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Sample records for elderly care unit

  1. Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Morten; Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.......The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care....

  2. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. St Joseph's Hospital in Comox, BC. One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients' hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P TCU costs per patient were lower ($155/d postintervention period vs $273/d preintervention period). Elderly ALC patients experienced improvements in health and function at reduced cost after the creation of an interdisciplinary TCU, to which most of the nonpalliative ALC patients were transferred. Although all the postintervention ALC patients (those admitted to the TCU and those who received SC) were analyzed together, it is very likely that the greatest gains were made in the ALC patients who received care in the TCU. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  3. Nursing Professional’s Working Load Given To The Elderly At The Intensive Unit Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline de Lima Alves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The natural aging process accelerate the appearance and the installation of diseases and symptoms characteristic of the age in which the physical and cognitive aspects are compromised progressively. Increasing the necessity of specialized cares and intensive accompaniment. This study aimed to evaluate through the Nursing Activities Score appliance, the nursing team’s working load, destined to elderly people assisted at intensive unit care and subsidize the personal sizing according to what advocate the legislation. It is about a descriptive and documental study of quantitative approach. It was used as data basis 50 patient records of elderly users admitted at a public intensive unit care from João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. It was determined that 56% (28 of the elderly in his first hospitalization day at the Intensive Unit Care, required a nursing high working load while 44% (42 a nursing low working load. Through the sum of the Nursing Activities Score average score, we can achieve the total of hours at the nursing assistance necessaries to the elderly patient care during the hospitalization. The average scores obtained by the total score, corresponded to 59.2 ± 7.8, transforming in hours according to the conducted calculus, correspond to 14.47 hours of nursing assistance turned to the elderly people. It is waited that the results can contribute to quantify the expended assistance time and also evidence the real necessity of the people to ensure safe and quality assistance practices to the elderly people.  Descriptors: Workload. Nursing. Aged. Intensive Care Units.

  4. Effects of an acute care for elders unit on costs and 30-day readmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Kellie L; Maclennan, Paul A; McGrew, Deborah; Green, Darlene; Dodd, Cindy; Brown, Cynthia J

    2013-06-10

    Providing high-quality care while containing cost is essential for the economic stability of our health care system. The United States is experiencing a rapidly growing elderly population. The Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit interdisciplinary team model of care has been shown to improve outcomes in hospitalized older adults. The University of Alabama at Birmingham ACE unit incorporates evidence-based care processes. We hypothesized that the ACE model would also reduce costs. To examine variable direct costs from an interdisciplinary ACE compared with a multidisciplinary usual care (UC) unit. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care academic medical center. Hospitalists' patients aged 70 years or older spending the entirety of their hospitalization in either the ACE or UC unit in fiscal year 2010. Using administrative data, we analyzed variable direct costs for ACE and UC patients. We also conducted a subset analysis restricted to the 25 most common diagnosis related groups (DRGs) shared by ACE and UC patients. Generalized linear regression was used to estimate cost ratios and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity score, and case mix index (CMI). A total of 818 hospitalists' patients met inclusion criteria: 428 from the ACE and 390 from the UC unit. For this study group (all DRGs), the mean (SD) variable direct cost per patient was $2109 ($1870) for ACE and $2480 ($2113) for UC (P = .009). Adjusted cost ratios revealed significant cost savings for patients with low (0.82; 95% CI, 0.72-0.94) or moderate (0.74; 95% CI, 0.62-0.89) CMI scores; care was cost neutral for patients with high CMI scores (1.13; 95% CI, 0.93-1.37). Significantly fewer ACE patients than UC patients were readmitted within 30 days of discharge (7.9% vs 12.8%; P = .02). Subset analysis of the 25 most common DRGs revealed a significantly reduced mean (SD) variable direct cost per patient for ACE compared with UC patients ($1693 [$1063] vs $2138 [$1431]; P cost ratios for

  5. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14-0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1-0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19-0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22-0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033-0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15-0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32-0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs ( P >0.05). Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality, at no higher cost.

  6. Anticonvulsant use in elderly patients in long-term care units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Timmons, S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients in long-term care units are frailer than their community-dwelling peers and may be more at risk from toxic side-effects of anticonvulsant medication at standard doses. AIM: To examine the prescribing of anticonvulsants to patients in elderly care units. METHODS: Drug prescription sheets and case notes were reviewed. Serum anticonvulsant concentration, renal and liver profiles and albumin level were measured. RESULTS: Anticonvulsants were prescribed to twice as many male as female patients (32 vs 14%; p<0.03) and to 33% of those younger than 80 years of age versus 10% of those aged 80 years or older (p<0.0002). No patient had significant hypoalbuminaemia and routine measurement of serum anticonvulsant concentration did not indicate an alteration of dosage. CONCLUSIONS: Anticonvulsants appear to be well tolerated in these patients. The younger age of those receiving anticonvulsants is inadequately explained by the characteristics of the patient cohort and may reflect a shift towards a younger age in patients requiring anticonvulsants due to increased mortality in this group.

  7. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units. Part II: Intensive care benefit for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Artigas, Antonio; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    accepted to the intensive care unit, 1,194 (18%) rejected; 3,795 (49%) were =65 yrs. Refusal rate increased with increasing patient age (18-44: 11%; 45-64: 15%; 65-74: 18%; 75-84: 23%; >84: 36%). Mortality was higher for older patients (18-44: 11%; 45-64: 21%; 65-74: 29%; 75-84: 37%; >84: 48%). Differences......RATIONALE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Admission to an intensive care unit is denied when intensive care unit resources are constrained, especially for the elderly. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the effect of intensive care unit triage decisions...... on mortality and intensive care unit benefit, specifically for elderly patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with an explicit request...

  8. [Gait, balance and independence rehabilitation program in elderly adults in a primary care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cuervo, Gisela; López-Roldán, Verónica Miriam; Escobar-Rodríguez, David Alvaro; Conde-Embarcadero, Margarita; Trejo-León, Gerardo; González-Carmona, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate the effect of a supervised rehabilitation program to improve gait, balance and independence in elderly patients attending a family medicine unit. we conducted a quasi-experimental study over a period of four weeks in a group of 72 patients older than 65 years. a supervised program regarding the risk factors for falling, and balance, gait, coordination and oculovestibular system, the modalities to be done two or three times a week in the primary care unit or at home. An analysis of both tests was performed by "up and go," Tinetti scale and the Katz index. "intention to treat" and "by protocol." mean age was 72 ± 5 years, 67.8% were female and 81.9% of the patients completed the program. A significant clinical improvement with statistical level were evident for gait and balance (p = 0.001), independence showed only clinical improvement (p = 0.083). The efficacy for periodicity (two or three times/week) and performance place showed same clinical improvement and statistical level for gait and balance (p = 0.001 to 0.003) and independence showed only clinical improvement (p = 0.317 to 0.991). an integral rehabilitation program improved gait, balance and clinical independence significantly. The supervised program is applicable and can be reproduced at primary care unit or home for geriatric care and preventive actions.

  9. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekerstad N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Niklas Ekerstad,1,2 Björn W Karlson,3 Synneve Dahlin Ivanoff,4 Sten Landahl,5 David Andersson,6 Emelie Heintz,7 Magnus Husberg,2 Jenny Alwin2 1Department of Cardiology, NU (NÄL-Uddevalla Hospital Group, Trollhattan, 2Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, 4Centre for Ageing and Health, AGECAP, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, 5Department of Geriatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 6Division of Economics, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, 7Health Outcomes and Economic Evaluation Research Group, Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design: This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting: This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants: The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206 or control group (n=202. Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention: This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3. Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results: After adjustment by

  10. Community acquired pneumonia in the elderly: the Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE study protocol by the Italian Society of Hospital and Community Geriatrics (SIGOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Luca Fimognari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a frequent cause of hospital admission in elderly patients. Diagnosis of pneumonia in elderly persons with comorbidity may be challenging, due to atypical presentation and complex clinical scenarios. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP arises out-of-hospital in subjects without previous contact with the healthcare system. Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP occurs in patients who have frequent contacts with the healthcare system and should be treated with empiric broad spectrum antibiotic therapy also covering multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Recent findings, however, have questioned this approach, because the worse prognosis of HCAP compared to CAP may better reflect increased level of comorbidity and frailty (poor functional status, older age of HCAP patients, as well as poorer quality of hospital care provided to such patients, rather than pneumonia etiology by MDR pathogens. The Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE Study, promoted by the Società Italiana di Geriatria Ospedale e Territorio (SIGOT, is an observational prospective cohort study of patients consecutively admitted because of pneumonia to hospital acute care units of Geriatrics throughout Italy. Detailed information regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, etiology, comprehensive geriatric assessment, antibiotic therapy, possible complications and comorbidities was recorded to identify factors potentially predicting in-hospital mortality (primary endpoint, 3-month mortality, length of hospital stay, postdischarge rate of institutionalization and other secondary endpoints. This paper describes the rationale and method of PIACE Study and reviews the main evidence on pneumonia in the elderly.

  11. The elderly in family health units: morbidity and use of health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cabrelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the profile of morbidity and use of health services by the elderly in the Family Health Program Antonio Estevão de Carvalho, from São Paulo, Brazil. The information of 92 seniors from the database of the project "Family Health - assessment of the new assistance strategy in the setting of public policies" were used. A descriptive data analysis showed the elderly with an average age of 70.6 years old; 64.1%, females: 93.5% reported any kind of health problems, especially hypertension (67.4% and diabetes mellitus (19.6%, 77.3% looked for health care; public hospitals (42.4% were the most sought after services. The reasons for the choice of services were ease of access (18.5% and need of care (7.6%. The main reason of satisfaction was the interpersonal care and of dissatisfaction the lack of medicines and the long wait to set appointments.

  12. Struggles in (Elderly) Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    This book provides a critical engagement with the intensified struggles to be found within elderly care provision. Various social and political processes, including the forces of globalisation and the de-gendering of care, have changed how we might understand this national and global political...... of contestation. Dahl approaches these issues from a post-structuralist and radical feminist position, while drawing from feminist sociology, feminist political science, nursing philosophy and feminist history. In particular, Struggles In (Elderly) Care highlights how the predominantly feminist theorization...

  13. Racial and ethnic disparities in depression care in community-dwelling elderly in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akincigil, Ayse; Olfson, Mark; Siegel, Michele; Zurlo, Karen A; Walkup, James T; Crystal, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    We investigated racial/ethnic disparities in the diagnosis and treatment of depression among community-dwelling elderly. We performed a secondary analysis of Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data (n = 33,708) for 2001 through 2005. We estimated logistic regression models to assess the association of race/ethnicity with the probability of being diagnosed and treated for depression with either antidepressant medication or psychotherapy. Depression diagnosis rates were 6.4% for non-Hispanic Whites, 4.2% for African Americans, 7.2% for Hispanics, and 3.8% for others. After we adjusted for a range of covariates including a 2-item depression screener, we found that African Americans were significantly less likely to receive a depression diagnosis from a health care provider (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41, 0.69) than were non-Hispanic Whites; those diagnosed were less likely to be treated for depression (AOR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.30, 0.66). Among elderly Medicare beneficiaries, significant racial/ethnic differences exist in the diagnosis and treatment of depression. Vigorous clinical and public health initiatives are needed to address this persisting disparity in care.

  14. Struggles in (Elderly) Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    concern. Emerging discourses such as neoliberalism have also reframed elderly care to increase existing tensions at the individual, national, and transnational level. Dahl argues that in order to grasp these new realities of care we need a new analytical framework that redirects us to new sites...... of care has been dominated by a sociological bias that could be improved using insights from political science concerning concepts of power and struggle, and the importance of the state and governance....

  15. The Prevalence of Potential Drug Interactions Among Critically Ill Elderly Patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rafiei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the research was to determine prevalence of potential drug interactions among elderly patients in the Shahid Bahonar ICU in Kerman. Methods & Materials: In this cross sectional study, data about all elderly patients who were admitted in the intensive care unit from 1/4/2009 to 1/4/2010 were retrieved from medical records and evaluated with regard to the number and type of drug interactions, the number of drugs administered, age, sex, length of stay in the ICU, and the number of doctors prescribing medications of medications administered. The extent and number of drug interactions were investigated based on the reference textbook Drug Interaction Facts and in order to analyze the data collected, using SPSS 18 and according to study goals, a descriptive test, Pierson's correlation test, an independent T-test and a one-way ANOVA were used. Results: In total, 77 types of drugs and 394 drugs were prescribed with a mean of 5.6(SD=1.5 drugs per patient. A total of 108 potential drug interactions were found related to drugs prescribed during the first twenty-four hours. In terms of the type of drug interactions, delayed, moderate and possible types comprised the highest proportion of drug interactions. The four major interactions were between cimetidine and methadone, furosemide and amikacine, phenytoin and dopamine, and heparin and aspirin. The results of Pierson's correlation test were inicative of a positive correlation between the number of potential drug interactions and that of the drugs prescribed (r=0.563, P<0.05. Results of a one-way ANOVA showed that the mean number of potential drug interaction were significantly higher in those who died than in other patients (P<0.05. Conclusion: Elderly patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit are at a high risk of developing drug interactions and better care must be taken by medical team members.

  16. Struggles in (Elderly) Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    of contestation. Dahl approaches these issues from a post-structuralist and radical feminist position, while drawing from feminist sociology, feminist political science, nursing philosophy and feminist history. In particular, Struggles In (Elderly) Care highlights how the predominantly feminist theorization......This book provides a critical engagement with the intensified struggles to be found within elderly care provision. Various social and political processes, including the forces of globalisation and the de-gendering of care, have changed how we might understand this national and global political...... of care has been dominated by a sociological bias that could be improved using insights from political science concerning concepts of power and struggle, and the importance of the state and governance....

  17. Robots in Elderly Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Vercelli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Low birth rate and the long life expectancy represent an explosive mixture, resulting in the rapid aging of population. The costs of healthcare in the grey society are increasing dramatically, and soon there will be not enough resources and people for care. This context requires conceptually new elderly care solutions progressively reducing the percentages of the human-based care. Research on robot-based solutions for elderly care and active ageing aims to answer these needs. From a general perspective, robotics has the power to completely reshape the landscape of healthcare both in its structure and its operation. In fact, the long-term sustainability of healthcare systems could be addressed by automation powered by digital health technologies, such as artificial intelligence, 3D-printing or robotics. The latter could take over monotonous work from healthcare workers, which would allow them to focus more on patients and to have lesser workload. Robots might be used in elder care with several different aims. (i Robots may act as caregivers, i.e. assist the elderly, (ii they can provide remainders and instructions for activities of daily life and safety, and/or assist their carers in daily tasks; (iii they can help monitor their behaviour and health; and (iv provide companionship, including entertainment and hobbies, reminiscence and social contact. The use of Robots with human subjects/patients raise several sensitive questions. First of all, robots may represent information hubs, and can collect an incredible amount of data about the subjects and their environment. In fact, they record habits such as sleeping, exercising, third persons entering in the house, appointments. Communications may be continuously recorded. Moreover, by connecting with medical devices, they can store medical data. On one hand, this represents a very powerful tool to collect information about the single subject (precision medicine, about disease (thus eventually finding

  18. A before and after study of medical students' and house staff members' knowledge of ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards on an acute care for elders unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Samantha P; Cohen, Victor; Nelson, Marcia; Likourezos, Antonios; Goldman, William; Paris, Barbara

    2008-06-01

    The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) comprehensive set of quality assessment tools for ill older persons is a standard designed to measure overall care delivered to vulnerable elders (ie, those aged > or =65 years) at the level of a health care system or plan. The goal of this research was to quantify the pretest and posttest results of medical students and house staff participating in a pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention that focused on the ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards. This was a before and after study assessing the knowledge ofACOVE standards following exposure to an educational intervention led by a pharmacotherapist. It was conducted at the 29-bed Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit of Maimonides Medical Center, a 705-bed, independent teaching hospital located in Brooklyn, New York. Participants included all medical students and house staff completing a rotation on the ACE unit from August 2004 through May 2005 who completed both the pre-and posttests. A pharmacotherapist provided a 1-hour active learning session reviewing the evidence supporting the quality indicators and reviewed case-based questions with the medical students and house staff. Educational interventions also occurred daily through pharmacotherapeutic consultations and during work rounds. Medical students and house staff were administered the same 15-question, patient-specific, case-based, multiple-choice pre-and posttest to assess knowledge of the standards before and after receiving the intervention. A total of 54 medical students and house staff (median age, 28.58 years; 40 men, 14 women) completed the study. Significantly higher median scores were achieved on the multiple-choice test after the intervention than before (median scores, 14/15 [93.3%] vs 12/15 [80.0%], respectively; P = 0.001). A pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention improved the scores of medical students and house staff on a test evaluating knowledge of evidence

  19. Impact of functional status on the onset of nosocomial infections in an acute care for elders unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazière, S; Couturier, P; Gavazzi, G

    2013-01-01

    To assess the role of functional status as a risk factor for nosocomial infections in the elderly. Prospective study. Acute care for elders units of university hospital of Grenoble. All patients over 75 years old consecutively hospitalized between January and April 2007. The main judgement criteria was the rate of nosocomial infection during the hospital stay, defined according to the French technical comity against nosocomial infections. Other data included functional status at baseline and admission (Katz' ADL), usual risk factors for nosocomial infections, demographic and geriatric assessment data. The study included 223 patients. The mean age was 86.7±6.5 years. A nosocomial infection was diagnosed for 17.0% of the patients. In univariate analysis, the number of medicines, pressure sore, pneumonia diagnosis, illness severity, indwelling bladder catheter, IADL at baseline, and all disability parameters (ADL at baseline, ADL at admission, recent functional decline) were significantly associated with nosocomial infection (pnosocomial infection (pnosocomial infection (OR=2.21). Our results suggest a significant impact of functional impairment on the incidence of nosocomial infections in hospitalized elderly population. Disability is a higher risk factor for nosocomial infections than the usual and well-known other parameters. Larger prospective studies are needed to examine the power of this relationship.

  20. Dutch care innovation units in elderly care: A qualitative study into students' perspectives and workplace conditions for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeren, Miranda; Volbeda, Patricia; Niessen, Theo J H; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-03-01

    To promote workplace learning for staff as well as students, a partnership was formed between a residential care organisation for older people and several nursing faculties in the Netherlands. This partnership took the form of two care innovation units; wards where qualified staff, students and nurse teachers collaborate to integrate care, education, innovation and research. In this article, the care innovation units as learning environments are studied from a student perspective to deepen understandings concerning the conditions that facilitate learning. A secondary analysis of focus groups, held with 216 nursing students over a period of five years, revealed that students are satisfied about the units' learning potential, which is formed by various inter-related and self-reinforcing affordances: co-constructive learning and working, challenging situations and activities, being given responsibility and independence, and supportive and recognisable learning structures. Time constraints had a negative impact on the units' learning potential. It is concluded that the learning potential of the care innovation units was enhanced by realising certain conditions, like learning structures and activities. The learning potential was also influenced, however, by the non-controllable and dynamic interaction of various elements within the context. Suggestions for practice and further research are offered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic care case management for the frail elderly population in the United States: normative, funding and organizational aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giulio de Belvis

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    In the most developed countries, it is necessary to bring about significant changes to health care delivery through the strengthening of prevention, rehabilitation and the integration of the social and healthcare dimensions.

    This means moving the policy focus from “treating” to “taking care” of the sick in a broader and more integrated way, one which is more closely linked to the World Health Organization’s definition of health as physical, psychological and social well-being. This change involves the delivery of care for the elderly. Developed countries are confronting this issue by using different community-based programs to integrate acute and long-term care services for frail elderly individuals with complex health needs.

    The objective of this health policy article is to give an overview of the most recent initiatives on long-term care management for the elderly including normative, funding and organizational issues in the USA, as their public health system largely differs from those of the Western European countries.

    Particular attention is given to the PACE (Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly, which applies a comprehensive approach to managing the care of the frail elderly population and would represent a new framework in geriatric care. By incorporating a central core care team to manage the needs of each elderly individual, this approach recognizes the contributing factors that non-traditional health related functions play in the overall health of the individual.

    Although there is a little knowledge of this program, as it covers a very small percentage of the eligible individuals, and it may be difficult to extrapolate to other sectors of the population, PACE offers many lessons that could be applied to more effective integration of care for individuals and lead to better health outcomes.

  2. Intensive Care Unit (ICU) - Managed Elderly Hospitalizations with Dementia in Texas, 2001-2010: A Population-Level Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-10-20

    BACKGROUND The demand for critical care services among elderly with dementia outpaces that of their non-dementia elderly counterparts. However, there are scarce data on the corresponding attributes among ICU-managed patients with dementia. MATERIAL AND METHODS We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to examine temporal trends of the demographics, burden of comorbidities, measures of severity of illness, use of healthcare resources, and short-term outcomes among hospitalizations aged 65 years or older with a reported diagnosis of dementia, who were admitted to ICU (D-ICU hospitalizations) between 2001 and 2010. Average annual percent changes (AAPC) were derived. RESULTS D-ICU hospitalizations (n=276,056) had increasing mean (SD) Charlson comorbidity index [1.7 (1.5) vs. 2.6 (1.9)], with reported organ failure (OF) nearly doubling from 25% to 48.5%, between 2001–2001 and 2009–2010, respectively. Use of life support interventions was infrequent, but rose in parallel with corresponding changes in respiratory and renal failure. Median total hospital charges increased from $26,442 to $36,380 between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010. Routine home discharge declined (–5.2%/year [–6.2%– –4.1%]) with corresponding rising use of home health services (+7.2%/year [4.4–10%]). Rates of discharge to another hospital or a nursing facility remained unchanged, together accounting for 60.4% of discharges of hospital survivors in 2010. Transfers to a long-term acute care hospital increased 9.2%/year (6.9–11.5%). Hospital mortality (7.5%) remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS Elderly D-ICU hospitalizations have increasing comorbidity burden, with rising severity of illness, and increasing use of health care resources. Though the majority survived hospitalization, most D-ICU hospitalizations were discharged to another facility.

  3. Intensive Care Unit (ICU) – Managed Elderly Hospitalizations with Dementia in Texas, 2001–2010: A Population-Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The demand for critical care services among elderly with dementia outpaces that of their non-dementia elderly counterparts. However, there are scarce data on the corresponding attributes among ICU-managed patients with dementia. Material/Methods We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to examine temporal trends of the demographics, burden of comorbidities, measures of severity of illness, use of healthcare resources, and short-term outcomes among hospitalizations aged 65 years or older with a reported diagnosis of dementia, who were admitted to ICU (D-ICU hospitalizations) between 2001 and 2010. Average annual percent changes (AAPC) were derived. Results D-ICU hospitalizations (n=276,056) had increasing mean (SD) Charlson comorbidity index [1.7 (1.5) vs. 2.6 (1.9)], with reported organ failure (OF) nearly doubling from 25% to 48.5%, between 2001–2001 and 2009–2010, respectively. Use of life support interventions was infrequent, but rose in parallel with corresponding changes in respiratory and renal failure. Median total hospital charges increased from $26,442 to $36,380 between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010. Routine home discharge declined (−5.2%/year [−6.2%– −4.1%]) with corresponding rising use of home health services (+7.2%/year [4.4–10%]). Rates of discharge to another hospital or a nursing facility remained unchanged, together accounting for 60.4% of discharges of hospital survivors in 2010. Transfers to a long-term acute care hospital increased 9.2%/year (6.9–11.5%). Hospital mortality (7.5%) remained unchanged. Conclusions Elderly D-ICU hospitalizations have increasing comorbidity burden, with rising severity of illness, and increasing use of health care resources. Though the majority survived hospitalization, most D-ICU hospitalizations were discharged to another facility. PMID:27764074

  4. [The influence of the advertising in the medication use in a group of elderly attended in a primary health care unit in Aracaju (Sergipe, Brasil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lyra, Divaldo Pereira; Neves, Aline Souza; Cerqueira, Karine Santos; Marcellini, Paulo Sergio; Marques, Tatiane Cristina; de Barros, José Augusto Cabral

    2010-11-01

    The growth of the Brazilian elderly people has led to a trend to an increase in the medication use. The inadequate use of drugs can be induced by some factors, like advertisement, with the risk of damaging the user's health. The objective of the study was to evaluate the advertisement influence in medication use in a group of elderly patients in a primary health care unit in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. 230 elderly aging over 60 years with both genders had been interviewed from April to June of 2007. The majority of the interviewees (73%) has at least a chronic health condition and 73.9% consumed regularly at least one medication. 17.8% of the sample informed to use medication motivated by publicity influence; 2.2% had considered that the medication never cause damages and 6.5% believed that always it makes well. In this study, correlations have been made and demonstrated that those who presented a higher level of consumption influenced by advertising also think that drugs used are always beneficial and vice versa (p= 0.04). The data showed that part of elderly suffered influence of advertisement to medication use, and are not conscious of risks involved.

  5. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    OpenAIRE

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Bj?rn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Niklas Ekerstad,1,2 Björn W Karlson,3 Synneve Dahlin Ivanoff,4 Sten Landahl,5 David Andersson,6 Emelie Heintz,7 Magnus Husberg,2 Jenny Alwin2 1Department of Cardiology, NU (NÄL-Uddevalla) Hospital Group, Trollhattan, 2Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, 4Centre for Ageing and Health, AGECAP, Department of Health a...

  6. Handgrip Strength and Factors Associated in Poor Elderly Assisted at a Primary Care Unit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Teresa Saraiva Lino

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is a condition diagnosed when the patient presents low muscle mass, plus low muscle strength or low physical performance. Muscle weakness in the oldest (dynapenia is a major public health concern because it predicts future all-cause mortality and is associated with falls, disability, cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Grip strength is a simple method for assessment of muscle function in clinical practice.To estimate the grip strength and identify factors associated with handgrip strength variation in elderly people with low socioeconomic status.Cross-sectional study based on a multidimensional assessment of primary care users that were 60 years or older. The sample size was calculated using an estimated prevalence of depression in older adults of 20%. A kappa coefficient of 0.6 with a 95% confidence interval was used to generate a conservative sample size of 180 individuals. Procedures: tests and scales to assess humor, cognition (MMSE, basic (ADL and instrumental activities (IADL of daily living, mobility (Timed Up and Go, strength, height, Body Mass Index (BMI and social support were applied. Questions about falls, chronic diseases and self-rated health (SRH were also included. Statistical Analysis: Mean, standard deviation and statistical tests were used to compare grip strength means by demographic and health factors. A multivariate linear model was used to explain the relationship of the predictors with grip strength.The group was composed predominantly by women (73% with a very low level of education (mean 3 years of schooling, mean age of 73.09 (± 7.05 years old, good mobility and without IADL impairment. Mean grip strength of male and female were 31.86Kg (SD 5.55 and 21.69Kg (SD 4.48 [p- 0.0001], respectively. Low grip strength was present in 27.7% of women and 39.6% of men. As expected, men and younger participants had higher grip strength than women and older individuals. In the adjusted model, age (p- 0.03, female sex

  7. Occupational therapy for delirium management in elderly patients without mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit: A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Evelyn A; Garrido, Maricel A; Tobar, Eduardo A; Prieto, Stephanie A; Vergara, Sebastian O; Briceño, Constanza D; González, Francisco J

    2017-02-01

    Delirium has negative consequences such as increased mortality, hospital expenses and decreased cognitive and functional status. This research aims to determine the impact of occupational therapy intervention in duration, incidence and severity of delirium in elderly patients in the intensive care unit; secondary outcome was to assess functionality at hospital discharge. This is a pilot randomized clinical trial of patients without mechanical ventilation for 60 years. Patients were assigned to a control group that received standard strategies of prevention (n=70) or to an experimental group that received standard strategies plus occupational therapy twice a day for 5 days (n=70). Delirium was valued with Confusion Assessment Method and Delirium Rating Scale, and functional outcomes at discharge with Functional Independence Measure, Hand Dynamometer, and Mini-Mental State Examination. A total of 140 participants were recruited. The experimental group had lower duration (risk incidence ratios, 0.15 [P=.000; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.19] vs 6.6 [P=.000, 95% confidence interval, 5.23-8.3]) and incidence of delirium (3% vs 20%, P=.001), and had higher scores in Motor Functional Independence Measure (59 vs 40 points, POccupational therapy is effective in decreasing duration and incidence of delirium in nonventilated elderly patients in the intensive care unit and improved functionality at discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The geriatric patient: use of acute geriatrics units in the emergency care of elderly patients in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somme, D; Lazarovici, C; Dramé, M; Blanc, P; Lang, P O; Gauvain, J B; Voisin, T; Gonthier, R; De Wazières, B; Jeandel, C; Couturier, P; Blanchard, F; Saint-Jean, O

    2011-01-01

    We studied the factors influencing the choice of admission to Geriatrics units, instead of other acute hospital units after an emergency visit. We report the results from a cohort of 1283 randomly selected patients aged >75 years hospitalized in emergency and representative of the French University hospital system. All patients underwent geriatric assessment. Baseline characteristics of patients admitted to Geriatrics and other units were compared. A center effect influencing the use of Geriatrics units during emergencies was also investigated. Admission to a Geriatrics unit during the acute care episode occurred in 499 cases (40.3%). By multivariate analysis, 4 factors were related to admission to a Geriatrics unit: cognitive disorder: odds ratio (OR)=1.79 (1.38-2.32) (95% confidence interval=95% CI); "failure to thrive" syndrome OR=1.54 (1.01-2.35), depression: OR=1.42 (1.12-1.83) or loss of Activities of Daily Living (ADL): OR=1.35 (1.04-1.75). The emergency volume of the hospital was inversely related to the use of Geriatrics units, with high variation that could be explained by other unstudied factors. In the French University Emergency Healthcare system, the "geriatrics patient" is defined by the existence of cognitive disorder, psychological symptoms or installed loss of autonomy. Nevertheless, considerable nation-wide variation was observed underlining the need to clarify and reinforce this discipline in the emergency healthcare system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of Welfare Technology in Elderly Care

    OpenAIRE

    Woll, Anita

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is an interpretive qualitative research study exploring the use of welfare technology in elderly care. In Norway, health care and social services for elderly people are important parts of the welfare policy. A growing elderly population is putting a strain on the society’s welfare system. Scarce welfare resources restrict human care services for our future generations. Alternative housings and the use of welfare technology are effective techniques that can be used to transform cur...

  10. Short-term and long-term mortality in very elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, S. E.; Govers, A.; Korevaar, J C; Abu-Hanna, A; Levi, M; de Jonge, E

    OBJECTIVE: To report short-term and long-term mortality of very elderly ICU patients and to determine independent risk factors for short-term and long-term mortality DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective cohort study in the medical/surgical ICU of a tertiary university teaching hospital. PATIENTS: 578

  11. Short-term and long-term mortality in very elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, S. E.; Govers, A.; Korevaar, J. C.; Abu-Hanna, A.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; de Jonge, E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report short-term and long-term mortality of very elderly ICU patients and to determine independent risk factors for short-term and long-term mortality DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective cohort study in the medical/surgical ICU of a tertiary university teaching hospital. PATIENTS: 578

  12. Social innovation in public elder care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilfeldt, Annette; Andersen, John

    2013-01-01

    The chapter addresses the role of action research in social innovation related to elder care work at public nursing homes in Denmark. It is shown how critical utopian action research can contribute to the development of humanity in elder care to the benefit of the residents life quality...

  13. Robots for elderly care institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Norbert; Bodenhagen, Leon; Juel, William Kristian

    In this paper we raise questions about the ethically appropriate use of welfare robots. As engineers, we proceed from concrete examples. We present certain use cases for ”welfare robots” that are supposed to help to maintain the quality of elder care in a Danish institution, while a dramatic...... demographic shift will lead to a significant problem to attract a sufficient number of ”warm hands”. In relation to these applications we describe the technical challenges in the area of ”welfare robotics” and consider how these interact with the ethical dimension of the application. We formulate three...... hypotheses for the ethically appropriate use of welfare robots that we hope to discuss with philosophers, thereby testing the very possibility (or necessity-?) of interdisciplinary collaborations in Robophilosophy....

  14. The ETHICA study (part I): elderly's thoughts about intensive care unit admission for life-sustaining treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, F; Vesin, A; Bruel, C; Kpodji, A; Durand-Gasselin, B; Garçon, P; Levy-Soussan, M; Jagot, J L; Calvo-Verjat, N; Timsit, J F; Misset, B; Garrouste-Orgeas, M

    2013-09-01

    To assess preferences among individuals aged ≥80 years for a future hypothetical critical illness requiring life-sustaining treatments. Observational cohort study of consecutive community-dwelling elderly individuals previously hospitalised in medical or surgical wards and of volunteers residing in nursing homes or assisted-living facilities. The participants were interviewed at their place of residence after viewing films of scenarios involving the use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV), invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), and renal replacement therapy after a period of invasive mechanical ventilation (RRT after IMV). Demographic, clinical, and quality-of-life data were collected. Participants chose among four responses regarding life-sustaining treatments: consent, refusal, no opinion, and letting the physicians decide. The sample size was 115 and the response rate 87 %. Mean participant age was 84.8 ± 3.5 years, 68 % were female, and 81 % and 71 % were independent for instrumental activities and activities of daily living, respectively. Refusal rates among the elderly were 27 % for NIV, 43 % for IMV, and 63 % for RRT (after IMV). Demographic characteristics associated with refusal were married status for NIV [relative risk (RR), 2.9; 95 % confidence interval (95 %CI), 1.5-5.8; p = 0.002] and female gender for IMV (RR, 2.4; 95 %CI, 1.2-4.5; p = 0.01) and RRT (after IMV) (RR, 2.7; 95 %CI, 1.4-5.2; p = 0.004). Quality of life was associated with choices regarding all three life-sustaining treatments. Independent elderly individuals were rather reluctant to accept life-sustaining treatments, especially IMV and RRT (after IMV). Their quality of life was among the determinants of their choices.

  15. Low-dose Dexmedetomidine Improves Sleep Quality Pattern in Elderly Patients after Noncardiac Surgery in the Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Hai; Cui, Fan; Zhang, Cheng; Meng, Zhao-Ting; Wang, Dong-Xin; Ma, Jing; Wang, Guang-Fa; Zhu, Sai-Nan; Ma, Daqing

    2016-11-01

    Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) after surgery often develop sleep disturbances. The authors tested the hypothesis that low-dose dexmedetomidine infusion could improve sleep architecture in nonmechanically ventilated elderly patients in the ICU after surgery. This was a pilot, randomized controlled trial. Seventy-six patients age 65 yr or older who were admitted to the ICU after noncardiac surgery and did not require mechanical ventilation were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine (continuous infusion at a rate of 0.1 μg kg h; n = 38) or placebo (n = 38) for 15 h, i.e., from 5:00 PM on the day of surgery until 8:00 AM on the first day after surgery. Polysomnogram was monitored during the period of study-drug infusion. The primary endpoint was the percentage of stage 2 non-rapid eye movement (stage N2) sleep. Complete polysomnogram recordings were obtained in 61 patients (30 in the placebo group and 31 in the dexmedetomidine group). Dexmedetomidine infusion increased the percentage of stage N2 sleep from median 15.8% (interquartile range, 1.3 to 62.8) with placebo to 43.5% (16.6 to 80.2) with dexmedetomidine (difference, 14.7%; 95% CI, 0.0 to 31.9; P = 0.048); it also prolonged the total sleep time, decreased the percentage of stage N1 sleep, increased the sleep efficiency, and improved the subjective sleep quality. Dexmedetomidine increased the incidence of hypotension without significant intervention. In nonmechanically ventilated elderly patients who were admitted to the ICU after noncardiac surgery, the prophylactic low-dose dexmedetomidine infusion may improve overall sleep quality.

  16. Sexual Harassment towards Newcomers in Elder Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøjer, Jo; Lehn-Christiansen, Sine; Nielsen, Mette Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Sexual harassment is illegal and may have very damaging effects on the people exposed to it. One would expect organizations, employers, and institutions to take very good care to prevent employees from exposure to sexual harassment from anyone in their workplace. And yet, many people, mostly women...... focusing on the relation between elderly citizens in need of care and their professional caregivers. In this article, we argue that sexual harassment from the elderly toward newcomers in elder care should also be seen as an effect of institutional practices. Based upon a Foucauldian-inspired notion......, are exposed to sexual harassment at work. In care work, such behaviour is often directed toward their female caregiver by elderly citizens in need of care. Contemporary Nordic studies of working life and work environment have primarily investigated the interpersonal dimensions of sexual harassment, thus...

  17. Two Principles of good elderly care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene; Eskelinen, Leena; Boll Hansen, Eigil

    ) which is a possibility for the elderly to choose a private provider. Stressing the self-determination of the elderly and the help provided as service is potentially at odds with one of the existing principles of elderly care, namely the professional principle of help-to-self help. It aims at activating...... the elderly person to manage as much as possible themselves and is based upon a socio-pedagogical culture, where the professional is teaching elderly people about the proper behavior. It’s based upon a formal knowledge of aging and upon different techniques to motivate and involve the elderly....... These are clearly different logics. However, no research has so far studied how these concepts are translated from a national to the municipal level to groups of home helpers and to individual home helpers. And how are these principles played out in different contexts of private firms and public providers...

  18. Measuring continuity of elders' posthospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, M J; Luo, D; Maruyama, G M

    2000-01-01

    Continuity of care is a critical component of quality patient care, yet the paucity of reliable and valid measures of continuity of care make it difficult to ascertain the extent to which continuity has been achieved. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of an instrument to measure continuity of care that incorporates the perspectives of elders hospitalized for a chronic illness and their family caregivers. The instrument was used, and its reliability and validity examined, in a series of studies related to elders' posthospital transition. Elders in the studies ranged in age from 55 to 94 years. The findings supported content and construct validity, internal consistency reliability, and ability to detect changes in the same subjects at different points in time for the care management and services subscales. With further refinement, the continuity of provider and conflicting information subscales might also facilitate assessment of care continuity.

  19. Paradoxical constructions in Danish elderly care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liveng, Anne

    2015-01-01

    . This article explores these questions drawing on care ethics and theory of recognition. It presents the new conception of the elderly and illustrates, through analysis of empirical data from activity centres, how the transformations pose challenges to care workers and are reflected as different logics which......Transformations take place in Danish elderly care due to neo-liberal modernization processes which imply a conception of human beings as rational and autonomous while simultaneously increasing the level of governance and control. Inspired by trends in gerontology these transformations form...... a radical change in the understanding of the relationships between those in need of support and the professionals. The critical questions raise concern as to where this leaves the elderly in need of care, the care workers, and the ideas of a welfare state responsible for those who cannot care for themselves...

  20. Relational agency in elderly care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, Tiina; Fuglsang, Lars; Hasu, Mervi

    In this paper, we aim to understand how elderly care work is changing alongside the introduction of new co-creative frameworks and practices. The ideas of value co-creation and service co-production are expanding rapidly to new service areas also in the public sector. The elderly care context may...... pose specific challenges for co-creative frameworks due to the physical and mental conditions of the elderly users. We argue that to understand how cocreation fits to these contexts, researchers need to develop a relational view on the co-creation of value between care workers and elderly users. We use...... the concept of ‘relational agency’ to discuss how the interests and capabilities of the workers and users to co-create value are relationally constructed, and how these agentic properties contribute to the manner in which value is co-created. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by analysing...

  1. Intersectional perspective in elderly care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cuesta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Earlier research has shown that power relationships at workplaces are constructed by power structures. Processes related to power always influence the working conditions for (in this study in elderly care the working groups involved. Power structures are central for intersectional analysis, in the sense that the intersectional perspective highlights aspects such as gender and ethnicity (subjective dimensions and interrelates them to processes of power (objective dimension. This qualitative study aims to explore in what way an intersectional perspective could contribute to increased knowledge of power structures in a nursing home where the employees were mostly immigrants from different countries. By using reflexive dialogues related to an intersectional perspective, new knowledge which contributes to the employees’ well-being could develop. Narrative analysis was the method used to conduct this study. Through a multi-stage focus group on six occasions over 6 months, the staff were engaged in intersectional and critical reflections about power relationship with the researchers, by identifying patterns in their professional activities that could be connected to their subjectivities (gender, ethnicity, etc.. The result of this study presents three themes that express the staff's experiences and connect these experiences to structural discrimination. 1 Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of professionalism; 2 Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of collaboration; and 3 Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of discrimination. The result demonstrates that an intersectional perspective reinforces the involved abilities, during the conversations, into being clear about, for example, their experiences of discrimination, and consequently developing a better understanding of their professionalism and collaboration. Such deeper reflections became possible through a process of consciousness raising, strengthening the employee

  2. Intersectional perspective in elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Marta; Rämgård, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Earlier research has shown that power relationships at workplaces are constructed by power structures. Processes related to power always influence the working conditions for (in this study in elderly care) the working groups involved. Power structures are central for intersectional analysis, in the sense that the intersectional perspective highlights aspects such as gender and ethnicity (subjective dimensions) and interrelates them to processes of power (objective dimension). This qualitative study aims to explore in what way an intersectional perspective could contribute to increased knowledge of power structures in a nursing home where the employees were mostly immigrants from different countries. By using reflexive dialogues related to an intersectional perspective, new knowledge which contributes to the employees' well-being could develop. Narrative analysis was the method used to conduct this study. Through a multi-stage focus group on six occasions over 6 months, the staff were engaged in intersectional and critical reflections about power relationship with the researchers, by identifying patterns in their professional activities that could be connected to their subjectivities (gender, ethnicity, etc.). The result of this study presents three themes that express the staff's experiences and connect these experiences to structural discrimination. 1) Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of professionalism; 2) Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of collaboration; and 3) Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of discrimination. The result demonstrates that an intersectional perspective reinforces the involved abilities, during the conversations, into being clear about, for example, their experiences of discrimination, and consequently developing a better understanding of their professionalism and collaboration. Such deeper reflections became possible through a process of consciousness raising, strengthening the employee's self

  3. A Vocational Calling: Exploring a Caring Technology in Elderly Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejes, Andreas; Nicoll, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    In this article we explore the relationship of care of a group of health care workers in elderly care, through their descriptions of themselves and their work. We have an interest in how relationships of care may be explored and characterised in and across disparate vocational settings. This is a critical response to policy discourses of…

  4. Why do care workers withdraw from elderly care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liveng, Anne

    2012-01-01

    . At the same time it illustrates the care workers' commitment to the elderly. A paradoxical "empathy at a distance" is characteristic of the scene. When analyzing my written observations in an interpretation group, my use of language was a point of discussion. What did it mean when I described the interactions...... between care workers and elderly residents in words commonly used to describe mother-child interactions? My use of language became a "hermeneutical key" which enabled a psychoanalytically inspired interpretation. This focuses on the care relationship as activating our earliest memories of our own care...... relations, independently of whether we are in the role of care providers or care receivers. Through collusion theory, the interpretation accepts both the anxiety which the helpless elderly people arouse in the care workers and their motivation for care work as two sides of a subjectively important theme...

  5. Concept of Care, Caring Expectations, and Caring Frustrations of the Elderly Suffering from Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Santos, Charisse Izobelle Q.; Santos, Ivan Benedict A.; Santos, Jedda A.; Santos, Justin E.; Santos, Justo Martin S.; Santos, Vincent Emmanuelle E.

    2012-01-01

    While it is true that elderly concepts of care and caring expectations have been ascertained in previous literatures, little is known about how the elderly population views caring frustrations--particularly that of the Filipino elderly. This study purports to surface the lebenswelt of healthcare expectations and frustrations based on the…

  6. PATHWAYS TO INSTITUTIONAL CARE FOR ELDERLY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    KEY TERMS: indigenous Zimbabwean, institutional care, elderly, old age home ... Contact details: Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Midlands State University, Private Bag 9055,. Gweru ... being the most productive age-group of 21 to 49 (UN, 2015), die of HIV/AIDS, and Sub-Saharan Africa remains.

  7. Training health professionals in the care of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneton, P E; Moritsugu, K P; Miller, A M

    1982-02-01

    Twenty-seven projects for the development of interdisciplinary geriatric curricula were supported by the Health Resources Administration's Bureau of Health Professions in fiscal 1979. A variety of clinical training sites were used (e.g., university gerontology centers, VA medical centers, senior citizen facilities, adult health care centers), and innovative teaching approaches were developed. For example, a combined medical/dental/optometry clinic is conducted by students at the three professional schools; medical students accompany volunteers serving Meals on Wheels; and dental students treat patients in nursing homes in a mobile dental unit. Students have gained insights into the problems of the elderly and the roles of other health professionals through the interdisciplinary-team training courses. Nurse-practitioner programs to prepare nurses to provide primary health care to the elderly were also supported by the Bureau, as were special projects to develop short-term in-service basic training programs for nurses' aides and orderlies in nursing homes, to upgrade the skills of the paraprofessionals who care for the elderly. In other projects, the geriatric educational needs of pharmacy students were assessed, and dental schools promoted remote-site training to improve access to dental care for the elderly.

  8. Perioperative Care of the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ping Cheng

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The geriatric population is growing in number and complexity in modern surgical practice. This challenging group presents differences in physiology and outcomes that make a more comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach necessary. This review emphasizes the meticulous assessment and preparation in all facets before surgery, including a thorough examination, nutrition evaluation and intervention, and preoperative optimization of pulmonary function and cardiovascular hemodynamics. This article highlights the importance of age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations, effective pain control, as well as prevention and treat-ment of hypothermia, fluid and electrolyte imbalance, and postoperative delirium. The vulnerable elderly patient with multiple medical problems and functional impairment is best served by a surgeon with a particular interest and working knowledge of the changes associated with aging and the physiology of surgery and anesthesia.

  9. Central adiposity among elderly women in a gerontology-geriatric unit

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Marla Caroline Martins de; Nóbrega, Soraya Silva; Tomiya, Marilia Tokilko Oliveira; Arruda, Ilma Kruze Grande de; Diniz, Alcides da Silva; Lemos, Maria Conceição Chaves de

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate central adiposity in elderly women in a gerontology-geriatric care unit of the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (the Federal University of Pernambuco). Method: A cross-sectional study involving a sample of 182 elderly women, aged from 60 to 89 years, who received care from January to July 2011, was performed. The variables analyzed were the socio-economic and demographic conditions, lifestyle, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) of the women,...

  10. A randomized controlled trial on early physiotherapy intervention versus usual care in acute care unit for elderly: potential benefits in light of dietary intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Bisson, C; Dechamps, A; Gouspillou, G; Dehail, P; Bourdel-Marchasson, I

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate effects of early intensive physiotherapy during acute illness on post hospitalization activity daily living autonomy (ADL). Prospective randomized controlled trial of intensive physiotherapy rehabilitation on day 1 to 2 after admission until clinical stability or usual care. acute care geriatric medicine ward. A total of 76 acutely ill patients, acutely bedridden or with reduced mobility but who were autonomous for mobility within the previous 3 months. Patients in palliative care or with limiting mobility pathology were excluded. Mean age was 85.4 (SD 6.6) years. At admission, at clinical stability and one month later: anthropometry, energy and protein intakes, hand grip strength, ADL scores, and baseline inflammatory parameters. An exploratory principal axis analysis was performed on the baseline characteristics and general linear models were used to explore the course of ADL and nutritional variables. A 4-factor solution was found explaining 71.7% of variance with a factor "nutrition", a factor "function" (18.8% of variance) for ADL, handgrip strength, bedridden state, energy and protein intakes, serum albumin and C-reactive protein concentrations; a factor "strength" and a fourth factor . During follow-up, dietary intakes, handgrip strength, and ADL scores improved but no changes occurred for anthropometric variables. Intervention was associated only with an increase in protein intake. Better improvement in ADL was found in intervention group when model was adjusted on "function" factor items. Physical intervention programs should be proposed according to nutritional intakes with the aim of preventing illness induced disability.

  11. Self-care as a health resource of elders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente; Wagner, Lis; Hall, Elisabeth O.C.

    2007-01-01

    into self-care as a significant health resource of elders with different health status. It suggests that an elder's self-care ability is determined by the interaction of various sub-resources and conditions and emphasizes the constantly evolving nature of self-care. The framework may be of use in clinical......AIM: To review the literature related to self-care and health promotion for elders and to develop an understanding of self-care as a health resource. BACKGROUND: Self-care may improve health and prevent illness and disabilities in elders. Although studies of self-care are numerous, the significance...... of the concept as a health resource for elders lacks clarity. Before 1989, research focused principally on medical self-care at the expense of health care, and self-care was seen more as supplementary to professional health care rather than as a health-promoting approach in health care. METHOD...

  12. Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisabeth Ranheim, Albertine; Kärner, Anita; Berterö, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theory -practice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring.The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses' lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care.Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly.The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept.The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses' commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention.We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force.

  13. Care work and diffusion of innovation in Danish elder care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langergaard, Luise Li

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the interplay between different types of knowledge and rationality in care work through a case study of a nursing home innovation project in a Danish municipality. The aim is to understand the implications for innovation processes and dissemination within the context of elder...

  14. Social representations of elderly people care and social network maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Mehes Maldonado Brito

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the social representations of elderly people self-care, care to other elders and their social network, by relating them to care practices used by social networks. The study included a survey distributed to 102 elderly subjects who were asked about their gender and dependency level, in order to identify the elderly social network and the structural part of the social representation of elderly people care. The results shown by the configuration and network map indicate a difference between gender in the elderly social network configuration, where men and independent elderly felt less loneliness, which may reflect a slight deterioration of dependent elderly’s social network. In social practice, elderly people care is assigned to informal caregivers, family members and women. The social representation of elderly people care mainly included the pragmatic aspects of care, functionality and passivity. There is a need for educational policies related to health and aging that favor not only the elderly, but also people who are close to experience old age, especially those who have become, in social practice, elderly caregivers.

  15. A moralidade da alocação de recursos no cuidado de idosos no centro de tratamento intensivo The morality of allocating resources to the elderly care in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Estelita Costa Freitas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O mundo está envelhecendo. No Brasil e em vários outros países do mundo, mudanças na composição etária da população vêm acompanhadas por um aumento da demanda por tipos de assistência à saúde cujo custo é elevado. Atualmente, alguns conflitos morais são decorrentes da alocação dos recursos públicos em saúde, pois a magnitude das desigualdades sociais e os recursos escassos impõem que as prioridades da gestão pública se fundamentem no conhecimento da situação de saúde e do impacto de políticas, programas, projetos e ações sobre a saúde. Nesse contexto, a medicina intensiva, os gestores e os médicos em terapia intensiva estão sujeitos a conflitos morais, principalmente quanto à justa microalocação de recursos para os idosos no centro de tratamento intensivo. Este trabalho procura rever a situação destes conflitos à luz das ferramentas da bioética.The world is aging. In Brazil, and in several other countries in the world, changes in population's age composition have been accompanied by an increase in demand for types of health care whose cost is high. Actually, some moral conflicts are arising from allocation of public resources for health, because the magnitude of social inequalities in health and limited resources require that priorities for public management are based on knowledge of the health situation and the impact of policies, programs, projects and actions on health. In this context, the intensive medicine, managers and physicians in intensive care are subject to moral conflicts, especially at the fair micro allocation resources for the elderly in the intensive care unit level. This paper attempts to review the situation of conflicts in the light of the tools of bioethics.

  16. A Self-Care Practice Theory of Nursing the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Toni J.; Munroe, Donna J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a practice theory of nursing for the elderly which focuses on maintaining the maximum amount of independence of elderly patients through a nursing focus on the full range of human functional abilities. Interrelates varied health related characteristics and requirements of the elderly with theoretical components of self-care nursing…

  17. Green care farms promote activity among elderly people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, S.R. de; Oosting, S.J.; Kuin, Y.; Hoefnagels, E.C.M.; Blauw, Y.H.; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Schols, J.M.G.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, an increasing number of green care farms are providing day care to community-dwelling elderly people with dementia. Currently, it is unknown whether activities, activity participation, and facility use of elderly people with dementia at green care farms differ from those at

  18. Depression in elderly primary health care clinic attendees in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depression in the elderly presenting at primary care settings is usually under- detected by primary care physicians. This study assessed the prevalence of depression and the utility of the Geriatric Depression Scale (Short Form) in detecting depression in elderly patients in primary care populations in Ilorin, Nigeria. This was ...

  19. Assessment of adherence in elderly patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt Júnior, Antônio Augusto; Lindner, Stéphanie; Helena, Ernani Tiaraju de Santa

    2013-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of non-adherence to drug therapy for elderly patients in primary care in Blumenau, SC, Brazil. This is a cross-sectional, population-based epidemiological study. A randomly selected sample of users who attended the pharmacies of 14 units of primary healthcare answered the questionnaire's study variables. The prevalence of non-adherence was measured using a self-reported questionnaire. A logistic regression model to calculate odds ratio was performed to estimate the association between risk factors and non-adherence. Of the 151 elderly individuals interviewed, 84.1% reported continuous use of their medicines. The average age of the participants was 69.04 years. Regarding the characteristics of the medications, an average of 4.3 medicines were used by the elderly, and diseases of the circulatory system were the most prominent (43.3%). The prevalence of non-adherence was 35.4%. Logistic regression showed an association between non-adherence and "prior stopping treatment because of lack of medication" and "inappropriately prescribed medication use" (p < 0.005). The results reinforce the need to improve public policy and management processes aimed at ensuring people's access to essential medicines and qualify the process of prescribing health professionals as a way to improve treatment adherence in the elderly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatial analysis of elderly access to primary care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano-Gracia Nancy

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Admissions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs are considered preventable admissions, because they are unlikely to occur when good preventive health care is received. Thus, high rates of admissions for ACSCs among the elderly (persons aged 65 or above who qualify for Medicare health insurance are signals of poor preventive care utilization. The relevant geographic market to use in studying these admission rates is the primary care physician market. Our conceptual model assumes that local market conditions serving as interventions along the pathways to preventive care services utilization can impact ACSC admission rates. Results We examine the relationships between market-level supply and demand factors on market-level rates of ACSC admissions among the elderly residing in the U.S. in the late 1990s. Using 6,475 natural markets in the mainland U.S. defined by The Health Resources and Services Administration's Primary Care Service Area Project, spatial regression is used to estimate the model, controlling for disease severity using detailed information from Medicare claims files. Our evidence suggests that elderly living in impoverished rural areas or in sprawling suburban places are about equally more likely to be admitted for ACSCs. Greater availability of physicians does not seem to matter, but greater prevalence of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates, relative to U.S. medical graduates, does seem to reduce ACSC admissions, especially in poor rural areas. Conclusion The relative importance of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates in providing primary care to the elderly in geographic areas of greatest need can inform the ongoing debate regarding whether there is an impending shortage of physicians in the United States. These findings support other authors who claim that the existing supply of physicians is perhaps adequate, however the distribution of them across

  1. Coexisting principles and logics of elder care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene; Eskelinen, Leena; Boll Hansen, Eigil

    2015-01-01

    Healthy and active ageing has become an ideal in Western societies. In the Nordic countries, this ideal has been supported through a policy of help to self-help in elder care since the 1980s. However, reforms inspired by New Public Management (NPM) have introduced a new policy principle of consumer......-oriented service that stresses the wishes and priorities of older people. We have studied how these two principles are applied by care workers in Denmark. Is one principle or logic replacing the other, or do they coexist? Do they create tensions between professional knowledge and the autonomy of older people......? Using neo-institutional theory and feminist care theory, we analysed the articulation of the two policy principles in interviews and their logics in observations in four local authorities. We conclude that help to self-help is the dominant principle, that it is deeply entrenched in the identity...

  2. Housing policies for the elderly: why should we care?

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Szczygieł; Mafalda Almeida

    2017-01-01

    In aging societies, housing responses for the elderly are of increasing importance. The article deals with the problem of housing policies from the viewpoint of an elder person and analyzes an impact of the place of residence. The study suggests that community dwelling elderly have significantly higher quality of life and experience less loneliness. In view of these results, there are reasons to believe that a well-designed quality home care system for the elderly could be beneficial in that ...

  3. Medical care for the homeless elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Ansell

    2008-01-01

    This is a case study of two elderly, frail women in New York City who were recently rendered homeless. One woman had a massive tumor on her occipital scalp; the other was in renal failure. The obstacles and complexities of providing care to those with double jeopardy--being elderly and homeless--are described. There are enormous difficulties for placement into safe, supportive housing once people become homeless. The process is expensive and labor intensive. This can be complicated by the existence of mental illness. A New York agency that works with mentally ill homeless people is described. There are systemic obstacles as well: One woman loses her Medicaid when she moves from one state to another to be closer to her family. Another, 82 years old, is told to get a job so that she could qualify for Medicare. There are numerous contradictions and unnecessary costs in a fragmented health care system to which the obvious solution is a national single-payer system of care.

  4. Self-care as a health resource of elders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente; Hall, E.O.C.; Wagner, L.

    2007-01-01

    : In this integrative review from 2006, we selected theoretical and empirical articles published between 1990 and 2006, where self-care was related to elders' health promotion. Data were extracted from primary sources and included definitions of self-care, critical attributes, antecedents, goals and outcomes. We......AIM: To review the literature related to self-care and health promotion for elders and to develop an understanding of self-care as a health resource. BACKGROUND: Self-care may improve health and prevent illness and disabilities in elders. Although studies of self-care are numerous, the significance...... interactively compared data and display matrices to describe self-care as a health resource. RESULTS: Fifty-seven articles addressed health self-care and were integrated into a framework of self-care as a health resource of elders. Self-care was identified as a two-dimensional construct including action...

  5. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Utilization Patterns among the Elderly with Osteoarthritis at Primary Ambulatory Care Units in Busan Metropolitan City, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nam Kyong; Kim, Yooni; Lee, Seung Mi; Park, Byung Joo

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the utilization patterns of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) among the elderly with osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing primary ambulatory care in Busan metropolitan city, Korea. OA patients, aged 65 years and over, were identified from the Korean National Health Insurance Review Agency drug prescription database. The subjects had at least one episode of claim for OA (ICD-10-CM: M15-M19) between August 1, 2000 and February 28, 2002. Trends in the determinations of NSAIDs utilization were identified using chi-squared tests for trend. There were 47, 711 osteoarthritic patients. The total number of visits by these patients was 177, 443, with a total frequency for NSAID prescriptions of 214, 952. Seventy-nine percent of the OA patients were female. NSAIDs were prescribed on 133, 284 visits (75.1%) and the proportion of prescriptions was significantly increased with age. Only the proportion of visit when NSAIDs were prescribed decreased, from 65.1 to 43.5%, during the study period (p< 0.001). However, the proportion of combined treatments with anti-ulcer drugs was increased. The use of NSAIDs injections was decreased. Of the individual NSAIDs, diclofenac (28.7% of total frequency of NSAID prescriptions), piroxicam (15.0%) and talniflumate (8.7%), were the most frequently prescribed. Among the NSAIDs prescribed OA visits, 45.7% used two or more NSAIDs. The total proportion of NSAIDs prescribed to the osteoarthritic patients was higher than in other studies. The decline in the use of NSAIDs during the study period, and the frequent selection of safer medications, such as combination therapy with anti-ulcer drug, may reflect the risk awareness of the use of NSAIDs.

  6. Experience of Oral Care among Elderly in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Buiyan, Salmah; Sheng, Nongfei

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy among the elderly has been improving for decades and edentulousness is constantly decreasing among the senior citizens. The steady decrease of tooth loss among the elderly is a challenge to the dental profession due to the increased demand of oral care. This study aims to explore the perspectives regarding oral health and oral care among the elderly living in nursing homes. Ten subjects from two nursing homes in Umeå were interviewed based on a defined interview guide. The int...

  7. Position paper: robots as companions and therapists in elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallego Pérez, J.; Lohse, M.; Evers, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing portion of elderly people in the western world and severe lacks in care-taking, we believe that we should research possibilities to employ robots in elderly care. Social robots could offer companionship as well as treatment of physical and psychological disturbances. In our

  8. Demand of elderly people for residential care: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bilsen, P.; Hamers, J.; Groot, W.; Spreeuwenberg, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Because of the rapid aging population, the demand for residential care exceeds availability. This paper presents the results of a study that focuses on the demand of elderly people for residential care and determinants (elderly people's personal characteristics, needs and resources) that

  9. The factors affecting the burden of care of informal caregivers of the elderly in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Rohani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid growth of the elderly population followed by an increase in long term care will lead to a rise in the health costs of the elderly and the healthcare burden of their caregivers. This study was carried out to examine the factors affecting the burden of care for informal caregivers in order to design better interventional programs and to reduce this burden and unwanted consequences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in retirement associations of Tehran in 2012. The study population included 200 elderly and 200 caregivers. The instruments for data collection included two questionnaires about the elderly and their caregivers that were completed in a face-to-face interview. The data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using multiple linear regression. Results: About 60% of the elderly and 34% of caregivers were female. Burden of care was low in 70%, moderate in 11.5%, and high in 18.5% of caregivers. Female caregivers were suffering 1.42 unit more burden of care than male caregivers (P= 0.027. Also, there was a significant association between the burden of care of untrained caregivers and instrumental activities of the daily living of the elderly (P< 0.001, daily activity of the elderly (P<0.001 and adequacy of wage (= 0.001. Conclusion: According to the results, being a female caregiver, daily physical activity of the elderly, instrumental activities of the daily living of the elderly, and adequacy of the wage were the most important factors in increasing the burden of care for caregivers of the elderly.

  10. Care for elderly : A challenge in the anaesthesia context

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson Mauleon, Annika

    2005-01-01

    Anaesthesia care involves bioscience and technical knowledge. Provision of anaesthesia care for elderly surgical patients can be a significant challenge when promoting patient comfort, safety, and satisfaction in a high-tech context with time constraints. Many patients in anaesthesia care are old and frail and have multiple illnesses and other problems, such as delicate skin, malnutrition, and pain. All this must be accounted for when caring for the elderly. Extra time in an...

  11. Elderly care with alzheimer disease: a focus on the theory of cultural care

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Lúcio Costa Ramos; Maria do Rosário de Menezes

    2012-01-01

    This report was aimed in reflecting on care for the elderly with Alzheimer disease, through family care, focused on Madeleine Leininger’s Theory of Diversity and Universality of Cultural Care. Qualitative study, with 20 home care workers looking after elderly people in Salvador, BA, Brazil, was performed between June and August of 2010.Four categories emerged: characterization of family caregivers of elders with Alzheimer's disease, knowledge about the disease to the practice of caring for th...

  12. Intensive Care Unit Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsuk Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is described as a manifestation of acute brain injury and recognized as one of the most common complications in intensive care unit (ICU patients. Although the causes of delirium vary widely among patients, delirium increases the risk of longer ICU and hospital length of stay, death, cost of care, and post-ICU cognitive impairment. Prevention and early detection are therefore crucial. However, the clinical approach toward delirium is not sufficiently aggressive, despite the condition’s high incidence and prevalence in the ICU setting. While the underlying pathophysiology of delirium is not fully understood, many risk factors have been suggested. As a way to improve delirium-related clinical outcome, high-risk patients can be identified. A valid and reliable bedside screening tool is also needed to detect the symptoms of delirium early. Delirium is commonly treated with medications, and haloperidol and atypical antipsychotics are commonly used as standard treatment options for ICU patients although their efficacy and safety have not been established. The approaches for the treatment of delirium should focus on identifying the underlying causes and reducing modifiable risk factors to promote early mobilization.

  13. Sexual Harassment of Newcomers in Elder Care. An Institutional Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Krøjer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sexual harassment is illegal and may have very damaging effects on the people exposed to it. One would expect organizations, employers, and institutions to take very good care to prevent employees from exposure to sexual harassment from anyone in their workplace. And yet, many people, mostly women, are exposed to sexual harassment at work. In care work, such behaviour is often directed toward their female caregiver by elderly citizens in need of care. Contemporary Nordic studies of working life and work environment have primarily investigated the interpersonal dimensions of sexual harassment, thus focusing on the relation between elderly citizens in need of care and their professional caregivers. In this article, we argue that sexual harassment from the elderly toward newcomers in elder care should also be seen as an effect of institutional practices. Based upon a Foucauldianinspired notion of practice-making, the article carries out a secondary analysis of three different empirical studies in order to explore how sexual harassment is produced and maintained through institutional practices in elder care. The term institution in this perspective includes three dimensions; a political, an educational (educational institutions in health and elder care, and a work organizational dimension. By examining elder care in these different dimensions, we identify how sexual harassment of professional caregivers is produced and maintained through institutional practice-making in elder care. The article thus contributes to our knowledge on working life by expanding and qualifying the understanding of the problematic working environment in care work, and by offering an alternative theoretical and analytical approach to the study of sexual harassment. Together, these insights suggest how elder care institutions might act to prevent sexual harassment toward caregivers.

  14. PALLIATIVE CARE ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH SLEEPING DISORDERS ARE POORLY TREATED

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido-Estevez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are frequent in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative-care, especially in elderly patients (1). Sleep disorders during palliative-care may be related with anxiety, opioids related central-sleep apnoea or corticoids therapy between others (2). Our aim was to quantify the effectiveness of hypnotic medication in the sleep quality in advanced cancer receiving palliative-care elderly patients. Material and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was...

  15. On the palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    As a physician working in palliative care, the author is often privileged to share special moments with patients and their families at the end of life. This haiku poem recalls one such moment in that precious space between life and death, as an elderly woman, surrounded by her adult daughters, takes her last breath. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. The home care team approach to self-neglecting elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Ellen W; Sonstegard-Gamm, Janel

    2006-04-01

    Elderly patients who neglect their own health present special challenges. This article describes techniques for establishing rapport, understanding the patient's world, using a team approach to care, and achieving closure. At each step the clinician must find a balance between respecting the elder's rights and meeting his or her healthcare needs.

  17. Clothing for Elderly Persons: Management and Caring Strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the clothing requirements of the elderly across the globe and the management and caring strategies in supporting them. There is however, no specific requirement for the elderly in terms of what they wear or how they dress over and above the requirements of early adult life in many nations of the world.

  18. Trends in hospital and intensive care admissions in the Netherlands attributable to the very elderly in an ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Karakus, Attila; Holman, Rebecca; Cihangir, Sezgin; Reidinga, Auke C.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch population is ageing and it is unknown how this is affecting trends in the percentage of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions attributable to patients aged 80 years or older, the very elderly. We present data on the percentage of the very elderly in the general population and

  19. Care work an diffusion of innovation in Danish elder care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise Li Langergaard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the interplay between different types of knowledge and rationality in care work through a case study of a nursing home innovation project in a Danish municipality. The aim is to understand the implications for innovation processes and dissemination within the context of elder care. Care work, in some sense, relies on relational and contextual knowledge which may lead to challenges when innovation and best practices are to be diffused across organizations. This is especially true since diffusion often relies on codification of practices and knowledge. Caring rationality is essential to how technologies and methods are practiced in the care situation, and thus also essential for best practices and how they are disseminated. However, other types of codified and explicit rationality are equally important. The article concludes that there are several types of knowledge in play in care work practices and innovation, and it indicates that communities of practice could be key to understanding how to share and learn from best practices across organizations. 

  20. Technology acceptance for an Intelligent Comprehensive Interactive Care (ICIC system for care of the elderly: a survey-questionnaire study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M K Wong

    Full Text Available The key components of caring for the elderly are diet, living, transportation, education, and safety issues, and telemedical systems can offer great assistance. Through the integration of personal to community information technology platforms, we have developed a new Intelligent Comprehensive Interactive Care (ICIC system to provide comprehensive services for elderly care. The ICIC system consists of six items, including medical care (physiological measuring system, Medication Reminder, and Dr. Ubiquitous, diet, living, transportation, education (Intelligent Watch, entertainment (Sharetouch, and safety (Fall Detection. In this study, we specifically evaluated the users' intention of using the Medication Reminder, Dr. Ubiquitous, Sharetouch, and Intelligent Watch using a modified technological acceptance model (TAM. A total of 121 elderly subjects (48 males and 73 females were recruited. The modified TAM questionnaires were collected after they had used these products. For most of the ICIC units, the elderly subjects revealed great willingness and/or satisfaction in using this system. The elderly users of the Intelligent Watch showed the greatest willingness and satisfaction, while the elderly users of Dr. Ubiquitous revealed fair willingness in the dimension of perceived ease of use. The old-old age group revealed greater satisfaction in the dimension of result demonstrability for the users of the Medication Reminder as compared to the young-old and oldest-old age groups. The women revealed greater satisfaction in the dimension of perceived ease of use for the users of Dr. Ubiquitous as compared to the men. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of gender, age, and education level in the other dimensions. The modified TAM showed its effectiveness in evaluating the acceptance and characteristics of technologic products for the elderly user. The ICIC system offers a user-friendly solution in telemedical care and improves the

  1. Technology acceptance for an Intelligent Comprehensive Interactive Care (ICIC) system for care of the elderly: a survey-questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alice M K; Chang, Wei-Han; Ke, Pei-Chih; Huang, Chun-Kai; Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Shieh, Wann-Yun; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The key components of caring for the elderly are diet, living, transportation, education, and safety issues, and telemedical systems can offer great assistance. Through the integration of personal to community information technology platforms, we have developed a new Intelligent Comprehensive Interactive Care (ICIC) system to provide comprehensive services for elderly care. The ICIC system consists of six items, including medical care (physiological measuring system, Medication Reminder, and Dr. Ubiquitous), diet, living, transportation, education (Intelligent Watch), entertainment (Sharetouch), and safety (Fall Detection). In this study, we specifically evaluated the users' intention of using the Medication Reminder, Dr. Ubiquitous, Sharetouch, and Intelligent Watch using a modified technological acceptance model (TAM). A total of 121 elderly subjects (48 males and 73 females) were recruited. The modified TAM questionnaires were collected after they had used these products. For most of the ICIC units, the elderly subjects revealed great willingness and/or satisfaction in using this system. The elderly users of the Intelligent Watch showed the greatest willingness and satisfaction, while the elderly users of Dr. Ubiquitous revealed fair willingness in the dimension of perceived ease of use. The old-old age group revealed greater satisfaction in the dimension of result demonstrability for the users of the Medication Reminder as compared to the young-old and oldest-old age groups. The women revealed greater satisfaction in the dimension of perceived ease of use for the users of Dr. Ubiquitous as compared to the men. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of gender, age, and education level in the other dimensions. The modified TAM showed its effectiveness in evaluating the acceptance and characteristics of technologic products for the elderly user. The ICIC system offers a user-friendly solution in telemedical care and improves the quality of

  2. Horizontal Inequity in Elderly Health Care Utilization: Evidence from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Shalini; Subramanian, S V

    2015-01-01

    Against the backdrop of population aging, this paper presents the analysis of need-standardised health care utilization among elderly in India. Based on nationally representative morbidity and health care survey 2004, we demonstrate that the need for health care utilization is indeed pro-poor in nature. However, the actual health care utilization is concentrated among richer sections of the population. Further, the decomposition analysis reveals that income has a very strong role in shifting the distribution of health care away from the poor elderly. The impact of income on utilization is well-demonstrated even at the ecological-level as states with higher per capita incomes have higher elderly health care utilization even as the levels of need-predicted distribution across these states are similar. We also find that the distribution of elderly across social groups and their educational achievements favours the rich and significantly contributes to overall inequality. Nevertheless, contribution of need-related self-assessed health clearly favours pro-poor inequality. In concluding, we argue that to reduce such inequities in health care utilization it is necessary to increase public investments in health care infrastructure including geriatric care particularly in rural areas and underdeveloped regions to enhance access and quality of health care for the elderly. PMID:26617450

  3. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Olof Hedman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Method: Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289. Results: Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The models represented different degrees of integration of home care, i.e. health and social aspects of home care were to varying degrees integrated in the same organization. The county councils (i.e. large sub-national political-administrative units tended to contain clusters of municipalities (smaller sub-national units with the same organizational characteristics. Thus, municipalities' home care organization followed a county council pattern. In spite of a general tendency for Swedish municipalities to reorganize their activities, only 1% of them had changed their home care services organization in relation to the county council since the reform. Conclusion: The decentralist intention of the reform—to give actors at the sub-national levels freedom to integrate home care according to varying local circumstances—has resulted in a sub-national inter-organizational network structure at the county council, rather than municipal, level, which is highly inert and difficult to change.

  4. Clustering and inertia: structural integration of home care in Swedish elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olof Hedman, Nils; Johansson, Roine; Rosenqvist, Urban

    2007-09-12

    To study the design and distribution of different organizational solutions regarding the responsibility for and provision of home care for elderly in Swedish municipalities. Directors of the social welfare services in all Swedish municipalities received a questionnaire about old-age care organization, especially home care services and related activities. Rate of response was 73% (211/289). Three different organizational models of home care were identified. The models represented different degrees of integration of home care, i.e. health and social aspects of home care were to varying degrees integrated in the same organization. The county councils (i.e. large sub-national political-administrative units) tended to contain clusters of municipalities (smaller sub-national units) with the same organizational characteristics. Thus, municipalities' home care organization followed a county council pattern. In spite of a general tendency for Swedish municipalities to reorganize their activities, only 1% of them had changed their home care services organization in relation to the county council since the reform. The decentralist intention of the reform-to give actors at the sub-national levels freedom to integrate home care according to varying local circumstances-has resulted in a sub-national inter-organizational network structure at the county council, rather than municipal, level, which is highly inert and difficult to change.

  5. The Igbo care for the elderly in contemporary times: an old testament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indications of aging challenges in most world societies are evidenced from the statistical records and projections of the World Health Organization and United Nations. The challenges of aging and how to cope with caring for the elderly are therefore not peculiar to Igbo society. This study examined the traditional Igbo ...

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NURSING AND ELDERLY CARE STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES TOWARDS AGEISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve ÇAYIR YILMAZ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Perceptions of individuals and society about the elderly are reflected in the services provided to them. These reflections might be revealed in various fields such as health care services and sufficient job opportunities, or they could be revealed in the issue of discrimination against the elderly, which is a problem emerging in advanced ages. Objective: This study aims to identify the relationship between nursing and elderly care program students’ attitudes towards ageism. Methods: This study, which is descriptive and relational method, was conducted between November and December, 2016. The participants were 220 students. The data were collected through a questionnaire, and the Ageism Attitude Scale, and were analyzed using t-test, two-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Findings: Results show that the students generally had positive attitudes towards ageism. Nursing department students received significantly higher scores in the Limiting the Elderly Person’s Life sub-dimension and Ageism Attitude Scale in comparison to Elderly Care Program students. 3rd year nursing department students had higher scores in the Ageism Attitudes Scale in comparison to 1st and 2nd year nursing department students and students in the Elderly Care Program. “Positive Discrimination towards the Elderly” sub-dimension and the “Ageism Attitudes Scale” total scores were found to be significantly higher in nursing department students according to the variable of desire to work in a geriatric service in the future. (p<0.05. Conclusion: This study found that students had positive attitudes towards ageism, and nursing students’ Ageism Attitudes Scale mean scores were higher than those of elderly care program students. More comprehensive studies are needed in order to improve students’ attitudes towards elderly people.

  7. Paying for the health and social care of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, S

    1996-01-01

    The aging population of Japan is causing serious concern among social policymakers. The most urgent issue is to find a way to pay for the health and social care of the frail elderly. After universal coverage of pension and health insurance was achieved, but just before the economic growth rate was considerably slowed, in part, because of the oil crisis, the Japanese government more than doubled pension benefits and made medical care for the elderly free. Since the early 1980s, the government has tried hard to cut and control these benefits, only with moderate success. With a consumption tax rate of only 5%, rather than the proposed 7%, the government is now considering establishing a new health and social care insurance scheme for the elderly to finance the increasing cost of their care.

  8. The care needs of elderly patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, P.D.; Comijs, H.C.; Dröes, R.M.; de Haan, L.; Smit, J.H.; Eikelenboom, P.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Stek, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Elderly patients constitute the fastest growing segment of the schizophrenia population. Still, their needs for care are poorly understood. This study aimed to gain insight into the care needs of older patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Setting and Participants: Patients,

  9. Interactive CaringTV® supporting elderly living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Interactive CaringTV® is a Finnish innovation that was developed by Laurea University of Applied Sciences in 2006. CaringTV was developed through action research during three research projects. The aim of interactive CaringTV is to support the health and well-being of elderly people living in their own homes. The Safe Home project was based on action research, userdriven methods, and a case study. User-driven methods were applied in planning, implementing and evaluating the programme and eServices e.g. testing and evaluating peer support, including eConsultation as the methods for supporting clients´ coping with life in their own homes. Costeffectiveness and process modelling were studied through the case study. The user-driven approach and the collected data formed the basis for the interactive programme. The online CaringTV programme included content to: support everyday life for the elderly, safety, and activities of daily living, support social relationships, participate in rehabilitation and physical exercises, manage self-care, and health issues. Active participation in the CaringTV programme provided functional ability and everyday coping as well as a meaningful activity in everyday life. CaringTV is an interactive platform to support elderly in their everyday life and help them cope at home. User-driven methods enable participants´ active involvement in planning interactive and online programmes and eServices via CaringTV. The ultimate goal of the CaringTV is to support elderly´s health, wellbeing and interaction. CaringTV empowers elderly people to take responsibility for their own health care as part of healthy ageing.

  10. Effects of professional oral health care on elderly: randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, T; Ookawa, K; Haruta, N; Hagiwara, Y; Seki, M

    2014-11-01

    To better understand the role of the professional oral health care for elderly in improving geriatric oral health, the effects of short-term professional oral health care (once per week for 1 month) on oral microbiological parameters were assessed. Parallel, open-labelled, randomize-controlled trial was undertaken in a nursing home for elderly in Shizuoka, Japan. Thirty-four dentate elderly over 74 years were randomly assigned from ID number to the intervention (17/34) and control (17/34) groups. The outcomes were changes in oral microbiological parameters (number of bacteria in unstimulated saliva; whole bacteria, Streptococcus, Fusobacterium and Prevotella: opportunistic pathogens detection: and index of oral hygiene evaluation [Dental Plaque Index, DPI]) within the intervention period. Each parameter was evaluated at before and after intervention period. Four elderly were lost from mortality (1), bone fracture (1), refused to participate (1) and multi-antibiotics usage (1). Finally, 30 elderly were analysed (14/intervention and 16/control). At baseline, no difference was found between the control and intervention groups. After the intervention period, the percentage of Streptococcus species increased significantly in the intervention group (Intervention, 86% [12/14]; Control, 50% [8/16]: Fisher's, right-tailed, P oral health care can improve oral conditions in the elderly. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinical evolution of adult, elderly and very elderly patients admitted in Intensive Care Units Evolución clínica de adultos, ancianos y muy ancianos internados en Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Evolução clínica de adultos, idosos e muito idosos internados em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Cunha Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared clinical outcomes among adult, elderly and very elderly patients admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICUs located in São Paulo, Brazil. This retrospective, longitudinal and comparative study included 279 adult (≥18 and El estudio comparó la evolución clínica de adultos, ancianos y muy ancianos internados en Unidades de Terapia Intensiva localizadas en Sao Paulo, Brasil. El estudio fue retrospectivo longitudinal, del tipo comparativo. Participaron 279 adultos (≥18 y O estudo comparou a evolução clínica de adultos, idosos e muito idosos, internados em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva, localizadas em São Paulo, Brasil. Trata-se de estudo retrospectivo-longitudinal, do tipo comparativo. Participaram 279 adultos (≥18 e <60 anos, 216 idosos (≥60 e <80 anos e 105 muito idosos (≥80 anos. Os adultos diferiram dos outros grupos em relação à unidade de destino e evolução da gravidade, segundo Simplified Acute Physiology Score II. Foi mais prevalente o encaminhamento dos adultos para unidades de internação, porém, os idosos e muito idosos, sobreviventes à internação na unidade crítica, apresentaram melhora mais acentuada antes da alta. Entre adultos e idosos ocorreu diferença em relação à mortalidade, com maior taxa no grupo mais velho; entretanto, a mortalidade dos muito idosos e adultos foi similar. Em geral, os resultados indicaram que a idade mais avançada não foi fator associado aos desfechos indesejáveis da assistência intensiva.

  12. Designing an Elderly Assistance Program Based-on Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umusya'adah, L.; Juwaedah, A.; Jubaedah, Y.; Ratnasusanti, H.; Puspita, R. H.

    2018-02-01

    PKH (Program Keluarga Harapan) is a program of Indonesia’s Government through the ministry of social directorate to accelerate the poverty reduction and the achievement of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) target as well as the policies development in social protection and social welfare domain or commonly referred to as Indonesian Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) Program. This research is motivated that existing participants of the family expectation program (PKH) that already exist in Sumedang, Indoensia, especially in the South Sumedang on the social welfare components is only limited to the health checking, while for assisting the elderly based Home Care program there has been no structured and systematic, where as the elderly still need assistance, especially from the family and community environment. This study uses a method of Research and Development with Model Addie which include analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. Participants in this study using purposive sampling, where selected families of PKH who provide active assistance to the elderly with 82 participants. The program is designed consists of program components: objectives, goals, forms of assistance, organizing institutions and implementing the program, besides, program modules include assisting the elderly. Form of assistance the elderly cover physical, social, mental and spiritual. Recommended for families and companions PKH, the program can be implemented to meet the various needs of the elderly. For the elderly should introspect, especially in the health and follow the advice recommended by related parties

  13. An Elderly Care System Based on Multiple Information Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of social economy in the 21st century, and the rising of medical level, the aging of population have become a global trend. However lots of elderly people are in “empty nest” state. In order to solve the problem of high risk of daily life in this group, this paper proposed a method to integrate the information of video images, sound, infrared, pulse, and other information into the elderly care system. The whole system consists of four major components, that is, the main control board, the information acquisition boards, the server, and the client. The control board receives, processes and analyzes the data collected by the information acquisition boards, and uploads necessary information to the server, which are to be saved to the database. When something unexpected occurs to the elderly, the system will notify the relatives through the GPRS (general packet radio service module. The system also provides an interface for the relatives to inquire the living status of the elderly through an app. The system can monitor the living status for the elderly with the characteristics of quick response, high accuracy, and low cost and can be widely applied to the elderly care at home.

  14. Sexual Harassment of Newcomers in Elder Care. An Institutional Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Jo Krøjer; Sine Lehn-Christiansen; Mette Lykke Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Sexual harassment is illegal and may have very damaging effects on the people exposed to it. One would expect organizations, employers, and institutions to take very good care to prevent employees from exposure to sexual harassment from anyone in their workplace. And yet, many people, mostly women, are exposed to sexual harassment at work. In care work, such behaviour is often directed toward their female caregiver by elderly citizens in need of care. Contemporary Nordic studies of working li...

  15. [Pharyngeal bacteria and professional oral health care in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, K; Yoneyama, T; Ota, M; Hashimoto, K; Miyake, Y

    1997-02-01

    In 15 elderly residents of an old-age home, we measured the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci in the pharynx over 5 months. Seven residents received professional oral health care from dentists and dental hygienists and eight practiced oral care by themselves or together with a helper. During the 5 months, the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci decreased (p professional care. In contrast, the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci neither did not change or increased in those who did not receive professional care. These findings show that professional oral health care by dentists and dental hygienists can decrease the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci in the pharynx of elderly people, which might prevent aspiration pneumonia.

  16. Caring for the elderly: changing perceptions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Marge

    2006-03-01

    The aging population is currently one of the main issues facing international health care systems. It is a recognized fact that with advancing age, the likelihood of developing health problems and chronic disease will increase and the demand for health care resources will escalate. This will impact hospitals and long-term care facilities. Our young nurses of the future will be faced with the challenging task of caring for this elderly population. A review of the literature revealed that nursing students have a negative attitude toward the elderly. This may be affected by personal beliefs, values, culture, experience, or observations. Their perceived attitudes toward the gerontology field will make it difficult to recruit the nurses required in this area. This article will explore these issues and examine the role of all health care professionals to help change their attitudes and develop a more positive relationship to meet the needs of this unique population.

  17. Quality of care: from the perspective of elderly people: the QUOTE-Elderly instrument.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sixma, H.J.; Campen, C. van; Kerssens, J.J.; Peters, L.

    2000-01-01

    Background: patient views on the quality of care are usually assessed by means of patient satisfaction questionnaires. Aim: to develop an instrument that would: (i)produce data to the expectations and experiences of non-institutionalized elderly people, (ii) contain items that has been formulated in

  18. Factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Hitoshi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Asai, Atsushi; Kanda, Shigeru; Maeda, Keiko; Shimojima, Takuya; Nomura, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    Polypharmacy, which is often observed in elderly patients, has been associated with several unfavorable outcomes, including an increased risk of potentially inappropriate medications, medication non-adherence, drug duplication, drug-drug interactions, higher healthcare costs and adverse drug reactions. A significant association between polypharmacy and adverse outcomes among older people living in the community has also been confirmed. A reduction in the number of medications should thus be pursued for many older individuals. Nevertheless, the factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients have not been reported. Here, we investigated those factors in elderly home-care patients in Japan. We used the data of the participants in the Observational Study of Nagoya Elderly with Home Medical investigation. Polypharmacy was defined as the current use of six or more different medications. We carried out univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the associations between polypharmacy and each of several factors. A total of 153 home-care patients were registered. The mean number of medications used per patient was 5.9, and 51.5% of the patients belonged to the polypharmacy group. The multivariate model showed that the patients' scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Mini-Nutrition Assessment Short Form were inversely associated with polypharmacy, and potentially inappropriate medication was most strongly associated with polypharmacy (odds ratio 4.992). The present findings showed that polypharmacy was quite common among the elderly home-care patients, and they suggest that home-care physicians should prescribe fewer medications in accord with the deterioration of home-care patients' general condition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 33-41. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Filipino Arts among Elders in Institutionalized Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Satuito, James Cyril B.; Satumba, Miko Anne E.; Segui, Diego Rey A.; Serquina, Faith Evelyn C.; Serrano, Lawrence Jan P.; Sevilla, Madelyn D.

    2011-01-01

    The use of traditional art in recreational therapies is unexplored. This paper, thus, attempts to surface the unique power of traditional Filipino arts (TFA) as synergizing lens in capturing the individual and the collective experiences of a select group of Filipino elderly in an institutionalized care setting relative to their feelings of…

  20. Future elderly care in China, how should it be?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Hao; Cai, Yanguang; Tao, Yingshan

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese healthcare system is at a crossroads of the history. Multiple challenges are encountered due to the demographic changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the aspects of the Chinese youngsters on the future elderly care system. A significant social-cultural consciousness...

  1. [Factors influencing health care needs of solitude elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Suk

    2003-10-01

    This study was to identify factors that influence the health care needs of that over 65 years of age in Mokpo, Korea. The data was collected from June 2002 to September 2002. The subjects were 120 homebound solitude elderly(age=76.8). Subjects were interviewed with structured questionnaire in order to identify the health care needs, health variables (perceived health status, risk of malnutrition, K-IADL), psychological variables(self-esteem, depression) and demographic variables. physiological health variables (height, weight, blood pressure, pulse, blood sugar)were assessed after the interview. In general perceived health status was poor, risk of malnutrition was high, number of disease was 3 disease, self-esteem was low but depression was high and health care needs were relatively high. Among the elderly education & counseling needs topped the list. In regression analysis, health care needs were significantly influenced by IADL(23%), duration of solitudes(4%), sex(3%), and education(1%). These variables explained 31% of the variances in health care needs. The result identified that health care needs should be a considered in IADL, female, duration of solitudes and education for the solitude elderly.

  2. Care Support Activities for Elderly Koreans in Japan:The Historical Development and Present Challenges(2)

    OpenAIRE

    趙, 文基

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the historical development of elderly care focusing on the activities of the Federation of Korean Residents in Japan (CHONGRYON).How has the ethnic Korean elderly care system developed in Japan? CHONGRYON's data of social welfare facilities for the elderly enable us to understand care support activities and the circumstances for this minority elderly group in Japan. I also surveyed this organization and qualitatively analyzed the publications (1998-2010) of their social mo...

  3. Multicultural voices: Attitudes of older adults in the United States about elder mistreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enguidanos, Susan; DeLiema, Marguerite; Aguilar, Iris; Lambrinos, Jorge; Wilber, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Despite international growth in policies to increase the identification and response to elder abuse and neglect, there remain considerable barriers to treating the problem. Some of these barriers may be attributed to how older adults from different racial/ethnic backgrounds define, experience, and seek to remedy elder mistreatment. Using focus group discussions based on case vignettes, this paper examines how older adults from different racial and ethnic backgrounds in the United States perceive elder mistreatment. Five focus groups were conducted with African Americans, English-speaking Latinos, Spanish-speaking Latinos, non-Latino Whites and African American caregivers for older adults. While similar definitions and meanings of elder abuse were expressed across the different racial/ethnic groups, Latino participants introduced additional themes of machismo, respect, love, and early intervention to stop abuse, suggesting that perceptions/beliefs about elder mistreatment are determined by culture and degree of acculturation in addition to race/ethnicity. Most differences in attitudes occurred within groups, demonstrating that perceptions vary by individual as well as by culture. In identifying scenarios that constitute elder mistreatment, some participants felt that certain cases of abuse are actually the persistence of intimate partner violence into old age. Participants also indicated that victims may prefer to tolerate mistreatment in exchange for other perceived benefits (e.g., companionship, security); and out of fear that they could be placed in an institution if mistreatment is reported. Findings suggest the need for person–centred intervention and prevention models that integrate the cultural background, care needs, and individual preferences of older adults. PMID:25364064

  4. Multicultural voices: Attitudes of older adults in the United States about elder mistreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enguidanos, Susan; DeLiema, Marguerite; Aguilar, Iris; Lambrinos, Jorge; Wilber, Kathleen

    2014-05-01

    Despite international growth in policies to increase the identification and response to elder abuse and neglect, there remain considerable barriers to treating the problem. Some of these barriers may be attributed to how older adults from different racial/ethnic backgrounds define, experience, and seek to remedy elder mistreatment. Using focus group discussions based on case vignettes, this paper examines how older adults from different racial and ethnic backgrounds in the United States perceive elder mistreatment. Five focus groups were conducted with African Americans, English-speaking Latinos, Spanish-speaking Latinos, non-Latino Whites and African American caregivers for older adults. While similar definitions and meanings of elder abuse were expressed across the different racial/ethnic groups, Latino participants introduced additional themes of machismo, respect, love , and e arly intervention to stop abuse, suggesting that perceptions/beliefs about elder mistreatment are determined by culture and degree of acculturation in addition to race/ethnicity. Most differences in attitudes occurred within groups, demonstrating that perceptions vary by individual as well as by culture. In identifying scenarios that constitute elder mistreatment, some participants felt that certain cases of abuse are actually the persistence of intimate partner violence into old age. Participants also indicated that victims may prefer to tolerate mistreatment in exchange for other perceived benefits (e.g., companionship, security); and out of fear that they could be placed in an institution if mistreatment is reported. Findings suggest the need for person-centred intervention and prevention models that integrate the cultural background, care needs, and individual preferences of older adults.

  5. Lessons learned from Hurricane Andrew: recommendations for care of the elderly in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, M A; Weston, M; Llorente, M; Beber, C; Tam, R

    1995-06-01

    We report on the experience of a 500-bed, long-term care facility in Miami, Fla, which provides housing and nursing care units for patients--ranging from those who are independently ambulatory to those who are acutely ill and feeble--in preparing for, during, and in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, which struck on August 24, 1992. The problems encountered included a massive influx of evacuated elderly to the facility, facility isolation, loss of electrical power, loss of running water, special dietary needs, and limited professional staffing due to personal property losses or loss of transportation. Overwhelmed county emergency medical services, limited access to hospitals and patient care, and difficulty in procuring supplies exacerbated the already complicated situation resulting from the storm. As a result of these catastrophic conditions, a number of challenges specific to the care of the elderly were identified. In conjunction with the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, we drafted a comprehensive blueprint that could serve as a disaster plan for other long-term care facilities facing a similar threat during the hurricane season.

  6. Primary health care to elderly people: Occupational Therapy actions perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Batista Alves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, Occupational Therapy (OT was legislated in 1969, and was introduced into the Primary Health Care (PHC in the 90s. At this level of care, the OT serves various stages of human development, including aging, in a perspective of care and active aging line, seeks to optimize opportunities for health, participation and safety, using clinical reasoning in order to plan, guide, conduct and reflect their actions in producing the line of care. This career considers human activities as part of the construction of the man himself as an expertise area and seeks to understand the relationships that the active human establishes in its life and health. This study aimed to verify the actions and identify the occupational therapy line of care with the elderly in APS. This is a qualitative study that used a semi-structured interview applied during April to May 2013 with six occupational therapists that cared for older people in the APS at Uberaba-MG. The data was analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD technique. We observed that the OT actions to produce line of care for the elderly happen according to the general public care, whether individual or group, with the team during case discussions, referrals or work management and the territory during the territorial diagnosis and networks formation, all permeated by the principles of fairness, integrity, intersectoriality and clinical reasoning in OT.

  7. [Cancer and elderly people, what palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyahia, Stéphanie; N'Fissi, Karima; Sahut-D'Izarn, Marine; Cudennec, Tristan

    Epidemiological data relating to cancer and the ageing of the population highlight the need for oncology, geriatrics and palliative care to work more closely together. Geriatric and palliative care assessments in oncology are complex procedures and result in the modification of the oncological therapeutic choices. They have a significant impact on the methods of treatment of the patients concerned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Undermining the rules in home care services for the elderly in Norway: flexibility and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollscheid, Sabine; Eriksen, John; Hallvik, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the provision of home care services (home nursing and domiciliary help) for the elderly in Norwegian municipalities with purchaser-provider split model. The study draws on the assumption that flexibility in adjusting services to the care receivers' needs, and cooperation between provider and purchasers are indicators of good quality of care. Data were collected through semi-structured telephone interviews with 22 team leaders of provider units in nine municipalities. Data were collected in 2008-2009. The study has been approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. We identified four different ways of organising home care services under a purchaser-provider split model: Provider empowerment, New Public Management, Vague instructions and undermining the rules. High flexibility in providing care and cooperation with the purchaser unit were identified by the team leaders as characteristics for good care. Our findings suggest that the care providers use individual strategies that allow flexibility and cooperation rather than rigidly abiding to the regulations the purchaser-provider split models implies. Ironically, in provider units where the 'rules were undermined', the informants (team leaders of provider units) seemed to be most satisfied with the quality of home care that they delivered. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Addressing workplace violence among nurses who care for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the social-situational (ie, Job Demands-Resource model) and individual (ie, negative affectivity) factors that might be associated with violence among nurses caring for the elderly (aged care nurses). Workplace violence is recognized as a serious issue among nurses. Effective intervention and prevention require an understanding of antecedent factors. Nurses working in elderly care facilities across an Australian healthcare organization participated in a cross-sectional survey. Job demands were associated with all of the externally sourced types of violence. Low job control was linked with external emotional abuse and physical assault. Outside work support was related to external physical assault and verbal sexual harassment. Finally, high negative affectivity was linked to internal and external emotional abuse and threat of assault. Both the Job Demands-Resource model and negative affectivity were useful in identifying relationships with violence, supporting suggestions that situational and individual factors are associated with violence among nurses who care for the elderly.

  10. Leadership and management skills of first-line managers of elderly care and their work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrazek, Fathya; Skytt, Bernice; Aly, Magda; El-Sabour, Mona Abd; Ibrahim, Naglaa; Engström, Maria

    2010-09-01

    To study the leadership and management skills of first-line managers (FLMs) of elderly care and their work environment in Egypt and Sweden. FLMs in Egypt and Sweden are directly responsible for staff and quality of care. However, FLMs in Sweden, in elderly care, have smaller units/organizations to manage than do their colleagues in Egypt. Furthermore, family care of the elderly has been the norm in Egypt, but in recent years institutional care has increased, whereas in Sweden, residential living homes have existed for a longer period. A convenience sample of FLMs, 49 from Egypt and 49 from Sweden, answered a questionnaire measuring leadership and management skills, structural and psychological empowerment, job satisfaction and psychosomatic health. In both countries, FLMs' perceptions of their leadership and management skills and psychological empowerment were quite high, whereas scores for job satisfaction and psychosomatic health were lower. FLMs had higher values in several factors/study variables in Egypt compared with in Sweden. The work environment, both in Egypt and Sweden, needs to be improved to increase FLMs' job satisfaction and decrease stress. The cultural differences and levels of management have an effect on the differences between the two countries. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Costs and benefits of home care for the elderly versus residential care: a comparison using propensity scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, L.; Berden, C.; Sadiraj, K.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the costs of residential care and home care shows that the former is more expensive for society. However, elderly people seem to be happier in residential care. All stakeholders, except the state (and thus the taxpayer), benefit if elderly people enter residential care. This reveals

  13. Three dialogues concerning robots in elder care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Theodore A; Barnes, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    The three dialogues in this contribution concern 21st century application of life-like robots in the care of older adults. They depict conversations set in the near future, involving a philosopher (Dr Phonius) and a nurse (Dr Myloss) who manages care at a large facility for assisted living. In their first dialogue, the speakers discover that their quite different attitudes towards human-robot interaction parallel fundamental differences separating their respective concepts of consciousness. The second dialogue similarly uncovers deeply contrasting notions of personhood that appear to be associated with respective communities of nursing and robotics. The additional key awareness that arises in their final dialogue links applications of life-like robots in the care of older adults with potential transformations in our understandings of ourselves - indeed, in our understandings of the nature of our own humanity. This series of dialogues, therefore, appears to address a topic in nursing philosophy that merits our careful attention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The teaching about the care of the elderly in nursing training: the situation in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Sidney Costa Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to look at the teaching situation of the nursing undergraduate degree’s courses about eldercare in Portugal. A documentary research on the teaching programs in 39 nursing schools, 26 schools presented syllabus units related to the topic ‘eldercare’ and in eight of these schools the contents of the units were identified. Using textual analysis and from the categories we concluded that the teaching regarding eldercare for the nurse training in Portugal is focused on hospital care; it is directed to the adult/elderly/family; it explores the definitions related to the aging process; it explores community issues, legislation and research. People responsible for the design/monitoring of teaching programs should include teaching regarding eldercare in the nurse training, considering that the elder population is increasing in Portugal.

  15. The contributions of the elderly care at the hiperdia program, for vocational training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Jéssica Rodrigues de França

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to report descriptively the lived experience in basic health unit by academics, and describe the practices in the elderly HIPERDIA program, contributing to the training of the academic. The preparation of this study embasou in the descriptive approach with a qualitative approach, developed at the Basic Health Unit in the Municipality of Parnamirim (RN. Given the experiences, one can understand the care with these elderly patients with chronic diseases, enabling the formation of a more qualified professional to draw up specific intervention strategies. The study finds that allowed for the formation of nursing academic, curricular and extracurricular internship is of great importance, since it enables the joining of theory and practice through activities that are held during stages.  

  16. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine......" protocol was directed toward improving ICU environment between 10pm and 6am. Noise levels during control and intervention nights were recorded. Patients on mechanical ventilation and able to give consent were eligible for the study. We monitored sleep by PSG.The standard (American Association of Sleep...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...

  17. The outcomes of the elderly in acute care general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Louis, E; Sudarshan, M; Al-Habboubi, M; El-Husseini Hassan, M; Deckelbaum, D L; Razek, T S; Feldman, L S; Khwaja, K

    2016-02-01

    Elderly patients form a growing subset of the acute care surgery (ACS) population. Older age may be associated with poorer outcomes for some elective procedures, but there are few studies focusing on outcomes for the elderly ACS population. Our objective is to characterize differences in mortality and morbidity for acute care surgery patients >80 years old. A retrospective review of all ACS admissions at a large teaching hospital over 1 year was conducted. Patients were classified into non-elderly (4 days) hospital stay (p = 0.05), increased postoperative complications (p = 0.002), admission to the ICU (p = 0.002), and were more likely to receive a non-operative procedure (p = 0.003). No difference was found (p = NS) for patient flow factors such as time to consult general surgery, time to see consult by general surgery, and time to operative management and disposition. Compared to younger patients admitted to an acute care surgery service, patients over 80 years old have a higher risk of complications, are more likely to require ICU admission, and stay longer in the hospital.

  18. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-10-01

    The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains inadequate to prepare them for the social and healthcare needs of the elderly. To determine the essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care. First, a draft version of essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care (N=120) was developed and approved by experts, also members of the project steering committee. Second, a Delphi survey was conducted to determine the essential competencies. The Delphi panel consisted of eleven field experts (teachers/educational developers) working for different vocational education training colleges in the Netherlands. Ten panel members participated in a two-round consensus building process via email. A definitive set of 116 essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and 42 essential competencies for the initial education of care helpers were determined. The competencies in the definitive set are more in line with social and healthcare needs of the elderly like: autonomy, daily functioning prevention of health problems, healthy ageing and wellbeing, involvement of informal care, collaboration between professionals and informal care. The main challenge now is to translate these competencies into educational programmes for vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Recommendations are made for the implementation of these competencies in the Dutch vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Palliative care for the elderly - developing a curriculum for nursing and medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Bongartz Maren; Schulz Christian; Just Johannes M; Schnell Martin W

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Delivering palliative care to elderly, dying patients is a present and future challenge. In Germany, this has been underlined by a 2009 legislation implementing palliative care as compulsory in the medical curriculum. While the number of elderly patients is increasing in many western countries multimorbidity, dementia and frailty complicate care. Teaching palliative care of the elderly to an interprofessional group of medical and nursing students can help to provide better...

  20. Impact of hospice care on end-of-life hospitalization of elderly patients with lung cancer in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chao Kang

    2012-05-01

    Conclusion: Hospice care has provided a humane and cost-efficient pathway for end-of-life elderly patients with lung cancer. Parenteral nutrition/hydration should be limited for terminal care patients. Opioids should be promoted for the relief of pain and dyspnea in acute ward care. Family physicians and radiation oncologists play important roles in hospice care. Compared with the prevalence of hospice care in the United Kingdom and other developed countries, hospice care in Taiwan is in the position to be expanded.

  1. Caring for Mom and Neglecting Yourself? The Health Effects of Caring for an Elderly Parent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coe, N.B.; Van Houtven, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    We examine the physical and mental health effects of providing care to an elderly mother on the adult child caregiver. We address the endogeneity of the selection in and out of caregiving using an instrumental variable approach, and carefully control for baseline health and work status of the adult

  2. Quality indicators of laryngeal cancer care in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourin, Christine G; Frick, Kevin D; Blackford, Amanda L; Herbert, Robert J; Quon, Harry; Forastiere, Arlene A; Eisele, David W; Dy, Sydney M

    2014-09-01

    To examine associations between quality of care, survival, and costs in elderly patients treated for laryngeal squamous cell cancer (SCCA). Retrospective analysis of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Medicare data. We evaluated 2,370 patients diagnosed with laryngeal SCCA from 2004 to 2007 using multivariate regression and survival analysis. Using quality indicators derived from guidelines for recommended care, summary measures of quality were calculated for diagnosis, initial treatment, surveillance, treatment of recurrence, end-of-life care, performance, and an overall summary measure of quality. High-quality care was associated with significant differences in survival for diagnosis [HR = 0.80, 95% CI (0.66-0.97)], initial treatment [HR = 0.75 (0.63-0.88)], surveillance [HR = 0.54 (0.44-0.66)], treatment of recurrence [HR = 1.54 (1.26-1.89)], end-of-life care [HR = 0.69 (0.52-0.92)], performance [HR = 0.41 (0.33-0.52)], and an overall summary measure of quality [HR = 0.66 (0.54-0.80)], which was significantly associated with lower mean incremental costs [-$24,958 (-$35,873 - -$14,042)]. There was a significant survival advantage for initial treatment with surgery and postoperative radiation [HR = 0.66 (0.53-0.82)] and high-volume surgical care [HR = 0.64 (0.43-0.96)] after controlling for all other variables, including quality of care. High-quality larynx cancer care in elderly patients was associated with improved survival and reduced costs; however, high-quality care for treatment of recurrence was associated with poorer survival. These data suggest that survival outcomes in elderly patients with laryngeal cancer are not entirely explained by differences in the receipt of quality care using existing treatment and performance quality indicators and also suggest a need to develop sensitive and valid quality indicators of larynx cancer care in this population. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of a Medical and Mental Health Unit compared with standard care for older people whose emergency admission to an acute general hospital is complicated by concurrent 'confusion': a controlled clinical trial. Acronym: TEAM: Trial of an Elderly Acute care Medical and mental health unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladman John RF

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with delirium and dementia admitted to general hospitals have poor outcomes, and their carers report poor experiences. We developed an acute geriatric medical ward into a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit over an eighteen month period. Additional specialist mental health staff were employed, other staff were trained in the 'person-centred' dementia care approach, a programme of meaningful activity was devised, the environment adapted to the needs of people with cognitive impairment, and attention given to communication with family carers. We hypothesise that patients managed on this ward will have better outcomes than those receiving standard care, and that such care will be cost-effective. Methods/design We will perform a controlled clinical trial comparing in-patient management on a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit with standard care. Study participants are patients over the age of 65, admitted as an emergency to a single general hospital, and identified on the Acute Medical Admissions Unit as being 'confused'. Sample size is 300 per group. The evaluation design has been adapted to accommodate pressures on bed management and patient flows. If beds are available on the specialist Unit, the clinical service allocates patients at random between the Unit and standard care on general or geriatric medical wards. Once admitted, randomised patients and their carers are invited to take part in a follow up study, and baseline data are collected. Quality of care and patient experience are assessed in a non-participant observer study. Outcomes are ascertained at a follow up home visit 90 days after randomisation, by a researcher blind to allocation. The primary outcome is days spent at home (for those admitted from home, or days spent in the same care home (if admitted from a care home. Secondary outcomes include mortality, institutionalisation, resource use, and scaled outcome measures, including quality of

  4. Multimedia Education Increases Elder Knowledge of Emergency Department Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Terndrup

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elders who utilize the emergency department (ED may have little prospectiveknowledge of appropriate expectations during an ED encounter. Improving elder orientation toED expectations is important for satisfaction and health education. The purpose of this study wasto evaluate a multi-media education intervention as a method for informing independently livingelders about ED care. The program delivered messages categorically as, the number of tests,providers, decisions and disposition decision making.Methods: Interventional trial of representative elders over 59 years of age comparing pre andpost multimedia program exposure. A brief (0.3 hour video that chronicled the key events after ahypothetical 911 call for chest pain was shown. The video used a clinical narrator, 15 ED healthcare providers, and 2 professional actors for the patient and spouse. Pre- and post-video testsresults were obtained with audience response technology (ART assessed learning using a 4point Likert scale.Results: Valid data from 142 participants were analyzed pre to post rankings (Wilcoxon signedranktests. The following four learning objectives showed significant improvements: number oftests expected [median differences on a 4-point Likert scale with 95% confidence intervals: 0.50(0.00, 1.00]; number of providers expected 1.0 (1.00, 1.50; communications 1.0 (1.00, 1.50;and pre-hospital medical treatment 0.50 (0.00, 1.00. Elders (96% judged the intervention asimproving their ability to cope with an ED encounter.Conclusion: A short video with graphic side-bar information is an effective educational strategy toimprove elder understanding of expectations during a hypothetical ED encounter following calling911.

  5. Day care in the united kingdom and the netherlands : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Henk; Nuijens, Jan Maarten

    1991-01-01

    The United Kingdom and the Netherlands differ significantly with respect to structure, policy, legislation and financing of their care delivery systems. Day care services for elderly people thus developed in considerably different policy and socio-historical contexts. In this article various aspects

  6. Comprehensive care of elderly patients with hip fracture: the orthogeriatric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Frondini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hip fractures in the elderly are a major source of morbidity and mortality. Interdisciplinary hospital care models proposed for the treatment of these patients include consultant teams, integrated orthopedic-geriatric care, and comprehensive geriatric-led care settings. A prospective interventional cohort study was conducted in 4 public hospitals in the Emilia-Romagna Region of Italy to compare the outcomes of these different care models. This report presents the preliminary results obtained with an orthogeriatric model in one of these centers, a large teaching hospital in Bologna. Materials and methods: Beginning in February 2008, all patients older than 75 years admitted to the University of Bologna’s Sant’Orsola-Malpighi Hospital for hip fractures were cared for in an orthogeriatric unit. The unit consisted of 10 beds in the orthopedic ward that were managed by a geriatric specialist and a multidisciplinary team, which met daily and included an orthopedic surgeon, a physiatrist, a nurse case-manager, staff nurses, a physical therapist, and a social worker. The management protocol included a thorough geriatric work-up to identify comorbidities and risk factors, systematic assessment and prevention of pain and acute disorientation, early verticalization and moblization, postacute rehabilitation therapy, family support, and regular follow-up after discharge. Preliminary results were compared with those achieved in the same orthopedic ward prior to the creation of the Orthogeriatric Unit. Results: During 2008, 226 elderly patients (mean age 86.2 + 5.5 years, 73.4% of whom were women, were admitted to the Orthogeriatric Unit for hip fractures. The mean Charlson comorbidity index of this cohort was 3.0 + 1.8. Half the patients had Activity of Daily Living scores < 4, and cognitive impairment was common (mean score on Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire: 5.9 + 3.2. Compared with figures obtained in the hospital

  7. THE PREVALENCE OF DEPRESSION AND ITS RISK FACTORS AMONG MALAY ELDERLY IN RESIDENTIAL CARE

    OpenAIRE

    R. Normala; C. Azlini; M. J. Nurul Jannah; Z. M. Lukman

    2014-01-01

    The motivation for the study is to improve the quality of life for elderly in residential care particularly the mental health aspect. Hence, the aim of this study is to examine the prevalence of depression and to identify risk factors related to depression among Malay elderly in residential care. Changes in social structure and economic status have shifted the direction of care for elderly people, as the value of filial piety has gradually declined among the modern Malays. The researchers hyp...

  8. Interprofessional education in primary care for the elderly : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Luten, Truus A.; van Etten, Antoinette V. M.; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Roodbol, Petrie F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of nurses and physicians required to meet this demand. At present, the main focus of health care in the Netherlands lies on illness and treatment. However, (frail) elderly

  9. Geriatric patient profile in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akin; Hakverdioglu, Gulendam; Ozlem, Maryem; Ozlem, Maryem; Yurekli, Ismail; Gurbuz, Ali; Alp, Nilgun Akalin

    2013-11-01

    To determine hospitalization durations and mortalities of elderly in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit. The retrospective study was conducted in a Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit in Turkey and comprised patient records from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Computerized epicrisis reports of 255, who had undergone a cardiac surgery were collected. The patients were grouped according to their ages, Group I aged 65-74 and Group II aged 75 and older. European society for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation scores of the two groups were compared using SPSS 17. Overall, there were 80 (31.37%) females and 175 (68.62%) males. There were 138 (54.1%) patients in Group I and 117 (45.9%) in Group II. Regarding their hospitalization reasons, it was determined that 70 (27.5%) patients in Group I and 79 (30.9%) patients in Group II were treated with the diagnosis ofcoronary artery disease. The average hospitalization duration of patients in the intensive care unit was determined to be 11.57 +/- 0.40 days. Regarding the EuroSCORE score intervals of patients, 132 (51.8%) had 3-5 and 225 (88.2%) patients were transferred to the Cardiovascular Surgery and then all of them were discharged; 5 (4.1%) had a mortal course; and 11 (7.7%) were transferred to the anaesthesia intensive care unit. The general mortality rates are very low in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit and the patients have a good prognosis.

  10. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

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    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  11. Care management in nursing within emergency care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane; Vieira Hermida, Patrícia Madalena; da Silva Copelli, Fernanda Hannah; Guedes Dos Santos, José Luís; Lorenzini Erdmann, Alacoque; Regina de Andrade, Selma

    2015-12-01

    Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  12. Indigenous Elder Insights About Conventional Care Services in Alaska: Culturally Charged Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrery, Jean E

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous peoples around the world endure health and social disparities. In the United States, such disparities are typically ameliorated through conventional care services and organizations. To examine points of tension that characterize culturally pluralistic care services in the United States, specifically Alaska, within context of Indigenous colonial histories. The research design is ethnographic and multisited, comprising 12 months of fieldwork across urban, rural and remote village sites in Alaska. A conceptual lens that accounts for culturally diverse social spaces where relations of power are at stake frames research presented here. This work incorporates relational and participatory action research principles with Alaska Native Elders. Ethnographic evidence was collected through multiple methods, including field notes, documents, and interviews, with ethnographic analysis involving atlas.ti. Alaska Native Elders describe salient points of tension characterizing Alaska's conventional care services through the following insights: generational curses--a pain, prejudice on both sides-wounded, and value-systems clash-fighting. This article concludes with discussion about collective anxieties and implications for care services.

  13. Attitudes and behaviors of hospital staff toward elders in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacelon, Cynthia S

    2002-11-01

    This study was a grounded-theory approach to the social processes engaged in by elderly people while in the hospital. Staff behaviors were identified along two continua, attitude, which affected the elders' dignity and autonomy, and managing care, which affected the elders' health. Elders described the physicians' role as the director of their health care. The elders characterized the nurses' role to provide their medications and direct needs, whereas the nurses identified their role as providing education and emotional support. Implications and recommendations for practice are offered. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  14. [Home care to the elderly who had stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Larissa Chaves; Lopes, Regina Lúcia Mendonça

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to Identify the knowledge production about the stroke in elderly under home care. Bibliographic research whose data were collected though the abstracts from 1997 to 2007, contained in LILACS and SciELO databases. The following key words were used: home assistance, aged people and cerebrovascular accident. Fifty-two references were found in the LILACS database, nine in the SciELO Brazil, and three in the SciELO Cuba. Most of the researches were carried out in 2000. Regarding the method, qualitative method predominance were observed, and central theme is related to the care giver, as well as to the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of the disease. It was observed that this knowledge is still established in Brazil, and the themes related to the person submitted to home care and violence to the aged are still little explored.

  15. Accountable Care Units: A Disruptive Innovation in Acute Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Bryan W; Shapiro, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Accountable Care Units are a disruptive innovation that has moved care on acute care units from a traditional silo model, in which each discipline works separately from all others, to one in which multiple disciplines work together with patients and their families to move patients safely through their hospital stay. This article describes the "what," "how," and "why" of the Accountable Care Units model as it has evolved in different locations across a single health system and includes the lessons learned as different units and hospitals continue working to implement the model in their complex care environments.

  16. Risk Factors of Co‏ronary Artery Disease in Residents and Non-Resid Entsof Elderly Care Homes in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzal Shamsi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in United States and many parts of the world. This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors of coronary artery disease in residents and non-residents of elderly care homes in Tehran. Methods & Materials: In this descriptive study, about 382 elderly with above 65 years of age participated, from whom 191 were non-resident and 191 were resident of elderly care homes in Tehran in 1388. Random-cluster sampling method was used to choose samples from elderly care homes of different regions of Tehran and also the same was performed for non-resident elderly in houses of Tehran. Required data was gathered by interview using a questionnaire. Measurement of height and weight (body-mass index or BMI, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and blood lipid profile was performed as well. All statistics were computed using SPSS17 software using parametric and nonparametric statistical tests, 2 and Fisher’s Exact test. P<0.05 denoted a statistical significance. Results: Prevalence of risk factors in resident and non-resident elderly of elderly care homes was as follows: high systolic (26.2% and 36.6% and diastolic (24.1% and 31.9% blood pressure, high cholesterol (28.3% and 36.1%, high triglyceride (31.4% and 42.9%, obesity (12.6% and 22%, diabetes (12% and 17.3%, physical inactivity (18.8% and 7.4% and lack of exercise(56.6% and 16.2%, stress (22.5% and 2.1% (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors in elderly is high. Prevalence of all risk factors was higher in non-resident elderly than residents of elderly care homes except physical activity, exercise and stress. Therefore, training elderly the correct lifestyle could decrease the risk of coronary artery disease and its complications.

  17. Use of medicinal plants by primary care elderly

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    Laura Ligiana Dias Szerwieski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Our study objective was to verify the use of medicinal plants by elderly users of the primary care. The study has a cross-sectional, correlational, analytical and descriptive design with a quantitative approach. It was carried out in the west of Paraná state, in 2016. We applied 252 questionnaires with socio-demographic information and questions about the use of medicinal plants. Our results showed that 72.22% of elderly use plants, and of the most cited ones, Peppermint, Lemon Grass, Boldo and Rosemary were noteworthy. Elderly report to use them because they are better for healing, they prefer them, and it does not harm. There was disagreement regarding the recommendations, where 36.81% does not recommend them for fear to cause harm. About toxicity, they reported adverse events that are not found in the scientific literature. We highlight the importance of a correct guidance regarding the toxicity of some plants, as well as their benefits, and the importance of the nurse in this context acting as a health promoter.

  18. Psychological type profile of Lead Elders within the Newfrontiers network of churches in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Leslie J.; Gubb, Sean; Robbins, Mandy

    2009-01-01

    This study set out to examine the psychological type profile of Lead Elders within the Newfrontiers network of churches in the United Kingdom and to compare this profile with the established profile of clergymen in the Church of England. A sample of 134 Lead Elders completed the Francis Psychological Type Scales. The study shows that Newfrontiers Lead Elders display slight preferences for extraversion over introversion, for sensing over intuition, and for thinking over feeling, and a strong p...

  19. Relationship between home care service use and changes in the care needs level of Japanese elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Mikiya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the introduction of long-term care insurance (LTCI in Japan, more home care services are available for the community-dwelling elderly. To deliver effective home care services, it is important to know the effects of service use. In this study, as the first step to determine this, we sought to describe different home service use in the sustained/improved group and deteriorated group in their care needs levels, and to report the relationship between the use of home care services and changes in care needs levels. Methods The participants included 624 of a total of 1,474 users of LTCI services in one city in Japan. Home care service users were stratified into a 'lower care needs level subgroup' and a 'higher care needs level subgroup' based on the baseline care needs level. Simple statistical comparison and multiple logistic regression analyses in which the change in care needs level was set as a dependent variable were performed. Gender, age, and baseline care needs level were designated as control variables. Home based services were treated as independent variables. In this study, home care services consisted of home help, home bathing services, a visiting nurse, home rehabilitation, nursing home daycare, health daycare, loan of medical devices, respite stay in a nursing home, respite stay in a health care facility, respite stay in a sanatorium-type medical care facility, and medical management by a physician. Results In the lower care needs level subgroup, age (OR = 1.04, CI, 1.01-1.08, use of respite stay in a nursing home (OR = 2.55; CI, 1.43-4.56, and the number of types of long-term care services (OR = 1.33; CI, 1.02-1.74 used during an 11 month period were significantly related to a deterioration of the user's care needs level. In the higher care needs level subgroup, use of medical management by a physician (OR = 6.99; CI, 1.42-41.25 was significantly related to a deterioration of the user's care needs level. There

  20. Relationship between home care service use and changes in the care needs level of Japanese elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Gohei; Tamiya, Nanako; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Sato, Mikiya; Takahashi, Hideto

    2009-12-21

    With the introduction of long-term care insurance (LTCI) in Japan, more home care services are available for the community-dwelling elderly. To deliver effective home care services, it is important to know the effects of service use. In this study, as the first step to determine this, we sought to describe different home service use in the sustained/improved group and deteriorated group in their care needs levels, and to report the relationship between the use of home care services and changes in care needs levels. The participants included 624 of a total of 1,474 users of LTCI services in one city in Japan. Home care service users were stratified into a 'lower care needs level subgroup' and a 'higher care needs level subgroup' based on the baseline care needs level. Simple statistical comparison and multiple logistic regression analyses in which the change in care needs level was set as a dependent variable were performed. Gender, age, and baseline care needs level were designated as control variables. Home based services were treated as independent variables. In this study, home care services consisted of home help, home bathing services, a visiting nurse, home rehabilitation, nursing home daycare, health daycare, loan of medical devices, respite stay in a nursing home, respite stay in a health care facility, respite stay in a sanatorium-type medical care facility, and medical management by a physician. In the lower care needs level subgroup, age (OR = 1.04, CI, 1.01-1.08), use of respite stay in a nursing home (OR = 2.55; CI, 1.43-4.56), and the number of types of long-term care services (OR = 1.33; CI, 1.02-1.74) used during an 11 month period were significantly related to a deterioration of the user's care needs level. In the higher care needs level subgroup, use of medical management by a physician (OR = 6.99; CI, 1.42-41.25) was significantly related to a deterioration of the user's care needs level. There were no home based services significantly related to

  1. Operational and quality outcomes of a mobile acute care for the elderly service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Jeffrey I; Korc-Grodzicki, Beartriz; Du, Qingling; Leipzig, Rosanne M; Siu, Albert L

    2011-01-01

    The traditional acute care for the elderly (ACE) unit has demonstrated improved functional outcomes without increased costs or changes in length of stay (LOS). It is, however, limited in scope to patients cared for on a fixed geographical unit. To compare operational and quality outcomes for patients cared for on a mobile ACE (MACE) service to those cared for on a unit-based ACE service and matched controls on other general medical services. Retrospective cohort study with propensity-score matching. An urban academic medical center. A total of 8094 hospitalized adults >64 years old admitted to an ACE, MACE, and general medical services from July 2006 to June 2009. An interdisciplinary MACE service com- posed of a geriatrician-hospitalist, fellow, nurse coordinator, and social worker. LOS, total cost, 7- and 30-day readmission rates, and in-hospital mortality. Mean LOS and total cost were significantly lower for patients in the MACE service compared with the ACE unit service (5.8 vs 7.9 days, P mobile ACE service may result in reduced LOS and lower costs with no change in in-hospital mortality or 7- or 30-day readmission rates when compared with standard medical service and a traditional unit-based ACE service. Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Managing Organized Insecurity: The Consequences for Care Workers of Deregulated Working Conditions in Elderly Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Ede

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Part-time work is more than twice as common among women than men in Sweden. New ways of organizing working hours to allow for more full-time jobs have been introduced for care workers in elderly care, which means unscheduled working hours based on the needs of the workplace. The aim of the study is to analyze how the organization of the unscheduled working hours affect employees’ daily lives and their possibility to provide care. The Classic Grounded Theory method was used in a secondary analysis of interviews with employees and managers in Swedish municipal elderly care. The implementation of unscheduled working hours plunged employees into a situation of managing organized insecurity. This main concern for the care workers involved a cyclic process of first having to be available for work because of economic and social obligations to the employer and the co-workers, despite sacrifices in the private sphere. Then, they had to be adaptable in relation to unknown clients and co-workers and to the employer, which means reduced possibilities to provide good care. Full-time jobs were thus created through requiring permanent staff to be flexible, which in effect meant eroded working conditions with high demands on employee adaptability. Solving the part-time problem in elderly care by introducing unscheduled working hours may in effect be counter-productive.

  3. Impact of home care versus alternative locations of care on elder health outcomes: an overview of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boland, L.; Legare, F.; Perez, M.M.; Menear, M.; Garvelink, M.M.; McIsaac, D.I.; Guerard, G.P.; Emond, J.; Briere, N.; Stacey, D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many elders struggle with the decision to remain at home or to move to an alternative location of care. A person's location of care can influence health and wellbeing. Healthcare organizations and policy makers are increasingly challenged to better support elders' dwelling and health

  4. One Welfare State, Two Care Regimes: Understanding Developments in Child and Elderly Care Policies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooren, F.; Becker, U.

    2012-01-01

    The different development of child and elderly care in the Netherlands reflects the hybrid character of its welfare system, which, until the 1980s, featured both social democratic and conservative elements. While public involvement in the provision of elderly care services rapidly increased after

  5. Variability of intensive care admission decisions for the very elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Boumendil

    Full Text Available Although increasing numbers of very elderly patients are requiring intensive care, few large sample studies have investigated ICU admission of very elderly patients. Data on pre triage by physicians from other specialities is limited. This observational cohort study aims at examining inter-hospital variability of ICU admission rates and its association with patients' outcomes. All patients over 80 years possibly qualifying for ICU admission who presented to the emergency departments (ED of 15 hospitals in the Paris (France area during a one-year period were prospectively included in the study. Main outcome measures were ICU eligibility, as assessed by the ED and ICU physicians; in-hospital mortality; and vital and functional status 6 months after the ED visit. 2646 patients (median age 86; interquartile range 83-91 were included in the study. 94% of participants completed follow-up (n = 2495. 12.4% (n = 329 of participants were deemed eligible for ICU admission by ED physicians and intensivists. The overall in-hospital and 6-month mortality rates were respectively 27.2% (n = 717 and 50.7% (n = 1264. At six months, 57.5% (n = 1433 of patients had died or had a functional deterioration. Rates of patients deemed eligible for ICU admission ranged from 5.6% to 38.8% across the participating centers, and this variability persisted after adjustment for patients' characteristics. Despite this variability, we found no association between level of ICU eligibility and either in-hospital death or six-month death or functional deterioration. In France, the likelihood that a very elderly person will be admitted to an ICU varies widely from one hospital to another. Influence of intensive care admission on patients' outcome remains unclear.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00912600.

  6. Does care to dependent elderly people living at home increase their mental health?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Barnay; Sandrine Juin

    2014-01-01

    In France, the number of dependent elderly should d ouble by 2060. It is thus important to address the well-being of this growing share of the population. This work aims at estimating the effects of informal care and formal care on the mental health of dependent elderly. Furthermore, we allow the effect of care to vary de pending on the level of dependence, the gender of the dependent elderly and the relationship between the elderly and the primary informal caregiver. Many theoretical models ...

  7. Primary Care for the Elderly Bereaved: Recommendations for Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Sue; Schaefer, Kristen; Rosowsky, Erlene

    2018-03-02

    The aim of this study was to explore the current practices of primary care physicians (PCPs) in providing bereavement care to elderly patients, with implications for medical education. A total of 63 PCPs answered a brief online survey about their typical practices, barriers, comfort level with bereavement, and confidence in their ability to diagnose prolonged grief disorder (PGD). They were recruited through an online newsletter and contacts of one of the authors. The results found that two-thirds of the PCPs do not routinely screen their elderly patients for recent losses, nor do they refer to mental health clinicians when loss is identified. Barriers included not learning of the deaths in patients' lives and lack of time during clinic visits. Those PCPs who had experienced their own losses were significantly more comfortable in speaking to patients about recent losses and more confident in their ability to diagnose PGD. We recommend bereavement education be incorporated into the medical school curriculum from the outset, utilizing the psychological principle of graded exposure to bereaved individuals.

  8. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira; Patrícia Madalena Vieira Hermida; Fernanda Hannah da Silva Copelli; José Luís Guedes dos Santos; Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann; Selma Regina de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency se...

  9. Institutional abuse toward the elderly: Perceptions of health care providers and older adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guadalupe Ruelas-González

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the health care providers (HCP and elderly patients’ perceptions about abuse of the elderly by health personnel of public health services, in selected cities in Mexico. Materials and methods. A qualitative study and a strategy of data triangulation were performed during 2009 and 2012; 13 HCPs and 12 elders were interviewed, in order to obtain their experience regarding elder abuse. Grounded Theory proceedings were used for the analysis. Results. Elder abuse is a naturalized practice, from HCP and elderly people’s point of view; these perceptions are showed in different ways. Conclusion. Institutionalization, historical professionalization and lack of consciousness about needs of the elderly (sociocultural and economic, require changes in planning, organization and monitoring process in the Health System; training and educational interventions on staff and exchange attitudes and behavior are necessary in order to offer a health care that is comprehensive, decent, human and with respect for the human rights.

  10. Oral hygiene care status of elderly with dementia and in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philcy; Rogers, Clive; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2012-06-01

    To explore the effectiveness of oral hygiene care on plaque and gingival status of residents with dementia. Oral hygiene and oral hygiene care has been reported to be poor among the institutionalised elderly with dementia. The severity of oral diseases has been shown to increase with the severity of physical and cognitive impairment related with dementia. Little research has been carried out on plaque and gingival status of elderly with dementia and the impact of disability related with dementia on oral health in residential aged care facilities (RACF). A cross-sectional study of 205 elderly residing in RACF in Perth. Forty-one percent of the residents in RACF had dementia. Sixty percent of the residents with dementia and 75% of the residents with an Activities of Daily Living Oral Health score of D were assisted with oral care. Mean plaques scores and extent of gingival inflammation were higher for residents in the DD and D subgroups and resident with dementia. Residents assisted with brushing had higher mean plaque score and more moderate gingival inflammation. Oral hygiene care status in residents with dementia was poor despite the fact that oral care assistance was being provided. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Assessment of primary health care received by the elderly and health related quality of life: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato dos Santos de Carvalho, Vivian C; Rossato, Sinara L; Fuchs, Flávio D; Harzheim, Erno; Fuchs, Sandra C

    2013-06-24

    Population aging leads to increased burden of chronic diseases and demand in public health. This study aimed to assess whether the score of Primary Health Care (PHC) is associated with a) the model of care - Family Health Strategy (FHS) vs. traditional care model (the Basic Health Units; BHU); b) morbid conditions such as - hypertension, diabetes mellitus, mental disorders, chronic pain, obesity and central obesity; c) quality of life in elderly individuals who received care in those units. A survey was conducted among the elderly between August 2010 and August 2011, in Ilheus, Bahia. We interviewed elderly patients - 60 years or older - who consulted at BHU or FHS units in that day or participated in a group activity, and those who were visited at home by the staff of PHC, selected through a random sample. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, services' attainment of primary care attributes, health problems and quality of life were investigated. The Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) was used to assess quality of life and PCATool to generate PHC scores. In addition, weight, height and waist circumference were measured. Trained research assistants, under supervision performed the data collection. A total of 511 elderly individuals were identified, two declined to participate, resulting in 509 individuals interviewed. The health care provided by the FHS has higher attainment of PHC attributes, in comparison to the BHU, resulting in lower prevalence of score below six. Except for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, other chronic problems were not independently associated with low scores in PHC. It was observed an independent and positive association between PHC score and the mental component of quality of life and an inverse association with the physical component. This study showed higher PHC attributes attainment in units with FHS, regardless of the health problem. The degree of orientation to PHC increased the mental component score of quality of life.

  12. Elderly care and the one-child policy: concerns, expectations and preparations for elderly life in a rural Chinese township.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Kiira; Baofeng, Huang

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have looked at the effect of the one-child policy on elderly care in China. This study compares the differences in concerns, expectations and preparations for elderly life of parents of reproductive age between one- and two-child families in a rural Chinese village. With support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, 800 one- and two-child families were surveyed from 2009 to 2010. The data showed that the parents of one-child families were significantly more concerned about being abandoned in old age. There was a discrepancy between parents' preferences and expectations for elderly care: while many parents "preferred" to live with their children in old age, only a small percentage "expected" to co-reside with their adult children. Some elders even preferred to live in elderly care institutions, indicating a change in the perception and accessibility of these institutions, which have historically been stigmatized and heavily restricted. As China's population ages, there is increased need for expanded services and alternatives to the traditional model of co-residence for the rural elderly.

  13. Ethics support in institutional elderly care: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Dam, S.; Molewijk, A.C.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.; Abma, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical ethics support mechanisms in healthcare are increasing but little is known about the specific developments in elderly care. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic literature review on the characteristics of existing ethics support mechanisms in institutional elderly care. A review

  14. Economies of scale in British intensive care units and combined intensive care/high dependency units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Philip; Rapoport, John; Edbrooke, David

    2004-04-01

    To estimate the relationship between size of intensive care unit and combined intensive care/high dependency units and average costs per patient day. Retrospective data analysis. Multiple regression of average costs on critical care unit size, controlling for teaching status, type of unit, occupancy rate and average length of stay. Seventy-two United Kingdom adult intensive care and combined intensive care/high dependency units submitting expenditure data for the financial year 2000-2001 as part of the Critical Care National Cost Block Programme. None. The main outcome measures were total cost per patient day and the following components: staffing cost, consumables cost and clinical support services costs. Nursing Whole Time Equivalents per patient day were recorded. The unit size variable has a negative and statistically significant ( peconomies of scale in planning intensive care and combined intensive care/high dependency units.

  15. Improving coordination of care centers for the elderly through IT support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Andreas Kaas; Lauridsen, Frederik Vahr Bjarnø; Manea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    In Denmark, care of elderly people involves numerous and relatively autonomous care providers, including care centers, activity centers, physiotherapists, doctors, and other specialists. However, due to a poor coordination of activities, many elderly experience a lack of continuity of care, missed...... appointments, and general discomfort. In this poster we report on preliminary findings from a project aimed at creating improved IT support for coordination of care for the elderly in a Danish municipality. We propose that in order to successfully support heterogeneous collaboration, our system must address...

  16. Innovative assistive technology in Finnish public elderly-care services: a focus on productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkas, Helinä

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates ways in which technology use may help municipalities improve productivity in elderly-care services. A case study of Finnish elderly-care services provides responses concerning impacts, decisions and options in technology use. The research data were collected during a 'smart home pilot' implemented in four housing service units. Over 60 assistive devices were introduced in the smart homes used during short-term housing periods. Both customers and care staff's experiences as well as processes related to the use of assistive devices were investigated on the basis of survey questionnaires, interviews and feedback. Assistive device-related operational processes were investigated with the help of concepts of 'resource focus', 'lost motion' and 'intermediate storage'. Four central operational processes were identified. Design and desirability as well as costs, such as opportunity costs of assistive devices were also a focus. Significant factors related to productivity were disclosed in this way. Technology use versus productivity needs to be 'circled' from the points of view of individual users, workplaces, service processes, and larger technology options. There must be long-term patience to introduce technology properly into use to produce positive impacts on productivity. Customers and care staff have an interlinked, vital role to play as decision-makers' informants.

  17. Developing Quality of Care Indicators for the Vulnerable Elderly: The ACOVE Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    .... Furthermore, the goal of medical care for the elderly has progressed beyond survival to maximizing quality of life, yet little attention has been paid to the overall quality of medical care that older people receive...

  18. Research Highlights: Developing Quality of Care Indicators for the Vulnerable Elderly. The ACOVE Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Furthermore, the goal of medical care for the elderly has progressed beyond survival to maximizing quality of life, yet little attention has been paid to the overall quality of medical care that older people receive...

  19. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were "being in pain", "being unable to fulfill family roles" and "being bored". For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were "being in pain", "being unable to fulfill family roles" and "not being able to communicate". The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. "Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed" was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, "hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises" and "hearing people talk about you" were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units.

  20. Construction of elderly identity within an education programme for care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    courses and on-the-job training in a nursing home or in the private homes of the elderly. The paper suggests that throughout the theoretical courses a specific elderly identity is constructed alongside the future care helper identity: E.g. while the care helpers are construed as activating and motivating...... helpers, the elderly are construed and looked upon as a homogeneous group that must be activated. Likewise in the traineeships: The care worker staff and their practices influence the students´ view upon the elderly. The elderly as well as the students are positioned by the dominant discourses within...... an educational research project; however as the programme being studied is withinThe Basic Social and Health Education Programmes in Denmark, Elderly Identity is an important subtheme....

  1. Elderly and long-term care trends and policy in Taiwan: Challenges and opportunities for health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Hung Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to address the trends and policy of elderly and long-term care in Taiwan. In response to the increasing demand of an aging society, healthcare professionals play crucial roles in elderly and long-term care and quality assurance of services. This article focuses on the current situation of elderly health care, demands of long-term care, long-term care policy in Taiwan, draft of the Long-term Care Services Act, and draft of the Long-term Care Insurance Act. After the 10-year long-term care project was proposed by the Taiwan government, the supply of health care services and demand for long-term care have created many challenges and opportunities for innovative health professional development. Challenges consist of low old dependency ratio caused by low birth rate, lack of elderly and long-term care related manpower, services and education reform related to long-term care for the future society, and interprofessional collaboration and team work of long-term care. Opportunities include expanding the roles and the career pathways of healthcare professionals, promoting the concepts of active aging and good quality of life, and developing industrial cooperation related to long-term care services. Under these circumstances, healthcare professonals are actively involved in practice, education and research of long-term care services that ensure elderly and disabled people can live a healthier and better life.

  2. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring

  3. [Home end-of-life care for advanced dementia vs advanced cancer elderly patients: dying elderly at home project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Masuda, Yuichiro; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Iguchi, Akihisa; Asahi, Takiko; Uemura, Kazumasa

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of symptoms and end-of-life care received in advanced dementia and advanced cancer elderly patients dying at home during the last two days of their lives and to evaluate the differences observed between the two groups. We used data from the Dying Elderly at Home (DEATH) project, which was a prospective study of home elderly patients dying with end-stage illness. Consecutive deceased subjects aged 65 or older who were seen at 16 study clinics belonging to the Japanese Society of Hospice and Home-care with diagnoses of all illnesses including advanced dementia and advanced cancer and died at home from October 2002 to September 2004 were included in the study. We evaluated 36 deceased subjects with advanced dementia and 116 with advanced cancer. We collected the following information: sociodemographics, ADLs, cognitive impairment, observed symptoms and end-of-life care provided during the last 48 hours of life. Deceased subjects with advanced dementia were less likely to show symptoms of pain, acute confusion, or nausea/vomiting and more likely to display fever or cough than advanced cancer patients. Also, those with advanced dementia were more likely to receive intravenous drip injection or narcotic analgesia and more likely to be given sputum suction, or antibiotics. We observed that the dying process and end-of-life care for advanced dementia elderly patients was different from that for advanced cancer elderly patients.

  4. [Health status of the elderly in primary health care practices using an integral geriatric assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Becerra, Roxana Gisela; Villarreal Ríos, Enrique; Galicia Rodríguez, Liliana; Vargas Daza, Emma Rosa; Martínez González, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    To determine the health status of patients 60 years of age or over in Primary Health Care practices using an integral geriatric assessment. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Five primary care units, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; México. Elderly patient aged 60 years of age or over, who were seen in primary health care practices. Previously signed informed consent was given, with exclusion criteria being non-completion of the integral geriatric assessment. A technical sample of conglomerates and quota was used. Medical dimension variables: visual, hearing (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly), urinary incontinence (Consultation in Incontinence Questionnaire), nutritional condition (Mini Nutritional Assessment), personal clinical history, polypharmacy; mental impairment (Mini Mental State Examination), depression (Yesavaje); functional: basic (Katz) and instrumental (Lawton and Brody) activities of daily living, mobility (Up and go) and social (Social sources scale). The analysis included percentages and confidence intervals. In the medical dimensions; 42.3% with visual impairment, 27.7% hearing, 68.3% urinary incontinence, 37.0% malnutrition, and 54.7% polypharmacy. In the mental dimension: 4.0% severe mental impairment, and 11% depression: functional dimension: 2.0% total dependence of activities of daily living; 14.3% instrumental activities impairment; 29.0% mobility impairment, and 48.0% had moderately deteriorated social resources. The health status of the elderly seen in primary health care practices is characterized by independent patients with different levels of alterations in the medical dimensions, low levels in mental alteration, and moderately deteriorated social resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Fostering teamwork in an intermediate care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Heather; Cappleman, Julia

    2011-06-01

    The government has emphasised that, to deliver high quality, integrated care, staff must work across organisational boundaries using a team approach so that everyone works towards the same goals. This article describes how one NHS-managed intermediate care unit has integrated care staff employed by the independent sector.

  6. CARE FOR HEALTH AMONG ELDERLY PEOPLE: EXPERTS’ OPINION INTERPRETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Viacheslavovna Chernyshkova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper is to determine the most important health preserving practices widely used among the elderly employees. Materials and methods: data were provided by sociological qualitative research method – semi-structured expert interview conducted in Saratov in 2015. The respondents included 10 doctors of Saratov polyclinics (7 women and 3 men of different specialties: therapists, neurologists, endocrinologists, cardiologist, allergist-immunologist, gerontologist. The survey’s key findings were discussed and analyzed. It is revealed that the majority of working pensioners do not apply for professional medical care. It is explained by the fact that the representatives of working elderly population predominantly focus on avoidance of unhealthy habits, rational labour and rest regimen, diminished conditions of work, adequate physical activity and health resort treatment. The aim of the research is also to stress that such practices as self-medication and mass media advertising for prescription drugs may worsen the health status of individuals of a sociogeriatric group.

  7. Diagnosing delirium in very elderly intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heriot, Natalie R; Levinson, Michele R; Mills, Amber C; Khine, Thinn Thinn; Gellie, Anthea L; Sritharan, Gaya

    2017-02-01

    To determine the incidence of delirium in elderly intensive care patients and to compare incidence using two retrospective chart-based diagnostic methods and a hospital reporting measure (ICD-10). Retrospective study. An ICU in a large metropolitan private hospital in Melbourne, Australia. English-speaking participants (n=348) 80+ years, admitted to ICU for >24 hours. Medical files of ICU patients admitted October 2009-October 2012 were retrospectively assessed for delirium using the Inouye chart review method, DSM-IV diagnostic criteria and ICD-10 coding data. General patient characteristics, first onset of delirium symptoms, source of delirium information, administration of delirium medication, hospital and ICU length of stay, 90 day mortality were documented. Delirium was found in 11-29% of patients, the highest incidence identified by chart review. Patients diagnosed with delirium had higher 90 day mortality, and those meeting criteria for all three methods had longer hospital and ICU length of stay. ICU delirium in the elderly is often under-reported and strategies are needed to improve staff education and diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship-based care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    At St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, implementation of the Relationship-Based Care (RBC) model of care delivery and enculturation of the philosophy of care embodied in Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring (Watson, 2007) improved patient outcomes and supported quality nursing care across the continuum of care in our organization. The ability of staff nurses to create an atmosphere of professional inquiry that places patients and families at the center of practice supported implementation of RBC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  9. Injustice in family care of the Chinese elderly in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, R; Wong, W

    1995-01-01

    With increasing longevity, family care of the Chinese elderly in Hong Kong is evolving as a "caring trap" for female caregivers, especially unmarried daughters. Despite this, as Hong Kong is still a patriarchal Chinese society, most of the major decisions affecting the destiny of frail elders are made by sons or other male members of the family. The unequal gender roles, obligations, and division of caregiving responsibilities within the Chinese family and their effects on the caring relationship are discussed. Implications of this injustice based on gender regarding family care of the elderly and the possibility of its elimination are examined.

  10. Attitudes to a Robot Bathtub in Danish Elder Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Anne-Marie Skovsgaard

    2015-01-01

    In Western countries, assistive technology is implemented on a large scale in elder care settings. Only a few studies have attempted to explore the different attitudes to assistive technology among various groups of users. In this study, we investigated and explained the different attitudes among...... implicit quality criteria, and ascribed different symbolic significance to the robot bathtub. Thus, the study demonstrated how attitudes toward the robot bathtub were connected to the informants’ institutional role. The findings challenge the current paradigm, where technology is expected to operate...... as a passive tool, simply facilitating desired human acts and interactions. Further studies drawing on the epistemological and ontological perceptions of science technology studies are needed in order to understand human rationalities in the assistive technology context and to offer new insights into how...

  11. Lessons from interprofessional e-learning: piloting a care of the elderly module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, Anitta; Heikkinen, Eija

    2004-08-01

    Educating health care professionals is a key issue in the provision of quality healthcare services. Interprofessional education has been suggested as a means of meeting this challenge. Four Finnish polytechnics providing education for nurses, social workers and physiotherapists wished to develop the content and methods of teaching the care of the elderly by collaboratively creating and implementing an interprofessional module of 15 European Credit Transfer units, using e-learning. This paper examines the planning and assessment of the impact of the pilot module. The web-based environment eminently suited teaching interprofessional care of the elderly. It supported content and methodological development and renewal of the module. It enabled discussion and collaboration between nursing, social work and rehabilitation teachers and students from the Polytechnics which are located in different parts of Finland. However, it became evident during the pilot that the most crucial challenges of the web-based pedagogy were in the ability of the teacher to supervise, support and motivate students and the organisation of interprofessional learning offered by collaborating institutions.

  12. Education of Elderly Patients Within Nursing Care in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaduchová Petra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The paper deals with the issues of the education of senior patients within nursing care. The aim of the paper is to find out the level of nurses’ knowledge and skills in educating elderly patients and to discover how these are reflected in the reality of clinical practice. It is a case study focused on showing the current real state of clinical practice related to the given topic. Methods: This paper will introduce the outcomes of a qualitative research (semistructured interview, semi-structured observation, documents analysis based on theoretical background. The research was carried out during the survey fellowship in the Slovak Republic and the respondents were nurses working in standard hospital departments. Certain phenomena, relations and influencing factors were clarified through the follow-up analysis. The gathered data were processed by using qualitative methods in the form of case studies. Results: The qualitative survey has revealed certain deficiencies in nurses’ knowledge and in the reality of the education of elderly patients in clinical practice. Discussion: The deficiencies in knowledge and skills are essential in the reality of clinical practice. Limitations: The research sample was made up of educating nurse/nurses working in geriatrics, in long-term care departments or internal departments. It included a total of 16 respondents. Conclusions: Sufficient attention should be paid to the training of nurses which should be focused on the specificities of educating seniors/senior patients as well as on the reality of education that is performed. It is necessary to provide training for working with this specific age group even in pre-gradual nursing education.

  13. Spatial Behaviour, Care And Well Being Of The Elderly In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of Nigeria's population, and yet the concerns and needs of the elderly are yet to feature prominently in major policy debates. In this contribution I examine spatial ... Also, about 50% of the elderly sphere of activities is within 1Km from their house location. Result of the correlation ...

  14. Intensive care unit family satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S M; So, H M; Fok, S K; Li, S C; Ng, C P; Lui, W K; Heyland, D K; Yan, W W

    2015-10-01

    To examine the level of family satisfaction in a local intensive care unit and its performance in comparison with international standards, and to determine the factors independently associated with higher family satisfaction. Questionnaire survey. A medical-surgical adult intensive care unit in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Adult family members of patients admitted to the intensive care unit for 48 hours or more between 15 June 2012 and 31 January 2014, and who had visited the patient at least once during their stay. Of the 961 eligible families, 736 questionnaires were returned (response rate, 76.6%). The mean (± standard deviation) total satisfaction score, and subscores on satisfaction with overall intensive care unit care and with decision-making were 78.1 ± 14.3, 78.0 ± 16.8, and 78.6 ± 13.6, respectively. When compared with a Canadian multicentre database with respective mean scores of 82.9 ± 14.8, 83.5 ± 15.4, and 82.6 ± 16.0 (Pcare were concern for patients and families, agitation management, frequency of communication by nurses, physician skill and competence, and the intensive care unit environment. A performance-importance plot identified the intensive care unit environment and agitation management as factors that required more urgent attention. This is the first intensive care unit family satisfaction survey published in Hong Kong. Although comparable with published data from other parts of the world, the results indicate room for improvement when compared with a Canadian multicentre database. Future directions should focus on improving the intensive care unit environment, agitation management, and communication with families.

  15. Determinants of undergraduate nursing students' care willingness towards the elderly in China: Attitudes, gratitude and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Meng, Li-Na; Liu, Peng-Xi

    2016-08-01

    An aging population has become a serious problem in China. Improving the nursing students' care willingness is a critical way to solve this dilemma. Few studies reveal the relationship between the knowledge, care willingness, attitude towards the elderly and gratitude. This research has found that the attitude towards the elderly, the knowledge about aging, and gratitude showed correlation with care willingness. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships among knowledge about aging, care willingness, attitude towards the elderly and gratitude. A cross-sectional descriptive design has been used. From November to December 2015, a total of 382 undergraduate nursing students in China completed the questionnaires. The response rate was 95.5%. Four questionnaires including Care Willingness to the Elderly Scale (CW), Kogan's Attitudes towards Old People scale (KAOP), the Facts on Aging Quiz (FAQ), and the Gratitude Scale. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the relationship among those variables in this study. For Chinese nursing students, the care willingness of elderly was in medium-high level. Their attitude towards the elderly and gratitude were at the medium degree, while the knowledge about aging was at a lower level. The attitude towards older people, knowledge about aging, and gratitude were significantly correlated with care willingness. The knowledge about aging has no relationship with the attitude. Gratitude plays a mediation role between the knowledge about aging and care willingness. The experience of caring the elderly could lead to a positive impact in care willingness. The nursing students' knowledge about aging had a direct influence on their care willingness. Gratitude plays a mediating role between the knowledge about aging and care willingness to the elderly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Geriatric patient profile in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korha, E.A.; Hakverdioglu, G.; Ozlem, M.; Yurekli, I.; Gurbuz, A.; Alp, N.A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine hospitalization durations and mortalities of elderly in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted in a Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit in Turkey and comprised patient records from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Computerized epicrisis reports of 255, who had undergone a cardiac surgery were collected. The patients were grouped according to their ages, Group I aged 65-74 and Group II aged 75 and older. European society for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation scores of the two groups were compared using SPSS 17. Results: Overall, there were 80 (31.37%) females and 175 (68.62%) males. There were 138 (54.1%) patients in Group I and 117 (45.9%) in Group II. Regarding their hospitalization reasons, it was determined that 70 (27.5%) patients in Group I and 79 (30.9%) patients in Group II were treated with the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The average hospitalization duration of patients in the intensive care unit was determined to be 11.57+-10.40 days. Regarding the EuroSCORE score intervals of patients, 132 (51.8%)had 3-5 and 225 (88.2%) patients were transferred to the Cardiovascular Surgery and then all of them were discharged; 5 (4.1%) had a mortal course; and 11 (7.7%) were transferred to the anaesthesia intensive care unit Conclusions: The general mortality rates are very low in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit and the patients have a good prognosis. (author)

  17. Improving Quality of Care in Hospitals for Victims of Elder Mistreatment: Development of the Vulnerable Elder Protection Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Tony; Mehta-Naik, Nisha; Elman, Alyssa; Mulcare, Mary R; Stern, Michael E; Clark, Sunday; Sharma, Rahul; LoFaso, Veronica M; Breckman, Risa; Lachs, Mark; Needell, Nancy

    2018-03-01

    Hospitals have an opportunity to improve the quality of care provided to a particularly vulnerable population: victims of elder mistreatment. Despite this, no programs to prevent or stop elder abuse in the acute care hospital have been reported. An innovative, multidisciplinary emergency department (ED)-based intervention for elder abuse victims, the Vulnerable Elder Protection Team (VEPT), was developed at NewYork-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell Medical Center (New York City). The VEPT is a consultation service available 24 hours a day/7 days a week to improve identification, comprehensive assessment, and treatment for potential victims of elder abuse or neglect. All ED providers have been trained on how to recognize signs of elder mistreatment. Any provider can activate the VEPT via a single page/telephone call, which triggers the VEPT's often time-consuming, complex assessment of the potential mistreatment victim. First, the ED social worker on duty performs the initial bedside assessment and separately interviews the potential perpetrator and/or caregiver. He or she then contacts the on-call VEPT medical provider to discuss next steps and other team members' potential involvement. For patients admitted to the hospital, the VEPT connects with the inpatient social workers and medical team to ensure appropriate follow-up and care planning. The VEPT program was launched in April 2017 after comprehensive training. Its impact will be measured by tracking the short-term and long-term mistreatment-related outcomes, as well as medical, mental health, functional, psychosocial, and legal outcomes of the vulnerable ED patients for whom the team provides care. Copyright © 2018 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Health economic analyses of domiciliary dental care and care at fixed clinics for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, M; Davidson, T; Ordell, S; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M; Sjögren, P

    2015-03-01

    Dental care for elderly nursing home residents is traditionally provided at fixed dental clinics, but domiciliary dental care is an emerging alternative. Longer life expectancy accompanied with increased morbidity, and hospitalisation or dependence on the care of others will contribute to a risk for rapid deterioration of oral health so alternative methods for delivering oral health care to vulnerable individuals for whom access to fixed dental clinics is an obstacle should be considered. The aim was to analyse health economic consequences of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden, compared to dentistry at a fixed clinic. A review of relevant literature was undertaken complemented by interviews with nursing home staff, officials at county councils, and academic experts in geriatric dentistry. Domiciliary dental care and fixed clinic care were compared in cost analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. The mean societal cost of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents was lower than dental care at a fixed clinic, and it was also considered cost-effective. Lower cost of dental care at a fixed dental clinic was only achieved in a scenario where dental care could not be completed in a domiciliary setting. Domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents has a lower societal cost and is cost-effective compared to dental care at fixed clinics. To meet current and predicted need for oral health care in the ageing population alternative methods to deliver dental care should be available.

  19. Thought outside the box: intensive care unit freakonomics and decision making in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Deepika; Angus, Derek C

    2010-10-01

    Despite concerted efforts to improve the quality of care provided in the intensive care unit, inconsistency continues to characterize physician decision making. The resulting variations in care compromise outcomes and impose unnecessary decisional regret on clinicians and patients alike. Critical care is not the only arena where decisions fail to conform to the dictates of logic. Behavioral psychology uses scientific methods to analyze the influence of social, cognitive, and emotional factors on decisions. The overarching hypothesis underlying this "thought outside the box" is that the application of behavioral psychology to physician decision making in the intensive care unit will demonstrate the existence of cognitive biases associated with classic intensive care unit decisions; provide insight into novel strategies to train intensive care unit clinicians to better use data; and improve the quality of decision making in the intensive care unit as characterized by more consistent, patient-centered decisions with reduced decisional regret and work-related stress experienced by physicians.

  20. Emotional geriatric care: a health worker development framework for advancing health care for the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Asiamah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The trend of population ageing is a critical global condition and is expected to impose dire socio-economic ramifications on populations in the near future. Its contribution to the global burden of disease is increasing, and the implications of this situation for the future are awe-inspiring. This paper draws from the researchers’ experience and relevant literature to recommend a framework that would guide the development and institutionalization of a specialized system of geriatric care, hereby called emotional geriatric care. The application of this framework by governments and health care organizations is expected to constantly improve care for the elderly as a way of gearing health care administration in response to ageing.

  1. [Immobility syndrome in patients being care for in a home care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Pedrazuela, C; Lázaro del Nogal, M; Verdejo Bravo, C; Royuela Arte, T; Torrijos Torrijos, M; Ribera Casado, J M

    1995-10-01

    to asses in a group of elderly patients included in a Home Care Unit, the level of immobility, the functional status based on the Katz's index and the Red Cross scale, and their medical, psychological and social consequences. assessment of elderly patients visited during three consecutive months, through and standardized protocol with 14 items related with the previous aspects. 114 elderly patients (71% females) were visited during this time. The mean age was 82.4 years. 71 patients (65.7%) had immobility, with a mean age of 83.4 years and females predominance. Based on the level of immobility, 24 patients were in bed and 44 patients were able to be in bed-armchair. 74% of the patients were severely disabled on the activities daily living (Katz G); 85% of the patients had a severe physical disability (Red Cross scale 4-5), whereas a lower percentage (36%) had severe mental disability (Red Cross scale 4-5). Neurological disorders were the most frequent etiology of immobility (72%), with only one cause in 27 patients, two causes in 20 patients and more than three causes in 24 patients. Medical consequences were the most frequent, mainly urinary and chest infections, pressure sores and constipation. Immobility's syndrome represents a common medical problem in the geriatric care, related specially with the neurological and osteo-articular disorders, conditioning a high mobility.

  2. The therapeutic use of music in a care of the elderly setting: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, R

    1997-09-01

    This paper reviews recent literature concerning the use of music and music therapy in health care. Focusing particularly on the elderly, the use of music in relation to patients with dementia and Parkinsonism is examined. Brief reference is also made to the use of music in pain control. Although in this case, literature is not specific to care of the elderly settings, the results are still relevant to gerontological nursing. Projects which achieved positive results in controlling pain perception could be transferable to a care of the elderly scenario, where chronic pain is often part of daily life.

  3. Personality characteristics of staff in elderly care-a cross-cultural comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jörg; Aström, Sture; Isaksson, Ulf

    2012-02-01

    Communication and interaction between carers and residents in elderly and dementia care can be challenging and demanding. The carer's personality, one factor shaping this interaction, seems to have been neglected in the literature. This article looks at cross-cultural comparisons of staff in elderly and dementia care with individuals from the general population matched by age and gender. Compared to individuals in the general population, elderly and dementia care staff are usually slower tempered, more stoic and reflective, tolerant to monotony, and more systematic. They also have more optimistic attitudes in situations that might worry most people, and more confidence in social situations and in the face of danger and uncertainty.

  4. Obesity in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honiden, Shyoko; McArdle, John R

    2009-09-01

    The exact prevalence of obesity among critically ill patients is not known, but some evidence suggests that in the United States one in four patients in the intensive care unit is obese. The authors review the physiologic alterations in obesity that are relevant in critical illness and highlight some common diseases associated with obesity. Various practical challenges in the care of the critically ill obese patient, including drug dosing, are also reviewed.

  5. Barriers to dental care in an elderly population resident in an inner city area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, J; Gelbier, S; Watson, R M

    1990-10-01

    A sample of 765 elderly people living in London was interviewed and examined. Barriers to dental care stemmed from: elderly people's beliefs that dentures should last a life-time and dental visits are unnecessary for edentulous persons: mobility difficulties; fear; problems with access to NHS care and with access to satisfactory care. The attitudes of general dental practitioners, community dentists and final year dental students towards elderly people were favourable. Sixty per cent of surgeries were on the ground floor, and 46 per cent of premises were unsuitable for wheelchair access. Carers wanted improvement in domiciliary services. The provision of domiciliary care was significantly related to training. There was a paucity of experience in this field amongst dental students. Community dentists recognized a need for retraining before providing care for handicapped elderly people.

  6. Self-Regulation and Experience of Loneliness of Elderly People Who Live in Social Care Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitov, Ildar R.; Gorodetskaya, Inna M.

    2016-01-01

    The research addresses the peculiarities of self-regulation of loneliness experience of elderly people living in care homes. The population of the study consisted of 60 elderly people (65-80 years old). 30 of them live in families with spouses and children and 30 persons live in the State residential social service institution. It was found that…

  7. Cost-effectiveness of interpersonal psychoterapy for elderly primary care patients with major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, J.E.; van Schaik, D.J.; Heijmans, M.W.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Hout, H.P. van; de Bruijne, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Major depression is common in elderly patients. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a potentially effective treatment for depressed elderly patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of IPT delivered by mental health workers in primary care practices,

  8. Trends in the development of obesity in elderly day care attendees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-09

    Sep 9, 2013 ... to investigate the factors responsible for weight loss in the elderly men. Frequent walking and engaging in an appropriate vocation that ensures healthy bodily exercise are ways to reduce obesity in the elderly. However, care must be taken to ensure the loss of fat, and not muscle or bone mass,37 through ...

  9. Morality in the mundane. Specific Needs for Ethics Support in Elderly Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, L.M.; van der Dam, S.; Abma, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    Ethics support is called for to improve the quality of care in elderly institutions. Various forms of ethics support are presented, but the needs for ethics support remain unknown. Using a mixed-methods design, this article systematically investigates the specific needs for ethics support in elderly

  10. Evaluation of the Costs of Caring for the Senile Demented Elderly: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Teh-wei; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Evaluated economic costs for nursing home patients and elderly living in their own homes. Using time records compiled by nurses or family members, the costs incurred annually in caring for a senile demented elderly person at home were estimated to average $11,735, and in a nursing home, $22,458. (Author/BL)

  11. Informatics for the Modern Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Diana C; Jackson, Ashley A; Halpern, Neil A

    Advanced informatics systems can help improve health care delivery and the environment of care for critically ill patients. However, identifying, testing, and deploying advanced informatics systems can be quite challenging. These processes often require involvement from a collaborative group of health care professionals of varied disciplines with knowledge of the complexities related to designing the modern and "smart" intensive care unit (ICU). In this article, we explore the connectivity environment within the ICU, middleware technologies to address a host of patient care initiatives, and the core informatics concepts necessary for both the design and implementation of advanced informatics systems.

  12. Symptom assessment in elderly cancer patients receiving palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautex, Sophie; Berger, André; Chatelain, Catherine; Herrmann, François; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the concordance of symptom assessment among the multiple raters in French-speaking elderly patients with an advanced cancer benefiting from palliative care. This study was conducted in a geriatric hospital with palliative care specificity. During 6 months, patient, nurse and physician completed the Edmonton symptom assessment system on two consecutive days. 42 patients with an advanced oncological disease were included. Mean age was 72+/-9.04 (range 52-88) and 23 were females. Mean mini mental status examination (MMSE) was 27.5+/-1.6. First assessment was completed at a median of day 8 after admission. Nurses, physicians and patients assessments were reproducible between days 1 and 2 (P>0.05). Pearson correlation coefficient significantly associated nurse assessment with patient assessment for pain, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite and wellbeing (Ppatient assessment for pain, depression, drowsiness, appetite, wellbeing and shortness of breath (Ppatient score from both physicians and nurses scores weakly correlated all these factors (R2patients without cognitive failure and in stable general condition are consistent in their symptom assessment, and they have to be considered as the gold standard. Nevertheless, interdisciplinary assessment is probably a valid surrogate to self-assessment by the patient but only when the latter is truly impossible.

  13. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  14. Political experiences of changing the focus in elderly care in one municipality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertsson, Paula; Rosengren, Kristina

    2015-11-01

    To describe local politicians' experiences of an ongoing planning process for elderly care for the future in a medium-sized municipality in western Sweden. Elderly care is facing challenges because of an ageing population. The study comprised a total of eight semi-structured interviews with politicians. The interviews were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis. One category (political consensus) and three subcategories (involvement generates security, trust in change management and confidence to create visions) were identified. Political consensus across elderly care organisations could establish a sense of security for old people, their relatives and the staff in particular. Continuous information and support from different managerial levels is one way of implementing changes within large organisations. However, further research is needed to describe how to develop future elderly care. An ageing population requires cooperation across provider boundaries to further develop high-quality elderly care services. Nursing leadership during a change process is crucial to implement political decisions in care organisations. Furthermore, active marketing of the health care profession for elderly care is needed as well as new knowledge regarding old people. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Impact of home care versus alternative locations of care on elder health outcomes: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Laura; Légaré, France; Perez, Maria Margarita Becerra; Menear, Matthew; Garvelink, Mirjam Marjolein; McIsaac, Daniel I; Painchaud Guérard, Geneviève; Emond, Julie; Brière, Nathalie; Stacey, Dawn

    2017-01-14

    Many elders struggle with the decision to remain at home or to move to an alternative location of care. A person's location of care can influence health and wellbeing. Healthcare organizations and policy makers are increasingly challenged to better support elders' dwelling and health care needs. A summary of the evidence that examines home care compared to other care locations can inform decision making. We surveyed and summarized the evidence evaluating the impact of home care versus alternative locations of care on elder health outcomes. We conducted an overview of systematic reviews. Data sources included MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and CINAHL. Eligible reviews included adults 65+ years, elder home care, alternative care locations, and elder health outcomes. Two independent reviewers screened citations. We extracted data and appraised review quality using the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) checklist. Results were synthesized narratively. The search yielded 2575 citations, of which 19 systematic reviews were eligible. Three hundred and forty studies with 271,660 participants were synthesized across the systematic reviews. The categories of comparisons included: home with support versus independent living at home (n = 11 reviews), home care versus institutional care (n = 3 reviews), and rehabilitation at home versus conventional rehabilitation services (n = 7 reviews). Two reviews had data relevant to two categories. Most reviews favoured home with support to independent living at home. Findings comparing home care to institutional care were mixed. Most reviews found no differences in health outcomes between rehabilitation at home versus conventional rehabilitation services. Systematic review quality was moderate, with a median AMSTAR score of 6 (range 4 - 10 out of 11). The evidence on the impact of home care compared to alternative care locations on elder health outcomes is heterogeneous. Our findings

  16. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit

  17. Barriers in access to home care services among ethnic minority and Dutch elderly--a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suurmond, Jeanine; Rosenmöller, Doenja L.; El Mesbahi, Hakima; Lamkaddem, Majda; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Ethnic minority elderly have a high prevalence of functional limitations and chronic conditions compared to Dutch elderly. However, their use of home care services is low compared to Dutch elderly. Explore the barriers to access to home care services for Turkish, Moroccan Surinamese and ethnic Dutch

  18. Rural-urban differences in the long-term care of the disabled elderly in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In China, the rapid rate of population aging and changes in the prevalence of disability among elderly people could have significant effects on the demand for long-term care. This study aims to describe the urban-rural differences in use and cost of long-term care of the disabled elderly and to explore potential influencing factors. METHODS: This study uses data from a cross-sectional survey and a qualitative investigation conducted in Zhejiang province in 2012. The participants were 826 individuals over 60 years of age, who had been bedridden or suffered from dementia for more than 6 months. A generalized linear model and two-part regression model were applied to estimate costs, with adjustment of covariates. RESULTS: Pensions provide the main source of income for urban elderly, while the principal income source for rural elderly is their family. Urban residents spend more on all services than do rural residents. Those who are married spend less on daily supplies and formal care than the unmarried do. Age, incapacitation time, comorbidity number, level of income, and bedridden status influence spending on medical care (β=-0.0316, -0.0206, 0.1882, 0.3444, and -0.4281, respectively, but the cost does not increase as the elderly grow older. Urban residents, the married, and those with a higher income level tend to spend more on medical equipment. Urban residence and living status are the two significant factors that affect spending on personal hygiene products. CONCLUSIONS: The use of long-term care services varies by living area. Long-term care of the disabled elderly imposes a substantial burden on families. Our study revealed that informal care involves huge opportunity costs to the caregivers. Chinese policy makers need to promote community care and long-term care insurance to relieve the burden of families of disabled elderly, and particular attention should be given to the rural elderly.

  19. [Family care for the elderly and the importance of filial piety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bi-Su; Huang, Hui-Chi

    2009-08-01

    A decreasing birthrate, rising numbers of women pursuing careers, work pressures, tensions between parents and children, and a weakening in traditional filial piety mores have changed Taiwanese society in recent years. Such changes may result in poorer levels of family care. The personal ideas of children regarding filial piety determine their future willingness to take care of elderly parents. Recently, concepts associated with filial piety have shifted from a focus on authoritative filial piety to one on reciprocal filial piety. Thus, good or poor interactions between parents and children will impact on the willingness of children to take care of their parents. When children show a reduced level of filial piety than expected, they lower their parents' hopes, which may cause uncertainty and a fear of abandonment among elderly family members. Moreover, such may also give rise to abuse from family caregivers. Therefore, those involved in the care of the elderly should evaluate the relationship between a family and its elderly members and, if the family needs more care support, resources should be provided. The result will be better overall, more holistic care of the elderly. In the future, a study in the community that examines the relationship between children's concepts of filial piety and family care of the elderly is suggested. The results of such may be used in education.

  20. Effectiveness of intervention programs in primary care for the robust elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Pereira Caldas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to search the literature for intervention programs in primary care with a multiprofessional character, specifically directed at the robust elderly, and with viable and cost-effective interventions. Materials and methods. The search strategies were applied in Cochrane, Lilacs, Pubmed, Scopus, WHOLIS, Embase, Medcarib, Scielo, Web of Science, and PAHO databases. Results. 3 665 articles were found and 32 remained for analysis, grouped into four categories: care management; multidisciplinary intervention;interventions on the basis of risk; and educational interventions with health professionals. Conclusion. Strategies such as domestic interventions can promote health and functionality of elderlies, as well as reduce mortality, use of the health system and costs. Besides that, the use of hard and light-hard technologies are important for risk prevention and care management for the elderly. There is a need to create programs for risk prevention and effective management of elderly care at the primary level.

  1. Precarious Situations of Care Workers in Home-Based Elder Care in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrženjak, Majda

    2018-02-01

    Based on policy analysis and individual interviews, the author analyzes the care workers' precarious situations in home-based elder care in Slovenia, a post-socialist, European Union country characterized by a rapidly aging population and delays in adapting a long-term care system to this new social risk. Employment and quasi-employment positions which coexist in home-based care can be sorted along two continuums: between public and market service; between formal and informal work. The author argues that working conditions in home-based care differ according to the position of the care worker on these two continuums, that is, being employed in public services, being self-employed, working in informal care markets, holding a status of family assistant, or being an informal family caregiver. Although the working conditions in public services are deteriorating, the analysis shows that precarity is more severe in market and informal care, while formalization and socialization of care bring about less precarious conditions.

  2. Impact of hospice care on end-of-life hospitalization of elderly patients with lung cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shih-Chao; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Hwang, I-Hsuan; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the impact of hospice care on end-of-life elderly patients with lung cancer in Taiwan. Data were collected from deceased inpatients with lung cancer who were at least 65 years old, using the National Health Insurance Research Database of 2004. A total of 1282 patients were enrolled, of whom 277 (21.6%) received hospice care (hospice-care group) and the other 1005 (78.4%) received general acute ward care (control group). The patients' age, gender, and institution of hospitalization did not differ significantly between the two groups, and most of the patients had chosen medical centers and their affiliated hospices for terminal care. The hospice-care group had a significantly shorter hospital stay and lower costs of hospitalization than the control group, with patients cared for primarily by family physicians and radiation oncologists (all phospice-care group had an elevated incidence of co-morbid diabetes mellitus, higher scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index, fewer acute lower respiratory conditions, and fewer invasive procedures than the control group (all phospice-care group, whereas parenteral solutions were most frequently requested in the control group. Hospice care has provided a humane and cost-efficient pathway for end-of-life elderly patients with lung cancer. Parenteral nutrition/hydration should be limited for terminal care patients. Opioids should be promoted for the relief of pain and dyspnea in acute ward care. Family physicians and radiation oncologists play important roles in hospice care. Compared with the prevalence of hospice care in the United Kingdom and other developed countries, hospice care in Taiwan is in the position to be expanded. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. [Prevalence of hypertension in elderly long-term care residents in Spain. The Geriatric HTA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Baranera, Montserrat; Sánchez Ferrín, Pau; Armario, Pedro

    2006-11-11

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of hypertension in elderly long-term care residents in Spain and to describe such population in terms of comorbidity and hypertension treatment and control. A countrywide cross-sectional study was conducted in May 2003 among long-term care residents aged 65 or more. Patients in palliative care units were excluded. Hypertension was defined in patients who fulfilled at least one of the following criteria: diagnosis of hypertension on the medical record, antihypertensive medication and/or highest blood pressure values during the previous year > or = 140/90 mmHg. Overall, 13,272 subjects - mean age (standard deviation) 82.9 (7.5) years (range: 65-106 years) - were included from 223 centres; 70.6% were women. Almost 2 thirds of patients met at least one hypertension criterion (8,242 patients, 62.1%; 95% confidence interval, 61.3-62.9%). In those patients, other frequent cardiovascular risk factors were obesity (26.3%), diabetes (25.7%) and dislipemia (23.8%). A concomitant diagnosis of dementia, peripheral vascular disease, stroke or congestive heart failure was present in 37.1%, 28.3%, 26.0% and 25.1%, respectively. The proportion of hypertensive patients receiving at least one antihypertensive drug was 69.7%. Diuretics were the most commonly used agents (46.3%), followed by angiotensine converting enzyme inhibitors (34.6%). The latest blood pressure measurement was < 140/90 mmHg in 60.4% of the hypertensive patients. Elderly long-term care residents in Spain showed a high prevalence of hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors, and a substantial degree of associated clinical conditions. The proportion of antihypertensive drug therapy was comparable to those reported in similar studies.

  4. Application of Dorothea Orem's Theory of Self-Care to the Elderly Patient on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Due to improvements in health care and increasing life expectancy, a greater number of elderly patients need renal replacement therapy. Dorothea Orem's Theory of Self-Care is an appropriate model to guide healthcare providers addressing the unique capabilities of this generation. The utilization and promotion of peritoneal dialysis as a therapy option offers the elderly an improved quality of life with a greater sense of self-worth. Literature has shown the elderly have superior technique and similar peritonitis-free survival rates as the younger population.

  5. Caregiver Objective Burden and Assessments of Patient-Centered, Family-Focused Care for Frail Elderly Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Julia Hannum; Bowman, Karen F.; O'Toole, Elizabeth E.; Abbott, Katherine; Love, Thomas E.; Thomas, Charles; Dawson, Neal V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing consensus that quality of care for frail elders should include family and be evaluated in terms of patient-centered, family-focused care (PCFFC). Family caregivers are in a unique and sometimes sole position to evaluate such care. In the context of caring for physically frail elders, this study examined the extent to…

  6. Asian Indian Elderly and Care Giving: Problems and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Pillai, Vijayan K.

    1996-01-01

    Identifies the factors associated with elderly caregiving burden among Asian Indians. Generally, elderly parents experience a high level of social isolation. Caregivers express concerns over lack of informal and formal resources, and a large portion of caregivers feel a heavy burden of catering to the needs of two generations of dependents, their…

  7. Physicians' Perspectives on Caring for Cognitively Impaired Elders.(author Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wendy L.; McIlvain, Helen E.; Geske, Jenenne A.; Porter, Judy L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to develop ah in-depth understanding of the issues important to primary care physicians in providing care to cognitively impaired elders. Design and Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 primary care physicians. Text coded as "cognitive impairment" was retrieved and analyzed by use of grounded theory analysis…

  8. Caregiver Confidence: Does It Predict Changes in Disability among Elderly Home Care Recipients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lydia W.; McLaughlin, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: The primary aim of this investigation was to determine whether caregiver confidence in their care recipients' functional capabilities predicts changes in the performance of activities of daily living (ADL) among elderly home care recipients. A secondary aim was to explore how caregiver confidence and care recipient functional…

  9. Training of Professionals from the Family Health Strategy for Psychosocial Care for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Lourdes Lima Batista Maia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders of the elderly constitute a public health problem due to their high prevalence, shortage of specialized services offered in Brazil, difficulties of access by the population and deficiency in the training of professionals of the Family Health Strategy for the identification, receptiveness and psychosocial assistance to the elderly. Objectives: To analyze the training of professionals of the Family Health Strategy on psychosocial care for the elderly in the context of the Psychosocial Care Network – RAPS (Rede de Atenção Psicossocial, and to discuss how professional training influences the care provided to the elderly. Methodology: Descriptive, qualitative study carried out with 31 professionals, 13 physicians and 18 nurses, who work at the Family Health Strategy of the city of Picos, Piauí, Brazil. The data were collected in January 2016, through a semi-structured interview guide, processed by the IRAMUTEQ software and analyzed by means of the Descending Hierarchical Classification. Results: The results were presented in three segments, namely: 1. The practice of professionals from the Family Health Strategy in psychosocial care in the family context; 2. Training of specialized professionals, in the attention to the elderly, in the Family Health Strategy; 3. The Psychosocial Attention Network in the care of elderly users of alcohol and other drugs; Conclusion: Health professionals have difficulties in dealing with the elderly with mental disorders in basic care. In order to facilitate access to specialized health services and to develop actions for social reintegration, prevention and harm reduction, it is necessary to implement a policy of ongoing training and education for health professionals to improve care for the elderly. Keywords: Aging; Mental Health; Mental disorders; Family Health Strategy.

  10. The match between institutional elderly care management research and management challenges - a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Elderly care practice and its management together with policy and research play a crucial role in responding to increasing challenges in institutional care for elderly people. Successful dialogue between these is necessary. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to compare how institutional elderly care management research meets the care challenges currently emphasized in international long-term care policy documents. Methods This paper was based on a systematic literature review. After screening 1971 abstracts using inclusion/exclusion criteria, 58 refereed articles published between 2000 and 2010 remained for analysis. The articles were analyzed using theory-based content analysis by comparing the results to the framework based on analysis of international long-term care management policy documents. Results The current challenges of long-term care management identified from policy documents were Integrated Care Management, Productivity Management, Quality Management, Workforce Management and ICT Management. The research on institutional elderly care management responded somewhat to the challenges mentioned in policy documents. However, some of the challenges were studied broadly and some were paid only minor attention. Further, only few studies focused on the core items of challenges addressed in policy documents. Conclusions Institutional care management research needs to focus more on challenges in integrated care, productivity, ICT and division of labor. Managers, researchers and policy-makers should assume more active collaborative roles in processes of research, policymaking and policy implementation. In addition managers’ and policymakers’ scientific literacy needs to be enhanced. PMID:23137416

  11. The match between institutional elderly care management research and management challenges - a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Kaija; Rissanen, Sari; Hujala, Anneli

    2012-11-08

    Elderly care practice and its management together with policy and research play a crucial role in responding to increasing challenges in institutional care for elderly people. Successful dialogue between these is necessary. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to compare how institutional elderly care management research meets the care challenges currently emphasized in international long-term care policy documents. This paper was based on a systematic literature review. After screening 1971 abstracts using inclusion/exclusion criteria, 58 refereed articles published between 2000 and 2010 remained for analysis. The articles were analyzed using theory-based content analysis by comparing the results to the framework based on analysis of international long-term care management policy documents. The current challenges of long-term care management identified from policy documents were Integrated Care Management, Productivity Management, Quality Management, Workforce Management and ICT Management. The research on institutional elderly care management responded somewhat to the challenges mentioned in policy documents. However, some of the challenges were studied broadly and some were paid only minor attention. Further, only few studies focused on the core items of challenges addressed in policy documents. Institutional care management research needs to focus more on challenges in integrated care, productivity, ICT and division of labor. Managers, researchers and policy-makers should assume more active collaborative roles in processes of research, policymaking and policy implementation. In addition managers' and policymakers' scientific literacy needs to be enhanced.

  12. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  13. Nutritional Status Among Elderly in Ambulatory Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Nurizky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutritional status is a final outcome from a balance between food intake and body’s needs of the nutrients. Elderly is people whose age more than 60 years old. In Indonesia, elderly population has increased. Its phenomena is also known as population aging. Population aging is related to malnutrition in elderly. Malnutrition is defined as the insufficient, excessive or imbalanced consumption of nutrients.The objective of this study was to describe the nutritional status among elderly outpatients in geriatrics clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Methods: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study that used primary data in geriatrics clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from September 2013 to October 2013. The sampling method was convenience sampling. This study was done with  43 elderly ( women, n=27 and men, n=16 outpatients.The nutritional status was classified by the questionnaire of Mini Nutritional Assessment into malnourished, risk of malnutrition and without malnutrition (adequate. After collecting the data, it was analyzed by Microsoft Excel in presenting the proportion of the elderly nutritional status. Results: Among all the respondents, 27 (63% respondents had adequate nutrition and 16 (37% respondents had risk of malnutrition. There was no respondent who had malnutrition (undernutrition. Conclusions: Majority of elderly outpatients in geriatrics clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital had adequate nutrition.   DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1087

  14. Oral health care activities performed by caregivers for institutionalized elderly in Barcelona-Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Ovalle, Marco; Costa-de-Lima, Kenio; Pérez, Glória; Borrell, Carme; Casals-Peidro, Elías

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the frequency of brushing teeth and cleaning of dentures, performed by caregivers, for institutionalized elderly people. Methods: A cross-sectional study in a sample of 196 caregivers of 31 health centers in Barcelona. The dependent variables were frequency of dental brushing and frequency of cleaning of dentures of the elderly by caregivers. The independent variables were characteristics of caregivers and institutions. We performed bivariate and multivariate descriptive analyses. Robust Poisson regression models were fitted to determine factors associated with the dependent variables and to assess the strength of the association. Results: 83% of caregivers were women, 79% worked on more than one shift, 42% worked only out of necessity, 92% were trained to care for elderly persons, 67% were trained in oral hygiene care for the elderly, and 73% recognized the existence of institutional protocols on oral health among residents. The variables explaining the lower frequency of brushing teeth by caregivers for the elderly, adjusted for the workload, were: no training in the care of elderly persons (PRa 1.7 CI95%: 1.6-1.8), not fully agreeing with the importance of oral health care of the elderly (PRa 2.5 CI95%: 1.5-4.1) and not knowing of the existence of oral health protocols (PRa 1.8 CI95%: 1.2-2.6). The variables that explain the lower frequency of cleaning dentures, adjusted for the workload, were lack of training in elderly care (PRa 1.7 CI95%: 1.3-1.9) and not knowing of the existence of protocols (PRa 3.7 CI95%: 1.6-8.7). Conclusion: The majority of caregivers perform activities of oral health care for the elderly at least once per day. The frequency of this care depends mainly on whether caregivers are trained to perform these activities, the importance given to oral health, the workload of caregivers and the existence of institutional protocols on oral health of institutionalized elderly persons. Key words:Institutionalized elderly

  15. Palliative care for the elderly - developing a curriculum for nursing and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongartz Maren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivering palliative care to elderly, dying patients is a present and future challenge. In Germany, this has been underlined by a 2009 legislation implementing palliative care as compulsory in the medical curriculum. While the number of elderly patients is increasing in many western countries multimorbidity, dementia and frailty complicate care. Teaching palliative care of the elderly to an interprofessional group of medical and nursing students can help to provide better care as acknowledged by the ministry of health and its expert panels. In this study we researched and created an interdisciplinary curriculum focussing on the palliative care needs of the elderly which will be presented in this paper. Methods In order to identify relevant learning goals and objectives for the curriculum, we proceeded in four subsequent stages. We searched international literature for existing undergraduate palliative care curricula focussing on the palliative care situation of elderly patients; we searched international literature for palliative care needs of the elderly. The searches were sensitive and limited in nature. Mesh terms were used where applicable. We then presented the results to a group of geriatrics and palliative care experts for critical appraisal. Finally, the findings were transformed into a curriculum, focussing on learning goals, using the literature found. Results The literature searches and expert feedback produced a primary body of results. The following deduction domains emerged: Geriatrics, Palliative Care, Communication & Patient Autonomy and Organisation & Social Networks. Based on these domains we developed our curriculum. Conclusions The curriculum was successfully implemented following the Kern approach for medical curricula. The process is documented in this paper. The information given may support curriculum developers in their search for learning goals and objectives.

  16. Palliative care for the elderly--developing a curriculum for nursing and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Johannes M; Schulz, Christian; Bongartz, Maren; Schnell, Martin W

    2010-09-20

    Delivering palliative care to elderly, dying patients is a present and future challenge. In Germany, this has been underlined by a 2009 legislation implementing palliative care as compulsory in the medical curriculum. While the number of elderly patients is increasing in many western countries multimorbidity, dementia and frailty complicate care. Teaching palliative care of the elderly to an interprofessional group of medical and nursing students can help to provide better care as acknowledged by the ministry of health and its expert panels. In this study we researched and created an interdisciplinary curriculum focussing on the palliative care needs of the elderly which will be presented in this paper. In order to identify relevant learning goals and objectives for the curriculum, we proceeded in four subsequent stages. We searched international literature for existing undergraduate palliative care curricula focussing on the palliative care situation of elderly patients; we searched international literature for palliative care needs of the elderly. The searches were sensitive and limited in nature. Mesh terms were used where applicable. We then presented the results to a group of geriatrics and palliative care experts for critical appraisal. Finally, the findings were transformed into a curriculum, focussing on learning goals, using the literature found. The literature searches and expert feedback produced a primary body of results. The following deduction domains emerged: Geriatrics, Palliative Care, Communication & Patient Autonomy and Organisation & Social Networks. Based on these domains we developed our curriculum. The curriculum was successfully implemented following the Kern approach for medical curricula. The process is documented in this paper. The information given may support curriculum developers in their search for learning goals and objectives.

  17. Palliative care for the elderly - developing a curriculum for nursing and medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Delivering palliative care to elderly, dying patients is a present and future challenge. In Germany, this has been underlined by a 2009 legislation implementing palliative care as compulsory in the medical curriculum. While the number of elderly patients is increasing in many western countries multimorbidity, dementia and frailty complicate care. Teaching palliative care of the elderly to an interprofessional group of medical and nursing students can help to provide better care as acknowledged by the ministry of health and its expert panels. In this study we researched and created an interdisciplinary curriculum focussing on the palliative care needs of the elderly which will be presented in this paper. Methods In order to identify relevant learning goals and objectives for the curriculum, we proceeded in four subsequent stages. We searched international literature for existing undergraduate palliative care curricula focussing on the palliative care situation of elderly patients; we searched international literature for palliative care needs of the elderly. The searches were sensitive and limited in nature. Mesh terms were used where applicable. We then presented the results to a group of geriatrics and palliative care experts for critical appraisal. Finally, the findings were transformed into a curriculum, focussing on learning goals, using the literature found. Results The literature searches and expert feedback produced a primary body of results. The following deduction domains emerged: Geriatrics, Palliative Care, Communication & Patient Autonomy and Organisation & Social Networks. Based on these domains we developed our curriculum. Conclusions The curriculum was successfully implemented following the Kern approach for medical curricula. The process is documented in this paper. The information given may support curriculum developers in their search for learning goals and objectives. PMID:20854665

  18. Nutritional status among older residents with dementia in open versus special care units in municipal nursing homes: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Undernutrition is widespread among institutionalised elderly, and people suffering from dementia are at particularly high risk. Many elderly with dementia live in open units or in special care units in nursing homes. It is not known whether special care units have an effect on the nutritional status of the residents. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the nutritional status of residents with dementia in both open units and in special care units. Methods Among Oslo’s 29 municipal nursing homes, 21 participated with 358 residents with dementia or cognitive impairment, of which 46% lived in special care units. Nutritional status was assessed using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool and anthropometry. Results We found no differences (p > 0.05) in risk of undernutrition, body mass index, mid-upper arm muscle circumference or triceps skinfold thickness between residents in open units and those in special care units. Residents in special care units were significantly younger and stronger when measured with a hand-grip test. Conclusions We found no difference in nutritional status between nursing home residents with dementia/cognitive impairment in open units versus in special care units. PMID:23496975

  19. Employee effort - reward balance and first-level manager transformational leadership within elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisu, Britt-Inger; Öhman, Ann; Enberg, Birgit

    2018-03-01

    Negative aspects, staff dissatisfaction and problems related to internal organisational factors of working in elderly care are well-known and documented. Much less is known about positive aspects of working in elderly care, and therefore, this study focuses on such positive factors in Swedish elderly care. We combined two theoretical models, the effort-reward imbalance model and the Transformational Leadership Style model. The aim was to estimate the potential associations between employee-perceived transformational leadership style of their managers, and employees' ratings of effort and reward within elderly care work. The article is based on questionnaires distributed at on-site visits to registered nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists (high-level education) and assistant nurses (low-level education) in nine Swedish elderly care facilities. In order to grasp the positive factors of work in elderly care, we focused on balance at work, rather than imbalance. We found a significant association between employees' effort-reward balance at work and a transformational leadership style among managers. An association was also found between employees' level of education and their assessments of the first-level managers. We conclude that the first-level manager is an important actor for achieving a good workplace within elderly care, since she/he influences employees' psychosocial working environment. We also conclude that there are differences and inequalities, in terms of well-being, effort and reward at the work place, between those with academic training and those without, in that the former group to a higher degree evaluated their first-level manager to perform a transformational leadership style, which in turn is beneficial for their psychosocial work environment. Consequently, this (re)-produce inequalities in terms of well-being, effort and reward among the employees at the work place. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. Factors influencing quality of life of elderly people with dementia and care implications: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wenbo; Willis, Rosalind; Feng, Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors associated with Quality of Life (QoL) of elderly people with dementia could contribute to finding pathways to improve QoL for elderly people in dementia. This paper systematically reviews all possible factors that influence QoL of elderly people with dementia, identifies how these factors are different by different stages of dementia and living settings, and explores how the influencing factors could be perceive differently by elderly people with dementia, family members, and caregivers. PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science and DelphiS searches from 2000 to 2015 and hand searches of publication lists, reference lists and citations were used to identify primary studies on 'quality of life' and 'dementia' elderly people. The results suggest that there are a complex variety of factors influencing QoL of elderly people with dementia, and the factors cover demographic, physical, psychological, social, and religious aspects. And the factors influencing QoL of elderly people with dementia are different in different living settings (care institutions and communities) as well as different people's perspectives (elderly people with dementia, family members and care staff). Environmental factors and quality of care are important for elderly people in care institutions; while religious seem to only affect QoL of those living in communities. However, this review fails to comprehensively identify unique or common factors associated QoL in dementia across three stages. Further study should pay more attention to comparing factors associated with QoL in dementia across three stages of dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Completing the circle: elders speak about end-of-life care with aboriginal families in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Mary; Baydala, Angelina; Bourassa, Carrie; McKay-McNabb, Kim; Placsko, Cheryl; Goodwill, Ken; McKenna, Betty; McNabb, Pat; Boekelder, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we share words spoken by Aboriginal elders from Saskatchewan, Canada, in response to the research question, "What would you like non-Aboriginal health care providers to know when providing end-of-life care for Aboriginal families?" Our purpose in publishing these results in a written format is to place information shared by oral tradition in an academic context and to make the information accessible to other researchers. Recent theoretical work in the areas of death and dying suggests that cultural beliefs and practices are particularly influential at the end of life; however, little work describing the traditional beliefs and practices of Aboriginal peoples in Canada exists to guide culturally appropriate end-of-life care delivery. Purposive sampling procedures were used to recruit five elders from culturally diverse First Nations in southern Saskatchewan. Key informant Aboriginal elder participants were videotaped by two Aboriginal research assistants, who approached the elders at powwows. Narrative analysis of the key informant interview transcripts was conducted to identify key concepts and emerging narrative themes describing culturally appropriate end-of-life health care for Aboriginal families. Six themes were identified to organize the data into a coherent narrative: realization; gathering of community; care and comfort/transition; moments after death; grief, wake, funeral; and messages to health care providers. These themes told the story of the dying person's journey and highlighted important messages from elders to non-Aboriginal health care providers.

  2. Teting Effectiveness of a Community-Based Health Care System Model for Elders in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Nowrouzi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In recent years a variety of system models for providing community based health care services to the elderly has been envisioned and implemented in the developed countries which meet the special care needs of different groups of elders. In Iran due to lack of these systems development, implementation and evaluation of these care system models from aspects of effectiveness and efficiency seems to be necessary. Materials & Methods: In this study a model of social and health care system for community dwelling frail elders was implemented on 36 such elders for approximately six months and their respective expected outcomes were evaluated. The model has been developed in another study using a qualitative inquiry approach with named methodological triangulation (i.e. comprehensive literature review, panel of experts and ethnography on elders’ life styles and health practices. Implementation of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment Tool, staff meetings for care planning, adopting an interdisciplinary approach with collaboration among all team members and case management rather than disease management were the most significant characters of this care delivery system. Results: Investigation of Pretest scores and posttest score in two experimental and control group showed a statistical significance differences. Conclusion: The preliminary results of employing this care system and examination of expected outcomes such as enhancing quality of life and hope in elders reflects the efficiency of this system, although further complementary studies and particularly cost benefit analysis are strongly recommended.

  3. Fast Hugs with Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimet Şenoğlu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mnemonics are commonly used in medical procedures as cognitive aids to guide clinicians all over the world. The mnemonic ‘FAST HUG’ (Feeding, Analgesia, Sedation, Thromboembolic prophylaxis, Head-of-bed elevation, stress Ulcer prevention, and Glycemic control was proposed almost ten years ago for patient care in intensive care units and have been commonly used worldwide. Beside this, new mnemonics were also determined for improving routine care of the critically ill patients. But none of this was accepted as much as “FAST HUGS”. In our clinical practice we delivered an another mnemonic as FAST HUGS with ICU (Feeding, Analgesia, Sedation, Thromboembolic prophylaxis, Head-of-bed elevation, Stress ulcer prevention, and Glucose control, Water balance, Investigation and Results, Therapy, Hypo-hyper delirium, Invasive devices, Check the daily infection parameters, Use a checklist for checking some of the key aspects in the general care of intensive care patients. In this review we summarized these mnemonics.

  4. Gender (inequality among employees in elder care: implications for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwér Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gendered practices of working life create gender inequalities through horizontal and vertical gender segregation in work, which may lead to inequalities in health between women and men. Gender equality could therefore be a key element of health equity in working life. Our aim was to analyze what gender (inequality means for the employees at a woman-dominated workplace and discuss possible implications for health experiences. Methods All caregiving staff at two workplaces in elder care within a municipality in the north of Sweden were invited to participate in the study. Forty-five employees participated, 38 women and 7 men. Seven focus group discussions were performed and led by a moderator. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the focus groups. Results We identified two themes. "Advocating gender equality in principle" showed how gender (inequality was seen as a structural issue not connected to the individual health experiences. "Justifying inequality with individualism" showed how the caregivers focused on personalities and interests as a justification of gender inequalities in work division. The justification of gender inequality resulted in a gendered work division which may be related to health inequalities between women and men. Gender inequalities in work division were primarily understood in terms of personality and interests and not in terms of gender. Conclusion The health experience of the participants was affected by gender (inequality in terms of a gendered work division. However, the participants did not see the gendered work division as a gender equality issue. Gender perspectives are needed to improve the health of the employees at the workplaces through shifting from individual to structural solutions. A healthy-setting approach considering gender relations is needed to achieve gender equality and fairness in health status between women and men.

  5. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... the discharge of fit ICU patients to the ward (95.3%), transfer patients not receiving acute care to high dependency unit or recovery room (70.3%), or create additional ICU beds (42.2%). Chi‑square test showed a significant difference between single and married respondents with regard to clinical doubt (P ...

  6. TAKING CARE OF THE SICK ELDER PEOPLE AT HOME IN THE SPEECH OF FAMILIAL CARE TAKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roceli Brum Cattani

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is about an exploratory, descriptive and in a qualitative approach study, which hadas its objective to know how the choice of the sick elderly people’s familial caretaker occurs and how the caretakerfeels in this role. The main caretaker was interviewed in home visits. The sample was constituted of nine familialcaretakers, mainly from the female sex: wives, daughters, daughters-in-law, granddaughters, and the husband. Forthe analysis of the data, the content analysis, following the methodological steps of Minayo, was used. Twoanalytical categories were elaborated: being a familial caretaker: is it an option or an obligation?, which shows thatthe choice of taking care is closely related to the feeling of obligation, but also to affection relations, gratitude andthe impossibility of choosing another caretaker, and being a sick elderly people’s familial caretaker that approachesfeelings of gratitude, resignation, inexperience in face of the care demands, physical and emotional tiredness, lossof freedom and solitude due to the activity in the caretaker.

  7. Oral health status and need for oral care of care-dependent indwelling elderly : from admission to death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Arie R; Peters, Lilian L; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A; Vissink, Arjan; Visser, Anita

    The objective of this study is to assess oral health and oral status of elderly patients newly admitted to a nursing home from admission until death. Oral health, oral status, need for dental care, cooperation with dental treatment, and given dental care were assessed by two geriatric dentists in

  8. 24 CFR 92.258 - Elder cottage housing opportunity (ECHO) units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... designed to be installed adjacent to existing single-family dwellings. (b) Eligible owners. The owner of a HOME-assisted ECHO unit may be: (1) The owner-occupant of the single-family host property on which the... elderly or disabled family as defined in 24 CFR 5.403 and must also be a low-income family. (d) Applicable...

  9. A person-centred segmentation study in elderly care: towards efficient demand-driven care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissens van der Laan, M R; van Offenbeek, M A G; Broekhuis, H; Slaets, J P J

    2014-07-01

    Providing patients with more person-centred care without increasing costs is a key challenge in healthcare. A relevant but often ignored hindrance to delivering person-centred care is that the current segmentation of the population and the associated organization of healthcare supply are based on diseases. A person-centred segmentation, i.e., based on persons' own experienced difficulties in fulfilling needs, is an elementary but often overlooked first step in developing efficient demand-driven care. This paper describes a person-centred segmentation study of elderly, a large and increasing target group confronted with heterogeneous and often interrelated difficulties in their functioning. In twenty-five diverse healthcare and welfare organizations as well as elderly associations in the Netherlands, data were collected on the difficulties in biopsychosocial functioning experienced by 2019 older adults. Data were collected between March 2010 and January 2011 and sampling took place based on their (temporarily) living conditions. Factor Mixture Model was conducted to categorize the respondents into segments with relatively similar experienced difficulties concerning their functioning. First, the analyses show that older adults can be empirically categorized into five meaningful segments: feeling vital; difficulties with psychosocial coping; physical and mobility complaints; difficulties experienced in multiple domains; and feeling extremely frail. The categorization seems robust as it was replicated in two population-based samples in the Netherlands. The segmentation's usefulness is discussed and illustrated through an evaluation of the alignment between a segment's unfulfilled biopsychosocial needs and current healthcare utilization. The set of person-centred segmentation variables provides healthcare providers the option to perform a more comprehensive first triage step than only a disease-based one. The outcomes of this first step could guide a focused and

  10. Implementation and evaluation of a depression care model for homebound elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden-Baer, Rose; McConnell, Eleanor; Rosati, Robert J; Rosenfeld, Peri; Edison, Ilaina

    2013-01-01

    Depression affects 14% to 46% of homebound elderly and is costly and disabling. Home health agencies face significant challenges delivering effective depression care. In response, an evidence-based depression care model was developed in a home health agency. Twelve-month program evaluation data demonstrated a 2.99 mean reduction in depression scores (P Depression Scale and confirmed that a clinically effective, operationally feasible, and financially sustainable depression care model can be implemented in home health care.

  11. Only Near Is Dear? Doing Elderly Care with Everyday ICTs in Indian Transnational Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Tanja

    2018-03-01

    In Kerala, South India, young people, especially women, are encouraged to become nurses in order to migrate abroad for work and thereby improve the financial status of their family. Meanwhile, many of their parents remain in India by themselves. This is occurring in the context of a strong popular discourse of elder abandonment, related to the local norms of intergenerational co-habitation. Based on fieldwork in Kerala and one of the nurses' destination countries, Oman, I present evidence that complicates this discourse by showing how: (1) migration is a form of elder care practice in itself; and (2) care for the elderly continues across countries and continents with the help of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Using the theoretical approaches of science and technology studies, I analyze ICTs as key members of care collectives and argue that ICTs have a significant role in reshaping care relations at a distance. © 2017 by the American Anthropological Association.

  12. Graduate Students' Reflections on Elder and End-of-Life Care for Prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Steven L; Todaro-Franceschi, Vidette

    2017-07-01

    The focus of this report was graduate nursing students' reflections on elder and end-of-life care for prisoners. The personal reflections of 21 graduate nursing students who attended a presentation by Susan J. Loeb on October 26, 2016 were included in this report. The title of the presentation was "Enhancing End-of-Life Care for Prisoners Through Partnering With the Prison Community." The student essays were synthesized to construct a summary essay, from which four themes were identified: aging in prison, dying in prison, ethical and professional issues in the elder and end-of-life care of prisoners, and ethical and professional issues in research involving elderly and end-of-life care of prisoners. These findings were interpreted from a global perspective in light of two different nursing perspectives: the humanbecoming tradition and the science of unitary human beings.

  13. The systems of care for frail elderly persons: the case of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagergren, Marten

    2002-08-01

    Sweden has a well-developed welfare system following the Nordic model and it maintains - even though there have been some reductions in the last decade - good economic security and comprehensive services for the elderly. The national policy for the elderly aims at enabling older persons to live independently with a high quality of life. A great majority of the elderly in Sweden live in ordinary homes - very few live with their grown-up children. The municipalities are responsible for providing long-term social services and care for the frail elderly in the form of home help services for those that live in ordinary housing, and special housing accommodation for those with extensive needs. The county councils are responsible for health care and provide home nursing care and rehabilitation. Sweden used to have the oldest population in the world. The proportion of 80+ years old in the population increased from 3% to over 5% between 1980 and 2000. Due to financial restrictions as a result of the economic recession in the last decade, the health and social services for the elderly have not been able to keep up with the population development. The previous generous allocation of care has been replaced by a more restrictive approach. This has mainly affected persons with lesser needs for help, younger elderly, and married persons. The number of elderly persons is expected to increase rapidly in the coming decades. However, due to improved health among the elderly, this will lead to a relatively limited increase of needs. Depending on assumptions concerning the health development, the required increase in volume of health and social services is expected to fall somewhere between 10-30% during the coming 30-year period.

  14. Effect of Internet technology on extended care in elderly patients with diabetic feet

    OpenAIRE

    Xian Zang; Jiao-Jiao Bai; Jiao Sun; Yue Ming; Li Ji

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of Internet technology on continuing nursing in elderly patients with diabetic feet. Method: From January 2015 to July 2016, 12 elderly patients with diabetic foot ulcers were enrolled from the Endocrinology Department in our hospital. We used “WeChat”, “E nursing” and other Internet technologies to perform remote extended care and to observe the foot ulcer outcomes. Results: All foot ulcers healed with a wound healing time between 38 and 73 days (avera...

  15. Long-term care of the elderly: Current status, policies and dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matković Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Serbia, the long-term care as a system does not actually exist. One part of the system is regulated through cash benefits, one part through institutional social care and community-based social services, and one part is just being established under the health care system. The linkages among these segments are not strong and there is insufficient awareness of the need to regard the different parts of the system as being interdependent and interconnected. According to the different surveys, home care is needed for the daily functioning of more than 80,000 elderly people, especially for around 27,000 of those who are completely immobile. More than 300 thousand elderly persons have indicated that they are in need of some type of self-care support. By tradition, elderly people in Serbia rely primarily on family support. Some are getting the state support as well. Research shows that 62 thousand elderly persons (5 percent receive attendance allowance; 9,000 elderly are accommodated in institutions (0.7 percent, while 11.7 thousand (1 percent persons received some type of support through home care community based services. In addition, in Belgrade there are also 2,000 elderly who are beneficiaries of medical and palliative care at home. The government expenditures for these purposes can be very roughly estimated at 0.55 percent of GDP, largely for cash benefits (0.37 percent. Considered over a medium and longer term, the government expenditures on longterm care in Serbia will inevitably increase significantly, primarily due to an increase in the number and share of elderly people and the increase in additional life years spent in ill health or in need of assistance. An increase in the expenditures will also be influenced by a change in the family models and the increasing number of elderly that will be living alone, as well as the diminishing possibilities for reliance on the closest family members, especially due to emigration flows both at local

  16. Self-Care and Self-Help Groups for the Elderly: A Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This document notes that, as health care costs continue to rise, the elderly are monitoring themselves as a means of cost containment, and as a way of enhancing their sense of well-being and their ability to lead active lives. It points out that more and more organizations are sponsoring health programs that promote the concept of self-care and…

  17. Effects of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly on Hospital Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meret-Hanke, Louise A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study evaluates the effects of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) on hospital use. PACE's capitated financing creates incentives to reduce the use of costly services. Furthermore, its emphasis on preventative care and regular monitoring by provides a mechanism for reducing unnecessary hospital use…

  18. Investigating the relationship between ageism and some demographic aspects in offering nursing care to elder patients of Al-zahra hospital, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Afarigan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective and domain: patient care quality is influenced by many factors one of which can be nurse’s attitude toward the elderly. The present study conducted aiming at specifying the relationship between ageism and some demographic aspects of nursing care toward elder patients hospitalized at Alzahra hospital. Method: the present study is a co relational descriptive research. The statistical population includes all nurses who work in different units of Alzahra hospital of Isfahan (except those working in pediatric and NICU units, as they have no contact with elder patients in 2015. Through availability sampling 275 nurses were selected; 93 male and182 female nurses. Instrument of this study was a questionnaire on ageism designed by researcher. In order for analyzing the data, the researcher used independent T test, variance analysis test and Cross call Valise test. Findings: in investigating knowledge related to elder people, findings of this study shows that this knowledge was in a low level in 11.6 % of nurses and high in 32.7% of them. Attitudes toward elder patients were in 8.4%of nurses negative in 81.8% of them neuter and 9.8% of nurses have got positive attitudes toward the elderly. Also results demonstrated that this attitude was meaningfully more negative in male nurses than females. But in other aspects like age, educational level, income, educational time, ethnicity, living with elderly people and presence of an elder person in their family or relatives, no meaningful difference was seen. Discussion and conclusion: In general, this study showed that sex, occupational record, having passed educational term time are factors influencing ageism. But other demographic characteristics played no meaningful role in nurses’ ageism and these are to be paid more attention in order to decrease ageism.

  19. [Is ageism a relevant concept for health care practice in the elderly?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Marie; Meire, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    With the demographic aging, the older adults' needs for assistance and care will inevitably increase. Therefore, it is important to explore the beliefs and attitudes of the health care professionals toward the elderly. This paper discusses the notion of ageism and its paradoxes in health care practices for the elderly. First, the concept of ageism is defined through its cognitive, affective and behavioral components. Second, on the basis of the literature review, different "age biases" induced by ageism are described, which can influence the assessment of health condition of the elderly, the treatment decisions, but also the attitudes of the health care workers with out-patients as with institutionalized subjects. Third, the potential negative effects of ageist stereotypes on the health status and psychological well-being of the elderly are examined. Finally, some propositions are made to oppose ageism in health care practices for the elderly, including continuing education, better knowledge of the diversity of aging processes, reflexion on professionals' own prejudices, values and beliefs, promotion of relational attitudes which sustain autonomy.

  20. Improving asthma care for the elderly: a randomized controlled trial using a simple telephone intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Roopen R; Saltoun, Carol A; Grammer, Leslie C

    2009-02-01

    Several studies suggest that asthma is undertreated in the elderly population. To determine if the use of a simple telephone intervention can improve asthma care in the elderly. Fifty-two elderly subjects with asthma who required their rescue inhalers more than twice a week and had at least one emergency department or urgent care visit in the previous year were randomized to an intervention or control group. All subjects received two telephone calls over a 12-month period. The intervention group received an asthma-specific questionnaire and the control group received a general health questionnaire. Medication use and health care utilization were evaluated at the beginning and end of a 12-month period. The study was completed by 23 control and 25 intervention subjects. Baseline data were similar in both groups. After 12 months, 72% (n = 18) of the intervention group were on an inhaled corticosteroid compared with 40% (n = 10) of the control group (p = 0.08). The intervention group had fewer emergency department visits when compared with the control group (p = 0.21). Sixty-four percent (n = 16) of the intervention group had an asthma action plan compared with 26% (n = 6) in the control group (p = 0.01). This study suggests that asthma care in the elderly can be improved using a simple telephone intervention. Clinicians need to recognize that under treatment of asthma in the elderly still exists and to use alternative methods such as a simple telephone questionnaire to improve care in this population.

  1. Dying Care Interventions in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisvetrová, Helena; Školoudík, David; Joanovič, Eva; Konečná, Jana; Mikšová, Zdeňka

    2016-03-01

    Providing high-quality end-of-life care is a challenging area in intensive care practice. The aim of the current study was to assess the practice of registered nurses (RNs) with respect to dying care and spiritual support interventions in intensive care units (ICUs) in the Czech Republic (CR) and find correlations between particular factors or conditions and the frequency of NIC interventions usage. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was designed. A questionnaire with Likert scales included the particular activities of dying care and spiritual support interventions and an evaluation of the factors influencing the implementation of the interventions in the ICU. The group of respondents consisted of 277 RNs working in 29 ICUs in four CR regions. The Mann-Whitney U test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for statistical evaluation. The most and least frequently reported RN activities were "treat individuals with dignity and respect" and "facilitate discussion of funeral arrangements," respectively. The frequencies of the activities in the biological, social, psychological, and spiritual dimensions were negatively correlated with the frequency of providing care to dying patients. A larger number of activities were related to longer lengths of stay in the ICU, higher staffing, more positive opinions of the RNs regarding the importance of education in a palliative care setting, and attending a palliative care education course. The psychosocial and spiritual activities in the care of dying patients are used infrequently by RNs in CR ICUs. The factors limiting the implementation of palliative care interventions and strategies improving implementation warrant further study. Assessment of nursing activities implemented in the care of dying patients in the ICU may help identify issues specific to nursing practice. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Ethical climate and missed nursing care in cancer care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vryonides, Stavros; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Charalambous, Andreas; Andreou, Panayiota; Eleftheriou, Christos; Merkouris, Anastasios

    2016-09-27

    Previous research has linked missed nursing care to nurses' work environment. Ethical climate is a part of work environment, but the relationship of missed care to different types of ethical climate is unknown. To describe the types of ethical climate in adult in-patient cancer care settings, and their relationship to missed nursing care. A descriptive correlation design was used. Data were collected using the Ethical Climate Questionnaire and the MISSCARE survey tool, and analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation and analysis of variance. All nurses from relevant units in the Republic of Cyprus were invited to participate. The research protocol has been approved according to national legislation, all licenses have been obtained, and respondents participated voluntarily after they have received all necessary information. Response rate was 91.8%. Five types identified were as follows: caring (M = 3.18, standard deviation = 1.39); law and code (M = 3.18, standard deviation = 0.96); rules (M = 3.17, standard deviation = 0.73); instrumental (M = 2.88, standard deviation = 1.34); and independence (M = 2.74, standard deviation = 0.94). Reported overall missed care (range: 1-5) was M = 2.51 (standard deviation = 0.90), and this was positively (p < 0.05) related to instrumental (r = 0.612) and independence (r = 0.461) types and negatively (p < 0.05) related to caring (r = -0.695), rules (r = -0.367), and law and code (r = -0.487). The reported levels of missed care and the types of ethical climates present similarities and differences with the relevant literature. All types of ethical climate were related to the reported missed care. Efforts to reduce the influence of instrumental and independence types and fostering caring, law and code, and rules types might decrease missed nursing care. However, more robust evidence is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Facilitating and Hindering Factors in Family Care Giving Process on Iranian Frail Elderly: Female Caregivers Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Mohamadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is worldwide growth in the elderly population. Family care of elderly is key to long term care system and main duty of women at home. Qualitative study about facilitating and hindering factor of family care giving process provide clarified viewpoint on female caregivers need to plan and make effective supportive health policy. Methods & Materials: The present study was conducted by grounded theory. A purposive sample of 12 family caregiver participated in this study and data was gathered by deeply semi-structured interview and observation in the field. All of them were transcribed word by word and were analyzed through open, axial and selective coding according to Strauss and Corbin's approach (1998. Triangulation of the data gathering from different methods, prolonged engagement with caregivers, member check by participants and experts, was used to increase rigor of the study. Results: Female caregivers experience facilitator and hindering factors that affect the care giving process. These factors were categorized in 3 main classes of personal, familial and external factors and 9 subcategories of caregiver's knowledge on elderly care, personal characters of caregiver and care recipient, care giving burden, background of interpersonal relationship between caregiver and care recipient, familial supportive network, family member participation, formal supportive system, context of family care giving at home, and community based health care systems for elder people. Conclusion: Naturally, intervening factors in care giving process can confront caregivers with relief or difficulty Based on caregivers experiences, modifying facilitator and hindering factors by more family participation, psychosocial support, care giving education, improvement of care giving context and establishing appropriate age friendly health care systems would be effective in managing of the process by female caregivers, and could be helpful for them to be

  4. The Family in Care for the Elderly: Managing the Overload and Coping with Difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisete dos Santos Mendes Mónico

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family is considered the main support of the elderly in a situation of dependency. Caregiving often results in overloading, leading to diverse problems. Aim: To evaluate the self-perception of the family caregiver’s overload and the strategies used to provide informal care to the dependent elderly considering their level of dependence. Method: The sample consisted of 21 children, 16 spouses, and nine other relatives of elderly dependents who responded to the Caregiver’s Overload Scale (Sequeira, 2007, the Portuguese version of Caregivers’ Assessment Management Index (CAMI, Nolan, Keady, & Grant, 1995 and the Barthel Index (Mahoney & Barthel, 1965. Results: The Barthel Index showed 34.8% of the elderly as severely dependent and 37.0% as totally dependent. The care most provided respected to medication, hygiene, food, and monitoring. Above 56.5% of the caregivers had an intense overload, both at the objective (impact of care and interpersonal relationship and subjective (F3-Expectations regarding care and F4-Perceived self-efficacy levels. The main reason for maintaining caregivers was family/personal obligation (95.7%. Caregivers reasonably assessed the effectiveness of their strategies in dealing with their dependent elderly (CAMI; M = 101.0, SD = 15.0. There was a negative relationship between the perception of the caregiver’s overload and the age and health status of the elderly, as well as between the number of strategies used by the caregiver to overcome difficulties and the self-perception of the overload. Conclusion: The multiplicity of daily tasks performed in support of a family member in a situation of severe dependence translates into situations of intense overload, negatively impacting on care, interpersonal relationship, expectations regarding caring, and perception of self-efficacy of care.

  5. Increased bone fractures among elderly United States hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, John; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Rosen, Lisa; Sunday, Suzanne; Mathew, Anna T; Fishbane, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Fractures are an important cause of morbidity in hemodialysis patients. Multiple advances in the treatment of mineral and bone disease in hemodialysis patients have occurred. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the rate of fractures in hemodialysis patients has changed over time. We studied US Renal Data System (USRDS) datasets to determine the rates of hospitalized fractures among hemodialysis patients. The primary outcome was incidence of fractures requiring hospitalization. The fracture rate per 1000 person-years was calculated by year from 1992 to 2009. The first 90 days after initiating dialysis were excluded from analysis. The incidence of hip and vertebral fractures increased from 12.5 fractures per 1000 patient-years in 1992 to 25.3 per 1000 patient-years in 2004 (P fractures increased from 3.2 per 1000 patient-years in 1992 to 7.7 per 1000 patient-years in 2009 (P fracture rate was seen in white patients >65 years of age. After 2004, the incidence rate of these fractures stabilized and subtly declined, but did not decrease significantly. Fracture rates increased significantly in hemodialysis patients from 1992 to 2004, with most of the increase occurring in elderly white patients. Assessment of fracture risk and management in dialysis patients at greatest risk requires greater emphasis and further study.

  6. Discrimination of elderly patients in the health care system of Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Selli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to explore and describe the barriers that elderly Lithuanians experience with respect to going to court or other institutions to defend their right not to be discriminated regarding medical care. Methods: We used a mixed methods approach due to the scarcity of information in Lithuania. First, the review of laws was done using the e-tar database and court cases were searched using the e-teismai database followed by policy analysis. Additional sources of information were identified searching Google Scholar and PubMed, as well as Google for grey literature. The keywords used were: ageism in patient care, discrimination against elderly, elderly and health (English and Lithuanian: 2000-2015. Secondly, we conducted in-depth individual interviews with 27 clients of newly-established integrated home care services: 13 elderly patients, and 14 informal caregivers. Results:  This study identified five groups of barriers explaining why Lithuanian elderly are hesitant to fight discrimination in the health system. The results of the study disclose the following barriers that the elderly in Lithuania face: i the lack of recognition of the phenomenon of discrimination against the elderly in patient care; ii the lack of information for complaining and the fear of consequences of complaining; iii the deficiencies and uncertainties of laws and regulations devoted to discrimination; iv the high level of burden of proof in court cases and lack of good practices; v the lack of a patient (human rights-based approach in all policies and in education as well as the lack of intersectoral work. Conclusions:  This study disclosed the need to: encourage training of legists and lawyers in expanding knowledge and skills in human rights in patient care;  encourage training of health care professionals – the burden of leadership for this has to be assumed by universities and public health professionals; incorporate a new article in the ‘Law on the

  7. Physical and mental health aspects of elderly in social care in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzyn-Matusiak D

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dorota Dobrzyn-Matusiak,1 Czeslaw Marcisz,2 Ewelina Bąk,3 Halina Kulik,1 Ewa Marcisz4 1Department of Nursing Propaedeutics, 2Department of Gerontology and Geriatric Nursing, School of Health Care, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bielsko-Biała, Bielsko-Biała, Poland; 4Department of Anxiety Disorders, Hospital of Ministry of Internal Affairs, Katowice, Poland Background: The objective of the study was to evaluate health aspects in elderly individuals in social, institutional, and home care in Poland.Methods: A total of 300 elderly individuals in care in Poland were included in the study. The subjects were divided into three groups: residents of long-term care institutions (group I, residents of adult day-care homes (group II, and community-dwelling subjects (group III. Each group consisted of 100 subjects. Questionnaires evaluating the following physical and mental dimensions of health were used: SF-36 Health Survey, basic activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Mini–mental state examination.Results: It was found that the health aspects of the elderly varied depending on whether care was provided in an institutionalized or a home environment, and the lowest health status was found in the elderly receiving in-home care. Furthermore, home-based elderly indicated significant limitations in performing basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, as well as a higher prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment.Conclusion: The elderly in long-term institutionalized care, both in a residential home and adult day-care homes, were characterized by a better physical and mental health status than those receiving in-home care. It seemed that worse health status, including the more frequent depression occurrence and cognitive function disorders in the elderly using the nursing care at their homes

  8. Nursing diagnosis in intenzive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Bartošová, Simona

    2013-01-01

    v AJ: This diploma thesis deals with the field of nursing diagnosis in internal intensive care units. The theoretical part describes the basics of the nursing process and mainly focuses on the nursing diagnosis. Subsequently, it informs the reader about history, development and structure of the NANDA Taxonomy II. The main part of the thesis consists of a quantitative survey which aims at general nurses' knowledge about the nursing diagnosis NANDA - International. It also comments on how nursi...

  9. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Tzialla, C.; Borghesi, A.; Serra, G.; Stronati, M.; Corsello, G.

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued us...

  10. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SELF-CARE BEHAVIORS AND SELF-ESTEEM OF RURAL ELDERLIES; NECESSITY OF HEALTH PROMOTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Mirani, Hesam; Jouybari, Sina Sabourian; Nasiri, Davoud

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the modern medical science caused significant reduction of mortality and every day increase of the elderly in the world. According to prevalence of physical and mental problems in elderly, it is necessary to take some actions. Self care in one of the best way to improve elderly health and life satisfaction that seems have a relation to self-esteem. This descriptive and analytical study was performed on 180 elderly in rural areas of the Sari city. Elderly selected by multi-stage randomize sampling method. Data were gathered by using standard questionnaires of self-care and Rosenberg self-esteem. Data were analyzed by Spearman and Pearson's correlation using SPSS software (V16). The mean±SD of the ages of the elderly were 66.85±7.661. The score of self-care varies between 99 to 155 and most of them (66.7%) had good level of self-care. Also, most of elderly (52.2%) had high level of self-esteem. Also there was a significant relationship, between self-care and self-esteem (Pself-care and self-esteem of elderly, by the planning for improving the self care of elderly, can increase their health and significantly reduce from physical and mental complications.

  11. Malaysian government dentists' experience, willingness and barriers in providing domiciliary care for elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Akmal Aida; Yusof, Zamros; Saub, Roslan

    2014-06-01

    To assess Malaysian government dentists' experience, willingness and barriers in providing domiciliary care for elderly people. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire targeting government dentists working in the Ministry of Health in Peninsular Malaysia. Seven hundred and eleven out of 962 dentists responded with a response rate of 74.0%. Only 36.1% of the dentists had experience in providing domiciliary care for elderly people in the past 2 years with mean number of visit per year of 1. Younger dentists below the age of 30 and those with confidence in providing the service were the most willing to undertake domiciliary care for elderly patients (OR=13.5, poral health service (67.5%), and dentist's unfavourable working condition (64.4%). The majority of Malaysian government dentists had not been involved in providing domiciliary care for elderly patients. Apart from overcoming the barriers, other recommendations include improving undergraduate dental education, education for elderly people and carers, improving dentist's working condition, and introducing domiciliary financial incentive for dentist. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Intergenerational relations and elder care preferences of Asian Indians in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, S

    2014-03-01

    The US older population is growing in ethnic diversity. Persistent ethnic disparities in service use among seniors are linked to structural barriers to access, and also to family processes such as cultural preferences and intergenerational relations. There is sparse information on the latter issue for immigrant ethnic minority seniors. Information on the Asian group (the fastest growing senior sub-population) is extremely scarce, due to this group's diversity in national, linguistic, and cultural origins. We conducted a qualitative study among community-dwelling Asian Indian families (including at least one member aged 60 years and older) in North Carolina to examine preferences of seniors and the midlife generation regarding elder care, and the role of intergenerational relations in desired care for elders, exploring the theoretical perspective of intergenerational relationship ambivalence. Our results suggest that cultural preferences, ambivalence in intergenerational relations, and regulations on health service eligibility among immigrant/transnational seniors and midlife adults influence preferences for elder care.

  13. The political construction of elder care markets: comparing Denmark, Finland and Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burau, Viola; Zechner, Minna; Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2017-01-01

    to understand the ideas behind the marketization of elder care. Ideas emerge as a key leverage for making policies and practices of marketization acceptable and which decision makers and other influential political/societal actors use in policy and public debates. The importance of ideas is further underlined......In Europe over the last two decades, marketization has become an important policy option in elder care. Comparative studies predominantly adopt an institutional perspective and analyze the politics and policies of marketization. This analysis takes a step back and examines the fundamental ideas...... underpinning the policies of marketization, using the ‘What's the problem?’ approach by Carol Bacchi. The central question is how the market was discursively framed as the solution to the perceived problems of three different systems of elder care, and how such processes are similar or different across...

  14. The dialogic educational pathway as a strategy of care with elderly women in sexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Mara Murio Ribeiro Rodrigues

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Unveiling the critical knowledge mediated by a care-educational dialogic pathway in sexuality with elderly women. Method: Qualitative and participatory study, outlined in educational action research approach, for which it was anchored in the Paulo Freire's Research Itinerary. 15 elderly women from a group of socialization participated in the study. Three ethical precepts were followed. Results: It was evident that the women of this study had difficulty in conceptualizing sexuality, reducing the concept to sex. In addition to diverging sexuality for men and women and configuring it as a practice of the youth. Conclusion and implications for practice: Dialogic educational activity proved to be an important care tool, since it allowed the unleashing of prejudice concerning sexuality in Aging, promoting elderly health and showing new ways of care.

  15. A Trial of electronic surveillance feedback for quality improvement at Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Heidi L; Bandle, Brian; Richard, Angela A; Min, Sung-Joon; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) risk is directly related to duration of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs), rising beyond 2 days of catheterization. We conducted a cluster randomized study in nonintensive care units of Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) hospitals. Electronic surveillance data were used in an audit and feedback intervention for frontline nurses to reduce IUC duration. Multivariable methods were used to identify the difference in average IUC duration and proportion of patients with IUC duration hospital characteristics. A total of 24 units at 19 NICHE hospitals reported 13,499 adult patients with IUCs over 18 months. Early and delayed intervention groups had important baseline differences in IUC utilization. Use of evidence-based CAUTI prevention measures increased during study participation. In multivariable analysis, the average IUC duration and proportion of patients with IUC duration Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assistive social robots in elderly care: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekens, J.; Heerink, M.; Rosendal, H.

    2009-01-01

    Assistive social robots, a particular type of assistive robotics designed for social interaction with humans, could play an important role with respect to the health and psychological well-being of the elderly. Objectives: Assistive social robots are believed to be useful in eldercare for two

  17. 447 Clothing for Elderly Persons: Management and Caring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... leisure – travel, gyms, games, etc, may influence the senior's wardrobe. 3. The next strategy having known the foregoing discourse is to be able to select appropriate fashion for the active as well as the frail elderly persons. In doing this, it is necessary to continue to seek their input and pay special attention ...

  18. Pattern and outcome of elderly admissions into the Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical admissions accounted for 75.8% of admissions while medical admissions were 24.2%. The overall ICU mortality in the elderly was 58.1%.The major predictors of mortality were: need for endotracheal intubation (p=0.001), mechanical ventilation (p=0.001), vasopressor (p=0.001), electrolyte derangement (p=0.001), ...

  19. Pathways to institutional care for elderly indigenous Africans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sought to explore factors resulting in institutionalisation of elderly indigenous Africans in Zimbabwe. Though Africans value ageing-in-place, in the comfort of familiar people and surroundings, some are institutionalised despite negative outcomes on well-being. A qualitative case study was conducted using total ...

  20. The Needs of the Elderly in Health Care – Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabiś Małgorzata

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The objective of the study was presentation of the needs of the elderly in the context of changes of these needs conditioned by the demographic processes. Analyses also covered the projected demographic changes and a wider context, e.g. social and cultural.

  1. Infection control in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed F; Askari, Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is critical for health care personnel to recognize and appreciate the detrimental impact of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections. The economic, clinical, and social expenses to patients and hospitals are overwhelming. To limit the incidence of ICU-acquired infections, aggressive infection control measures must be implemented and enforced. Researchers and national committees have developed and continue to develop evidence-based guidelines to control ICU infections. A multifaceted approach, including infection prevention committees, antimicrobial stewardship programs, daily reassessments-intervention bundles, identifying and minimizing risk factors, and continuing staff education programs, is essential. Infection control in the ICU is an evolving area of critical care research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A perspective on health care for the elderly who lose their only child in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan

    2013-08-01

    The 30-plus years of the One Child Policy has brought about a new "childless" elderly phenomenon in China and this group is expanding rapidly. These elderly parents who lose their only child are forced to endure psychological suffering and cope with health problems alone, as they are often ignored by society. The aim of this study is to explore the psychological trauma and living dilemma among older Chinese people who lose their only child and to discuss the support and health care to this newly vulnerable group in China. In-depth interviews with 34 childless older people were conducted in three districts in Beijing. The study shows that the death of only child causes an unbearable psychological trauma for elderly parents, who display prominent clusters of symptoms. Moreover, the childless elderly frequently encounter discrimination in their lives and they feel neglected by the government and society. Although several local governments have launched schemes to support the childless elderly, the gap in assistance is still vast. Support from the government is essential in relieving the difficulties currently faced by the childless elderly, and the difficulties they face in the future. This includes two major aspects: health and life care, and spiritual comfort.

  3. Frailty and geriatric syndromes in elderly assisted in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Elizabeth Closs

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the association between frailty and geriatric syndromes (GS [cognitive impairment (CI; postural instability (PI; urinary/fecal incontinence (UFI; polypharmacy (PP; and immobility (IM] and the frequency of these conditions in elderly people assisted in primary health care. Five hundred twenty-one elderly participants of The Multidimensional Study of the Elderly in the Family Health Strategy (EMI-SUS were evaluated. Sociodemographic data, identification of frailty (Fried phenotype and GS were collected. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed. The frequency of frailty was 21.5%, prefrailty 51.1% and robustness 27.4%. The frequency of CI was 54.7%, PP 41.2%, PI 36.5%, UFI 14% and IM 5.8%. The odds of frailty when compared to robustness and adjusted for gender, age, depression, self-perception of health, nutritional status, falls, vision and hearing, was significantly higher in elderly with CI, PI and PP. The adjusted odds of prefrail when compared to robustness was significantly higher only in elderly with CI. The most frequently presented number of GS (0-5 was two geriatric syndromes (26.87%. The frequency of frailty was high among elderly in primary health care and was associated with three of five GS (CI - PI - PP.

  4. Cancer in the elderly: is it time for palliative care in geriatric oncology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighi, Nicole; Balducci, Lodovico; Biasco, Guido

    2014-04-01

    Persons aged 65 and over are the fastest growing segment of the population in most Western countries. Although cancer-related death occurs far more commonly in older people than in any age group, studies on palliative care in older adults are lacking. This paper aims at evaluating the needs in elderly patients affected by cancer and the state of the art of the research in palliative care in this setting. A literature search was performed (PubMed) to identify relevant studies. Papers were reviewed for relevance to palliative care in the elderly. Elderly who need palliative care are frequently disregarded as individuals and may experience discrimination because of their age. Palliative care for older patients relates particularly to multiple treatments for various conditions. This causes extra complexities for the researchers. The aim of the study was not fully achieved due to the paucity of literature focusing upon these issues. The areas of investigation that need to be addressed comprise: establishing the prevailing symptoms in elderly patients, understanding patients' psychological/spiritual well-being and quality of life and elucidating the sources of caregiver burden, adapting research methodologies specifically for palliative care and comparing the needs and the outcomes of this age group to younger patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Are Nutritional Care Adequate for Elderly Hospitalized Patients? A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Helene Kjøllesdal Eide

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses nutritional care in identifying and treating nutritional risk in elderly hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a large Norwegian University hospital in the period 2011 to 2013. Data on nutritional risk and care for elderly patients (≥70 years without dementia were collected at 20 wards by 173 second-year nursing students in acute-care clinical studies. A stratified sampling technique was utilized to improve the representativeness of the sample. In total, 508 patients (48.8% women with a mean age of 79.6 years participated. The internationally and nationally recommended nutritional care was not implemented at the hospital, suggesting that nutritional care for elderly hospitalized patients was not adequate. This implies that the majority of the elderly patients nutritionally at risk are neither identified nor treated according to their needs. The article highlights the importance of having systematic nutritional care practices to make it possible for the hospital ward staff to routinely identify nutritional risk and initiate appropriate nutritional treatment measures.

  6. [Chapter 3. Concretely enhancing the role of elderly through capacitating health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closon, Marie-Christine; Léonard, Christian

    2016-12-19

    This paper questions the signification of reinforcing the active role of elderly between societal injunction to feel responsible of the costs to the collectivity and the freedom to choose one's way of life and having the means to realize it. It describes two experiences in two Brussels communes of a model of co-construction with the elderly of a project to live in one's own home, to reinforce the active roles of persons. We want to illustrate the difficulty of such an approach in Belgium, separating the organization and the financing of medical and social care, that does not foster the accompanying and the active role of elderly. The conflict of interest between the different actors is not allowing the proper multidisciplinary approach to empower and allow the maintenance of elderly capability of choice and well being.

  7. Systematization of nursing care to institutionalized elderly based on Virginia Henderson

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    Jorge Wilker Bezerra Clares

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This is an experience report that aims to describe the application of the nursing process to an institutionalized elderly, based on Virginia Henderson’s theory. The case study was developed in a long-stay institution for the elderly in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, from May to August 2010, by filling out a form, physical examination and observation. Identifying the needs of elimination, communication, recreation and learning allowed to raise the nursing diagnoses, respectively: urge urinary incontinence; impaired social interaction; diversional activity deficit; and impaired memory. The nursing interventions were directed to the health and independence of the elderly. The application of systematic nursing care impacted positively on the health of the elderly, demonstrating the applicability of the nursing systematization based on Henderson’s theory in the scenery in which the study was developed.

  8. Providing housing and care to elderly homeless men and women in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipmann, Bryan

    2003-01-01

    People who are unemployed and who lack the resources to buy adequate food, shelter, or basic health care services face an endless struggle to survive. It is frequently a degrading and humiliating experience. The elderly homeless, who are often frail and sick, are particularly disadvantaged in this struggle. Yet resources are often available to welfare providers to care for the aged homeless. All that is needed is a willingness for providers and government agencies to acknowledge the existence of homelessness among the elderly and be prepared to alleviate the problem.

  9. Long-term care of dependent elderly and quality of life their carers

    OpenAIRE

    Macková, Marie

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the issue of long-term care of dependent elderly and quality of life of their carers. Elderly care has an impact on the quality of life of family members. The research was carried out through a questionnaire and interview. The quality of life was measured using the WHOQOL instrument. The research aimed to identify the current levels of family members’ quality of life and the factors influencing the quality of life thereof. The research findings showed a lower quality o...

  10. COMBINING WORK WITH CARING FOR ELDERLY FAMILY MEMBER IN POLAND (CHOSEN ISSUES

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    Lukasz Jurek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of combining work with caring for elderly family members is becoming an increasingly important matter due to demographic (population ageing and social (increasing economic activity of women changes that are currently in progress. The aim of the article is to present selected issues related to the professional situation of people taking care for their elderly family members. The primary focus of the study is reasons for not working of non-working caregivers, and professional problems of working caregivers

  11. The anatomy of health care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Hamilton; Matheson, David H M; Dorsey, E Ray; George, Benjamin P; Sadoff, David; Yoshimura, Satoshi

    2013-11-13

    Health care in the United States includes a vast array of complex interrelationships among those who receive, provide, and finance care. In this article, publicly available data were used to identify trends in health care, principally from 1980 to 2011, in the source and use of funds ("economic anatomy"), the people receiving and organizations providing care, and the resulting value created and health outcomes. In 2011, US health care employed 15.7% of the workforce, with expenditures of $2.7 trillion, doubling since 1980 as a percentage of US gross domestic product (GDP) to 17.9%. Yearly growth has decreased since 1970, especially since 2002, but, at 3% per year, exceeds any other industry and GDP overall. Government funding increased from 31.1% in 1980 to 42.3% in 2011. Despite the increases in resources devoted to health care, multiple health metrics, including life expectancy at birth and survival with many diseases, shows the United States trailing peer nations. The findings from this analysis contradict several common assumptions. Since 2000, (1) price (especially of hospital charges [+4.2%/y], professional services [3.6%/y], drugs and devices [+4.0%/y], and administrative costs [+5.6%/y]), not demand for services or aging of the population, produced 91% of cost increases; (2) personal out-of-pocket spending on insurance premiums and co-payments have declined from 23% to 11%; and (3) chronic illnesses account for 84% of costs overall among the entire population, not only of the elderly. Three factors have produced the most change: (1) consolidation, with fewer general hospitals and more single-specialty hospitals and physician groups, producing financial concentration in health systems, insurers, pharmacies, and benefit managers; (2) information technology, in which investment has occurred but value is elusive; and (3) the patient as consumer, whereby influence is sought outside traditional channels, using social media, informal networks, new public sources

  12. Care Network For The Elderly With Alzheimer’s Disease In The View Of Primary Care Nurses

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    Matheus Figuereido Nogueira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to build a care network for the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease from the view of nurses of the Family Health Strategy (FHS. Method: exploratory qualitative study, developed with seven nurses from the FHS in the city of Santa Cruz, state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. After obtaining a favorable opinion of the Ethics Committee of the Alcides Carneiro University Hospital (CAAE nº 31307314.9.0000.5182, data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed according to the Collective Subject Discourse. Results: for an effective care network to the elderly with Alzheimer, some elements are necessary, such as: care in the three levels of complexity, family support, complementary diagnostic center, pharmaceutical services, continuing education, intersectionality and group of caregivers. Conclusions: when the care to the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease is performed in an articulated manner between the multiples axes that compose the network, it clarifies the caring process, facilitates the decision making, directs care, guarantee a comprehensive care and greatly reduce the deficits associated with this disease. Key-Words: Alzheimer’s disease; Family Health Strategy; Health Care Network.

  13. Necessidade de cuidados de enfermagem e intervenções terapêuticas em UTI: estudo comparativo entre pacientes idosos e não idosos Necesidades de cuidados de enfermeria e intervenciones terapeuticas en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos: estudio comparativo entre pacientes ancianos y no ancianos Nursing care need and therapeutics interventions in Intensive Care Unit: a comparative study among elderly and non-elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Trench Ciampone

    2006-03-01

    ón promedio NAS fue de 66,57% (+ 9,15 manteniéndose sobre el 60,0% durante el período analizado. No se observó diferencia en el promedio NAS de pacientes adultos mayores (66,44% y no adultos mayores (66,33%. De esta forma, no hubo diferencia entre las intervenciones terapéuticas realizadas en los dos grupos de pacientes. CONCLUSION: Los resultados muestran la necesidad de discusiones sobre la indicación de la UCI, frente a las implicaciones éticas, económicas y sociales inherentes a la atención intensiva.OBJECTIVES: To compare nursing care needs and therapeutic interventions of elderly and non-elderly patients admitted to an ICU. METHODS: The sample consisted of 50 adult patients from a university hospital in the district of São Paulo. Data were collect with the Nursing Activity Scale (NAS from September 26, 2003. The NAS was applied daily, from the time of admission to and discharge from the ICU, with a total of 339 measurements. Patients with 60 years of age or older were considered elderly patients. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney tests. RESULTS: The mean age of the patient sample was 70 years and the most frequent type of treatment was clinical (78.0%. The mean stay was 3.5 days and the mortality rate was 38.0%. The mean score for NAS was 66.57% (+ 9.15 and remained above the 60.0% mark for the entire period analyzed. No difference was observed between the mean NAS scores for elderly (66.44% and nonelderly (66.33% patients. And, there was no difference between the therapeutic interventions carried out in the two groups of patients. CONCLUSIONS: The results show the need for further discussion about the criteria for admission in ICU regarding the ethical, social, and economic implications of intensive care.

  14. Perfil de idosos admitidos em unidades de terapia intensiva gerais em Rio Grande, RS: resultados de um estudo de demanda Profile of the elderly admitted into general intensive care units in Rio Grande, Southern Brazil: results of a cross-sectional survey

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    Luiz Eduardo C. Schein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo conhecer o perfil do paciente com 60 anos ou mais de idade internado nas duas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI do município de Rio Grande, RS. Utilizando-se de delineamento transversal, entre abril/2007 e março/2008, entrevistadores previamente treinados aplicaram questionário padrão investigando sobre suas características demográficas, socioeconômicas e ambientais, utilização prévia de serviços de saúde e condições clínicas, que em 90% dos casos foram respondidos por familiares. Os 213 idosos hospitalizados neste período provinham, em sua maioria, do próprio município, eram casados, tinham mais de 70 anos, cinco anos de escolaridade, dois ou mais salários mínimos de renda familiar mensal, viviam em casa própria com outras duas pessoas e não possuíam plano de saúde; 88% foram à consulta médica nos últimos seis meses e 56% foram hospitalizados nos últimos 12 meses; metade deles chegaram à UTI inconscientes, por problemas clínicos oriundos da enfermaria do próprio hospital, onde 147 foram submetidos a ventilação mecânica, e 45% do grupo total evoluiu para óbito, em média, no oitavo dia. Estes dados mostram que é possível identificar idosos com maior potencial de internação em UTI também a partir de suas condições socioeconômicas e ambientais.This study aimed at assessing the profile of patients aged > 60 years admitted into intensive care units (ICU in the city of Rio Grande, Southern Brazil. A cross-sectional survey was carried out between April/2007 and March/2008 in two hospitals. Family members answered a standardized questionnaire that collected data on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, household conditions, use of healthcare services and current clinical conditions. Among the 213 elderly people included in the study, about 90% came from Rio Grande, were married, aged 70 years or more, had at least five years of schooling, earned two or more minimum wages

  15. Meeting the Housing and Care Needs of Older Homeless Adults: A Permanent Supportive Housing Program Targeting Homeless Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rebecca T.; Thomas, M. Lori; Cutler, Deborah F.; Hinderlie, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The homeless population is aging faster than the general population in the United States. As this vulnerable population continues to age, addressing complex care and housing needs will become increasingly important. This article reviews the often-overlooked issue of homelessness among older adults, including their poor health status and unique care needs, the factors that contribute to homelessness in this population, and the costs of homelessness to the U.S. health care system. Permanent supportive housing programs are presented as a potential solution to elder homelessness, and Hearth, an outreach and permanent supportive housing model in Boston, is described. Finally, specific policy changes are presented that could promote access to housing among the growing older homeless population. PMID:24729832

  16. Meeting the Housing and Care Needs of Older Homeless Adults: A Permanent Supportive Housing Program Targeting Homeless Elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rebecca T; Thomas, M Lori; Cutler, Deborah F; Hinderlie, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The homeless population is aging faster than the general population in the United States. As this vulnerable population continues to age, addressing complex care and housing needs will become increasingly important. This article reviews the often-overlooked issue of homelessness among older adults, including their poor health status and unique care needs, the factors that contribute to homelessness in this population, and the costs of homelessness to the U.S. health care system. Permanent supportive housing programs are presented as a potential solution to elder homelessness, and Hearth, an outreach and permanent supportive housing model in Boston, is described. Finally, specific policy changes are presented that could promote access to housing among the growing older homeless population.

  17. General care plan in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

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    Mª Teresa Martín Alonso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The care plan we expose is a general one applicable to all the children who are admitted in the unit, no matter what pathology they present/display, their physiopathological situation or their age. We present the common nursing actions which are applied to all the patients at the time of their admittance. The factor related to the studied problems is the hospitalization and what it has associate, from separation of the parents and rupture familiar ties, up to immobilization, the use of bloody devices and the generally hostile and stranger background.The protocol is based on the NANDA, the nursing outcomes classification NOC and the nursing intervention classification NIC. It is part of the nursing process and promotes systematized, humanistic and effective care, focuses on the child and his parents.We have selected the most relevant problems, ordered according to the deficits in the different selfcare requirements of Dorotea E. Orem. Each problem has its definition, the outcomes we pretend to reach with our care and the interventions to get the outcomes (these two last topics have the corresponding codification. In them all the most important factor is hospitalization in a unit of intensive care and the separation of the child from his habitual environment.

  18. An Integrated Curriculum of Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs for Health Care Providers of the Elderly (Project NNED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit-Portage Area Health Education Network, Akron, OH.

    This document is intended to give health care providers interdisciplinary information concerning drugs, nutrition, and exercise to help them enhance health maintenance of the elderly. Prepared as part of Project NNED, (Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs), an integrated curriculum for health care providers of the elderly, the document includes…

  19. Effects of Health Education Programs for the Elders in Community Care Centers – Evaluated by Health Promotion Behaviors

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    Kuo-Song Chang

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The health education programs specifically for elders and middle age adults in community care centers were effective in raising the awareness of health promotion behaviors. The success could provide a reference for future studies developing health promotion and education programs and holistic care for community elders and middle age adults in Taiwan.

  20. Intensive care unit audit: invasive procedure surveillance

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    Mariama Amaral Michels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and objective: currently, Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs constitute a serious public health problem. It is estimated that for every ten hospitalized patients, one will have infection after admission, generating high costs resulting from increased length of hospitalization, additional diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The intensive care unit (ICU, due to its characteristics, is one of the most complex units of the hospital environment, a result of the equipment, the available technology, the severity of inpatients and the invasive procedures the latter are submitted to. The aim of the study was to evaluate the adherence to specifi c HAI prevention measures in invasive ICU procedures. Methods: This study had a quantitative, descriptive and exploratory approach. Among the risk factors for HAIs are the presence of central venous access, indwelling vesical catheter and mechanical ventilation, and, therefore, the indicators were calculated for patients undergoing these invasive procedures, through a questionnaire standardized by the Hospital Infection Control Commission (HICC. Results: For every 1,000 patients, 15 had catheter-related bloodstream infection, 6.85 had urinary tract infection associated with indwelling catheter in the fi rst half of 2010. Conclusion: most HAIs cannot be prevented, for reasons inherent to invasive procedures and the patients. However, their incidence can be reduced and controlled. The implementation of preventive measures based on scientifi c evidence can reduce HAIs signifi cantly and sustainably, resulting in safer health care services and reduced costs. The main means of prevention include the cleaning of hands, use of epidemiological block measures, when necessary, and specifi c care for each infection site. KEYWORDS Nosocomial infection. Intensive care units.

  1. [Oral health care guidelines for elderly people in long-term care facilities. Effectiveness and implementation in The Netherlands and Flanders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. De; Putten, G.J. van der; Baat, C. de; Schols, J.M.; Vanobbergen, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Oral health care includes self-care, volunteer care, and professional care for maintaining or advancing appropriate oral health. It has been demonstrated that the oral health care in long-term care facilities for elderly people in The Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium) is not adequate. Daily oral

  2. Scoping review on the use of socially assistive robot technology in elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Jordan; Al-Hindawi, Ahmed; Ng, Tiffany; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P

    2018-02-12

    With an elderly population that is set to more than double by 2050 worldwide, there will be an increased demand for elderly care. This poses several impediments in the delivery of high-quality health and social care. Socially assistive robot (SAR) technology could assume new roles in health and social care to meet this higher demand. This review qualitatively examines the literature on the use of SAR in elderly care and aims to establish the roles this technology may play in the future. Scoping review. Search of CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, PsychINFO and Scopus databases was conducted, complemented with a free search using Google Scholar and reference harvesting. All publications went through a selection process, which involved sequentially reviewing the title, abstract and full text of the publication. No limitations regarding date of publication were imposed, and only English publications were taken into account. The main search was conducted in March 2016, and the latest search was conducted in September 2017. The inclusion criteria consist of elderly participants, any elderly healthcare facility, humanoid and pet robots and all social interaction types with the robot. Exclusions were acceptability studies, technical reports of robots and publications surrounding physically or surgically assistive robots. In total, 61 final publications were included in the review, describing 33 studies and including 1574 participants and 11 robots. 28 of the 33 papers report positive findings. Five roles of SAR were identified: affective therapy, cognitive training, social facilitator, companionship and physiological therapy. Although many positive outcomes were reported, a large proportion of the studies have methodological issues, which limit the utility of the results. Nonetheless, the reported value of SAR in elderly care does warrant further investigation. Future studies should endeavour to validate the roles demonstrated in this review. NIHR 58672.

  3. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Storm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures.Methodology: Included in the study were elderly patients (75+ receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41 were carried out by two researchers.Results: Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1 next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering, (2 patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions, (3 health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles, (4 information exchange (oral, written, electronic, (5 context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers and (6 patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment.Conclusion: Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings.

  4. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Storm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures. Methodology: Included in the study were elderly patients (75+ receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41 were carried out by two researchers. Results: Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1 next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering, (2 patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions, (3 health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles, (4 information exchange (oral, written, electronic, (5 context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers and (6 patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment. Conclusion: Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings.

  5. Work-related change in residential elderly care: Trust, space and connectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Borg, Wieke E; Verdonk, Petra; Dauwerse, Linda; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-07-01

    Increasing care needs and a declining workforce put pressure on the quality and continuity of long-term elderly care. The need to attract and retain a solid workforce is increasingly acknowledged. This study reports about a change initiative that aimed to improve the quality of care and working life in residential elderly care. The research focus is on understanding the process of workforce change and development, by retrospectively exploring the experiences of care professionals. A responsive evaluation was conducted at a nursing home department in the Netherlands one year after participating in the change program. Data were gathered by participant observations, interviews and a focus and dialogue group. A thematic analysis was conducted. Care professionals reported changes in workplace climate and interpersonal interactions. We identified trust, space and connectedness as important concepts to understand perceived change. Findings suggest that the interplay between trust and space fostered interpersonal connectedness. Connectedness improved the quality of relationships, contributing to the well-being of the workforce. We consider the nature and contradictions within the process of change, and discuss how gained insights help to improve quality of working life in residential elderly care and how this may reflect in the quality of care provision.

  6. A quasi-experimental study of the effects of an integrated care intervention for the frail elderly on informal caregivers’ satisfaction with care and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Huijsman; B. Janse; I.N. Fabbricotti

    2014-01-01

    Informal caregivers of frail elderly people often perform a substantial number of care tasks over a prolonged period of time [1]. By definition, informal care is nonprofessional and unpaid and is provided by family members, partners or close friends [2]. Frail elderly people suffer from age-related

  7. Multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary actions in the care of elderly with Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Thais Mara Alexandre Bertazone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the available evidence in the literature on the effect of multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary actions on health or in the treatment of the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: an integrative revision made in databases, without accrual period of publication of articles, using controlled and non controlled descriptors. Results: the initial search resulted in a total of 508 studies, six of which were considered eligible for analysis. The results showed that the multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary actions used were effective in the care of the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease. The main effects observed were improved behavioral problems and cognitive function and the decrease use of psychotropic drugs. Conclusion: multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary actions can provide more effective care for the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease, maximizing their cognitive and functional levels, with improvement in the quality of life for both the patient and for the family/caregivers.

  8. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, Mokgadi C; Bezuidenhout, Martie C; Botha, Annali D H

    2014-04-04

    Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs) are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  9. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  10. Information transfer and continuity of care for stroke patients with eating difficulties from the perspectives of nursing staff in Swedish elderly care

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Eva; Ehnfors, Margareta; Eldh, Ann Catrine; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Continuity of care is a key issue in the care for elderly people, for example, those having experienced stroke, particularly with regards to informational and managerial continuity based on patient record data.

  11. [Nutritional therapy in Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Iára Kallyanna Cavalcante

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to approach the main necessary aspects for the accomplishment of safety and efficient nutritional therapy to the critically ill patient. Bibliographical survey with didactic books and scientific articles was made in Portuguese, English and Spanish with results of the last 20 years. Nutritional support is an integrant part in the care of patients in intensive care units. The success of the nutritional therapy involves the stages of nutritional assessment, determines the route of diet infusion and the calories and nutrients needs. The use of nutrients with immune function (immunonutrients) is each more frequents, however, its use is not well established for critical illness. More clinical studies are necessary to establish the best form to nourish the critical ill patient.

  12. [Oral health care guidelines for elderly people in long-term care facilities. Effectiveness and implementation in The Netherlands and Flanders

    OpenAIRE

    Visschere, L. De; Putten, G.J. van der; Baat, C. de; Schols, J.M.; Vanobbergen, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Oral health care includes self-care, volunteer care, and professional care for maintaining or advancing appropriate oral health. It has been demonstrated that the oral health care in long-term care facilities for elderly people in The Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium) is not adequate. Daily oral hygiene care, carers' knowledge and skills providing adequate oral health care, (co)morbidity, and drug usage are points of special interest in realizing an improvement of oral health care and oral h...

  13. [Elder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Pedro; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this review is to present scientific evidence on the biological, dietary, cultural and economic advantages of cow´s milk and dairy products intake in adults, with emphasis on the elderly. The role of milk and dairy products as part of the regular diet, as well as their contribution to a healthy diet for the aged population is described. The updated scientific references on the importance of milk and dairy products on the dietary management of the most prevalent diseases of the eldery -among these energy-protein malnutrition, sarcopenia, obesity, sarcopenic obesity, osteoporosis, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases- are presented.

  14. Nurses\\' perception of caring behaviors in intensive care units in hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Caring is the core of nursing however, different individules have different perceptions of it. Continuous assessment and measurement of caring behaviors results in the identification of their problems. The careful planning of interventions and problem solving will improve care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' perception of caring behaviors in the intensive care units. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic study, 140 nurses were selected from intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, using the census method in 2012. The data collection tool was the Caring Behaviors Inventory for Elders (CBI-E. This questionnaire consisted of two parts including demographic information and 28 items related to care. Face and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire were provided by professionals, and after deletion of 4 items a 24-item questionnaire was provided. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to assess reliability (&alpha = 0.71. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18 and descriptive-analytic statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Based on the findings, nurses paid more attention to the physical–technical aspects (95.71 ± 12.76 of care in comparison to its psychosocial aspects (75.41 ± 27.91. Nurses had the highest score in care behavior of "timely performance of medical procedures and medication administration". Conclusion: Since nurses paid more attention to the technical aspects of care than its psychosocial aspects, by providing nurses with a correct perception of care, patients can be provided with needs-based care. This will increase patient satisfaction with nursing care, and indirectly result in the positive attitude of patients and society toward the nursing profession and its services. Moreover, nursing education officials can use these results to assist nurses in meeting

  15. Intergenerational transfers and informal care for disabled elderly persons in China: evidence from CHARLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoting; Lu, Bei; Feng, Zhixin

    2017-07-01

    Aiming at 'ageing healthier and ageing better', a certain amount of high-quality informal care should be available for elderly persons with physical disability as formal care is barely accessible in China. The demographic transition and family structural changes have dramatically weakened traditional norms of filial piety and the structure of intergenerational transfers. This article employed nationwide representative data from the first wave (2011) of Chinese Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) in order to identify the duration of informal care provision at home for frail elders (1122 in rural areas and 577 in urban areas, total 1699), measured in monthly hours, before estimating the associations between intergenerational transfers and the received time of informal care with Tobit Model analysis. Results showed that financial support from the younger generation was unexpectedly negatively associated with the monthly hours of care, implying a reduction of caring support along with increasing financial transfers towards older parents. The lack of informal care could not be compensated by having more children, co-residing with children, or increasing the parent-to-child/grandchild transfers. Spouses were shown to replace children as the major caregivers. In addition, the community-based long-term care system needs to be promoted to sustain and develop informal care, as the latter will become increasingly important with changing family dynamics. Finally, the received time of informal care, rather than the severity of physical disability measured by difficulty with ADLs or IADLs, was introduced to identify the actual demand for care by elders. The paper argues that it is important to reconceptualise and re-investigate the duration of care provision in the Chinese context in order to develop standards of payment as part of long-term care policies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Complex educational and care (gerontechnology for elderly individuals/families experiencing Alzheimer's disease

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    Silomar Ilha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the contributions of the Integrated Multidisciplinary Care Group for Caregivers of Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease as an educational and care (gerontechnology in the context of Alzheimer's disease in elderly individuals from the perspective of family members/caregivers. Method: Exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach conducted with 13 family members/caregivers of elderly people participating in the support group of a university institution of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data collected between January and April 2016 through a semi-structured interview were submitted to discursive textual analysis. Results: Family members/caregivers pointed out education and care as contributions of the group; education for care and for the future; exchange, socialization, and development of knowledge through the range of knowledge existing in the Group. Conclusion: The Group contributes as a (gerontechnology of care and education for care in which knowledge is built and applied in practice, supporting the experienced disorders and improving the quality of care provided for elderly individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

  17. [Violence against the elderly in domestic care settings : Short profile of an interdisciplinary research project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedler, Anna; Konopik, Nadine; Heber, Lukas; Wellenhofer, Marina; Oswald, Frank; Zenz, Gisela; Salgo, Ludwig

    2017-06-01

    Most elderly people wish to remain and be cared for in their own home. Approximately 1.38 million people in Germany are cared for without professional support. However, domestic care by relatives can be a risk factor for violence against the elderly. This research project deals with the issue from a legal and social sciences perspective. The aim of the project is to develop a regulatory framework providing aid-oriented prevention and intervention in the family care of vulnerable elderly people by public agencies and courts. Firstly, empirical data on the situation in family care will be analyzed; secondly, the existing legal framework will be examined. In a third step, recommendations for legislation and administration will be developed in collaboration with practitioners. Initial findings show that, although various support, advice, and training services exist, the situation at home is not always safe. There is a lack of legal regulation on the issue of abuse in the family care setting, especially compared with German legislation on child protection. Thus, the legal framework should reinforce the prevention of care problems by giving more efficient support to carers and permitting legal intervention in the case of abuse. However, at the same time, the proposed legislation should take into account the importance of the individual's right to self-determination.

  18. Understanding of pictograms from the United States Pharmacopeia Dispensing Information (USP-DI among elderly Brazilians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros IMC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Izadora MC Barros, Thaciana S Alcântara, Alessandra R Mesquita, Monica L Bispo, Chiara E Rocha, Vagner Porto Moreira, Divaldo P Lyra Junior Laboratory of Teaching and Research in Social Pharmacy (LEPFS, Department of Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe, São Cristóvão, Brazil Objective: To assess the understanding and cultural acceptability of the United States Pharmacopeia Dispensing Information (USP-DI in a group of elderly Brazilians.Methods: The study participants were individuals between 60 and 90 years old, of both sexes, with different levels of education and income. Fifteen of 81 pictograms from the USP-DI were presented to the elderly subjects, individually, without subtitles and in random order, so that the participants’ understanding of the pictograms could be evaluated.Results: The study included 116 participants. Only one of the selected pictograms reached the comprehension criterion established by the International Organization for Standardization 3864. With regard to the relationship between understanding and sociodemographic characteristics, age, wage income, and level of education were all found to be significantly associated with participants’ understanding of some of the pictograms.Conclusion: Most of the USP-DI pictograms evaluated were not well understood by the elderly Brazilians. This finding indicates that such pictograms need to be culturally adapted for the Brazilian context if they are to serve their purpose effectively in this country. Keywords: pictograms, understanding, elderly, Brazil

  19. Technology-Based Training of Administrators in Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Ron J.

    2011-01-01

    The Problem: The problem in this study was to determine whether there is a difference between technology-based and instructor-led RCFE administrator training. Method: A quasi-experimental research design study was conducted, and 70 students enrolled in the Residential Care Facility for the Elderly (RCFE) Administration Licensing renewal course…

  20. How I learned to love the robot: capabilities, information technologies, and elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark; Oosterlaken, I.; van den Hoven, J.

    2012-01-01

    Information technologies seem promising when it comes to improving elderly care, but they also raise ethical worries, for example about privacy, human contact, and justice. This paper argues that the capability approach is a helpful tool to make explicit what is at stake in this context and to

  1. Care staff training in detection of depression in residential homes for the elderly: randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisses, A.M.H.; Kluiter, H.; Jongenelis, K.; Pot, A.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Ormel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Many people with depression in residential care homes for the elderly do not receive treatment because their depression remains undetected. Aims: To determine the effects of staff training on the detection, treatment and outcome of depression in residents of ten homes. Method: We

  2. Care staff training in detection of depression in residential homes for the elderly - Randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisses, AMH; Kluiter, H; Jongenelis, K; Beekman, ATF; Ormel, J

    Background. Many people with depression in residential care homes for the elderly do not receive treatment because their depression remains undetected. Aims. To determine the effects of staff training on the detection, treatment and outcome of depression in residents often homes. Method. We

  3. Assessing Quality of Care and Elder Abuse in Nursing Homes via Google Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowery, Jared; Andrei, Amanda; Le, Elizabeth; Jian, Jing; Ward, Megan

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to assess the quality of care and detect elder abuse in nursing homes, since patients may be incapable of reporting quality issues or abuse themselves, and resources for sending inspectors are limited. This study correlates Google reviews of nursing homes with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) inspection results in the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) data set, to quantify the extent to which the reviews reflect the quality of care and the presence of elder abuse. A total of 16,160 reviews were collected, spanning 7,170 nursing homes. Two approaches were tested: using the average rating as an overall estimate of the quality of care at a nursing home, and using the average scores from a maximum entropy classifier trained to recognize indications of elder abuse. The classifier achieved an F-measure of 0.81, with precision 0.74 and recall 0.89. The correlation for the classifier is weak but statistically significant: = 0.13, P rating correlations approach approximately 0.65 when the effective average number of reviews per provider is increased by aggregating similar providers. These results indicate that an analysis of Google reviews of nursing homes can be used to detect indications of elder abuse with high precision and to assess the quality of care, but only when a sufficient number of reviews are available.

  4. AmI in good care? Developing design principles for ambient intelligent domotics for elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulendijk, Michiel; van de Wijngaert, Lidwien; Brinkkemper, Sjaak; Leenstra, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The combination of ambient intelligence (AmI) and domotics has the potential to respond to elderly people's desire to live independent from extensive forms of care. Their slow adoption of technological aids shows reluctance, though. This article investigates their motivations to adopt ambient

  5. Nurses' knowledge of universal health coverage for inclusive and sustainable elderly care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Ling Ngai Tung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to explore nurses' knowledge of universal health coverage (UHC for inclusive and sustainable development of elderly care services. Method: this was a cross-sectional survey. A convenience sample of 326 currently practicing enrolled nurses (EN or registered nurses (RN was recruited. Respondents completed a questionnaire which was based on the implementation strategies advocated by the WHO Global Forum for Governmental Chief Nursing Officers and Midwives (GCNOMs. Questions covered the government initiative, healthcare financing policy, human resources policy, and the respondents' perception of importance and contribution of nurses in achieving UHC in elderly care services. Results: the knowledge of nurses about UHC in elderly care services was fairly satisfactory. Nurses in both clinical practice and management perceived themselves as having more contribution and importance than those in education. They were relatively indifferent to healthcare policy and politics. Conclusion: the survey uncovered a considerable knowledge gap in nurses' knowledge of UHC in elderly care services, and shed light on the need for nurses to be more attuned to healthcare policy. The educational curriculum for nurses should be strengthened to include studies in public policy and advocacy. Nurses can make a difference through their participation in the development and implementation of UHC in healthcare services.

  6. Delivering Integrated Care to the Frail Elderly: The Impact on Professionals’ Objective Burden and Job Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.N. Fabbricotti; B. Janse; R. Huijsman; R.D.M. de Kuyper

    2016-01-01

    The impact of integrated working on professionals’ objective burden and job satisfaction was examined. An evidence-based intervention targeting frail elderly patients was implemented in the Walcheren region of the Netherlands in 2010. The intervention involved the primary care practice as a single

  7. Tracing Error-Related Knowledge in Interview Data: Negative Knowledge in Elder Care Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartmeier, Martin; Gruber, Hans; Heid, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates elder care nurses' negative knowledge. This form of experiential knowledge is defined as the outcome of error-related learning processes, focused on how something is not, on what not to do in certain situations or on deficits in one's knowledge or skills. Besides this definition, we presume the existence of…

  8. Learning from Errors at Work: A Replication Study in Elder Care Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicher, Veronika; Mulder, Regina H.; Bauer, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Learning from errors is an important way of learning at work. In this article, we analyse conditions under which elder care nurses use errors as a starting point for the engagement in social learning activities (ESLA) in the form of joint reflection with colleagues on potential causes of errors and ways to prevent them in future. The goal of our…

  9. Elderly people's perceptions of how they want to be cared for: an interview study with healthy elderly couples in Northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrefors, Christina; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2009-06-01

    Many countries encounter a demographic change where the number of elderly people will increase. As a result, the number of very old people needing care, services and medical assistance will increase. Care in the private home is often described as providing the best alternative for many elderly people. The aim of this study was to describe elderly people's perceptions of how they wanted to be cared for, from a perspective of becoming in need of assistance with personal care, in the future. Twelve couples of healthy elderly people living in a couple hood participated in an interview study. They were all 70 years and older and received no kind of professional care or social support. Open individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with the support of written vignettes. The vignettes were formed as scenarios that described three levels of caring needs where the elderly people would become ill. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings were interpreted in one main theme: maintaining the self and being cared for with dignity to the end. The theme was built from three categories: at home as long as possible, professional care at nursing home when advanced care is needed and fear of being abandoned. The categories reflect the perception that when minimum help was needed, care and support by the partner and nursing staff were preferred. As the scenarios changed to being totally dependent on care, they preferred care in a nursing home. There was a pervading concern of the risk of not being seen as an individual person and becoming a nobody with no meaningful relations. Thus, there must be a singular goal to support old people, in all stages of their lives, through the recognition and affirmation of self, and providing care with dignity to the end.

  10. A New Model of Delirium Care in the Acute Geriatric Setting: Geriatric Monitoring Unit

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    Chong Mei

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium is a common and serious condition, which affects many of our older hospitalised patients. It is an indicator of severe underlying illness and requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment, associated with poor survival, functional outcomes with increased risk of institutionalisation following the delirium episode in the acute care setting. We describe a new model of delirium care in the acute care setting, titled Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU where the important concepts of delirium prevention and management are integrated. We hypothesize that patients with delirium admitted to the GMU would have better clinical outcomes with less need for physical and psychotropic restraints compared to usual care. Methods/Design GMU models after the Delirium Room with adoption of core interventions from Hospital Elder Life Program and use of evening bright light therapy to consolidate circadian rhythm and improve sleep in the elderly patients. The novelty of this approach lies in the amalgamation of these interventions in a multi-faceted approach in acute delirium management. GMU development thus consists of key considerations for room design and resource planning, program specific interventions and daily core interventions. Assessments undertaken include baseline demographics, comorbidity scoring, duration and severity of delirium, cognitive, functional measures at baseline, 6 months and 12 months later. Additionally we also analysed the pre and post-GMU implementation knowledge and attitude on delirium care among staff members in the geriatric wards (nurses, doctors and undertook satisfaction surveys for caregivers of patients treated in GMU. Discussion This study protocol describes the conceptualization and implementation of a specialized unit for delirium management. We hypothesize that such a model of care will not only result in better clinical outcomes for the elderly patient with delirium compared to usual geriatric care

  11. Development of skills-based competencies for forensic nurse examiners providing elder abuse care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mont, Janice; Kosa, Daisy; Macdonald, Sheila; Elliot, Shannon; Yaffe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective As a critical step in advancing a comprehensive response to elder abuse built on existing forensic nursing-led hospital-based programmes, we developed a list of skills-based competencies for use in an Elder Abuse Nurse Examiner curriculum. Participants and setting Programme leaders of 30 hospital-based forensic nursing-led sexual assault and domestic violence treatment centres. Primary and secondary outcome measures 149 verbatim recommendations for components of an elder abuse response were identified from a systematic scoping review. In 2 online Delphi consensus survey rounds, these components of care were evaluated by an expert panel for their overall importance to the elder abuse intervention under development and for their appropriateness to the scope of practice of an elder abuse nurse examiner. The components retained after evaluation were translated into skills-based competencies using Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning and, using the Nominal Group Technique, were subsequently reviewed and revised by a subset of members of the expert panel in a consensus meeting. Results Of the 148 recommendations evaluated, 119 were rated as important and achieved consensus or high level of agreement. Of these, 101 were determined to be within the scope of practice of an Elder Abuse Nurse Examiner and were translated into skills-based competencies. Following review and revision by meeting experts, 47 final competencies were organised by content into 5 metacompetencies: documentation, legal and legislative issues; interview with older adult, caregiver and other relevant contacts; assessment; medical and forensic examination; and case summary, discharge plan and follow-up care. Conclusions We determined the skills-based competencies of importance to training forensic nurse examiners to respond to elder abuse in the context of a hospital-based intervention. These findings may have implications for violence and abuse treatment programmes with a forensic nursing component

  12. Health Demands Characteristics and Quality of Life in the Elderly Monitored in the Primary Care

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    Jéssica Maria Arouca de Miranda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To characterize the demands of health and quality of elderly peoplemonitored in the primary care of Rio Grande do Norte/Brazil. Methods and Findings: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study of a quantitative approach with elderly patients monitored by the primary care. The sample was given for convenience, obtaining 120 participants. The research was conducted through an interview with theapplication of the following questionnaires: Mini Mental State Examination, Socio-demographic Data and Pain Characteristics, Short-Form-36, Mini Nutritional Assessment, the primary activities of daily living, the instrumental activities of daily living, Prism 7 and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS statistical program, in which descriptive and association tests were used.The main demands were related to functionality, followed by nutritional and geriatric depression. The quality of life presented worse results in the domain of general health status and better scores in the emotional and mental health aspects. Regarding the dimensions, the physical health obtained aworse score. Conclusion: Based on the characterization of the health demands found, it is suggested to perform other studies with the same population, enabling to plan and implementing a multidimensional intervention and improving the quality of life of the elderly people. Keywords: Elderly; Quality of Life; Aging; Elderly Health; Nursing.

  13. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and construct...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test...

  14. Social justice, health disparities, and culture in the care of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye; Pierre, Geraldine; Hilliard, Tandrea S

    2012-01-01

    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and are often a barrier to support and equality for minority communities. The "conundrum of health disparities" refers to the interplay between disparity, social justice, and cultural interpretation, and encourages researchers to understand both (1) disparity caused by economic and structural barriers to access, treatment, and diagnosis, and (2) disparity due to cultural interpretation of disease, in order to effectively address health care issues and concerns among elderly Americans. © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  15. The secure base script and the task of caring for elderly parents: implications for attachment theory and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cory K; Waters, Harriet Salatas; Hartman, Marilyn; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Miklowitz, David J; Waters, Everett

    2013-01-01

    This study explores links between adults' attachment representations and the task of caring for elderly parents with dementia. Participants were 87 adults serving as primary caregivers of a parent or parent-in-law with dementia. Waters and Waters' ( 2006 ) Attachment Script Assessment was adapted to assess script-like attachment representation in the context of caring for their elderly parent. The quality of adult-elderly parent interactions was assessed using the Level of Expressed Emotions Scale (Cole & Kazarian, 1988 ) and self-report measures of caregivers' perception of caregiving as difficult. Caregivers' secure base script knowledge predicted lower levels of negative expressed emotion. This effect was moderated by the extent to which participants experienced caring for elderly parents as difficult. Attachment representations played a greater role in caregiving when caregiving tasks were perceived as more difficult. These results support the hypothesis that attachment representations influence the quality of care that adults provide their elderly parents. Clinical implications are discussed.

  16. Modern Management and Diagnosis of Hypertension in the United Kingdom: Home Care and Self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, James P; Schwartz, Claire L; Tucker, Katherine L; McManus, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The effective diagnosis and management of hypertension is one of the most important parts of cardiovascular prevention internationally and this is no different in the United Kingdom. Approximately 14% of the UK population currently receive treatment for hypertension. Recent UK guidelines from the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence have placed greater emphasis on the utilization of out-of-office measurement of blood pressure to more accurately diagnose hypertension. The aim of the present study was to provide a state-of-the-art review of the evidence for screening, diagnosing, and managing hypertension, as implemented in the United Kingdom, with an emphasis on the role of self-monitored and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in routine clinical care. Consideration was given to the use of ambulatory and home monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of hypertension and the use of self-monitoring and self-management to monitor and guide treatment. The evidence for the use of self-monitoring in patients with hypertension was examined, both in isolation, and in combination with lifestyle and treatment interventions. There is a place for self-monitored blood pressure in specific underresearched populations such as the elderly, specialist conditions, ethnic groups, and during pregnancy and this is discussed here. The evidence supporting the use of out-of-office monitoring in all aspects of routine clinical care has increased substantially in recent years and is reflected in increased utilization by patients and clinicians alike. Several areas require further research but it is clear that out-of-office monitoring is here to stay and is fast becoming an important part of hypertension management in the United Kingdom. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Viewpoints of the members of the workers' retirement centers in Tehran about elderly day care centers (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Rohani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no documented evidence regarding elderly day care centers in Iran. This needs analysis study was conducted to investigate the demand for elderly day care centers in Tehran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted recruiting 210 participants aged over 60 who were members of the elderly retirement centers in Tehran in 2012. Data were gathered by Kansas state university questionnaire and analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: About 80% of participants were men with the mean age of 67.5±5.23 years. Results showed that male (P<0.001, married (P=0.01 and literate elderly (P<0.001, and those living in rental homes (P<0.001 expressed a greater need for elderly day care centers. There was no statistically significant relationship between the lifestyle (P=0.051 and income (P=0.08 of the participants and demand for elderly day care centers. Conclusion: Given the rising population of the elderly and their high demand for day care centers, it is necessary to establish well-equipped day care centers for this group of people. Also, these centers may reduce the burden of care for the aged people on public services and family care givers.

  18. Predictors of Self-care among the Elderly with Diabetes Type 2: Using Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhaninejad, Vahidreza; Iranpour, Abedin; Shati, Mohsen; Tahami, Ahmad Naghibzadeh; Yousefzadeh, Gholamrezan; Fadayevatan, Reza

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among the elderly and is also a very serious health problem. Adopting theory-based self-care behaviors is an effective means in managing such diseases. This study aimed to determine the predictors of diabetes self-care in the elderly in Kerman based on a social cognitive theory. In this cross-sectional study, 384 elderly diabetic patients who had referred to health screening centers in Kerman were chosen via cluster sampling. To collect information about self-care and its predictors, Toobert Glasgow's diabetes self-efficacy scale as well as a questionnaire was used which was based on social cognitive theory constructs. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire was confirmed. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis in SPSS software 17. Among the subjects, 67.37% (252) had poor self-care ability; 29.14% (109) had average ability, and 3.40% (13) enjoyed a proper level of self- care ability. There was a significant relationship between the constructs of the social cognitive theory (knowledge, self- efficacy, social support, outcome expectations, outcome expectancy and self-regulation) and the self-care score. Furthermore, the mentioned constructs could predict 0.47% of the variance of the self-care behaviors. self-care behaviors in this study were poor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an educational intervention based on cognitive theory constructs with the goal of properly managing diabetes in the elderly patients. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Elderly who take care of elderly: a study on the Frailty Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Orlandi, Ariene Angelini Dos; Brito, Tábatta Renata Pereira de; Ottaviani, Ana Carolina; Rossetti, Estefani Serafim; Zazzetta, Marisa Silvana; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost

    2017-01-01

    Identifying prevalence of frailty in elderly caregivers inserted in a high social vulnerability context and its correlation with sociodemographic and health aspects. Descriptive, correlational and cross-sectional study. Forty elderly caregivers were evaluated with: questionnaire for caregiver characterization, Mini Mental State Examination, Katz Index, Lawton instrumental activities of daily living scale, Geriatric Depression Scale and the frailty phenotype proposed by Fried. Interviews were conducted at their residences and scheduled in advance. All ethical precautions were observed. Data were analyzed with the Stata statistical program version 11.0. 10% of elderly caregivers were frail. There was a significant correlation between frailty and sex, instrumental activities of daily living and cognition. Female caregivers, partially dependent individuals regarding instrumental activities of daily living and with worse cognitive state deserve a special attention from health services. Identificar a prevalência de fragilidade em cuidadores idosos inseridos em contexto de alta vulnerabilidade social e sua correlação com aspectos sociodemográficos e de saúde. Estudo descritivo, correlacional, transversal. Foram avaliados 40 cuidadores idosos utilizando-se: questionário para caracterização do cuidador, Mini Exame do Estado Mental, Índice de Katz, Escala de atividades instrumentais de vida diária de Lawton, Escala de Depressão Geriátrica e o fenótipo de fragilidade proposto por Fried. As entrevistas foram realizadas no domicílio, sendo previamente agendadas. Todos os cuidados éticos foram observados. Os dados foram analisados com apoio do pacote estatístico Stata versão 11.0. 10,0% dos cuidadores idosos eram frágeis. Houve correlação significativa entre fragilidade e: sexo, atividades instrumentais de vida diária e cognição. Conclusão: Cuidadoras do sexo feminino, indivíduos parcialmente dependentes em relação às atividades instrumentais de vida

  20. Audit of Postoperative Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shaili K; Kacheriwala, Samir M; Duttaroy, Dipesh D

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an audit of Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) for identifying the admission risk factors and evaluating the outcomes of postoperative surgical patients. This was a prospective, observational study. This study was conducted at SICU of a 1500-bedded tertiary care university hospital in Western India. Two hundred and forty patients admitted to the SICU postoperatively over a period of 15 months. Planned and unplanned postoperative SICU admission rate was 4.45% and 0.09% of the 5284 patients operated. Indications for planned admissions included preoperative medical illnesses, anticipated blood loss, and anticipated mechanical ventilation while unpredicted intraoperative hypotension was the principal cause of unplanned admittance. Univariate analysis for two groups of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status indicated that advanced age, high American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) surgical risk, emergency surgery, planned admissions, and mortality were related to high ASA class. Analysis for ACC/AHA surgical risk showed association of high ACC/AHA surgical risk with advanced age, male gender, high ASA physical status, emergency surgery, planned admissions, and mortality. High mortality was observed in patients with SICU stay of >7 days (75.86%) and readmitted cases (72.73%). The need for postoperative critical care is significantly higher in males, elderly, patients with poor preoperative risk stratification scores, preexisting medical illness, major intraoperative hemorrhage, hypotension requiring inotropic support, perioperative respiratory problems and patients undergoing abdominal, trauma, and emergent surgeries. A larger study inclusive of other surgical subspecialties would aid in optimal decision-making for admissions to the SICU.

  1. Culturally acceptable health care services for Saudi's elderly population: the decision-maker's perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Shammari, S A; Felemban, F M; Jarallah, J S; Ali el-S; al-Bilali, S A; Hamad, J M

    1995-01-01

    This article reports on a study carried out in 1993 to elicit the opinions of decision makers (medical and non-medical) as to the types of facilities, locations and culturally acceptable levels of health care appropriate for the elderly in Saudi Arabia. In addition, the study sought to find out the procedures and likely constraints in the development of future health care services for the elderly. An opinion survey was carried out on a randomly selected sample of decision makers, drawn from: hospitals of 100-bed capacity or more; and, from directorates of education, agriculture, police, municipalities, commerce, transport and media, in each of the regions of Saudi Arabia. A predesigned Arabic questionnaire was completed by the respondents during February-April, 1993. Of the 244 respondents, the most important categories of elderly to be cared for were considered to be those with handicaps, the chronically ill, and those without family support. The non-medical decision makers gave higher scores to these alternatives than did the medical decision makers (P < 0.05). Use of the family home for elderly health care was rated as the most appropriate, followed by medical rehabilitation centres, and only then by hospitals. Non-medical respondents gave more emphasis on rehabilitation centres (P < 0.02). Medical respondents thought that primary care doctors (87.2%), physiotherapists (87.2%) and general nurses (78.2%) can adequately fulfil the needs of most elderly patients. In contrast, non-medical respondents demanded the presence of specialist doctors (72.3%), specialist nurses (78.9%), laboratory and X-ray facilities to run such services (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Prescription errors in UK critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, S A; Booth, S A; Thompson, C M

    2004-12-01

    Drug prescription errors are a common cause of adverse incidents and may be largely preventable. The incidence of prescription errors in UK critical care units is unknown. The aim of this study was to collect data about prescription errors and so calculate the incidence and variation of errors nationally. Twenty-four critical care units took part in the study for a 4-week period. The total numbers of new and re-written prescriptions were recorded daily. Errors were classified according to the nature of the error. Over the 4-week period, 21,589 new prescriptions (or 15.3 new prescriptions per patient) were written. Eighty-five per cent (18,448 prescriptions) were error free, but 3141 (15%) prescriptions had one or more errors (2.2 erroneous prescriptions per patient, or 145.5 erroneous prescriptions per 1000 new prescriptions). The five most common incorrect prescriptions were for potassium chloride (10.2% errors), heparin (5.3%), magnesium sulphate (5.2%), paracetamol (3.2%) and propofol (3.1%). Most of the errors were minor or would have had no adverse effects but 618 (19.6%) errors were considered significant, serious or potentially life threatening. Four categories (not writing the order according to the British National Formulary recommendations, an ambiguous medication order, non-standard nomenclature and writing illegibly) accounted for 47.9% of all errors. Although prescription rates (and error rates) in critical care appear higher than elsewhere in hospital, the number of potentially serious errors is similar to other areas of high-risk practice.

  3. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  4. Towards a virtual health record for mobile home care of elderly citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sabine; Hägglund, Maria; Scandurra, Isabella; Moström, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    Mobile work situations within home care of the elderly require immediate and ubiquitous access to patient-oriented data. The ongoing Swedish research project "Technical support for Mobile CloseCare" focuses on the development and evaluation of work-scenario oriented ICT support for enhanced home care of elderly citizens. The aim of the project is to provide a seamless and consistent information flow between different health care providers and to give intuitive access to information services for the elderly and their relatives. For that purpose, different independent software components are connected through a mobile communication platform. Flexible access to prioritized information for different users in different work situations will be given through a virtual health record. In order to obtain both usable and clinically relevant results, a user centered system development approach is followed. Evaluation of the project results will be based on usability tests and quasi-experimental studies on how system implementation influences quality of care and job- and life satisfaction for care providers, patients and relatives.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy in the elderly: Retrospective analysis from an urban general hospital psychiatry unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimple D Dadarwala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of elder patients with severe psychiatric illnesses other than depression is increasing. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has a special role in the treatment of late-life depression and other psychiatric conditions in the elderly. Using ECTs in the elderly could be difficult. In an Indian setting, ECT in the geriatric population is used as last resort of treatment which is in contrast to Western countries. There is dearth of data available for the use of ECT in the elderly in India. Methodology: Retrospective data review was carried out to identify patients 55 years or older who had received ECT from January 2014 to June 2016 in tertiary care teaching hospital in a metropolitan city in India. Results: A total of 304 ECTs were administered to 25 elderly aged> 55 years with average of 12 ECTs per patient. Schizophrenia (56% was the most common diagnosis among patients who were considered for ECT, and this was followed by major depression without psychotic features (24% and major depression with psychotic features (8%. The most common indication to start ECT was nonresponsiveness to medications (92%. There was an increase in mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores from baseline (23.42 to the end of the sixth (24.60 and last ECT (24.60. Duration of current used during ECT had positive correlation with MMSE. Patients with comorbid medical illness (20% received ECT without any complication. Conclusions: This study adds to scarce database on the use of ECT in old-age patients in India and adds to evidence that ECT is safe and effective treatment in old age with no negative impact on cognition.

  6. Elder-clowning in long-term dementia care: Results of a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Kontos, Pia; Miller, Karen-Lee; Colobong, Romeo; Lazgare, Luis Ivan Palma; Binns, Malcolm; Low, Lee-Fay; Surr, Claire; Naglie, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effects of elder-clowning on moderate to severe behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in nursing home residents with dementia, primarily of the Alzheimer's type.Before-and-after study.Nursing home.Nursing home residents with moderate to severe BPSD, as defined according to a Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) score of 10 or greater (N = 23), and their care aides.A pair of elder-clowns visited all residents twice weekly (~10 minutes per vi...

  7. Home care needs for elderly people in the context of the Family Health Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Aires, Marinês; Aparecida Paz, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    This study had the objective of identifying the needs of care reported by a group of elderly people in a region covered by the Family Health Strateg y (ESF). The methodolog y used was based on a descriptive cross-sectional study, with a sample of 176 persons over 60 years of age. Most of the individuals were females, between 60 and 69 years old, with an average of 69.6 ± 7.4 years. The elderly reported co-morbidities, most of which were related to diseases of the circulatory and endocr...

  8. The duality in using information and communication technology in elder care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sävenstedt, Stefan; Sandman, P O; Zingmark, Karin

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a study illuminating values and perceptions held by professional carers of older people about the use of information and communication technology applications. Various information and communication technology applications have successfully been developed to help solve a variety of problems in elder care. Beside different technical barriers and the assumed negative attitudes among older people, staff values and attitudes have been found to be an important cause of resistance to change and slowness in introduction of information and communication technology in health care of older people. An interview study was conducted in 2004 with 10 healthcare personnel with 3-26 years experience of working in home care and nursing homes in Northern Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify recurring themes in the data. The interpretation of values and perceptions among carers revealed a duality where the carers perceived information and communication technology as a promoter of both inhumane and humane care, a duality that seemed to make them defensive and resistant to change. Within the overall duality, other dualities were embedded that described both perceptions about the care of older people and about being a carer. There was evidence of resistance among professional carers towards an introduction of information and communication technology applications in elder care. Carers considered that the same attributes of information and communication technology that could promote humane care could also lead to dehumanized care. There should be an ethical discussion when introducing information and communication technology applications in elder care. The best caring alternative for all those concerned should be considered. It should promote aspects of wellbeing and dignity for frail older people and fears of inhumane care among carers must be recognized and discussed.

  9. Oral health status and need for oral care of care-dependent indwelling elderly: from admission to death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, Arie R; Peters, Lilian L; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A; Vissink, Arjan; Visser, Anita

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to assess oral health and oral status of elderly patients newly admitted to a nursing home from admission until death. Oral health, oral status, need for dental care, cooperation with dental treatment, and given dental care were assessed by two geriatric dentists in all new long-stay patients (n = 725) admitted to a nursing home between January 2009 and December 2013. All patients were followed from admission until death or until they left the nursing home. At admission, dementia patients were significantly older than somatic patients; median [IQR] ages were, respectively, 85 [79-89] and 81 [76-87] (p = 0.001). In addition, edentulous patients were significantly older than patients with remaining teeth, 83 [79-89] versus 80 [74-86] (p = 0.001) years. Thirty percent of the admitted patients died within 12 months after admission. A small minority (20%) of the patients had their own teeth. In this group, poor oral hygiene (72%), caries (70%), and broken teeth (62%) were frequently observed. Edentulous patients were significantly more cooperative with treatment than patients with remaining teeth (64 versus 27%). Finally, significantly less professional dental care was given to edentulous patients when compared to patients with remaining teeth (median 90 [IQR 60-180] versus 165 [75-375] min). When compared to edentulous elderly patients, patients with remaining teeth were younger at admittance, were more often non-cooperative, and had a poorer oral health and higher need for dental care. It is important that health care workers ensure adequate oral health and dental care to frail elderly, especially for elderly with remaining teeth.

  10. Malnutrition in elder care: qualitative analysis of ethical perceptions of politicians and civil servants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Kihlgren, Mona; Soerlie, Venke

    2010-06-16

    Few studies have paid attention to ethical responsibility related to malnutrition in elder care. The aim was to illuminate whether politicians and civil servants reason about malnutrition in elder care in relation to ethical responsibility, and further about possible causes and how to address them. Eighteen elected politicians and appointed civil servants at the municipality and county council level from two counties in Sweden were interviewed. They worked at a planning, control and executive level, with responsibility for both the elder care budget and quality of care. Qualitative method was used for the data analysis. Two themes emerged from their reasoning about malnutrition related to ethical responsibility. The theme assumed role involves the subthemes quality of care and costs, competent staff and govern at a distance. Old and ill patients were mentioned as being at risk for malnutrition. Caregivers were expected to be knowledgeable and stated primary responsible for providing adequate nutritional care. Extended physician responsibility was requested owing to patients' illnesses. Little was reported on the local management's role or on their own follow-up routines. The theme moral perception includes the subthemes discomfort, trust and distrust. Feelings of discomfort concerned caregivers having to work in a hurried, task-oriented manner. Trust meant that they believed for the most part that caregivers had the competence to deal appropriately with nutritional care, but they felt distrust when nutritional problems reappeared on their agenda. No differences could be seen between the politicians and civil servants. New knowledge about malnutrition in elder care related to ethical responsibility was illuminated by persons holding top positions. Malnutrition was stressed as an important dimension of the elder care quality. Governing at a distance meant having trust in the staff, on the one hand, and discomfort and distrust when confronted with reports of

  11. Welfare technologies and surveillance in care work for elderly citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Agnete Meldgaard; Kamp, Annette; Grosen, Sidsel Lond

    facilitate care and surveillance of citizens in different manners and with different consequences for care relationships between citizens and eldercare professionals. We focus on a technology facilitating ‘virtual homecare visits’ in a municipal homecare service, as well as ‘intelligent floors......’ in an eldercare center. Virtual home care entails the performance of specific home care services by means of video conversations rather than physical visits in citizens’ homes (e.g. reminding citizens to take their pills). The eldercare center’s intelligent floors are equipped with sensors, which communicate...... on the care relationships developed, but in quite different ways. In both cases the new configurations of responsibilities and (dis)empowerment of citizens, exist in a delicate balance with professional power and professionals’ legal responsibility to secure the health and wellbeing of citizens in their care...

  12. Trends in the United States in the treatment of distal radial fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Shauver, Melissa J; Birkmeyer, John D

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, distal radial fractures in the elderly have been treated nonoperatively with casting. However, since the introduction of the volar locking plating system in 2000, there has been an interest in the use of more aggressive treatment methods. The purpose of the present study was to assess changing trends in the treatment of distal radial fractures in elderly patients in the United States. We evaluated a 5% sample of Medicare data from 1996 to 1997 and a 20% sample from 1998 to 2005. Information on four treatment methods (closed treatment, percutaneous pin fixation, internal fixation, and external fixation) was extracted from the dataset. Other available data were diagnosis, physician specialty, and patient age, sex, and race. We calculated frequencies and rates to compare the utilization of different treatments over time. Over the ten-year time period examined, the rate of internal fixation of distal radial fractures in the elderly increased fivefold, from 3% in 1996 to 16% in 2005. Closed treatment, however, remained the predominant method (used for 82% of the fractures in 1996 and 70% in 2005). Fractures in patients with an age of eighty-five years or more were significantly more likely to be treated in a closed fashion (p < 0.0001). There was a large variation among physician specialties with regard to the fixation methods that were used. Orthopaedic surgeons were significantly more likely to use closed treatment than hand surgeons were, whereas hand surgeons were significantly more likely to use internal fixation than orthopaedic surgeons were. Since 2000, although the majority of distal radial fractures are still treated nonoperatively, there has been an increase in the use of internal fixation and a concurrent decrease in the rate of closed treatment of distal radial fractures in the elderly in the United States.

  13. Health care utilization in the elderly Mexican population: Expenditures and determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Peña Carmen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide population aging has been considered one of the most important demographic phenomena, and is frequently referred as a determinant of health costs and expenditures. These costs are an effect either of the aging process itself (social or because of the increase that comes with older age (individual. Objective To analyze health expenditures and its determinants in a sample of Mexican population, for three dimensions acute morbidity, ambulatory care and hospitalization focusing on different age groups, particularly the elderly. Methods A secondary analysis of the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT, 2006 was conducted. A descriptive analysis was performed to establish a health profile by socio-demographic characteristics. Logistic regression models were estimated to determine the relation between acute morbidity, ambulatory care, hospitalization and age group; to establish the determinants of hospitalization among the population 60 years and older; and to determine hospitalization expenditures by age. Results Higher proportion of elderly reporting health problems was found. Average expenditures of hospitalization in households were $240.6 am dlls, whereas in households exclusively with elderly the expenditure was $308.9 am dlls, the highest among the considered age groups. The multivariate analysis showed higher probability of being hospitalized among the elderly, but not for risks for acute morbidity and ambulatory care. Among the elderly, older age, being male or living in a city or in a metro area implied a higher probability of hospitalization during the last year, with chronic diseases playing a key role in hospitalization. Conclusions The conditions associated with age, such as chronic diseases, have higher weight than age itself; therefore, they are responsible for the higher expenditures reported. Conclusions point towards a differentiated use and intensity of health services depending on age

  14. Health care utilization in the elderly Mexican population: expenditures and determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, César; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis M; García-Peña, Carmen

    2011-03-29

    Worldwide population aging has been considered one of the most important demographic phenomena, and is frequently referred as a determinant of health costs and expenditures. These costs are an effect either of the aging process itself (social) or because of the increase that comes with older age (individual). To analyze health expenditures and its determinants in a sample of Mexican population, for three dimensions acute morbidity, ambulatory care and hospitalization focusing on different age groups, particularly the elderly. A secondary analysis of the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT), 2006 was conducted. A descriptive analysis was performed to establish a health profile by socio-demographic characteristics. Logistic regression models were estimated to determine the relation between acute morbidity, ambulatory care, hospitalization and age group; to establish the determinants of hospitalization among the population 60 years and older; and to determine hospitalization expenditures by age. Higher proportion of elderly reporting health problems was found. Average expenditures of hospitalization in households were $240.6 am dlls, whereas in households exclusively with elderly the expenditure was $308.9 am dlls, the highest among the considered age groups. The multivariate analysis showed higher probability of being hospitalized among the elderly, but not for risks for acute morbidity and ambulatory care. Among the elderly, older age, being male or living in a city or in a metro area implied a higher probability of hospitalization during the last year, with chronic diseases playing a key role in hospitalization. The conditions associated with age, such as chronic diseases, have higher weight than age itself; therefore, they are responsible for the higher expenditures reported. Conclusions point towards a differentiated use and intensity of health services depending on age. The projected increase in hospitalization and health care needs for this

  15. Nutritional survey of an elderly Russian population. CARE International Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, C H; Posner, B M; Peterson, D E

    1994-01-01

    During March and April 1992, CARE International, with epidemiological support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, conducted household surveys of pensioners 70 years of age or older in two Russian cities. The objectives of these studies were to assess survey feasibility, to report baseline nutritional data, and to determine if demographic identifiers on computerized government listings could be used to target nutritional aid toward the most needy among elderly people. Pensioners in each city were administered questionnaires regarding food consumption and financial and health status. We calculated scores for body mass index (BMI) and Nutritional Screening Initiative (NSI) Checklist (a tool for assessing the nutritional risk status of U.S. elderly). Median pension income was 410 roubles (about $4.00) per month. Forty-five percent of the participants had pensioners will be used for continuing assessment of the impact of economic restructuring in Russia upon elderly citizens.

  16. The hidden curriculum of the medical care for elderly patients in medical education: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiboom, Ariadne; Diedrich, Chantal; Vries, Henk De; Hertogh, Cees; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-01-01

    Despite more attention being given to geriatrics in medical curricula, few new physicians are seeking training in this field. So far, there has been no exploration of factors in the hidden curriculum that could potentially influence the persisting lack of interest in this field of medicine. To study this hidden curriculum in medical education in relation to medical care of elderly patients, the authors used a qualitative research design including participant observations on two internal medicine wards in a teaching hospital and semistructured interviews. The results showed that elderly patients with multiple problems are seen as frustrating and not interesting. Medical students were not stimulated to go into the totality of medical problems of elderly patients. They picked up a lot of disparaging remarks about these patients. The mainly negative attitudes demonstrated by role models, in particular the residents, may potentially influence the development of future doctors and their choice of career.

  17. Seeking "a place where one belongs": elderly Korean immigrant women using day care services in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kumsun; Herrera C, Lourdes R; Lee, Setsuko; Nakamura, Yasuhide

    2012-10-01

    The study examined the subjective life experiences of elderly first-generation Korean women living in Japan and investigated their adjustment to the local Japanese community. The study group comprised 14 elderly Korean women residents at a Korean-oriented, insurance-based, day services center in midwestern Japan. They were interviewed in depth, and the data were analyzed using the modified grounded theory approach. The study designated the core category as "conservation of ethnic identity" and identified five subcategories: (a) loneliness, (b) returning to one's homeland culture, (c) physical decline as a result of aging, (d) family ties, and (e) a place where one belongs. The results elucidated that although the participants had adapted to Japanese culture, they were strongly influenced by the memories of their hometowns and wished to return to their homeland. The study suggests that elderly immigrants need day care support that provides an environment where they can enjoy their culture.

  18. Therapeutic nursing care: transition in sexuality of the elderly caregiving spouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Feio da Maia Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To understand the transitions experienced, and the conditions and expected response patterns to changes in sexuality of the spouse-caregiver of the elderly, during progression of the dementia process. Method: A qualitative research study, conducted at the neurogeriatric clinic between May of 2014 and May of 2015. An intensive, individual interview was administered to 12 elderly caregivers. Thematic content analysis was applied, using the theoretical model of Transition Theory. Results: Seven categories emerged, involving relationship and conjugal sexuality; disease repercussions; care and professional approach; attitudes, beliefs and social imagery of sexuality and care; family relationship and redefining of sexuality. Final considerations: Family development and marital life, the aspects of formation and development of sexuality, the specifics that involved living and caring for the other were understood, with successive events and changes influenced by old age, dementia, beliefs and social imagery.

  19. Ethics support in institutional elderly care: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Dam, Sandra; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Abma, Tineke A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical ethics support mechanisms in healthcare are increasing but little is known about the specific developments in elderly care. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic literature review on the characteristics of existing ethics support mechanisms in institutional elderly care. A review was performed in three electronic databases (Pubmed, CINAHL/PsycINFO, Ethxweb). Sixty papers were included in the review. The ethics support mechanisms are classified in four categories: 'institutional bodies' (ethics committee and consultation team); 'frameworks' (analytical tools to assist care professionals); 'educational programmes and moral case deliberation'; and 'written documents and policies'. For each category the goals, methods and ways of organising are described. Ethics support often serves several goals and can be targeted at various levels: case, professional or organisation. Over the past decades a number of changes have taken place in the development of ethics support in elderly care. Considering the goals, ethics support has become more outreaching and proactive, aiming to qualify professionals to integrate ethics in daily care processes. The approaches in clinical ethics support have become more diverse, more focused on everyday ethical issues and better adapted to the concrete learning style of the nursing staff. Ethics support has become less centrally organised and more connected to local contexts and primary process within the organisation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Effects of changes in depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning on physical disability in home care elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lydia W; Conwell, Yeates

    2009-02-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of changes in depression status on physical disability in older persons receiving home care, examine whether the effect is due to concomitant changes in cognitive status, and test whether affective state and cognitive ability interact to influence physical disability. Multilevel analyses were conducted using longitudinal data collected about every 3 months from older participants in Michigan's community-based long-term care programs (N = 13,129). The data set provided an average of nine repeated measures of depressive symptoms, cognitive functioning, and physical disability. We estimated the lag effects of within-person changes in depression and cognitive status, and their interaction, on physical disability measured by activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), controlling for health-related events that occurred in the interim. Changes between not having and having depressive symptoms, including subsyndromal symptoms, are critical to physical disability for home care elders. The effects are independent of concomitant changes in cognitive status, which also have significant adverse effects on physical disability. There is some evidence that improvement of depression buffers the adverse effect of cognitive decline on IADL disability. Providers should monitor changes in depression and cognitive status in home care elders. Early detection and treatment of subthreshold depression, as well as efforts to prevent worsening of cognitive status in home care elders, may have a meaningful impact on their ability to live at home.

  1. Multi-disciplinary Care for the Elderly in Disasters: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heather L; Ling, Catherine G; McBee, Elexis C

    2015-02-01

    Older adults are disproportionately affected by disaster. Frail elders, individuals with chronic diseases, conditions, or disabilities, and those who live in long-term care facilities are especially vulnerable. Purpose The purpose of this integrative review of the literature was to describe the system-wide knowledge and skills that multi-disciplinary health care providers need to provide appropriate care for the elderly during domestic-humanitarian and disaster-relief efforts. Data sources A systematic search protocol was developed in conjunction with a research librarian. Searches of PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were conducted using terms such as Disaster, Geological Processes, Aged, Disaster Planning, and Vulnerable Populations. Forty-six articles met criteria for inclusion in the review. Policies and guidance regarding evacuating versus sheltering in place are lacking. Tenets of elderly-focused disaster planning/preparation and clarification of legal and ethical standards of care and liability issues are needed. Functional capacity, capabilities, or impairments, rather than age, should be considered in disaster preparation. Older adults should be included in disaster planning as population-specific experts. Implications for Practice A multifaceted approach to population-specific disaster planning and curriculum development should include consideration of the biophysical and psychosocial aspects of care, ethical and legal issues, logistics, and resources.

  2. [Individual determinants of dental care utilization among low-income adult and elderly individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldani, Márcia Helena; Brito, Wanessa Hoffmann; Lawder, Juliana Aparecida de Campos; Mendes, Yasmine Bittencourt Emílio; da Silva, Francilene de Fátima Marcondes; Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira

    2010-03-01

    The utilization of dental care services results from the interaction of biological determinants with sociocultural, family and community variables, as well as from some characteristics of health systems. The objective of this study was to assess the individual factors associated with the use of dental care services among low-income adult and elderly individuals living in the catchment area of the Family Health Strategy, in Ponta Grossa, PR. The sample included 246 individuals, aged 35 years or over, who answered a questionnaire on socioeconomic conditions, perceived needs, and access to dental care services. Data analysis was performed according to a conceptual framework based on Andersen's Behavioral Model. Non-recent use of dental care services was considered as the dependent variable in the logistic regression analysis models. There were high prevalences of self-reported oral health diseases and teeth loss. About 40% of the adults and 67% of the elderly had not made any dental visit in the past 3 years. Individuals without ownership of the family home, with inadequate oral hygiene habits and who wore complete dentures had higher odds of having gone to the dentist longer ago. The fact of having a regular source of dental care was identified as a protective factor in the analysis. The conceptual framework confirmed the presence of social and psychosocial inequalities in the use of dental services among low-income adult and elderly individuals.

  3. [Care and acceptance of the elderly homeless person].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Homeless people are even more vulnerable to the harsh conditions of life on the street when they are old and in poor health. Torn between respecting the individual's choice and performing its mission to provide care, the nursing team aims to find the most adapted solution. Seeking to convince without restraining it is guided by an attitude of care and concern.

  4. Candidemia in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Oleg; Chasan, Rachel

    2017-09-01

    Candidemia presents several challenges to the intensive care unit (ICU) community. Recognition and treatment of this infection is frequently delayed, with dramatic clinical deterioration and death often preceding the detection of Candida in blood cultures. Identification of individual patients at the highest risk for developing candidemia remains an imperfect science; the role of antifungal therapy before culture diagnosis is yet to be fully defined in the ICU. The absence of well-established molecular techniques for early detection of candidemia hinders efforts to reduce the heavy clinical and economic impact of this infection. Echinocandins are the recommended antifungal drug class for the treatment of ICU candidemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nosocomial diarrhea in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Marcon

    Full Text Available We made an epidemiological case-control study to examine risk factors for the development of diarrhea in the intensive care unit (ICU of a public hospital in Santo André, SP, from January to October 2002. Forty-nine patients with diarrhea (cases and 49 patients without diarrhea (controls, matched for age and gender, were included in the study. A stool culture and enzyme immunoassays for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B were performed on fecal specimens from diarrhea patients. Fourteen of them presented positive cultures for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 22 patients presented positive ELISA for Clostridium diffícile. Nosocomial diarrhea was associated with several factors, including use of antibiotics (P=0.001, use of ceftriaxone (P=0.001, presence of infection (P=0.010 and length of hospital stay (P=0.0001.

  6. Citizens' Jury and Elder Care: Public Participation and Deliberation in Long-Term Care Policy in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuengsatiansup, Komatra; Tengrang, Kanisorn; Posayanonda, Tipicha; Sihapark, Siranee

    2018-02-16

    Health care policies for the elderly are complex, multidimensional, and contextually circumscribed. While engagement of health experts, economists, health care administrators, and political leaders is generally viewed as instrumental to the success and sustainability of eldercare programs, the elders themselves are often viewed as passive recipients of care and not included in the policy processes. Experiences and expectations from users' perspectives can be invaluable information for policy formulation and systems design. This paper examines a participatory policy process using a "citizens' jury" to promote public engagement in eldercare policy. The process was initiated by the National Health Commission Office in Thailand to explore how a citizens' jury as a model for civic deliberation can be utilized to provide sophisticated policy recommendations on long-term care policies for the elderly. The objectives of this paper are to (1) examine how public participation in health policy can be actualized through the citizens' jury as an operational model, (2) understand the strengths and weaknesses of the ways the idea was implemented, and (3) provide recommendations for further use of the model. Details of how a citizens' jury was deployed are discussed, with recommendations for further use provided at the end.

  7. Family Relations and Elder Care Among Arabs in the North of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2018-01-01

    The study examined family relations and elder care, in light of the modernization processes that are taking place in the Arab sector. Interviews with 25 older adults, 27 family members, and 5 paid home care workers of an Arab origin were conducted. Qualitative analysis consisted of constant comparisons and contrasts of relevant themes. Most Arabs reported that intergenerational solidarity is very strong in the Arab sector. Whereas many older adults and a few of their family members tended to favor paid care, the majority of Arab family members and fewer older adults stated that family care is preferred. Finally, a third theme outlined the desired properties of care, which consists of a true mix between formal and informal care. The study points to two sources of tension between (a) older adults and their family members and (b) perspectives on care held by the National Insurance Institute and the Arab sector.

  8. Physical work load, physical capacity and strain among elderly female aides in home-care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgén, M; Nygård, C H; Kilbom, A

    1995-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate physical work load, physical capacity, physical strain and perceived health among elderly aides in home-care service. A secondary aim was to compare the work load and strain between the two main types of home-care service available in Sweden today. Work tasks and their distribution among 20 elderly aides (aged 45-65 years), working in open home-care service (clients living in their original flats or houses) and at service apartment houses (clients living in private flats constructed for the elderly and handicapped with service functions) were observed during whole work days. Heart rate and number of steps taken were also measured continuously during the whole work day. Oxygen consumption and work postures for upper arm and back were measured during parts of the work day. The results showed that home-care work is characterised by long periods of standing and walking and that postures potentially harmful for the low back and shoulders occurred frequently. Average physiological strain measured as relative oxygen consumption and heart rate during the work day did not exceed present recommendations. Average physical work load and strain in open home-care service slightly exceeded those in service apartment houses because of more frequent cleaning and walking outdoors. Many aides in this study showed slightly reduced physical capacity, and musculoskeletal problems were common. Many elderly aides in home-care service are probably exposed at work to high risks of overexertion and impaired health as a result of high postural loads in combination with other known important factors, such as time stress and lack of equipment.

  9. Care ‘going market’: Finnish elderly-care policies in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Anttonen

    2011-06-01

    -ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The article evaluates marketization and its effects on elderly-care policies in Finland, where the welfare state has been the most important mechanism in mitigating failures caused by the functioning of market. In addition, since the 1960s the public sector has been regarded as the guarantee for citizens' social rights and the common good. Therefore, marketization, denoting to market logics intervened with social-care practices that construct care as a commodity and the individual in need of care as a consumer, is a critical juncture for an evaluation of the underlying pattern change. To evaluate the change this article employs a framework of institutional policy analysis. By focusing on institutional framing of care policies, institutionalized responsibilities, policy discourses, and policy outcomes and by using textual and statistical data, this article aims to reach a detailed but comprehensive picture on marketization and its influence in the Finnish social-care regime. All institutional aspects analysed in the study show a clear transition from universal social policies based on public responsibility to market-friendly policies and the marketization of social care. However, they also imply that marketization is regulated by public authorities. On the basis of these results, we argue that Finnish elderly-care policies is going through a profound change, in magnitude similar to what occurred 30-40 years ago when the politics of universalism was breaking through. The new direction points to the market and a deep-going reform of social-care service provision is taking place, and the earlier state-centred welfare production mode is at least partly withering away. In this respect the pattern of social-care service

  10. Intensive care admission and hospital mortality in the elderly after non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nadal, M; Pérez-Hoyos, S; Montejo-González, J C; Pearse, R; Aldecoa, C

    2018-03-01

    To assess whether patient age is independently associated to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission after non-cardiac surgery. An observational cohort study of the Spanish subset of the European Surgical Outcome Study (EuSOS) was carried out. Hospitals of the public National Health Care System and private hospitals in Spain. None. All patients over 16 years of age undergoing inpatient non-cardiac surgery in the participating hospitals during a 7-day period in the month of April 2011 were consecutively included. ICU admission rate, factors associated with ICU admission and hospital mortality were assessed using logistic regression analysis and fractional polynomial regression. Out of 5412 patients, 677 (12.5%) were admitted to the ICU after surgery. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) for ICU admission was 1.1 (0.8-1.4) for patients aged 65-74 years, 0.7 (0.5-1) for patients aged 75-85 years, and 0.4 (0.2-0.8) for patients over 85 years, respectively. Age, ASA score, grade of surgery (minor, intermediate, major), urgent surgery, surgical specialty, laparoscopic surgery and metastatic disease were independent factors for ICU admission. Global risk-adjusted mortality was 1.4 (95% CI 0.9-2.2). The ASA score, urgent surgery, surgical specialty and diabetes were predictors of hospital mortality. Elderly patients (over 80 years) appear less likely to be admitted to ICU after non-cardiac surgery in Spanish hospitals. There was no significant association between age and postoperative mortality in this cohort. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. [Nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; López-Pueyo, María Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) still have a high incidence in intensive care units (ICUs), and are becoming one of the most important problems in these units. It is well known that these infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and are associated with increases in the length of stay and excessive hospital costs. Based on the data from the ENVIN-UCI study, the rates and aetiology of the main nosocomial infections have been described, and include ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and both primary and catheter related bloodstream infections, as well as the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. A literature review on the impact of different nosocomial infections in critically ill patients is also presented. Infection control programs such as zero bacteraemia and pneumonia have been also analysed, and show a significant decrease in NI rates in ICUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. [Psychiatric disorders in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampélas, J F; Pochard, F; Consoli, S M

    2002-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders in intensive care patients have been for a long time neglected. They are nowadays better recognized and managed. These disorders are mainly: delirium; anxiety disorders, from simple anxiety to panic disorder with agitation; adaptation disorders with depressive mood; brief psychotic disorders with persecution ideas. The manifestations of psychiatric disorders occur not only during the stay in intensive care unit (ICU) but also after transfer from ICU and several months after discharge from hospital. Part of psychiatric disorders is caused by organic or toxic causes (metabolic disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, withdrawal syndromes, infection, vascular disorders and head trauma). Nevertheless some authors estimate that they are due to the particular environment of ICU. The particularities of these units are: a high sound level (noise level average between 50 and 60 dBA), the absence of normal day-night cycle, a sleep deprivation, a sensory deprivation, the inability for intubated patients to talk, the pain provoked by some medical procedures, the possibility to witness other patients' death. Although most patients feel secure in ICU, some of them perceive ICU's environment as threatening. Simple environmental modifications could prevent the apparition of some psychiatric manifestations: efforts should be made to decrease noise generated by equipment and staff conversations, to provide external windows, visible clocks and calendar, to ensure adequate sleep with normal day-night cycle and to encourage more human contact. Psychotropic drugs are useful but a warm and empathetic attitude can be very helpful. Some authors described specific psychotherapeutic interventions in ICU (hypnosis, coping strategies.). To face anxiety, many patients have defense attitudes as psychological regression and denial. Patient's family is suffering too. Relative's hospitalization causes a crisis in family. Unpredicted illnesses often

  13. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and adjust systematic implementation of guided family-centred care in a neonatal intensive care unit. BACKGROUND: Family-centred care is valued in neonatal intensive care units internationally, but innovative strategies are needed to realise the principles. Guided...... of a busy neonatal care unit. Promoting practice uptake was initially underestimated, but nurse guided family-centred care training was improved by increasing the visibility of the study in the unit, demonstrating intervention progress to the nurses and assuring a sense of ownership among nurse leaders...... family-centred care was developed to facilitate person-centred communication by bridging the gap between theory and practice in family-centred care. Main mechanisms of guided family-centred care are structured dialogue, reflection and person-centred communication. DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative...

  14. The limits of care. Organisation of the Household Assistance for the elderly in Madrid and Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Moré

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses from a comparative perspective household care for the elderly in the capitals of Spain and France. Through a qualitative methodology combining interviews and participant observation, the article compares household care services and domestic work in both cities. The analysis shows how the moral, emotional and material dimensions are articulated in the performance of the work. This analysis contributes to the “denaturalization” of care work by showing that those jobs can be defined in multiple ways, implying very different limits in the definition of the tasks, qualifications, working times and labour relations.

  15. Invisible Elderly in Danish and Swedish Residential Care Home Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E Andersson, Jonas; Grangaard, Sidse

    2015-01-01

    This study of two architectural competitions suggests that the fit between architectural design and older users, who depend on regular caregiving due to cognitive or functional disabilities, requires a particular consideration when designing new residential care homes.......This study of two architectural competitions suggests that the fit between architectural design and older users, who depend on regular caregiving due to cognitive or functional disabilities, requires a particular consideration when designing new residential care homes....

  16. A framework for understanding outcomes of integrated care programs for the hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Hartgerink

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated care has emerged as a new strategy to enhance the quality of care for hospitalised elderly. Current models do not provide insight into the mechanisms underlying integrated care delivery. Therefore, we developed a framework to identify the underlying mechanisms of integrated care delivery. We should understand how they operate and interact, so that integrated care programmes can enhance the quality of care and eventually patient outcomes.Theory and methods: Interprofessional collaboration among professionals is considered to be critical in integrated care delivery due to many interdependent work requirements. A review of integrated care components brings to light a distinction between the cognitive and behavioural components of interprofessional collaboration.Results: Effective integrated care programmes combine the interacting components of care delivery. These components affect professionals’ cognitions and behaviour, which in turn affect quality of care. Insight is gained into how these components alter the way care is delivered through mechanisms such as combining individual knowledge and actively seeking new information.Conclusion: We expect that insight into the cognitive and behavioural mechanisms will contribute to the understanding of integrated care programmes. The framework can be used to identify the underlying mechanisms of integrated care responsible for producing favourable outcomes, allowing comparisons across programmes.

  17. A framework for understanding outcomes of integrated care programs for the hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Hartgerink

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated care has emerged as a new strategy to enhance the quality of care for hospitalised elderly. Current models do not provide insight into the mechanisms underlying integrated care delivery. Therefore, we developed a framework to identify the underlying mechanisms of integrated care delivery. We should understand how they operate and interact, so that integrated care programmes can enhance the quality of care and eventually patient outcomes. Theory and methods: Interprofessional collaboration among professionals is considered to be critical in integrated care delivery due to many interdependent work requirements. A review of integrated care components brings to light a distinction between the cognitive and behavioural components of interprofessional collaboration. Results: Effective integrated care programmes combine the interacting components of care delivery. These components affect professionals’ cognitions and behaviour, which in turn affect quality of care. Insight is gained into how these components alter the way care is delivered through mechanisms such as combining individual knowledge and actively seeking new information. Conclusion: We expect that insight into the cognitive and behavioural mechanisms will contribute to the understanding of integrated care programmes. The framework can be used to identify the underlying mechanisms of integrated care responsible for producing favourable outcomes, allowing comparisons across programmes.

  18. Horizontal Inequity in Health Care Utilization among the Middle-Aged and Elderly in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaofan; Dou, Lei; Wang, Haipeng; Jing, Shanshan; Yin, Aitian

    2017-07-26

    Equitable utilization of health care is a primary goal of the Chinese health system. This study aimed to examine horizontal inequity in health care utilization and identify the factors resulting in inequity among the middle-aged and elderly in China. The data were obtained from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). We employed the concentration index (CI) and horizontal inequity (HI) to measure inequity in health care utilization. Non-linear regression models were used to decompose the CI into the contribution of each factor. The CIs for the probability of and total number of outpatient visits were 0.0642 and 0.0780, respectively, and those for inpatient visits were 0.1418 and 0.1471, respectively. The HIs were also significantly positive. Living standard was the most important contributor. The contribution of health insurance varied between plans. This study supported the presence of pro-rich inequity in health care utilization for both probability and frequency among the middle-aged and elderly in China. Narrowing the living standard gap and improving the health insurance benefit package for the elderly should help to resolve these inequities.

  19. Horizontal Inequity in Health Care Utilization among the Middle-Aged and Elderly in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofan Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Equitable utilization of health care is a primary goal of the Chinese health system. This study aimed to examine horizontal inequity in health care utilization and identify the factors resulting in inequity among the middle-aged and elderly in China. Methods: The data were obtained from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS. We employed the concentration index (CI and horizontal inequity (HI to measure inequity in health care utilization. Non-linear regression models were used to decompose the CI into the contribution of each factor. Results: The CIs for the probability of and total number of outpatient visits were 0.0642 and 0.0780, respectively, and those for inpatient visits were 0.1418 and 0.1471, respectively. The HIs were also significantly positive. Living standard was the most important contributor. The contribution of health insurance varied between plans. Conclusions: This study supported the presence of pro-rich inequity in health care utilization for both probability and frequency among the middle-aged and elderly in China. Narrowing the living standard gap and improving the health insurance benefit package for the elderly should help to resolve these inequities.

  20. Oral Health Status of Older Adults in Sweden Receiving Elder Care: Findings From Nursing Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Isabelle; Jansson, Henrik; Lindmark, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Frail elderly people often have poor oral hygiene, contributing to oral health problems that can detract significantly from quality of life. The aim of this study was to describe oral health status of frail elderly individuals using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide-Jönköping (ROAG-J), a mouth assessment instrument that can be used in daily nursing care. Data were obtained from the Swedish Senior Alert quality registry in one Swedish municipality. ROAG-J assessments on admission to elder care and one subsequent occasion were used. ROAG-J measurements documented oral health in nine areas: voice, lips, oral mucosa, tongue, gums, teeth, saliva, swallowing, and presence of any prostheses or implants. Assessments were made by nursing staff during the course of daily nursing care. Individuals 65 years of age or older and receiving elder care services (N = 667) were involved; 1,904 assessments made between November 2011 and March 2014 were used for the analysis. On the basis of both assessments, less than one third of participants had oral health problems. No significant difference in any of the oral health variables was found between first and subsequent assessments. At first assessment, men and women differed in tongue health (p oral health. Assessments made by nursing staff using the ROAG-J demonstrate that this tool can be used in daily nursing care, where different, important oral conditions may be encountered. However, knowledge about oral health conditions and the ROAG-J instrument is important to ensure high validity. The ROAG-J enables nursing staff to detect problems in the mouth and to guide decisions related to oral health interventions.

  1. Caring for the Elderly at Work and Home: Can a Randomized Organizational Intervention Improve Psychological Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Thompson, Rebecca J; Lawson, Katie M; Bodner, Todd; Perrigino, Matthew B; Hammer, Leslie B; Buxton, Orfeu M; Almeida, David M; Moen, Phyllis; Hurtado, David A; Wipfli, Brad; Berkman, Lisa F; Bray, Jeremy W

    2017-12-07

    Although job stress models suggest that changing the work social environment to increase job resources improves psychological health, many intervention studies have weak designs and overlook influences of family caregiving demands. We tested the effects of an organizational intervention designed to increase supervisor social support for work and nonwork roles, and job control in a results-oriented work environment on the stress and psychological distress of health care employees who care for the elderly, while simultaneously considering their own family caregiving responsibilities. Using a group-randomized organizational field trial with an intent-to-treat design, 420 caregivers in 15 intervention extended-care nursing facilities were compared with 511 caregivers in 15 control facilities at 4 measurement times: preintervention and 6, 12, and 18 months. There were no main intervention effects showing improvements in stress and psychological distress when comparing intervention with control sites. Moderation analyses indicate that the intervention was more effective in reducing stress and psychological distress for caregivers who were also caring for other family members off the job (those with elders and those "sandwiched" with both child and elder caregiving responsibilities) compared with employees without caregiving demands. These findings extend previous studies by showing that the effect of organizational interventions designed to increase job resources to improve psychological health varies according to differences in nonwork caregiving demands. This research suggests that caregivers, especially those with "double-duty" elder caregiving at home and work and "triple-duty" responsibilities, including child care, may benefit from interventions designed to increase work-nonwork social support and job control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Oral health status, dental treatment needs, and barriers to dental care of elderly care home residents in Lodz, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Szatko, Franciszek; Godala, Malgorzata; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    To determine oral health status, dental treatment needs, and to identify barriers that prevent easy access to dental care by elderly care home residents in Lodz. Studies in many countries show that oral health status of elderly care home residents is poor and there is an urgent need to improve it. The study included 259 care home residents, aged 65 years and older. The oral examination was performed. In face-to-face interviews, subjects were asked about frequency of cleaning teeth and/or dentures, whether they needed assistance, and whether the assistance was available; they were also asked about the perceived dental needs, and about the time since their last visit to a dentist and the purpose of the visit. If they had not visited the dentist in the past 12 months, they were asked about reasons for failing to visit the dentist. Forty-six percent of the subjects were edentulous. Only 5.8% of all participants had a sufficient number of functional natural teeth. Dental treatment was found to be necessary in 59.8% of the respondents. One in four subjects reported reduced ability of correctly cleaning teeth and dentures themselves, of whom only one-third were helped by others. An insufficient level of hygiene was found in every other subject. About 42% of residents had not visited a dentist for over 5 years, mainly due to organizational reasons. Expanding the current scope of medical care for the elderly care home residents to include dental care would improve their currently poor oral health status.

  3. The short-term effects of an integrated care model for the frail elderly on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina Mijntje Looman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study explores the short-term value of integrated care for the frail elderly by evaluating the effects of the Walcheren Integrated Care Model on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care after three months. Intervention: Frailty was preventively detected in elderly living at home with the Groningen Frailty Indicator. Geriatric nurse practitioners and secondary care geriatric nursing specialists were assigned as case managers and co-ordinated the care agreed upon in a multidisciplinary meeting. The general practitioner practice functions as a single entry point and supervises the co-ordination of care. The intervention encompasses task reassignment between nurses and doctors and consultations between primary, secondary and tertiary care providers. The entire process was supported by multidisciplinary protocols and web-based patient files. Methods: The design of this study was quasi-experimental. In this study, 205 frail elderly patients of three general practitioner practices that implemented the integrated care model were compared with 212 frail elderly patients of five general practitioner practices that provided usual care. The outcomes were assessed using questionnaires. Baseline measures were compared with a three-month follow-up by chi-square tests, t-tests and regression analysis. Results and conclusion: In the short term, the integrated care model had a significant effect on the attachment aspect of quality of life. The frail elderly patients were better able to obtain the love and friendship they desire. The use of care did not differ despite the preventive element and the need for assessments followed up with case management in the integrated care model. In the short term, there were no significant changes in health. As frailty is a progressive state, it is assumed that three months are too short to influence changes in health with integrated care models. A more longitudinal approach is

  4. Health related quality of life and care dependency among elderly hospital patients: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Ate; Hakverdioğlu, Gülendam; Muszalik, Marta; Andela, Richtsje; Korhan, Esra Akın; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia

    2015-03-01

    Many countries in Europe and the world have to cope with an aging population. Although health policy in many countries aims at increasing disability-free life expectancy, elderly patients represent a significant proportion of all patients admitted to different hospital departments. The aim of the research was to investigate the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the care dependency status among elderly hospital patients. In 2012, a descriptive survey was administered to a convenience sample of 325 elderly hospital patients (> 60 years) from The Netherlands (N = 125), from Poland (N = 100), and from Turkey (N = 100). We employed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Measurement System and the Care Dependency Scale. FACIT is a collection of HRQOL questionnaires that assess multidimensional health status in people with various chronic illnesses. From demographic variables, gender (female) (r = -0.13, p < 0.05), age and informal care given by family members (r = -0.27 to 0.27, p < 0.01) were significantly correlated with the care dependency status for the whole samples. All HRQOL variables, hearing aid and duration of illness correlated with care dependency status (r = -0.20 to 0.50, p < 0.01). Moreover, the FACIT sum score (Poland and Turkey) and functional wellbeing (The Netherlands) are significantly associated with the decrease in care dependency status. Thus, the FACIT variables are the most powerful indicators for care dependency. The study provides healthcare professionals insight into improvement of quality of care in all three countries.

  5. Terminally ill African American elders' access to and use of hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hyunjin; Schroepfer, Tracy A

    2015-05-01

    The underuse of hospice care by terminally ill African American elders suggests they are suffering when hospice care could offer quality end of life care. Guided by the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study sought understanding of structural barriers faced when seeking access to hospice care and reasons for using it when access is possible. Data was collected through interviews with 28 African American hospice patients. Themes from directed content analysis provide insights into strategies used to overcome access barriers posed by income, health insurance and administrative procedure, as well as the role religion, family, information and health beliefs played in using it. Distributing educational materials and addressing spiritual/religious concerns in choosing hospice care are key in promoting African Americans' use of hospice care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Race and Gender Differences in Correlates of Death Anxiety Among Elderly in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Moghani Lankarani, Maryam

    2016-06-01

    Death anxiety among elderly is a major public health concern. Few studies, however, have been conducted on factors associated with death anxiety. This study investigated race and gender differences in psychosocial correlates of death anxiety among elderly in the US. With a cross-sectional design, we used data of the Religion, Aging, and Health survey. 1,074 White and Black elderly (age > 65 years, 615 women, 359 men) were entered to this study. Demographic (age, gender, and race), socio-economic (family income, perceived financial difficulty), health (number of chronic medical conditions and self-rated health), and psychological (perceived control over life) factors were measured. Death anxiety was measured using four items. We used linear regressions to determine factors associated with death anxiety based on race and gender. Although race and gender did not have main effects on death anxiety (P > 0.05), they altered correlates of death anxiety. Age was a predictor of death anxiety among women (B = 0.165, P = 0.002) but not men (B = 0.082, P = 0.196). Self-rated health was associated with death anxiety among Whites (B = - 0.120, P = 0.050) but not Blacks (B = - 0.077, P = 0.268). Total family income was only associated with death anxiety among White men. Demographic, socio-economic, health, and psychological determinants of death anxiety in United States differ based on race, gender, and their intersection. Findings advocate that geriatric psychiatrists and gerontologists who wish to reduce death anxiety among elderly people may need to tailor their interventions to race and gender.

  7. Race and Gender Differences in Correlates of Death Anxiety Among Elderly in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Moghani Lankarani, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Death anxiety among elderly is a major public health concern. Few studies, however, have been conducted on factors associated with death anxiety. Objectives This study investigated race and gender differences in psychosocial correlates of death anxiety among elderly in the US. Materials and Methods With a cross-sectional design, we used data of the Religion, Aging, and Health survey. 1,074 White and Black elderly (age > 65 years, 615 women, 359 men) were entered to this study. Demographic (age, gender, and race), socio-economic (family income, perceived financial difficulty), health (number of chronic medical conditions and self-rated health), and psychological (perceived control over life) factors were measured. Death anxiety was measured using four items. We used linear regressions to determine factors associated with death anxiety based on race and gender. Results Although race and gender did not have main effects on death anxiety (P > 0.05), they altered correlates of death anxiety. Age was a predictor of death anxiety among women (B = 0.165, P = 0.002) but not men (B = 0.082, P = 0.196). Self-rated health was associated with death anxiety among Whites (B = - 0.120, P = 0.050) but not Blacks (B = - 0.077, P = 0.268). Total family income was only associated with death anxiety among White men. Conclusions Demographic, socio-economic, health, and psychological determinants of death anxiety in United States differ based on race, gender, and their intersection. Findings advocate that geriatric psychiatrists and gerontologists who wish to reduce death anxiety among elderly people may need to tailor their interventions to race and gender. PMID:27803717

  8. Characterisation and carriage ratio of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from a community-dwelling elderly population in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Miyajima

    Full Text Available Community-associated Clostridium difficile infection (CDI appears to be an increasing problem. Reported carriage rates by C. difficile are debatable with suggestions that primary asymptomatic carriage is associated with decreased risk of subsequent diarrhoea. However, knowledge of potential reservoirs and intestinal carriage rates in the community, particularly in the elderly, the most susceptible group, is limited. We have determined the presence of C. difficile in the faeces of a healthy elderly cohort living outside of long-term care facilities (LCFs in the United Kingdom.Faecal samples from 149 community-based healthy elderly volunteers (median age 81 years were screened for C. difficile using direct (Brazier's CCEY and enrichment (Cooked Meat broth culture methods and a glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH immunoassay. Isolates were PCR-ribotyped and analysed for toxin production and the presence of toxin genes.Of 149 faecal samples submitted, six (4% were found to contain C. difficile. One particular sample was positive by both the GDH immunoassay and direct culture, and concurrently produced two distinct strain types: one toxigenic and the other non-toxigenic. The other five samples were only positive by enrichment culture method. Overall, four C. difficile isolates were non-toxigenic (PCR-ribotypes 009, 026 (n = 2 and 039, while three were toxigenic (PCR-ribotypes 003, 005 and 106. All individuals who had a positive culture were symptom-free and none of them had a history of CDI and/or antibiotics use in the 3 month period preceding recruitment.To our knowledge, this is the first study of the presence of C. difficile in healthy elderly community-dwelling individuals residing outside of LCFs. The observed carriage rate is lower than that reported for individuals in LCFs and interestingly no individual carried the common epidemic strain PCR-ribotype 027 (NAP1/BI. Further follow-up of asymptomatic carriers in the community, is required to

  9. Pneumonia and hospitalizations in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cacciatore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia in the elderly is a common and severe problem. In this review we analyze the state of the art for pneumonia in the elderly. Several aspects are discussed: i how common is the disease; signs and symptoms in the elderly; ii the elderly must always be hospitalized and which is the best place - Intensive Care Unit or medical ward?; iii the role of comorbidities; iv etiology and pathogenesis; medical treatment - when and how to start; v antibiotic resistance; vi antibiotics in hospital acquired and ventilator related pneumonia; vii assisted non-invasive ventilation; viii the treatment in the terminally ill elderly patient.

  10. A model of community-based interdisciplinary team training in the care of the frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, Mary Ellen; Field, Terry S; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2002-09-01

    It is widely recognized that interdisciplinary team care is essential for effective management of complex patients such as the frail elderly. Physicians need to understand the operational mechanisms that drive the team care model. While such concepts should be an integral part of medical education, teaching such a model of care that demonstrates effective provider communication, coordination of multiple services, and the provision of cost-effective health care can be difficult. The Program of All-inclusive Care of the Elderly (PACE) is a well-established, high-quality program that has been replicated nationally and can serve as an effective teaching model. Achieving the goals of the PACE program requires strong team leadership and communication, clear patient-oriented goal definition, an understanding and appreciation of roles among various disciplines, skillful negotiation, and shared responsibility for the patient. The PACE model offers medical and family practice residents a non-traditional clinical setting with educational opportunities not available in most hospital or ambulatory settings. For several years the Fallon Healthcare System Elder Service Plan (ESP), one of 25 national PACE programs, has provided an educational setting for medical and family practice residents as a component of their clinical rotations in geriatrics. This training experience has been expanded to include additional residents in on-site interactive seminars that focus on effective communication using an interdisciplinary team approach to care. The ESP program provides comprehensive medical and social services to a frail, non-institutionalized nursing-home-eligible population. The aim of the program is to preserve the health and independence of its participants for as long as possible. The ESP team consists of physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, nurse's aides, home health workers, social workers, therapists, nutritionists, and pharmacists. The seminar includes a slide and video

  11. A Bit(e) of the Everyday- The Meaning of Meals in the New Living Units for Elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Karen Marie

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to identity and interpret the experiences, values and meanings of the meals among a small group of elderly living in the new living units. Meals in this study include preparations and cleaning up besides the actual meal. Living units are a new way of organisi...

  12. [Physical disability in the elderly and accessibility to primary health care: integrative literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girondi, Juliana Balbinot Reis; dos Santos, Silvia Maria Azevedo

    2011-06-01

    This is an integrative literature review of studies on physically disabled elder's access to primary health care, published between 1998 and 2008. The research was performed in: databases, virtual documents from the Health Ministry Library (Brazil), the catalogs of the Nursing Research and Study Center (CEPEN), the Brazilian Nursing Association (ABEn), and through e-mail consultation of experts. Sixty studies were selected and subjected to thematic analysis. The following categories emerged: The history of disability in Brazil, Accessibility and social inclusion, Disability and the elderly. Articles from different scenarios, subjects and methodologies show similar conditions experienced by people with disabilities when accessing health care systems. Scarcity of resources and and the indifference of the public administration were the most evident conditions.

  13. Prevalence of undetected cognitive impairment and depression in residents of an elderly care home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawad, M; Rashid, A K; Narayan, K A

    2007-12-01

    The elderly population in Malaysia is growing rapidly. Some of the most vulnerable are in residential care. Research is needed into the characteristics of this population to aid clinicians and policy makers in addressing the needs of this group. This observational, cross-sectional study aims to determine prevalence of undetected cognitive impairment and depression in elderly care home residents in Malaysia. One hundred and sixty-seven people over 60 years of age living in a state run residential home were interviewed. Validated assessment tools were used to measure dependency, cognitive impairment and depression. The prevalence of probable dementia is 36.5%, with increasing prevalence with age and level of dependence. Prevalence of depression is 67.0% (major depression 13.2%), with more depression in males and in the Indian population. None of the identified cases had been previously investigated or treated for dementia or depression.

  14. Mental health services for black and minority ethnic elders in the United Kingdom: a systematic review of innovative practice with service provision and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sarmishtha; Benbow, Susan Mary

    2013-03-01

    The proportion of older people from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups in the United Kingdom (UK) is increasing steadily as the population ages. The numbers with dementia, depression, and other mental health problems are predicted to increase. Government policy documents have highlighted gaps in services for BME elders and/or the need to develop culturally appropriate services, in order to prevent people from BME communities from becoming socially excluded and finding services hard to access. This paper reviews published examples of innovative services and key learning points from them. A search was carried out on Pubmed, Medline, and Google Scholar for service developments aimed at BME elders in the UK. Sixteen relevant papers and reports were identified and were analysed to identify learning points and implications for clinical practice and policy. Commissioning issues included were forward planning for continuing funding and mainstreaming versus specialist services. Provider management issues included were employing staff from the communities of interest, partnership, and removing language barriers. Provider service issues included were education for service provider staff on the needs of BME elders, making available information in relevant languages, building on carers' and users' experiences, and addressing the needs of both groups. A model for structuring understanding of the underutilisation of services by BME elders is suggested. The main emphasis in future should be to ensure that learning is shared, disseminated, and applied to the benefit of all communities across the whole of the UK and elsewhere. Person-centred care is beneficial to all service users.

  15. Assessment of delirium in the intensive care unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ICU) and the Intensive Care Delirium Screening ... Delirium is a prevalent problem in the intensive care unit (ICU),1–4 .... (3) Hyperactive – increased level of psychomotor activity evident by labile mood, agitation, or refusal to cooperate.

  16. [Burnout syndrome in different intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade Mera, M J; Vinagre Gaspar, R; Zaragoza García, I; Viñas Sánchez, S; Antúnez Melero, E; Alvarez González, S; Malpartida Martín, P

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of the professional burnout syndrome in health care personnel of different Intensive Care Units (ICUs). To know the association between burnout, its dimensions and sociodemographic-laboral variables. To compare the dimensions of burnout, characteristics of the personnel and of the patients of the different ICUs. Analytic, comparative, cross-sectional study performed in the ICU of a tertiary hospital in November 2006 performed in a sample of 289 professionals. The Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire and sociodemographic-laboral variables were provided. The following were evaluated in the ICUs: Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS), Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower Use Score (NEMS), mortality, stay, isolations and travel of third parties. The chi2 test, Fischer test, Kruskall-Wallis test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used. A total of 73% of the workers answered. Ages ranged from 37 +/- 9 and 81% were women. The prevalence of burnout was 14%, this affecting 16% of the nurses, 14% of residents, 13% physicians and 10% auxiliary workers. Burnout was associated to low professional satisfactions, relationship with regular colleagues, low work recognition and time worked and experience in the ICU to high emotional tiredness, with a p burnout syndrome 17%, elevated emotional tiredness 49%, elevated depersonalization 63% and low professional performance 44%. The prevalence of the burnout syndrome in our sample was 14%, those being affected most being the nursing professionals. We detected elevated levels of depersonalization and middle levels of emotional tiredness and professional performance. The variables related with professional burnout syndrome were low professional satisfaction, relationship with regular colleagues, low work recognition, and elevated emotional tiredness in the more expert personnel. The ICU with the greatest prevalence of burnout during the month studied attended patients with greater

  17. Alternatives to Institutional Care of the Elderly: beyond the Dichotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L.; Kane, Rosalie A.

    1980-01-01

    The growth in the demand for long-term care services and accompanying cost implications have spurred interest in alternatives to nursing homes. The rationale for such alternatives is a mixture of prevention, displacement, and deinstitutionalization; none may result. The alternative may prove to be additive rather than substitutive. (Author)

  18. Leadership in Care of the Elderly: Assessing Needs and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryker-Gordon, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    This article discusses the following questions: What opportunities and challenges for nursing leadership present themselves in institutions that provide care for our expanding aged population? Should nursing administrators take up these challenges? If so, what skills, resources, and attitudes will they need? (Author/CT)

  19. Gamifying elderly care: Feasibility of a digital gaming solution for active aging

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Ascolese; Jin Kiat; Lucia Pannese; Luca Morganti

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Aging society is a social health issue that digital gaming solutions can address by enabling both infrastructures as advanced environments for care and patients as active people in their aging. Cost-effective patient management may be emphasized thanks to the communication protocols that allow remote monitoring and intervention by medical professionals. Services for elderly depend on their behavior and lifestyle toward personal health management. Digital games could...

  20. [the Role Of Dentistry In The Interdisciplinary Team: Contributing To Comprehensive Health Care For The Elderly].

    OpenAIRE

    Shinkai, R S; Del Bel Cury, A A

    2015-01-01

    This literature review focuses on dentistry's role in comprehensive health care for the elderly. The authors discuss the need for an interdisciplinary approach. They begin by analyzing the current situation in geriatric dentistry and related problems in Brazil, relating primarily to the lack of specific studies and human resources with training in geriatrics and gerontology. The authors emphasize interactions between dentistry and other health professions for health promotion, specific preven...

  1. Social Occupational Therapy in the care of the elderly: life history and production of meanings

    OpenAIRE

    Amabile Teresa de Lima Neves; Maria Daniela Corrêa de Macedo

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the experience report of accompanying an elderly woman attended by the Specialized Home Care Service (SEAD) of the social assistance network of the municipality of Vitoria, Espirito Santo state, Brazil. Through the Social Assistance Specialized Reference Center (CREAS), SEAD is offered to people with disabilities and older people with some degree of dependency and under situation of violation of human rights, as well as to their caregivers and family. In order to contextu...

  2. Pre-testing nutrition education materials for elderly care-givers in Boipatong

    OpenAIRE

    Gaede, Rolf J

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The paper deals with issues and concerns relating to the process of pre-testing visual illustrations used in educational material in a community communication setting. The first part of the paper discusses how selected aspects of nutrition education materials meant for elderly care givers in Boipatong were pre‐tested using questionnaires (n=55) and focus group discussions in order to establish the target group’s views and opinions about different types of visual illustration appro...

  3. Caring for Elderly Parents: A New Commitment of the Third Age

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudová, Radka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2015), s. 903-928 ISSN 0038-0288 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP404/12/P053 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : elderly care * third age * young old Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.262, year: 2015 http://sreview.soc.cas.cz/cs/issue/180-sociologicky-casopis-czech-sociological-review-6-2015/3577

  4. High prevalence of skin and wound care of hospitalized elderly in Brazil: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa Silva, Carleara Ferreira; Santana, Rosimere Ferreira; de Oliveira, Beatriz Guitton Renaud Baptista; do Carmo, Thalita Gomes

    2017-02-02

    Skin changes caused by aging increase the risk of skin damages, such as pressure ulcers, during hospitalization of elderly patients. There is few information about the cost of wound treatment in Brazil. Conversely, skin and wound problems are highly reported among hospitalized elderly patients and caregivers. The purpose is to analyze the socio-demographic and clinical profile associated with skin and wound care in hospitalized elderly. This is a prospective observational study. The sample consisted of 75 patients, aged 60 years or more, randomly selected in three hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data extraction from nursing records of the sample, using cross mapping with Nursing Interventions Classification. Data Synthesis supported by SAS 6.11 (SAS Institute, Inc. Cary North Carolina) in association with SPSS version 14.0 and statistics analysis. The findings were: age standard deviation 7.8, with minimum as 60, and maximum as 91 years old. Prevalence of women and married seniors. High prevalence of long-term hospitalization. There were 21 Nursing Interventions in the nursing records and seventeen of them related to skin and wound care. They were described in 57 nursing activities, present during 376 evaluations and repeated 1756 times. A significant difference was obtained between age and the presence of the nursing interventions "Positioning" (p-0.004), Eye Care/Hygiene (p- < 0.0001) and Oral Health Maintenance (p-0.0003). The skin care to prevention and treatment of skin damages represented the major demand of nursing interventions in different clinical conditions of hospitalized elderly.

  5. Auditing an intensive care unit recycling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Mark A; McGain, Forbes; O'Shea, Catherine J; Bates, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    The provision of health care has significant direct environmental effects such as energy and water use and waste production, and indirect effects, including manufacturing and transport of drugs and equipment. Recycling of hospital waste is one strategy to reduce waste disposed of as landfill, preserve resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and potentially remain fiscally responsible. We began an intensive care unit recycling program, because a significant proportion of ICU waste was known to be recyclable. To determine the weight and proportion of ICU waste recycled, the proportion of incorrect waste disposal (including infectious waste contamination), the opportunity for further recycling and the financial effects of the recycling program. We weighed all waste and recyclables from an 11-bed ICU in an Australian metropolitan hospital for 7 non-consecutive days. As part of routine care, ICU waste was separated into general, infectious and recycling streams. Recycling streams were paper and cardboard, three plastics streams (polypropylene, mixed plastics and polyvinylchloride [PVC]) and commingled waste (steel, aluminium and some plastics). ICU waste from the waste and recycling bins was sorted into those five recycling streams, general waste and infectious waste. After sorting, the waste was weighed and examined. Recycling was classified as achieved (actual), potential and total. Potential recycling was defined as being acceptable to hospital protocol and local recycling programs. Direct and indirect financial costs, excluding labour, were examined. During the 7-day period, the total ICU waste was 505 kg: general waste, 222 kg (44%); infectious waste, 138 kg (27%); potentially recyclable waste, 145 kg (28%). Of the potentially recyclable waste, 70 kg (49%) was actually recycled (14% of the total ICU waste). In the infectious waste bins, 82% was truly infectious. There was no infectious contamination of the recycling streams. The PVC waste was 37% contaminated

  6. Social care going market : Institutional and cultural change regarding services for the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Bode

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades or so, major Western societies have remoulded the institutional set-up by which they are deailing with social risks related to frailty during old age. While the 20th century had brought a transnational tendency towards the establishment of elderly care ‘going public’, the proliferation of more market-based services brings confusion into the societal norm-set underlying the aforementioned tendency. Marketisation has placed the emphasis on economic values engrained in liberal worldviews, leading into a new welfare culture that devaluates universalism and reemphasises the sovereignty of the individual. However, the new cult of the individual produces contradictory signals. Drawing on an encompassing study on the ‘culture of welfare markets’ in elderly care provision, covering two (post-liberal and two (post-corporatist welfare regimes (Canada, Britain; France, Germany, the paper looks at these fuzzy developments in order to assess the cultural embeddedness of what can be referred to as the mixed economy of elderly care. The analysis, charting major patterns of both institutional change and public communication around it, elucidates that we currently are facing a permanent struggle between liberal values and (renewed elements of the ‘going-public-agenda’ proliferating over the 1970s and 1980s, that is, a hybrid and ‘nervous’ cultural configuration in which senior social citizenship remains an issue, albeit on precarious foundations.

  7. Losing an only child: the one-child policy and elderly care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu

    2014-05-01

    China has had the one-child policy for more than 30 years. It reduced China's population growth within a short period of time and promoted economic development. However, it has also led to difficulties, and this paper focuses on those which pertain to ageing and losing one's only child. Approximately one million families have lost their only child in China. They suffer mentally and physically, and sometimes face social stigma and economic loss. What worries them most, however, is elderly care, which has become a severe crisis for the families who have lost their only children. This article draws upon several qualitative studies and 12 cases reported by the Chinese media in 2012 and 2013, and existing laws and policies for supporting those who have lost only children. It also analyses the current elderly care situation facing these families. The Chinese government has recognized the predicament and provides some help, which is increasing but is still not always adequate. To both sustain China's economic development and limit population growth, it is essential for the government to reform the one-child policy and provide a comprehensive support system for the families who have lost their only children, including financial relief and elderly care, and work to reduce stigma against these families. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral Health Status and Oral Health Care among the Dependent Elderly at Muang, Phitsanulok,Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supaporn Sangouam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to survey the oral health status and describe the oral health care of dependent elderly in Muang, Phitsanulok. The subjects obtained by convenience sampling, were 70 dependent elderly with ADL score 0-4 in Muang, Phitsanulok.  Data was collected via the oral health status examination and interview about oral health care.The data was analyzed by descriptive statistics. The results showed that most subjects (62.9% had remain natural teeth but they had not occluding pairs of teeth (52%, most of them had dental caries (82.1%. Among the edentulous group found that majority of the study group were  primary school level and low income. Among the dentate group revealed that 100 % of the study group had never flossed their teeth, 31.9 % brushed their teeth twice a day and 14.3% did not clean their mouth with any methods. The caregivers play the major role of dependent elderly oral health care.  

  9. [Effects of psychosomatic treatment for the elderly on cognition and quality of life : Naturalistic study at the psychosomatic day care hospital for the elderly in Nuremberg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunner, Christina; Reichhart, Corinne; Strauss, Bernhard; Söllner, Wolfgang

    2016-11-16

    In 2006 the psychosomatic day care hospital for the treatment of acute mental illness of elderly people opened as the first clinic of its kind in Germany. The aim of the study was to determine treatment effectiveness regarding quality of life and cognition. Designed as a naturalistic study of a population sample of 116 patients, the cognitive capacity (memory performance and cognitive speed) and the subjective quality of life were measured by the Nuremberg aging inventory (NAI) and the World Health Organization quality of life for elderly persons (WHOQOL-OLD). The patients were surveyed at four points in time including at 8‑month follow-up. A 5-week waiting time before admission to the 5‑week therapy was implemented as a control condition. In comparison with the waiting time, after treatment significant improvement (psychosomatic day care hospital treatment of the elderly improves subjective quality of life and cognitive capacity.

  10. Estimating Long-Term Care Costs among Thai Elderly: A Phichit Province Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattaraporn Khongboon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rural-urban inequality in long-term care (LTC services has been increasing alongside rapid socioeconomic development. This study estimates the average spending on LTC services and identifies the factors that influence the use and cost of LTC for the elderly living in urban and rural areas of Thailand. Methods. The sample comprised 837 elderly aged 60 years drawn from rural and urban areas in Phichit Province. Costs were assessed over a 1-month period. Direct costs of caregiving and indirect costs (opportunity cost method were analyzed. Binary logistic regression was performed to determine which factors affected LTC costs. Results. The total annual LTC spending for rural and urban residents was on average USD 7,285 and USD 7,280.6, respectively. Formal care and informal care comprise the largest share of payments. There was a significant association between rural residents and costs for informal care, day/night care, and home renovation. Conclusions. Even though total LTC expenditures do not seem to vary significantly across rural and urban areas, the fundamental differences between areas need to be recognized. Reorganizing country delivery systems and finding a balance between formal and informal care are alternative solutions.

  11. [Refusal of care faced by case manager from elderly persons in complex situation: cross perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvol, A; Balard, F; Moutel, G; Somme, D

    2014-01-01

    Case management is a new professional field in France. It is addressed to elderly persons living in community whose situation is regarded as particularly complex. Case managers have to assess needs and coordinate necessary services. One common criteria of complexity is refusal of care. The objective of this study is to compare the words of users with those of case managers about refusal of care, in order to understand its meaning, professionals' attitudes and ethical challenges. Two researchers have cooperated on this qualitative research: the first one, anthropologist, interviewed 19 individuals, and 11 of their caregivers. The second one, geriatrician and researcher in medical ethics, lead four focus groups gathering a total of 18 case managers. Refusal of care often is the result of the will of preserving one's identity, compromised by illness. Individuals seek control on their life. Facing this behaviour, case managers try to secure the individual, by establishing a personal relationship that respects their choices, even if care has to be delayed. Refusal of care may sometimes disclose a desire to vanish, in front of which professionals meet their own limits. To recognise an elderly person that refuses care as a unique individual who can make choices secure his identity, and allow him to change. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-efficacy of foot care behaviour of elderly patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizatul Nadwa Mohd Razi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly patients with diabetes are at a high risk of contracting diabetic foot problems. Self-efficacy is essential to help improve foot care behaviour. Aim: To identify levels of self-efficacy and foot care behaviour and their relationship with demographic characteristics in elderly patients with diabetes Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two general hospitals in Malaysia from May to June 2015. Diabetes patients aged 60 years with specific inclusion criteria were invited to participate in this study. The respondents were interviewed using a set of validated questionnaires. Data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics (multiple linear regression using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. Results: Levels of foot self-efficacy (mean+31.39; standard deviation=7.76 and foot care behaviour (mean=25.37; SD=5.88 were high. There was a positive significant relationship between foot selfefficacy (β = 0.41, p < 0.001 and gender (β = 0.30, p < 0.001 with foot care behaviour. Conclusion: Self-efficacy can be incorporated in diabetes education to improve foot care behaviour. High-risk patients should be taught proper foot inspection and protection as well as the merits of skin care to prevent the occurrence of diabetic foot problems.

  13. Use of telemedicine-based care for the aging and elderly: promises and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujnowska-Fedak MM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria Magdalena Bujnowska-Fedak, Urszula Grata-Borkowska Department of Family Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Abstract: Telemedicine-based care provides remote health and social care to maintain people's autonomy and increase their quality of life. The rapidly aging population has come with a significant increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and their effects, and thus the need for increased care and welfare. The elderly have become one of the main target groups for telecare technologies. Smart home systems allow older adults to live in the environment of their choice and protect them against institutionalization or placement in a nursing home. It gives the elderly person a feeling of reassurance and safety, and appears to be one of the most promising approaches to facilitate independent living in a community-dwelling situation. Telecare solutions give a new opportunity for diagnosis, treatment, education, and rehabilitation, and make it possible to monitor patients with a number of chronic diseases. It also reduces socioeconomic disparity with regard to access to care and gives equal chances to patients from urban and rural areas. However, although telecare has undisputed benefits, it also has some limitations. Older people are often resistant to use of new technology, in particular acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary for use of electronic devices and computer systems. Further, privacy and security are important elements when building confidence in telemedicine systems. Leaking of sensitive information, such as health or test results, may have a negative and far-reaching impact on the personal and professional life of the patient. Telemedicine-based care should now be personalized for the needs, capabilities, and preferences of the elderly, with adaptation over time as care needs evolve. If technologies are introduced that are familiar, usable, desirable, and cost-effective, and able to be adapted to

  14. Airborne fungi in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Gonçalves

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of airborne fungi in Intensive Care Unit (ICUs is associated with increased nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of airborne fungi presented in an ICU from the University Hospital of Pelotas – RS, with the attempt to know the place’s environmental microbiota. 40 Petri plates with Sabouraud Dextrose Agar were exposed to an environment of an ICU, where samples were collected in strategic places during morning and afternoon periods for ten days. Seven fungi genera were identified: Penicillium spp. (15.18%, genus with the higher frequency, followed by Aspergillus spp., Cladosporium spp., Fusarium spp., Paecelomyces spp., Curvularia spp., Alternaria spp., Zygomycetes and sterile mycelium. The most predominant fungi genus were Aspergillus spp. (13.92% in the morning and Cladosporium spp. (13.92% in the afternoon. Due to their involvement in different diseases, the identified fungi genera can be classified as potential pathogens of inpatients. These results reinforce the need of monitoring the environmental microorganisms with high frequency and efficiently in health institutions.

  15. [Hospital infections in neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisić, Jasna; Marković-Denić, Ljiljana; Ilić, Slobodanka; Ramadani, Ruzdi

    2005-01-01

    Sick newborn babies in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) are at increased risk for hospital-acquired infections (HI). The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and localization of neonatal hospital infections in NICU. A prospective, six-month study was carried out in a NICU. All patients hospitalized in NICU longer then 48 hours were examined according to their basic descriptive-epidemiological characteristics and the incidence of all hospital-acquired infections (diagnosed using CDC criteria) were accounted for. The incidence of patients with HI was 46.1% while the incidence of HI was 57.2%. On the basis of patients' records in the NICU, the incidence of HI was 43.9 per 1000 patient-hospital days. Patients with HI were hospitalized significantly longer in NICU than patients without HI (t=9.2 DF=267 p<0.001). In terms of localization of HI, a large number of patients had pneumonia--74.7% (115/154), followed by sepsis (37/154), while two had meningitis. This study suggests that it is necessary to maintain continuous surveillance of HI in NICU, as well as infection control measures, which are also very beneficial.

  16. Invasive candidiasis in pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Deep, Akash

    2009-10-01

    Candidemia and disseminated candidiasis are major causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients especially in the intensive care units (ICU). The incidence of invasive candidasis is on a steady rise because of increasing use of multiple antibiotics and invasive procedures carried out in the ICUs. Worldwide there is a shifting trend from C. albicans towards non albicans species, with an associated increase in mortality and antifungal resistance. In the ICU a predisposed host in one who is on broad spectrum antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and central venous catheters. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The clinical clues are: unexplained fever or signs of severe sepsis or septic shock while on antibiotics, multiple, non-tender, nodular erythematous cutaneous lesions. The spectrum of infection with candida species range from superficial candidiasis of the skin and mucosa to more serious life threatening infections. Treatment of candidiasis involves removal of the most likely source of infection and drug therapy to speed up the clearance of infection. Amphotericin B remains the initial drug of first choice in hemodynamically unstable critically ill children in the wake of increasing resistance to azoles. Evaluation of newer antifungal agents and precise role of prophylactic therapy in ICU patients is needed.

  17. Conflicts in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wujtewicz, Maria; Wujtewicz, Magdalena Anna; Owczuk, Radosław

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts in intensive care units (ICUs) are common and concern all professional groups, patients and their families. Both intra- and inter-team conflicts occur. The most common conflicts occur between nurses and physicians, followed by those within nursing teams and between ICU personnel and family members. The main causes of conflicts are considered to be unsatisfactory quality of the information provided, inappropriate ways of communication and improper approach towards treatment of patients. ICU conflicts can have serious consequences not only for families but also for patients, physicians, nurses and wider society. Lack of communication among ICU teams is likely to impair cooperation and ICU team-family contacts. From the point of view of patients and their families, communication skills, as one of the factors affecting the satisfaction of families with treatment, are essential to ensure high quality of ICU treatment. While conflicts are generally unfavourable, they can also have positive implications for the parties involved, depending on their prevalence and management, as well as the community they concern.

  18. Arrhythmia in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrawi, Nadia; Hegazy, Ranya A; Tokovic, Edisa; Lotfy, Wael; Mahmoud, Fadia; Aly, Hany

    2009-04-01

    A random sample of 457 neonates was prospectively studied in order to identify the incidence, common types, and risk factors for arrhythmias in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A 12-lead EKG was studied in all neonates (n = 457). A total of 139 Holter studies was done in every fourth baby with a normal EKG (n = 100) and in all babies with an abnormal EKG (n = 39). Of the 100 infants who were thought to be arrhythmia-free by EKG, nine infants demonstrated an arrhythmia on Holter studies. When we correlated screening results with maternal, obstetrical, and neonatal risk factors; arrhythmias were significantly associated with male gender, more mature gestational age, lower glucose levels, maternal smoking, high umbilical artery lines, and the use of the nebulized beta-2 adrenergic treatment, whereas umbilical venous lines and dopamine infusion did not relate to arrhythmia. We conclude that arrhythmias are more common in the NICU than in the general neonatal population. Compared to Holter monitoring, the sensitivity of the EKG was only 89%.

  19. Clinical outcome of elderly peritoneal dialysis patients with assisted care in a single medical centre: a 25 year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hung; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ting; Chou, Ming-Chih; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2013-06-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an alternative treatment for elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In Taiwan, non-professional personnel are employed to provide assisted care for elderly patients. Whether assisted care is appropriate for elderly patients is unknown. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the outcomes of assisted care in a single centre. This is a retrospective cohort study in a single medical centre. The outcomes were derived from the assessment of patient survival, technique survival and peritonitis incidence between self-care patients and assisted-care patients. From 1984 to 2010, there were 138 elderly PD patients at Taichung Veterans General Hospital, of which 70% were assisted-care patients and 30% self-care patients. The mean duration of PD survival was 49.2 months in self-care patients, which was significantly longer than the 17.0 months of assisted-care patients (P self-care patients had a lower risk in both patient survival (Hazard Ratio 0.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2-0.94, P care patients. Type of assistance was not a risk factor for PD-related peritonitis. Our elderly assisted care had patients had a poorer survival and technique survival rates than those of the self-care patients. We argue that this is because early recognition of medical deterioration and early medical intervention are necessary for a better outcome for elderly PD patients. © 2013 The Authors. Nephrology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  20. [Empathy fatigue and psychiatric care of the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazif-Thomas, Cyril; Thomas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is one of the qualities which enable caregivers to develop high quality care. The circumstances of professional practice such as pressure and lack of time can see this quality pushed to one side. The risk of burnout is all the greater as empathy alone does not protect caregivers from submitting themselves to their hierarchy. Compassion, on the other hand, enables caregivers to actively take on their responsibilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Beta-blockers and depression in elderly hypertension patients in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringoir, Lianne; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Widdershoven, Jos W M G

    2014-01-01

    myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between lipophilic beta-blocker use and depression in elderly primary care patients with hypertension. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in primary care practices located in the South of The Netherlands. Primary care......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Previous findings regarding a possible association between beta-blocker use and depression are mixed. To our knowledge there have been no studies investigating the association of beta-blockers with depression in primary care hypertension patients without previous...... for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that primary care hypertension patients who use a lipophilic beta-blocker are more likely to have higher depression scores than those who do not use a lipophilic beta-blocker....

  2. Impact of Obesity on Outcomes in a Multiethnic Cohort of Medical Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Vrinda; Jean, Raymonde E; Genese, Frank; Fuhrmann, Katherine A; Saini, Anjeet K; Mangulabnan, Van Derick; Bavishi, Chirag

    2018-02-01

    To examine the association of obesity with in-hospital mortality and complications during critical illness. We performed a retrospective analysis of a multiethnic cohort of 699 patients admitted to medical intensive care unit between January 2010 and May 2011 at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai West Hospitals, tertiary care centers in New York City. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30] and in-hospital mortality. Subgroup analysis was performed in elderly patients (age ≥65 years). Compared to normal BMI, obese patients had lower in-hospital mortality (24.4% vs 17.6%, P = .04). On multivariate analysis, obesity was independently associated with lower in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR]: 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.27-0.89, P = .018). There was no significant difference in rates of mechanical ventilation, reintubation, and vasopressor requirement across BMI categories. In subgroup analysis, elderly obese patients did not display lower in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.40-1.82, P = .68). Our study supports the hypothesis that obesity is associated with decreased mortality during critical illness. However, this finding was not observed among elderly obese patients. Further studies should explore the interaction between age, obesity, and outcomes in critical illness.

  3. Do nurses and other health professionals' in elderly care have education in family nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Olivia Sissil; Øyen, Karianne Røssummoen; Ytrehus, Siri

    2018-03-01

    Family caregivers are an important resource for providing care to elderly living at home. How nurses and other health professionals interact with family caregivers can have both a positive and a negative impact on the family caregivers' situation. We lack knowledge of Norwegian nurses' and other health professionals' participation in educational programmes about family caregivers' needs and situations. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether nurses and other health professionals working in home-care nursing had participated in educational programmes about family caregivers. Additionally, the study aimed to determine whether participation in educational programmes was associated with awareness of family caregivers' contributions to elder care. This is a quantitative study, and it was conducted as a cross-sectional study. The participants were required to be educated as nurses, nursing assistants or other health professionals with relevant health education and to be working with the elderly in home-care nursing settings. Descriptive statistics and trivariate table analysis using the Pearson Chi-square t-test were conducted using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). A total of 152 nurses and health professionals in home-care nursing in 23 municipalities have participated (in one county in Norway). The results showed that only half of the respondents had participated in educational programmes about family caregivers' needs and situations. The study did not provide a clear answer regarding the association between participation in educational programmes and awareness of family caregivers' contributions. The results indicate that nurses and other health professionals, to a small extent, have participated in educational programmes about family caregivers. Our findings indicate that participation in educational programmes may be particularly important for health professionals in leadership positions and for health professionals with vocational

  4. [Risk of tuberculosis infection among care workers during an outbreak of tuberculosis at a care facility for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Hiroki

    2014-07-01

    Owing to limited evidence, the risk of and factors related to tuberculosis (TB) infection among care workers is not understood. We experienced an outbreak of TB with 2 cases of active TB (positive cultures) and 34 cases of latent TB infection at a care facility for the elderly. Using an epidemiological investigation of the outbreak, this study aimed to investigate the risk of and factors related to TB infection among care workers and to establish a system for TB control in care facilities for the elderly. The index patient (80-year-old woman; fever for 1.5 months) was diagnosed with TB [bI3: GAKKAI classification, sputum smear (3+)]. We investigated the contacts of the patient. On the basis of the epidemiological investigation, we conducted a contact examination of close contacts, including those of residents and care workers at the care facility and staff at the medical facility to which the patient was referred. Reviewing this information, we compared both the results of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-GIT) test and the degree of contact in 10 care workers and 7 nurses who had close contact while providing care services to the patient. The QFT-GIT test was conducted twice: 3 weeks and 11-12 weeks after the last contact with the patient. The number of care workers who tested positive while providing care services to the patient were 3, 0, and 5 according to the contact time of patient, while each of the nurses spent approximately 20 min for the same. Care workers provided daily care services such as feeding, changing the patient's posture, turning in bed, diaper changing, bathing, and providing a bed bath, and nurses provided services such as the measurement of vital signs, hydration, administration of medication, and exchange of cooling material for lowering body temperature. In addition, care workers had been in contact with the patient while providing care services before the patient developed fever, and nurses initiated contact with the patient for care after the

  5. The process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Konder, Mariana Teixeira; Reciputti, Luciano Pereira; Lopes, Mônica Guimarães Macau; Agostinho, Danielle Fernandes; Alves, Gabriel Farias

    2017-12-11

    To analyze the process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil. We have carried out a documentary analysis, with interviews with twenty-four state urgency coordinators and a panel of experts. We have analyzed issues related to policy background and trajectory, players involved in the implementation, expansion process, advances, limits, and implementation difficulties, and state coordination capacity. We have used the theoretical framework of the analysis of the strategic conduct of the Giddens theory of structuration. Emergency care units have been implemented after 2007, initially in the Southeast region, and 446 emergency care units were present in all Brazilian regions in 2016. Currently, 620 emergency care units are under construction, which indicates expectation of expansion. Federal funding was a strong driver for the implementation. The states have planned their emergency care units, but the existence of direct negotiation between municipalities and the Union has contributed with the significant number of emergency care units that have been built but that do not work. In relation to the urgency network, there is tension with the hospital because of the lack of beds in the country, which generates hospitalizations in the emergency care unit. The management of emergency care units is predominantly municipal, and most of the emergency care units are located outside the capitals and classified as Size III. The main challenges identified were: under-funding and difficulty in recruiting physicians. The emergency care unit has the merit of having technological resources and being architecturally differentiated, but it will only succeed within an urgency network. Federal induction has generated contradictory responses, since not all states consider the emergency care unit a priority. The strengthening of the state management has been identified as a challenge for the implementation of the urgency network.

  6. Team social cohesion, professionalism, and patient-centeredness: Gendered care work, with special reference to elderly care - a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhman, Ann; Keisu, Britt-Inger; Enberg, Birgit

    2017-06-02

    Healthcare organisations are facing large demands in recruiting employees with adequate competency to care for the increasing numbers of elderly. High degrees of turnover and dissatisfaction with working conditions are common. The gendered notion of care work as 'women's work', in combination with low salaries and status, may contribute to negative work experiences. There is abundant information about the negative aspects of elderly care health services, but little is known about positive aspects of this work. The study aim was to investigate work satisfaction from a gender perspective among Swedish registered nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists, focusing specifically on healthcare services for the elderly. A mixed methods approach was adopted in which we combined statistics and open-ended responses from a national survey with qualitative research interviews with healthcare professionals in elderly care organisations. The survey was administered to a random sample of 1578 registered nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists. Qualitative interviews with 17 professionals were conducted in six elderly care facilities. Qualitative and quantitative content analyses, chi 2 and constructivist grounded theory were used to analyse the data. There was a statistically significant difference in overall work satisfaction between those who worked in elderly care and those who did not (64 and 74,4% respectively, p Team social cohesion', 'Career development and autonomy', 'Client-centeredness', and 'Invisible and ignored power structures'. The results show the complexity of elderly care work and describe several aspects that are important for work satisfaction among health professionals. The results reveal that work satisfaction is dependent on social interrelations and cohesion in the work team, in possibilities to use humour and to have fun together, and in the ability to work as professionals to provide client-centered elderly care. Power relations

  7. Gait speed and cognitive score in elderly users of the primary care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenardt, Maria Helena; de Sousa, Jacy Aurelia Vieira; Grden, Clóris Regina Blanski; Betiolli, Susanne Elero; Carneiro, Nathália Hammerschmidt Kolb; Ribeiro, Dâmarys Kohlbeck de Melo Neu

    2015-01-01

    to investigate the association between gait speed and the cognitive score of elderly patients enrolled in a Basic Health Unit. a quantitative cross-sectional study with 203 elderly, a sample calculated based on the estimated population proportion. Data were collected using a sociodemographic and clinical questionnaire, gait speed test (GS) and the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). the illiterate patients had a mean MMSE=19.33(±3.7) and GS = 0.76m/s (±0.3); those with low/medium education had a MMSE = 25.43(±2.8) and GS = 0.92m/s (±0.2); and the elderly with higher education had a MMSE = 27.33(±2.9) and GS=1.12m/s (±0.3).There was a weak correlation (R2=00354) between gait speed and cognitive score, with statistical significance (Prob>F = 0.0072) and a positive linear trend. the better cognitive score the higher the gait speed; the illiterate elderly were those with lower gait speed, thereby indicating a poorer physical performance.

  8. Social Problems of Families Caring for a Frail Elderly Referrals to Public Hospitals Clinics in Karaj City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Babaei

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: One of the most important challenges for modem societies is the increasing of elder population. Caring these people is also another important matter for health systems. Families do most of caring responsibilities of the elders who face with many problems for meeting the elders' needs. The aim of this study was to determine the problems of families caring a frail elder who came to the clinics of public hospitals in karaj city in 2002. Methods & Materials: this study was a correlational descriptive research that 90 families were selected through purposive sampling. Data collection tool was a questionnaire. The method of data collection was interview and then filling the questionnaires by the researcher. Results: findings of the study showed that the age range of elders was 77±9, most of them came to the hospitals for heart diseases. The activity of daily living independency score was 46±5.7. The majority of help and support of elders was done by women. Most of families expressed the social family relationship problems from high to medium level, the leisure activity problems from medium to high level and the economical problems from medium to high level. All of woman expressed doing job problems from high to medium level and most of men expressed these problems from medium to low level. As a whole, women caregivers' problems were more than men caregivers' problems. Also the results showed that, an increase in the elder age, dependency in activity of daily living, mental and cognitive disorders of the elder and the time of physical support of the elder by other members would increase. Conclusion: this study show, in regards to increasing the elder population in our country special planning must be designed and done as programs for elders and their families. In case of continuity of caring the elders and not supporting these families by health systems, possibility of existing burnout and burden in them will as such so that elder abuse

  9. Investigation of General Health in Female Care givers of Elderly People With Alzheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Bastani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the general health status in women as care givers of the elderly people with Alzheimer who attending to the Iranian Association of Alzheimer’s Disease. Methods & Materials: In this descriptive –cross sectional study as a introductory stage of a randomized controlled field trial, 150 women were recruited with a consecutive sampling method. The study population of this study included the women as family care givers attending to the Iranian Association of Alzheimer Disease. In this study, the inclusion criteria was consisted of women who had 18-60 years old, be a close relative to elderly patients with Alzheimer disease, as well as they have had direct caring with the duration of at least six months. Data collection regarding assessment of general health of the women was a questionnaire including 28 items of Persian version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ. For data analysis, descriptive statistics and chi square were used in the study. Results: The study findings showed that only 24% of the subjects had a good level of general health, but 58.7% and 17.3% of them had a moderate and weak general health respectively. There were significant relations between general health of the women as care givers and the variables such as age (P=0.016, occupation (P=0.008, type of relative (P=0.013, and economic status (P=0.049. However, there were not any significant relation between general health and the other variables of marriage situation (P=0.5, education (P=0.07, and duration of caring the elderly patients with Alzheimer (P=0.205. Conclusion: According to the findings, the considerable percentage of the female care givers of elders with Alzheimer disease did not pose optimum level of general health. As Care givers’ gender centered studies have seldom conducted in Iran, future researches should focus on different dimensions of health promotion among both male and female care givers.

  10. Serving Impaired Elders in the Community: The Interface of Case Management with Mental Health Services. Texas Project for Elders: Assistance with Long Term Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nancy L.

    Following a brief introduction, this paper focuses on how the Texas Project for Elders, one of ten sites in the country participatng in the National Long-Term Care Channeling Demonstration Project (Channeling), has taken into account the mental health needs of clients and caregivers both in the development and delivery of services. The clients…

  11. Effectiveness of supporting intensive care units on implementing the guideline 'End-of-life care in the intensive care unit, nursing care': a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noome, M.; Dijkstra, B.M.; Leeuwen, E. van; Vloet, L.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of supporting intensive care units on implementing the guidelines. BACKGROUND: Quality of care can be achieved through evidence-based practice. Guidelines can facilitate evidence-based practice, such as the guidelines 'End-of-life care in

  12. Unplanned intensive care unit admission following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubano, Jerry A; Vosswinkel, James A; McCormack, Jane E; Huang, Emily C; Shapiro, Marc J; Jawa, Randeep S

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence and outcomes of trauma patients requiring an unplanned return to the intensive care unit (ICU) and those initially admitted to a step-down unit or floor and subsequently upgraded to the ICU, collectively termed unplanned ICU (UP-ICU) admission, are largely unknown. A retrospective review of the trauma registry of a suburban regional trauma center was conducted for adult patients who were admitted between 2007 and 2013, focusing on patients requiring ICU admission. Prehospital or emergency department intubations and patients undergoing surgery immediately after emergency room evaluation were excluded. Of 5411 admissions, there were 212 UP-ICU admissions, 541 planned ICU (PL-ICU) admissions, and 4658 that were never admitted to the ICU (NO-ICU). Of the 212 UP-ICU admits, 19.8% were unplanned readmissions to the ICU. Injury Severity Score was significantly different between PL-ICU (16), UP-ICU (13), and NO-ICU (9) admits. UP-ICU patients had significantly more often major (Abbreviated Injury Score ≥ 3) head/neck injury (46.7%) and abdominal injury (9.0%) than the NO-ICU group (22.5%, 3.4%), but significantly less often head/neck (59.5%) and abdominal injuries (17.9%) than PL-ICU patients. Major chest injury in the UP-ICU group (27.8%) occurred at a statistically comparable rate to PL-ICU group (31.6%) but more often than the NO-ICU group (14.7%). UP-ICU patients also significantly more often underwent major neurosurgical (10.4% vs 0.7%), thoracic (0.9% vs 0.1%), and abdominal surgery (8.5% vs 0.4%) than NO-ICU patients. Meanwhile, the PL-ICU group had statistically comparable rates of neurosurgical (6.8%) and thoracic surgical (0.9%) procedures but lower major abdominal surgery rate (2.0%) than the UP-ICU group. UP-ICU admission occurred at a median of 2 days following admission. UP-ICU median hospital LOS (15 days), need for mechanical ventilation (50.9%), and in-hospital mortality (18.4%) were significantly higher than those in the PL-ICU (9 days

  13. Obesity and excess mortality among the elderly in the United States and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteverde, Malena; Noronha, Kenya; Palloni, Alberto; Novak, Beatriz

    2010-02-01

    Increasing levels of obesity could compromise future gains in life expectancy in low- and high-income countries. Although excess mortality associated with obesity and, more generally, higher levels of body mass index (BAI) have been investigated in the United States, there is little research about the impact of obesity on mortality in Latin American countries, where very the rapid rate of growth of prevalence of obesity and overweight occur jointly with poor socioeconomic conditions. The aim of this article is to assess the magnitude of excess mortality due to obesity and overweight in Mexico and the United States. For this purpose, we take advantage of two comparable data sets: the Health and Retirement Study 2000 and 2004 for the United States, and the Mexican Health and Aging Study 2001 and 2003 for Mexico. We find higher excess mortality risks among obese and overweight individuals aged 60 and older in Mexico than in the United States. Yet, when analyzing excess mortality among different socioeconomic strata, we observe greater gaps by education in the United States than in Mexico. We also find that although the probability of experiencing obesity-related chronic diseases among individuals with high BMI is larger for the U.S. elderly, the relative risk of dying conditional on experiencing these diseases is higher in Mexico.

  14. Inpatient care of the elderly in Brazil and India: Assessing social inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Andrew Amos; Andrade, Monica Viegas; Noronha, Kenya; Leone, Tiziana; Dilip, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing older adult populations in Brazil and India present major challenges for health systems in these countries, especially with regard to the equitable provision of inpatient care. The objective of this study was to contrast inequalities in both the receipt of inpatient care and the length of time that care was received among adults aged over 60 in two large countries with different modes of health service delivery. Using the Brazilian National Household Survey from 2003 and the Indian National Sample Survey Organisation survey from 2004 inequalities by wealth (measured by income in Brazil and consumption in India) were assessed using concentration curves and indices. Inequalities were also examined through the use of zero-truncated negative binomial models, studying differences in receipt of care and length of stay by region, health insurance, education and reported health status. Results indicated that there was no evidence of inequality in Brazil for both receipt and length of stay by income per capita. However, in India there was a pro-rich bias in the receipt of care, although once care was received there was no difference by consumption per capita for the length of stay. In both countries the higher educated and those with health insurance were more likely to receive care, while the higher educated had longer stays in hospital in Brazil. The health system reforms that have been undertaken in Brazil could be credited as a driver for reducing healthcare inequalities amongst the elderly, while the significant differences by wealth in India shows that reform is still needed to ensure the poor have access to inpatient care. Health reforms that move towards a more public funding model of service delivery in India may reduce inequality in elderly inpatient care in the country. PMID:23041128

  15. Hypoglycemia is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, J.; Bosman, R.J.; Vriesendorp, T.M.; Dotsch, R.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Zandstra, D.F.; Hoekstra, J.B.L.; DeVries, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The implementation of intensive insulin therapy in the intensive care unit is accompanied by an increase in hypoglycemia. We studied the relation between hypoglycemia on intensive care unit mortality, because the evidence on this subject is conflicting. Design: Retrospective database

  16. Hypoglycemia is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, Jeroen; Bosman, Robert J.; Vriesendorp, Titia M.; Dotsch, Ron; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The implementation of intensive insulin therapy in the intensive care unit is accompanied by an increase in hypoglycemia. We studied the relation between hypoglycemia on intensive care unit mortality, because the evidence on this subject is conflicting. DESIGN: Retrospective database

  17. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  18. Glucose variability is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, Jeroen; Vriesendorp, Titia M.; Bosman, Robert J.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Hoekstra, Joost B.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mounting evidence suggests a role for glucose variability in predicting intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. We investigated the association between glucose variability and intensive care unit and in-hospital deaths across several ranges of mean glucose. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort

  19. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Samiee-Zafarghandy; S.R. Raman (Sudha R.); J.N. van den Anker (John); K. McHutchison (Kerstin); C.P. Hornik; R.H. Clark; P.B. Smith; D.K. Benjamin (Daniel K.); K. Berezny (Katherine); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); E.V. Capparelli (Edmund); M. Cohen-Wolkowiez (Michael); G.L. Kearns (Greg); M. Laughon (Matthew); A. Muelenaer (Andre); T. Michael O'Shea; I.M. Paul (Ian M.); K. Wade (Kelly); T.J. Walsh (Thomas J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10. years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: We conducted a

  20. Social workers' roles in addressing the complex end-of-life care needs of elders with advanced chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Betty J

    2013-01-01

    This study examined social workers' roles in caring for low-income elders with advanced chronic disease in an innovative, community-based managed care program, from the perspective of elders, family, team members, and social workers. The results are drawn from a larger longitudinal, multimethod case study. Sources of data include survey reports of needs addressed by social workers for 120 deceased elders, five focus groups with interdisciplinary team members, and in-depth interviews with 14 elders and 10 of their family caregivers. A thematic conceptual matrix was developed to detail 32 distinctive social work roles that address divergent needs of elders, family, and team members. Distinctive perceptions of social workers' roles were identified for the different stakeholder groups (i.e., elders, family caregivers, team members, and social workers). Findings from this study may inform supervisors and educators regarding training needs of those preparing to enter the rapidly growing workforce of gerontological social workers who may be called upon to care for elders at the end of life. Training is particularly warranted to help social workers gain the skills needed to more successfully treat symptom management, depression, anxiety, agitation, grief, funeral planning, and spiritual needs that are common to the end of life.

  1. Perfil sociodemográfico e clínico de idosos atendidos em Unidade Básica de Saúde da Família Perfil sociodemográfico y clínico de adultos mayores atendidos en una Unidad Básica de Salud de la Familia Sociodemographic and clinical profile of elders who receive Care in a Family Health Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Fonseca Victor

    2009-02-01

    adultos mayores.OBJECTIVE: To characterize the sociodemographic and clinical profile of elders who receive care in a family health unit. METHODS: A cross-sectional, exploratory study was conducted in Fortaleza, CE. The sample consisted of 214 elders. The data were collected from September through December 2006 using a specific demographic questionnaire during the interviews RESULTS: The findings were similar to those reported by other studies; the majority of elders were female and were living alone or in families with three generations. Ostheoarthrosis was the most common self-reported disease. In addition, according to the Body Mass Index (BMI, most elders were obese. CONCLUSION: This study provides indicators that can be used for planning of actions to prevent diseases and to promote elders' health.

  2. Determinants of quality of life in elderly patients of a psychosocial care center in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottan, Gabriela; Morais, Eliane Pinheiro de; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Trentini, Clarissa; Heldt, Elizeth

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the sociodemographic, clinical, and functional determinants of quality of life in elderly (older than 60 years) patients from a Psychosocial Care Center. The sample was randomly selected patients undergoing treatment at the center during the study period. Quality of life was assessed using the brief version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL-BREF) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment for older adults (WHOQOL-OLD). A total of 50 elderly individuals with a mean age of 67.5 (SD = 5.72) years were included in the study. A hierarchical linear regression showed that clinical characteristics, such as severe symptoms of depression and a higher number of comorbidities, were related to lower quality of life. Better functional capacity and more frequent visits to the center were determinants of higher quality of life. These findings underscore the importance of assessing quality of life and of taking this variable into account when planning health interventions for elderly patients at a Psychosocial Care Center.

  3. [The dynamics of the family that lives with and takes care of an elderly dependent relative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Hugo; Lopes, Manuel

    2010-03-01

    Constant depletion of some functional capacities and an increasing vulnerability are associated with the ageing process. Eventually, the individual becomes dependent on someone and the family is the main supportive institution. In view of this situation, one question guided our study: What is the relation between the family dynamics and to live with and take care of an elderly dependent relative? Our purpose is to analyse how the care provided by the family works, relating the family dynamics with the level of dependency of that relative and the age of the caregivers. We developed a related and transversal study, with an intentionally sample composed by 80 families and 143 caregivers. An evaluation scale was used to measure the dependency level of the elderly anda family adaptability and cohesion evaluation scale (FACES III). We concluded that the elderly level of dependency does not change the cohesion and adaptability of the family. Nonetheless, we also observed that the age of the caregiver alters the family dynamics, what can lead to the development of a pathological picture.

  4. Knowledge translation: An interprofessional approach to integrating a pain consult team within an acute care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kira; Berall, Anna; Karuza, Jurgis; Senderovich, Helen; Perri, Giulia-Anna; Grossman, Daphna

    2016-11-01

    Management of pain in the frail elderly presents many challenges in both assessment and treatment, due to the presence of multiple co-morbidities, polypharmacy, and cognitive impairment. At Baycrest Health Sciences, a geriatric care centre, pain in its acute care unit had been managed through consultations with the pain team on a case-by-case basis. In an intervention informed by knowledge translation (KT), the pain specialists integrated within the social network of the acute care team for 6 months to disseminate their expertise. A survey was administered to staff on the unit before and after the intervention of the pain team to understand staff perceptions of pain management. Pre- and post-comparisons of the survey responses were analysed by using t-tests. This study provided some evidence for the success of this interprofessional education initiative through changes in staff confidence with respect to pain management. It also showed that embedding the pain team into the acute care team supported the KT process as an effective method of interprofessional team building. Incorporating the pain team into the acute care unit to provide training and ongoing decision support was a feasible strategy for KT and could be replicated in other clinical settings.

  5. Frequency and associated factors for care giving among elderly patients visiting a teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Qidwai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study frequency and associated factors for care giving among elderly patients visiting a teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODOLOGY: A cross sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted at the Community Health Centre (CHC, Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH Karachi, Pakistan from September to November 2009. All individuals, visiting the CHC and aged 65 years or above were interviewed after taking written informed consent. RESULTS: A total of 400 elderly completed the interview. Majority were females, 65-69 years age, More than half of the individuals ie: 227 (85% had received Care Giver experience for assistance and among these 195(72% had care provided by an immediate family member. A large proportion of them stated that their Care Givers managed to provide less than four hours in a day for care giving. Around 37% showed substantial improvement in their relationship with the care givers. About 70% of the respondents stated that the care provided by the Care Giver improved their quality of life. CONCLUSION: Elderly care is provided by majority of the family members resulting in increased satisfaction level, however small number still not satisfied due to unfulfilled need of these older people. This demands that efforts should be made to strengthen the family support by increasing awareness regarding elderly care and arranging support system by the government.

  6. Differences between young and elderly in soleus motor unit discharge rate in dynamic movements

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    Jouni eKallio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is related to changes at the muscular level, leading to a decline in motor performance increasing the risk of falling and injury. It seems that the age-related changes in motor unit activation are muscle- and intensity dependent. The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in soleus motor unit discharge rate (MUDR in both isometric and dynamic contractions between young and elderly adults. 11 young (YOUNG and 8 elderly (OLD males participated in the study. The subjects performed isometric and dynamic plantar flexions while seated in an ankle dynamometer. The force levels studied were 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% of the isometric (ISO MVC in ISO and 10, 20 and 40% in concentric (CON and eccentric (ECC contractions. Soleus intramuscular EMG was recorded with bipolar fine-wire electrodes and decomposed to individual trains of motor unit discharges. In ISO the MUDR was higher in YOUNG in 20, 40, 60 and 80% MVC, while in the dynamic contractions no age-difference was seen. For both age-groups MUDR was higher in CON compared to ISO or ECC. The relative level of sEMG activity in SOL and GM for a given force level was in all conditions higher for OLD compared to YOUNG. The decreased MUDR in OLD may be an adaptation to an increased twitch duration in order to optimize force generation. The lack of an age-difference in dynamic contractions could be due to differences in recruitment-strategies, coactivation or a lack of recording from high force levels.

  7. Frailty and quality of life in elderly primary health care users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenardt, Maria Helena; Carneiro, Nathalia Hammerschmidt Kolb; Binotto, Maria Angélica; Willig, Mariluci Hautsch; Lourenço, Tânia Maria; Albino, Jéssica

    2016-06-01

    to investigate the association between physical frailty and quality of life in elderly users of primary health care in the capital of the state of Paraná. a cross-sectional, quantitative study with 203 elders. Data collected included: physical activity questionnaires, weight loss, fatigue/exhaustion, quality of life, performance of gait speed tests, and handgrip strength. of the 203 older adults, 115 were pre-frail, 49 were non-frail, and 39 were frail, with a significant association with functional capacity and quality of life in all groups. The dimensions resulting from physical aspects, pain, and vitality were associated with those that were non-frail. in this study, frailty syndrome was inversely proportional to the quality of life, and significantly associated with functional capacity of older adults. Physical frailty is a manageable condition which can be targeted through geriatric nursing interventions.

  8. Idosos asilados em hospitais gerais Long-term care elderly residents in general hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luiz Gorzoni

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Instituições de longa permanência para idosos interagem periodicamente com hospitais gerais para internações de casos agudos ou dos que necessitam de métodos diagnósticos complexos e da atenção de várias especialidades simultaneamente. A decisão de indicar hospitalização é multifatorial, sendo influenciada por circunstâncias como a gravidade do quadro clínico e a infra-estrutura das instituições de longa permanência para idosos. Internações hospitalares apresentam benefícios e riscos, como o desenvolvimento de iatrogenias, delirium e declínios funcionais, podendo resultar em piora do estado geral e da qualidade de vida do idoso asilado durante e/ou após a hospitalização. O objetivo do estudo foi abordar aspectos peculiares na avaliação, tratamento e manejo de idosos asilados em internações hospitalares, particularmente quanto a cuidados que os auxiliem efetivamente nessas circunstâncias. Discutiram-se situações freqüentes como delirium, iatrogenias, desnutrição, declínio funcional e cuidados paliativos e características próprias de residentes em instituições para idosos durante internações em hospitais gerais.Long-term care facilities for the elderly have regularly to work together with general hospitals to provide care to acutely ill residents or when they require all together more complex diagnostic procedures and multi-specialty care. The decision to hospitalize a nursing home elderly resident is multifactorial and it is based on factors such as illness severity and care facility infrastructure. Hospitalizations have benefits and risks such developing iatrogenic diseases, delirium, and functional decline, which may deteriorate patients' general condition and their quality of life during and/or after hospitalization. This study aimed at addressing specific aspects of assessment, treatment and management of nursing home elderly who require to be hospitalized, especially focusing on their effective care

  9. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  10. A one-year longitudinal study of subjective well-being in elderly home care recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars; Povlsen, Thomas Kaalby; Mortensen, Steen Lee

    , it was earlier in life, despite age-related stressors. However, when these stressors cause loss of independence and a permanent need for help, it could be a different matter. Objectives: This study attempted to answer the following questions: How large a proportion of home care recipients had well-being levels......A one-year longitudinal study of subjective well-being in elderly home care recipients Larsen, L, Povlsen, T.K., Mortensen, S.L. & Christoffersen, M. Background: Old age is not a risk factor per se when it comes to low well-being. In most old people well-being is as high as, or higher than...... indicating stress and risk of depression? Did the overall level of subjective well-being change during a one-year period? How did subjective well-being in elderly home care recipients compare to the national Danish average? Sample: 759 home care recipients 65 years or older in The Municipality of Aarhus...

  11. Long-term health care utilisation and costs after spinal fusion in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Borbjerg; Bünger, Cody; Søgaard, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Spinal fusion surgery rates in the elderly are increasing. Cost effectiveness analyses with relatively short-length follow-up have been performed. But the long-term effects in terms of health care use are largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe the long......-term consequences of spinal fusion surgery in elderly patients on health care use and costs using a health care system perspective. METHODS: 194 patients undergoing spinal fusion between 2001 and 2005 (70 men, 124 women) with a mean age of 70 years (range 59-88) at surgery were included. Average length of follow......-up was 6.2 years (range 0.3-9.0 years). Data on resource utilisation and costs were obtained from national registers providing complete coverage of all reimbursed contacts with primary- and secondary health care providers. Data were available from 3 years prior fusion surgery until the end of 2009. RESULTS...

  12. Nursing homes: Development of elderly care management in the Buddhist way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warakorn Poolswat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the historical background and current situation of care management in nursing homes for the elderly in Western Thailand and develop care management according to Buddhist principles. This qualitative research analyzes three nursing homes using interview, observation, focus group discussion and workshop as data collection tools. The researchers used a snowball sampling method to identify 109 respondents, made up of 35 key informants, 34 casual informants and 40 general informants. The researchers verified data with a triangulation method and analyzed information descriptively. Results found that the most eminent problems in care management of elderly nursing homes are the image of experts, environment and activity management. Nursing homes do not respond to spiritual requests because of a lack of social and spiritual development. It is necessary to find a new way to emphasize responsibility and respond to spiritual requests by Buddhist means. In this paper, the researchers propose a set of guidelines for the care management of nursing homes in Western Thailand.

  13. The quality of life of older people from the influence of religiosity and spirituality: care for the institutionalized elderly in Caetité (BA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeire Moreira de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article illustrates how elderly caretakers from a Long-Term Care Institution (LTCI perform the care of the body, mind and spirit, and how it affects the life quality of the elderly. Emphasizes the importance of a better preparation for the caretakers to deal and supply the needs of these elderly, in order to provide cares involving the body, mind and the spirit. Uses observational research, with a cross-sectional, descriptive and quantitative qualitative approach.  

  14. Relationship among health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Ülkü; Bayrak Kahraman, Burcu; Kaynak, İlknur; Görgülü, Ümit

    2016-11-01

    The present descriptive study was carried out to determine the relationship between health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services among elderly patients. Patients aged 65 years or older staying at the surgery and internal medicine clinics were included in the study. The "Patient Introduction Form," "Short Form-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire" and "Geriatric Depression Scale" were utilized in the collection of data. In the present study, it was determined that only approximately half of elderly patients (54.9%) knew the concept of home care, most of them had not previously received home care and requested home care related to medical care. The mean scores were lower in some areas of the quality of life questionnaire in some factors that could influence home care awareness. These factors were determined as: female sex, history of falling, chronic illness, functionally, moderately or severely dependent, no previous receipt of home care and wishing to receive home care. The home care requirement of elderly patients can be influenced by many physiological, psychological and social factors that can affect their quality of life. Thus, it is of utmost importance that medical professionals evaluate the quality of life of elderly individuals and its influencing factors. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 1211-1219. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Predictors of intensive care unit refusal in French intensive care units: a multiple-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Montuclard, Luc; Timsit, Jean-François; Reignier, Jean; Desmettre, Thibault; Karoubi, Philippe; Moreau, Delphine; Montesino, Laurent; Duguet, Alexandre; Boussat, Sandrine; Ede, Christophe; Monseau, Yannick; Paule, Thierry; Misset, Benoit; Carlet, Jean

    2005-04-01

    To identify factors associated with granting or refusing intensive care unit (ICU) admission, to analyze ICU characteristics and triage decisions, and to describe mortality in admitted and refused patients. Observational, prospective, multiple-center study. Four university hospitals and seven primary-care hospitals in France. None. Age, underlying diseases (McCabe score and Knaus class), dependency, hospital mortality, and ICU characteristics were recorded. The crude ICU refusal rate was 23.8% (137/574), with variations from 7.1% to 63.1%. The reasons for refusal were too well to benefit (76/137, 55.4%), too sick to benefit (51/137, 37.2%), unit too busy (9/137, 6.5%), and refusal by the family (1/137). In logistic regression analyses, two patient-related factors were associated with ICU refusal: dependency (odds ratio [OR], 14.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.27-38.25; p refused patients, and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.28-1.75) for later-admitted patients. ICU refusal rates varied greatly across ICUs and were dependent on both patient and organizational factors. Efforts to define ethically optimal ICU admission policies might lead to greater homogeneity in refusal rates, although case-mix variations would be expected to leave an irreducible amount of variation across ICUs.

  16. A family involvement and patient-tailored health management program in elderly Korean stroke patients' day care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ae Kyung; Park, Yeon-Hwan; Fritschi, Cynthia; Kim, Mi Ja

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of a family involvement and functional rehabilitation program in an adult day care center on elderly Korean stroke patients' perceived health, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and cost of health services, and on family caregivers' satisfaction. Using one-group pre- and posttest design, dyads consisting of 19 elderly stroke patients and family caregivers participated in 12-week intervention, including involvement of family caregivers in day care services and patient-tailored health management. Outcomes of patients and caregivers were significantly improved (all p health services did not decrease significantly. This program improved functional levels and health perception of elderly stroke patients and caregivers' satisfaction. However, results must be interpreted with caution, because this was only a small, single-group pilot study. This program may be effective for elderly stroke patients and their caregivers. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  17. Regular Source of Care for the Elderly: A Cross-National Comparative Study of Hong Kong With 11 Developed Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samuel Yeung-Shan; Zou, Dan; Chung, Roger Y; Sit, Regina W; Zhang, Dexing; Chan, Dicken; Yeoh, Eng Kiong; Woo, Jean W

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to give an international perspective of health service gaps for caring for elderly individuals and explore the role of primary care for caring for elderly individuals with chronic conditions in Hong Kong. Cross-sectional, telephone survey. Hong Kong. A sample of 1000 Chinese participants in Hong Kong aged 60 or older. Questionnaire extracted from the Commonwealth Fund 2014 International Health Policy Survey of Older Adults. Similar to the 11 countries, more than half (about 65%) of Hong Kong respondents suffered from chronic conditions, whereas approximately one-third of them had at least 2 chronic conditions. US respondents had highest rate of having chronic conditions. Only 65% of Hong Kong respondents reported having a regular source of care and a higher proportion of elderly reported having poor self-rated health when compared with overseas counterparts. However, the proportion of elderly individuals who could access same-day or next-day medical care was higher compared with findings of other countries. Both Hong Kong and US respondents were more likely to report cost-related problems when accessing care. Waiting time for specialists in Hong Kong was much longer and coordination between regular doctors was poorer than in all other countries. Although half of Hong Kong respondents had a management plan for chronic conditions, a smaller proportion of them considered it helpful. Hong Kong has the lowest rate of regular source of care when compared with 11 developed countries, although people in Hong Kong were more likely to be able to access same-day or next-day medical care. To cope with increasing needs of chronic disease care, there may be a need to further develop the provision of regular source of care for elderly individuals, including the development of quality primary care in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Social capital and preventive care use among the elderly under Taiwan's National Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-I; Lin, Tsui-Fang

    The National Health Insurance (NHI) system in Taiwan provides free annual preventive care services and other disease-specific preventive care services under low copayments to people aged 65 and older, yet their utilization rates remain low ever since implementation. This study investigates whether social capital is associated with preventive care use among people aged 65 and older. Using the 2009 National Health Interview Study, this study measures social capital by the elderly's social network and social participation, and employs the logistic regressions to estimate the association between social capital and the odds of using a variety of preventive care services. The results show that social capital in terms of social network and social participation is significantly associated with the use of NHI general preventive care services. For disease-specific preventive care, it is social participation, rather than social network, that is related to the utilization rate. The associations between social capital and different types of preventive care use found in our study could be considered as an important factor when making policies to promote the utilization of preventive care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Current prevention and control of health care-associated infections in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Naoko; Sakon, Naomi; Komano, Jun; Tomono, Kazunori; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2018-05-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities for the elderly are vulnerable to health care-associated infections. However, compared to medical institutions, long-term care facilities for the elderly lag behind in health care-associated infection control and prevention. We conducted a epidemiologic study to clarify the current status of infection control in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Japan. A questionnaire survey on the aspects of infection prevention and control was developed according to SHEA/APIC guidelines and was distributed to 617 long-term care facilities for the elderly in the province of Osaka during November 2016 and January 2017. The response rate was 16.9%. The incidence rates of health care-associated infection outbreaks and residents with health care-associated infections were 23.4 per 100 facility-years and 0.18 per 1,000 resident-days, respectively. Influenza and acute gastroenteritis were reported most frequently. Active surveillance to identify the carrier of multiple drug-resistant organisms was not common. The overall compliance with 21 items selected from the SHEA/APIC guidelines was approximately 79.2%. All facilities had infection control manuals and an assigned infection control professional. The economic burdens of infection control were approximately US$ 182.6 per resident-year during fiscal year 2015. Importantly, these data implied that physicians and nurses were actively contributed to higher SHEA/APIC guideline compliance rates and the advancement of infection control measures in long-term care facilities for the elderly. Key factors are discussed to further improve the infection control in long-term care facilities for the elderly, particularly from economic and social structural standpoints. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Strange and scary memories of the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Dreyer, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Method of the Intensive Care Unit for delirium in intensive care unit, and after discharge, memories of delusions were described by 114 of 325 patients in face-to-face (after two weeks) and telephone interviews (after two and six months) using the Intensive Care Unit Memory Tool. Results: Four themes...... emerged: the ever-present family, dynamic spaces, surviving challenges and constant motion. Memories of delusions were a vivid mix of fact and fiction, demonstrating dynamic shifts in time, place and motion, but not dependent on the presence of delirium assessed by Confusion Assessment Method...... delusions and delirium after an intensive care unit stay. Relevance to clinical practice: Understanding patients’ memories of delusions is beneficial to nurses caring for patients that are anxious, upset or agitated. It opens a window to the world of the patient who is unable to communicate due...

  1. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  2. Development and validation of an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ok-Hee; Yoo, Yang-Sook; Yun, Sun-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-Hye

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses. Eye care guidelines and protocols have been developed for increasing eye care implementation in intensive care units. However, the guidelines lack consistency in assessment or intervention methodology. This was a one-sample pre/postprogramme evaluation study design for testing the effects of the eye care educational programme, developed for and applied to intensive care unit nurses, on their levels of knowledge and awareness. The eye care educational programme was developed based on literature review and survey of educational needs. Thirty intensive care unit nurses served as subjects for the study. The levels of eye care-related knowledge, awareness and practice were enhanced following the implementation of the educational programme. Moreover, satisfaction with the educational programme was high. It is necessary to intensify eye care education aimed at new nurses who are inexperienced in intensive care unit nursing and provide continuing education on the latest eye care methods and information to experienced nurses. The eye care educational programme developed in this study can be used as a strategy to periodically assess the eye status of patients and facilitate the appropriate eye care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Proposed policies on palliative care for elderly people in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Parodi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fast aging of population, epidemiological changes and the need to guarantee human rights (health, social protection,etc. force countries and the wider community to become aware and develop policies that form the basis for an strategy of maintaining the health and care of elderly people. This should be designed taking into account the particularities of this age group, and the need for adaptation of social health services to provide quality care and equity. The adequacy of services involves recognizing the new requirements, the particularities of the risks and problems of this stage of life, comprehensive care, and even decent evidence-based on the end of life. In the presence of new problems and new goals, new skills, new work scenarios and an information system that improve the efficiency and quality of interventions are required

  4. Pay less, consume more? The price elasticity of home care for the disabled elderly in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquebert, Quitterie; Tenand, Marianne

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the price sensitivity of demand for home care of the disabled elderly. We partially fill this knowledge gap by using administrative data on the beneficiaries of the main French home care subsidy program in a department and exploiting interindividual variation in provider prices. We address the potential endogeneity of prices by taking advantage of the unequal spatial coverage of providers and instrumenting price by the number of municipalities served by a provider. We estimate a price elasticity of around -0.4 that is significantly different from both 0 and -1. This less than proportionate response of consumption to price has implications for the efficiency and redistributive impact of variation in the level of copayments in home care subsidy schemes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Understanding the impact of supervision on reducing medication risks: an interview study in long-term elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.A.; Kleefstra, S.M.; Zijp, E.M.; Kool, R.B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2009, the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) observed several serious risks to safety involving medication within elderly care facilities. However, by 2011, high risks had been reduced in almost all the organisations we visited. And yet the IGZ analysed too the alarming increase in

  6. The Informal Caregivers’ Viewpoint About Care Inhibitors for Community-Dwelling Elderly in an Iranian Context: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Pourhadi

    2016-09-01

    Discussion: The inhibitors affect a proper caregiving and based on their own nature, cause discomfort to the caregiver and care receiver. Many of these cases are deemed as rectifiable hindrances that can lead us to optimal care for community-dwelling elderly if the cases are taken into consideration and proper strategies are designed and implemented in small and large scale planning.

  7. [Incidence of falls and fractures in disabled elderly people utilizing long-term care insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzukawa, Megumi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Makizako, Hyuma; Watanabe, Shuichiro; Suzuki, Takao

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the incidence of falls and fall-related fractures in disabled elderly people utilizing long-term care insurance, and influence of gender, age, disabled level is examined. Subjects were 8,335 elderly people (mean age, 82.2+/-7.4 years). Falls and fractures were investigated retrospectively for the one year study period either via a self-report questionnaire, or via care workers and/or family members when the subjects had cognitive impairments. The care workers gave are a free description about for the fall that had occurred when using the facilities. Men showed significantly higher rate of falls (26.8%) than women (24.6%). In women, there was a significant difference in fall rates between the severely disabled group (26.4%) and the moderately disabled group (23.5%). Women showed a significantly higher rate of fractures (12.2%) than that of men (4.5%). In relationship between fall-related fractures and potential correlates, there was a significant relation between women and the fall-related fractures [OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.7-3.6]. The severely disabled group showed a significantly higher rate of falls in the toilet, on the other hand, the moderately disabled group showed significantly higher rate of falls during exercise and recreation or standing. The rate of falls in women was lower than men in this study population. The result may be affected by the lower proportion of women in the moderately disabled group compared with men. Only gender was significantly associated with the incidence of fall-related fractures in disabled elderly people.

  8. Extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cader, Samária Ali; de Souza Vale, Rodrigo Gomes; Zamora, Victor Emmanuel; Costa, Claudia Henrique; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and identify predictors of successful weaning. Twenty-eight elderly intubated patients in an intensive care unit were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 14) that received conventional physiotherapy plus IMT with a Threshold IMT(®) device or to a control group (n = 14) that received only conventional physiotherapy. The experimental protocol for muscle training consisted of an initial load of 30% maximum inspiratory pressure, which was increased by 10% daily. The training was administered for 5 minutes, twice daily, 7 days a week, with supplemental oxygen from the beginning of weaning until extubation. Successful extubation was defined by the ventilation time measurement with noninvasive positive pressure. A vacuum manometer was used for measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure, and the patients' Tobin index values were measured using a ventilometer. The maximum inspiratory pressure increased significantly (by 7 cm H(2)O, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4-10), and the Tobin index decreased significantly (by 16 breaths/ min/L, 95% CI -26 to 6) in the experimental group compared with the control group. The Chi-squared distribution did not indicate a significant difference in weaning success between the groups (χ(2) = 1.47; P = 0.20). However, a comparison of noninvasive positive pressure time dependence indicated a significantly lower value for the experimental group (P = 0.0001; 95% CI 13.08-18.06). The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed an area beneath the curve of 0.877 ± 0.06 for the Tobin index and 0.845 ± 0.07 for maximum inspiratory pressure. The IMT intervention significantly increased maximum inspiratory pressure and significantly reduced the Tobin index; both measures are considered to be good extubation indices. IMT was associated with a reduction in noninvasive positive

  9. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binit N Jhaveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer′s criteria (2012 and PRISCUS list (2010. Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer′s criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3% patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%, alprazolam (9%, diazepam (8%, digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%, and diclofenac (3.7% were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug-disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06% patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients.

  10. Drug treatment of skin and soft tissue infections in elderly long-term care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertzman, B H; Gaspari, A A

    1996-08-01

    Nursing home-acquired skin and soft tissue infections are common, with an estimated prevalence of approximately 5%. Such infections can be a cause of significant morbidity. The types of organisms that cause primary skin and soft tissue infections in the elderly are diverse, and include bacterial, viral and fungal infections, as well as infestations with scabies or lice. In the elderly, these infections or infestations may present with atypical signs and symptoms, so a high index of suspicion is necessary. These skin and soft tissue infections may complicate an underlying chronic skin disorder (such as a decubitus ulcer), further altering their clinical presentation. Treatment of skin infections and infestations is based on the appropriate diagnostic tests. Once the diagnosis has been confirmed, treatment with the standard drug therapy is usually associated with a favourable clinical outcome. This article summarises the major skin and soft tissue infections in the elderly, and the appropriate drug therapy, with emphasis on special considerations for long-term care residents and the unique environment of the nursing home that allows for the emergence of resistant organisms. These factors make the management of skin and soft tissue infections in this population unique and challenging.

  11. Reforming health care for the elderly--the example of Vorarlberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badelt, C

    1987-01-01

    Vorarlberg--Austria's most western province with a population of about 325,000--has always implemented forms of social policy in which the principles of subsidiarity and solidarity play an important role. This is reflected in the structure of the organizations traditionally providing social services as well as in the more recent programmes the government has developed for social policy. This paper discusses two cases in point: the private associations for home care (Krankenpflegerverbände)--which now exist in 65 Vorarlberg communities and cover 85% of the population in the province--offering nursing services at home to members or to persons who are willing to join the organization when they need care, and the new organizational model, called Gesunder Lebensraum Vorarlberg (GLV), which is successfully operating in a few pilot communities. GLV has spawned umbrella organizations, run by volunteers, and offering a variety of social services relevant to the elderly, for example visiting services or neighbourhood help in case of emergencies. The volunteers get organizational help from a profit-making firm financed by the government. The Vorarlberg models can be interpreted as a step towards demedicalization and deinstitutionalization of health care for the elderly. Nevertheless, they also show the problems that arise when professionals and volunteers must cooperate. The models may lead to savings for the governments involved, although details are still subject to future empirical investigations.

  12. Influence of Internal Marketing on Organizational Commitment-Evidence from Care Institutions for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Alves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The provision of institutional care, particularly for the elderly, assumes dedication and commitment of the employees. Hence, identifying the prevailing level of organizational commitment (OC and precisely which internal marketing (IM techniques may be deployed to shape this performance is of inherent importance. The objective of this research project is, correspondingly, to ascertain the extent to which IM influences the OC of employees at three elderly care support institutions. To study this influence, we selected a sample of 188 individuals, all employees at the three institutions who agreed to participate in the study by answering a questionnaire. As regards IM, quality of work, ascending communication, and valuing and sharing information are the most commonly adopted practices at institutions. In terms of OC related dimensions, we found the affective and the instrumental to be the predominant types of commitment. Our findings support a moderately positive correlation between the IM and OC variables. This study enables an evaluation of respective institutions, informing them of the changes that are both feasible and necessary to the provision of quality care services and, consequently, a higher level of employee commitment and performance.

  13. Complex educational and care (geron)technology for elderly individuals/families experiencing Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilha, Silomar; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa; Backes, Dirce Stein; Barros, Edaiane Joana Lima; Pelzer, Marlene Teda; Costenaro, Regina Gema Santini

    2017-01-01

    To describe the contributions of the Integrated Multidisciplinary Care Group for Caregivers of Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease as an educational and care (geron)technology in the context of Alzheimer's disease in elderly individuals from the perspective of family members/caregivers. Exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach conducted with 13 family members/caregivers of elderly people participating in the support group of a university institution of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data collected between January and April 2016 through a semi-structured interview were submitted to discursive textual analysis. Family members/caregivers pointed out education and care as contributions of the group; education for care and for the future; exchange, socialization, and development of knowledge through the range of knowledge existing in the Group. The Group contributes as a (geron)technology of care and education for care in which knowledge is built and applied in practice, supporting the experienced disorders and improving the quality of care provided for elderly individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Descrever as contribuições do Grupo de Assistência Multidisciplinar Integrada aos Cuidadores de Pessoas com a Doença de Alzheimer como (geronto)tecnologia cuidativo-educacional no contexto da doença de Alzheimer em pessoas idosas, na perspectiva de familiares/cuidadores. Pesquisa exploratório-descritiva, qualitativa, realizada com 13 familiares/cuidadores de pessoas idosas, participantes do grupo de apoio de uma instituição universitária do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Os dados coletados entre janeiro a abril/2016, com uma entrevista semiestruturada, foram submetidos à análise textual discursiva. Os familiares/cuidadores referiram como contribuições do Grupo a educação e o cuidado; a educação para o cuidado e para o futuro; a troca, socialização e construção do conhecimento por meio dos diversos saberes existentes no Grupo. O

  14. From Hospital to Home Care: Creating a Domotic Environment for Elderly and Disabled People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Natalia M; Ponce, Sergio; Piccinini, David; Perez, Elisa; Roberti, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Advances in medicine have led to a significant increase in human life expectancy and, therefore, to a growing number of disabled elderly people who need chronic care and assistance [1]. The World Health Organization reports that the world's population over 60 years old will double between 2000 and 2050 and quadruple for seniors older than 80 years, reaching 400 million [2]. In addition, strokes, traffic-related and other accidents, and seemingly endless wars and acts of terrorism contribute to an increasing number of disabled younger people.

  15. A Game of Two Elderly Care Facilities: Competition, Mothballing Options, and Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a model to investigate the entry strategies of private investors to the elderly care service market, with the purpose of explaining the reasons behind dilemma of low signing rate plaguing China’s Public-Private Partnership projects. We focus on the competition between two private investors with or without mothballing options under price uncertainty. After the derivation of equilibria of entry strategies, we employ numerical examples to analyze the dependencies of entry thresholds on market parameters, cost parameters, subsidy, and possession of mothballing option. Conclusions are drawn and some policy implications are given with the intention to alleviate the problem of low signing rate.

  16. AmI in good care? Developing design principles for ambient intelligent domotics for elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulendijk, Michiel; Van De Wijngaert, Lidwien; Brinkkemper, Sjaak; Leenstra, Herbert

    2011-03-01

    The combination of ambient intelligence (AmI) and domotics has the potential to respond to elderly people's desire to live independent from extensive forms of care. Their slow adoption of technological aids shows reluctance, though. This article investigates their motivations to adopt ambient intelligent domotics, and proposes design principles specifically based on their preferences and experiences. Respondents appeared to be more acceptive of tangible problems they expected with AmI domotics than intangible ones. In addition, their opinions seemed to be profoundly influenced by the way they perceived their psychological quality of life, while their physical conditions did not seem to have noticeable impacts.

  17. Inequality of access to health care among the urban elderly in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juhua; Zhang, Xiulan; Jin, Chenggang; Wang, Dongmin

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine inequalities of access to health care among the urban elderly in northwestern China. 4441 seniors (over 60 years of age) were drawn from a cross-sectional study conducted in three northwestern Chinese cities. The effects of these factors on the use of health care services (visits to physician and hospitalizations) were estimated using multiple binomial regressions. Overall, 7.6% of the population studied had visited a physician during the past 4 weeks, 10.1% had used inpatient care during the past year, and 7.6% did not use inpatient services despite being referred by doctors for hospital admission during the previous year. Both visits to a physician and non-hospitalization were independently associated with the place of residence and household per capita income; the use of inpatient care services was significantly lower among those with less education, those with lower household per capita income and those without health insurance coverage. Women tended to make more use of outpatient services, but spent less time and money in hospital than men. Our findings indicate a significant inequality of access to health care services among urban seniors in northwestern China. More appropriate health care policies should be developed to achieve the goal of greater equality of access to health care services for all.

  18. Continuous Care Units: a response to aging and dependency in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Monteiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Portuguese population is undergoing an irreversible aging process and must deal with this demographic issue. Many influencing factors have been identified, including biological, psychological and social changes which have led to this new social stratification. The increasing prevalence of chronic and debilitating illnesses as a direct result of human aging has increased the demand for answers on both a health and social level. Life expectancy at birth in Portugal is almost 81 years, one year above the OECD mean. Life expectancy for women is 84 years, compared to 78 years for men. The National Network for Continuous Care (REDE was formed in response to this new issue. The implementation of Continuous Care Units (UCCI provide an alternative to hospitalization for dependent people needing special care but who do not require the specific care of an acute unit. The UCCI present a model of multidisciplinary intervention that covers all aspects of a health, social and economic nature and, consists of multidisciplinary teams. Due to the characteristics of the elderly and / or their situation of dependency, the intervention from specialized professionals of UCCI must be carefully prepared. Focused training and team expertise are key factors of the REDE’s success.

  19. Processing older persons as clients in elderly care: A study of the micro-processes of care management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaison, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Elder care has undergone a marketization in recent years in which various models for care management have been introduced with the aim of making assessments efficient. This article investigates the effects the care management model has on resource allocation for home care when handling the requests of older persons in the needs assessment process. Sixteen tape-recorded assessment conversations with associated case-file texts were analyzed through discourse analysis. The results show that a managerialist thinking has had a partial impact on the assessment process where the documentation requirements have entailed bureaucratization in terms of the transfer that occurs from talk to text. The findings from the study nevertheless indicate that the assessment conversations have clear elements of an individual-centred perspective in which there is room for a care rational dialogue. This constitutes a welfare policy dilemma today. Providing for older people's requests should be on the basis of quality and an individual-centred perspective and care management has had a contrary effect in which focus is directed instead towards needs assessment and bureaucratic processes.

  20. Challenges of human resource management in the institutions for care of elderly people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepir, Lj; Šćepović, D.; Radonjić, A. R.

    2017-05-01

    Human resources are the most important resources of any work organization or institution. They are the bearers of the work process and are key in determining the quality of a product or service. The staff employed in an institution contributes with their work to its business success which is why the institution management should pay close attention to human resources management. Functionally, the successful management of social protection institutions implies the attainment of balance in the process of satisfying interests of beneficiaries, interests of the institution management (founder-owner), and interests of the employees (service providers to elderly people). Interests of beneficiaries (elderly people) who are placed in residential care are reflected in the need for high quality and accessible services. Interests of the institution management are recognized as the need to achieve economically sustainable and profitable institution. An interest of direct service providers (employed caregivers, social workers, etc.) is in the safe premises and good working conditions. The term “human resources” in institutions of social protection implies overall knowledge, skills, abilities, creative capabilities, motivation, loyalty and personal characteristics owned by employees in the institution. It is the overall intellectual and emotional energy of employees that the management can count on and that can be engaged to achieving the objectives of the institution. The objectives of human resource management in social protection institutions are related to providing capability with job demands, fulfillment of professional and optimal number of competent workers, improving socio-economic status of employees, ensuring full time engagement of workers, improving the quality of work conditions and work environment, creating and maintaining a flexible and adaptive potential of employees, reducing resistance and increasing the sensitivity of employees to changes in the

  1. Screening for chronic kidney disease among the elderly in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirović S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of elderly with chronic kidney disease (CKD is constantly increasing worldwide, and irregular screening of CKD leads to disease discovering usually in advanced stages. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of CKD biomarkers in the elderly primary care patients, and to analyze whether the presence of diabetes and hypertension in elderly increases the risk for microalbuminuria and reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Cross-sectional study included 90 patients older than 65 years of age who are registered in the Family medicine teaching centre of Health centre Bijeljina. Patients were divided into three groups: first consisted of 30 patients who had neither hypertension nor diabetes nor other chronic disease, second of 30 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and third of 30 patients with arterial hypertension. Data on patients were obtained by interview, analysis of medical records and physical examinations. Serum and urine creatinine, proteinuria, microalbuminuria (MAU, turbidimetry, and urinary sediment were analyzed. Biomarkers of chronic kidney disease (GFR <60 mL / min / 1.73m2, proteinuria and mikroalbuminurija ¬MAU were found in 20 (22.2% patients. Among them, 14 had normal GFR and MAU (12 or MAU and proteinuria (2, whereas 6 had GFR <60 mL / min / 1.73m2 of which 3 had proteinuria and / or MAU. The group with diabetes had significantly more MAU compared to the other two groups, while the groups with diabetes and hypertension had slightly more proteinuria and erythrocyturia than control group. Hypertension and diabetes in the elderly may result in development of CKD biomarkers, so prevention and regular screening of CKD in the patients with these two diseases are necessary.

  2. Oral health in institucionalizated elderly patients in two care centers in Passo Fundo - RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau Silveira Neto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Considering that oral health, as well as general health are fundamental for maintaining the quality of life, the objective of this study was to investigate the oral health of the elderly population in the São José and Nossa Senhora da Luz Care Centers in Passo Fundo/ RS, Brazil. Methods: a clinical examination was performed in 107 elderly patients, to evaluate the oral health status as regards periodontal disease, edentulism, physiological alterations, and mucosa infection by the Candida fungus, smoking habit, use of medications and denture use and conditions of this population. The data were submitted to statistical Chi-square test at 5% of significance. Results: 107 patients, ranging from 52 to 106 years old, were assessed (average = 76.16, d.p. = 9.53. Among the interviewed, 61.6% were women, aged 78 years. Furthermore, 26.2% of the sample were smokers, of whom 67.8% were men. Among patients using medication (81.3%, the majority used cardiovascular (53.3% and benzodiazepines (42.1%, both associated with dry mouth. The oral hygiene was considered precarious in 87.8% of the elderly and was linked to gingivitis and periodontitis in patients with teeth. Edentulism was present in 68.2% of the individuals, among whom 53.4% used complete maxillary dentures and 30.1% complete mandibular dentures. It was observed that 41.13% of those surveyed had some type of candidiasis. Conclusions: Poor oral hygiene linked to the habit of smoking, use of drugs and prolonged use of these dentures leads to a deterioration of the oral health in elderly institutionalized persons, with consequent unfavorable impacts on the quality of life.

  3. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged ≥75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  4. Insomnia in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Comparison of Seven European Countries and Israel: The Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gindin, J.; Shochat, T.; Chetrit, A.; Epstein, S.; Ben Israel, Y.; Levi, S.; Onder, G.; Carpenter, I.; Finne-Soveri, H.; van Hout, H.P.J.; Henrard, J.C.; Nikolaus, T.; Topinkova, E.; Fialova, D.; Bernabei, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess insomnia and its correlates as part of the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) study, funded by the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union. Design Cross-cultural investigation. Setting Long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in eight European countries

  5. Development and psychometric evaluation of a measure to evaluate the quality of integrated care : the Patient Assessment of Integrated Elderly Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbroek, Ronald J; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Stewart, Roy E; Spoorenberg, Sophie L W; Kremer, Hubertus P H; Wynia, Klaske

    BACKGROUND: Novel population-based integrated care services are being developed to adequately serve the growing number of elderly people. Suitable, reliable and valid measurement instruments are needed to evaluate the quality of care delivered. OBJECTIVE: To develop a measure to evaluate the quality

  6. Elderly care in daily living in rural Vietnam: need and its socioeconomic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Le V; Thang, Pham; Lindholm, Lars

    2011-12-02

    The proportion of older people is increasing rapidly in Vietnam. The majority of the elderly live in rural areas. Their health status is generally improving but this is less pronounced among the most vulnerable groups. The movement of young people for employment and the impact of other socioeconomic changes leave more elderly on their own and with less family support. This study aims to assess the daily care needs and their socioeconomic determinants among older people in a rural setting. In 2007, people aged 60 years and older, living in 2,240 households, were randomly selected from the FilaBavi Demographic Surveillance System (DSS). They were interviewed using structured questionnaires to assess needed support in activities of daily living (ADLs). Individuals were interviewed about the presence of chronic illnesses that had been diagnosed by a physician. Participant socioeconomic characteristics were extracted from the FilaBavi repeat census. The repeat census used a repeat of the same survey methods and questions as the original FilaBavi DSS. Distributions of study participants by socioeconomic group, supports needed, levels of support received, types of caregivers, and the ADL index were described. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify socioeconomic determinants of the ADL index. The majority of older people do not need of support for each specific ADL item. Dependence in instrumental or intellectual ADLs was more common than for basic ADLs. People who need total help were less common than those who need some help in most ADLs. Over three-fifths of those who need help receive enough support in all ADL dimensions. Children and grandchildren are the main caregivers. Age group, sex, educational level, marital status, household membership, working status, household size, living arrangement, residential area, household wealth, poverty status, and chronic illnesses were determinants of daily care needs in old age. Although majority of older people who

  7. Health care in the United States: organization, management, and policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenwald, Howard P

    2010-01-01

    "Health Care in the United States discusses the basic structures and operations of the U.S. health system. This resource includes examples, tables, and a glossary with key terms and acronyms to help understand important concepts...

  8. Comprehensive care improves physical recovery of hip-fractured elderly Taiwanese patients with poor nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yun; Tseng, Ming-Yueh; Li, Hsiao-Juan; Wu, Chi-Chuan; Cheng, Huey-Shinn; Yang, Ching-Tzu; Chou, Shih-Wei; Chen, Ching-Yen; Shyu, Yea-Ing L

    2014-06-01

    The effects of nutritional management among other intervention components have not been examined for hip-fractured elderly persons with poor nutritional status. Accordingly, this study explored the intervention effects of an in-home program using a comprehensive care model that included a nutrition-management component on recovery of hip-fractured older persons with poor nutritional status at hospital discharge. A secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial with 24-month follow-up. A 3000-bed medical center in northern Taiwan. Subjects were included only if they had "poor nutritional status" at hospital discharge, including those at risk for malnutrition or malnourished. The subsample included 80 subjects with poor nutritional status in the comprehensive care group, 87 in the interdisciplinary care group, and 85 in the usual care group. The 3 care models were usual care, interdisciplinary care, and comprehensive care. Usual care provided no in-home care, interdisciplinary care provided 4 months of in-home rehabilitation, and comprehensive care included management of depressive symptoms, falls, and nutrition as well as 1 year of in-home rehabilitation. Data were collected on nutritional status and physical functions, including range of motion, muscle power, proprioception, balance and functional independence, and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. We also compared patients' baseline characteristics: demographic characteristics, type of surgery, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, cognitive function, and depression. Patients with poor nutritional status who received comprehensive care were 1.67 times (95% confidence interval 1.06-2.61) more likely to recover their nutritional status than those who received interdisciplinary and usual care. Furthermore, the comprehensive care model improved the functional independence and balance of patients who recovered their nutritional status over the first year following discharge

  9. Perceived barriers to healthcare and receipt of recommended medical care among elderly Medicare beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurichi, Jibby E; Pezzin, Liliana; Streim, Joel E; Kwong, Pui L; Na, Ling; Bogner, Hillary R; Xie, Dawei; Hennessy, Sean

    2017-09-01

    Many Medicare beneficiaries perceive barriers to receiving healthcare, although the consequences are unknown. Facilitators can aid in the receipt of healthcare services. The objective was to assess the relationship between perceived facilitators and barriers to healthcare and actual receipt of recommended medical care among elderly beneficiaries. A cohort study using data from the 2001-2008 entry panels of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey that included 24,607 community-dwelling beneficiaries 65 years of age and older. Surveys elicited perceptions of healthcare with respect to: care coordination and quality; access to medical care; getting or delaying healthcare because of financial reasons; transportation; and usual source of care. The outcome was receipt of recommended medical care, expressed as an aggregate of 38 indicators covering initial evaluation, diagnostic tests, therapeutic interventions, hospitalization follow-up, and routine preventive care. Multivariable survey logistic regression produced odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for receipt of recommended medical care, adjusted for sociodemographics, insurance, comorbidities, and disability. Beneficiaries who reported having trouble getting or reported delaying healthcare because of financial reasons (barrier) (adjusted OR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.73-0.86) and those who reported having no usual source of care (facilitator) (adjusted OR=0.55, 95% CI: 0.48-0.63) were less likely to receive recommended medical care. Survey data that capture patient perceptions of facilitators and barriers to healthcare may be useful for identifying system factors that affect timely receipt of recommended medical care. This information can inform the design of policies and programs to improve the healthcare of older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nursing care in a hematopoietic stem cells transplantation unit

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Kaoana; Bernardino,Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation units, nursing care is different from other services. The objective in this descriptive study with a qualitative approach was to identify the care activities of nurses at a transplantation unit, classified according to the framework of nurses' functions. The data were collected through systematic observation and treated through content analysis. Three functions were identified for nurses: clinical nurse, management nurse and visit nurse, the first ha...

  11. Nurse management skills required at an emergency care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Montezeli, Juliana Helena; Peres, Aida Maris; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the management skills needed for this professional at an emergency care unit. Method: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study conducted with eight nurses in which semi-structured interviews with nonparticipating systematic observation were conducted; the data was processed by content analysis. Results: The categories which emerged from the content analysis served as a list of management skills necessary to their work at the emergency care unit: leadership, decision...

  12. Delivering Integrated Care to the Frail Elderly: The Impact on Professionals’ Objective Burden and Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Janse

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of integrated working on professionals’ objective burden and job satisfaction was examined. An evidence-based intervention targeting frail elderly patients was implemented in the Walcheren region of the Netherlands in 2010. The intervention involved the primary care practice as a single entry point, and included proactive frailty screening, a comprehensive assessment of patient needs, case management, multidisciplinary teams, care plans and protocols, task delegation and task specialisation, a shared information system, a geriatric care network and integrated funding. Methods: A quasi-experimental design with a control group was used. Data regarding objective burden involved the professionals’ time investments over a 12-month period that were collected from patient medical records (n = 377 time registrations, transcripts of meetings and patient questionnaires. Data regarding job satisfaction were collected using questionnaires that were distributed to primary care and home-care professionals (n = 180 after the intervention’s implementation. Within- and between-groups comparisons and regression analyses were performed.  Results: Non-patient related time was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group, whereas patient-related time did not differ. Job satisfaction remained unaffected by the intervention. Conclusion and Discussion: Integrated working is likely to increase objective burden as it requires professionals to perform additional activities that are largely unrelated to actual patient care. Implications for research and practice are discussed. [Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN05748494].

  13. The index of ADOH: concept of measuring oral self-care functioning in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J G

    2001-01-01

    Measures of ability, or function, are used in the health field to determine the level of performance of a specific task, assess the loss of function, and to measure the return to function as a result of rehabilitation or interventions. While these measures are important to all age groups, it is the elderly and chronically ill who are at most risk for adverse changes in their health and functional status. The Index of the Activities of Daily Oral Hygiene (ADOH) is an instrument to assess and monitor functional dependency in manipulating aids used in oral self-care. It is part of the overall concept of oral self-care which subsumes function, education and training, and compliance in achieving and maintaining oral health. The purpose of the Index of ADOH is two-fold: to assess a subject for the progressive loss of the physical ability to manipulate the aids used in oral self-care, and to measure the return to function in response to care intervention and rehabilitative services. These manipulative tasks are associated with flossing, brushing, topical fluoride application, and the use of oral rinses. Aside from changes in function, the Index of ADOH can be used by health care providers and administrators to project the need for services or support for home care.

  14. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care. Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units. built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions); "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context); "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions); "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy) and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences). confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients".

  15. Quality of care in elder emergency department patients with pneumonia: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Daniel R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goals of the study were to assess the relationship between age and processes of care in emergency department (ED patients admitted with pneumonia and to identify independent predictors of failure to meet recommended quality care measures. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of a pre-existing database undertaken at a university hospital ED in the Midwest. ED patients ≥18 years of age requiring admission for pneumonia, with no documented use of antibiotics in the 24 hours prior to ED presentation were included. Compliance with Pneumonia National Quality Measures was assessed including ED antibiotic administration, antibiotics within 4 hours, oxygenation assessment, and obtaining of blood cultures. Odds ratios were calculated for elders and non-elders. Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of process failure. Results One thousand, three hundred seventy patients met inclusion criteria, of which 560 were aged ≥65 years. In multiple variable logistic regression analysis, age ≥65 years was independently associated with receiving antibiotics in the ED (odds ratio [OR] = 2.03, 95% CI 1.28–3.21 and assessment of oxygenation (OR = 2.10, 95% CI, 1.18–3.32. Age had no significant impact on odds of receiving antibiotics within four hours of presentation (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.84–1.43 or having blood cultures drawn (OR 1.02, 95%CI 0.78–1.32. Certain other patient characteristics were also independently associated with process failure. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted from the ED with pneumonia are more likely to receive antibiotics while in the ED and to have oxygenation assessed in the ED than younger patients. The independent association of certain patient characteristics with process failure provides an opportunity to further increase compliance with recommended quality measures in admitted patients diagnosed with pneumonia.

  16. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatiotemporal gait parameters during dual task walking in need of care elderly and young adults. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, S; Bernet, J; Brülhart, Y; Radlinger, L; Rogan, S

    2015-12-01

    Up to now there have only been marginal data in the elderly in need of care regarding spatiotemporal gait parameters during single (ST) and dual tasking (DT). The aim of this study was to allocate data for gait speed, cadence and stride length cycle variability in the elderly in need of care and in young adults during ST and DT, to compare the two groups and to demonstrate the impact of ST and DT on gait parameters. This cross-sectional study investigated a group of 16 young healthy adults (mean age 23.0 ± 2.5 years) and a group of 16 elderly persons in need of care (mean age 85.5 ± 0.6 years). The RehaWatch system was used to collect the spatiotemporal gait parameters cadence, speed and stride length. The participants completed four different measurements during normal walking and fast walking during ST and DT over a walking distance of 20 m. The Wilcoxon rank sum test and Whitney-U test were used for statistical analysis. Gait speed (ST and DT: p gait variability (ST: p = 0.007, DT: p = 0.003) were significantly reduced in the elderly in need of care group compared to the young group. The gait speed in the elderly in need of care group decreased from normal to fast walking (ST = - 2.8%, DT = - 12.2%) compared to the young group (ST = 31.5%, DT = 25.2%). The results of this study are comparable with the results of existing studies, which investigated falling and non-falling participants. Elderly people in need of care cannot increase the normal gait speed.

  18. Predictors of psychosocial adaptation among elderly residents in long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shu-Yuan; Lan, Yii-Hwei; Tso, Hsiu-Ching; Chung, Chao-Ming; Neim, Yum-Mei; Clark, Mary Jo

    2008-06-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive study explored psychosocial adaptation and its determinants among elderly residents of long-term care facilities. A convenience sample of 165 elderly residents was recruited from two nursing homes and two assisted living institutions in the Taichung area. All residents who met the criteria for this study were interviewed individually from April through June 2006. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on participant demographic characteristics, admission conditions, functional status, perceived family support, life attitudes, and psychosocial adaptation. The adaptation inventory incorporated three aspects of adaptation, including (1) sense of self-value, (2) sense of belonging and (3) sense of continuity. Findings, in general, did not indicate participants had achieved a high level of overall adaptation or significant adaptation in any of the three aspects targeted. Most participants were female. More than half were widowed and unable to fully finance their own institutional care. Nearly one-third was not admitted voluntarily. Having adequate funding for admission, voluntary admission, and number of roommates were the three most influential factors affecting overall adaptation, explaining 54% of variance. Study findings reflect the importance to residents' adaptation of self-determination, autonomy, and pre-institutionalization preparation and are intended to provide guidance for nursing intervention and social welfare policy making.

  19. Geriatric core competencies for family medicine curriculum and enhanced skills: care of elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A C; Dobbs, Bonnie M; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents' clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit.

  20. Elderly dental care. Needs and costs in three different resident settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelman, D; Gagnon, G; Hurley, R; Ruel, D

    1990-04-01

    Although the real dental treatment needs of the elderly has been established, the costs for these needs has not been determined. This report compares dental services and costs required for older adults living in three different resident settings. Dental needs and costs have been evaluated from a sample of 305 aged persons living in nursing homes (N = 156), low-cost housing facilities (N = 79) or dependent on home care services (N = 70). This study indicates that the homebound or institutionalized elderly population presents with poor dental and periodontal conditions, a high rate of edentulousness, and inadequate dentures. Dental needs are essentially characterized by the repair or replacement of prosthesis, the screening and treatment of mucosal lesions of prosthetic origin, and scaling/curettage of remaining teeth. The average rehabilitative dental costs was Can. $720 and there was no difference between the three types of residence. Important differences in cost, however, were observed between the dentate and edentulous population. The F-test (P less than .05) and chi-square were used to analyze differences in dental treatment needs and costs between different residences. Maintenance care corresponds to Can. $80/year/person.

  1. Preparedness of elderly long-term care facilities in HSE East for influenza outbreaks.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, L

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We assessed preparedness of HSE East elderly long-term care facilities for an influenza outbreak, and identified Public Health Department support needs. We surveyed 166 facilities based on the HSE checklist document for influenza outbreaks, with 58% response rate. Client flu vaccination rates were > 75%; leading barriers were client anxiety and consent issues. Target flu vaccine uptake of 40% in staff occurred in 43% of facilities and was associated with staff vaccine administration by afacility-attached GP (p = 0.035), having a facility outbreak plan (p = 0.013) and being anon-HSE run facility (p = 0.013). Leading barriers were staff personal anxiety (94%) and lack of awareness of the protective effect on clients (21%). Eighty-nine percent found Public Health helpful, and requested further educational support and advocacy. Staff vaccine uptake focus, organisational leadership, optimal vaccine provision models, outbreak plans and Public Health support are central to the influenza campaign in elderly long-term care facilities.

  2. [The importance of Dysphagia management during the peri-operative period to home elderly care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Seiko; Iwai, Akiko; Mito, Saori; Utsumi, Tsukasa; Shinoki, Keiji; Nakashita, Chisako; Hata, Akiko; Ibata, Takeshi; Komuro, Ryutaro; Iijima, Andshohei

    2010-12-01

    Dysphagia is usually a major problem for the elderly to go home after a surgical treatment for the bone fracture of the thigh bone cervix or trochanter part in the leg. We analyzed each clinical course with regard to a change of the oral intake and the nutritional status, the activity of daily living(ADL)and a nutritional management and the place after the patient was discharged. According to our results, about 20% of the patients among those surgical cases were pointed with dysphagia, and there were many cases that ADL was ultimately gotten worse. We took care of disphagia by doing a best practice of changing in feedings and deglutition function. However, some of the patients with the problem finally moved to another elderly health care institute against their primary wishes to go home. Furthermore, 55% of the disphagia patients became dementia. It seems that dementia might be a high risk factor of disphagia. We should do more better job for managing disphargia during a peri-operative period just after admission.

  3. Older residents' perspectives on aged sexuality in institutionalized elderly care: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Lieslot; Gastmans, Chris

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review is to investigate older residents' thoughts on, experiences of and engagement in sexual behavior and aged sexuality within institutionalized elderly care. Systematic literature review. We conducted an extensive search of the electronic databases Cinahl, Medline, Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and Invert for papers published between January 1980 and October 2014 when the searches were closed. Additional papers were identified through forward and backward citation chasing. Data from relevant studies were extracted by means of a data extraction form. Relevant data were isolated, summarized, compared, related and categorized according to theme. Quality assessment of the included studies focused on their adequacy of reporting the study's research aim, sampling, collection, and analysis procedures, ethical considerations and results. Twenty-five appropriate studies were identified. These studies varied in research design (using surveys, vignettes, focus groups, interviews, or observation), objectives, quality of reporting, and sample characteristics (i.e. male and/or female long-term care residents with and/or without dementia). Yet, they all point to the relevance of sex and sexuality in old age and emphasize the highly individual character of both sexual interest and expression. Older residents who wish to sexually express themselves, might do this in a wide variety of ways, including, but not limited to, daydreaming, dressing-up, looking for emotional and intellectual intimacy, stroking, caressing, kissing, and engaging in sexual intercourse. Overall, residents appear to have a rather positive attitude toward aged sexuality as such. When it comes to specific sexual behaviors or homosexuality, however, attitudes tend to be more negative. The perceived appropriateness of the displayed behavior is a predominant factor in determining older people's reactions to the sexual behavior of co-residents, rather than the potential

  4. Subset of nursing diagnoses for the elderly in Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; Guedes, Maria Vilaní Cavalcante; Silva, Lúcia de Fátima da; Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima da; Freitas, Maria Célia de

    2016-04-01

    To develop a subset of nursing diagnoses for the elderly followed in primary health care based on the bank of terms for clinical nursing practice with the elderly, in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP(r)) version 2013, and on the Model of Nursing Care. Descriptive study developed in sequential steps of construction and validation of the bank of terms, elaboration of the nursing diagnoses based on the guidelines of the International Council of Nurses and the bank of terms, and categorization of diagnostics according to the Care Model. The total of 127 nursing diagnoses were elaborated from 359 validated terms, distributed according to the basic human needs. It is expected that these diagnoses will form the basis for the planning of nursing care and use of a unified language for documentation of clinical nursing practice with the elderly in primary care. Desenvolver um subconjunto de diagnósticos de enfermagem para idosos acompanhados na Atenção Primária à Saúde, com base no banco de termos para a prática clínica de enfermagem com idosos, na Classificação Internacional para a Prática de Enfermagem (CIPE(r)) Versão 2013 e no Modelo de Cuidados de Enfermagem. Pesquisa descritiva, desenvolvida em etapas sequenciadas de construção e validação do banco de termos, elaboração dos enunciados de diagnósticos de enfermagem, com base nas diretrizes do Conselho Internacional de Enfermeiros e no banco de termos, e categorização dos diagnósticos segundo o Modelo de Cuidados. A partir de 359 termos validados foram elaborados 127 enunciados de diagnósticos de enfermagem, distribuídos segundo as necessidades humanas fundamentais. Acredita-se que esses enunciados servirão de base para o planejamento dos cuidados de enfermagem e utilização de uma linguagem unificada para a documentação da prática clínica de enfermagem com idosos na atenção primária.

  5. Caring for frail elders with musculoskeletal conditions and family caregivers' subjective well-being: The role of multidimensional caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nan; Liu, Jinyu; Lou, Vivian W Q

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the unique set of correlates of each dimension of the burden experienced by family caregivers of frail elders with musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions in China, and the role of caregiver burden in between caregiver stressors and subjective well-being. The data was derived from a community sample of 494 elder-caregiver dyads from six urban districts of Shanghai (China). The elders were aged 75 or above, needed assistance in activities of daily living (ADL) and had MSK conditions. The family caregivers were these elders' primary caregivers and at the age of 18 or older. Path analysis was used to examine the proposed model. Care recipients' functional health, cognitive status and behavioral problems affected the multiple dimensions of caregiver burden differently. These three stressors also indirectly affected caregivers' subjective well-being through physical, social and developmental burden. The findings highlighted the mediator role of caregiver burden in between caregiver stressors and subjective well-being, which supported burden-as-mediator theory in understanding family caregiving for frail elders with musculoskeletal conditions in a Chinese context. The focus of intervention should be varied according to the levels of the primary stressors. Policy and intervention implications with regard to the ways of helping Chinese families care for their frail elders with MSK conditions were discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  7. How Do Students Learn on a Primary Nursing Care Unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mary Barbera

    1977-01-01

    When a unit's staff changed from a team nursing to a primary nursing approach to care, the role of students gaining experience there changed to that of associate nurse, who is accountable for providing continuity of care to the primary nurses' patients. (Editor/TA)

  8. Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus in the intensive care unit: Do ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus are important electrolytes involved in the regulation of homeostasis. However the utility in monitoring them in critically ill patients is still unclear. We therefore undertook a prospective, non-interventional, single center study in the intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in ...

  9. Neonatal intensive care unit: Reservoirs of Nosocomial pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the care and treatment of neonates had contributed to their increased survival. Nosocomial infection remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic ...

  10. Empowerment of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents of infants who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to be empowered to improve bonding, attachment and care-giving skills. Neonatal nurses play a critical role in the empowerment of such parents, but often find it difficult due to a lack of clarity on how it has to be done. A qualitative contextual ...

  11. The effects of selective decontamination in Dutch Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, E.A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Infe