitrary periodic potential, an electric field orientated in a commensurable direction of the lattice, and coupling between Landau levels. A weak periodic potential broadens each Landau level in a series of minibands, separated by the corresponding minigaps. The addition of the electric field induces a series of avoided and exact crossing of the quasienergies, for sufficiently strong electric field the spectrum evolves into equally spaced discreet levels, in this 'magnetic Stark ladder' the energy separation is an integer multiple of hE/aB, with a the lattice parameter

  9. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  10. The crossover from mean-field to 3D-Ising critical behaviour in a 3-component microemulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seto, H.; Schwahn, D.; Yokoi, E.

    1995-01-01

    Density fluctuations and associated critical phenomena of water droplets in a water-in-oil microemulsion system have been studied, We have recently found a mean-field behavior in the ''near-critical region'', and this evidence suggested that a crossover from mean-field to non-mean-field behavior...

  11. 3D Seismic Reflection Amplitude and Instantaneous Frequency Attributes in Mapping Thin Hydrocarbon Reservoir Lithofacies: Morrison NE Field and Morrison Field, Clark County, KS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Totten, Matthew; Vohs, Andrew; Linares, Aria

    2017-12-01

    Thin hydrocarbon reservoir facies pose resolution challenges and waveform-signature opportunities in seismic reservoir characterization and prospect identification. In this study, we present a case study, where instantaneous frequency variation in response to a thin hydrocarbon pay zone is analyzed and integrated with other independent information to explain drilling results and optimize future drilling decisions. In Morrison NE Field, some wells with poor economics have resulted from well-placement incognizant of reservoir heterogeneities. The study area in Clark County, Kanas, USA, has been covered by a surface 3D seismic reflection survey in 2010. The target horizon is the Viola limestone, which continues to produce from 7 of the 12 wells drilled within the survey area. Seismic attributes extraction and analyses were conducted with emphasis on instantaneous attributes and amplitude anomalies to better understand and predict reservoir heterogeneities and their control on hydrocarbon entrapment settings. We have identified a higher instantaneous frequency, lower amplitude seismic facies that is in good agreement with distinct lithofacies that exhibit better (higher porosity) reservoir properties, as inferred from well-log analysis and petrographic inspection of well cuttings. This study presents a pre-drilling, data-driven approach of identifying sub-resolution reservoir seismic facies in a carbonate formation. This workflow will assist in placing new development wells in other locations within the area. Our low amplitude high instantaneous frequency seismic reservoir facies have been corroborated by findings based on well logs, petrographic analysis data, and drilling results.

  12. Forward modelling of global gravity fields with 3D density structures and an application to the high-resolution ( 2 km) gravity fields of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šprlák, M.; Han, S.-C.; Featherstone, W. E.

    2017-12-01

    Rigorous modelling of the spherical gravitational potential spectra from the volumetric density and geometry of an attracting body is discussed. Firstly, we derive mathematical formulas for the spatial analysis of spherical harmonic coefficients. Secondly, we present a numerically efficient algorithm for rigorous forward modelling. We consider the finite-amplitude topographic modelling methods as special cases, with additional postulates on the volumetric density and geometry. Thirdly, we implement our algorithm in the form of computer programs and test their correctness with respect to the finite-amplitude topography routines. For this purpose, synthetic and realistic numerical experiments, applied to the gravitational field and geometry of the Moon, are performed. We also investigate the optimal choice of input parameters for the finite-amplitude modelling methods. Fourth, we exploit the rigorous forward modelling for the determination of the spherical gravitational potential spectra inferred by lunar crustal models with uniform, laterally variable, radially variable, and spatially (3D) variable bulk density. Also, we analyse these four different crustal models in terms of their spectral characteristics and band-limited radial gravitation. We demonstrate applicability of the rigorous forward modelling using currently available computational resources up to degree and order 2519 of the spherical harmonic expansion, which corresponds to a resolution of 2.2 km on the surface of the Moon. Computer codes, a user manual and scripts developed for the purposes of this study are publicly available to potential users.

  13. 3D printed e-tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, Gabriel; da Silva, Tatiana A.; Gaál, Vladimir; Hensel, Rafael C.; Amaral, Lucas R.; Rodrigues, Varlei; Riul, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Nowadays, one of the biggest issues addressed to electronic sensor fabrication is the build-up of efficient electrodes as an alternative way to the expensive, complex and multistage processes required by traditional techniques. Printed electronics arises as an interesting alternative to fulfill this task due to the simplicity and speed to stamp electrodes on various surfaces. Within this context, the Fused Deposition Modeling 3D printing is an emerging, cost-effective and alternative technology to fabricate complex structures that potentiates several fields with more creative ideas and new materials for a rapid prototyping of devices. We show here the fabrication of interdigitated electrodes using a standard home-made CoreXY 3D printer using transparent and graphene-based PLA filaments. Macro 3D printed electrodes were easily assembled within 6 minutes with outstanding reproducibility. The electrodes were also functionalized with different nanostructured thin films via dip-coating Layer-by-Layer technique to develop a 3D printed e-tongue setup. As a proof of concept, the printed e-tongue was applied to soil analysis. A control soil sample was enriched with several macro-nutrients to the plants (N, P, K, S, Mg and Ca) and the discrimination was done by electrical impedance spectroscopy of water solution of the soil samples. The data was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis and the 3D printed sensor distinguished clearly all enriched samples despite the complexity of the soil chemical composition. The 3D printed e-tongue successfully used in soil analysis encourages further investments in developing new sensory tools for precision agriculture and other fields exploiting the simplicity and flexibility offered by the 3D printing techniques.

  14. Linking the X3D Pathway to Integral Field Spectrographs: YSNR 1E 0102.2-7219 in the SMC as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Dopita, Michael A.; Ruiter, Ashley J.

    2017-05-01

    The concept of the x3d pathway was introduced by Vogt et al. as a new approach to sharing and publishing three-dimensional structures interactively in online scientific journals. The core characteristics of the x3d pathway are that: (1) it does not rely on specific software, but rather a file format (x3d), (2) it can be implemented using fully open-source tools, and (3) article readers can access the interactive models using most main stream web browsers without the need for any additional plugins. In this article, we further demonstrate the potential of the x3d pathway to visualize data sets from optical integral field spectrographs. We use recent observations of the oxygen-rich young supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud to implement additional x3dom tools & techniques and expand the range of interactions that can be offered to article readers. In particular, we present a set of javascript functions allowing the creation and interactive handling of clip planes, effectively allowing users to take measurements of distances and angles directly from the interactive model itself.

  15. A 3D-structural model of unsulfated chondroitin from high-field NMR: 4-sulfation has little effect on backbone conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattelle, Benedict M.; Shakeri, Javad; Roberts, Ian S.; Almond, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate is essential in human health and disease but exactly how sulfation dictates its 3D-strucutre at the atomic level is unclear. To address this, we have purified homogenous oligosaccharides of unsulfated chondroitin (with and without 15N-enrichment) and analysed them by high-field NMR to make a comparison published chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan 3D-structures. The result is the first full assignment of the tetrasaccharide and an experimental 3D-model of the hexasaccharide (PDB code 2KQO). In common with hyaluronan, we confirm that the amide proton is not involved in strong, persistent inter-residue hydrogen bonds. However, in contrast to hyaluronan, a hydrogen bond is not inferred between the hexosamine OH-4 and the glucuronic acid O5 atoms across the β(1→3) glycosidic linkage. The unsulfated chondroitin bond geometry differs slightly from hyaluronan by rotation about the β(1→3) ψ dihedral (as previously predicted by simulation), while the β(1→4) linkage is unaffected. Furthermore, comparison shows that this glycosidic linkage geometry is similar in chondroitin-4-sulfate. We therefore hypothesise that both hexosamine OH-4 and OH-6 atoms are solvent exposed in chondroitin, explaining why it is amenable to sulfation and hyaluronan is not, and also that 4-sulfation has little effect on backbone conformation. Our conclusions exemplify the value of the 3D-model presented here and progress our understanding of glycosaminoglycan molecular properties. PMID:20022001

  16. In situ electron holography of electric potentials inside a solid-state electrolyte: Effect of electric-field leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizawa, Yuka; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Sato, Takeshi [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan); Murata, Hidekazu [Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 468-8502 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryuji; Fisher, Craig A.J. [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan); Kato, Takehisa; Iriyama, Yasutoshi [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Hirayama, Tsukasa, E-mail: t-hirayama@jfcc.or.jp [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    In situ electron holography is used to observe changes of electric-potential distributions in an amorphous lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) solid-state electrolyte when different voltages are applied. 2D phase images are simulated by integrating the 3D potential distribution along the electron trajectory through a thin Cu/LiPON/Cu region. Good agreement between experimental and simulated phase distributions is obtained when the influence of the external electric field is taken into account using the 3D boundary-charge method. Based on the precise potential changes, the lithium-ion and lithium-vacancy distributions inside the LiPON layer and electric double layers (EDLs) are inferred. The gradients of the phase drops at the interfaces in relation to EDL widths are discussed. - Highlights: • Solid-state electrolyte LiPON has been observed by in situ electron holography. • Observed phase distributions are compared with those simulated numerically. • 3D electric fields around the specimen are taken into account in the simulation. • Electric-potential distributions inside LiPON have been obtained. • The lithium-ion and lithium-vacancy distributions inside the LiPON are inferred.

  17. Positrons trapped in polyethylene: Electric field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolaccini, M.; Bisi, A.; Gambarini, G.; Zappa, L.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity of the iot 2 -component of positrons annihilated in polyethylene is found to increase with increasing electric field, while the formation probability of the positron state responsible for this component remains independent of the field. (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  18. Electric arc behaviour in dynamic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put'ko, V.F.

    2000-01-01

    The behaviour of an electric arc in different time-dependent (dynamic) magnetic fields was investigated. New possibilities were found for spatial and energy stabilisation of a discharge, for intensifying heat exchange, extending the electric arc and distributed control of electric arc plasma. Rotating, alternating and travelling magnetic fields were studied. It was found that under the effect of a relatively low frequency of variations of dynamic magnetic fields (f 1000 Hz) the arc stabilised at the axis of the discharge chamber, the pulsation level decreased and discharge stability increased. The borders between these two arc existence modes were formed by a certain critical field variation frequency the period of which was determined by the heat relaxation time of the discharge. (author)

  19. Model to Test Electric Field Comparisons in a Composite Fairing Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Burford, Janessa

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. This work is an extension of the bare aluminum fairing perfect electric conductor (PEC) model. Test and model data correlation is shown.

  20. Experimental Investigation of 3-D flow fields around the mouth of the Dwarf Seahorse during attacks on planktonic prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad; Buskey, Edward; Sheng, Jian

    2009-11-01

    Copepods are an important planktonic food source for fish species. High predation has led to the development of effective escape responses with short reaction times (less than 2 ms), maximum escape velocities of over 500 body lengths per second and shear sensitivity as low as 1.5s-1. Using high speed digital holography (2 kfps), we measure 3-D distributions of velocity generated by a dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) during attacks on its copepod prey, Acartia tonsa. It is found that successful attacks often produce smaller or even no detectable hydrodynamic disturbances around the strike zone, when compared to unsuccessful attempts. In this paper, we will provide quantitative characterization of this ``low-flow'' zone. Further, to elucidate the role of a possible geometrical advantage of the seahorse's head in minimizing its bow wave, high-speed time resolved PIV measurements are conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. On-going analysis will provide insights and implications in understanding the dynamics of flows around the stagnation point at high Reynolds number flow. Sponsored by NSF.

  1. Hybrid micro-/nano-particle image velocimetry for 3D3C multi-scale velocity field measurement in microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Young Uk; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2011-01-01

    The conventional two-dimensional (2D) micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique has inherent bias error due to the depth of focus along the optical axis to measure the velocity field near the wall of a microfluidics device. However, the far-field measurement of velocity vectors yields good accuracy for micro-scale flows. Nano-PIV using the evanescent wave of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy can measure near-field velocity vectors within a distance of around 200 nm from the solid surface. A micro-/nano-hybrid PIV system is proposed to measure both near- and far-field velocity vectors simultaneously in microfluidics. A near-field particle image can be obtained by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy using nanoparticles, and the far-field velocity vectors are measured by three-hole defocusing micro-particle tracking velocimetry (micro-PTV) using micro-particles. In order to identify near- and far-field particle images, lasers of different wavelengths are adopted and tested in a straight microchannel for acquiring the three-dimensional three-component velocity field. We found that the new technique gives superior accuracy for the velocity profile near the wall compared to that of conventional nano-PIV. This method has been successfully applied to precisely measure wall shear stress in 2D microscale Poiseulle flows

  2. GPU-accelerated 3D phase-field simulations of dendrite competitive growth during directional solidification of binary alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, S; Takaki, T; Ohno, M; Shimokawabe, T; Aoki, T

    2015-01-01

    Phase-field method has emerged as the most powerful numerical scheme to simulate dendrite growth. However, most phase-field simulations of dendrite growth performed so far are limited to two-dimension or single dendrite in three-dimension because of the large computational cost involved. To express actual solidification microstructures, multiple dendrites with different preferred growth directions should be computed at the same time. In this study, in order to enable large-scale phase-field dendrite growth simulations, we developed a phase-field code using multiple graphics processing units in which a quantitative phase-field method for binary alloy solidification and moving frame algorithm for directional solidification were employed. First, we performed strong and weak scaling tests for the developed parallel code. Then, dendrite competitive growth simulations in three-dimensional binary alloy bicrystal were performed and the dendrite interactions in three-dimensional space were investigated. (paper)

  3. Application of high-precision 3D seismic technology to shale gas exploration: A case study of the large Jiaoshiba shale gas field in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuqing Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation pattern of the marine shale gas in South China is different from that in North America. The former has generally thin reservoirs and complex preservation conditions, so it is difficult to make a fine description of the structural features of shale formations and to reflect accurately the distribution pattern of high-quality shale by using the conventional 2D and 3D seismic exploration technology, which has an adverse effect on the successful deployment of horizontal wells. In view of this, high-precision 3D seismic prospecting focusing on lithological survey was implemented to make an accurate description of the distribution of shale gas sweet spots so that commercial shale gas production can be obtained. Therefore, due to the complex seismic geological condition of Jiaoshiba area in Fuling, SE Sichuan Basin, the observation system of high-precision 3D seismic acquisition should have such features as wide-azimuth angles, small trace intervals, high folds, uniform vertical and horizontal coverage and long spread to meet the needs of the shale gas exploration in terms of structural interpretation, lithological interpretation and fracture prediction. Based on this idea, the first implemented high-precision 3D seismic exploration project in Jiaoshiba area played an important role in the discovery of the large Jiaoshiba shale gas field. Considering that the high-quality marine shale in the Sichuan Basin shows the characteristics of multi-layer development from the Silurian system to the Cambrian system, the strategy of shale gas stereoscopic exploration should be implemented to fully obtain the oil and gas information of the shallow, medium and deep strata from the high-precision 3D seismic data, and ultimately to expand the prospecting achievements in an all-round way to balance the high upstream exploration cost, and to continue to push the efficient shale gas exploration and development process in China.

  4. X-Ray diffraction on rare earth-3d Laves phase compound ErCo2 in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagasaki, Katsuma; Notsu, Shiko; Takaesu, Yoshinao; Nakama, Takao; Sakai, Eijiro; Koyama, Keiichi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Burkov, Alexander T.

    2006-01-01

    X-Ray powder diffraction method is used to investigate the effect of magnetic ordering and external magnetic field on crystal structure of Laves phase intermetallic compound ErCo 2 . The diffraction patterns were recorded at temperatures from 300K down to 8.5K in magnetic field up to 5T. Distortion of the room-temperature cubic structure was found in magnetically ordered state below 32K. The symmetry at low temperature is rhombohedral in agreement with literature results, or lower symmetry than it. However the symmetry of the unit cell increases to cubic in external magnetic field of 5T

  5. The order parameter and susceptibility of the 3D Ising-like system in an external field near the phase transition point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Kozlovskii

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to the investigation of the 3D Ising-like model in the presence of an external field in the vicinity of critical point. The method of collective variables is used. General expressions for the order parameter and susceptibility are calculated as functions of temperature and the external field as well as scaling functions of that are explicitly obtained. The results are compared with the ones obtained within the framework of parametric representation of the equation of state and Monte Carlo simulations. New expression for the exit point from critical regime of the order parameter fluctuations is proposed and used for the calculation.

  6. Trans-Hudsonian far-field deformation effects in the Rae foreland: An integrated geological-3D magnetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, J. A.; Tschirhart, V.

    2017-03-01

    The intracratonic Rae cover sequence, deposited ca. 2.2-1.9 Ga, forms a useful marker for unravelling tectonic events that affected the Archean Rae Province at ca.2.0, 1.9 and 1.85 Ga. Polyphase deformation is recognized within the Rae cover rocks, including the 70 × 10 km Montresor belt, and attributed to distal effects of the ca. 1.85 Ga Trans-Hudson orogeny. In this contribution we explore the 3D geometry and structural history of the Montresor belt, previously considered to be a simple syncline lying unconformably on Archean basement. New geological, geophysical and geochronological results define a more complex history in which lower Montresor units were thrust-imbricated with basement gneisses and metamorphosed to the amphibolite facies. Mid-to upper greenschist facies upper Montresor units, exposed in an open synform, are superficially less deformed. However, using high-resolution aeromagnetic data and distinct magnetic marker units considered proxies for bedding, we constructed a set of forward models to explore the three-dimensional geometry of the belt. The re-analysis outlines a set of pre-synform structures defined by low-angle truncations of the magnetic markers. Geometric relationships indicate the presence of at least three faults at low angles to bedding, interpreted as D1 piggy-back thrusts, and bracketed by available geochronology between 1.924 and 1.87 Ga. D1 strain in the upper Montresor strata is significantly less intense than that further south in Rae cover rocks, consistent with a more distal foreland setting during the Trans-Hudson orogeny. The Montresor belt preserves a record of the Trans-Hudson tectonic style at relatively shallow crustal levels as a result of its foreland setting and structural history including a syn-orogenic extensional detachment event.

  7. Breaking the Crowther limit: Combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ercius, Peter [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jiang, Yi [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Elser, Veit [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability. - Highlights: • Develop tomography technique for high-resolution and large field of view. • We combine depth sectioning with traditional tilt tomography. • Through-focal tomography reduces tilts and improves resolution. • Through-focal tomography overcomes the fundamental Crowther limit. • Aberration-corrected becomes a benefit and not a hindrance for tomography.

  8. Three-dimensional scanning near field optical microscopy (3D-SNOM) imaging of random arrays of copper nanoparticles: implications for plasmonic solar cell enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezugwu, Sabastine; Ye, Hanyang; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2015-01-07

    In order to investigate the suitability of random arrays of nanoparticles for plasmonic enhancement in the visible-near infrared range, we introduced three-dimensional scanning near-field optical microscopy (3D-SNOM) imaging as a useful technique to probe the intensity of near-field radiation scattered by random systems of nanoparticles at heights up to several hundred nm from their surface. We demonstrated our technique using random arrays of copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) at different particle diameter and concentration. Bright regions in the 3D-SNOM images, corresponding to constructive interference of forward-scattered plasmonic waves, were obtained at heights Δz ≥ 220 nm from the surface for random arrays of Cu-NPs of ∼ 60-100 nm in diameter. These heights are too large to use Cu-NPs in contact of the active layer for light harvesting in thin organic solar cells, which are typically no thicker than 200 nm. Using a 200 nm transparent spacer between the system of Cu-NPs and the solar cell active layer, we demonstrate that forward-scattered light can be conveyed in 200 nm thin film solar cells. This architecture increases the solar cell photoconversion efficiency by a factor of 3. Our 3D-SNOM technique is general enough to be suitable for a large number of other applications in nanoplasmonics.

  9. L2F and LDV velocimetry measurement and analysis of the 3-D flow field in a centrifugal compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, John R., Jr.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1989-01-01

    The flow field in the Purdue Research Centrifugal Compressor is studied using a laser two-focus (L2F) velocimeter. L2F data are obtained which quantify: (1) the compressor inlet flow field; (2) the steady-state velocity field in the impeller blade passages; and (3) the flow field in the radial diffuser. The L2F data are compared with both laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and predictions from three-dimensional inviscid and viscous flow models. In addition, a model is developed to calculate the effect on the measurement volume geometry of refraction by curved windows. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of using the L2F for turbomachinery measurements is discussed in terms of measurement accuracy, ease of use, including sample time per correlated event and the ability to make measurements in regions of high noise due to stray radiation from wall reflections.

  10. Quasi-Static Electric Field Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A generator for producing an electric field for with an inspection technology system is provided. The generator provides the required variable magnitude quasi-static electric fields for the "illumination" of objects, areas and volumes to be inspected by the system, and produces human-safe electric fields that are only visible to the system. The generator includes a casing, a driven, non-conducting and triboelectrically neutral rotation shaft mounted therein, an ungrounded electrostatic dipole element which works in the quasi-static range, and a non-conducting support for mounting the dipole element to the shaft. The dipole element has a wireless motor system and a charging system which are wholly contained within the dipole element and the support that uses an electrostatic approach to charge the dipole element.

  11. Digital Geology from field to 3D modelling and Google Earth virtual environment: methods and goals from the Furlo Gorge (Northern Apennines - Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Donatis, Mauro; Susini, Sara

    2014-05-01

    A new map of the Furlo Gorge was surveyed and elaborated in a digital way. In every step of work we used digital tools as mobile GIS and 3D modelling software. Phase 1st Starting in the lab, planning the field project development, base cartography, forms and data base were designed in the way we thought was the best for collecting and store data in order of producing a digital n­-dimensional map. Bedding attitudes, outcrops sketches and description, stratigraphic logs, structural features and other informations were collected and organised in a structured database using rugged tablet PC, GPS receiver, digital cameras and later also an Android smartphone with some survey apps in-­house developed. A new mobile GIS (BeeGIS) was developed starting from an open source GIS (uDig): a number of tools like GPS connection, pen drawing annotations, geonotes, fieldbook, photo synchronization and geotagging were originally designed. Phase 2nd After some month of digital field work, all the informations were elaborated for drawing a geologic map in GIS environment. For that we use both commercial (ArcGIS) and open source (gvSig, QGIS, uDig) without big technical problems. Phase 3rd When we get to the step of building a 3D model (using 3DMove), passing trough the assisted drawing of cross-­sections (2DMove), we discovered a number of problems in the interpretation of geological structures (thrusts, normal faults) and more in the interpretation of stratigraphic thickness and boundaries and their relationships with topography. Phase 4th Before an "on­-armchair" redrawing of map, we decide to go back to the field and check directly what was wrong. Two main vantages came from this: (1) the mistakes we found could be reinterpreted and corrected directly in the field having all digital tools we need; (2) previous interpretations could be stored in GIS layers keeping memory of the previous work (also mistakes). Phase 5th A 3D model built with 3D Move is already almost self

  12. Temperature/electric field scaling in Ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaji, Abdelowahed; Guyomar, Daniel; Pruvost, Sebastien; Touhtouh, Samira; Yuse, Kaori; Boughaleb, Yahia

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the field amplitude (E) and temperature on the polarization and their scaling relations were investigated on rhombohedral PMN-xPT ceramics. The scaling law was based on the physical symmetries of the problem and rendered it possible to express the temperature variation (Δθ) as an electric field equivalent ΔE eq =(α+2βxP(E,θ 0 ))xΔθ. Consequently, this was also the case for the relationship between the entropy (Γ) and polarization (P). Rhombohedral Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 ) 0.75 Ti 0.25 O 3 ceramics were used for the verification. It was found that such an approach permitted the prediction of the maximal working temperature, using only purely electrical measurements. It indicates that the working temperature should not exceed 333 K. This value corresponds to the temperature maximum before the dramatic decrease of piezoelectric properties. Reciprocally, the polarization behavior under electrical field can be predicted, using only purely thermal measurements. The scaling law enabled a prediction of the piezoelectric properties (for example, d 31 ) under an electrical field replacing the temperature variation (Δθ) by ΔE/(α+2βxp(E,θ 0 )). Inversely, predictions of the piezoelectric properties (d 31 ) as a function of temperature were permitted using purely only electrical measurements.

  13. Temperature/electric field scaling in Ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajjaji, Abdelowahed, E-mail: Hajjaji12@gmail.co [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Guyomar, Daniel; Pruvost, Sebastien [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Touhtouh, Samira [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, LPMC, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, 24000 El-Jadida, Maroc (Morocco); Yuse, Kaori [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Boughaleb, Yahia [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, LPMC, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, 24000 El-Jadida, Maroc (Morocco)

    2010-07-01

    The effects of the field amplitude (E) and temperature on the polarization and their scaling relations were investigated on rhombohedral PMN-xPT ceramics. The scaling law was based on the physical symmetries of the problem and rendered it possible to express the temperature variation ({Delta}{theta}) as an electric field equivalent {Delta}E{sub eq}=({alpha}+2{beta}xP(E,{theta}{sub 0}))x{Delta}{theta}. Consequently, this was also the case for the relationship between the entropy ({Gamma}) and polarization (P). Rhombohedral Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3}){sub 0.75}Ti{sub 0.25}O{sub 3} ceramics were used for the verification. It was found that such an approach permitted the prediction of the maximal working temperature, using only purely electrical measurements. It indicates that the working temperature should not exceed 333 K. This value corresponds to the temperature maximum before the dramatic decrease of piezoelectric properties. Reciprocally, the polarization behavior under electrical field can be predicted, using only purely thermal measurements. The scaling law enabled a prediction of the piezoelectric properties (for example, d{sub 31}) under an electrical field replacing the temperature variation ({Delta}{theta}) by {Delta}E/({alpha}+2{beta}xp(E,{theta}{sub 0})). Inversely, predictions of the piezoelectric properties (d{sub 31}) as a function of temperature were permitted using purely only electrical measurements.

  14. The use of a relaxation method to calculate the 3D magnetic field contribution of an iron yoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-07-01

    A computational procedure has been developed for calculating the three-dimensional field produced by an axisymmetric iron yoke of high permeability in the presence of a system of conductors. The procedure is particularly applicable to the end regions of multipole magnets of the sort used in particle accelerators. The field produced by the conductors is calculated using the Biot-Savart law. We speak of the field contribution of the yoke as an ''image field'' although it is associated with a distinctly diffuse distribution of image currents or magnetic moments. At every point on the boundary of the yoke the total scalar potential is constant, so V i = -V d where i=image and d=direct contribution from the conductors. If we describe both potentials as a series of ''harmonic components'' with respect to azimuthal dependence, then the nature of the boundary condition is such that a de-coupling of one harmonic component from another is preserved and therefore it is also true that V i (n)=-V d (n) at the iron interface, where n is a harmonic number. If we solve the appropriate individual differential equations for the scalar potential functions V i (n) throughout the iron-free region, with the proper applied boundary condition for the scalar potential of each harmonic number, we shall achieve upon summation the appropriate potential function to describe the field contribution of the surrounding high-permeability iron. 2 refs., 3 figs

  15. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  16. 3D magneto-convective heat transfer in CNT-nanofluid filled cavity under partially active magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Kolsi, Lioua; Oztop, Hakan F.; Aydi, Abdelkarim; Malekshah, Emad Hasani; Abu-Hamdeh, Nidal; Borjini, Mohamed Naceur

    2018-05-01

    A computational study has been performed to investigate the effects of partially active magnetic field on natural convection heat transfer in CNT-nanofluid filled and three-dimensional differentially heated closed space. Two cases are considered to see this effect as magnetic field is applied to upper half (Case I) and lower half (Case II) while remaining walls are insulated. The finite volume method is used to solve governing equations and results are obtained for different governing parameters as Hartmann number (0 ≤ Ha ≤ 100), nanoparticle volume fraction (0 ≤ φ ≤ 0.05) and height of the active zone (0 ≤ LB ≤ 1). It is found that location of magnetic field plays an important role even at the same Hartmann number. Thus, it can be a good parameter to control heat and fluid flow inside the closed space.

  17. In-Plane Magnetic Field Effect on the Transport Properties in a Quasi-3D Quantum Well Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.; Clark, R.; Lumpkin, N.; O'Brien, J.; Reno, J.; Simmons, J.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, B.

    1999-01-01

    The transport properties of a quasi-three-dimensional, 200 layer quantum well structure are investigated at integer filling in the quantum Hall state. We find that the transverse magnetoresistance R xx , the Hall resistance R xy , and the vertical resistance R zz all follow a similar behavior with both temperature and in-plane magnetic field. A general feature of the influence of increasing in-plane field B in is that the Hall conductance quantization first improves, but above a characteristic value B C in , the quantization is systematically removed. We consider the interplay of the chid edge state transport and the bulk (quantum Hall) transport properties. This mechanism may arise from the competition of the cyclotron energy with the superlattice band structure energies. A comparison of the resuIts with existing theories of the chiral edge state transport with in-plane field is also discussed

  18. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  19. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D fields from its value in a finite number of points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dari, E.A.; Venere, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes a method for the visualization of two- and three-dimensional fields, given its value in a finite number of points. These data can be originated in experimental measurements, numerical results, or any other source. For the field interpolation, the space is divided into simplices (triangles or tetrahedrons), using the Watson algorithm to obtain the Delaunay triangulation. Inside each simplex, linear interpolation is assumed. The visualization is accomplished by means of Finite Elements post-processors, capable of handling unstructured meshes, which were also developed by the authors. (Author) [es

  20. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, Timothy W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allured, Bradley [UNIV NEVADA, RENO; Carpenter, Michael A [CAMBRIDGE UNIV. UK

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  1. Parallel electric fields from ionospheric winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The possible production of electric fields parallel to the magnetic field by dynamo winds in the E region is examined, using a jet stream wind model. Current return paths through the F region above the stream are examined as well as return paths through the conjugate ionosphere. The Wulf geometry with horizontal winds moving in opposite directions one above the other is also examined. Parallel electric fields are found to depend strongly on the width of current sheets at the edges of the jet stream. If these are narrow enough, appreciable parallel electric fields are produced. These appear to be sufficient to heat the electrons which reduces the conductivity and produces further increases in parallel electric fields and temperatures. Calculations indicate that high enough temperatures for optical emission can be produced in less than 0.3 s. Some properties of auroras that might be produced by dynamo winds are examined; one property is a time delay in brightening at higher and lower altitudes

  2. Electric field stimulated growth of Zn whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, D.; McCulloch, J.; Warrell, G. R.; Irving, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the impact of strong (˜104 V/cm) electric fields on the development of Zn whiskers. The original samples, with considerable whisker infestation were cut from Zn-coated steel floors and then exposed to electric fields stresses for 10-20 hours at room temperature. We used various electric field sources, from charges accumulated in samples irradiated by: (1) the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), (2) the electron beam of a medical linear accelerator, and (3) the ion beam of a linear accelerator; we also used (4) the electric field produced by a Van der Graaf generator. In all cases, the exposed samples exhibited a considerable (tens of percent) increase in whiskers concentration compared to the control sample. The acceleration factor defined as the ratio of the measured whisker growth rate over that in zero field, was estimated to approach several hundred. The statistics of lengths of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution known previously for metal whiskers. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  3. Electric field stimulated growth of Zn whiskers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niraula, D.; McCulloch, J.; Irving, R.; Karpov, V. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Warrell, G. R.; Shvydka, Diana, E-mail: diana.shvydka@utoledo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toledo Health Science Campus, Toledo, Ohio 43614 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    We have investigated the impact of strong (∼10{sup 4} V/cm) electric fields on the development of Zn whiskers. The original samples, with considerable whisker infestation were cut from Zn-coated steel floors and then exposed to electric fields stresses for 10-20 hours at room temperature. We used various electric field sources, from charges accumulated in samples irradiated by: (1) the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), (2) the electron beam of a medical linear accelerator, and (3) the ion beam of a linear accelerator; we also used (4) the electric field produced by a Van der Graaf generator. In all cases, the exposed samples exhibited a considerable (tens of percent) increase in whiskers concentration compared to the control sample. The acceleration factor defined as the ratio of the measured whisker growth rate over that in zero field, was estimated to approach several hundred. The statistics of lengths of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution known previously for metal whiskers. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  4. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. 3D dynamic displacement-field measurement for structural health monitoring using inexpensive RGB-D based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbarr, Mohamed; Chen, Yulu Luke; Jahanshahi, Mohammad R.; Masri, Sami F.; Shen, Wei-Men; Qidwai, Uvais A.

    2017-12-01

    The advent of inexpensive digital cameras with depth sensing capabilities (RGB-D cameras) has opened the door to numerous useful applications that need quantitative measures of dynamic fields whose simultaneous time history quantification (at many points as dictated by the resolution of the camera) provides capabilities that were previously accessible only through expensive sensors (e.g., laser scanners). This paper presents a comprehensive experimental and computational study to evaluate the performance envelope of a representative RGB-D sensor (the first generation of Kinect sensor) with the aim of assessing its suitability for the class of problems encountered in the structural dynamics field, where reasonably accurate information of evolving displacement fields (as opposed to few discrete locations) that have simultaneous dynamic planar translational motion with significant rotational (torsional) components. This study investigated the influence of key system parameters of concern in selecting an appropriate sensor for such structural dynamic applications, such as amplitude range, spectral content of the dynamic displacements, location and orientation of sensors relative to target structure, fusing of measurements from multiple sensors, sensor noise effects, rolling-shutter effects, etc. The calibration results show that if the observed displacement field generates discrete (pixel) sensor measurements with sufficient resolution (observed displacements more than 10 mm) beyond the sensor noise floor, then the subject sensors can typically provide reasonable accuracy for transnational motion (about 5%) when the frequency range of the evolving field is within about 10 Hz. However, the expected error for torsional measurements is around 6% for static motion and 10% for dynamic rotation for measurements greater than 5°.

  6. Particle creation by peak electric field

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