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Sample records for elastic-plastic fracture toughness

  1. Effect of plastic strain on elastic-plastic fracture toughness of SM490 carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Although the plastic strain induced in materials increases the mechanical strength, it may reduce the fracture toughness. The change in the fracture toughness is brought about by four factors; reduction in critical plastic strain due to pre-strain, localization of deformation, increase of material strength by work hardening, and change in material resistance for fracture. In this study, correlation between change in fracture toughness by pre-strain and the four factors was investigated. Firstly, the change in the tensile properties and fracture toughness were examined for pre-strained SM490 carbon steel. The specimens with blunt notch of 0.2 mm and 0.4 mm radius were used in addition to those with conventional fatigue pre-cracking. The degree of applied plastic strain was 5%, 10% and 20%. The fracture toughness was largest when the induced plastic strain was 5%, although it decreased in the cases for the plastic strain of 10% and 20%. Secondly, the stress and strain field near notch tip was evaluated by simulating the experiment using elastic-plastic finite element analyses. It was concluded that the change in fracture toughness was mainly brought about by the change in material resistance caused by the plastic strain. Under the plastic strain of 10% and 20%, the critical plastic strain for crack initiation decreased due to change in material resistance in addition to apparent reduction by pre-straining. The localized deformation and work hardening had minor effect on the change in fracture toughness. (author)

  2. Evaluation of elastic-plastic fracture of toughness and fracture resistance of carbon steel STS42

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Nakamura, Haruo; Kashiwagi, Kohmei

    1987-01-01

    The elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J Ic ) and fracture resistance (J-R curve) of a carbon steel, STS42, used for piping in a nuclear reactor were evaluated according to the several evaluating methods recommended or proposed so far, to discuss their applicability and utility. The results obtained are as follows: (1) In evaluating J Ic , the multiple specimen method recommended by the Japan Society for Mechanical Engineers (JSME standard S001) gives the most reliable results by using smaller sized specimens. (2) The single-specimen methods by using the compliance technique, adopted in the ASTM standards (E813, E813 modified, Tentative test procedure for determining the plain strain J-R curve), do not give an accurate J-R curve or J Ic , due to an error in the calculated crack length. (3) In evaluating the J-R curve, it is necessary to account for crack extension in calculating the J-integral. (4) According to the above results, a new standard method for determining the J-R curve including the J Ic test method should be poprosed. (author)

  3. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  4. Conversion of fracture toughness testing values from small scale three point bending test specimens to small scale yielding state (SSY) by elastic-plastic stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    1993-07-01

    The report describes the work performed for achieving readiness to calculate fracture toughness dependence on dimension effects and loading conditions in fracture test specimens and real structures. In the report two- and three-dimensional computer codes developed and calculational methods applied are described. One of the main goals is to converse fracture toughness from small scale three point bending test specimens to case of a depth crack in plane strain i.e. to small scale yielding state (SSY) by numerical elastic-plastic stress analysis. Thickness effect of a test specimens and effect of a crack depth are separately investigated. Tests of three point bending specimens with and without sidegrooves and curved crack front are numerically simulated and experimental and computed results are compared. J-integral is calculated along crack front and also from force-deflection dependence of the beam. For the analyses the computing system was thoroughly automatized. Measuring capacity of three point bending test specimens was tried to evaluate. (orig.) (7 refs., 54 figs.)

  5. Elastic-plastic fracture toughness and rising JR-curve behavior of cortical bone is partially protected from irradiation-sterilization-induced degradation by ribose protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, Mitchell; Willett, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that pre-treating cortical bone with ribose would protect the rising fracture resistance curve behavior and crack initiation fracture toughness of both bovine and human cortical bone from the degrading effects of γ-irradiation sterilization. A ribose pre-treatment (1.8 M for bovine, and 1.2 M for human, in PBS at 60 °C for 24 h) was applied to single-edge notched bending fracture specimens prior to sterilization with a 33 kGy dose of γ-irradiation. Fracture resistance curves were generated with a single specimen method using an optical crack length measurement technique. The effect of the treatment on overall fracture resistance behavior, crack initiation fracture toughness, and tearing modulus was compared with non-irradiated and conventionally irradiation sterilized controls. Hydrothermal isometric tension testing was used to examine collagen network connectivity and thermal stability to explore relationships between collagen network quality and fracture resistance. The ribose pre-treatment successfully protected the crack growth initiation fracture toughness of bovine and human bone by 32% and 63%, respectively. The rising JR-curve behavior was also partially protected. Furthermore, collagen connectivity and thermal stability followed similar patterns to those displayed by fracture toughness. This paper demonstrates that the fracture toughness of irradiation-sterilized bone tissue can be partially protected with a ribose pre-treatment. This new approach shows potential for the production and clinical application of sterilized allografts with improved mechanical performance and durability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. comparison of elastic-plastic FE method and engineering method for RPV fracture mechanics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yingxue; Zheng Bin; Zhang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    This paper described the FE analysis of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for a crack in RPV belt line using ABAQUS code. It calculated and evaluated the stress intensity factor and J integral of crack under PTS transients. The result is also compared with that by engineering analysis method. It shows that the results using engineering analysis method is a little larger than the results using FE analysis of 3D elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, thus the engineering analysis method is conservative than the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics method. (authors)

  7. Elastic Plastic Fracture Analysis of an Aluminum COPV Liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Scott; Gregg, Bradley; Bailey, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Onboard any space-launch vehicle, composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) may be utilized by propulsion or environmental control systems. The failure of a COPV has the potential to be catastrophic, resulting in the loss of vehicle, crew or mission. The latest COPV designs have reduced the wall-thickness of the metallic liner to the point where the material strains plastically during operation. At this time, the only method to determine the damage tolerance lifetime (safe-life) of a plastically responding metallic liner is through full-scale COPV testing. Conducting tests costs substantially more and can be far more time consuming than performing an analysis. As a result of this cost, there is a need to establish a qualifying process through the use of a crack growth analysis tool. This paper will discuss fracture analyses of plastically responding metallic liners in COPVs. Uni-axial strain tests have been completed on laboratory specimens to collect elastic-plastic crack growth data. This data has been modeled with the crack growth analysis tool, NASGRO 6.20 to predict the response of laboratory specimens and subsequently the complexity of a COPV.

  8. Investigation of the local fracture toughness and the elastic-plastic fracture behavior of NiAl and tungsten by means of micro-cantilever tests; Untersuchung der lokalen Bruchzaehigkeit und des elastisch-plastischen Bruchverhaltens von NiAl und Wolfram mittels Mikrobiegebalkenversuchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ast, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work was to get an improved understanding of the size dependence of the fracture toughness. For this purpose notched micro-cantilevers were fabricated ranging in dimensions from the submicron regime up to some tens of microns by means of a focused ion beam. B2-NiAl and tungsten were chosen as model materials as their brittle to ductile transition temperatures are well above room temperature. In that way, fracture processes accompanied by limited plastic deformation around the crack tip could be studied at the micro scale. For this size regime, new methods to describe the local elastic-plastic fracture behavior and to measure the fracture toughness were elaborated. Particular focus was set on the J-integral concept which was adapted to the micro scale to derive crack growth from stiffness measurements. This allowed a precise analysis of the transition from crack tip blunting to stable crack growth which is necessary to accurately measure the fracture toughness. Experiments in single crystalline NiAl showed for the two investigated crack systems, namely the hard and the soft orientation, that the fracture toughness at the micro scale is the same as the one known from macroscopic testing. Thus, size effects were not found for the tested length scale. The addition of little amounts of iron did not affect the fracture toughness considerably. Yet, it influenced the crack growth in those samples and consequently the resistance curve behavior. Concerning experiments in single crystalline tungsten, the fracture toughness showed a clear dependency on sample size. The smallest cantilevers fractured purely by cleavage. Larger samples exhibited stable crack growth along with plastic deformation which was recognizable in SEM-micrographs and quantified by means of EBSD measurements. Just as in macroscopic testing, the investigated crack system <100>{100} demonstrated a dependency on loading rate with higher loading rates leading to a more brittle behavior

  9. Fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Ipiña J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the fracture toughness in metal matrix composites (Duralcan reinforced with 15% of Al(20(3 and SiC are presented in this work. The application of Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics is discussed and the obtained values are compared with the ones obtained by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Results show that J IC derived K JC values are higher than the corresponding values obtained by direct application of the linear elastic methodology. The effect of a heat treatment on the material fracture toughness was also evaluated in which the analyzed approaches showed, not only different toughness values, but also opposite tendencies. A second comparison of the J IC and K JC values obtained in this work with toughness values reported in the literature is presented and discussed.

  10. Computational Modelling of Fracture Propagation in Rocks Using a Coupled Elastic-Plasticity-Damage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Kolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled elastic-plasticity-damage constitutive model, AK Model, is applied to predict fracture propagation in rocks. The quasi-brittle material model captures anisotropic effects and the distinct behavior of rocks in tension and compression. Calibration of the constitutive model is realized using experimental data for Carrara marble. Through the Weibull distribution function, heterogeneity effect is captured by spatially varying the elastic properties of the rock. Favorable comparison between model predictions and experiments for single-flawed specimens reveal that the AK Model is reliable and accurate for modelling fracture propagation in rocks.

  11. Three-dimensional elastic--plastic stress and strain analyses for fracture mechanics: complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, H.J.

    1975-11-01

    The report describes the continuation of research into capability for three-dimensional elastic-plastic stress and strain analysis for fracture mechanics. A computer program, MARC-3D, has been completed and was used to analyze a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle insert. A method for generating crack tip elements was developed and a model was created for a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle and an imbedded flaw at the inside nozzle corner. The MARC-3D program was again used to analyze this flawed model. Documentation for the use of the MARC-3D computer program has been included as an appendix.

  12. Elastic, plastic, fracture analysis of masonry arches: A multi-span bridge case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Accornero, Federico

    2018-01-01

    In this work a comparison is presented between elastic, plastic, and fracture analysis of the monumental arch bridge of Porta Napoli, Taranto (Italy). By means of a FEM model and applying the Mery's Method, the behavior of the curved structure under service loads is verified, while considering the Safe Theorem approach byHeyman, the ultimate carrying capacity of the structure is investigated. Moreover, by using Fracture Mechanics concepts, the damage process which takes place when the conditions assessed through linear elastic analysis are no longer valid, and before the set-in of the conditions established by means of the plastic limit analysis, is numerically analyzed. The study of these transitions returns an accurate and effective whole service life assessment of the Porta Napoli masonry arch bridge.

  13. Fracture toughness determination in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergant M; Yawny, A; Perez Ipina, J

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of the structural integrity of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants deserved increasing attention in the last years due to the negative impact related to their failures. In this context, elastic plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) methodology appears as a potential tool for the analysis. The application of EPFM requires, necessarily, knowledge of two aspects, i.e., the driving force estimation in terms of an elastic plastic toughness parameter (e.g., J) and the experimental measurement of the fracture toughness of the material (e.g., the material J-resistance curve). The present work describes the development of a non standardized experimental technique aimed to determine J-resistance curves for steam generator tubes with circumferential through wall cracks. The tubes were made of Incoloy 800 (Ni: 30.0-35.0; Cr: 19.0-23.0; Fe: 35.5 min, % in weight). Due to its austenitic microstructure, this alloy shows very high toughness and is widely used in applications where a good corrosion resistance in aqueous environment or an excellent oxidation resistance in high temperature environment is required. Finally, a procedure for the structural integrity analysis of steam generator tubes with crack-like defects, based on a FAD diagram (Failure Assessment Diagram), is briefly described (author)

  14. Development of a formalism of movable cellular automaton method for numerical modeling of fracture of heterogeneous elastic-plastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Psakhie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A general approach to realization of models of elasticity, plasticity and fracture of heterogeneous materials within the framework of particle-based numerical methods is proposed in the paper. It is based on building many-body forces of particle interaction, which provide response of particle ensemble correctly conforming to the response (including elastic-plastic behavior and fracture of simulated solids. Implementation of proposed approach within particle-based methods is demonstrated by the example of the movable cellular automaton (MCA method, which integrates the possibilities of particle-based discrete element method (DEM and cellular automaton methods. Emergent advantages of the developed approach to formulation of many-body interaction are discussed. Main of them are its applicability to various realizations of the concept of discrete elements and a possibility to realize various rheological models (including elastic-plastic or visco-elastic-plastic and models of fracture to study deformation and fracture of solid-phase materials and media. Capabilities of particle-based modeling of heterogeneous solids are demonstrated by the problem of simulation of deformation and fracture of particle-reinforced metal-ceramic composites.

  15. Addendum to the User Manual for NASGRO Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Software Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, M. Wayne (Technical Monitor); Chell, Graham; Gardner, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modules in NASGRO have been enhanced by the addition of of the following: new J-integral solutions based on the reference stress method and finite element solutions; the extension of the critical crack and critical load modules for cracks with two degrees of freedom that tear and failure by ductile instability; the addition of a proof test analysis module that includes safe life analysis, calculates proof loads, and determines the flaw screening 1 capability for a given proof load; the addition of a tear-fatigue module for ductile materials that simultaneously tear and extend by fatigue; and a multiple cycle proof test module for estimating service reliability following a proof test.

  16. A critical review on the application of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to nuclear pressure vessel and piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarth, D.A.; Kim, Y.J.; Vanderglas, M.L.

    1985-10-01

    A comprehensive literature survey on the application of Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics to the assessment of the structural integrity of nuclear pressure vessels and piping is presented. In particular, the J-integral/Tearing Modulus (J/T) approach and the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD) are covered in detail because of their general suitability for use in Ontario Hydro. (25 refs.)

  17. Dynamic fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Yang, K.-H.; Kang, B. S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relations of Homalite-100, polycarbonate, hardened 4340 steel and reaction bonded silicon nitride are reviewed and discrepancies with published data and their probable causes are discussed. Data scatter in published data are attributed in part to the observed fluctuations in crack velocities. The results reaffirmed our previous conclusion that the dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relation is specimen dependent and that the dynamic arrest stress intensity factor is not a unique material property.

  18. Essential work of fracture (EWF): a useful tool for the fracture toughness characterization of particulate polyolefin composites

    OpenAIRE

    Arencón Osuna, David; Antunes, Marcelo de Sousa Pais; Velasco Perero, José Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of the fracture toughness of polyolefin composites filled with inorganic particles is commonly solved by means of standardized testing procedures based wherther on the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) and the Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics approaches. Fracture parameters as Kc, Gc and Jc are obtained and managed as "material" parameters in plain strain conditions. Nevertheless, particulate polyolefin composites are often in form of film or sheet, making diffi...

  19. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with an axial outer surface flaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.

    1988-04-01

    Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of a test vessel (steel 1.6310=20 MnMoNi 55) with a semi-elliptical axial outer surface crack have been performed. The variations of J and CTOD along the crack front and the stresse state in the vicinity of the crack are presented. The applicability of approaches to determine J is examined. The FE results are compared with the experimental data. The results are analyzed with respect to the validity of J-controlled crack growth. It will be shown that the local ductile crack growth and, especially, the 'canoe effect' for a semi-elliptical crack can only be described correctly if local J R -curves are used which account for the varying triaxiality of the stress state along the crack front. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  1. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  2. Evaluation of the fracture toughness for nuclear piping using the compact pipe specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo; Choi, Jung Hoon; Huh, Yong; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    For estimating the crack of real pipes on the basis of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, we must first measure the correct fracture toughness from such pipes. However, a fracture resistance test that uses real pipes entails much time and expense. Also, the test is very difficult. For these reasons, many researchers have been performing fracture resistance tests by using standard specimens instead of real pipes since standard specimens are easy to test. However, the estimates of fracture toughness from standard specimens are conservative when compared to the fracture toughness of real pipes owing to the difference in the constraint effect between real pipes and standard specimens. Therefore, for correctly evaluating cracks, we need a new specimen that can express the constraint effect of real pipes. Therefore, this study proposes a new specimen(CP) and test method for conducting fracture resistance tests with new specimens. Also verifies the proposed method of testing.

  3. Fracture toughness of irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeston, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The fracture toughness of nuclear grade hot-pressed beryllium upon irradiation to fluences of 3.5 to 5.0 x 10 21 n/cm 2 , E greater than 1 MeV, was determined. Procedures and data relating to a round-robin test contributing to a standard ASTM method for unirradiated beryllium are discussed in connection with the testing of irradiated specimens. A porous grade of beryllium was also irradiated and tested, thereby enabling some discrimination between the models for describing the fracture toughness behavior of porous beryllium. The fracture toughness of unirradiated 2 percent BeO nuclear grade beryllium was 12.0 MPa m/sup 1 / 2 /, which was reduced 60 percent upon irradiation at 339 K and testing at 295 K. The fracture toughness of a porous grade of beryllium was 13.1 MPa m/sup 1 / 2 /, which was reduced 68 percent upon irradiation and testing at the same conditions. Reasons for the reduction in fracture toughness upon irradiation are discussed

  4. The fracture toughness of eggshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David; Walsh, Megan; Cullen, Alexandra; O'Reilly, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The shells of avian eggs are very brittle, but how brittle? Fracture toughness, Kc is a standard measure used widely to characterise engineering materials. We devised a novel way to measure Kc and applied it to commercial hens' eggs, obtaining a value of 0.3MPa√m. This value is much lower than previous published values, which we argue are incorrect and misleading. We discuss how this exceptionally low toughness value (in comparison to that of other natural materials made from calcium carbonate) has been achieved by prevention of toughening mechanisms. Eggshell has an unusual combination of mechanical properties (low fracture toughness combined with high Young's modulus), making it ideally suited as a container for the developing chick, which must be stiff and rigid but also brittle enough to be broken when required. Further testing and analysis using the Theory of Critical Distances and Weibull probability theory allowed us to describe the effects of defects of various types: cracks, holes and notches, on the strength of whole eggs. These results are of commercial importance because many eggs break prematurely as a result of microscopic defects. This paper presents the first accurate measurements of the fracture toughness of eggshell. These results are important because eggshell is a brittle material which fails from microscopic defects, so knowledge of the fracture toughness is essential to understand its mechanical performance. The toughness value obtained is discussed in the context of other mechanical properties, of eggshell and other natural materials. This is useful for understanding how eggshell's stiffness and toughness make it ideally suited to its purpose, and the mechanisms by which toughness is achieved. The paper also contains analysis of the effect of defect type, including cracks, notches and holes, to provide a fuller picture of defect tolerance which will be useful in the egg producing industry. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by

  5. Test-Free Fracture Toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Computational simulation results can give the prediction of damage growth and progression and fracture toughness of composite structures. The experimental data from literature provide environmental effects on the fracture behavior of metallic or fiber composite structures. However, the traditional experimental methods to analyze the influence of the imposed conditions are expensive and time consuming. This research used the CODSTRAN code to model the temperature effects, scaling effects and the loading effects of fiber/braided composite specimens with and without fiber-optic sensors on the damage initiation and energy release rates. The load-displacement relationship and fracture toughness assessment approach is compared with the test results from literature and it is verified that the computational simulation, with the use of established material modeling and finite element modules, adequately tracks the changes of fracture toughness and subsequent fracture propagation for any fiber/braided composite structure due to the change of fiber orientations, presence of large diameter optical fibers, and any loading conditions.

  6. Effects of tensile loading on upper shelf fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, J.A. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Link, R.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Constraint has been an important consideration in fracture mechanics from the earliest work that was done to develop the 1974 version of the ASTM Standard E399. O`Dowd and Shih (1991) have proposed that the difference in crack tip stress fields can be quantified in terms of a field quantity that they have call Q. The Q quantity is a function of J, the crack shape and size, the structural geometry, mode of loading and on the level of deformation and can only be calculated from a high resolution elastic-plastic computational analysis. A similar, simpler, but more controversial approach has been suggested by Betegon and Hancock (1991), who use the non-singular term of the elastic, crack singularity solution, called the T-Stress, as a measure of elastic-plastic crack tip constraint. The objective of this work is to develop some upper shelf, elastic-plastic experimental results to attempt to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness and J resistance curves. The first objective was to obtain upper shelf J resistance curves, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance results for a range of applied constraint. The J-Q and J-T stress loci were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. Constraint was varied by changing the crack length and also by changing the mode of loading from bending to predominantly tensile. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  7. Some comment on the use of J criterion in elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    In Post Yield Fracture Mechanics, several criteria have been proposed for the onset of crack propagation, one of the most popular being the J 1 integral criterion. This is only well established for elastic materials, where it can be shown that J 1 is not path dependent, and that J 1 is equal to the variation of potential energy with crack length. Extension is easy for material exhibiting deformation type plasticity, but there is no proof of path independence for flow-type plastic material. Experimental results are often given as a proof of J 1 criterion validity, but a critical analysis shows that important assumptions are made in the use of the test results. The main assumption is that the received work, known as strain energy, is not dependent on the loading history and is only dependent on the mechanical state. The study of the J 1 path dependence is the main point of the J 1 criteria validation. A general method to assess path dependence can be founded on the 'defect vector' (or driving force) concept. The space-density of defect is given by j = grad W - σ grad (W = strain-energy, σ stress tensor, epsilon strain tensor). It is shown that the virtual translation delta a of the defect vectors inside a volume, lead to a virtual work variation given by J 1 delta a and that J 1 is the resultant of all the defect vectors included in the volume surrounded by the integration surface. Using these results the path independence conditions are examined. Some numerical results are given for incremental processes such as plasticity or creep, and where the loading path is radial (proportional) and monotonic, no appreciable path variations found. Finally the results of direct applications of J 1 criterion to real structures are examined. (author)

  8. Influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Bryson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Recently, it has been shown that, in notched beam testing, shallow cracks tend to exhibit an elevated toughness as a result of a loss of constraint at the crack tip. The loss of constraint takes place when interaction occurs between the elastic-plastic crack-tip stress field and the specimen surface nearest the crack tip. An increased shallow-crack fracture toughness is of interest to the nuclear industry because probabilistic fracture-mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the probability of vessel failure during postulated pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) events. Tests have been performed on beam specimens loaded in 3-point bending using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel material (A533 B). Testing has been conducted using specimens with a constant beam depth (W = 94 mm) and within the lower transition region of the toughness curve for A533 B. Test results indicate a significantly higher fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens compared to the fracture toughness determined using deep-crack (a/W = 0.5) specimens. Test data also show little influence of thickness on the fracture toughness for the current test temperature (-60 degree C). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Impact toughness and fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingcheng LIU

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact toughness and fracture toughness ofaustermpered ductile iron (ADI are described. The notched and un-notched charpy impact toughness of ADI at room temperature are somewhat lower than that of steel castings or forged steel pieces, however, they are approximately three times higher than that of mormal pearlitic ductile iron. The impact toughness of ADI decreases with decreasing temperature; but at -40 ℃ it still maintains about 70% of the value at room temperature. The properties of fracture toughness are important in safety design and failure analysis. In this study all fracture toughness data of ADI are higher than that of conventional ductile iron, and are equivalent to or better than that of steel castings o forged steel pieces with the tensile strength equivalent to ADI.

  10. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  11. Fracture toughness in the transition region of a carbon steel and a ferritic nodular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Keishi; Yasunaka, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    In order to characterize the fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition region for thick-walled cylinders of ASME SA350 Gr.LF5 carbon steel and JIS FCD300LT ferritic nodular cast iron, elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests were carried out. The specimens were fatigue precracked compact tension (CT) specimens of 25mm in thickness. The tensile testing machines used were Instron type, electrohydraulic type and drop-weight type ones. In the static fracture toughness test on a FCD300LT cast iron, CT specimens were often fractured at somewhat higher loads after the initiation of pop-in cracks. Although the scatter of pop-in fracture toughness was small, the values of critical J-integral at the unstable brittle fracture scattered largely. In the transition region of SA350 steel, the initiation of pop-in crack was not observed, and fracture toughness scattered largely. At the propagation of the unstable crack near the transition temperature, the Weibull distribution provides good fits for the critical CTOD and the critical J-integral. This distribution can be mainly interpreted by the scatter of the distance between the precrack tip and the origin of unstable brittle fracture. (author)

  12. Fracture Toughness Of Zircaloy Claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, J.; Hoffelner, W

    2003-01-01

    Zirconium-based alloys (Zircaloy) have been used as cladding material in Light Water Reactors for many years. During fabrication, or in in-reactor service, crack-type defects can be formed, posing questions regarding mechanical integrity. As claddings change their mechanical properties (mainly toughness) during service as a result of irradiation-induced degradation, oxidation and hydride formation, it is essential for integrity considerations to provide parameters for the assessment of the influence of flaws on rupture behaviour. Usually, fracture-mechanics parameters are employed such as the fracture toughness, K IC , or, for high plastic strains, the J-integral, JIC. The applicability of these parameters is, however, limited by the dimensions of the samples (e.g. thickness). In claddings with a wall thickness of below 1 mm, determination of toughness necessitates an extension of the J-integral concept. A method based on the traditional J-approach, but applicable to thin-walled structures, is presented in this paper. (author)

  13. Effect of specimen size on intergranular mode fracture toughness of Cr-Mo-V steel in the transition temperature region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Keiichi; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Hideaki; Saito, Kiyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    A determination procedure of intergranular mode fracture toughness has been studied on the basis of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics and by use of AE technique to detect an onset of microscopic pop-in cracking at the crack front. Experiments were performed on a steam turbine rotor steel (Cr-Mo-V steel) at 150 deg C, and four different sizes of compact tension specimens having the thickness of 10 mm(0.4TCT), 25 mm(1TCT), 50 mm(2TCT), and 100 mm(4TCT) were used. In combination with the fractographic observation on fractured surfaces, the fracture toughness determined by AE technique, J iAE , was proposed as the critical J-integral value characterizing an onset of a microscopic intergranular mode pop-in fracture, and its size effects was discussed. Each lower value of K JAE (= √(E · J iAE /(1 - ν 2 ))) obtained from smaller specimens such as 0.4TCT and 1TCT specimens was coincident with that from the large specimens. Furthermore, the toughness values of 2TCT and 4TCT specimens, K IC(AE) , met the size requirement for the plane-strain fracture toughness, and were about 76 percent of the valid K IC . This evidence suggests that the fracture toughness by AE technique proposed here is a suitable parameter to the toughness value of the brittle fracture initiation more conservative than the plane-strain fracture toughness value. (author)

  14. Evaluation of fracture toughness characteristics for nuclear piping using various types of specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo, E-mail: roonasis@skku.edu [Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Sang-Soo, E-mail: gombohunter@hotmail.com [Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jun-Ki, E-mail: kjlume@naver.com [Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Jae-Mean, E-mail: Kjm9000@hanmail.net [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Chang-Sung, E-mail: seok@skku.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The leak-before-break (LBB) concept is based on the fracture resistance curve obtained by J-R tests for various types of specimens. But fracture toughness data of various types of specimens are different. For example, the estimates for fracture toughness of standard specimens are conservative when compared to the fracture toughness of real pipes because of the difference of the constraint effect between real pipes and standard specimens. Therefore, to estimate the integrity of real pipes based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, we have to first establish the relations among real pipes, standard CT specimens and curved CT specimens. In this study, we perform fracture toughness tests of nuclear piping materials using various types of specimens. And each J-R curve considered in the constraint effect is compared. The experimental results showed that a curved CT specimen is similar to the cases of pipes with small crack angles (60 Degree-Sign and 120 Degree-Sign) and a CT specimen is similar to the case of pipes with the crack length of 180 Degree-Sign . Also, the Q-stress for curved CT specimens is higher than that of pure bending pipe specimens and lower than that of CT specimens.

  15. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analyses For circumferential Part-through Surface Cracks At The Interface Between Elbows and Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yun Jae; Oh, Chang Kyun; Kim, Jong Sung; Jin, Tae Eun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plastic limit loads and approximate J-integral estimates for circumferential part-through surface crack at the interface between elbows and pipes. Based on finite element limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials, plastic limit moments under in-plane bending are obtained and it is found that they are similar those for circumferential part-through surface cracks in the center of elbow. Based on present FE results, closed-form limit load solutions are proposed. Welds are not explicitly considered and all materials are assumed to be homogeneous. And the method to estimate the elastic-plastic J-integral for circumferential part-through surface cracks at the interface between elbows and straight pipes is proposed based on the reference stress approach, which was compared with corresponding solutions for straight pipes

  16. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Fracture Toughness Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fracture Toughness Requirements G Appendix G to Part 50..., App. G Appendix G to Part 50—Fracture Toughness Requirements I. Introduction and scope. II. Definitions. III. Fracture toughness tests. IV. Fracture toughness requirements. I. Introduction and Scope...

  17. Fracture toughness of reactor grade graphites, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Sennosuke; Awaji, Hideo; Akuzawa, Hironobu; Kon, Junichi.

    1979-01-01

    In our recent papers, we presented a new technique for determining the thermal shock fracture toughness, using a disk specimen with an edge crack. The thermal shock fracture toughness is defined as K sub( ic)k/Eα(K sub( ic) standing for fracture toughness; k for thermal conductivity; E for Young's modulus; α for thermal expansion coefficient) and it can be determined en bloc by measuring the threshold electric power of the arc discharge heating produced when an edge crack propagates in the disk. The value obtained is the fracture toughness corresponding to the thermal shock resistance defined as σk/Eα (σ standing for tensile strength). The experimental data shown in the following discussion concern themselves with four kinds of reactor grade graphite and some varieties of electrode graphite. (author)

  18. Fracture toughness of hydrogels: measurement and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2016-10-04

    The fracture mechanics of hydrogels, especially those with significantly enhanced toughness, has attracted extensive research interests. In this article we discuss the experimental measurement and theoretical interpretation of the fracture toughness for soft hydrogels. We first review the definition of fracture toughness for elastic materials, and the commonly used experimental configurations to measure it. In reality most gels are inelastic. For gels that are rate insensitive, we discuss how to interpret the fracture toughness associated with two distinct scenarios: crack initiation and steady-state crack propagation. A formulation to estimate energy dissipation during steady-state crack propagation is developed, and connections to previous models in the literature are made. For gels with rate-dependent behaviors, we review the physical mechanisms responsible for the rate-dependence, and outline the difficulties to rigorously define the fracture toughness for both crack initiation and propagation. We conclude by discussing a few fundamental questions on the fracture of tough gels that are yet to be answered.

  19. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with an axial outer surface flaw. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocks, W.; Kuenecke, G.

    1989-06-01

    Continuing preceding investigations, a further elastic-plastic finite element analysis of a test vessel with a semi-elliptical axial outer surface crack has been performed. The variations of J and CTOD along the crack front and the stress state in the vicinity of the crack are presented. The applicability of analytical approaches to determine J is examined. The FE results are used to analyze the experimental data with respect to the validity of J-controlled crack growth. Local J R -curves of the surface flaw are compared with J R -curves of various specimens of different geometries. Again, it became evident that the local ductile crack growth and, especially, the developing 'canoe shape' of the surface crack cannot be described by a single resistance curve which is assumed to be a material property. A method described in a previous report to predict the ductile crack growth by using local J R -curves which depend on the triaxiality of the stress state did not result in a satisfactory outcome, in the present case. The presumed reasons will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Fracture toughness of thin specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Kenji; Kikuchi, Masanori; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional elastic-plastic analyses were carried out on 1 and 2 mm-thick CCT specimens with or without side grooves. The valid effective thickness, 0.85 √(B o xB n ), was obtained from the 3-D analyses. The stretched-zone method is better than the R-curve method to determine the J in value of the thin specimen. However, a great many data should be gathered near the J in value. The J in value obtained using side-grooved specimens is always lower than that of non-side-grooved specimens. Considering the difficulty of machining the side groove, the side groove is not appropriate for the thin specimen. As the thickness decreases, the J in value decreases. However, it is possible to estimate the J ic value from the J in value obtained using thin CCT specimens. (author)

  1. Assessment of the fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel for BWR core shrouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.G.; Gamble, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Data from previously performed experiments were collected and evaluated to determine the relationship between fracture toughness and neutron fluence for conditions representative of BWR core shrouds. This relationship together with EPFM (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) analysis methods similar to those in Appendix K of Section XI of the ASME Code were used to compute margin against failure as a function of neutron fluence for postulated cracks in BWR core shrouds. The results indicate that EPFM analyses can be used for flaw evaluation of core shrouds at fluence levels less than 3.10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). At fluence levels equal to or greater than 3.10 21 n/cm 2 , LEFM (linear-elastic fracture mechanics) analyses should be used with K Ic = 55 MPa-(m) 0.5 . (authors)

  2. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-11-24

    Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their resistance to fracture or fracture toughness. It is not by accident that most critical structures, such as bridges, ships, nuclear pressure vessels and so forth, are manufactured from materials that are comparatively low in strength but high in toughness. Indeed, in many classes of materials, strength and toughness are almost mutually exclusive. In the first instance, such resistance to fracture is a function of bonding and crystal structure (or lack thereof), but can be developed through the design of appropriate nano/microstructures. However, the creation of tough microstructures in structural materials, i.e., metals, polymers, ceramics and their composites, is invariably a compromise between resistance to intrinsic damage mechanisms ahead of the tip of a crack (intrinsic toughening) and the formation of crack-tip shielding mechanisms which principally act behind the tip to reduce the effective 'crack-driving force' (extrinsic toughening). Intrinsic toughening is essentially an inherent property of a specific microstructure; it is the dominant form of toughening in ductile (e.g., metallic) materials. However, for most brittle (e.g., ceramic) solids, and this includes many biological materials, it is largely ineffective and toughening conversely must be developed extrinsically, by such shielding mechanisms as crack bridging. From a fracture mechanics perspective, this results in toughening in the form of rising resistance-curve behavior where the fracture resistance actually increases with crack extension. The implication of this is that in many biological and high-strength advanced materials, toughness is developed primarily during crack growth and not for crack initiation. This is an important realization yet is still rarely reflected in the way that toughness is measured, which is invariably involves the use of single-value (crack-initiation) parameters such as

  3. Assessment of fracture toughness of structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes Junyor, José Onésimo; Faria, Stéfanno Bruno; Rocha, Nirlando Antônio; Reis, Emil; Vilela, Jefferson José, E-mail: ze_onezo@hotmail.com, E-mail: sbrunofaria@gmail.com, E-mail: nar@cdtn.br, E-mail: emilr@cdtn.br, E-mail: jjv@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro Universitário de Belo Horizonte (UNIBH), MG (Brazil); Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The fracture toughness parameters are applied to estimate the lifetime of mechanical components and define the criteria of safe failure and tolerable damages. This information allows equipment to be used longer with a high degree of safety. These techniques are applied in the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept that is accepted for designing the piping system of the primary circuit of the pressurized water reactor (PWR). In this work, fracture toughness tests such as J{sub IC} and CTOD were performed on some structural steels. The fracture toughness parameters were determined using SE(B) and C(T) test specimens. The fracture toughness values for the same material varied according to the type specimen. The parameter δ{sub 1c} showed different values when it was calculated using the ASTM E1820 standard and using the BS 7448: Part 1 standard. These results indicate that procedures of these standards need to be improved. Two systems with different sensitivity in the force measurement were used that showed similar results for toughness fracture but the dispersion was different. (author)

  4. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  5. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  6. Fracture toughness of manet II steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gboneim, M.M.; Munz, D.

    1997-01-01

    High fracture toughness was evaluated according to the astm and chromium (9-12) martensitic steels combine high strength and toughness with good corrosion and oxidation resistance in a range of environments, and also show relatively high creep strength at intermediate temperatures. They therefore find applications in, for example, the offshore oil and gas production and chemical industries i pipe work and reaction vessels, and in high temperature steam plant in power generation systems. Recently, the use of these materials in the nuclear field was considered. They are candidates as tubing materials for breeder reactor steam generators and as structural materials for the first wall and blanket in fusion reactors. The effect of ageing on the tensile properties and fracture toughness of a 12 Cr-1 Mo-Nb-v steel, MANET II, was investigated in the present work. Tensile specimens and compact tension (CT) specimens were aged at 550 degree C for 1000 h. The japanese standards. Both microstructure and fracture surface were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that ageing did not affect the tensile properties. However, the fracture toughness K Ic and the tearing modules T were reduced due to the ageing treatment. The results were discussed in the light of the chemical composition and the fracture surface morphology. 9 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Mezzo-scopic Analysis of Fracture Toughness in Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyata Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cleavage fracture toughness of steels was mezzo-scopically analyzed on the basis of the statistical local fracture criterion approach. The statistical stress criterion at the crack tip region suggests that the cleavage fracture toughness in steels can be described as a function of the yield stress, the cleavage fracture stress, and other mechanical properties of the materials. Formulation of the cleavage fracture toughness was first examined through an investigation on correlation between the cleavage toughness and the cleavage fracture stress obtained in notched round bar specimens in accordance with the theoretical prediction. Then, the scatter of the toughness, specimen thickness effect on the toughness, deterioration of the toughness due to cold working and irradiation, and improvement of the toughness caused by the Ni addition, were analyzed through the formulation of the toughness.

  8. Fracture-toughness variations in Alloy 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of product-form variations within a single heat on the J Ic fracture toughness behavior of Alloy 718 was examined at 24, 427 and 538 degree C using the multiple-specimen J R -curve method. Three product forms (plate, round bar and upset forging) were tested in both the conventional and modified heat-treatment (CHT and MHT) conditions. In CHT material, the fracture toughness response was different for the three product forms -- plate having the highest toughness, bar the lowest. The MHT was found to improve the overall fracture resistance for each product form. In this condition, plate and forging had very similar toughness values, but J Ic levels for the bar were considerably lower. These results and WHC data previously reported for four other Alloy 718 heats were unalloyed statistically to establish minimum-expected J Ic values based on tolerance limits bracketing 90% of a total population at a 95% confidence level. Metallographic and fractographic examinations of the seven material lots were performed to relate key microstructural features and operative fracture mechanisms to macroscopic properties. Generally, coarse δ precipitates controlled fracture properties in CHT material by initiating secondary dimples that pre-empted growth of the primary dimples nucleated by broken carbide inclusions. The MHT dissolved the coarse δ particles and thereby suppressed secondary microvoid coalescence. This generally enhanced the fracture resistance of Alloy 718, except when alternate secondary fracture mechanism, such as channel fracture and dimple rupture at δ-phase remnants, prematurely interrupted primary microvoid growth. 25 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs

  9. Fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and EN52 weld in air and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.M.; Mills, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    The effect of low and high temperature water with high hydrogen on the fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and its weld, EN52, was characterized using elastic-plastic J{sub IC} methodology. While both materials display excellent fracture resistance in air and elevated temperature (>93 C) water, a dramatic degradation in toughness is observed in 54 C water. The loss of toughness is associated with a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism where hydrogen is picked up from the water. Comparison of the cracking behavior in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air indicates that the critical local hydrogen content required to cause low temperature embrittlement is on the order of 120 to 160 ppm. Loading rate studies show that the cracking resistance is significantly improved at rates above ca. 1000 MPa{radical}m/h because there is insufficient time to produce grain boundary embrittlement. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate cracking behavior with microstructural features and operative fracture mechanics.

  10. Fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, M.N. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Komatsu, S. [Kinki Univ., Higashihiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering

    1995-12-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature, austempering temperature and austempering time on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron have been presented and discussed in this paper. Statistical design of experiments with a 2{sup 3} matrix was used to determine the effect of the individual variables and their interactions. The desirable combination of the three variables is suggested based on the analysis.

  11. Fracture toughness evaluation of a low upper-shelf weld metal from the Midland Reactor using the master curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Tenth Irradiation Series was to develop a fracture mechanics evaluation of weld metal WF-70, which was taken from the beltline and nozzle course girth weld joints of the Midland Reactor vessel. This material became available when Consumers Power Company of Midland, Michigan, decided to abort plans to operate their nuclear power plant. WF-70 is classified as a low upper-shelf steel primarily due to the Linde 80 flux that was used in the submerged-arc welding process. The master curve concept is introduced to model the transition range fracture toughness when the toughness is quantified in terms of K Jc values. K Jc is an elastic-plastic stress intensity factor calculated by conversion from J c ; i.e., J-integral at onset of cleavage instability

  12. An elastic-plastic fracture mechanics based methodology to characterize cracking behavior and its application to environmental assisted processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.A.; Gutierrez-Solana, F.

    1999-01-01

    Cracking processes suffered by new structural and piping steels when used in petroleum or other energy installations have demonstrated the need for a cracking resistance characterization methodology. This methodology, valid for both elastic and elastoplastic regimes, should be able to define crack propagation kinetics as a function of their controlling local parameters. This work summarizes an experimental and analytical methodology that has been shown to be suitable for characterizing cracking processes using compact tensile specimens, especially subcritical environmentally assisted ones, such as those induced by hydrogen in microalloyed steels. The applied and validated methodology has been shown to offer quantitative results of cracking behavior and to correlate these with the existing fracture micromechanisms. (orig.)

  13. Determination of ASTM 1016 structural welded joints fracture toughness through J integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Terra, Jose Lucio; Rabello, Emerson Giovani; Martins, Geraldo Antonio Scoralick; Carneiro, Jose Rubens Goncalves

    2009-01-01

    Fracture toughness is an important parameter for studies of materials behavior in nuclear and conventional industry. Crack propagation resistance is, in general, evaluate using one of the fracture mechanics parameters K IC , for the case of the materials that exhibits a linear elastic behavior, the CTOD (crack tip opening displacement) and J IC , the critical value of J Integral, for the case of materials with elastic-plastic behavior. On this work the fracture mechanics parameters of the ASTM 1016 structural steel welded joints were obtained, using the J Integral. Charpy V tests at several temperatures were also obtained, with the purpose to obtain the curves of ductile-brittle of the regions of the welded joints: Base Metal, (MB), and Melted Zone (MZ). The joints were welded by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) with V bevel for evaluation the MZ toughness properties. The tests were accomplished at temperatures varying from -100 deg C to 100 deg C using the technical of compliance variation for J IC determination, the critical value that defines the initial stable crack growth, that applies to brittle and ductile materials. The J Integral alternative specimens has square cross section 10mmX10mm, according ASTM E 1820, with notch localized respectively at the BM and MZ. After the tests, the specimens fractured were analyzed in a scanning microscopic electronic (SME) for verification of the fracture surface. The fractography of the specimens at elevated temperatures presented dimples at the region of stable crack growth, characteristic of ductile fracture. The results of J Integral and Charpy V presented a good correlation between these two parameters. From these correlations it can be concluded that in some applications, the use Charpy V energy to infer fracture toughness can be substitute the Integral J tests. (author)

  14. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Henning Dirks

    Full Text Available During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m. However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm. This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  15. Veins Improve Fracture Toughness of Insect Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect’s flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material’s resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing’s toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically ‘optimal’ solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial ‘venous’ wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  16. Measuring fracture toughness in biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David

    2018-01-01

    Many biological materials fail by cracking. Examples are bone fractures, contact damage in eggs, splits in bamboo culm and defects in cartilage. The mechanical property that best describes failure by cracking is fracture toughness, which quantifies the ease with which cracks propagate and defines a material's tolerance for pre-existing cracks and other stress concentrating features. The measurement of fracture toughness presents some challenges, especially for biological materials. To obtain valid results requires care and, in many cases, considerable ingenuity to design an appropriate specimen and test protocol. Common mistakes include incorrect interpretation of the mechanics of loading in unusual specimen designs, and failures occurring at the material's ultimate tensile strength as a result of specimens or cracks being too small. Interpretation of the resulting toughness data may also present challenges, for example when R-curve behaviour is present. In this article, examples of good and bad practice are described, and some recommendations made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Techniques developed to evaluate the fracture toughness offast breeder reactor duct. [Use of J-integral tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F. H.; Wire, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    Large changes in strength and ductility of metals after irradiation are known to occur. The fracture toughness of irradiated metals, which is related to the combined strength and ductility of a material, may be significantly reduced and the potential for unstable crack extension increased. Therefore, the resistance of cladding and duct materials to fracture after exposure to fast neutron environments is of concern. Existing Type 316 stainless steel irradiated ducts are relatively thin and since this material retains substantial ductility, even after irradiation, the fracture behavior of the duct material cannot be analyzed by linear elastic fracture mechanics techniques. Instead, the multispecimen R-curve method and J-integral analysis were used to develop an experimental approach to evaluate the fracture toughness of thin breeder reactor duct materials irradiated at elevated temperatures. Alloy A-286 was chosen for these experiments because the alloy exhibits elastic/plastic behavior and the fracture toughness data of thicker (12 mm) specimens were available for comparison. Technical problems associated with specimen buckling and remote handling were treated in this work. The results are discussed in terms of thickness criterion for plane strain.

  18. Influence of microstructure on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P.P.; Putatunda, S.K. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    1997-07-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of microstructure on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron. Austempered ductile iron (ADI) alloyed with nickel, copper, and molybdenum was austenitized and subsequently austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized through optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and was correlated with the microstructure. The results of the present investigation indicate that the lower bainitic microstructure results in higher fracture toughness than upper bainitic microstructure. Both volume fraction of retained austenite and its carbon content influence the fracture toughness. The retained austenite content of 25 vol pct was found to provide the optimum fracture toughness. It was further concluded that the carbon content of the retained austenite should be as high as possible to improve fracture toughness.

  19. Non-local plasticity effects on fracture toughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2002-01-01

    of the effective plastic strain. Fracture is modelled by a cohesive zone criterion. Results on the numerically obtained stress fields are presented, as well as results on the steady-state fracture toughness. It is shown that the nonlocal theory predicts lower steady-state fracture toughness compared to predictions...

  20. Dynamic fracture toughness of ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K. H.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness vs crack velocity relationships of TiB2 particulate-reinforced SiC-matrix and SiC whisker-reinforced Al2O3-matrix composites were determined at both room temperature and 1200 C with impacted, single-edge notched three-point bend specimens. Rapid crack initiation and propagation were monitored by a laser interferometric-displacement gage system. A FEM model that transmitted the measured outside-impact load to the specimen within the furnace was used to characterize the entire loading system-specimen unit. Small differences were measured between the room temperature and 1200 C dynamic responses.

  1. Time-dependent fracture toughness of cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonsomboon, Khaow; Koh, Ching Theng; Oyen, Michelle L

    2014-06-01

    The fracture and time-dependent properties of cornea are very important for the development of corneal scaffolds and prostheses. However, there has been no systematic study of cornea fracture; time-dependent behavior of cornea has never been investigated in a fracture context. In this work, fracture toughness of cornea was characterized by trouser tear tests, and time-dependent properties of cornea were examined by stress-relaxation and uniaxial tensile tests. Control experiments were performed on a photoelastic rubber sheet. Corneal fracture resistance was found to be strain-rate dependent, with values ranging from 3.39±0.57 to 5.40±0.48kJm(-2) over strain rates from 3 to 300mmmin(-1). Results from stress-relaxation tests confirmed that cornea is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. The cornea behaved closer to a viscous fluid at small strain but became relatively more elastic at larger strain. Although cornea properties are greatly dependent on time, the stress-strain responses of cornea were found to be insensitive to the strain rate when subjected to tensile loading. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fracture Toughness of Vocal Fold Tissue: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Amir K; Chen, Lei Xi; Mongrain, Rosaire; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-05-01

    A customized mechanical tester that slices thin, soft samples was used to measure the fracture toughness of vocal fold tissue. Porcine vocal fold lamina propria was subjected to quasi-static, guillotine-like tests at three equally distanced regions along the anterior-posterior direction. The central one-third where high-velocity collisions between vocal folds occur was found to have the maximum fracture toughness. In contrast, the anterior one-third featured a lower toughness. Fracture toughness can be indicative of the risk of benign and malignant lesions in vocal fold tissue. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fracture Toughness Prediction under Compressive Residual Stress by Using a Stress-Distribution T-Scaling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Meshii

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in the fracture toughness Jc of a material in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature region due to compressive residual stress (CRS was considered in this study. A straightforward fracture prediction was performed for a specimen with mechanical CRS by using the T-scaling method, which was originally proposed to scale the fracture stress distributions between different temperatures. The method was validated for a 780-MPa-class high-strength steel and 0.45% carbon steel. The results showed that the scaled stress distributions at fracture loads without and with CRS are the same, and that Jc improvement was caused by the loss in the one-to-one correspondence between J and the crack-tip stress distribution. The proposed method is advantageous in possibly predicting fracture loads for specimens with CRS by using only the stress–strain relationship, and by performing elastic-plastic finite element analysis, i.e., without performing fracture toughness testing on specimens without CRS.

  4. Identifying Novel Clinical Surrogates to Assess Human Bone Fracture Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-07-01

    Fracture risk does not solely depend on strength but also on fracture toughness; ie, the ability of bone material to resist crack initiation and propagation. Because resistance to crack growth largely depends on bone properties at the tissue level, including collagen characteristics, current X-ray based assessment tools may not be suitable to identify age-related, disease-related, or treatment-related changes in fracture toughness. To identify useful clinical surrogates that could improve the assessment of fracture resistance, we investigated the potential of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and reference point indentation (RPI) to explain age-related variance in fracture toughness. Harvested from cadaveric femurs (62 human donors), single-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens of cortical bone underwent fracture toughness testing (R-curve method). NMR-derived bound water showed the strongest correlation with fracture toughness properties (r = 0.63 for crack initiation, r = 0.35 for crack growth, and r = 0.45 for overall fracture toughness; p toughness properties were best explained by a combination of NMR properties including pore water and RPI-derived tissue stiffness with age as a significant covariate (adjusted R(2)  = 53.3%, 23.9%, and 35.2% for crack initiation, crack growth, and overall toughness, respectively; p toughness and emphasize the utility of a multimodal assessment of fracture resistance. Exploring the mechanistic origin of fracture toughness, glycation-mediated nonenzymatic collagen crosslinks and intracortical porosity are possible determinants of bone fracture toughness and could explain the sensitivity of NMR to changes in fracture toughness. Assuming fracture toughness is clinically important to the ability of bone to resist fracture, our results suggest that improvements in fracture risk assessment could potentially be achieved by accounting for water distribution (quantitative ultrashort echo time magnetic

  5. Statistical analyses of fracture toughness results for two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Haggag, F.M.; Bowman, K.O.; Downing, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Fifth Irradiation Series were to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the transition temperature shift and the shape of the K Ic curve described in Sect. 6 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31% were commercially fabricated in 215-mm-thick plates. Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact, tensile, drop-weight, and compact specimens up to 203.2 mm thick [1T, 2T, 4T, 6T, and 8T C(T)] were tested to provide a large data base for unirradiated material. Similar specimens with compacts up to 4T were irradiated at about 288 degrees C to a mean fluence of about 1.5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV) in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Both linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods were used to analyze all cleavage fracture results and local cleavage instabilities (pop-ins). Evaluation of the results showed that the cleavage fracture toughness values determined at initial pop-ins fall within the same scatter band as the values from failed specimens; thus, they were included in the data base for analysis (all data are designated K Jc )

  6. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Kullberg, Marc L.

    1993-01-01

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro.sub.2 particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K.sub.IC). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 (211) on the ZrO.sub.2 particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO.sub.2 coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K.sub.IC of 4.5 MPa(m).sup.0.5.

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment, Pre-stress and Surface Hardening on Fracture Toughness of Micro-Alloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag Chaudhury, Joydeb

    2014-01-01

    Micro-alloyed steels are being increasingly accepted by industry in various fields of application and are available with a wide variety of microstructures. Extensive literature is available on their microstructure-property relationships. The superior mechanical properties of micro-alloyed steels are caused by fine-grained microstructures and precipitation of micro-alloying elements such as V, Ti and Nb that led to an improvement in yield strength, in the product of tensile strength and total elongation and in Charpy V-notch impact energy as well. The microstructural changes caused by heat treatment or residual stress state caused by surface hardening or mechanical means may influence the fracture toughness of these micro-alloyed steels. It is in this context that the present work begins with experimental determination of quasi-static initiation fracture toughness ( J 1c) of low carbon (0.19%) micro-alloyed steel in as-rolled condition without any heat treatment. The study further explores the effect of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening on fracture toughness of as-rolled steel under study. The normalizing heat treatment, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening—each indicates a positive influence on initiation fracture toughness. Results, when compared, show that cyaniding followed by shot-peening have led to a 2.7 times increase in J 1c. Cyaniding followed by shot-peening may therefore be considered as having the most positive influence on initiation fracture toughness in as-rolled condition for the type of micro-alloyed steel under study. Although initiation fracture toughness is in general known to decrease with increase in yield strength in LEFM arena, the micro-alloyed steel under study when normalized displayed simultaneous improvement in yield strength and J 1c. All these observed effects of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding on initiation fracture toughness (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) were explained

  8. Fracture toughness measurements on zirconia toughened ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sayed Ali, M.; Toft Soerensen, O.

    1986-12-01

    Three techniques for fracture toughness measurements on zirconia toughened ceramics were evaluated: the notched beam (NB) technique, the indentation fracture (IF) technique and the indentation strength in bending (ISB) technique. Using these techniques comparative measurements were performed on samples prepared by pressing (uniaxial) and sintering of four commercially available powder types. These were: Toya Soda (Japan) powders with the designations TZ3Y (2.86 mole% Y 2 O 3 ), TZ3YA (2.77 mole% Y 2 O 3 , 0.1 wt% Al 2 O 3 ) and TZ3Y20A (2.88 mole% Y 2 O 3 , 20 wt.% Al 2 O 3 ) and a powder supplied by Viking Chemicals (Denmark) designated as YP5Z-2.5 (2.5 mole% Y 2 O 3 ). The measurements showed that similar K Ic values were obtained with the IF- and ISB-techniques, which therefore are recommended for K Ic measurements. Too high values were, however, obtained with the NB-technique which therefore cannot be recommended. Finally, the measurements showed that a high temperature annealing is recommended prior to testing for the IF-technique. (author)

  9. An evaluation of fracture toughness of bituminous coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathan, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    The role of fracture mechanics in the design of rock structures is vitally important. However, because of the complexities of rock structures and lack of understanding of the fundamentals of the failure mechanism, it has become customary to use the engineering properties approach in the design of stable rock structures. Recently considerable attention has been given and attempts are being made to apply the fracture mechanics approach to the design of safe mining structures. In mining engineering the fracture mechanics may be applied to calculate the formation of fracture zones around mine opening, thus estimating support requirements and formulating guide lines for the selection of mine roadway support system. The research work presented here is concerned with the evaluation of fracture toughness of coal under laboratory conditions. Diametral compression test method is used to determine the fracture toughness parameter of coal in the opening model failure. The effect of crack length and dimensionless crack length on the fracture toughness was studied also. A laboratory investigation of fracture toughness of coal in tensile mode failure has led to the conclusion that fracture toughness could be treated as a material property. (author)

  10. Characterization of fracture toughness exhaustion in pig aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Boby; Gaillard, Emmanuel; Mongrain, Rosaire; Reiter, Steven; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the aorta (SRA) without aneurysm, dissection, inflammation or infection of the aortic wall can be of two types: traumatic and non-traumatic. SRA is most of the time a fatal event. Consequently, it is important to understand the conditions which lead to the aortic rupture, and, in the case of non-traumatic SRA, to predict the temporal likelihood of rupture. The present work incorporates the temporal aspect by examining the effects of fatigue on aortic wall properties, and adopts an energy approach, based on fracture toughness, to evaluate the aorta's resistance to rupture. Fracture toughness characterization is a destructive testing process and as a consequence cannot be implemented as a clinical tool. However, using concepts in damage mechanics, in theory, it should be possible to indirectly assess fracture toughness from other mechanical properties, such as aortic wall stiffness. Tissue samples from non-aneurysmal porcine aortas were fatigued and were subjected to both biaxial and guillotine tests to assess wall stiffness variations and fracture toughness exhaustion, respectively. The experiments reveal that aortic wall stiffness variations and fracture toughness exhaustion decreased as a function of loading cycles and can be modeled with exponential functions. After one million loading cycles, the stiffness ratio between the non-fatigued sample and the fatigued sample, dropped to about 0.85, while the fracture toughness ratio counterpart fell to about 0.80. Consequently, the changes in both stiffness and fracture toughness as a function of applied fatigue cycles can be measured in aortic tissues. Moreover, these results suggest the possibility to use fracture toughness exhaustion curves as a fatigue criterion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fracture toughness of oxide-dispersion strengthened copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The fracture toughness of an oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloy AL-15 has been examined at room temperature and 250{degrees}C, in air and in vacuum (< 10{sup {minus}6} torr). Increasing test temperature causes a significant decrease in the fracture toughness of this material, in either air or vacuum environments. In addition, specimens oriented in the T-L orientation (crack growth parallel to the extrusion direction) show significantly lower toughness than those in the L-T orientation (crack growth perpendicular to the extrusion direction).

  12. Fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with a semi-elliptical surface crack using elastic-plastic FEM-calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.; Brocks, W.; Noack, D.; Veith, H.

    1983-01-01

    A three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis for stresses and strains in a pressure vessel containing two semi-elliptical surface cracks was carried out by finite element (FE) method. Results for stress distribution, spreading of plastic zones and crack opening displacements are presented and discussed. The variation of the stress intensity factor along the crack front as gained from a linear elastic FE-analysis is compared with solutions of various authors. First, the FE results are discussed according to the stress intensity concept using a plastic zone correction for small scale yielding. A Ksub(Ic) of 6900 Nmmsup(-3/2) for an operating temperature of 314 K, which was taken from the ASME code, resulted in a critical pressure of 280 bar. If the zone correction is done with plane stress approximations of IRWIN and DUGDALE, just slightly lower critical values are gained. Introducing the same two dimensional models in the COD concept gives far too conservative estimations for the critical pressure, whereas the plane strain solution agrees quite well with the FE computations. All together, the COD concept is very sensitive to different methods of determining delta. (orig.)

  13. Fracture analysis of a presure vessel with a semi-elliptical surface crack by three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.; Brocks, W.; Noack, D.; Veith, H.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis for stresses and strains in a pressure vessel containing two semi-elliptical surface cracks was carried out by finite element (FE) method. Results for stress distribution, spreading of plastic zones and crack opening displacements are presented and discussed. The variation of the stress intensity factor along the crack front as gained from a linear elastic FE-analysis is compared with solutions of various authors. First, the FE results are discussed according to the stress intensity concept using a plastic zone correction for small scale yielding. A Ksub(Ic) of 6900 Nmm -3 / 2 for an operating temperature of 314 K, which was taken from the ASME code, resulted in a critical pressure of 280 bar. If the zone correction is done with plane stress approximations of IRWIN and DUGDALE, just slightly lower critical values are gained. Introducing the same two dimensional models in the COD concept gives far too conservative estimations for the critical pressure, whereas the plane strain solution agrees quite well with the FE computations. All together, the COD concept is very sensitive to different methods of determining delta. (orig.) [de

  14. On the possibility of estimating the fracture toughness of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Giráldez, Isabel; Ceballos, Laura; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    There are many works that have attempted to estimate the fracture toughness of enamel by indentation techniques using equations whose success in determining the actual value of fracture toughness, rely on a particular three-dimensional pattern consisting of cracks growing from the edges of the indentation. Recently, an alternative methodology based on an energetic approach has been developed to estimate the fracture toughness of coatings by depth sensing indentation that is not less affected by the cracks pattern generated. In this work, the energetic approach to indentation fracture toughness of bovine enamel is presented and compared with those toughness values obtained using the traditional expressions reported in the literature. Indentation tests were carried out using a diamond Berkovich indenter onto the enamel surface of eight incisors from bovines of two years old. A continuous stiffness measurement methodology was used with a frequency of 45 Hz and displacement amplitude of 2 nm up to a maximum penetration depth of 2000 nm. The results showed that some modifications in the energetic methodology should be performed in order to apply it successfully. The fracture toughness values obtained using the traditional equation and applying the energetic methodology, were significantly different, although the values were within the range obtained by other authors. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New unified fracture toughness estimation scheme for structural integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, K.; Nevasmaa, P. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Bannister, A. [Research and Development, British Steel plc., Swinden Technology Centre Rotherham (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    At present, treatment of fracture toughness data varies depending on the type of data (K{sub IC}, J, CTOD) that are available for fracture mechanics analysis. This complicates structural integrity assessment and makes it difficult to apply any single, unified procedure. Within the Brite-Euram project `SINTAP` a fracture toughness estimation scheme has been developed for the unified treatment of data for use in structural integrity assessment. As a procedure, it can be applied to Charpy data, as well as to fracture toughness data, and is suitable for the treatment of data at both single and different temperatures. The data sets may contain results from both homogeneous and inhomogeneous material, making the procedure applicable also to welded joints. The procedure allows fracture toughness assessment with quantified probability and confidence levels. Irrespective of the type of the original data, one material-specific K{sub mat} value representing a conservative estimate of the mean fracture toughness is obtained (with its probability distribution). This information can then be applied to structural integrity assessment. (orig.) 4 refs.

  16. Experimental fracture toughness characterization using the modified TSD specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Alonso, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    The modified Tilted Sandwich Debond (TSD) specimen provides an improved methodology for characterization of the face/core fracture resistance. An experimental mixed mode characterization of the fracture toughness spanning a large range of phase angles has been achieved by specific steel bar...

  17. Observations in Fracture Toughness Testing of Glasses and Optical Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Fracture toughness is a critical structural design parameter and an excellent metrics to rank materials. Itdetermines fracture strength by way of the flaws, both inherent and induced, and defines the endpoint of the slow crackgrowth curve. The fracture toughness of structural and optical ceramics, and glasses as measured by several techniques is compared. When good metrology is employed, the results are very comparable with two exceptions: materials exhibiting crack growth resistance and those with a low SCG exponents. For materials with R-curves, the result is a function of extension and can be minimized with short cracks. For materials with low SCG exponents, such as glasses, elimination of the corrosive media andor increasing the stress intensity rate minimizes effects. A summary of values is given, and it appears that highly modified glasses exhibit lower fracture toughness and slow crack growth exponent than high purity glasses such as fused silica.

  18. The fracture toughness of Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picker, C.

    This paper describes the results of fracture toughness tests on Type 316 steel and Manual Metal Arc (MMA) weld metal over a range of temperatures from 20 deg. C to 550 deg. C, and includes the effects on toughness of specimen size, post weld heat treatment and thermal ageing. The conclusions reached are that Type 316 steel possesses a superior toughness to the weld metal in the as-welded or stress relieved conditions but the toughness of the steel is degraded to a level similar to that of the weld metal following thermal ageing at temperatures over 600 deg. C. Relatively short term thermal ageing in the temperature range 370 deg. C to 450 deg. C does not appear to affect the toughness of either Type 316 steel or weld metal. (author)

  19. Strength and fracture toughness of zirconia dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turon-Vinas, Miquel; Anglada, Marc

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to determine and discuss the correlation between the fracture toughness and the fracture stress in zirconia transforming ceramics with a small artificial crack. As an R-curve behaviour is usually present in transforming ceramics for both small and long cracks, predictions of the fracture stress can only be done with an accurate knowledge of the R-curve and crack dimensions. First, basic concepts of fracture mechanics, strength and testing of ceramic materials are introduced. This is followed by a very brief introduction to zirconia dental ceramics and to strength degradation by hydrothermal ageing of 3Y-TZP. Fracture toughness of 3Y-TZP and 12Ce-TZP are then determined for a short (∼50μm) sharp edge crack produced by ultra short pulsed laser ablation on prismatic bending bars in four point bending. The crack size is small but large enough for controlling fracture and for applying elastic fracture mechanics. In both materials the determined fracture toughness is similar, in spite of their difference R-curves. The results of fracture toughness and fracture stress are analysed by using a simple function to represent the R-curve, but which contains the main ingredients of experimental R-curves extracted from the literature either for short or long cracks in 12Ce-TZP. It is concluded that the high R-curves reported in the literature for long and short cracks in 12Ce-TZP and 3Y-TZP might have only a marginal influence on the fracture resistance with cracks of the size studied. This effect is of more significance in 12Ce-TZP. The use of an ideal and simple model of R-curve is presented as a useful guide to predict whether the fracture stress will be enhanced by an existent R-curve. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of texture on fracture toughness of zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, V.; Andersson, Stefan

    1997-06-01

    The correlation between texture and fracture toughness of Zircaloy 2 cladding has been investigated in connection with axial cracks in fuel rods. The texture of the cladding determines the anisotropy of plasticity of the cladding which, in turn, should influence the strain conditions at the crack-tip. Plastic strains in the cladding under uniaxial tension were characterised by means of the anisotropy constants F, G and H calculated according to Hill's theory. Test temperatures between 20 and 300 deg C do not influence the F, G and H values. Any significant effect of hydrogen (about 500 wtppm) on the anisotropy constants F, G and H has not been revealed at a test temperature of 300 deg C. The results, obtained for stress-relieved and recrystallized cladding with different texture, show an obvious influence of texture on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy cladding. A higher fracture toughness has been found for cladding with more radial texture

  1. Fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman; Koksal, Sakip; Yilmaz, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    In this study, fracture toughness properties of boronized ductile iron were investigated. Boronizing was realized in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon. Boronizing heat treatment was carried out between 850 and 950 deg. C under the atmospheric pressure for 2-8 h. Borides e.g. FeB, Fe 2 B formed on ductile iron was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, SEM and optical microscope. Experimental results revealed that longer boronizing time resulted in thicker boride layers. Optical microscope cross-sectional observation of borided layers showed dentricular morphology. Both microhardness and fracture toughness of borided surfaces were measured via Vickers indenter. The harnesses of borides formed on the ductile iron were in the range of 1160-2140 HV 0.1 and fracture toughness were in the range of 2.19-4.47 MPa m 1/2 depending on boronizing time and temperature

  2. The effect of specimen and flaw dimensions on fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevalainen, M.J. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-06-01

    The effect of the specimen size and geometry on fracture toughness has been investigated both by experimental tests and computational analyses. The methods for constraint description, namely T-stress, Q-parameter and Small-Scale Yielding Correction (SSYC) have been compared and applied for various geometries. A statistical treatment for the specimen thickness effect on cleavage fracture toughness has been investigated. Elliptical surface cracks were compared with straight-thickness cracks and a method for crack shape correction was presented. Based on the results, the differences in apparent fracture toughness values obtained from various specimen configurations can be better understood and taken into account. 64 refs. The thesis includes also four previous publications by author.

  3. Interfacial fracture toughness of aged adhesive-dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Poitevin, André; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2015-04-01

    To assess interfacial fracture toughness of different adhesive approaches and compare to a standard micro-tensile bond-strength (μTBS) test after 6 months water storage. Chevron-notched beam fracture toughness (CNB) was determined using a modified ISO 24370:2005 standard. Adhesive-dentin micro-specimens (1.0 mm × 1.0 mm × 8-10 mm) were stressed in tensile until failure to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS). The highest mean μTBS and interfacial fracture toughness were measured for the multi-step adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Noritake) and OptiBond FL (Kerr). While large differences were observed in the bond strength values (from 7.4 to 27.2 MPa) of the one-step self-etch adhesives tested, interfacial fracture toughness was less different (from 0.7 to 1.0 MPam(1/2)). The adhesive with the lowest mean toughness (All-bond Universal, Bisco) had however the highest Weibull reliability, which might be a better parameter in regard to more consistent clinical performance. The self-adhesive composite Vertise Flow (Kerr) scored significantly lower at all levels. Although the ranking of the adhesives tested using CNB and μTBS corresponded well, the outcome of CNB appeared more reliable and less variable. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fracture Toughness of Ceramics Fired at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter SIN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The fracture toughness test was performed at room temperature on sets of 5 ceramic samples made from material for high voltage insulators (kaolin 36 wt. %, Al2O3 30 wt. %, clay 12 wt. % and feldspar 22 wt. % fired at temperatures 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1100, 1200, 1250, 1300, 1400, 1500 °C at heating and cooling rate of 5 °C/min. The precrack was made to each sample by indentation under the loads 10 N – 200 N, the dwell time was 45 s and the loading rate was 10 N/s. Results of the fracture toughness tests were in accordance with changes of structure of the samples after the partial firings. Fracture toughness from 20 °C to 500 °C is almost constant and it varies between 0.1 MPa·m0.5and 0.2 MPa·m0.5. Dehydroxylation (420 °C – 600 °C does not influence the value of fracture toughness. At temperature interval where we assume sintering (700 °C – 1250 °C we observe exponential dependence of fracture toughness up to 1.5 MPa·m0.5. From comparison of the fracture toughness, Young’s modulus and flexural strength follows a correlation and proporcionality of these mechanical properties.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1349

  5. 75 FR 72653 - Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... RIN 3150-AI01 Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal... Regulations (10 CFR) part 50, section 61a to provide alternate fracture toughness requirements for protection...

  6. Photonics and fracture toughness of heterogeneous composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, S Joseph; Okeke, George; Tokgoz, D Deniz; Ozerkan, N Gozde

    2017-07-03

    Fracture toughness measures the resistance of a material to fracture. This fundamental property is used in diverse engineering designs including mechanical, civil, materials, electronics and chemical engineering applications. In spite of the advancements made in the past 40 years, the evaluation of this remains challenging for extremely heterogeneous materials such as composite concretes. By taking advantage of the optical properties of a thin birefringent coating on the surface of opaque, notched composite concrete beams, here we sense the evolution of the maximum shear stress distribution on the beams under loading. The location of the maximum deviator stress is tracked ahead of the crack tip on the experimental concrete samples under the ultimate load, and hence the effective crack length is characterised. Using this, the fracture toughness of a number of heterogeneous composite beams is evaluated and the results compare favourably well with other conventional methods using combined experimental and numerical/analytical approaches. Finally a new model, correlating the optically measured shear stress concentration factor and flexural strength with the fracture toughness of concretes is proposed. The current photonics-based study could be vital in evaluating the fracture toughness of even opaque and complex heterogeneous materials more effectively in future.

  7. Importance of tubule density to the fracture toughness of dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, C; Arola, D; Ossa, E A

    2016-07-01

    The fracture toughness of dentin is critical to the prevention of tooth fracture. Within the tooth crown, the mechanical properties of dentin are influenced by spatial variations in the density and diameter of the dentin tubules with distance from the pulp. There are also relevant changes to the microstructure of dentin with age. In this investigation the importance of tubule density to the fracture toughness of dentin was evaluated in "young" and "old" age groups. The variations in microstructure (density and diameter of tubules) from young and old donor teeth were studied by means of optical microscopy. A reduction in the density and diameter of tubules was identified to occur with aging. An approach previously proposed to study the mechanical behavior of porous materials was used to model the fracture toughness of coronal dentin in terms of the tubule characteristics. Results were then compared with published results from previous studies. The model predictions were consistent with experimental results for the fracture toughness of dentin from young donor teeth, but overestimated the values that have been reported for "old" dentin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fracture toughness of steel--aluminum deformation welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, C.E.

    1978-11-01

    A study of the fracture toughness (in this case, G/sub Ic/) of steel--aluminum deformation welds using a specially developed double cantilever beam fracture toughness specimen is presented. Welds made at 350 0 C were heat treated at 360, 380, 400, 420, and 440 0 C. An intermetallic reaction product layer of Fe 2 Al 5 is formed at the steel--aluminum interface with increasing heat treating temperature and time by a process of nucleation and growth of discrete particles. A transition in toughness from a higher average G/sub Ic/ value (6097 N/m) to a very low average G/sub Ic/ value (525 N/m) is observed. The decrease in toughness is accompanied by an increase in Fe 2 Al 5 particle diameter from 4 to 8 μm. Failure at the higher toughness values is characterized by ductile rupture through the aluminum. At the lower toughness values, failure occurs between the aluminum and the Fe 2 Al 5 reaction product layer. A void layer forming by a vacancy condensation mechanism in the aluminum adjacent to the Fe 2 Al 5 is shown to cause the embrittlement

  9. Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal aging

    KAUST Repository

    Quispe, Gustavo Q.

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal ageing Gustavo Quino Quispe The aim of this work is to characterize the e ects of hygrothermal aging in the plain strain fracture toughness of the epoxy system composed by cycloaliphatic epoxy resin and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA). For this, after having been under hygrothermal aging in a climatic chamber, epoxy samples were studied using ASTM D5045 fracture toughness test, and micrography and roughness measurements of the fracture surface. It is reported a rapid decrease of GIc and KIc during the rst 2 days. Moreover, a numerical model [13] was used to simulate and see with more detail the water absorption in the aged samples. From that, it was observed the heterogeneous distribution of water. Accordingly, it was proposed that the results should be correlated with the water content at the vicinity of the crack tip. Consequently, it was possible to obtain, by quasi-static simulations, the ideal load-displacement curves of crack propagation in the heterogeneous samples. Finally, another contribution of this work is the study of the fracture surface, that gives a clue of the relationship among the fracture energy, the appearance of microcracks in the fracture surface, and the roughness (Ra).

  10. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  11. Fracture toughness of mountain gorilla (Gorilla gorilla beringei) food plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart-Berry, Alison

    2004-04-01

    Mountain gorillas, the largest extant primates, subsist almost entirely on plant matter. Moreover, their diet includes a substantial amount of structural material, such as bark and stems, which other primates tend to avoid. Accordingly, the robust masticatory apparatus of gorillas may be adaptive to this presumably tough diet; however, quantitative information on this subject is lacking. In this study the fracture toughness of mountain gorilla foods was examined for the first time. Samples of 44 food plants from Bwindi-Impenetrable National Park (BINP) and Mgahinga Gorilla National Park (MGNP) were tested. These parks are inhabited by two gorilla populations that regarded by some as being distinct at the subspecific taxonomic level. Although food toughness did not differ between the two populations, both diets contained tough items. Tree barks were the toughest food items (varying from 0.23 to 8.2 kJ/m2), followed by shrub barks, pith, and stems. The toughness of leaves and fruit was negligible compared to that of bark. The toughness of bamboo was low in comparison to the toughest food items. Accordingly, the prominent toughness of bark, pith, and stems may be key factors in the evolution of orofacial robusticity in mountain gorillas. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Specimen size effects on the tensile strength and fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teran, J.; Gonzalez, J. L.; Hallen, J. M.; Martinez, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an experimental research was conducted to determine size and orientation effects on tension and toughness properties through CTOD-R curves, using standard and miniature specimens taken from a structural steel plate.Compliance function estimation for the miniature size sample through load-displacement curves was considered. Experimental and statistical results showed that size and orientation affect tensioned toughness properties. The miniature tension test specimens showed strength values slightly greater than the standard ones but with less ductility. Miniature specimen CTOD-R curves showed sensibility to load changes and measurement method of crack aperture and crack length. Inconsistency in fracture toughness for specimen orientation longitudinal circumferential (LC) regarding size effect was also observed. Short orientations showed less strength and toughness than the other directions. (Author) 27 refs

  13. 75 FR 10410 - Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 RIN 3150-AI01 Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against... (75 FR 13), that amends the NRC's regulations to provide alternate fracture toughness requirements for... adding Table 7 directly after Table 6 to read as follows: Sec. 50.61a Alternate fracture toughness...

  14. Influence of ageing on the quasistatic fracture toughness of an SS 316(N) weld at ambient and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasikala, G.; Ray, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    The leak before break analysis of SS 316L(N) components of the prototype fast breeder reactor requires the elastic plastic fracture toughness parameter J for 0.2 mm crack extension, J 0.2 , especially for the welds, at the operating temperatures. The J-R curves for the welds produced using the consumable developed by Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, were determined in the as-welded condition as well as after thermal ageing (923 K/4200 h) conditions at 298 K and 643 K, using unloading compliance method for 298 K and normalization method for 643 K. The aged material exhibited pop-in crack extensions of magnitudes that, according to ASTM E1820 standard, could be ignored for multi-specimen data analysis for determining J 0.2 . Therefore, for this condition, J nom -Δa curves were established using the multiple specimen method and also single specimen normalization method; for the latter, a modification earlier developed by the authors for accounting for small pop-in crack extensions was used. The value of J 0.2 from both methods showed excellent reproducibility. Ageing is seen to reduce the toughness of this material considerably at both the testing temperatures.

  15. Prediction of fracture toughness temperature dependence applying neural network

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Hadraba, Hynek; Chlup, Zdeněk; Šmída, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2011), s. 9-14 ISSN 1451-3749 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/0466 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : brittle to ductile transition * fracture toughness * artificial neural network * steels Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  16. On the in vitro fracture toughness of human dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbeni, V.; Nalla, R.K.; Bosi, C.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-02-05

    The in vitro fracture toughness of human dention has been reported to be of the order of 3 MPa sqrt m. This result, however is based on a single study for a single orientation, and furthermore involves notched, rather than fatigue precracked, test samples.

  17. Effect of thermal aging on fracture toughness of RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukakura, Juichi; Ishikawa, Masaaki

    1993-01-01

    The effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties and fracture toughness was investigated on pressure vessel steel of light water reactors. Submerged arc welded plates of ASME SA508 C1.3 steel were isothermally aged at 350 C, 400 C and 450 C for up to 10,000 hrs. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness testings were conducted on the base metal and the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) material to evaluate whether thermal aging induced by the plant operation is critical for the integrity of the pressure vessel or not. Tensile properties of the base metal was not changed by thermal aging as far as the thermal aging conditions were concerned. Relatively distinct degradation was observed in fracture toughness and J-resistance properties of both the base metal and the weld HAZ material, while only slight changes were observed in Charpy impact properties for both of them. However, it was concluded that the effect of thermal aging estimated by 40-80 years of plant operation on fracture toughness of both materials is small. (orig.)

  18. Fracture toughness of ultra high performance concrete by flexural performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolova Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the fracture toughness of the innovative structural material - Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC, evaluated by flexural performance. For determination the material behaviour by static loading are used adapted standard test methods for flexural performance of fiber-reinforced concrete (ASTM C 1609 and ASTM C 1018. Fracture toughness is estimated by various deformation parameters derived from the load-deflection curve, obtained by testing simple supported beam under third-point loading, using servo-controlled testing system. This method is used to be estimated the contribution of the embedded fiber-reinforcement into improvement of the fractural behaviour of UHPC by changing the crack-resistant capacity, fracture toughness and energy absorption capacity with various mechanisms. The position of the first crack has been formulated based on P-δ (load- deflection response and P-ε (load - longitudinal deformation in the tensile zone response, which are used for calculation of the two toughness indices I5 and I10. The combination of steel fibres with different dimensions leads to a composite, having at the same time increased crack resistance, first crack formation, ductility and post-peak residual strength.

  19. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT's truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m(0.5), typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene.

  20. Effect of accelerated aging on the fracture toughness of zirconias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kosuke; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Hatano, Yasuo; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2016-02-01

    Low temperature degradation (LTD) of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) is of concern. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of accelerated aging on the Vickers hardness and fracture toughness of a newly developed Y-TZP and 2 primary Y-TZPs. Two primary 3 mol% Y-TZP, Lava (LA), Everest Zirconium Soft (EV), and a new 3 mol% Y-TZP, ZirTough (NZ) were assessed. Specimens (n=30 each brand) of 10 × 10 × 3 mm were hydrothermally treated for accelerated aging to examine LTD. Five conditions were used (n = 5 per condition) as follows: control group (no aging); 5 hours at 134°C/0.2 MPa (5h-134°C); 100 hours at 134°C/0.2 MPa (100 h-134°C); 5 hours at 180°C/1.0 MPa (5 h-180°C); and 20 hours at 180°C/1.0 MPa (20 h-180°C). Fracture toughness was measured by using the indentation fracture (IF) method under a loading of 294 N and calculated from the obtained measurements. To observe differences in particle composition and fracture patterns, mirror-polished test specimens (n=5 each brand) were re-sintered at 1200°C for 1 hour as a thermal etching process, and a Vickers indenter was pressed into the test specimens according to the IF method. Test piece surfaces and cracks were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One-way ANOVA and the post- hoc (Scheffé test were used to examine) interlevel significant differences (α=.05). The Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were as follows: 1319 HV and 7.36 MPa · m(1/2) for LA, and 1371 HV and 6.76 MPa · m(1/2) for EV in no aging; 1334 HV and 7.02 MPa · m(1/2) for LA, and 1346 HV and 6.07 MPa · m(1/2) for EV in 5h-134°C. No significant differences were found between no aging and 5h-134°C for LA and EV for Vickers hardness and fracture toughness. Measurements could not be made for LA and EV for 100 h-134°C, 5h-180°C, or 20 h-180°C because of fractures in the surface layer. For NZ, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were as follows: 1261 HV and 15.60 MPa

  1. Fracture Behavior of Silica- and Rubber-Nanoparticle-Toughed Epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labak, Amelia K.

    Particle-toughened crosslinked epoxies are popular materials for a variety of applications, including the microelectronics industry. For this application, the properties of these materials, such as a high fracture toughness and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, are highly appealing. In order to achieve these properties, inorganic particles are often added into the matrix. For this study, both inorganic and organic particles-toughened epoxies are investigated in the hopes of finding an optimized system. In particular, in this study, micron-sized silica and nano-sized rubbery block copolymers are added to an amine-cured epoxy matrix. A series of rubber-only and silica-only systems are investigated for their contribution to the fracture toughness. Then, a series of hybrid systems are investigated. The hypothesis is that the rubber will contribute toughness through rubber particle cavitation and matrix void growth and the silica will contribute toughness through crack pinning and bridging and particle debonding. In the hybrid systems, these mechanisms will take place at a different scale. Therefore, the nanoscale mechanisms of the rubber will be able to function at the same time as the micron sized mechanisms of the silica and the resultant toughness will be synergistically higher. The results from this study show an interesting contribution from the rubber particles both in the rubber-only systems and the hybrid system. Ultimately, there was a marked increase in the fracture toughness of the hybrid systems, although not synergistic. This increase indicates that it would be possible to create an optimized hybrid system from the combined addition of these particles.

  2. The loss of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) reduces bone toughness and fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Wadeer, Sandra A; Whitehead, Jack M; Rowland, Barbara J; Granke, Mathilde; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Yang, Xiangli; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-05-01

    Even though age-related changes to bone tissue affecting fracture risk are well characterized, only a few matrix-related factors have been identified as important to maintaining fracture resistance. As a gene critical to osteoblast differentiation, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is possibly one of these important factors. To test the hypothesis that the loss of ATF4 affects the fracture resistance of bone beyond bone mass and structure, we harvested bones from Atf4+/+ and Atf4-/- littermates at 8 and 20 weeks of age (n≥9 per group) for bone assessment across several length scales. From whole bone mechanical tests in bending, femurs from Atf4-/- mice were found to be brittle with reduced toughness and fracture toughness compared to femurs from Atf4+/+ mice. However, there were no differences in material strength and in tissue hardness, as determined by nanoindentation, between the genotypes, irrespective of age. Tissue mineral density of the cortex at the point of loading as determined by micro-computed tomography was also not significantly different. However, by analyzing local composition by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), bone tissue of Atf4-/- mice was found to have higher mineral to collagen ratio compared to wild-type tissue, primarily at 20 weeks of age. From RS analysis of intact femurs at 2 orthogonal orientations relative to the polarization axis of the laser, we also found that the organizational-sensitive peak ratio, ν1Phosphate per Amide I, changed to a greater extent upon bone rotation for Atf4-deficient tissue, implying bone matrix organization may contribute to the brittleness phenotype. Target genes of ATF4 activity are not only important to osteoblast differentiation but also in maintaining bone toughness and fracture toughness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Relationships between fracture toughness and other material properties. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perra, M.; Finnie, I.

    1974-01-01

    The key experimental and analytical studies which have led to our present understanding of the mechanisms of ductile fracture are reviewed. It is concluded that insufficient progress has been made in the quantitative description of ductile separation mechanisms on a microscale to allow the realistic prediction of fracture toughness from material properties and microstructure. An experimental study of ductile fracture is underway which has the aim of determining the growth rate of voids in known plastic deformation fields as a function of triaxiality of stress and material work-hardening. Novel specimens of particularly well characterized microstructure are utilized

  4. Fracture toughness of heat-pressed and layered ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Richard; Flinn, Brian; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Mancl, Lloyd; Ishibe, Motoaki; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2013-04-01

    Veneering ceramic materials designed to be used with high noble alloy and zirconia-based restorations have been reported to be susceptible to chipping in vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the fracture toughness of heat-pressed and layered ceramics intended for zirconia and high-noble alloy substrates. Bar specimens were fabricated from 8 different ceramics (Ivoclar-Vivadent [I] and Noritake [N]) intended for pressing (P) and layering (L) to high noble alloy (M) and zirconia (Z) substrates, following the ISO 6872 protocol. The single edge notch beam test method was used to create a notch in the center of each specimen, which was then tested with a universal testing machine (n=6, cross-head speed=0.5 mm/min) and the fracture force values recorded. These values were used to calculate the fracture toughness (K1c) for each specimen. Fracture surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope, and the basic components of the tested ceramics were determined by using energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA, followed by multiple comparisons using the Holm method (α=.05). The mean (SD) of the calculated fracture toughness values obtained ranged from 1.20 (0.04) MPa·m(1/2) (group NZL) to 1.74 (0.04) MPa·m(1/2) (group IZL). Fracture toughness was significantly higher in group IZL (1.74) than group IZP (1.41), but lower in group NZL (1.20) than group NZP (1.36) (Pceramics used with a metal substrate showed a crystalline structure mixed with a glassy phase pattern on the fracture surface. The results of EDX analysis on the fracture surfaces indicated that the tested ceramics were composed of Si, Al, K, Na, Mg, and oxygen elements. Ceramics used for veneering zirconia substrate may have various fracture toughness values that relate primarily to the processing technique. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of WWER-1000 vessel materials fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinik, Eh.U.; Revka, V.N.; Chirko, L.I.; Chajkovskij, Yu.V.

    2007-01-01

    The lifetime of WWER-1000-type reactor vessels is finally conditioned by the fracture toughness (crack growth resistance) of RPV materials. Up to now in line with the regulations the fracture toughness is characterized by the critical temperature of brittleness determined by the results of the Charpy specimen impact testing. Such approach is typical for all countries operating the water pressure reactors. However, regulatory approach is known from the western specialists not always to characterize adequately the crack growth resistance of the vessel materials and in some cases to underestimate their characteristics in the reference state that leads to unreasonably high conservatism. Excessive conservatism may lead to the invalid restrictions in the operating modes and the service life of the reactor vessel. Therefore there appeared the necessity to apply another approaches based on the state-of-the-art experimental methods of the fracture mechanics and allowing evaluating the fracture toughness parameters sufficiently. The paper presents the results of the comparison of the regulatory approach and the Master curve approach from the point of view of the adequate determination of the vessel material crack growth resistance parameters. Analysis of the experimental data of the surveillance specimens illustrated the potential possibility of applying the new statistical method for the WWER-1000- type reactor vessel lifetime extension

  6. Single specimen fracture toughness determination procedure using instrumented impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1993-04-01

    In the study a new single specimen test method and testing facility for evaluating dynamic fracture toughness has been developed. The method is based on the application of a new pendulum type instrumented impact tester equipped with and optical crack mouth opening displacement (COD) extensometer. The fracture toughness measurement technique uses the Double Displacement Ratio (DDR) method, which is based on the assumption that the specimen is deformed as two rigid arms that rotate around an apparent centre of rotation. This apparent moves as the crack grows, and the ratio of COD versus specimen displacement changes. As a consequence the onset ductile crack initiation can be detected on the load-displacement curve. Thus, an energy-based fracture toughness can be calculated. In addition the testing apparatus can use specimens with the Double ligament size as compared with the standard Charpy specimen which makes the impact testing more appropriate from the fracture mechanics point of view. The novel features of the testing facility and the feasibility of the new DDR method has been verified by performing an extensive experimental and analytical study. (99 refs., 91 figs., 27 tabs.)

  7. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  8. Size Effect in Fracture Toughness Determination of Brittle Matreials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, - (2006), s. 101-106 ISSN 1662-0356. [CIMTEC 2006. Intrenational Ceramics Congress /11./. Acireale, 04.06.2006-09.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 854; GA ČR GP106/05/P119 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : fracture toughness * ceramics * straight-notch technique Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  9. Fracture toughness evaluation of circumferentially-cracked round bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scibetta, M.

    1996-05-01

    The measure of the fracture toughness of a circumferentially-cracked round bar is generally performed through approximate formulae. Comparison of existing formulae to finite element results does not always show good agreement. Therefore an eta factor is introduced in order to improve the existing analytical formula. The axisymmetrical geometry is generally considered to be a high constrained geometry. Finite element calculations are performed to verify and quantify the constraint relative to the three point bending configuration (precracked Charpy)

  10. Improving Fracture Toughness of Epoxy Nanocomposites by Silica Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Akherati Sany

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An epoxy resin was modified by silica nanoparticles and cured with an anhydride. The particles with different batches of 12, 20, and 40 nm sizes were each distributed into the epoxy resin ultrasonically. Electron microscopy images showed that the silica particles were well dispersed throughout the resin. Tensile test results showed that Young’s modulus and tensile strength increased with the volume fraction and surface area of the silica particles. The simultaneous use of two average sizes of 20 and 40 nm diameter silica particles still increased these mechanical properties but other combinations of silica particles were unsuccessful. A three-point bending test on each pre-cracked specimen was performed to measure the mode I fracture toughness energy. The fracture energy increased from 283 J/m2 for the unmodified epoxy to about 740 J/m2 for the epoxy with 4.5 wt% of 12 nm diameter silica nanoparticles. The fracture energy of smaller particles was greater because of their higher surface to volume ratio. The fracture energy results showed also that the combined nanoparticles has a synergic effect on the fracture toughness of nanocomposites. Simultaneous use of 10 and 20 nm particles increased the fracture energy to about 770 J/m2. Finally, crack-opening displacement was calculated and found to be in the range of several micrometers which was much larger than the sizes of particles studied. Thus, the toughening mechanisms of crack pinning and crack deflection have a negligible effect on improvement of toughness, nevertheless, the plastic deformation and plastic void growth are dominant mechanisms in epoxy toughening by nanoparticles.

  11. Crack and fracture behaviour in tough ductile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, R.D.; Hoeppner, D.W.

    1985-10-01

    The report describes various approaches and developments pertaining to the understanding of crack and fracture behaviour in tough ductile materials. The fundamental elastic fracture mechanics concepts based on the concepts of energy, stress field, and displacement are introduced and their interrelationships demonstrated. The extension of these concepts to include elasto-plastic fracture mechanics considerations is reviewed in the context of the preferred options available for the development of appropriate design methodologies. The recommendations of the authors are directed towards the continued development of the J-integral concept. This energy-based concept, in its fundamental form, has a sound theoretical basis and as such offers the possibility of incorporating elasto-plastic fracture mechanics considerations in the crack and fracture behaviour of tough ductile materials. It must however be emphasized that the concise defintion of J becomes increasingly suspect as the crack length increases. J is not a material property, as is J IC , but emerges as a useful empirical parameter which is dependent upon the particular geometry and the loading imposed on the structure. It is proposed that 'lowest bound' J-resistance curves and the associated J-T curves be experimentally developed and employed in the design process. Improvements to these 'lowest bounds' can be developed through extensive analysis of the twin J-CTOA criteria and validation of this approach through near full scale tests

  12. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Liu, Ken C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  13. The scaling of stress distribution under small scale yielding by T-scaling method and application to prediction of the temperature dependence on fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Kenichi; Hamada, Takeshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for scaling the crack tip stress distribution under small scale yielding condition was proposed and named as T-scaling method. This method enables to identify the different stress distributions for materials with different tensile properties but identical load in terms of K or J. Then by assuming that the temperature dependence of a material is represented as the stress-strain relationship temperature dependence, a method to predict the fracture load at an arbitrary temperature from the already known fracture load at a reference temperature was proposed. This method combined the T-scaling method and the knowledge “fracture stress for slip induced cleavage fracture is temperature independent.” Once the fracture load is predicted, fracture toughness J c at the temperature under consideration can be evaluated by running elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Finally, the above-mentioned framework to predict the J c temperature dependency of a material in the ductile-to-brittle temperature distribution was validated for 0.55% carbon steel JIS S55C. The proposed framework seems to have a possibility to solve the problem the master curve is facing in the relatively higher temperature region, by requiring only tensile tests. (author)

  14. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Tang, M.; Anderson, T.L.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (J c ) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often c -values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured J c -values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515)

  15. Apparent Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Resin/Ceramic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, A.; Anusavice, K.J.; Mecholsky, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that the apparent interfacial fracture toughness (KA) may be estimated by fracture mechanics and fractography. This study tested the hypothesis that the KA of the adhesion zone of resin/ceramic systems is affected by the ceramic microstructure. Lithia disilicate-based (Empress2-E2) and leucite-based (Empress-E1) ceramics were surface-treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) and/or silane (S), followed by an adhesive resin. Microtensile test specimens (n = 30; area of 1 ± 0.01 mm2) were indented (9.8 N) at the interface and loaded to failure in tension. We used tensile strength (σ) and the critical crack size (c) to calculate KA (KA = Yσc1/2) (Y = 1.65). ANOVA and Weibull analyses were used for statistical analyses. Mean KA (MPa•m1/2) values were: (E1HF) 0.26 ± 0.06; (E1S) 0.23 ± 0.06; (E1HFS) 0.30 ± 0.06; (E2HF) 0.31 ± 0.06; (E2S) 0.13 ± 0.05; and (E2HFS) 0.41 ± 0.07. All fractures originated from indentation sites. Estimation of interfacial toughness was feasible by fracture mechanics and fractography. The KA for the systems tested was affected by the ceramic microstructure and surface treatment. PMID:17062746

  16. An Investigation of Metallurgical Factors Which Affect Fracture Toughness of Ultra-High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology, while both Charpy V-notch impact tests and plane strain fracture toughness...correlation between the Charpy impact test results and the fracture toughness results.... tests were used to determine the fracture properties. The normal commercial heat treatment resulted in the formation of some bainite in all the alloys

  17. Plastic η-factor for Fracture Toughness Test of SA508 Narrow-gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yong; Cho, Sung Keun; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the plastic η-factors of SA508 narrow-gap welding part used for the primary piping system of nuclear power plant were obtained using the finite element analysis and suggested the revised fracture toughness testing method for the narrow-gap welding part. Also, we have performed the fracture toughness test for SA508 narrow-gap welding part applying the new testing method then compared the results with those by fracture toughness test according to ASTM

  18. Interrelation of material microstructure, ultrasonic factors, and fracture toughness of two phase titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The pivotal role of an alpha-beta phase microstructure in governing fracture toughness in a titanium alloy, Ti-662, is demonstrated. The interrelation of microstructure and fracture toughness is demonstrated using ultrasonic measurement techniques originally developed for nondestructive evaluation and material property characterization. It is shown that the findings determined from ultrasonic measurements agree with conclusions based on metallurgical, metallographic, and fractographic observations concerning the importance of alpha-beta morphology in controlling fracture toughness in two phase titanium alloys.

  19. Effect of WC/Co coherency phase boundaries on Fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxian Xie; Xiaoyan Song; Fuxing Yin; Yongguang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of coherency WC/Co phase boundaries on the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides is studied by MD simulation method. The simulation results show that the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides with coherency WC/Co phase boundaries has higher fracture toughness than that without coherency WC/Co phase boundaries. Moreover, the mechanism of why coherency WC/Co phase boundaries can improve the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides is a...

  20. TOUGH-RBSN simulator for hydraulic fracture propagation within fractured media: Model validations against laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kunhwi; Rutqvist, Jonny; Nakagawa, Seiji; Birkholzer, Jens

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents coupled hydro-mechanical modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in complex fractured media using a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. The individual physical processes in the fracture propagation are represented by separate program modules: the TOUGH2 code for multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) model for mechanical and fracture-damage behavior, which are coupled with each other. Fractures are modeled as discrete features, of which the hydrological properties are evaluated from the fracture deformation and aperture change. The verification of the TOUGH-RBSN code is performed against a 2D analytical model for single hydraulic fracture propagation. Subsequently, modeling capabilities for hydraulic fracturing are demonstrated through simulations of laboratory experiments conducted on rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed network of pre-existing fractures. Sensitivity analyses are also conducted by changing the modeling parameters, such as viscosity of injected fluid, strength of pre-existing fractures, and confining stress conditions. The hydraulic fracturing characteristics attributed to the modeling parameters are investigated through comparisons of the simulation results.

  1. A portable fracture toughness tester for biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvell, B. W.; Lee, P. K. D.; Yuen, T. D. B.; Lucas, P. W.

    1996-06-01

    A portable mechanical tester is described which is both lightweight and cheap to produce. The machine is simple and convenient to operate and requires only a minimum of personnel training. It can be used to measure the fundamental mechanical properties of pliant solids, particularly toughness (in the sense of `work of fracture') using either scissors or wedge tests. This is achieved through a novel hardware integration technique. The circuits are described. The use of the machine does not require a chart recorder but it can be linked to a personal computer, either to show force - displacement relationships or for data storage. The design allows the use of any relatively `soft' mechanical test, i.e. tests in which the deformability of the frame of the machine and its load cell do not introduce significant errors into the results. Examples of its use in measuring the toughness of biomaterials by scissors (paper, wood) and wedges (mung bean starch gels) are given.

  2. Fracture toughness and stress relief response of irradiated Type 347/348 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    A test program has experimentally determined: (1) The fracture toughness of Type 347/348 stainless steel (SS) specimens with high values of irradiation fluence (2.3 to 4.8 x 10 22 n/cm 2 , E > 1.0 MeV) and experiencing different levels of irradiation creep (0.0, 0.6, 1.1, 1.8%), (2) the effect of thermal stress relief on fracture toughness recovery for the highly irradiated material, and (3) the mechanisms associated with fracture toughness recovery due to thermal stress relief. The postirradiation fracture toughness tests and tensile tests were conducted at 427 0 C

  3. Fracture toughness estimation of ballast stone used in Iranian railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ferestade

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ballast is a layer composed of crushed stone basically with diameters of 20–60 mm, on which sleepers and rails are set. Ballast is used to withstand vertical, horizontal and lateral forces applied on sleepers and to hold the line in operative conditions. Ballast deterioration induced by crashed stones is a major issue of track instability as the ballast layer quality depending on the materials used and their densities should be focused on. Therefore, ballast should be resistant against loads applied, and the fracture toughness of ballast stone is of great importance. For this purpose, the fracture toughness of two kinds of ballast stones used in Iranian railway, i.e. Gaduk (limestone and Anjylavnd (andesite, is investigated experimentally in this paper. The quality of ballast stone is evaluated in different weather conditions. Numerical results shown that the Anjylavnd stone is more appropriate for rainy and cold weather when there is a probability of fracturing due to frozen water captured in ballast.

  4. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Carl M.; Liu, Cheng; Lovato, Manuel L.

    2015-09-01

    In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ˜0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC) will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  5. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cady Carl M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ∼0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  6. Dynamic fracture toughness data for CASTOR {sup registered} casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, H.P. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH/GNB, Essen (Germany); Trubitz, P.; Pusch, G. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany); Warnke, E.P. [Siempelkamp GmbH and Co. KG, Krefeld (Germany); Beute, K. [Gontermann-Peipers GmbH, Siegen (Germany); Novotny, V. [SKODA, HUTE, Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    For the use of cast iron spherical graphite for heavy-sectioned casks for transportation and storage of radiactive materials a complete failure assessment including fracture mechanical analysis is necessary. The casks require an elaborate fracture mechanics design based on fracture mechanics evaluation. The extension of the existing code with respect to dynamic loading takes account new developments to extend the field of applications. It also includes new criteria to design these casks against operating and accident loadings. A fundamental requirement for the realisation of this standard and the calculation of admissible crack lengths of stresses under dynamic loads is the availability of fracture mechanical data. The paper presents-as a part of a large test-program-first results of dynamic fracture-toughness-investigations depending on structure and temperature. The test-program will incorporate investigations on more then 2500 specimens. The investigations that will be done include static and dynamic fracture mechanics tests, dynamic tensile and pressure-tests on different formed specimens. The temperatures and other test conditions follows the IAEA-regulations and the real service conditions. The test-program will be realised in partnership with different institutes.

  7. Investigation on fracture toughness of laser beam welded steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riekehr, S.; Cam, G.; Santos, J.F. dos; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany); Klein, R.M.; Fischer, R. [Thyssen Laser-Technik GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Laser beam welding is currently used in the welding of a variety of structural materials including hot and cold rolled steels, high strength low alloy and stainless steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, refractory and high temperature alloys and dissimilar materials. This high power density welding process has unique advantages of cost effectiveness, low distortion, high welding speed, easy automation, deep penetration, narrow bead width, and narrow HAZ compared to the conventional fusion welding processes. However, there is a need to understand the deformation and fracture properties of laser beam weld joints in order to use this cost effective process for fabrication of structural components fully. In the present study, an austenitic stainless steel, X5CrNi18 10 (1.4301) and a ferritic structural steel, RSt37-2 (1.0038), with a thickness of 4 mm were welded by 5 kW CO{sub 2} laser process. Microhardness measurements were conducted to determine the hardness profiles of the joints. Flat microtensile specimens were extracted from the base metal, fusion zone, and heat affected zone of ferritic joint to determine the mechanical property variation across the joint and the strength mismatch ratio between the base metal and the fusion zone. Moreover, fracture mechanics specimens were extracted from the joints and tested at room temperature to determine fracture toughness, Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD), of the laser beam welded specimens. The effect of the weld region strenght mis-matching on the fracture toughness of the joints have been evaluated. Crack initiation, crack growth and crack deviation processes have also been examined. These results were used to explain the influence of mechanical heterogeneity of the weld region on fracture behaviour. This work is a part of the ongoing Brite-Euram project Assessment of Quality of Power Beam Weld Joints (ASPOW). (orig.)

  8. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  9. Fracture toughness of a welded super duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilhagen, Johan, E-mail: pilhagen@kth.se [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Sieurin, Henrik [Scania CV AB, Södertälje (Sweden); Sandström, Rolf [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted on standard single-edge notched bend bar specimens of base and weld metal. The material was the SAF 2906 super duplex stainless steel. The aim was to evaluate the susceptibility for brittle failure at sub-zero temperatures for the base and weld metal. The base metal was tested between −103 and −60 °C and was evaluated according to the crack-tip opening displacement method. The fracture event at and below −80 °C can be described as ductile until critical cleavage initiation occurs, which caused unstable failure of the specimen. The welding method used was submerged arc welding with a 7 wt% nickel filler metal. The welded specimens were post-weld heat treated (PWHT) at 1100 °C for 20 min and then quenched. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that during PWHT substitutional element partitioning occurred which resulted in decreased nickel content in the ferrite. The PWHT weld metal specimens were tested at −72 °C. The fracture sequence was critical cleavage fracture initiation after minor crack-tip blunting and ductile fracture.

  10. Fracture Toughness Improvement of Composites Reinforced with Optimally Shaped Short Ductile Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wetherhold, Robert C; Patra, Abani K

    2001-01-01

    The fracture toughness of brittle matrix composites reinforced with ductile fibers has been greatly improved by shaping the fibers so that they fully contribute their plastic work to the fracture process...

  11. Tensile and fracture toughness test results of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R.; Moons, F.; Puzzolante, J.L. [Centre d`Etude de l`Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)

    1998-01-01

    Tensile and fracture toughness test results of four Beryllium grades are reported here. The flow and fracture properties are investigated by using small size tensile and round compact tension specimens. Irradiation was performed at the BR2 material testing reactor which allows various temperature and irradiation conditions. The fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV) ranges between 0.65 and 2.45 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. In the meantime, un-irradiated specimens were aged at the irradiation temperatures to separate if any the effect of temperature from irradiation damage. Test results are analyzed and discussed, in particular in terms of the effects of material grade, test temperature, thermal ageing and neutron irradiation. (author)

  12. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile irons austenitized at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-05-25

    Ductile cast iron was austenitized at four different temperatures and subsequently austempered at six different temperatures. Plane strain fracture toughness was evaluated under all the heat treatment conditions and correlated with the microstructural features such as the austenite content and the carbon content of the austenite. Fracture mechanism was studied by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the optimum austempering temperature for maximum fracture toughness decreased with increasing austenitizing temperature. This could be interpreted in terms of the microstructural features. A study of the fracture mechanism revealed that good fracture toughness is unlikely to be obtained when austempering temperature is less than half of the austenitizing temperature on the absolute scale.

  13. Studies of elastic-plastic instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of plastic instabilities are reviewed, with focus on results in structural mechanics as well as continuum mechanics. First the basic theories for bifurcation and post-bifurcation behavior are briefly presented. Then, localization of plastic flow is discussed, including shear band formation...... in solids, localized necking in biaxially stretched metal sheets, and the analogous phenomenon of buckling localization in structures. Also some recent results for cavitation instabilities in elastic-plastic solids are reviewed....

  14. ADM guidance-Ceramics: Fracture toughness testing and method selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Della Bona, Alvaro; Scherrer, Susanne S; Tholey, Michael; van Noort, Richard; Vichi, Alessandro; Kelly, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    The objective is within the scope of the Academy of Dental Materials Guidance Project, which is to provide dental materials researchers with a critical analysis of fracture toughness (FT) tests such that the assessment of the FT of dental ceramics is conducted in a reliable, repeatable and reproducible way. Fracture mechanics theory and FT methodologies were critically reviewed to introduce basic fracture principles and determine the main advantages and disadvantages of existing FT methods from the standpoint of the dental researcher. The recommended methods for FT determination of dental ceramics were the Single Edge "V" Notch Beam (SEVNB), Single Edge Precracked Beam (SEPB), Chevron Notch Beam (CNB), and Surface Crack in Flexure (SCF). SEVNB's main advantage is the ease of producing the notch via a cutting disk, SEPB allows for production of an atomically sharp crack generated by a specific precracking device, CNB is technically difficult, but based on solid fracture mechanics solutions, and SCF involves fracture from a clinically sized precrack. The IF test should be avoided due to heavy criticism that has arisen in the engineering field regarding the empirical nature of the calculations used for FT determination. Dental researchers interested in FT measurement of dental ceramics should start with a broad review of fracture mechanics theory to understand the underlying principles involved in fast fracture of ceramics. The choice of FT methodology should be based on the pros and cons of each test, as described in this literature review. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 5495 - Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 RIN 3150-AI01 Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against... (75 FR 13), that amends the NRC's regulations to provide alternate fracture toughness requirements for...

  16. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron alloyed with chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-04-15

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of chromium content on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADIs containing 0, 0.3 and 0.5 wt.% chromium were austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and correlated with microstructure and chromium content. The chromium content was found to influence the fracture toughness through its influence on the processing window. Since the chromium addition shifts the processing window to shorter durations, the higher chromium alloys at higher austempering temperatures tend to fall outside of the processing window, resulting in less than optimum microstructure and inferior fracture toughness. A small chromium addition of 0.3 wt.% was found to be beneficial for the fracture toughness of ADI.

  17. Mode I fracture toughness of carbon-glass/epoxy interply hybrid composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ha Na; Kim, Yon Jig [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the fracture toughness of carbon-glass fiber reinforced epoxy interply hybrid composite was investigated. In this experiment, the interply hybrid composites were manufactured using a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. The fracture toughness of the interply hybrid composites was decreased with increasing the number of glass fabrics. The decrease in fracture toughness with an increase in the glass fiber content can be expressed in the form of a linear equation. Test results showed that the arrangement of fiber significantly influences the fracture toughness of the composite material. Glass fiber was effective against improving the fracture toughness of the hybrid composite when the glass fibers are dispersed by multi layers rather than a single layer.

  18. Correlation between fracture toughness, work of fracture and fractal dimensions of Alumina-mullite-zirconia composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Sérgio Francisco dos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to show the correlation between the fractal dimension, D, and mechanical properties such as work of fracture, gammawof, and fracture toughness, K Ic. Alumina-mullite-zirconia composites were characterized by the slit-island method, SIM, to obtain values of D and its fractional part, D*. The fracture surface roughness was also evaluated using a cyclic voltametric method. It will be shown that there is a positive experimental dependency of gammawof on D* and that there is not an evident correlation between K Ic and D*.

  19. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  20. Effect of aging on mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of 2034 aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamat, S.V.; Hirth, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of aging on the mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness was evaluated for two 2034 Al type alloys with different Mn content. The effect of aging was found to be significantly different in the two alloys. Alloy 1 which had < 0.1 wt% Mn exhibited a significant reduction in fracture toughness with increasing mode III loading contribution. In this alloy, increasing aging time resulted in less reduction of fracture toughness with increasing mode III loading contribution. On the other hand, alloy 2 which had 1.08 wt% Mn exhibited a marginal effect of mixed-mode loading on fracture toughness. In this alloy increasing aging time did not result in a significant change in the mixed-mode fracture behavior. The results are discussed in light of the microstructures, fracture mechanisms and deformation field ahead of the crack tip under mixed-mode loading

  1. Atomistic simulations on intergranular fracture toughness of copper bicrystals with symmetric tilt grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Cheng Bin; Beom, Hyeon Gyu

    2018-01-01

    The intergranular fracture toughness of Cu bicrystals with symmetric tilt grain boundaries was investigated using atomistic simulations. Mode I fracture of Cu bicrystals with an intergranular crack was considered. The boundary conditions were specified by the near-tip displacement fields obtained based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). Based on the energy interpretation of the energy release rate, a two-specimen method was adopted to determine the fracture toughness. The simulation results of the fracture toughness matched well with those determined using LEFM. In contrast to the toughness obtained using the Griffith energy criterion, the atomistic simulation results for the same bicrystal were not constants, but dependent on the crack-tip circumstances. This behavior was mainly associated with the different local stress conditions and fracture patterns observed for the different models.

  2. Effects of Silicon on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Toughness of Heavy-Section Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of silicon (Si on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of heavy-section ductile cast iron were investigated to develop material for spent-nuclear-fuel containers. Two castings with different Si contents of 1.78 wt.% and 2.74 wt.% were prepared. Four positions in the castings from the edge to the center, with different solidification cooling rates, were chosen for microstructure observation and mechanical properties’ testing. Results show that the tensile strength, elongation, impact toughness and fracture toughness at different positions of the two castings decrease with the decrease in cooling rate. With an increase in Si content, the graphite morphology and the mechanical properties at the same position deteriorate. Decreasing cooling rate changes the impact fracture morphology from a mixed ductile-brittle fracture to a brittle fracture. The fracture morphology of fracture toughness is changed from ductile to brittle fracture. When the Si content exceeds 1.78 wt.%, the impact and fracture toughness fracture morphology transforms from ductile to brittle fracture. The in-situ scanning electronic microscope (SEM tensile experiments were first used to observe the dynamic tensile process. The influence of the vermicular and temper graphite on fracture formation of heavy section ductile iron was investigated.

  3. Basic fracture toughness requirements for ferritic materials of nuclear class pressure retaining equipment in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Dong; Yao Weida

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, theory basis on cold brittleness and anti-brittle fracture design of ferritic materials are introduced summarily and fracture toughness requirements for ferritic materials in ASME code for nuclear safety class pressure retaining equipment in NPP are summarized and evaluated. The results show that notch impact toughness requirements for materials relate to nuclear safety class of materials so as to ensure that brittle fracture of retaining pressure boundary in NPP can not occur. (authors)

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of elastic-plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubarda, V.

    1981-01-01

    The complete set of constitutive equations which fully describes the behaviour of material in elastic-plastic deformation is derived on the basis of thermodynamic analysis of the deformation process. The analysis is done after the matrix decomposition of the deformation gradient is introduced into the structure of thermodynamics with internal state variables. The free energy function, is decomposed. Derive the expressions for the stress response, entropy and heat flux, and establish the evolution equation. Finally, we establish the thermodynamic restrictions of the deformation process. (Author) [pt

  5. Fracture toughness of Charpy-size compound specimens and its application in engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.P.; Shi, Y.W.

    1994-01-01

    The use of a pre-cracked Charpy-size specimen with a side-groove to evaluate the fracture toughness of materials has been researched and considered. This method not only satisfies the demand for small-size specimens in surveillance tests of fracture toughness but also avoids using complicated physical methods to monitor the initial conditions of crack propagation. For most materials this method has solved the problem in which the small-size specimen did not satisfy the valid conditions of a fracture toughness measurement. In order to obtain more information from neutron-irradiated sample specimens and raise the reliability of fracture toughness surveillance tests, it has been considered more important to repeatedly exploit the broken Charpy-size specimen tested in the surveillance test, and to make it renewable. In this work, on the renewing design and utilization of Charpy-size specimens, nine data on fracture toughness can be obtained from one pre-cracked side-grooved Charpy-size specimen, while at present usually only one to three data on fracture toughness can be obtained from one Charpy-size specimen. Thus, it is found that the new method would improve the reliability of fracture toughness surveillance testing and evaluation. In addition, some factors that affect the optimum design of pre-cracked deep side-groove Charpy-size compound specimens have also been discussed. (author)

  6. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture-toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Uniaxial tests of single-edged notched bend (SENB) specimens with both deep- and shallow-flaws have shown elevated fracture-toughness for the shallow flaws. The elevation in fracture-toughness for shallow flaws has been shown to be the result of reduced constraint at the crack-tip. Biaxial loading has the potential to increase constraint at the crack-tip and thereby reduce some of the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation. Biaxial fracture-toughness tests have shown that the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation is reduced but not eliminated by biaxial loading. Dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations have been proposed to reflect the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture-toughness. Test results from the uniaxial and biaxial tests were analyzed using the dual-parameter technology. Discrepancies between analysis results and cleavage initiation site data from fractographic examinations indicate that the analysis models are in need of further refinement. Addition of a precleavage, ductile-tearing element to the analysis model has the potential to resolve the noted discrepancies.

  7. Analysis of size effect applicable to evaluation of fracture toughness of base metal for PWR vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhamou, C.; Joly, P.; Andrieu, A.; Parrot, A.; Vidard, S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the specimen size effect (also called crack front length effect) on Fracture Toughness of PWR Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel base metal. The analysis of the reality and amplitude of this effect is conducted in a first step on a database (the so-called GKSS database) including fracture toughness test results on a single representative material using specimens of different thicknesses, tested in the same temperature range. A realistic analytical form for describing the size effect observed in this data set is thus derived from statistical analyses and proposed for engineering application. In a second step, this size effect formulation is then applied to a large number of fracture toughness data, obtained in Irradiation Surveillance Programs, and also to the numerous data used for the definition of the ASME (and RCC-M) fracture toughness reference curves. This analysis allows normalizing all the available fracture toughness data with a single specimen width of 100 mm and defining the fracture toughness reference curve as the lower bound of this normalized set of data points. It is thus demonstrated that the fracture toughness reference curve is associated with a reference crack length of 100 mm, and can be used in RPV integrity analyses for other crack front length in association with the crack front length correction formula defined in the first step. (authors)

  8. Fracture toughness testing of core from the Cambro-Ordovician Section on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemiszki, P.J.; Landes, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The modified ring test was used to determine the mode I fracture toughness of bedrock cores from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. Low porosity sandstones, limestones, and dolostones from the lower part of the Paleozoic section in Copper Creek and Whiteoak Mountain thrust sheets were sampled. In general, the average mode I fracture toughness decreases from sandstone, dolostone, and limestone. The fracture toughness of the limestones varies between rock units, which is related to different sedimentologic characteristics. Quality of results was evaluated by testing cores of Berea Sandstone and Indiana Limestone, which produced results similar to published results

  9. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness for Yong Gwang unit 5 reactor pressure vessel materials (Baseline Tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Se Hwan; Kim, Joo Hag; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kwon, Sun Chil; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness (K{sub d}) of intermediate shell and its weld in SA 508 CI. 3 Yong Gwang 5 reactor pressure vessel was determined and evaluated. Precracked thirty six Charpy specimens were tested by using an instrumented impact tester. The purpose of present work is to evaluate and confirm the un-irradiated dynamic fracture toughness and to provide pre-irradiation baseline data for future evaluation on dynamic fracture toughness change during operation. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  10. Estimation of fracture toughness and critical crack length of zircaloy pressure tube from ring tension test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Anantharaman, S.; Balakrishnan, K.S.; Sriharsha, H.K.

    1999-09-01

    Transverse fracture, toughness data of zircaloy pressure tubes are needed for assuring leak-before-break, if any, during their in-reactor residence. These data are conventionally computed from burst tests and/or using compact tension specimens. A study was undertaken to derive fracture toughness of zircaloy in the temperature range ambient to 300 deg C, from the transverse tensile properties. The fracture toughness properties so derived were used to estimate the values of critical crack length of zircaloy pressure tubes in the above temperature range. (author)

  11. Nanoindentation and micro-mechanical fracture toughness of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni–W alloy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.E.J.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Roberts, S.G.; Wilkinson, A.J.; Bade, K.

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel–tungsten alloys have great potential in the fabrication of components for microelectromechanical systems. Here the fracture toughness of Ni–12.7 at.%W alloy micro-cantilever beams was investigated. Micro-cantilevers were fabricated by UV lithography and electrodeposition and notched by focused ion beam machining. Load was applied using a nanoindenter and fracture toughness was calculated from the fracture load. Fracture toughness of the Ni–12.7 at.%W was in the range of 1.49–5.14 MPa √m. This is higher than the fracture toughness of Si (another important microelectromechanical systems material), but considerably lower than that of electrodeposited nickel and other nickel based alloys. - Highlights: ► Micro-scale cantilevers manufactured by electro-deposition and focused ion beam machining. ► Nanoindenter used to perform micro-scale fracture test on Ni-13at%W micro-cantilevers. ► Calculation of fracture toughness of electrodeposited Ni-13at%W thin films. ► Fracture toughness values lower than that of nanocrystalline nickel.

  12. Nanoindentation and micro-mechanical fracture toughness of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-W alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, D.E.J., E-mail: david.armstrong@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Haseeb, A.S.M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Roberts, S.G.; Wilkinson, A.J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Bade, K. [Institut fuer Mikrostrukturtechnik (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-04-30

    Nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloys have great potential in the fabrication of components for microelectromechanical systems. Here the fracture toughness of Ni-12.7 at.%W alloy micro-cantilever beams was investigated. Micro-cantilevers were fabricated by UV lithography and electrodeposition and notched by focused ion beam machining. Load was applied using a nanoindenter and fracture toughness was calculated from the fracture load. Fracture toughness of the Ni-12.7 at.%W was in the range of 1.49-5.14 MPa {radical}m. This is higher than the fracture toughness of Si (another important microelectromechanical systems material), but considerably lower than that of electrodeposited nickel and other nickel based alloys. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-scale cantilevers manufactured by electro-deposition and focused ion beam machining. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoindenter used to perform micro-scale fracture test on Ni-13at%W micro-cantilevers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation of fracture toughness of electrodeposited Ni-13at%W thin films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fracture toughness values lower than that of nanocrystalline nickel.

  13. Fracture Toughness Round Robin Test International in pressure tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagarcia, M.P.; Liendo, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the pressure tubes surveillance program of CANDU type reactors is to determine the fracture toughness using a special fracture specimen and test procedure. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited decided to hold a Round Robin Test International and 9 laboratories participated worldwide in which several pressure tube materials were selected: Zircaloy-2, Zr-2.5%Nb cold worked and Zr-2.5%Nb heat treated. The small specimens used held back the thickness and curvature of the tube. J-R curves at room temperature were obtained and the crack extension values were determined by electrical potential drop techniques. These values were compared with results generated from other laboratories and a bid scatter was founded. It could be due to slight variations in the test method or inhomogeneity of the materials and a statistical study must be done to see if there is any pattern. The next step for the Round Robin Test would be to make some modifications in the test method in order to reduce the scatter. (Author)

  14. Fracture toughness of zirconia ceramic crowns made by feather-edge tooth preparation design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Fracture toughness determines functional crown strenght and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. There is a lack of relevant literature data about fracture toughness of crowns made by feather-edge preparation. Mechanical testing of ceramic samples is supposed to show if feather-edge tooth preparation is a successful method for making ceramic crowns without any risk of reduction of their mechanical properties. This research was done to establish effects of feather-edge tooth preparation on fracture toughness of single zirconia ceramic crowns. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Sixty (60 ceramic crowns were made on non-carious extracted human premolars. Thirty (30 crowns were made on the basis of feather-edge preparation (experimental group I. The group II included 30 crowns made on 1 mm rounded shoulder. Crowns fabrication was executed on a copy mill production system “Zirkonzahn” (Zirkonzahn GMBH, Gais, Germany. The spherical compression test was used to determine fracture toughness, using 6 mm diameter ceramic ball. Fracture load for damaging ceramic crown was recorded on a universal testing machine - Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0.05 mm/min. Results. The results of this research introduced significant differences between fracture toughness of ceramic samples in every examined group. However, fracture toughness of crowns from both group was above 2 000 N, what was double beyond a recommended value. The mean value of fracture toughness in the feather-edge group was 2 090 N, and in shoulder group it was 2 214 N. Conclusion. This research showed a high fracture toughness of zirconia crowns made on feather-edge preparation. The examined crowns showed a fracture resistance at a sufficient distance in relation to the minimum values of functional loads. Further research of functional loads of these crown is necessary, as well as research of marginal adaptation of cemented crowns and

  15. [Fracture toughness of zirconia ceramic crowns made by feather-edge tooth preparation design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, Nemanja; Gostović, Aleksandra Spadijer; Lazić, Zoran; Trifković, Branka

    2012-07-01

    Fracture toughness determines functional crown strenght and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. There is a lack of relevant literature data about fracture toughness of crowns made by feather-edge preparation. Mechanical testing of ceramic samples is supposed to show if feather-edge tooth preparation is a successful method for making ceramic crowns without any risk of reduction of their mechanical properties. This research was done to establish effects of feather-edge tooth preparation on fracture toughness of single zirconia ceramic crowns. The research was performed as an experimental study. Sixty (60) ceramic crowns were made on non-carious extracted human premolars. Thirty (30) crowns were made on the basis of feather-edge preparation (experimental group I). The group II included 30 crowns made on 1 mm rounded shoulder. Crowns fabrication was executed on a copy mill production system "Zirkonzahn" (Zirkonzahn GMBH, Gais, Germany). The spherical compression test was used to determine fracture toughness, using 6 mmn diameter ceramic ball. Fracture load for damaging ceramic crown was recorded on a universal testing machine--Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0.05 mm/min. The results of this research introduced significant differences between fracture toughness of ceramic samples in every examined group. However, fracture toughness of crowns from both group was above 2000 N, what was double beyond a recommended value. The mean value of fracture toughness in the feather-edge group was 2090 N, and in shoulder group it was 2214 N. This research showed a high fracture toughness of zirconia crowns made on feather-edge preparation. The examined crowns showed a fracture resistance at a sufficient distance in relation to the minimum values of functional loads. Further research of functional loads of these crown is necessary, as well as research of marginal adaptation of cemented crowns and gingival inflammatory response.

  16. The use of finite element analysis and notch tensile testing to determine the cryogenic fracture toughness of thick section weldment in forged CSUS-JN1 plate with Inconel 625 type filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Yasuhide; Mano, Yasunori; Horiguchi, Katsumi; Sugo, Tomo

    2000-01-01

    The use of the notch tensile test to estimate the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J IC ) of structural alloys and weldments for superconducting magnets in fusion energy systems was studied. Notch tensile tests were performed with small round bar specimens containing an electro discharge machined (EDM) notch at liquid helium temperature (4 K) using crosshead rates of 3.3 x 10 -3 and 20 mm/s. Notch tensile test specimens were 5 mm in diameter with a 30-mm reduced section. In the mid section of the specimen a 1 mm deep EDM notch of 0.2 mm width was machined around the girth, thus maintaining a starting diameter of 3 mm. Correlations between notch tensile strength, failure energy absorption, and J IC were assessed. A finite element analysis was also performed to compute directly the J-values. Comparisons of the predicted J IC with results obtained from conventional JIS Z 2284 standard tests were made. (author)

  17. Fracture toughness of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, S.M.B. da; Bastian, F.L.; Pope, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    The fracture toughness of the different regions of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel, Niocor 2, was evaluated at different temperatures and compared with the toughness of the base metal. The studied regions were: the weld metal, fusion boundary and heat affected zone. The welding process used was the manual metal arc. It is shown that the weld metal region has the highest toughness values. (Author) [pt

  18. Comparisons of irradiation-induced shifts in fracture toughness, crack arrest toughness, and Charpy impact energy in high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program is examining relative shifts and changes in shape of fracture and crack-arrest toughness versus temperature behavior for two high-copper welds. Fracture toughness 100-MPa√m temperature shifts are greater than Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Mean curve fits to the fracture toughness data provide mixed results regarding curve shape changes, but curves constructed as lower boundaries indicate lower slopes. Preliminary crack-arrest toughness results indicate that shifts of lower-bound curves are approximately the same as CVN 41-J shifts with no shape changes

  19. Study of mixed mode fracture toughness and fracture trajectories in gypsum interlayers in corrosive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiankai, Bao; Jinchang, Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Based on the engineering background of water dissolving mining for hydrocarbon storage in multi-laminated salt stratum, the mixed mode fracture toughness and fracture trajectory of gypsum interlayers soaked in half-saturated brine at various temperatures (20°C, 50°C and 80°C) were studied by using CSNBD (centrally straight-notched Brazilian disc) specimens with required inclination angles (0°, 7°, 15°, 22°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). The results showed: (i) The fracture load of gypsum specimens first decreased then increased with increasing inclination angle, due to the effect of friction coefficient. When soaked in brine, the fracture toughness of gypsum specimens gradually decreased with increasing brine temperature. (ii) When soaked in brine, the crystal boundaries of gypsum separated and became clearer, and the boundaries became more open between the crystals with increasing brine temperature. Besides, tensile micro-cracks appeared on the gypsum crystals when soaked in 50°C brine, and the intensity of tensile cracks became more severe when soaking in 80°C brine. (iii) The experimental fracture envelopes derived from the conventional fracture criteria and lay outside these conventional criteria. The experimental fracture envelopes were dependent on the brine temperature and gradually expanded outward as brine temperature increases. (iv) The size of FPZ (fracture process zone) was greatly dependent on the damage degree of materials and gradually increased with increase of brine temperature. The study has important implication for the control of shape and size of salt cavern. PMID:29410841

  20. Fracture Toughness Determination of Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc Rock Specimen via Griffith Energy Criterion Incorporating Realistic Fracture Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Nu-wen; Liu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) specimen has been suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics to measure the mode I fracture toughness of rocks, and has been widely adopted in laboratory tests. Nevertheless, a certain discrepancy has been observed in results when compared with those derived from methods using straight through cracked specimens, which might be due to the fact that the fracture profiles of rock specimens cannot match the straight through crack front as assumed in the measuring principle. In this study, the progressive fracturing of the CCNBD specimen is numerically investigated using the discrete element method (DEM), aiming to evaluate the impact of the realistic cracking profiles on the mode I fracture toughness measurements. The obtained results validate the curved fracture fronts throughout the fracture process, as reported in the literature. The fracture toughness is subsequently determined via the proposed G-method originated from Griffith's energy theory, in which the evolution of the realistic fracture profile as well as the accumulated fracture energy is quantified by DEM simulation. A comparison between the numerical tests and the experimental results derived from both the CCNBD and the semi-circular bend (SCB) specimens verifies that the G-method incorporating realistic fracture profiles can contribute to narrowing down the gap between the fracture toughness values measured via the CCNBD and the SCB method.

  1. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  2. Influence of subcritical crack growth on the determination of fracture toughness in brittle materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krautgasser, C.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Supancic, P.; Danzer, R.; Bermejo, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 5 (2016), s. 1307-1312 ISSN 0955-2219 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Fracture toughness * Environment * SCCG * Ceramics * Glass Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  3. The fracture toughness of Fe{sub 2}B formed on boronized AISI 304

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topuz, Polat; Guendogdu, Emine; Yilamz, Eren; Guemues, Emre [Gedik Univ., Pendik Istanbul (Turkey). Gedik Vocational School

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the fracture toughness of Fe{sub 2}B boride layer on boronized AISI 304 stainless steel was investigated. Samples were boronized in an indirect heated fluidized bed furnace with Ekabor 1 trademark boronizing agent at 1123 K, 1223 K, and 1323 K for 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h, respectively. The boride phases were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness and fracture toughness of borides were measured via Vickers indentation. With increasing boriding temperature and time the fracture toughness values were reduced. The boride layer thickness formed on the boronized samples ranged between 12 μm and 176 μm. The hardness of the borides ranged between 1709 HV{sub 0.1} and 2119 HV{sub 0.1} and fracture toughness was in the range of 2.19-4.47 MPa x m{sup 1/2} depending on the layer thickness and hardness.

  4. Initial evaluation of ultrasonic attenuation measurements for estimating fracture toughness of RPV steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, A.L. Jr.; Green, R.E. Jr. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center for Nondestructive Evaluation

    1999-08-01

    Neutron bombardment of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes reductions in fracture toughness in these steels, termed neutron irradiation embrittlement. Currently, there are no accepted methods for nondestructive determination of the extent of the irradiation embrittlement nor the actual fracture toughness of the reactor pressure vessel. This paper provides initial results of an effort addressing the use of ultrasonic attenuation as a suitable parameter for nondestructive determination of irradiation embrittlement in RPV steels. (orig.)

  5. Effect of Initial Debond Crack Location on the Face/core Debond Fracture Toughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of initial crack location on the face/core debond fracture toughness under different mixed mode loading conditions. The mixed mode loading at the crack tip is defined in terms of the mode-mixity. In order to achieve the desired initial debond crack location, a pre...... as initial debond crack location. Lower fracture toughness values were measured for specimens with the initial crack location in the face laminate....

  6. Fracture toughness of two lithium disilicate dental glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadi, Lubna; Ruse, N Dorin

    2016-10-01

    IPS e.max CAD and IPS e.max Press (Ivoclar Vivadent AG) are lithium disilicate glass ceramics marketed as interchangeable materials indicated for the same clinical uses. However, different crystal sizes of lithium disilicate are formed during the processing of each of these materials, a factor that could lead to significantly different mechanical properties. As mechanical failure is always associated with a crack-initiation/crack-propagation process, fracture toughness (K IC ) values could be useful in comparing different ceramics and possibly predicting clinical performance. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine and compare the K IC of IPS e.max CAD and IPS e.max Press. The notchless triangular prism (NTP) specimen K IC test was used to determine and compare the K IC of IPS e.max Press and IPS e.max CAD. Twenty 6×6×6×12-mm NTP specimens of each material were prepared. IPS e.max CAD blocks were cut, ground, and then crystallized, while IPS e.max Press specimens were prepared by pressing IPS e.max Press ingots into molds obtained from 6×6×6×12-mm wax prisms, using the lost wax technique. Each specimen was mounted into a specimen holder, and custom grips were used to attach the specimen holder assembly to a computerized universal testing machine (model 4301; Instron Canada, Inc). The assembly was loaded in tension at a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/min, and the K IC value was calculated based on the recorded maximum load at fracture. Fractured surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results were statistically analyzed using Weibull statistics and the Student t test (α=.05). Significantly (P<.05) higher K IC value was determined for IPS e.max Press than for IPS e.max CAD and, based on the Weibull modulus (m), IPS e.max Press was also more reliable. Fractured surfaces, characterized by SEM, showed a marked difference between the 2 materials, suggesting a more complete crystallization in IPS e.max Press, which was most

  7. Rock Fracture Toughness Study Under Mixed Mode I/III Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliha, M. R. M.; Bahmani, A.

    2017-07-01

    Fracture growth in underground rock structures occurs under complex stress states, which typically include the in- and out-of-plane sliding deformation of jointed rock masses before catastrophic failure. However, the lack of a comprehensive theoretical and experimental fracture toughness study for rocks under contributions of out-of plane deformations (i.e. mode III) is one of the shortcomings of this field. Therefore, in this research the mixed mode I/III fracture toughness of a typical rock material is investigated experimentally by means of a novel cracked disc specimen subjected to bend loading. It was shown that the specimen can provide full combinations of modes I and III and consequently a complete set of mixed mode I/III fracture toughness data were determined for the tested marble rock. By moving from pure mode I towards pure mode III, fracture load was increased; however, the corresponding fracture toughness value became smaller. The obtained experimental fracture toughness results were finally predicted using theoretical and empirical fracture models.

  8. Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of CFRP Laminates Incorporating Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Borowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates exhibit limited fracture toughness due to characteristic interlaminar fiber-matrix cracking and delamination. In this article, we demonstrate that the fracture toughness of CFRP laminates can be improved by the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Experimental investigations and numerical modeling were performed to determine the effects of using MWCNTs in CFRP laminates. The CFRP specimens were produced using an epoxy nanocomposite matrix reinforced with carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH–MWCNTs. Four MWCNTs contents of 0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% per weight of the epoxy resin/hardener mixture were examined. Double cantilever beam (DCB tests were performed to determine the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of the unidirectional CFRP composites. This composite material property was quantified using the critical energy release rate, GIC. The experimental results show a 25%, 20%, and 17% increase in the maximum interlaminar fracture toughness of the CFRP composites with the addition of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt% MWCNTs, respectively. Microstructural investigations using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS verify that chemical reactions took place between the COOH–MWCNTs and the epoxy resin, supporting the improvements experimentally observed in the interlaminar fracture toughness of the CFRP specimens containing MWCNTs. Finite element (FE simulations show good agreement with the experimental results and confirm the significant effect of MWCNTs on the interlaminar fracture toughness of CFRP.

  9. Bone toughness at the molecular scale: A model for fracture toughness using crosslinked osteopontin on synthetic and biogenic mineral substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavelier, S; Dastjerdi, A K; McKee, M D; Barthelat, F

    2018-02-24

    The most prominent structural components in bone are collagen and mineral. However, bone additionally contains a substantial amount of noncollagenous proteins (most notably of the SIBLING protein family), some of which may act as cohesive/adhesive "binders" for the composite hybrid collagen/mineral scaffolding, whether in the bulk phase of bone, or at its interfaces. One such noncollagenous protein - osteopontin (OPN) - appears to be critical to the deformability and fracture toughness of bone. In the present study, we used a reconstructed synthetic mineral-OPN-mineral interface, and a biogenic (natural tooth dentin) mineral/collagen-OPN-mineral/collagen interface, to measure the fracture toughness of OPN on mineralized substrates. We used this system to test the hypothesis that OPN crosslinking by the enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2) that is found in bone enhances interfacial adhesion to increase the fracture toughness of bone. For this, we prepared double-cantilever beam substrates of synthetic pure hydroxyapatite mineral, and of narwhal dentin, and directly apposed them to one another under different intervening OPN/crosslinking conditions, and fracture toughness was tested using a miniaturized loading stage. The work-of-fracture of the OPN interface was measured for different OPN formulations (monomer vs. polymer), crosslinking states, and substrate composition. Noncrosslinked OPN provided negligible adhesion on pure hydroxyapatite, whereas OPN crosslinking (by the chemical crosslinker glutaraldehyde, and TG2 enzyme) provided strong interfacial adhesion for both hydroxyapatite and dentin using monomeric and polymeric OPN. Pre-coating of the substrate beams with monomeric OPN further improved the adhesive performance of the samples, likely by allowing effective binding of this nascent OPN form to mineral/matrix components, with this pre-attachment providing a protein layer for additional crosslinking between the substrates. Copyright © 2018. Published by

  10. Anisotropy of fracture toughness of austenitic high nitrogen chromium-manganese steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitskii, A.I.; Pokhmurskii, V.I.; Diener, M.; Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O.

    1999-01-01

    The anisotropy of mechanical properties, in particular of the fracture toughness measured by the J-integral method, is demonstrated for industrially manufactured high strength retaining rings made from the nitrogen alloyed steel 18Mn18Cr. The RT-orientation turns out to be the weakest with regard to the resistance of the material to stable crack growth. The fracture toughness results are compared with results from calorimetric measurements. Here, also an orientation dependence of the heat irradiation energy is observed, clearly showing the same ranking of specimen orientation as the toughness data suggest. (orig.)

  11. A study on the fracture behavior in tensile and fracture toughness tests of CFRP by acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Oh, Sae Kyoo; Nam, Ki Woo; Kim, Og Gyun [Bukyung National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    This study was carried out to analyze the fracture behavior and the acoustic emission(AE) characteristics, and to find relationship between tensile strength, fracture toughness and cure pressure in cure process of the carbon fiber reinforced composites of two types, [0 degree/90 degree]{sub 2s} and [0 degree{sub 2}/90 degree{sub 2}]{sub s}. AE signals were detected during the curing process, tensile tests and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission(AE) measurements, respectively. Tensile strengths showed that the less cure pressurizing steps and the side of [0 degree/90 degree]{sub 2s} specimens had the higher strengths than those of the others. Fracture toughness showed nearly same values in the same temperature region, but the higher test temperature had the lower fracture toughness values. In order to examine between fracture behavior of tensile and fracture toughness test and post processing for AE parameters of AE data and observations of microscopy, SEM are carried out respectively.

  12. A study on the fracture behavior of CFRP in tensile and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Oh, Sae Kyoo; Nam, Ki Woo; Kim, Og Gyun [National Fishery University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    The Study was carried out to analyze the fracture behavior and the acoustic emission(AE) characteristics and to find the relationship among tensile strength, fracture toughness and cure pressure in cure process of the carbon fiber reinforced composites of two types, [0 deg/90 deg]{sub 2s} and [0 deg{sub 2}/90 deg{sub 2}]{sub s}. AE signals were detected during the curing process, tensile tests and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission(AE) measurements, respectively. Tensile strengths showed that the less cure pressurizing steps and the side of [0 deg/90 deg]{sub 2s} specimens had the higher strengths than those of the others. Fracture toughness by the change of test temperature showed nearly same values in the same temperature region, but the higher test temperature had the lower fracture toughness values. In order to examine the relationship between fracture behavior of CFRP in tensile and fracture toughness tests and AE signals, the post processing for AE parameters of AE data and the observations of microscope and SEM have been carried out respectively. (author)

  13. A Study on the Fracture Behavior of CFRP in Tensile and Fracture Toughness Tests by Acoustic Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Oh, Sae Kyoo; Nam, Ki Woo; Kim, Og Gyun [Fisheries University of Pusan , Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    The study was carried out to analyze the fracture behavior and the acoustic emission(AE) characteristics and to find the relationship among tensile strength, fracture toughness and cure pressure in owe process of the carbon fiber reinforced composites of two types, [0 .deg. /90 .deg. ]{sub 2s} and [0 .deg. {sub 2}/90 .deg. {sub 2}]. AE signals were detected during the curing process, tensile tests and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission(AE) measurements, respectively. Tensile strengths showed that the less cure pressurizing steps and the side of [0 .deg. /90 .deg. ]{sub 2s} specimens had the higher strengths than those of the others. Fracture toughness by the change of test temperature showed nearly same values in the same temperature region, but the higher test temperature had the lower fracture toughness values. In order to examine the relationship between fracture behavior of CFRP in tensile and fracture toughness tests and AE signals, the post processing for AE parameters of AE data and the observations of microscope and SEM have been carried out respectively

  14. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  15. In vitro fracture toughness of commercial Y-TZP ceramics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Nychka, John A; Major, Paul; Linke, Bernie; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess research methods used to determine the fracture toughness of Y-TZP ceramics in order to systematically evaluate the accuracy of each method with regard to potential influencing factors. Six databases were searched for studies up to April 2013. The terms "tough*," "critical stress intensity factor," "zirconi*," "yttri*," "dent*," "zirconia," "zirconium," and "stress" were searched. Titles and abstracts were screened, and literature that fulfilled the inclusion criteria was selected for a full-text reading. Test conditions with potential influence on fracture toughness were extracted from each study. Ten laboratory studies met the inclusion criteria. There was a significant variation in relation to test method, ambient conditions, applied/indentation load, number of specimens, and geometry and dimension of the specimen. The results were incomparable due to high variability and missing information. Therefore, 10 parameters were listed to be followed to standardize future studies. A wide variation in research methods affected the fracture toughness reported for Y-TZP ceramics among the selected studies; single-edge-precracked beam and chevron-notched-beam seem to be the most recommended methods to determine Y-TZP fracture toughness; the indentation methods have several limitations. The accurate calculation of toughness values is fundamental because overestimating toughness data in a clinical situation can negatively affect the lifetime of the restoration. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Face/core mixed mode debond fracture toughness characterization using the modified TSD test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Christian; Quispitupa, Amilcar; Costache, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    . The fracture process was inspected visually during and after testing. For specimens with H45 core the crack propagated in the core. For specimens with an H100 core, the crack propagated between the resin-rich layer and the face sheet. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub......The modified tilted sandwich debond (TSD) test method is used to examine face/core debond fracture toughness of sandwich specimens with glass/polyester face sheets and PVC H45 and H100 foam cores over a large range of mode-mixities. The modification was achieved by reinforcing the loaded face sheet...... with a steel bar, and fracture testing of the test specimens was conducted over a range of tilt angles. The fracture toughness exhibited mode-mixity phase angle dependence, especially for mode II dominated loadings; although, the fracture toughness remained quite constant for mode I dominated crack loadings...

  17. Proposed mixed-mode dynamic fracture toughness testing method using a new specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, H.; Hinoshita, A. [Daido Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Calder, C.A.; Kennedy, T.C. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-12-31

    To find a simple and highly accurate testing method for determining the mixed-mode dynamic fracture toughness in a wide range of ratio of opening and sliding modes, the authors applied a combination technique using an electrical resistance strain gage method and a dynamic finite element method (FEM) to determine the mixed-mode dynamic fracture toughness. They used measuring and recording devices associated with an impact fracture apparatus based on an air gun. The impact fracture test was conducted to assess the mixed-mode dynamic fracture toughness testing method under single-point bending for three specimens of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The ratio of the opening mode deformation to the sliding mode can be changed by adjusting the hitting point. To measure a dynamic stress intensity factors (SIF) K{sub 1}(t) and a crack initiation time, a single axis strain gage was mounted in the vicinity of the crack tip.

  18. Fracture toughness of glass sealants for solid oxide fuel cell application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdoli, Hamid; Alizadeh, Parvin; Boccaccini, Dino

    2014-01-01

    Glass and glass-ceramics are versatile materials and have been widely used for sealing in the ongoing development of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology where its integrity is crucial for reliable operation of the stack. The fracture toughness is a key parameter...... required for the prediction of the mechanical performance of a seal glass. A comparative indentation study on two RE-glasses (RE=La and Y) was performed to evaluate their fracture toughness. Indentation toughness was calculated both through measurements of the indentation crack lengths and of crack......-opening displacements in the near regions of a crack tip. Both approaches exhibited good agreement. La-containing glass showed higher stiffness, hardness and fracture toughness, which has been related to the in-situ toughening mechanism caused by devitrification and formation of crystalline phases. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  19. The microstructure effect on the fracture toughness of ferritic Ni-alloyed steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheid, Adriano, E-mail: scheid@ufpr.br [Programa de Pos-Graduação em Engenharia Mecânica, PGMec, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Av. Cel. Francisco H. dos Santos, 210, Curitiba (Brazil); Félix, Lorenzo Marzari; Martinazzi, Douglas; Renck, Tiago; Fortis Kwietniewski, Carlos Eduardo [Programa de Pos-Graduação em Engenharia de Minas, Metalurgia e Materiais, PPGE3M, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2016-04-20

    Production of oil and gas in the Brazilian pre-salt faces several technical challenges and one of them that is a major concern is the presence of CO{sub 2} in high concentration. The aim of this work is to evaluate the fracture toughness of two nickel-containing steels as an alternative material to manufacture low-temperature toughness improved CO{sub 2} transporting pipelines for Enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Optical and scanning electron microscopies were employed to characterize the steels microstructures. Electron back-scattered diffraction was used to estimate the effective grain size and the density of high-angle grain boundaries. Fracture toughness was determined by the use of the crack tip opening displacement methodology. The results indicated that for the as-rolled condition the large islands of the microconstituent M/A in the 5{sup 1/2} Ni steel had a detrimental effect on fracture toughness at −100 °C, while finer M/A particles and lower effective grain size with higher density of high-angle grain boundaries in the 9 Ni steel turned its fracture toughness practically temperature independent. Additionally, heat treatment (quenching and tempering) has the potential to dissolve the M/A hard particles and consequently improve fracture toughness at low temperature.

  20. A Comparison of Microscale Techniques for Determining Fracture Toughness of LiMn₂O₄ Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Muhammad Zeeshan; Amanieu, Hugues-Yanis; Moscatelli, Riccardo; Sebastiani, Marco

    2017-04-12

    Accurate estimation of fracture behavior of commercial LiMn₂O₄ particles is of great importance to predict the performance and lifetime of a battery. The present study compares two different microscale techniques to quantify the fracture toughness of LiMn₂O₄ particles embedded in an epoxy matrix. The first technique uses focused ion beam (FIB) milled micro pillars that are subsequently tested using the nanoindentation technique. The pillar geometry, critical load at pillar failure, and cohesive FEM simulations are then used to compute the fracture toughness. The second technique relies on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the crack opening displacement (COD) and subsequent application of Irwin's near field theory to measure the mode-I crack tip toughness of the material. Results show pillar splitting method provides a fracture toughness value of ~0.24 MPa.m 1/2 , while COD measurements give a crack tip toughness of ~0.81 MPa.m 1/2 . The comparison of fracture toughness values with the estimated value on the reference LiMn₂O₄ wafer reveals that micro pillar technique provides measurements that are more reliable than the COD method. The difference is associated with ease of experimental setup, calculation simplicity, and little or no influence of external factors as associated with the COD measurements.

  1. THE EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE: A FINITE ELEMENT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Ani; Zioupos, Peter; Buchanan, Drew; Vashishth, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the mechanical response of bone under high loading rates is crucial to understanding fractures in traumatic accidents or falls. In the current study, a computational approach based on cohesive finite element modeling was employed to evaluate the effect of strain rate on fracture toughness of human cortical bone. Two-dimensional compact tension specimen models were simulated to evaluate the change in initiation and propagation fracture toughness with increasing strain rate (range: 0.08 to 18 s−1). In addition, the effect of porosity in combination with strain rate was assessed using three-dimensional models of microcomputed tomography-based compact tension specimens. The simulation results showed that bone’s resistance against the propagation of fracture decreased sharply with increase in strain rates up to 1 s−1 and attained an almost constant value for strain rates larger than 1 s−1. On the other hand, initiation fracture toughness exhibited a more gradual decrease throughout the strain rates. There was a significant positive correlation between the experimentally measured number of microcracks and the fracture toughness found in the simulations. Furthermore, the simulation results showed that the amount of porosity did not affect the way initiation fracture toughness decreased with increasing strain rates, whereas it exacerbated the same strain rate effect when propagation fracture toughness was considered. These results suggest that strain rates associated with falls lead to a dramatic reduction in bone’s resistance against crack propagation. The compromised fracture resistance of bone at loads exceeding normal activities indicates a sharp reduction and/or absence of toughening mechanisms in bone during high strain conditions associated with traumatic fracture. PMID:21783112

  2. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  3. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Fracture and fracture toughness of nanopolycrystalline metals produced by severe plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenwarter, A.; Pippan, R.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the fracture of bulk metallic materials developed in the last 50 years is mostly based on materials having grain sizes, d, in the range of some micrometres up to several hundred micrometres regarding the possibilities of classical metallurgical methods. Nowadays, novel techniques provide access to much smaller grain sizes, where severe plastic deformation (SPD) is one of the most significant techniques. This opens the door to extend basic research in fracture mechanics to the nanocrystalline (NC) grain size regime. From the technological point of view, there is also the necessity to evaluate standard fracture mechanics data of these new materials, such as the fracture toughness, in order to allow their implementation in engineering applications. Here, an overview of recent results on the fracture behaviour of several different ultrafine-grained (d<1 μm) and NC (d<100 nm) metals and alloys covering examples of body- and face-centred cubic structures produced by SPD will be given. PMID:25713459

  5. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  6. Mechanical properties and fracture toughness of rail steels and thermite welds at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-qing; Zhou, Hui; Shi, Yong-jiu; Feng, Bao-rui

    2012-05-01

    Brittle fracture occurs frequently in rails and thermite welded joints, which intimidates the security and reliability of railway service. Railways in cold regions, such as Qinghai-Tibet Railway, make the problem of brittle fracture in rails even worse. A series of tests such as uniaxial tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and three-point bending tests were carried out at low temperature to investigate the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of U71Mn and U75V rail steels and their thermite welds. Fracture micromechanisms were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the fracture surfaces of the tested specimens. The ductility indices (percentage elongation after fracture and percentage reduction of area) and the toughness indices (Charpy impact energy A k and plane-strain fracture toughness K IC) of the two kinds of rail steels and the corresponding thermite welds all decrease as the temperature decreases. The thermite welds are more critical to fracture than the rail steel base metals, as indicated by a higher yield-to-ultimate ratio and a much lower Charpy impact energy. U71Mn rail steel is relatively higher in toughness than U75V, as demonstrated by larger A k and K IC values. Therefore, U71Mn rail steel and the corresponding thermite weld are recommended in railway construction and maintenance in cold regions.

  7. Fracture toughness properties of rocks in Olkiluoto: Laboratory measurements 2008-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siren, T.

    2012-05-15

    In Olkiluoto an underground rock characterization facility (ONKALO) for the final disposal site of spent nuclear fuel has been under thorough research many years, but further knowledge is needed on fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness parameters are important for example in fracture mechanics prediction for Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment (POSE). This working report describes a laboratory campaign that was done between 2008 and 2009. The campaign aimed at determining the fracture mechanics parameters as well as density and ultrasonic velocities for Olkiluoto rocks. The specimens delivered were selected by Posiva; the core showed no damage and the quality of the delivered cores was good with varying sample diameter. Most of the test samples (9 out of 12) are gneissic rock. The Mode I fracture toughness was determined using two different methods to account for two different fracturing directions. The methods are the Chevron Bend (CB) test as proposed in the ISRM Suggested Method and a method based on the Brazilian Disk (BD) experiment. The Mode II fracture toughness was determined using the Punch-Through Shear with Confining Pressure experiment on the remaining pieces from the CB testing. The scatter in the results is very large, even within one piece of core sample. Usually the scatter of results is less than 5 %. The high scatter in the data at hand is believed to be due to the very inhomogeneous nature of the rock material. The magnitude of the determined Mode I fracture toughness compares well with available reported data for medium to coarse grained granitoide rocks. However the scatter of the mode II fracture toughness values is higher than experienced on other rock types, but the variability is reasonable for the inhomogeneous rock type. Distinguishing the fracture toughness values for different anisotropy directions would require more thorough testing with quality samples at different anisotropy directions. However since fracture

  8. Fracture strength of the particulate-reinforced ultra-high temperature ceramics based on a temperature dependent fracture toughness model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo; Ji, Baohua; Fang, Daining

    2017-10-01

    The particulate-reinforced ultra-high temperature ceramics (pUHTCs) have been particularly developed for fabricating the leading edge and nose cap of hypersonic vehicles. They have drawn intensive attention of scientific community for their superior fracture strength at high temperatures. However, there is no proper model for predicting the fracture strength of the ceramic composites and its dependency on temperature. In order to account for the effect of temperature on the fracture strength, we proposed a concept called energy storage capacity, by which we derived a new model for depicting the temperature dependent fracture toughness of the composites. This model gives a quantitative relationship between the fracture toughness and temperature. Based on this temperature dependent fracture toughness model and Griffith criterion, we developed a new fracture strength model for predicting the temperature dependent fracture strength of pUHTCs at different temperatures. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, flaw size and residual stress without any fitting parameters. The predictions of the fracture strength of pUHTCs in argon or air agreed well with the experimental measurements. Additionally, our model offers a mechanism of monitoring the strength of materials at different temperatures by testing the change of flaw size. This study provides a quantitative tool for design, evaluation and monitoring of the fracture properties of pUHTCs at high temperatures.

  9. Use of Circumferentially Cracked Bar sample for CTOD fracture toughness determination in the upper shelf regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gentile

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the use of circumferentially cracked bar (CCB sample to determine material fracture toughness in the upper shelf regime for carbon steels has been investigated. Since high fracture toughness materials are known to exhibit extensive crack tip blunting before ductile crack initiation, accurate specimen design is required to provide realistic fracture toughness measurement. Here, a CCB was designed to have similar loss of constraint as for SENT sample. Continuum damage mechanics was used to predict the occurrence of ductile crack initiation and propagation. Finite element analysis was performed to predict specimen response and to compare computed J-integral crack driving force with measured CTOD. Finally, experimental tests were performed on X65 carbon steel and the measured critical CTOD was compared with available fracture data obtained with SENT.

  10. Practical and theoretical considerations on the fracture toughness testing of dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Wendler, Michael; Zorzin, José I; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    An important tool in materials research, development and characterization regarding mechanical performance is the testing of fracture toughness. A high level of accuracy in executing this sort of test is necessary, with strict requirements given in extensive testing standard documents. Proficiency in quality specimen fabrication and test requires practice and a solid theoretical background, oftentimes overlooked in the dental community. In this review we go through some fundamentals of the fracture mechanics concepts that are relevant to the understanding of fracture toughness testing, and draw attention to critical aspects of practical nature that must be fulfilled for validity and accuracy in results. We describe our experience with some testing methodologies for CAD/CAM materials and discuss advantages and shortcomings of different tests in terms of errors in testing the applicability of the concept of fracture toughness as a single-value material-specific property. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe–9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (K JQ ) at represented temperatures: 240–280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160–220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic–martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616

  12. Fracture Toughness of Thick Boride Layers Estimated by the Cross-Sectioned Scratch Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Flores-Jiménez, M.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Meneses-Amador, A.

    2018-02-01

    New results about the fracture toughness ( K c) of thick boride layers estimated by the cross-sectioned scratch test are presented in this study. The FeB-Fe2B layers developed at the surface of borided AISI 1018 and AISI 1045 steels and the Fe2B layer formed on the borided AISI 1045 steel exposed to a diffusion annealing process (DAP) were used for this purpose. The cross-sectioned scratch tests were performed with a Vickers diamond stylus drawn across the thick boride layer under a constant load to produce a half-cone-shaped fracture near to the top surface of the borided steels. The height of the half-cone-shaped fracture as a function of the cross-sectioned scratch loads was used to determine the fracture toughness of the FeB and Fe2B layers. The results showed a fracture resistance of ˜2.8 {MPa}√ m for the FeB layer formed at the surface of borided AISI 1045 steel. Likewise, the effect of the DAP on the surface of the borided AISI 1045 steel promoted the formation of an exclusively Fe2B layer, with an increase in the fracture toughness of the whole boride layer around 5 {MPa}√ m. Finally, the principle of the technique can be used to minimize the influence of the anisotropic properties on the fracture toughness along the depth of boride layers.

  13. Dependence of fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron on austempering temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P.P. [Karnatak Regional Engineering Coll. (India). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Putatunda, S.K. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Ductile cast iron samples were austenitized at 927 C and subsequently austempered for 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours at 260 C, 288 C, 316 C, 343 C, 371 C, and 399 C. These were subjected to a plane strain fracture toughness test. Fracture toughness was found to initially increase with austempering temperature, reach a maximum, and then decrease with further rise in temperature. The results of the fracture toughness study and fractographic examination were correlated with microstructural features such as bainite morphology, the volume fraction of retained austenite, and its carbon content. It was found that fracture toughness was maximized when the microstructure consisted of lower bainite with about 30 vol pct retained austenite containing more than 1.8 wt pct carbon. A theoretical model was developed, which could explain the observed variation in fracture toughness with austempering temperature in terms of microstructural features such as the width of the ferrite blades and retained austenite content. A plot of K{sub IC}{sup 2} against {sigma}, (X{sub {gamma}}C{sub {gamma}}){sup 1/2} resulted in a straight line, as predicted by the model.

  14. Statistical analysis of the behavior of fracture toughness of compound bioceramic artificial bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shilian; Xu, Renping; Li, Ruoqi

    2011-12-01

    We show the manufacturing procedure of the test specimen of the compound bioceramic artificial bone, conduct experiments to measure its fracture toughness, and conclude that the experiment data conform to the two-parameter Weibull distribution with scale parameter β = 0.527369 and form parameter α = 5.24317. Furthermore, compound bioceramic artificial bone is of a high level of crack sensitivity and its data for the fracture toughness is has a high dispersion. We also analyze the evolution of the confidence level of the reliability of its fracture toughness. With the increase of the confidence level γ, the crack sensitivity increases, but the median, the discreteness, and the confidence intervals decrease. The size of the test specimen influences the experiment for the fracture toughness, the measured values and their dispersion, and there exists the conversion between size of the test specimen and that of the real device. We extend the results to introduce the statistic model of the size effect of the fracture toughness. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Bone fragility beyond strength and mineral density: Raman spectroscopy predicts femoral fracture toughness in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzana, Jason A; Maher, Jason R; Takahata, Masahiko; Schwarz, Edward M; Berger, Andrew J; Awad, Hani A

    2013-02-22

    Clinical prediction of bone fracture risk primarily relies on measures of bone mineral density (BMD). BMD is strongly correlated with bone strength, but strength is independent of fracture toughness, which refers to the bone's resistance to crack initiation and propagation. In that sense, fracture toughness is more relevant to assessing fragility-related fracture risk, independent of trauma. We hypothesized that bone biochemistry, determined by Raman spectroscopy, predicts bone fracture toughness better than BMD. This hypothesis was tested in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic mice (TNF-tg), which develop inflammatory-erosive arthritis and osteoporosis. The left femurs of TNF-tg and wild type (WT) littermates were measured with Raman spectroscopy and micro-computed tomography. Fracture toughness was assessed by cutting a sharp notch into the anterior surface of the femoral mid-diaphysis and propagating the crack under 3 point bending. Femoral fracture toughness of TNF-tg mice was significantly reduced compared to WT controls (p=0.04). A Raman spectrum-based prediction model of fracture toughness was generated by partial least squares regression (PLSR). Raman spectrum PLSR analysis produced strong predictions of fracture toughness, while BMD was not significantly correlated and produced very weak predictions. Raman spectral components associated with mineralization quality and bone collagen were strongly leveraged in predicting fracture toughness, reiterating the limitations of mineralization density alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness

  17. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinger, M. J.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness.

  18. Fracture toughness master curve characterization of Linde 1092 weld metal for Beaver valley 1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Yang, Won Jon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the test results obtained from the Korean contribution to the integrity assessment of low toughness Beaver Valley reactor vessel by characterizing the fracture toughness of Linde 1092 (No. 305414) weld metal. 10 PCVN specimens and 10 1T-CT specimens were tested in accordance with the ASTM E 1921-97 standard, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T o , for ferritic steels in the transition range'. This results can also be useful for assessment of Linde 80 low toughness welds of Kori-1

  19. In vitro comparative evaluation of the effect of two different fiber reinforcements on the fracture toughness of provisional restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Vaibhav D; Parkhedkar, Rambhau D

    2012-01-01

    Fracture of provisional fixed partial denture (FPD) may jeopardize the success of provisional prosthodontic treatment phase and cause patient discomfort. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture toughness of the Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) resin and Bis-Acryl Composite (BAC) resin reinforced with the Polyethylene and Glass fibers. Three groups (N=10) of each of the two materials were prepared for the fracture toughness test. Two groups had the different reinforcements and group without reinforcement served as the control. The mean fracture toughness (MPa.m½ ) was compared by One-way ANOVA, followed by the Scheffe analysis. Fracture toughness between fiber-reinforced PMMA and BAC resin was compared by the independent samples t test. For the controls, the fracture toughness for PMMA resin (0.91) was significantly lower than for the BAC resin (1.19). Glass fiber reinforcement produced significantly higher fracture toughness for both, PMMA (1.48) and BAC (1.82) resin, but the Polyethylene fibers did not (0.95 for PMMA and 1.23 for BAC resin). Among the reinforced groups, Silane impregnated Glass fibers showed highest fracture toughness for the BAC resin (1.82). Of two fiber reinforcement methods evaluated, Glass fiber reinforcement for the PMMA and BAC resin produced highest fracture toughness. On the basis of this in--vitro study, the use of Glass and Polyethylene fibers tested may be an effective way to reinforce resins used to fabricate fixed provisional restorations.

  20. Elastic-plastic load-carrying capacity of steel members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhas Pavol

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The load-carrying capacity of steel structures and members subjected mostly to bending depends in large measure on local stability of their compressed flanges and bending webs in decided cross-sections and areas. Depending on local stability, the elastic or plastic, eventually the elastic-plastic analysis and design can be applied. The actual standards for design of steel structures contain relatively detailed rules for elastic analysis by the elastic theory and for plastic analysis by the plastic theory. The elastic-plastic analysis and design of steel members are meanwhile still problematic from theory, standard and application point of view. The real elastic-plastic behavior of the steel members is complicated strength and stability problem. Therefore, the representative experimental knowledge and results about the real elastic-plastic behavior and mechanisms of failure of the steel members have been very important from the scientific and applied aspects. The author of paper realized in previous time the wide experimental research within the range of this intention. The paper contains selected knowledge and results of the previous experimental-theoretical investigation of the elastic-plastic local stability of the steel members subjected mostly to bending. The adequate slenderness – strain relation and methodology for practical calculation of the elastic-plastic bending load-carrying capacity of the steel cross-sections and members are presented in the paper.

  1. Influence of different surface treatments on the fracture toughness of a commercial ZTA dental ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Teixeira da Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate how mechanical surface treatments performed for removal of excess of molten glass, influence the fracture toughness of a dental zirconia toughened alumina (In-Ceram® Zirconia. Infiltrated ZTA disks were submitted to three different surface treatments (grinding, sandblasting and grinding + sandblasting + annealing. Fracture toughness was accessed through indentation strength test (IS. X ray diffraction was used to investigate the metastability of tetragonal zirconia particles under all treatments proposed. Kruskall-Wallis non-parametrical test and Weibull statistics were used to analyze the results. Grinding (group 1 introduced defects which decreased the fracture toughness and reliability, presenting the lowest K IC. On the other hand, grinding followed by sandblasting and annealing (group 3 presented the highest K IC. Sandblasting (group 2 presented the highest reliability but lower K IC compared to group 3.

  2. Effects of Forming Process on Composite mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Xingyi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare and analyse the effect of two different kinds of forming process on composite mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, the DCB specimens were tested by using hypothesis inspeetion method.A finite element model was also used to simulate the crack propagation process.The results demonstrate that the average of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness from silicon rubber flexible mold forming is a bit higher than that from metal rigid mold forming.Howevers the variance of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness from the two groups shows no significant difference.The crack propagation process of the two forming process is similar. The established finite element model, which is identical to the test results, can predict the process of the crack expansion effectively.

  3. Effects of low upper shelf fracture toughness on reactor vessel integrity during pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, W.H.; Heinecke, C.C.; Balkey, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    For the past decade, significant attention has been focused on the subject of nuclear rector vessel integrity during pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events. The issue of low upper shelf fracture toughness at operating temperatures has been a consideration for some reactor vessel materials since the early 1970's. Deterministic and probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity studies have been completed to evaluate the interaction between the PTS and lower upper shelf toughness issues that result from neutron embrittlement of the critical beltline region materials. This paper presents the results of these studies to show the interdependency of these fracture considerations in certain instances and to identify parameters that need to be carefully treated in reactor vessel integrity evaluations for these subjects. This issue is of great importance to those vessels which have low upper shelf toughness, both for demonstrating safety during the original design life and in life extension assessments

  4. Using Small Punch tests in environment under static load for fracture toughness estimation in hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, B.; Álvarez, J. A.; Lacalle, R.; González, P.; Gutiérrez-Solana, F.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the response of three medium and high-strength steels to hydrogen embrittlement is analyzed by means of the quasi-non-destructive test known as the Small Punch Test (SPT). SPT tests on notched specimens under static load are carried out, applying Lacaclle’s methodology to estimate the fracture toughness for crack initiation, comparing the results to KIEAC fracture toughness obtained from C(T) precracked specimens tested in the same environment; SPT showed good correlation to standard tests. A novel expression was proposed to define the parameter KIEAC-SP as the suitable one to estimate the fracture toughness for crack initiation in hydrogen embrittlement conditions by Small Punch means, obtaining good accuracy in its estimations. Finally, Slow Rate Small Punch Tests (SRSPT) are proposed as a more efficient alternative, introducing an order of magnitude for the adequate rate to be employed.

  5. Multiscale Polymer Composites: A Review of the Interlaminar Fracture Toughness Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwesh Dikshit

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials are prone to delamination as they are weaker in the thickness direction. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are introduced as a multiscale reinforcement into the fiber reinforced polymer composites to suppress the delamination phenomenon. This review paper presents the detailed progress made by the scientific and research community to-date in improving the Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness (ILFT by various methodologies including the effect of multiscale reinforcement. Methods of measuring the Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness of the composites along with the solutions to improve them are presented. The use of different methodologies and approaches along with their performance in enhancing the fracture toughness of the composites is summarized. The current state of polymer-fiber-nanotube composites and their future perspective are also deliberated.

  6. The importance of fracture toughness in ultrafine and nanocrystalline bulk materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippan, R; Hohenwarter, A

    2016-07-02

    The suitability of high-strength ultrafine and nanocrystalline materials processed by severe plastic deformation methods and aimed to be used for structural applications will strongly depend on their resistance against crack growth. In this contribution some general available findings on the damage tolerance of this material class will be summarized. Particularly, the occurrence of a pronounced fracture anisotropy will be in the center of discussion. In addition, the great potential of this generated anisotropy to obtain high-strength materials with exceptionally high fracture toughness in specific loading and crack growth directions will be enlightened. IMPACT STATEMENT Severely plastically deformed materials are reviewed in light of their damage tolerance. The frequently observed toughness anisotropy allows unprecedented fracture toughness - strength combinations.

  7. Effect of WC/Co coherency phase boundaries on Fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongxian; Song, Xiaoyan; Yin, Fuxing; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of coherency WC/Co phase boundaries on the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides is studied by MD simulation method. The simulation results show that the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides with coherency WC/Co phase boundaries has higher fracture toughness than that without coherency WC/Co phase boundaries. Moreover, the mechanism of why coherency WC/Co phase boundaries can improve the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides is also investigated. It is found the fact that the separation energy of the coherent WC/Co phase boundary is larger than that of the incoherent WC/Co phase boundaries is the main reason for this excellent mechanical property.

  8. Evaluation of fracture toughness characteristics for nuclear piping using various types of specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo; Yoo, Sang-Soo; Min, Jun-Ki; Koo, Jae-Mean; Seok, Chang-Sung

    2012-01-01

    The leak-before-break (LBB) concept is based on the fracture resistance curve obtained by J-R tests for various types of specimens. But fracture toughness data of various types of specimens are different. For example, the estimates for fracture toughness of standard specimens are conservative when compared to the fracture toughness of real pipes because of the difference of the constraint effect between real pipes and standard specimens. Therefore, to estimate the integrity of real pipes based on elastic–plastic fracture mechanics, we have to first establish the relations among real pipes, standard CT specimens and curved CT specimens. In this study, we perform fracture toughness tests of nuclear piping materials using various types of specimens. And each J-R curve considered in the constraint effect is compared. The experimental results showed that a curved CT specimen is similar to the cases of pipes with small crack angles (60° and 120°) and a CT specimen is similar to the case of pipes with the crack length of 180°. Also, the Q-stress for curved CT specimens is higher than that of pure bending pipe specimens and lower than that of CT specimens.

  9. Development of Fracture Toughness Evaluation Method for Composite Materials by Non-Destructive Testing Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. T.; Kim, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Fracture process of continuous fiber reinforced composites is very complex because various fracture mechanisms such as matrix cracking, debonding, delamination and fiber breaking occur simultaneously during crack growth. If fibers cause crack bridging during crack growth, the stable crack growth and unstable crack growth appear repeatedly. Therefore, it is very difficult to exactly determine tile starting point of crack growth and the fracture toughness at the critical crack length in composites. In this research, fracture toughness test for CFRP was accomplished by using acoustic emission(AE) and recording of tile fracture process in real time by video-microscope. The starting point of crack growth, pop-in point and the point of unstable crack growth can be exactly determined. Each fracture mechanism can be classified by analyzing the fracture process through AE and video-microscope. The more reliable method is the fracture toughness measurement of composite materials was proposed by using the combination of R-curve method, AE and video microscope

  10. A method to determine site-specific, anisotropic fracture toughness in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtle, Sabine; Özcoban, Hüseyin; Yilmaz, Ezgi D.; Fett, Theo; Rizzi, Gabriele; Lilleodden, Erica T.; Huber, Norbert; Schreyer, Andreas; Swain, Michael V.; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2012-01-01

    Many biological materials are hierarchically structured, with highly anisotropic structures and properties on several length scales. To characterize the mechanical properties of such materials, detailed testing methods are required that allow precise and site-specific measurements on several length scales. We propose a fracture toughness measurement technique based on notched focused ion beam prepared cantilevers of lower and medium micron size scales. Using this approach, site-specific fracture toughness values in dental enamel were determined. The usefulness and challenges of the method are discussed.

  11. Effect of Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Hot Isostatically Pressed 304L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    Herein, we have performed J- Resistance multi-specimen fracture toughness testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) and forged 304L austenitic stainless steel, tested at elevated (300 °C) and cryogenic (- 140 °C) temperatures. The work highlights that although both materials fail in a pure ductile fashion, stainless steel manufactured by HIP displays a marked reduction in fracture toughness, defined using J 0.2BL, when compared to equivalently graded forged 304L, which is relatively constant across the tested temperature range.

  12. Fracture toughness measurements on a glass bonded sodalite high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSanto, T.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; O'Holleran, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The electrometallurgical treatment of metallic spent nuclear fuel produces two high-level waste streams; cladding hulls and chloride salt. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream. The waste form consists of 75 Vol.% crystalline sodalite (containing the salt) with 25 Vol.% of an ''intergranular'' glassy phase. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on representative samples of this material using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confirmed by post-indentation polishing of a test sample. Young's modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and Young's modulus values are reported, along with results from scanning electron microscopy studies

  13. The modern evaluation method of fracture toughness of basaltplastic lining for engineering collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapidevskaya Olga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation methods of fracture toughness of reinforced blocks are considered for construction for engineering collectors. There are presented the methodical accesses that make possible to numerical describe all studies of destruction process of polymer lining with regard to simultaneously action the whole complex of exploitation factors. It is stated the data of fracture toughness of the composites on organic and nonorganic matrix in normal condition in comparison with basaltplastic lining. It is reported the dates of safety and critical coefficients of composite strains intensity on organic and nonorganic base in normal conditions.

  14. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P. A.; Wells, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  15. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  16. Generalized Fracture Toughness and Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Including Low Calcium Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golewski, Grzegorz Ludwik

    2017-12-06

    The paper presents the results of tests on the effect of the low calcium fly ash (LCFA) addition, in the amounts of: 0% (LCFA-00), 20% (LCFA-20) and 30% (LCFA-30) by weight of cement, on fracture processes in structural concretes. In the course of the experiments, compressive strength of concrete and fracture toughness for: I (tensile), II (in-plane shear) and III (anti-plane shear) models of cracking were measured. The tests determined the effect of age of concretes modified with LCFA on the analyzed parameters. The experiments were carried out after: 3, 7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of curing. Fracture toughness of concretes was determined in terms of the critical stress intensity factors: K I c S , K I I c , K I I I c and then a generalized fracture toughness K c was specified. The obtained results are significant for the analysis of concrete structures subjected to complex loading. The properties of composites with the additive of LCFA depend on the age of the concrete tested. Mature concretes exhibit high fracture toughness at 20% additive of LCFA, while the additive of LCFA in the amount of 30% weight of cement has a beneficial effect on the parameters of concrete only after half a year of curing.

  17. Generalized Fracture Toughness and Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Including Low Calcium Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Ludwik Golewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of tests on the effect of the low calcium fly ash (LCFA addition, in the amounts of: 0% (LCFA-00, 20% (LCFA-20 and 30% (LCFA-30 by weight of cement, on fracture processes in structural concretes. In the course of the experiments, compressive strength of concrete and fracture toughness for: I (tensile, II (in-plane shear and III (anti-plane shear models of cracking were measured. The tests determined the effect of age of concretes modified with LCFA on the analyzed parameters. The experiments were carried out after: 3, 7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of curing. Fracture toughness of concretes was determined in terms of the critical stress intensity factors: K I c S , K I I c , K I I I c and then a generalized fracture toughness K c was specified. The obtained results are significant for the analysis of concrete structures subjected to complex loading. The properties of composites with the additive of LCFA depend on the age of the concrete tested. Mature concretes exhibit high fracture toughness at 20% additive of LCFA, while the additive of LCFA in the amount of 30% weight of cement has a beneficial effect on the parameters of concrete only after half a year of curing.

  18. Macroscale and microscale fracture toughness of microporous sintered Ag for applications in power electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chuantong; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Jiu, Jinting; Sugahara, Tohru; Zhang, Hao; Iwashige, Tomohito; Sugiura, Kazuhiko; Tsuruta, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The application of microporous sintered silver (Ag) as a bonding material to replace conventional die-bonding materials in power electronic devices has attracted considerable interest. Characterization of the mechanical properties of microporous Ag will enable its use in applications such as lead-free solder electronics and provide a fundamental understanding of its design principles. However, the material typically suffers from thermal and mechanical stress during its production fabrication, and service. In this work, we have studied the effect of microporous Ag specimen size on fracture toughness from the microscale to the macroscale. A focused ion beam was used to fabricate 20-, 10- and 5-μm-wide microscale specimens, which were of the same order of magnitude as the pore networks in the microporous Ag. Micro-cantilever bending tests revealed that fracture toughness decreased as the specimen size decreased. Conventional middle-cracked tensile tests were performed to determine the fracture toughness of the macroscale specimens. The microscale and macroscale fracture toughness results showed a clear size effect, which is discussed in terms of both the deformation behavior of crack tip and the influence of pore networks within Ag with different specimen sizes. Finite element model simulations showed that stress at the crack tip increased as the specimen size increased, which led to larger plastic deformation and more energy being consumed when the specimen fractured.

  19. Fracture toughness enhancement of h-BN monolayers via hydrogen passivation of a crack edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Parashar, Avinash

    2017-04-21

    Molecular dynamics-based simulations were performed in conjunction with reactive force-field potential parameters to investigate the effect of crack-edge passivation via hydrogenation on the fracture properties of h-BN nanosheets. In semi-hydrogenated (H is attached to either B or N) and fully hydrogenated (H is attached to both B and N) crack-edge atoms, three hybridisation states-sp 2 , sp 3 and sp 2  + sp 3 -were considered in the simulations. Significant improvement in the fracture toughness of h-BN nanosheets was predicted with semi- and fully hydrogenated crack-edge atoms. An overall improvement in fracture toughness of h-BN in the range of 16%-23% was estimated with the sp 3 or sp 2  + sp 3 hybridisation state of crack-edge atoms. This significant shift in the fracture toughness of h-BN nanosheets was attributed to lowered crack-edge energy, a stress-relieving mechanism and blunting of the crack tip. Semi-hydrogenated crack-edge atoms with hydrogen attached only to N atoms have shown a negative response in terms of fracture toughness.

  20. Determination of Dynamic Fracture Toughness Properties of Rail Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    Motivated by the occurrence of a long-running rail web fracture in service, dynamic fracture mechanics research was undertaken to (1) quantify the crack driving force due to the residual stresses induced by roller straightening operations, (2) determ...

  1. Fracture toughness and reliability in high-temperature structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    fabrication of high strength ceramics. Also, it was felt that the high initial strength is not a solution if the material is readily degraded as a result of service conditions. Further, eliminating flaws did marginal to enhance the reliability or toughness of the ceramic throughout the duration of its operational lifetime. Subsequently, the ...

  2. Fracture toughness of the F-82H steel-effect of loading modes, hydrogen, and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.-X.; Jones, R.H.; Hirth, J.P.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of loading mode, hydrogen, and temperature on fracture toughness and tearing modulus were examined for a ferritic/martensitic steel (F-82H). The introduction of a shear load component, mode III, significantly decreased the initiation and propagation resistance of cracks compared to the opening load, mode I, behavior. Mode I crack initiation and propagation exhibited the highest resistance. A minimum resistance occurred when the mode I and mode III loads were nearly equal. The presence of 4 wppm hydrogen decreased the cracking resistance compared to behavior without H regardless of the loading mode. The minimum mixed-mode fracture toughness with the presence of hydrogen was about 30% of the hydrogen-free mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode toughness exhibited a lesser sensitivity to temperature than the mode I toughness. The J IC value was 284 kJ/m 2 at room temperature, but only 60 kJ/m 2 at -55 C and 30 kJ/m 2 at -90 C. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was apparently higher than -55 C. (orig.)

  3. Fracture toughness of Kevlar 29/poly(methyl methacrylate) composite materials for surgical implantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourdeyhimi, B; Robinson, H H; Schwartz, P; Wagner, H D

    1986-01-01

    A study of the fracture behaviour of Kevlar 29 reinforced dental cement is undertaken using both linear elastic and nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics techniques. Results from both approaches--of which the nonlinear elastic is believed to be more appropriate--indicate that a reinforcing effect is obtained for the fracture toughness even at very low fibre content. The flexural strength and modulus are apparently not improved, however, by the incorporation of Kevlar 29 fibres in the PMMA cement, probably because of the presence of voids, the poor fibre/matrix interfacial bonding and unsatisfying cement mixing practice. When compared to other PMMA composite cements, the present system appears to be probably more effective than carbon/PMMA, for example, in terms of fracture toughness. More experimental and analytical work is needed so as to optimize the mechanical properties with respect to structural parameters and cement preparation technique.

  4. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  5. Fracture toughness of yttria-stabilized zirconia sintered in conventional and microwave ovens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinis, Aristotelis; Aquilino, Steven A; Lund, Peter S; Gratton, David G; Stanford, Clark M; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Qian, Fang

    2013-03-01

    The fabrication of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) dental prosthetic substructures requires an extended sintering process (8 to 10 hours) in a conventional oven. Microwave sintering is a shorter process (2 hours) than conventional sintering. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture toughness of 3 mol % Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 sintered in a conventional or microwave oven. Partially sintered ZrO2 specimens from 3 manufacturers, KaVo, Lava 3M, and Crystal HS were milled (KaVo Everest engine) and randomly divided into 2 groups: conventional sintering and microwave sintering (n=16 per group). The specimens were sintered according to the manufacturers' recommendations and stored in artificial saliva for 10 days. Fracture toughness was determined by using a 4-point bend test, and load to fracture was recorded. Mean fracture toughness for each material was calculated. A 2-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HDS post hoc test was used to assess the significance of sintering and material effects on fracture toughness, including an interaction between the 2 factors (α=.05). The 2-way ANOVA suggested a significant main effect for ZrO2 manufacturer (P.05). The main effect of the sintering process (Conventional [5.30 MPa·m(1/2) ±1.00] or Microwave [5.36 MPa·m(1/2) ±0.92]) was not significant (P=.76), and there was no interaction between sintering and ZrO2 manufacturer (P=.91). Based on the results of this study, no statistically significant difference was observed in the fracture toughness of ZrO2 sintered in microwave or conventional ovens. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L; Oldknow, Karla J; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-12-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1(-/-) and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1(-/-)). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality. Copyright © 2014

  7. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  8. Dynamic Fracture Toughness of TaC/CNTs/SiC CMCs Prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyun Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the fracture toughness of TaC and carbon nanotubes (CNTs reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS technique. A high densification of 98.4% was achieved under the sintering parameter of 133°C/min, 1800°C, and 90 MPa pressure. Vickers indentation was employed to measure the indentation toughness on the polished surface of ceramic samples, SEM was applied to directly observe the crack propagation after indentation, and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB was developed to determine the dynamic fracture toughness within the ceramic samples subjected to an impact in a three-point bending configuration.

  9. Mixed mode fracture toughness characterization of sandwich interfaces using the modified TSD specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Christian; Andreasen, J.H.; Carlsson, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive parametric analysis shows that the modified Tilted Sandwich Debond (TSD) specimen provides a methodology for characterization of the face/core fracture resistance over a range of mode-mixities. A pilot experimental mixed mode characterization of the fracture toughness of sandwich spe...... specimens, with composite faces and various PVC foam cores spanning a range of phase angles, has been achieved by specific steel bar reinforcements and testing over a range of tilt angles....

  10. Effect of Control Mode and Test Rate on the Measured Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of control mode and test rate on the measured fracture toughness of ceramics were evaluated by using chevron-notched flexure specimens in accordance with ASTM C1421. The use of stroke control gave consistent results with about 2% (statistically insignificant) variation in measured fracture toughness for a very wide range of rates (0.005 to 0.5 mm/min). Use of strain or crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) control gave approx. 5% (statistically significant) variation over a very wide range of rates (1 to 80 µm/m/s), with the measurements being a function of rate. However, the rate effect was eliminated by use of dry nitrogen, implying a stress corrosion effect rather than a stability effect. With the use of a nitrogen environment during strain controlled tests, fracture toughness values were within about 1% over a wide range of rates (1 to 80 micons/m/s). CMOD or strain control did allow stable crack extension well past maximum force, and thus is preferred for energy calculations. The effort is being used to confirm recommendations in ASTM Test Method C1421 on fracture toughness measurement.

  11. Improvement of the fracture toughness matrix cured by electron beam radiation, by incorporation of thermoplastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauray, E.

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the fracture toughness of a vinyl-ester matrix cured by electron beam radiation, by incorporation of a thermoplastic polymer. The ultimate plan is to improve the fracture toughness of the composite material made of this reinforced matrix and carbon fibres. The first step deals with the study of an epoxy matrix reinforced by a polyether-sulfone. This well-known material, as it is used in industrial formulation, allowed us to characterize all the parameters needed to obtain a good reinforcement as for instance the morphology, and also to compare two kinds of processes: thermal and electron beam curing. In fact, we are really interested in increasing fracture toughness of a vinyl-ester matrix that is not miscible with polyether-sulfone. So a copolymer which has a similar structure as polyether-sulfone is synthesized in order to obtain a miscible blend. The corresponding material has good fracture toughness, with an increase of 80 % for 15 % addition of thermoplastic. (author)

  12. Effect of static pre-loading on fracture toughness of Nicalon fibre glass matrix composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Chawla, K. K.; Kulkarmi, R.; Koopman, M.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    č. 367 (2004), s. 17-23 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Nicalon fibre * glass matrix composite * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  13. Effect of Thermal Aging on SCC, Material Properties and Fracture Toughness of Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, T.; Ballinger, R. G.; Hanninen, H.; Saukkonen, T.

    An experimental program has been conducted in order to understand how the spinodal decomposition may affect material properties changes in Type 316L BWR pipe weld metals. The program includeed Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth and in-situ fracture toughness testing as a function of aging time and temperature. In this paper we report results of fracture toughness, SCC crack growth rate and fracture morphology studies of Type 316L stainless steel weld metals under simulated BWR conditions, consisting of 288°C, high purity water containing 300 ppb dissolved oxygen (defined for purposes of this paper as "In-Situ"). SCC crack growth results show an approximately 2X increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged material. In-situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40% over the corresponding at-temperature air values. Detailed analysis of the results strongly suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation in properties measured ex-environment. Analysis of the results also strongly suggests that the in-situ properties degradation is the result of hydrogen absorbed by the material during exposure to the high temperature aqueous environment.

  14. Reliability of the Chevron-notch technique for fracture toughness determination in glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Rawlings, R. D.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 347, 1/2 (2003), s. 102-108 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Fracture toughness * Glass * Chevron-notch technique Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.365, year: 2003

  15. Effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of 17-4 PH stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capeletti, T.L.

    1976-01-01

    Fracture toughness (K/sub c/) of 17-4 PH stainless steel decreased significantly with increased hydrogen test pressure for a variety of heat treatment conditions: solution annealed, underaged, peak-aged, and overaged. Minimum toughness (13 MPa√m) was obtained with peak-aged samples tested in 69.5-MPa hydrogen; toughness was maximum (100 MPa√m) for samples tested in helium. Aging treatments increased the hardness from 28 R/sub c/ for solution-annealed material to 42 R/c/ for peak-aged material and correspondingly decreased the fracture toughness in high-pressure hydrogen (K/sub H/) from 31 to 13 MPa√m. However, increased hardness had no substantial effect on the K/sub c/ in helium. Fracture mechanism changed from predominantly ductile rupture in helium to cleavage in 69.5-MPa hydrogen, with mixed-mode fractures at lower hydrogen pressure (3.5-MPa). On the basis of these data, 17-4 PH stainless steel is not recommended for hydrogen service

  16. Fracture toughness evaluation of heat-treated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoda, T.; Kasai, Y.; Kimoto, H.; Chiba, N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tests of full-size pressure tubes and compact tension specimens having several widths that are carried out with emphasis on the size effect on the fracture toughness of the pressure tube material, which is made of heat-treated Zr-2.5Nb. The hydrogen concentration of the specimens ranges from 10 to 400 ppm, and the test temperature from room temperature to 573 K. In the pressure tube burst tests at room temperature using radial hydrided materials, fracture toughness at maximum pressure K c decreased rapidly with hydrogen concentration in the region where the concentration was less than 100 ppm. In the region where the hydrogen concentration was higher than 100 ppm, K c slowly decreased with increased concentration. For materials having radial hydrides at a hydrogen concentration of 200 to 300 ppm, a steep brittle-ductile transition was observed at about 550 K. Fracture toughness K c shows strong dependence on specimen size, increasing and approaching that of pressure tubes with increased specimen width for a ductile material. This size effect of fracture toughness can be determined by a failure assessment method in which the Dugdale model is used

  17. The effect of electric discharge machined notches on the fracture toughness of several structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    Recent computational studies of the stress and strain fields at the tip of very sharp notches have shown that the stress and strain fields are very weakly dependent on the initial geometry of the notch once the notch has been blunted to a radius that is 6 to 10 times the initial root radius. It follows that if the fracture toughness of a material is sufficiently high so that fracture initiation does not occur in a specimen until the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) reaches a value from 6 to 10 times the size of the initial notch tip diameter, then the fracture toughness will be independent of whether a fatigue crack or a machined notch served as the initial crack. In this experimental program the fracture toughness (J Ic and J resistance (J-R) curve, and CTOD) for several structure alloys was measured using specimens with conventional fatigue cracks and with EDM machined notches. The results of this program have shown, in fact, that most structural materials do not achieve initiation CTOD values on the order of 6 to 10 times the radius of even the smallest EDM notch tip presently achievable. It is found furthermore that tougher materials do not seem to be less dependent on the type of notch tip present. Some materials are shown to be much more dependent on the type of notch tip used, but no simple pattern is found that relates this observed dependence to the material strength toughness, or strain hardening rate

  18. Strategies for fracture toughness, strength and reliability optimisation of ceramic-ceramic laminates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestáková, L.; Bermejo, R.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Danzer, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 6 (2011), s. 613-626 ISSN 1862-5282 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Ceramic laminates * Layered ceramics * Residual stress * Fracture toughness * Threshold strength Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.830, year: 2011

  19. Small specimen measurements of dynamic fracture toughness of heavy section steels for nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Iwadate, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1987-01-01

    This study presents the dynamic fracture toughness properties (KId) of 12 heats of RPV steels measured using small specimens and analysed based on the current research. The correlation between the KId test and other engineering small specimen tests such as Charpy test and drop weight test are also discussed and a method to predict the KId value is presented. (orig./HP)

  20. Irradiation effects on thermal shock resistance and its fracture toughness of HTGR graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Sennosuke; Imamura, Yoshio; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Awaji, Hideo; Oku, Tatsuo.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes changes in the thermal shock resistance delta = σsub(t)k / E alpha (σsub(t): tensile strength, k: thermal conductivity, E: Young's modulus, alpha : coefficient of thermal expansion) and the thermal shock fracture toughness delta = K sub( ic)k / E alpha (K sub( ic): fracture toughness value of the mode I) in addition to usual mechanical properties including the diametral compressive strength and fracture toughness of four varieties of graphite (IM2-24, 7477, H327 and SMG) for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor due to neutron irradiations of (1.6 -- 2.3) x 10 21 n/cm 2 ( gt 0.18 MeV) at 600 -- 850 0 C. These experiments are carried out by means of our recently developed techniques using small disk type specimens which are very effective for a capsule irradiation in the JMTR. Both the thermal shock resistance and the thermal shock fracture toughness of graphites after irradiation are expressed to decrease remarkably in contrast with the increase of the usual mechanical strength. (author)

  1. Shape effect of ultrafine-grained structure on static fracture toughness in low-alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tadanobu; Kimura, Yuuji; Ochiai, Shojiro

    2012-01-01

    A 0.4C-2Si-1Cr-1Mo steel with an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure and an ultrafine equiaxed grain (UFG) structure was fabricated by multipass caliber rolling at 773 K and subsequent annealing at 973 K. A static three-point bending test was conducted at ambient temperature and at 77 K. The strength–toughness balance of the developed steels was markedly better than that of conventionally quenched and tempered steel with a martensitic structure. In particular, the static fracture toughness of the UFEG steel, having a yield strength of 1.86 GPa at ambient temperature, was improved by more than 40 times compared with conventional steel having a yield strength of 1.51 GPa. Furthermore, even at 77 K, the fracture toughness of the UFEG steel was about eight times higher than that of the conventional and UFG steels, despite the high strength of the UFEG steel (2.26 GPa). The UFG steel exhibited brittle fracture behavior at 77 K, as did the conventional steel, and no dimple structure was observed on the fracture surface. Therefore, it is difficult to improve the low-temperature toughness of the UFG steel by grain refinement only. The shape of crystal grains plays an important role in delamination toughening, as do their refinement and orientation. PMID:27877493

  2. Fracture toughness improvement of austempered high silicon steel by titanium, vanadium and rare earth elements modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Li Yanxiang

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure of austempered high silicon (AHS) steel before and after treating with a modifier containing titanium, vanadium and rare earth elements (so-called Ti-V-RE modifier) and austempered at different temperatures has been investigated. The plane strain fracture toughness of the steel in room temperature and ambient atmosphere has been examined. The microstructure was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical metallography and correlated to the fracture toughness of the steel. The results show that the primary austenite grains are refined, the dendritic austempered structure is eliminated, and the volume of blocky shaped retained austenite is reduced by the addition of Ti-V-RE modifier. Modification with Ti-V-RE modifier can prompt the bainitic ferrite transformation and reduce the volume fraction of retained austenite. High fracture toughness is obtained for AHS steel with the addition of Ti-V-RE modifier when austempered between 350 and 385 deg. C with a retained austenite of 30-35% and the carbon content in the austenite is about 1.9-2%. The fracture toughness of AHS steel by the modification treatment can increase 10-40% than that of unmodified, an optimum value of 85 MPa m 1/2 was obtained when austempered at 385 deg. C

  3. Fracture toughness improvement of austempered high silicon steel by titanium, vanadium and rare earth elements modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiang [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Yanxiang [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: yanxiang@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2007-01-25

    The microstructure of austempered high silicon (AHS) steel before and after treating with a modifier containing titanium, vanadium and rare earth elements (so-called Ti-V-RE modifier) and austempered at different temperatures has been investigated. The plane strain fracture toughness of the steel in room temperature and ambient atmosphere has been examined. The microstructure was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and optical metallography and correlated to the fracture toughness of the steel. The results show that the primary austenite grains are refined, the dendritic austempered structure is eliminated, and the volume of blocky shaped retained austenite is reduced by the addition of Ti-V-RE modifier. Modification with Ti-V-RE modifier can prompt the bainitic ferrite transformation and reduce the volume fraction of retained austenite. High fracture toughness is obtained for AHS steel with the addition of Ti-V-RE modifier when austempered between 350 and 385 deg. C with a retained austenite of 30-35% and the carbon content in the austenite is about 1.9-2%. The fracture toughness of AHS steel by the modification treatment can increase 10-40% than that of unmodified, an optimum value of 85 MPa m{sup 1/2} was obtained when austempered at 385 deg. C.

  4. Roughness effects on the critical fracture toughness of materials under uniaxial stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, George

    1998-01-01

    The Griffith criterion is applied for the calculation of the critical fracture toughness upon which the formation of a rough self-affine crack (which is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude σ, the correlation length ξ, and the roughness exponent H) commences. For large crack sizes R»ξ, the

  5. THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL VARIATIONS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancik, J.; Arola, D.

    2012-01-01

    The crack growth resistance of human dentin was characterized as a function of relative distance from the DEJ and the corresponding microstructure. Compact tension specimens were prepared from the coronal dentin of caries-free 3rd molars. The specimens were sectioned from either the outer, middle or inner dentin. Stable crack extension was achieved under Mode I quasi-static loading, with the crack oriented in-plane with the tubules, and the crack growth resistance was characterized in terms of the initiation (Ko), growth (Kg) and plateau (Kp) toughness. A hybrid approach was also used to quantify the contribution of dominant mechanisms to the overall toughness. Results showed that human dentin exhibits increasing crack growth resistance with crack extension in all regions, and that the fracture toughness of inner dentin (2.2±0.5 MPa•m0.5) was significantly lower than that of middle (2.7±0.2 MPa•m0.5) and outer regions (3.4±0.3 MPa•m0.5). Extrinsic toughening, composed mostly of crack bridging, was estimated to cause an average increase in the fracture energy of 26% in all three regions. Based on these findings, dental restorations extended into deep dentin are much more likely to cause tooth fracture due to the greater potential for introduction of flaws and decrease in fracture toughness with depth. PMID:23131531

  6. Heat treatment effect on fracture toughness of F82H irradiated in HFIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, N.; Sokolov, M. A.; Tanigawa, H.; Hirose, T.; Jitsukawa, S.; Sawai, T.; Odette, G. R.; Stoller, R. E.

    2011-10-01

    Irradiation hardening and fracture toughness of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel F82H after irradiation were investigated with a focus on changing the fracture toughness transition temperature as a result of several heat treatments. The specimens were standard F82H-IEA (IEA), F82H-IEA with several heat treatments (Mod1 series) and a heat of F82H (Mod3) containing 0.1% tantalum. The specimens were irradiated up to 20 dpa at 300 °C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor under a collaborative research program between JAEA/US-DOE. The results of hardness tests showed that irradiation hardening of IEA was comparable with that of Mod3. However, the fracture toughness-transition temperature of Mod3 was lower than that of IEA. The transition temperature of Mod1 was also lower than that of the IEA heat. These results suggest that optimization of specifications on the heat treatment condition and modification of the minor alloying elements seem to be effective to reduce the fracture toughness-transition temperature after irradiation.

  7. Micromechanical prediction of fracture toughness for pressure vessel steel using a coupled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldthorpe, M.R.; Wiesner, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Ferritic components in nuclear plant should ideally operate on the upper shelf of the ductile to brittle transition curve describing the variation of material toughness with temperature. A method of analyzing the ductile to brittle transition region of a ferritic steel using a coupled micromechanical model of ductile damage, stable crack growth and cleavage fracture has been developed to improve the definition of upper shelf behavior for actual structures. Ductile damage is modelled using the Gurson model as modified by Tvergaard, along with a specially developed crack growth user element. The probability of cleavage fracture is predicted by post-processing the finite element results using the Beremin model of cleavage fracture. Predictions are made of ductile tearing and cleavage fracture in test specimen and wide plate configurations of A533B steel for a range of temperatures. The coupled model is capable of predicting transition toughness and transition temperature shifts for different levels of structural constraint. An analytically-based definition of the onset of upper shelf temperature (OUST) is the temperature at which the coupled ductile damage/cleavage fracture model predicts a probability of failure by cleavage fracture of 5%. Estimates of the shift in the OUST due to different levels of in-plane crack tip constraint are made using the elastic T-stress as a measure of constraint. There is potential for using the T-stress as a measure of structural constraint in order to determine shifts in transition temperature for materials with degraded toughness

  8. Research on Magnetoinductive NDE Techniques to Measure Tensile Strength and Fracture Toughness in Steels as They are Manufactured

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Charpy measurements, a knife edge pendulum was dropped from a height h. The minimum height from which the specimen fractures gives a measure of the...on Charpy specimens since the Charpy test is one way of measuring fracture toughness. Fracture 4 toughness was varied by heat-treating the specimens...specimens were machined with V- notches, according to the standard Charpy dimensional specifications [18], and then NLH measurements were performed at two

  9. Fracture Toughness of Nanohybrid and Hybrid Composites Stored Wet and Dry up to 60 Days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sookhakiyan M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Patients’ demand for tooth-colored restoratives in the posterior region is increasing. Clinicians use universal nanohybrid resin composites for both anterior and posterior regions. There are few published reports comparing fracture toughness of nonohybrids and that of hybrid composite stored wet and dry. Objectives: To investigate the fracture toughness of three nanohybrids compared to that of a hybrid resin composite stored dry or wet up to 60 days, using four- point bending test. Materials and Methods: Four resin composites were used: three nanohybrids; Filtek Supreme (3M, Ice (SDI, TPH3 (Dentsply and one hybrid Filtek P60 (3M. For each material, 40 rectangular notched beam specimens were prepared with dimensions of 30 mm × 5mm × 2mm. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10 and stored at 37ºC either in distilled water or dry for 1 and 60 days. The specimens were placed on the four-point test jig and subjected to force (N using universal testing machine loaded at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min and maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and KIc was calculated. Results: Three-way ANOVA showed a significant interaction between all the factors (all p < .0001. Except for TPH3, all tested materials showed significantly higher KIc when stored dry than stored wet (p < 0.05. After 1 day of dry storage, Ice showed the highest KIc (2.04 ± 0.32 followed by Filtek P60 and the lowest was for Filtek Supreme (1.39 ± 0.13. The effect of time on fracture toughness was material dependent. Conclusions: Wet storage adversely affected the fracture toughness of almost all materials. Keeping the restoration dry in the mouth may increase their fracture toughness. Therefore, using a coating agent on the surface of restoration may protect them from early water uptake and increase their strength during a time period.

  10. Application of Master Curve fracture toughness for reactor pressure vessel integrity assessment in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, William; Rosinski, Stan; Lott, Randy; Kim, Charles; Weakland, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The Master Curve fracture toughness approach has been used in the USA for better defining the transition temperature fracture toughness of irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels for end-of-life (EOL) and EOL extension (EOLE) time periods. The first application was for the Kewaunee plant in which the life-limiting material was a circumferential weld metal. Fracture toughness testing of this weld metal corresponding to EOL and beyond EOLE was used to reassess the PTS screening value, RT PTS , and to develop new operating pressure-temperature curves. The NRC has approved this application using a shift-based methodology and higher safety margins than those proposed by the utility and its contractors. Beaver Valley Unit 1, a First Energy nuclear plant, has performed similar fracture toughness testing, but none of the testing has been conducted at EOL or EOLE at this time. Therefore, extrapolation of the life-limiting plate data to higher fluences is necessary, and the projections will be checked in the next decade by Master Curve fracture toughness testing of all of the Beaver Valley Unit 1 beltline materials (three plates and three welds) at fluences near or greater than EOLE. A supplemental surveillance capsule has been installed in the sister plant, Beaver Valley Unit 2, which has the capability of achieving a higher lead factor while operating under essentially the same environment. The Beaver Valley Unit 1 evaluation has been submitted to the NRC. This paper reviews the shift-based approach taken for the Beaver Valley Unit 1 RPV and presents the use of the RT T 0 methodology (which evolved out of the Master Curve testing and endorsed through two ASME Code Cases). The applied margin accounts for uncertainties in the various material parameters. Discussion of a direct measurement of RT T 0 approach, as originally submitted for the Kewaunee case, is also presented

  11. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Lithium disilicate glass ceramic discs were prepared with two different surface preparations consisting of gritblasted with aluminium oxide, and gritblasted and etched with hydrofluoric acid. Ceramic surfaces with a chevron shaped circular hole were treated by an optimized silane treatment followed by an unfilled resin and then three different resin cements (Variolink II, Panavia F2, and Multilink Sprint). Specimens were kept in distilled water at 37°C for 24h and then subjected to thermocycling. The interfacial fracture toughness was measured and mode of failures was also examined. Data were analysed using analysis of variance followed by T-test analysis. No statistically significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between the gritblasted and gritblasted and etched surfaces for Variolink II resin cement was found (P>0.05). For the gritblasted ceramic surfaces, no significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between Panavia F2 and Variolink II was observed (P>0.05). For the gritblasted and etched ceramic surfaces, a significantly higher fracture toughness for Panavia F2 than the other cements was found (Pceramic system was affected by the surface treatment and the type of luting agent. Dual-cured resin cements demonstrated a better bonding efficacy to the lithium disilicate glass ceramic compared to the self-adhesive resin cement. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic surfaces should be gritblasted and etched to get the best bond when used with Panavia F2 and Multilink Sprint resin cements, whereas for the Variolink II only gritblasting is required. The best bond overall is achieved with Panavia F2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fracture fragility of HFIR vessel caused by random crack size or random toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Shih-Jung; Proctor, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    This report discuses the probability of fracture (fracture fragility) versus a range of applied hoop stresses along the HFIR vessel which is obtained as an estimate of its fracture capacity. Both the crack size and the fracture toughness are assumed to be random variables that follow given distribution functions. Possible hoop stress is based on the numerical solution of the vessel response by applying a point pressure-pulse it the center of the fluid volume within the vessel. Both the fluid-structure interaction and radiation embrittlement are taken into consideration. Elastic fracture mechanics is used throughout the analysis. The probability of vessel fracture for a single crack caused by either a variable crack depth or a variable toughness is first derived. Then the probability of fracture with multiple number of cracks is obtained. The probability of fracture is further extended to include different levels of confidence and variability. It, therefore, enables one to estimate the high confidence and low probability capacity accident load

  13. Elastic-plastic code in the static regime for two-dimensional structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, S.

    1976-07-01

    The finite-element computer code STEP-2D, which was conceived as a numerical tool for basic research in fracture mechanics presently under way in the Materials Division of JRC Ispra is described. The code employs 8-node isoparametric elements for calculating elastic-plastic stress and strain distributions in 2-D geometries. The von Mises yield criterion is used. Material strain hardening is described by means of either the isotropic or the so-called 'overlay' model. An incremental solution is employed in the plastic range. The program has been written in Fortran IV and compiled on an IBM 370-165

  14. Response of mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of composite laminates with carbon nanotubes interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Liang, Y. M.; Xu, G. Y.

    2007-07-01

    Aggregation is usually unavoidable for the carbon nanotubes due to the high surface free energy. In this paper, an attempt was carried out to investigate the effects of the nanotube's films as ply interfaces on the mode II interlaminar fracture toughness. The nanotubes were distributed into absolute ethyl alcohol solvent and acted as core solutions. A polymer, Poly(methylmethacrylate)(PMMA), was dissolved in solvent and acted as shell solutions. Then, the core and shell solutions were electrospun into compound nanofibers by use of a co-axial electrospinning to obtain a second distribution for the carbon nanotubes. The compound nanofibers were collected as thin films in a reasonable thickness and were inserted into the middle interface of a composite laminate. For comparison, the core solutions were sprayed directly onto the surface of the middle ply of the preformed laminates. End notched flexure (ENF) test was applied to investigate the effect of the nanotubes in different forms on the interlaminar fracture toughness of the cured laminates. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fracture mechanics of the ENF specimens. Testing results have shown that the nanotubes have significant reinforcement effect on the interlaminar fracture toughness for those studied cases in this research. SEM analysis of the fracture surface of the ENF specimens has indicated that the polymer nanofibers and nanotubes have a good consistency with the matrix resin of the laminates.

  15. Fracture toughness behaviour using small CCT specimen of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Dong Joon; Kim, Young Suk; Ahn, Sang Bok; Im, Kyung Soo; Kwon, Sang Chul; Cheong, Yong Mu

    2001-03-01

    Fracture toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube is the essential data to estimate the CCL(critical crack length) for the concept of LBB(Leak-Before-Break) in PHWR. Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes could be degraded due to the absorption of hydrogen from coolant and the irradiation. To investigate the fracture toughness behaviour such as J-resistance curves, dJ/da, and CCL of some Zr-alloys (CANDU-double, -quad, CW-E125, TMT-E125, E-635), the transverse tensile test and the fracture toughness test of small CCT (Curved Compact Tension) specimen with 17 mm width were carried out with the variation of testing temperature at different testing condition. To define the fracture mechanism of degradation, the fractographic comparison of fracture surface was performed using the stereoscope and SEM. In addition, the effect of non-uniformed pre-fatigue crack was also studied. In conclusion, CANDU double-melted was less tougher than CANDU quad-melted and the hydrogen embrittlement was found at room temperature. Finally, while the effect of non-uniformed pre-fatigue crack was considerable at room temperature, this effect was disappeared at 250-300 .deg. C

  16. Effect of autoclave postpolymerization treatments on the fracture toughness of autopolymerizing dental acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkan, Rukiye; Gürbüz, Ayhan; Yilmaz, Burak; Özel, M Birol; Bağış, Bora

    2012-06-26

    Microwave and water bath postpolymerization have been suggested as methods to improve the mechanical properties of heat and autopolymerizing acrylic resins. However, the effects of autoclave heating on the fracture properties of autopolymerizing acrylic resins have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of various autoclave postpolymerization methods on the fracture properties of 3 different autopolymerizing acrylic resins. Forty-two specimens of 3 different autopolymerizing acrylic resins (Orthocryl, Paladent RR and Futurajet) were fabricated (40x8x4mm), and each group was further divided into 6 subgroups (n=7). Control group specimens remained as processed (Group 1). The first test group was postpolymerized in a cassette autoclave at 135°C for 6 minutes and the other groups were postpolymerized in a conventional autoclave at 130°C using different time settings (5, 10, 20 or 30 minutes). Fracture toughness was then measured with a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Duncan test (α=0.05). The fracture toughness of Orthocryl and Paladent-RR acrylic resins significantly increased following conventional autoclave postpolymerization at 130°C for 10 minutes (Pautoclave postpolymerized Futurajet was not significantly different than its control specimens (Pautoclaved at 130°C for 10 minutes. Within the limitations of this study, it can be suggested that autoclave postpolymerization is an effective method for increasing the fracture toughness of tested autoploymerized acrylic resins.

  17. Rock Fracture Toughness Under Mode II Loading: A Theoretical Model Based on Local Strain Energy Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi Moghaddam, M.; Ayatollahi, M. R.; Berto, F.

    2018-01-01

    The values of mode II fracture toughness reported in the literature for several rocks are studied theoretically by using a modified criterion based on strain energy density averaged over a control volume around the crack tip. The modified criterion takes into account the effect of T-stress in addition to the singular terms of stresses/strains. The experimental results are related to mode II fracture tests performed on the semicircular bend and Brazilian disk specimens. There are good agreements between theoretical predictions using the generalized averaged strain energy density criterion and the experimental results. The theoretical results reveal that the value of mode II fracture toughness is affected by the size of control volume around the crack tip and also the magnitude and sign of T-stress.

  18. Fracture Toughness of Veneering Ceramics for Fused to Metal (PFM) and Zirconia Dental Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.; Sundar, Veeraraghaven

    2010-01-01

    Veneering ceramics designed to be used with modern zirconia framework restorations have been reported to fracture occasionally in vivo. The fracture toughness of such veneering ceramics was measured and compared to that of conventional feldspathic porcelain veneering ceramics for metal framework restorations. The fracture toughness of the leucite free veneer was measured to be 0.73 MPa m ± 0.02 MPa m, which is less than that for the porcelain fused to metal (PFM) veneering ceramic: 1.10 MPa ± 0.2 MPa. (Uncertainties are one standard deviation unless otherwise noted.) The surface crack in flexure (SCF) method was suitable for both materials, but precrack identification was difficult for the leucite containing feldspathic porcelain PFM veneer. PMID:21833158

  19. Fracture toughening and toughness asymmetry induced by flexoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Amir; Peco, Christian; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Catalan, Gustau; Arias, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Cracks generate the largest strain gradients that any material can withstand. Flexoelectricity (coupling between strain gradient and polarization) must therefore play an important role in fracture physics. Here we use a self-consistent continuum model to evidence two consequences of flexoelectricity in fracture: the resistance to fracture increases as structural size decreases, and it becomes asymmetric with respect to the sign of polarization. The latter phenomenon manifests itself in a range of intermediate sizes where piezo- and flexoelectricity compete. In BaTiO3 at room temperature, this range spans from 0.1 to 50 nm, a typical thickness range for epitaxial ferroelectric thin films.

  20. Fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel plate and weld metal steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.

    1988-01-01

    Compact tension specimens were used to measure the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel steel plates and submerged arc weld metal. Plate test specimens were manufactured from four different casts of steel comprising: aluminium killed C-Mn-Mo-Cu and C-Mn steel and two silicon killed C-Mn steels. Unionmelt No. 2 weld metal test specimens were extracted from welds of double V butt geometry having either the C-Mn-Mo-Cu steel (three weld joints) or one particular silicon killed C-Mn steel (two weld joints) as parent plate. A multiple specimen test technique was used to obtain crack growth data which were analysed by simple linear regression to determine the crack growth resistance lines and to derive the initiation fracture toughness values for each test temperature. These regression lines were highly scattered with respect to temperature and it was very difficult to determine precisely the temperature dependence of the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance. The data were re-analysed, using a multiple linear regression method, to obtain a relationship between the materials' crack growth resistance and toughness, and the principal independent variables (temperature, crack growth, weld joint code and strain ageing). (author)

  1. Photoelastic stress analysis assisted evaluation of fracture toughness in hydrothermally aged epoxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitarresi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work has investigated the fracture toughness of a model DGEBA epoxy system subject to Hidro-Thermal aging. A Photoelastic Stress Analysis technique has been implemented, showing the evolution of stresses arising throughout the water uptake process due to the non-uniform swelling of the material. Gravimetric and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analyses have further complemented the characterization, showing the onset of plasticization effects with aging. The correlation of all previous characterizations has allowed to conclude that an increase of KIC fracture toughness is obtained at the fully saturated condition. In particular Photoelasticity has also revealed the onset of relevant swelling induced stresses during the first stages of water absorption, leading to an increase of fracture toughness due to compressive stresses settling near the crack tip. A stress free condition is instead reestablished at the later stages of absorption, suggesting that the increased toughness of the saturated material is an effect of the modifications induced by aging on the polymer structure.

  2. Fracture toughness properties of candidate canister materials for spent fuel storage by concrete cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taku; Mayuzumi, Masami; Libin, Niu; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    It is very significant to clarify the fracture toughness properties of candidate canister materials to ensure the structural integrity against the accidents during handling in the storage facility. Fracture toughness tests on the CT specimens cut from base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal in the 2 types of weld joints made by candidate canister materials (SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel and YUS270 super stainless steel) were conducted under various test temperature between 233K and 473K. Stable ductile crack extensions were observed in all of the specimens. The fracture toughness J Q of the base metal and the HAZ of SUS329L4L showed the smallest value at 233K, and increased with temperature, then reached to the largest value at 298K. At the higher temperature, the value of J Q decreased slightly with temperature. While, the value of J Q in the weld metal increased with temperature. The value of J Q of YUS270 increased with temperature. The values of J Q for weld metal in both of the materials were not greater than those in base metal and HAZ at each test temperature. The values of J Q in weld metal of both materials at 213K and 473K were greater than applied J derived from postulated semi-elliptical surface flaw and maximum allowable stress in JSME design coed. This result suggested that these materials have enough toughness for use as the canister material. (author)

  3. Using acoustic emissions to enhance fracture toughness calculations for CCNBD marble specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kaklis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rock fracture mechanics has been widely applied to blasting, hydraulic fracturing, mechanical fragmentation, rock slope analysis, geophysics, earthquake mechanics and many other science and technology fields. Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. In the present study, acoustic emission (AE measurements were carried out during cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD tests on Nestos marble specimens. The fracture toughness of different modes of loading (mode-I and –II is calculated and the results are discussed in conjunction with the AE parameters.

  4. Strategy for characterizing fracture toughness in the ductile to brittle transition regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerens, J.; Zerbst, U.; Schwalbe, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    A tentative method is proposed for treating the scatter and size effects of fracture toughness of ferritic steels in the ductile-to-brittle transition regime. The method is aimed at the determination of the probability function for initiation of fast growing cleavage cracks under the plane strain condition. The practical relevance of this method has been checked with toughness data sets obtained from various CT-specimen sizes and CCT-specimens of a pressure vessel tested at two different temperatures in the transition regime. (orig.)

  5. A Comparative Study of Fracture Toughness at Cryogenic Temperature of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles Santillana, I.; Boyer, C.; Fernandez Pison, P.; Foussat, A.; Langeslag, S. A. E.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Ruiz Navas, E. M.; Sgobba, S.

    2018-03-01

    The ITER magnet system is based on the "cable-in-conduit" conductor (CICC) concept, which consists of stainless steel jackets filled with superconducting strands. The jackets provide high strength, limited fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness properties to counteract the high stress imposed by, among others, electromagnetic loads at cryogenic temperature. Austenitic nitrogen-strengthened stainless steels have been chosen as base material for the jackets of the central solenoid and the toroidal field system, for which an extensive set of cryogenic mechanical property data are readily available. However, little is published for their welded joints, and their specific performance when considering different combinations of parent and filler metals. Moreover, the impact of post-weld heat treatments that are required for Nb3Sn formation is not extensively treated. Welds are frequently responsible for cracks initiated and propagated by fatigue during service, causing structural failure. It becomes thus essential to select the most suitable combination of parent and filler material and to assess their performance in terms of strength and crack propagation at operation conditions. An extensive test campaign has been conducted at 7 K comparing tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds using two fillers adapted to cryogenic service, EN 1.4453 and JK2LB, applied to two different base metals, AISI 316L and 316LN. A large set of fracture toughness data are presented, and the detrimental effect on fracture toughness of post-weld heat treatments (unavoidable for some of the components) is demonstrated. In this study, austenitic stainless steel TIG welds with various filler metals have undergone a comprehensive fracture mechanics characterization at 7 K. These results are directly exploitable and contribute to the cryogenic fracture mechanics properties database of the ITER magnet system. Additionally, a correlation between the impact in fracture toughness and microstructure

  6. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Hybrid and Nano-hybrid Resin Composites after Ageing under Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferooz M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tooth-coloured restorative materials are brittle with the major shortcomings of sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been studied, no fracture toughness test data for nano-hybrid composites under acidic condition for a long period of time has been published. Objectives: To compare the fracture toughness (KIc of two types of resin composites under tensile loading and to assess the effect of distilled water and lactic acid on the resistance of the restoratives to fracture after three months of immersion. Materials and Methods: Four resin composites were used: three nanohybrids [EsteliteSigma Quick (Kuraray, Luna (SDI, Paradigm (3M/ESPE] and one hybrid, Rok (SDI. The specimens were prepared using a custom-made polytetrafluorethylene split mould, stored in distilled water (pH 6.8 or 0.01mol/L lactic acid (pH 4 and conditioned at 37°C for 24 hours, 1 or 3 months. They were loaded under tensile stress using a universal testing machine; the maximum load (N to the specimen failure was recorded and the fracture toughness (KIc was calculated. Data were analysed by ANOVA and Tukey’s test using SPSS, version 18. Results: The results of two-way ANOVA did not show a significant combined effect of material, time, and storage medium on fracture toughness (p= 0.056. However, there was a strong interaction between materials and time (p=0.001 when the storage medium were ignored. After 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Paradigm revealed the highest KIc values followed by Rok, Luna and Estelite. Immersion in either distilled water or lactic acid significantly decreased the fracture toughness of almost all materials as time interval increased. Conclusions: Paradigm showed the highest fracture toughness followed by Rok, Luna and Estelite respectively. As time increased, KIc significantly decreased for almost all resin composites except for Luna which showed a slight decrease

  7. Experimental Determination of the Fracture Toughness and Brittleness of the Mancos Shale, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mike; Meredith, Phil; Crawford, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The hydraulic fracturing of Gas-Shales has become a topic of interest since the US Shale Gas Revolution, and is increasingly being investigated across Europe. A significant issue during hydraulic fracturing is the risk of fractures propagating further than desired into aquifers or faults. This occured at Preese Hall, UK in April and May 2011 when hydraulic fractures propagated into an adjacent fault causing 2.3ML and 1.7ML earthquakes [1]. A rigorous understanding of how hydraulic fractures propagate under in-situ conditions is therefore important for treatment design, both to maximise gas accessed, and to minimise risks due to fracture overextension. Fractures will always propagate along the path of least resistance, but the direction and extent of this path is a complex relationship between the in-situ stress-field, the anisotropic mechanical properties of the rock, and the pore and fracturing pressures [2]. It is possible to estimate the anisotropic in-situ stress field using an isolated-section hydraulic fracture test, and the pore-pressure using well logs. However, the anisotropic mechanical properties of gas-shales remain poorly constrained, with a wide range of reported values. In particular, there is an extreme paucity of published data on the Fracture Toughness of soft sediments such as shales. Mode-I Fracture Toughness is a measure of a material's resistance to dynamic tensile fracture propagation. Defects such as pre-existing microcracks and pores in a material can induce high local stress concentrations, causing fracture propagation and material failure under substantially lower stress than its bulk strength. The mode-I stress intensity factor, KI, quantifies the concentration of stress at the crack tip. For linear elastic materials the Fracture Toughness is defined by the critical value of this stress intensity factor; KIc, beyond which rapid catastrophic crack growth occurs. However, rocks such as shales are relatively ductile and display significant

  8. Fracture Toughness of Nanohybrid and Hybrid Composites Stored Wet and Dry up to 60 Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookhakiyan, M; Tavana, S; Azarnia, Y; Bagheri, R

    2017-03-01

    Patients' demand for tooth-colored restoratives in the posterior region is increasing. Clinicians use universal nanohybrid resin composites for both anterior and posterior regions. There are few published reports comparing fracture toughness of nonohybrids and that of hybrid composite stored wet and dry. To investigate the fracture toughness of three nanohybrids compared to that of a hybrid resin composite stored dry or wet up to 60 days, using four-point bending test. Four resin composites were used: three nanohybrids; Filtek Supreme (3M), Ice (SDI), TPH3 (Dentsply) and one hybrid Filtek P60 (3M). For each material, 40 rectangular notched beam specimens were prepared with dimensions of 30 mm × 5mm × 2mm. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10) and stored at 37ºC either in distilled water or dry for 1 and 60 days. The specimens were placed on the four-point test jig and subjected to force (N) using universal testing machine loaded at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min and maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and K IC was calculated. Three-way ANOVA showed a significant interaction between all the factors (all p toughness was material dependent. Wet storage adversely affected the fracture toughness of almost all materials. Keeping the restoration dry in the mouth may increase their fracture toughness. Therefore, using a coating agent on the surface of restoration may protect them from early water uptake and increase their strength during a time period.

  9. Interim report on the fracture toughness of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel and weldments at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, J.L.; Roy, P.

    1980-01-01

    The Reference Nil Ductility Temperature (RT/sub NDT) for the base material and weldments tested range from -7 0 C (20 0 F) to 38 0 C (100 0 F). Fracture toughness results at room temperature fall above the ASME Code K/sub IR/ curve for all material conditions. Elevated temperature fracture toughness tests up to 510 0 C (950 0 F) decrease with increasing temperature and fall below the current code assumption for the K/sub IR/ curve at elevated temperatures. At 510 0 C (950 0 F), the thermally aged base material yielded the lowest fracture toughness values for the conditions tested

  10. Influence of second phase particles on fracture toughness in AZ31 magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Somekawa, H. [Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai (Japan); Takara, A.; Nishikawa, Y. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Higashi, K. [Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Three kinds of thin AZ31 wrought magnesium alloys sheets were used in order to investigate the influence of the second phase particles on fracture toughness. From the theoretical model, the ratio of {lambda}{sub p}/d{sub p} would be estimated 5 {proportional_to} 6. On the other hand, from the microstructural observation, average particle spacing on each material was sample A: 13.1 {mu}m, sample B: 14.1, and sample C: 12 {mu}. In addition, average particle size on each sample was sample A: 2.1, sample B: 1.9, and sample C: 2.3 {mu}m. Therefore, the ratio of {lambda}{sub p}/d{sub p} calculated from fracture surface observation would be predicted 6 {proportional_to} 7. In comparison with the result of the prediction by theoretical analysis was in good agreement with the result of fracture toughness observation. It was found that the variation in plane-strain fracture toughness on AZ31 were affected by both of particle spacing and particle size. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of fracture toughness of nuclear piping using real pipe and tensile compact pipe specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, J.M.; Park, S.; Seok, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen was proposed. • J-integral for the specimen was obtained by the plastic limit load analysis and FEA. • Fracture toughness tests by several types of specimens were performed and compared. • The constraint effects were considered by comparing Q-stresses for them. -- Abstract: The leak-before-break (LBB) concept is generally used to design the primary heat transport piping for a nuclear power plant. The LBB concept is based on the fracture resistance curve, which is obtained by J–R tests on various types of specimens. Fracture toughness data differ according to the various types of specimens. It has also been known that there is a difference in the constraint effect between real pipes and standard specimens, and LBB design using standard specimens is conservative. We propose a new type of specimen for J–R tests, a tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen, and perform fracture toughness tests on various types of specimens. We also perform constraint effect analysis on such specimens. The Q-stresses of the tensile CP specimens are lower than those of real pipes under 4-point bending, and are higher than those of elbow pipes. If the lever length of a tensile CP specimen is controlled, the specimen can simulate various stress conditions, and it is thought that the LBB design of piping in service can be performed using this specimen

  12. Evaluation of fracture toughness of nuclear piping using real pipe and tensile compact pipe specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, J.M.; Park, S.; Seok, C.S., E-mail: seok@skku.edu

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • The tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen was proposed. • J-integral for the specimen was obtained by the plastic limit load analysis and FEA. • Fracture toughness tests by several types of specimens were performed and compared. • The constraint effects were considered by comparing Q-stresses for them. -- Abstract: The leak-before-break (LBB) concept is generally used to design the primary heat transport piping for a nuclear power plant. The LBB concept is based on the fracture resistance curve, which is obtained by J–R tests on various types of specimens. Fracture toughness data differ according to the various types of specimens. It has also been known that there is a difference in the constraint effect between real pipes and standard specimens, and LBB design using standard specimens is conservative. We propose a new type of specimen for J–R tests, a tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen, and perform fracture toughness tests on various types of specimens. We also perform constraint effect analysis on such specimens. The Q-stresses of the tensile CP specimens are lower than those of real pipes under 4-point bending, and are higher than those of elbow pipes. If the lever length of a tensile CP specimen is controlled, the specimen can simulate various stress conditions, and it is thought that the LBB design of piping in service can be performed using this specimen.

  13. Microscale resolution fracture toughness profiling at the zirconia-porcelain interface in dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Alexander J. G.; Mohanty, Gaurav; Neo, Tee K.; Michler, Johann; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-12-01

    The high failure rate of the Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ)-porcelain interface in dental prostheses is influenced by the micro-scale mechanical property variation in this region. To improve the understanding of this behavior, micro-scale fracture toughness profiling by nanoindentation micropillar splitting is reported for the first time. Sixty 5 μm diameter micropillars were machined within the first 100 μm of the interface. Berkovich nanoindentation provided estimates of the bulk fracture toughness of YPSZ and porcelain that matched the literature values closely. However, the large included tip angle prevented precise alignment of indenter with the pillar center. Cube corner indentation was performed on the remainder of the pillars and calibration between nanoindentation using different tip shapes was used to determine the associated conversion factors. YPSZ micropillars failed by gradual crack propagation and bulk values persisted to within 15 μm from the interface, beyond which scatter increased and a 10% increase in fracture toughness was observed that may be associated with grain size variation at this location. Micropillars straddling the interface displayed preferential fracture within porcelain parallel to the interface at a location where nano-voiding has previously been observed and reported. Pure porcelain micropillars exhibited highly brittle failure and a large reduction of fracture toughness (by up to ~90%) within the first 50 μm of the interface. These new insights constitute a major advance in understanding the structure-property relationship of this important bi-material interface at the micro-scale, and will improve micromechanical modelling needed to optimize current manufacturing routes and reduce failure.

  14. Applying Full Spectrum Analysis to a Raman Spectroscopic Assessment of Fracture Toughness of Human Cortical Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J; Granke, Mathilde; Ayala, Oscar D; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2017-10-01

    A decline in the inherent quality of bone tissue is a † Equal contributors contributor to the age-related increase in fracture risk. Although this is well-known, the important biochemical factors of bone quality have yet to be identified using Raman spectroscopy (RS), a nondestructive, inelastic light-scattering technique. To identify potential RS predictors of fracture risk, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) to 558 Raman spectra (370-1720 cm -1 ) of human cortical bone acquired from 62 female and male donors (nine spectra each) spanning adulthood (age range = 21-101 years). Spectra were analyzed prior to R-curve, nonlinear fracture mechanics that delineate crack initiation (K init ) from crack growth toughness (K grow ). The traditional ν 1 phosphate peak per amide I peak (mineral-to-matrix ratio) weakly correlated with K init (r = 0.341, p = 0.0067) and overall crack growth toughness (J-int: r = 0.331, p = 0.0086). Sub-peak ratios of the amide I band that are related to the secondary structure of type 1 collagen did not correlate with the fracture toughness properties. In the full spectrum analysis, one principal component (PC5) correlated with all of the mechanical properties (K init : r = - 0.467, K grow : r = - 0.375, and J-int: r = - 0.428; p toughness, namely age and/or volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), were included in general linear models as covariates, several PCs helped explain 45.0% (PC5) to 48.5% (PC7), 31.4% (PC6), and 25.8% (PC7) of the variance in K init , K grow , and J-int, respectively. Deriving spectral features from full spectrum analysis may improve the ability of RS, a clinically viable technology, to assess fracture risk.

  15. Effect of cyclic fatigue on the fracture toughness of Polyoxymethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoa, B.; Berer, M.; Schwaiger, M.; Pinter, G.

    2017-05-01

    Polymers are used in a wide range of applications and their properties are dependent upon the morphological development during processing and the specimen configuration which in turn define the mechanical properties. In this context fatigue and monotonic testing are part of the standard procedure to assess relevant mechanical and material parameters to ensure a better part design. The present work addresses the performance issues of a real component made of Polyoxymethylene (POM) which is subjected to cyclic loads from intermediate levels to high peak values inside a damping mechanism. For this linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts were used to characterize the behavior of a POM homopolymer resin used in this application. Injection molded compact tension specimens, with sharp and blunt notches, were tested under a combination of cyclic and monotonic loads and the fracture surfaces were examined. The critical stress intensity factor obtained by monotonic tests was evaluated as a function of the cycle number, where an increase after the first 1000 cycles followed by a continuous decrease with higher numbers of cycles was observed. A variation of approximately 50% and 70% were obtained along the duration of the tests for the sharp and blunt notch specimens, respectively. In light of the obtained results, a discussion is presented considering the dynamic specimen compliance and the structural features observed on the fracture surfaces in combination with the fracture mechanical response.

  16. Fracture Toughness of Porous Material of LSCF in Bulk and Film Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangwei; Wang, Xin; Giuliani, Finn; Atkinson, Alan

    2015-07-01

    Fracture toughness of La 0.6 Sr 0.4 Co 0.2 Fe 0.8 O 3-δ (LSCF) in both bulk and film forms after sintering at 900°C to 1200°C was measured using both single-edge V-notched beam (SEVNB) 3-point bending and Berkovich indentation. FIB/SEM slice-and-view observation after indentation revealed the presence of Palmqvist radial crack systems after indentation of the bulk materials. Based on crack length measurements, the fracture toughness of bulk LSCF specimens was determined to be in the range 0.54-0.99 MPa·m 1/2 (depending on sintering temperature), in good agreement with the SEVNB measurements (0.57-1.13 MPa·m 1/2 ). The fracture toughness was approximately linearly dependent on porosity over the range studied. However, experiments on films showed that the generation of observable indentation-induced cracks was very difficult for films sintered at temperatures below 1200°C. This was interpreted as being the result of the substrate having much higher modulus than these films. Cracks were only detectable in the films sintered at 1200°C and gave an apparent toughness of 0.17 MPa·m 1/2 using the same analysis as for bulk specimens. This value is much smaller than that for bulk material with the same porosity. The residual thermal expansion mismatch stress measured using XRD was found to be responsible for such a low apparent toughness.

  17. A new method for improving the reliability of fracture toughness surveillance of nuclear pressure vessel by neutron irradiated embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinping; Shi Yaowu

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain more information from neutron irradiated sample specimens and raise the reliability of fracture toughness surveillance test, it has more important significance to repeatedly exploit the broken Charpy-size specimen which had been tested in surveillance test. In this work, on the renewing design and utilization for Charpy-size specimens, 9 data of fracture toughness can be gained from one pre-cracked side-grooved Charpy-size specimen while at the preset usually only 1 to 3 data of fracture toughness can be obtained from one Chharpy-size specimen. Thus, it is found that the new method would obviously improve the reliability of fracture toughness surveillance test and evaluation. Some factors which affect the reasonable design of pre-cracked deep side-groove Charpy-size compound specimen have been discussed

  18. Influence of casting size and graphite nodule refinement on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.C.; Hsu, C.H.; Chang, C.C.; Feng, H.P. [Tatung Inst. of Tech., Raipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Casting size affects the solidification cooling rate and microstructure of casting materials. Graphite nodules existing in the structure of ductile iron are an inherent and inert second phase that cannot be modified in subsequent heat-treatment processing. The matrix and the fineness of the second phase undoubtedly have some impact on the fracture toughness of the as-cast material, as does the subsequent heat treatment, as it alters the microstructure. This research applied austempering heat treatment to ductile iron of different section sizes and graphite nodule finenesses. The influence of these variables on the plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) of the castings so treated was compared to that of the as-cast state. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  19. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  20. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  1. Fracture toughness of WWER Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with various grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, R.; Novikov, V.; Mikheev, E.; Fedotov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with grain sizes 13, 26, and 33 μm for WWER were investigated in the present work in order to determine crack formation and the fracture toughness.The investigation of crack formation in uranium oxide fuel pellets of the WWER-types showed that Young’s modulus and the microhardness of polycrystalline samples increase with increasing grain size, while the fracture toughness decreases. Characteristically, radial Palmqvist cracks form on the surface of uranium dioxide pellets for loads up to 1 kg. Transgranular propagation of cracks over distances several-fold larger than the length of the imprint diagonal is observed in pellets with large grains and small intragrain pores. Intergranular propagation of cracks along grain boundaries with branching occurs in pellets with small grains and low pore concentration on the grain boundaries. Blunting on large pores and at breaks in direction does not permit the cracks to reach a significant length

  2. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2013-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  3. Two-dimensional magnesium oxide nanosheets reinforced epoxy nanocomposites for enhanced fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balguri, Praveen Kumar; Harris Samuel, D. G.; Guruvishnu, T.; Aditya, D. B.; Mahadevan, S. M.; Thumu, Udayabhaskararao

    2018-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles have been used as excellent reinforcements to enhance mechanical properties of polymers, natural composites, and ceramics. To date, a major portion of metal oxides used as nanofillers is three dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the last decade, two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene have been widely investigated to improve the mechanical and electrical properties of polymer materials. In this paper, 2D Magnesium oxide (MgO) nanosheets reinforced epoxy composites (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 wt%) are fabricated and studied for their ability to resist the propagation of preexisting flaw by conducting fracture toughness test for K IC, critical stress intensity factor. This property is an important mechanical property for designing applications in various engineering technologies. Our results show that the MgO with 0.2 wt% is the optimized level to improve the fracture toughness of the epoxy polymer by 47%.

  4. Effect of inclusion density on ductile fracture toughness and roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.; Osovski, S.

    2014-01-01

    that result in void nucleation at an early stage are modeled discretely while smaller particles that require large strains to nucleate voids are homogeneously distributed. Full field solutions are obtained for eight volume fractions, ranging from 1% to 19%, of randomly distributed larger inclusions. For each...... on the inclusion volume fraction. Consideration of the full statistics of the fracture surface roughness revealed other parameters that vary with inclusion volume fraction. For smaller values of the discretely modeled inclusion volume fraction (≤7%), there is a linear correlation between several measures......Three dimensional calculations of ductile fracture under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Larger inclusions...

  5. Fracture toughness evaluation of pre-cracked Charpy specimens; Avaliacao da tenacidade a fratura em amostras Charpy pre-trincadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzo, Roberto F. Di; Vilela, Jeferson J.; Soares, Wellington A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    This work presents the results of Fracture Toughness Evaluation of pre-cracked harpy specimens of pressure vessels of nuclear power plant material. These results were obtained by CDTN, as participant in a coordinated research project of International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, about Pressure Vessel of Nuclear Power Plant Structural Integrity Evaluation. This Project has the purpose of validating testing procedure of fracture toughness of small specimens, used in programmes of nuclear reactor surveillance. (author)

  6. Study of the effect of moisture content and bending rate on the fracture toughness of rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavro, Leona; Souček, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), s. 247-253 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : fracture toughness * bending rate * tensile strength Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.667, year: 2013 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2013_02/acta_170_14_Vavro_Soucek_247-253.pdf

  7. Microneedle-based minimally-invasive measurement of puncture resistance and fracture toughness of sclera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Hyun; Lee, Kang Ju; Lee, JiYong; Yoon, Jae Hyoung; Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kang, Keonwook; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2016-10-15

    The sclera provides the structural support of the eye and protects the intraocular contents. Since it covers a large portion of the eye surface and has relatively high permeability for most drugs, the sclera has been used as a major pathway for drug administration. Recently, microneedle (MN) technology has shown the possibility of highly local and minimally-invasive drug delivery to the eye by MN insertion through the sclera or the suprachoroidal space. Although ocular MN needs to be inserted through the sclera, there has been no systematic study to understand the mechanical properties of the sclera, which are important to design ocular MNs. In this study, we investigated a MN-based method to measure the puncture resistance and fracture toughness of the sclera. To reflect the conditions of MN insertion into the sclera, force-displacement curves obtained from MN-insertion tests were used to estimate the puncture resistance and fracture toughness of sclera tissue. To understand the effect of the insertion conditions, dependency of the mechanical properties on insertion speeds, pre-strain of the sclera, and MN sizes were analyzed and discussed. Measurement of mechanical property of soft biological tissue is challenging due to variations between tissue samples or lack of well-defined measurement techniques. Although non-invasive measurement techniques such as nano/micro indentation were employed to locally measure the elastic modulus of soft biological materials, mechanical properties such as puncture resistance or fracture toughness, which requires "invasive" measurement and is important for the application of "microneedles or hypodermic needles", has not been well studied. In this work, we report minimally-invasive measurement of puncture resistance and fracture toughness of sclera using a double MN insertion method. Parametric studies showed that use of MN proved to be advantageous because of minimally-invasive insertion into tissue as well as higher sensitivity to

  8. Experimental investigation of effect of specimen thickness on fracture toughness of Al-TiC composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Raviraj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the macro and micro-mechanical fracture behavior was studied for aluminum (Al6061 alloy matrix, reinforced with various proportions of TiC particles such as 3wt%, 5wt% and 7wt%. The Al6061-TiC metal matrix composites were produced by stir casting method to ensure uniform distribution of the TiC particulates in the Al matrix. The compact tension (CT specimens were machined according to ASTM E399 specifications to evaluate the fracture toughness for Al6061-TiC metal matrix composites. The CT specimens were machined for crack to width (a/W ratio of 0.5 and thickness to width (B/W ratios of 0.2 to 0.7 with an increment of 0.1. Load versus crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD data was plotted to estimate stress intensity factor KQ for various thicknesses of the specimen. The fracture toughness KIC was obtained by plotting stress intensity factor versus thickness to width ratios of specimen data. The fracture toughness of these composites varied between 16.4-19.2 MPa√m. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM studies was made on the fractured surface of the specimens to understand the micro-mechanisms of failure involved in these composites. Void initiation is more significant in the matrix near the interface. The micro-cracks grow from these micro-voids and crack propagates by linking these micro cracks locating the crack path preferentially in the matrix adjacent to the interface indicating ductile fracture.

  9. Residual stress state in pipe cut ring specimens for fracture toughness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damjanovic, Darko [J.J. Strossmayer Univ. of Osijek, Slavonski Brod (Croatia). Mechanical Engineering Faculty; Kozak, Drazan [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. for Mechanical Design; Marsoner, Stefan [Materials Center, Leoben (Austria).; Gubeljak, Nenad [Maribor Univ. (Slovenia). Chair of Mechanics

    2017-07-01

    Thin-walled pipes are not suitable for measuring fracture toughness parameters of vital importance because longitudinal crack failure is the most common failure mode in pipes. This is due to the impossibility to manufacture standard specimens for measuring fracture toughness, such as SENB or CT specimens, from the thin wall of the pipe. Previous works noticed this problem, but until now, a good and convenient solution has not been found or developed. To overcome this problem, very good alternative solution was proposed, the so-called pipe ring notched bend specimen (PRNB) [1-5]. Until now, only the idealized geometry PRNB specimen is analyzed, i. e., a specimen which is not cut out from an actual pipe but produced from steel plate. Based on that, residual stresses are neglected along with the imperfections in geometry (elliptical and eccentricity). The aim of this research is to estimate the residual stress state(s) in real pipes used in the boiler industry produced by hot rolling technique. These types of pipes are delivered only in normalized condition, but not stress relieved. Therefore, there are residual stresses present due to the manufacturing technique, but also due to uneven cooling after the production process. Within this paper, residual stresses are estimated by three methods: the incremental hole drilling method (IHMD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the splitting method (SM). Knowing the residual stress state in the ring specimen, it is possible to assess their impact on fracture toughness measured on the corresponding PRNB specimen(s).

  10. Measurement of the fracture toughness of polycrystalline bubbly ice from an Antarctic ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The critical fracture toughness is a material parameter describing the resistance of a cracked body to further crack extension. It is an important parameter for simulating and predicting the breakup behavior of ice shelves from the calving of single icebergs to the disintegration of entire ice shelves over a wide range of length scales. The fracture toughness values are calculated with equations that are derived from an elastic stress analysis. Additionally, an X-ray computer tomography (CT scanner was used to identify the density as a function of depth. The critical fracture toughness of 91 Antarctic bubbly ice samples with densities between 840 and 870 kg m−3 has been determined by applying a four-point bending technique on single-edge v-notched beam samples. The examined ice core was drilled 70 m north of Kohnen Station, Dronnning Maud Land (75°00' S, 00°04' E; 2882 m. Supplementary data are available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.835321.

  11. Enhancement of Fracture Toughness of Epoxy Nanocomposites by Combining Nanotubes and Nanosheets as Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiim Domun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the fracture toughness of epoxy resin has been improved through the addition of low loading of single part and hybrid nanofiller materials. Functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs was used as single filler, increased the critical strain energy release rate, GIC, by 57% compared to the neat epoxy, at only 0.1 wt% filler content. Importantly, no degradation in the tensile or thermal properties of the nanocomposite was observed compared to the neat epoxy. When two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS were added along with the one-dimensional f-MWCNTs, the fracture toughness increased further to 71.6% higher than that of the neat epoxy. Interestingly, when functionalised graphene nanoplatelets (f-GNPs and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs were used as hybrid filler, the fracture toughness of neat epoxy is improved by 91.9%. In neither of these hybrid filler systems the tensile properties were degraded, but the thermal properties of the nanocomposites containing boron nitride materials deteriorated slightly.

  12. Standard test method for plane-strain (Chevron-Notch) fracture toughness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plane-strain (chevron-notch) fracture toughnesses, KIv or KIvM, of metallic materials. Fracture toughness by this method is relative to a slowly advancing steady state crack initiated at a chevron-shaped notch, and propagating in a chevron-shaped ligament (Fig. 1). Some metallic materials, when tested by this method, exhibit a sporadic crack growth in which the crack front remains nearly stationary until a critical load is reached. The crack then becomes unstable and suddenly advances at high speed to the next arrest point. For these materials, this test method covers the determination of the plane-strain fracture toughness, KIvj or KIvM, relative to the crack at the points of instability. Note 1—One difference between this test method and Test Method E 399 (which measures KIc) is that Test Method E 399 centers attention on the start of crack extension from a fatigue precrack. This test method makes use of either a steady state slowly propagating crack, or a...

  13. Enhancement of Fracture Toughness of Epoxy Nanocomposites by Combining Nanotubes and Nanosheets as Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domun, Nadiim; Paton, Keith R; Hadavinia, Homayoun; Sainsbury, Toby; Zhang, Tao; Mohamud, Hibaaq

    2017-10-19

    In this work the fracture toughness of epoxy resin has been improved through the addition of low loading of single part and hybrid nanofiller materials. Functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) was used as single filler, increased the critical strain energy release rate, G IC , by 57% compared to the neat epoxy, at only 0.1 wt% filler content. Importantly, no degradation in the tensile or thermal properties of the nanocomposite was observed compared to the neat epoxy. When two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) were added along with the one-dimensional f-MWCNTs, the fracture toughness increased further to 71.6% higher than that of the neat epoxy. Interestingly, when functionalised graphene nanoplatelets (f-GNPs) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were used as hybrid filler, the fracture toughness of neat epoxy is improved by 91.9%. In neither of these hybrid filler systems the tensile properties were degraded, but the thermal properties of the nanocomposites containing boron nitride materials deteriorated slightly.

  14. Effect of specimen size on the fracture toughness of V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Li, Huaxin

    1996-04-01

    J-R curves were generated using the single specimen unload-compliance technique on four specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti to determine the effect of specimen dimensions on the fracture behavior. Ductile crack initiation and growth was observed in the 6.35 mm thick specimens but not in the 12.70 mm thick specimens. The J-R curves determined from these tests were not valid per ASTM validity criteria so quantitative measures of the resistance to ductile crack initiation and growth were not obtained. These data suggests that standard fracture toughness tests were performed with small-scale DCT specimens may also not be valid.

  15. A study on the fracture toughness test of the pipe specimen using the image processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Yong; Cho, Sung Keun; Lee, Kwang Hyeon; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Difficulties associated with full-scale pipe tests are rather obvious. That is, it is not only difficult to perform but also very expensive, and it requires lots of experience. And the process of the fracture test for the pipe specimen is very difficult and complicated. Because the pipe specimen, the test jig and the test equipment are very large and heavy, it requires lots of costs and times. In this study, to easily perform the fracture toughness test for a pipe specimen, load line displacement data was obtained using the image processing method.

  16. A study on the fracture toughness test of the pipe specimen using the image processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yong; Cho, Sung Keun; Lee, Kwang Hyeon; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2008-01-01

    Difficulties associated with full-scale pipe tests are rather obvious. That is, it is not only difficult to perform but also very expensive, and it requires lots of experience. And the process of the fracture test for the pipe specimen is very difficult and complicated. Because the pipe specimen, the test jig and the test equipment are very large and heavy, it requires lots of costs and times. In this study, to easily perform the fracture toughness test for a pipe specimen, load line displacement data was obtained using the image processing method

  17. Thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in HT9 steel after irradiation to high doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang, E-mail: byunts@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Baek, Jong-Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Anderoglu, Osman; Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Toloczko, Mychailo B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The HT9 ferritic/martensitic steel with a nominal chemistry of Fe(bal.)12%Cr1%MoVW has been used as a primary core material for fast fission reactors such as FFTF because of its high resistance to radiation-induced swelling and embrittlement. Both static and dynamic fracture test results have shown that the HT9 steel can become brittle when it is exposed to high dose irradiation at a relatively low temperature (<430 °C). This article aims at a comprehensive discussion on the thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in the HT9 steel after irradiation up to 3148 dpa at 378504 °C. A specimen reuse technique has been established and applied to this study: the fracture specimens were tested Charpy specimens or broken halves of Charpy bars (13 × 3 × 4 mm). The post-anneal fracture test results indicated that much of the radiation-induced damage can be recovered by a simple thermal annealing schedule: the fracture toughness was incompletely recovered by 550 °C annealing, while nearly complete or complete recovery occurred after 650 °C annealing. This indicates that thermal annealing is a feasible damage mitigation technique for the reactor components made of HT9 steel. The partial recovery is probably due to the non-removable microstructural damages such as void or gas bubble formation, elemental segregation and precipitation.

  18. Influence of Root Rotation on Delamination Fracture Toughness of Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Alfred Franklin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large deviations have been observed while analysing composite double cantilever beam (DCB specimens assuming each cracked half as a simple cantilever beam. This paper examines the effect of rotational spring stiffness (K on the critical fracture energy (GIC considering nonzero slope at the crack-tip of the DCB specimen by modelling each cracked half as the spring-hinged cantilever beam. The critical load estimates of DCB specimens from GIC are found to be in good agreement with in-house and existing test results of different composite material systems.

  19. Evaluation of fracture toughness by the variation of crack length measurement method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Hyeon; Cho, Sung Keun; Huh, Yong; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The Direct Current Potential Drop(DCPD) method is the most commonly used method to evaluate the dynamic fracture resistance characteristics of a material. However, at using DCPD method in the dynamic fracture resistance test, there is a problem that the voltage drops sharply on the initiation of crack. For this reason mentioned above, the normalization method was suggested by ASTM E1820 which was revised recently, as a new method to evaluate the dynamic fracture resistance characteristic. The normalization method can be used to obtain a J-R curve directly from a load-load line displacement. In this study, we obtained two J-R curves from the dynamic fracture toughness test of two materials' weldment (SA508 Gr.1A, SA508 Gr.3A) for nuclear piping both by the DCPD and the normalization method.

  20. Evaluation of fracture toughness by the variation of crack length measurement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Hyeon; Cho, Sung Keun; Huh, Yong; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2008-01-01

    The Direct Current Potential Drop(DCPD) method is the most commonly used method to evaluate the dynamic fracture resistance characteristics of a material. However, at using DCPD method in the dynamic fracture resistance test, there is a problem that the voltage drops sharply on the initiation of crack. For this reason mentioned above, the normalization method was suggested by ASTM E1820 which was revised recently, as a new method to evaluate the dynamic fracture resistance characteristic. The normalization method can be used to obtain a J-R curve directly from a load-load line displacement. In this study, we obtained two J-R curves from the dynamic fracture toughness test of two materials' weldment (SA508 Gr.1A, SA508 Gr.3A) for nuclear piping both by the DCPD and the normalization method

  1. Recommendations for the application of fracture toughness data for structural integrity assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.

    1993-01-01

    Large scale testing for the purpose of fracture mechanics verification is essentially directed towards the validation of the transferability of material data obtained with small specimens. Unfortunately the results are sometimes controversial, insinuating that the transferability is imprecise at the very least. However, it seems that in many cases the controversy is due to an improper application of the small specimen data. Present testing standards do not give any recommendations for the correct application of fracture toughness data and yet this is a crucial point for successful structural integrity assessment and fracture mechanics verification. In this presentation the topic concerning recommendations is addressed, focusing on the application of brittle (cleavage type) fracture data. Simple guidelines for obtaining optimum open-quotes best-close quotes and open-quotes safe-close quotes estimates of the behavior of the actual structure based on small specimen data are presented. 51 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  2. Experimental analysis of quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armor steel material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Peng; Guo, Zitao

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armour steel material are investigated using three point bend specimen. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus with digital image correlation (DIC) system is applied to dynamic loading experiments. Full-field deformation measurements are obtained by using DIC to elucidate on the strain fields associated with the mechanical response. A series of experiments are conducted at different strain rate ranging from 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1, and the loading rate on the fracture initiation toughness is investigated. Specially, the scanning electron microscope imaging technique is used to investigate the fracture failure micromechanism of fracture surfaces. The gy4 armour steel material fracture toughness is found to be sensitive to strain rate and higher for dynamic loading as compared to quasi-static loading. This work is supported by National Nature Science Foundation under Grant 51509115.

  3. Fatigue pre-cracking and fracture toughness in polycrystalline tungsten and molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuya; Nakadate, Kazuhito; Matsuo, Satoru; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2018-01-01

    Fatigue pre-cracking performance and fracture toughness in polycrystalline tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) have been investigated in relation to grain boundary (GB) configuration with respect to the crack advance direction. Sub-sized, single edge notched bend (SENB) specimens with three different orientations, R-L (ASTM notation) for a forged Mo rod and L-S and T-S for a rolled W plate, were pre-cracked in two steps: fully uniaxial compression fatigue loading to provoke crack initiation and its stable growth from the notch root, and subsequent 3-point bend (3PB) fatigue loading to extend the crack. The latter step intends to minimize the influence of the residual tensile stresses generated during compression fatigue by moving the crack tip away from the plastic zone. It is shown that fatigue pre-cracking performance, especially pre-crack extension behavior, is significantly affected by the specimen orientation. The R-L orientation, giving the easiest cracking path, permitted crack extension completely beyond the plastic zone, while the L-S and T-S orientations with the thickness cracking direction of the rolled plate sustained the crack lengths around or possibly within the plastic zone size due to difficulty in crack advance through an aligned grain structure. Room temperature fracture toughness tests revealed that the 3PB fatigued specimens exhibited appreciably higher fracture toughness by about 30% for R-L, 40% for L-S and 60% for T-S than the specimens of each orientation pre-cracked by compression fatigue only. This indicates that 3PB fatigue provides the crack tip front out of the residual tensile stress zone by crack extension or leads to reduction in the residual stresses at the crack tip front. Strong dependence of fracture toughness on GB configuration was evident. The obtained fracture toughness values are compared with those in the literature and its strong GB configuration dependence is discussed in connection with the appearance of pop-in.

  4. Effect of zirconia surface treatment on zirconia/veneer interfacial toughness evaluated by fracture mechanics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the airborne-particle abrasion and liner application on the interfacial toughness between veneering porcelain and zirconia core by means of a fracture mechanics test. Beam-shaped zirconia specimens were sectioned and divided into 4 groups according to different surface treatments as follows: Group C (control): no treatment; Group L: application of liner; Group A: airborne-particle abrasion with Al2O3 (sandblasting); and Group AL: airborne-particle abrasion and application of liner. The zirconia surfaces before and after sandblasting were observed and analyzed by SEM and white light interferometer. Specimens of each pretreated group were veneered with 3 core/veneer thickness ratios of 2:3, 1:1, and 3:2, corresponding to 3 phase angles respectively. Fracture mechanics test was performed on each specimen, the energy release rate G and phase angle ψ were calculated to characterize interfacial toughness. The experimental data were analyzed statistically using three-way ANOVA and the Tukey's HSD test. The surfaces of fractured specimens were examined by SEM and EDX. At each phase angle, the interfaces with no treatment had higher mean G values than that of other groups. All the specimens showed mixed failure mode with residual veneer or liner on the zirconia surfaces. The toughness of zirconia/veneer interface with no treatment is significantly higher than that of interfaces subjected to liner application and airborne-particle abrasion. Liner application and airborne-particle abrasion seem to reduce zirconia/veneer interfacial toughness. Therefore, the two surface treatment methods should be applied with caution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On the proper fracture toughness properties to be used for pressurized thermal shock evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    The traditional approach in the U.S. for evaluating PTS has relied upon probabilistic studies in which the toughness has been based upon the data used to generated the lower bound ASME Code K IC and K IR curves. A mean curve through this data with a Gaussian statistical distribution assumed, except for a lower bound cutoff of somewhere between 2 and 3 standard deviations, has been used. The RT NDT normalizing concept has been maintained which then requires the measured shift in Charpy V-notch toughness at the 41 J (30 ft-lb) energy level be used to adjust the position of the Code curves. The Master Curve method provides a unique alternative in providing a much better measure of real fracture toughness, plus the opportunity to use a more refined statistical distribution using Weibull statistics. There are active moves in the U.S. to Standardize and Codify the Master Curve (also termed T 0 method). Benefits to both deterministic and probabilistic analyses will be realized since more realistic measures of toughness can be used

  6. Technical Basis for the Master Curve Concept of Fracture Toughness Evaluations in the Transition Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.E.; Merkle, J.G.; Wallin, K.

    1998-06-23

    An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method (E 1921-97) has been developed that exclusively uses fracture mechanics test practices and advanced statistical methods to establish the ductile-to-brittle transition range of fracture toughness for structural steels. The development of suitably accurate analyses had been slowed in the past due to an incomplete understanding of the operational mechanisms that control the fracture toughness behavior of structural steels. New perspectives taken are (1) that dominant linear-elastic conditions need not be rigidly enforced in test specimens and (2) that the effect of weakest-link behavior is defined from local cleavage crack initiators such as precipitates, inclusions, and grain boundary embrittlement; namely, all microstructural features in steel. Statistical models can be built upon such mechanisms that result in defined fracture probability levels and, when coupled to a master curve concept, can more accurately define the true loctition of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. An integral part of the ASTM test standard development work has been the production of a supporting technical basis document. This document presents substantial background data and supporting theoretical aspects that have been used to justify the method development. The paper will include some of the salient features presented.

  7. Temperature dependence of the dynamic fracture toughness of the alloy Incoloy 800 after cold work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krompholz, K.; Ullrich, G.

    1991-02-01

    Precracked charpy-V-notch specimens of the iron-nickel base alloy Incoloy 800 in the as-received condition and after cold work have been tested using an instrumented impact tester (hammer) in the temperature range 293 ≤ T/K ≤ 1223. The specific impact energies were determined by dial readings, from the integration of the load versus time and the load versus load point displacement diagrams; in all cases the agreement was excellent. The specific impact energies and the impulses are correlated with the test temperature and with the degree of cold work, respectively. The dynamic fracture toughness values were determined following the equivalent energy approach. In all cases a distinct decrease of the mechanical properties in the range between the as-received state and after 5 % cold work was found. The temperature behaviour of the impact energies clearly reveals an increase of its value between room temperature and 673 K. This increase is distinctly reduced after cold work. The dynamic fracture toughness decreases with increasing temperature. The fracture surfaces clearly show elasto-plastic fracture behaviour of the material in the temperature regime investigated. (author) 19 figs., 3 tabs., 7 refs

  8. Improvement of the fracture toughness in the PWR pressurizer surgeline material (Final report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Yong Jun; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jong Myung; Park, Buk Gyun; Kim, Ju Hak; Kuk Il Hyun; Byun, Taek Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Fracture toughness property of PWR surgeline pipe materials is one of the most important factor for Leak Before Break(LBB) analysis. In order to improve fracture toughness of the surgeline material (SA312-TP347 stainless steel), base on the evaluation and analysis of the commercial TP347 alloys, eleven TP347 model alloys were designed and manufactured. Tensile and fracture resistance properties of the model alloys, as well as microstructure, were evaluated. It is concluded that the nitrogen shall be added more than 0.1% for high tensile property and the carbon shall be in the range of 0.02 to 0.04% for high fracture resistance. In addition, four TP316N stainless steels were manufactured and evaluated to find out the applicability as a candidate material for PWR surgeline pipe. As a conclusion, TP316N stainless steels had an excellent property to be used for surgeline piping materials, substituting the present TP347 stainless steels. (author). 11 refs., 50 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. An experimental study on fracture toughness of resistance spot welded galvanized and ungalvanized DP 450 steel sheets used in automotive body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevim, I.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine fracture toughness of Resistance Spot Welded (RSW) Dual Phase (DP) steels. RSW of galvanized and ungalvanized DP 450 steel sheets was carried out on spot welding machine. Fracture toughness of RSW joints of galvanized and ungalvanized DP 450 steel sheets was calculated from tensile-shear tests. New empirical equations were developed using Least Squares Method (LSM) between energy release rate, fracture toughness and critical crack size depending on the relationship between hardness and fracture toughness values. Results indicated that fracture toughness of joints welded by using RSW increased exponentially while the hardness decreased. In addition, fracture toughness and energy release rate of RSW galvanized DP 450 steel sheets were lower compared to RSW ungalvanized DP 450 steel sheets which had approximately the same hardness. (Author)

  10. Analytical Round Robin for Elastic-Plastic Analysis of Surface Cracked Plates: Phase I Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D. N.; Allen, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical round robin for the elastic-plastic analysis of surface cracks in flat plates was conducted with 15 participants. Experimental results from a surface crack tension test in 2219-T8 aluminum plate provided the basis for the inter-laboratory study (ILS). The study proceeded in a blind fashion given that the analysis methodology was not specified to the participants, and key experimental results were withheld. This approach allowed the ILS to serve as a current measure of the state of the art for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. The analytical results and the associated methodologies were collected for comparison, and sources of variability were studied and isolated. The results of the study revealed that the J-integral analysis methodology using the domain integral method is robust, providing reliable J-integral values without being overly sensitive to modeling details. General modeling choices such as analysis code, model size (mesh density), crack tip meshing, or boundary conditions, were not found to be sources of significant variability. For analyses controlled only by far-field boundary conditions, the greatest source of variability in the J-integral assessment is introduced through the constitutive model. This variability can be substantially reduced by using crack mouth opening displacements to anchor the assessment. Conclusions provide recommendations for analysis standardization.

  11. Fracture toughness evaluation of select advanced replacement alloys for LWR core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Xiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to develop and test degradation resistant alloys from current commercial alloy specifications by 2021 to a new advanced alloy with superior degradation resistance in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments by 2024. Fracture toughness is one of the key engineering properties required for core internal materials. Together with other properties, which are being examined such as high-temperature steam oxidation resistance, radiation hardening, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking resistance, the alloys will be down-selected for neutron irradiation study and comprehensive post-irradiation examinations. According to the candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, ductile fracture toughness of eight alloys was evaluated at room temperature and the LWR-relevant temperatures. The tested alloys include two ferritic alloys (Grade 92 and an oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy 14YWT), two austenitic stainless steels (316L and 310), four Ni-base superalloys (718A, 725, 690, and X750). Alloy 316L and X750 are included as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. Compact tension specimens in 0.25T and 0.2T were machined from the alloys in the T-L and R-L orientations according to the product forms of the alloys. This report summarizes the final results of the specimens tested and analyzed per ASTM Standard E1820. Unlike the

  12. Analytical relations between elastic-plastic fracture criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, J.G.

    1976-07-01

    The equation of the normalized COD design curve recently proposed in the UK as a basis for determining allowable crack sizes is derived from the Equivalent Energy approximation for the J Integral. It is also shown that another approximation for the J Integral recently proposed by Westinghouse is mathematically equivalent to the normalized COD approach

  13. Fracture toughness of esthetic dental coating systems by nanoindentation and FIB sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecnik, Christina Martina; Courty, Diana; Muff, Daniel; Spolenak, Ralph

    2015-07-01

    Improving the esthetics of Ti-based dental implants is the last challenge remaining in the optimization process. The optical issues were recently solved by the application of highly and selectively reflective coatings on Ti implants. This work focuses on the mechanical durability of these esthetic ceramic based coating systems (with and without adhesion layers). The coating systems (Ti-ZrO2, Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2, Ti-Bragg and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) were subjected to nanoindentation experiments and examined using scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam cross sectional analysis. Three coating systems contained adhesion layers (10nm of Ti or 60nm of TiO2 layers). The fracture toughness of selected samples was assessed applying two different models from literature, a classical for bulk materials and an energy-based model, which was further developed and adjusted. The ZrO2 based coating systems (total film thicknesstoughness between 2.70 and 3.70MPam(1/2) was calculated using an energy-based model. The classical model was applied to Bragg coated samples and their fracture toughness ranged between 0.70 and 0.80MPam(1/2). Furthermore, coating systems containing an additional layer (Ti-Ti-Al-ZrO2, Ti-Ti-Ag-ZrO2 and Ti-TiO2-Bragg) showed an improved adhesion between the substrate and the coating. The addition of a Ti or TiO2 layer improved the adhesion between substrate and coating. The validity of the models for the assessment of the fracture toughness depended on the layer structure and fracture profile of the samples investigated here (classical model for thick coatings and energy-based model for thin coatings). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Intralaminar and Interlaminar Mode-I Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional IM7/8552 Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James

    2012-01-01

    The intralaminar and interlaminar mode-I fracture-toughness of a unidirectional IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy composite were measured using compact tension (CT) and double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens, respectively. Two starter crack geometries were considered for both the CT and DCB specimen configurations. In the first case, starter cracks were produced by 12.5 micron thick, Teflon film inserts. In the second case, considerably sharper starter cracks were produced by fatigue precracking. For each specimen configuration, use of the Teflon film starter cracks resulted in initially unstable crack growth and artificially high initiation fracture-toughness values. Conversely, specimens with fatigue precracks exhibited stable growth onset and lower initiation fracture toughness. For CT and DCB specimens with fatigue precracks, the intralaminar and interlaminar initiation fracture toughnesses were approximately equal. However, during propagation, the CT specimens exhibited more extensive fiber bridging, and rapidly increasing R-curve behavior as compared to the DCB specimens. Observations of initiation and propagation of intralaminar and interlaminar fracture, and the measurements of fracture toughness, were supported by fractographic analysis using scanning electron microscopy.

  15. A review on mode-I interlaminar fracture toughness of fibre reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuha, N.; Azmi, A. I.; Tan, C. L.

    2017-10-01

    Composite material has been growing rapidly throughout the year for its unique properties in comparisons with metal. Recently, there has been a growth on studying the way to reduce the delamination failure, which is the primary challenge on laminated fibre composite. This failure can degrade the strength of composite materials, hence loses its function. In this review, database search was performed using the keywords search on “interlaminar fracture toughness”, “double cantilever beam”, “delamination resistance” and “Mode-I GIC”. The searches were performed on Google Scholar, Scopus and Web of Science with further cross-referencing with other databases. Most relevant studies were selected for review and referencing by the author. This review paper gives a brief explanation on Mode-I interlaminar fracture toughness of composite material. This fracture mode is the most common modes on studying the delamination failure.

  16. Relationship between toughness and the physical fracture process on a microscopic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, D.

    1975-01-01

    Cleavage occurs when a local stress reaches a critical level sigma-f which is a function of temperature and metallurgical factors such as grain size. Cleavages occur ahead of the main crack tip. It is possible to establish a relationship between the cleavage stress and toughness, involving the notch root radius. At higher temperatures, fracture is ductile and occurs at a critical elongation epsilon-f, which is a function of the distribution of inclusions and the strain hardening index. It is possible to establish a relationship between toughness and this elongation at rupture. The influence of temperature, which affects several parameters, is complex. On the other hand, pressure, modifying only elongation at rupture represents an attractive means for confirming this theories. Experimental results are presented [fr

  17. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  18. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3 145 dpa at 380 503 C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm 3mm 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa ffiffiffiffiffi m p at 350 450 C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperatureP430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  19. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk, E-mail: jhbaek@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Byun, Thak Sang [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Maloy, Start A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Toloczko, Mychailo B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 °C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 °C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180–200MPa√(m) at 350–450 °C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature ⩾430 °C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 °C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  20. Fracture toughness testing of V-4Cr-4Ti at 25{degrees}C and -196{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Measurements of the fracture toughness of the production-scale heat (832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti have been performed at 25{degrees}C and {minus}196{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at either 1000{degrees}C for 1 hour (HT1) or 1050{degrees}C for two hours (HT2). Specimens given the HT1 treatment were annealed after final machining, whereas the HT2 specimens received the 1050{degrees}C anneal at Teledyne Wah Chang prior to final machining. Following machining HT2 specimens were then vacuum annealed at 180{degrees}C for two hours to remove hydrogen. Specimens treated using HT1 had a partially recrystallized microstructure and those treated using HT2 had a fully recrystallized microstructure. The fracture toughness at 25{degrees}C was determined by J-integral tests and at {minus}196{degrees}C by ASTM E 399 type tests. Toughness values obtained at {minus}196{degrees}C were converted to J-integral values for comparison to the 25{degrees}C data. The 25{degrees}C fracture toughness was very high with none of the specimens giving valid results per ASTM criteria. Specimens fractured by microvoid coalescence. The fracture toughness at {minus}196{degrees}C was much lower than that at 25{degrees}C and the fracture surface showed predominantly cleavage features. The present results show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior with decreasing test temperature which is not observed from one-third scale Charpy impact tests. The fracture toughness at {minus}196{degrees}C was still quite high, however, at about 75 kJ/m{sup 2}. Delaminations in planes normal to the thickness direction were seen at both test temperatures. Fracture surfaces inside the delaminations exhibited nearly 100% cleavage facets. The cause of the brittle delaminations was not determined, but will be a subject for further investigation.

  1. Determination of the key microstructural parameter for the cleavage fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.C.; Lee, B.S.; Hong, J.H.; Yang, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the microstructural parameters, such as the prior austenite grain size and carbide size, on the cleavage fracture toughness were investigated in the transition region of Mn-Mo-Ni bainitic low alloy steels. Cleavage fracture toughness was evaluated by the ASTM standard E 1921 Master curve method. In order to clarify the effects of each microstructure, the grain size and carbide size of the test materials were independently controlled by modifying the heat treatment process. Firstly, the grain sizes were changed from 25 to 110 without any significant changes in the carbide size and shape. Secondly, the average carbide sizes were changed from 0.20 to 0.29 but maintaining the initial grain sizes. As a result, the fracture toughness in the transition region did not show any significant dependency on the austenite grain size, while the carbide size showed a close relation to the fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was decreased with an increase of the average carbide size. From the microscopic observation of the fractured surface, the cleavage initiation distance (CID) from the original crack tip showed no direct relationship to the prior austenite grain sizes but a strong relationship to the carbide sizes. However, the measured cleavage fracture toughness was strongly related to the distance from the crack tip to the cleavage initiation site. From the viewpoint of the weakest link theory, the particle size and their distribution in front of the crack tip is probably more important than the grain size in the transition temperature range where the fracture was controlled by the cleavage crack initiation. (orig.)

  2. Effect of 10% and 15% carbamide peroxide on fracture toughness of human dentin in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, L E; Bahrami, P; Oguienko, O; Limeback, H

    2013-01-01

    Although damage to the structural integrity of the tooth is not usually considered a significant problem associated with tooth bleaching, there have been some reported negative effects of bleaching on dental hard tissues in vitro. More studies are needed to determine whether the observed in vitro effects have practical clinical implications regarding tooth structural durability. This in situ study evaluated the effect of 10% and 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) dental bleach, applied using conventional whitening trays by participants at home, on the fracture toughness of dentin. Ninety-one adult volunteers were recruited (n ≈ 30/group). Compact fracture toughness specimens (approximately 4.5 × 4.6 × 1.7 mm) were prepared from the coronal dentin of recently extracted human molars and gamma-radiated. One specimen was fitted into a prepared slot, adjacent to a maxillary premolar, within a custom-made bleaching tray that was made for each adult participant. The participants were instructed to wear the tray containing the dentin specimen with placebo, 10% CP, or 15% CP treatment gel overnight for 14 nights and to store it in artificial saliva when not in use. Pre-bleach and post-bleach tooth color and tooth sensitivity were also evaluated using ranked shade tab values and visual analogue scales (VASs), respectively. Within 24-48 hours after the last bleach session, the dentin specimens were tested for fracture toughness using tensile loading at 10 mm/min. Analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, χ (2) , Tukey's, and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at ptoughness (+ standard deviation) for the placebo, 10% CP, and 15% CP groups were 2.3 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 0.7, and 2.0 ± 0.5 MPa*m(1/2) respectively. There were no significant differences in mean fracture toughness results among the groups (p=0.241). The tooth sensitivity VAS scores indicated a significantly greater incidence (p=0.000) and degree of tooth sensitivity (p=0

  3. Imaging Inelastic Fracture Processes in Biomimetic Nanocomposites and Nacre by Laser Speckle for Better Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verho, Tuukka; Karppinen, Pasi; Gröschel, André H; Ikkala, Olli

    2018-01-01

    Mollusk nacre is a prototypical biological inorganic-organic composite that combines high toughness, stiffness, and strength by its brick-and-mortar microstructure, which has inspired several synthetic mimics. Its remarkable fracture toughness relies on inelastic deformations at the process zone at the crack tip that dissolve stress concentrations and stop cracks. The micrometer-scale structure allows resolving the size and shape of the process zone to understand the fracture processes. However, for better scalability, nacre-mimetic nanocomposites with aligned inorganic or graphene nanosheets are extensively pursued, to avoid the packing problems of mesoscale sheets like in nacre or slow in situ biomineralization. This calls for novel methods to explore the process zone of biomimetic nanocomposites. Here the fracture of nacre and nacre-inspired clay/polymer nanocomposite is explored using laser speckle imaging that reveals the process zone even in absence of changes in optical scattering. To demonstrate the diagnostic value, compared to nacre, the nacre-inspired nanocomposite develops a process zone more abruptly with macroscopic crack deflection shown by a flattened process zone. In situ scanning electron microscopy suggests similar toughening mechanisms in nanocomposite and nacre. These new insights guide the design of nacre-inspired nanocomposites toward better mechanical properties to reach the level of synergy of their biological model.

  4. Fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel weld metal at 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1984-08-01

    Selection of the welding processess and weld filler metals for fabrication of a large toroidal superconducting magnet is described. Data available in the literature are collected and compared with data generated in this study for three welding processes, shielded metal arc (SMA), gas tungsten arc (GTA), and flux cored arc (FCA) welds had the highest fracture toughness as measured by K/sub Ic/ estimated from J/sub Ic/. The SMA and FCA welds had about the same toughness, below the GTA values but above the average from the literature. The fracture mode for all three processes was typified by ductile dimples. The fracture morphology of the FCA weld specimens was influenced by the solidification substructure, and small particles were found to be nucleation sites for void formation, especially for the GTA welds. All three welding processes were deemed adequate for the intended service and were used to fabricate the large magnet. A trunnion-type turning fixture eliminated the need for welding in the vertical and overhead positions. The GTA process was used for all root passes, and the horizontal welds were filled by the SMA process. Over 80% of the welds were done in the flat position with the FCA process, and its high deposition rate and ease of operation are credited with contributing greatly to the success of the effort

  5. Technique Comparison of the Fracture Toughness Tests for Irradiated Fuel Claddings in a Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sangbok; Kim, Dosik; Jung, Yanghong; Choo, Yongsun; Ryu, Wooseog

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of a fracture toughness in a fuel cladding is a important factor to restrict the operation safety in nuclear power plants. The fracture properties of claddings were traditionally measured through a rubber bung test, a burst test, etc. Those results were the qualitative fracture characteristics, and could not be used as design or operation safety evaluation data. We need to evaluate the quantitative characteristics of claddings under normal operation and in accidents. The application of a fracture mechanics concept in testing a fuel cladding is restricted by the cladding geometry and creating the correct stress-state conditions. The geometry of claddings does not meet the requirement of the ASTM Standards for a specimen configuration and an applied load. The specimen may be produced from previously flattened claddings, but the flattening causes some uncertainties in the results due to changes in the microstructure of the material and a new distribution of the internal stresses. Therefore many efforts have been devoted to developing new test techniques, to quantify the fracture characteristics of claddings. Researchers from JAEA and NFI in Japan, Studsvik Company Ltd in Sweden, IAEA in Australia, and KAERI in Korea have independently developed fracture test techniques. This study is designed to review the independently developed techniques and to compare of their merits. Finally we shall apply the other techniques to upgrade our developing techniques

  6. Fracture toughness of wet and dry particulate materials comprised of colloidal sized particles: role of plastic deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesso, Mitchell L; Franks, George V

    2017-07-21

    This work demonstrates a method of measuring the fracture toughness of particulate materials comprised of colloidal sized particles over a wide range of saturation. Diametral compression of cylinders containing flaws of controlled length was used to measure the mode I fracture toughness. The effect of degree of saturation on the fracture toughness of slip cast ceramic grade alumina (d 50 = 0.7 μm) was investigated. Dry powder compacts have significantly lower fracture toughness than when the powder compact is nearly fully saturated. All observations are consistent with the fracture mechanism being predominantly brittle for the dry samples but predominantly ductile in the nearly saturated samples. The additional dissipation that occurs during the ductile fracture of the nearly saturated samples is due to plastic deformation in front of the crack tip. This well-known mechanism for toughening in metals has been quantified for the first time in soft matter. Analysis of the results indicates that the size of the plastic dissipation zone is more than an order of magnitude larger in the nearly saturated materials compared to the dry material. Understanding the fracture mechanisms that control the propagation of cracks through saturated, partially saturated and dry particulate materials comprised of colloidal sized particles provides additional insight into understanding drying cracks in paint, other coatings, ceramics and water treatment sludge.

  7. Transition Fracture Toughness Characterization of Eurofer 97 Steel using Pre-Cracked Miniature Multi-notch Bend Bar Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clowers, Logan N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    In this report, we present the feasibility study of using pre-cracked miniature multi-notch bend bar specimens (M4CVN) with a dimension of 45mm (length) x 3.3mm (width) x 1.65mm (thickness) to characterize the transition fracture toughness of Eurofer97 based on the ASTM E1921 Master Curve method. From literature survey results, we did not find any obvious specimen size effects on the measured fracture toughness of unirradiated Eurofer97. Nonetheless, in order to exclude the specimen size effect on the measured fracture toughness of neutron irradiated Eurofer97, comparison of results obtained from larger size specimens with those from smaller size specimens after neutron irradiation is necessary, which is not practical and can be formidably expensive. However, limited literature results indicate that the transition fracture toughness of Eurofer97 obtained from different specimen sizes and geometries followed the similar irradiation embrittlement trend. We then described the newly designed experimental setup to be used for testing neutron irradiated Eurofer97 pre-cracked M4CVN bend bars in the hot cell. We recently used the same setup for testing neutron irradiated F82H pre-cracked miniature multi-notch bend bars with great success. Considering the similarity in materials, specimen types, and the nature of tests between Eurofer97 and F82H, we believe the newly designed experimental setup can be used successfully in fracture toughness testing of Eurofer97 pre-cracked M4CVN specimens.

  8. Microstructure-dependent fracture toughness (JIC) variations in dissimilar pipe welds for pressure vessel system of nuclear plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Dinesh W.; Pandey, Sunil; Singh, P. K.; Kumar, Suranjit

    2017-09-01

    In present study, dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joints between SA508Gr.3cl.1 ferritic steel and SS304LN pipes were prepared using Inconel 82/182, and Inconel 52/152 consumables. Metallurgical properties and their influence on fracture toughness of weldment regions and interfacial regions could play a significant role in integrity assessment of these joints. Ni-based consumables exhibit complex metallurgical properties at interfacial regions. The metallurgical characterization and fracture toughness studies of Inconel 82/182 and Inconel 52/152 joints have been carried out for determining the optimum consumable for DMW joint requirements and the effect of microstructure on fracture toughness in weldment regions. The present codes and procedures for integrity assessment of DMW joints have not given due considerations of metallurgical properties. The requirements for metallurgical properties by considering their effect on fracture toughness properties in integrity assessment have been discussed for reliable analysis. Inconel 82/182 is preferred over Inconel 52/152 joints owing to favorable metallurgical and fracture toughness properties across the interfacial and weldment regions.

  9. Fracture toughness of heat cured denture base acrylic resin modified with Chlorhexidine and Fluconazole as bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Alaa; Vahid Roudsari, Reza; Satterthwaite, Julian D

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of incorporating Chlorhexidine and Fluconazole as bioactive compounds on the fracture toughness of conventional heat cured denture base acrylic resin material (PMMA). 30 single edge-notched (SEN) samples were prepared and divided into three groups. 10% (mass) Chlorhexidine and 10% (mass) Diflucan powder (4.5% mass Fluconazole) were added to heat cured PMMA respectively to create the two study groups. A third group of conventional heat cured PMMA was prepared as the control group. Fracture toughness (3-point bending test) was carried out for each sample and critical force (Fc) and critical stress intensity factor (KIC) values measured. Data were subject to parametric statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA and Post hoc Bonferroni test (p=0.05). Fluconazole had no significant effect on the fracture toughness of the PMMA while Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the KIC and therefore affected the fracture toughness. When considering addition of a bioactive material to PMMA acrylic, Chlorhexidine will result in reduced fracture toughness of the acrylic base while Fluconazole has no effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material in evaluation of the safety analysis report of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widia Lastana Istanto

    2011-01-01

    Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material that must be met by applicants for nuclear power plants construction permit has been investigated in this paper. The fracture toughness should be described in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) document that will be evaluated by the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Because BAPETEN does not have a regulations or standards/codes regarding the material used for the reactor vessel, especially in the fracture toughness requirements, then the acceptance criteria that applied to evaluate the fracture toughness of reactor vessel material refers to the regulations/provisions from the countries that have been experienced in the operation of nuclear power plants, such as from the United States, Japan and Korea. Regulations and standards used are 10 CFR Part 50, ASME and ASTM. Fracture toughness of reactor vessel materials are evaluated to ensure compliance of the requirements and provisions of the Regulatory Body and the applicable standards, such as ASME or ASTM, in order to assure a reliability and integrity of the reactor vessels as well as providing an adequate safety margin during the operation, testing, maintenance, and postulated accident conditions over the reactor vessel lifetime. (author)

  11. The distinctiveness of measuring interlaminar fracture toughness by the mode I method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Isidor

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Practical problems in measuring the interlaminar fracture toughness by the mode I method were pointed out in this paper. Unidirectional carbon fibre/epoxy resin composite was used in the experiments (as the test material. The composite was obtained by curing commercial Hexcel ply 6376 in a mould. The techniques of initial crack formation, solving problems of applying the correct stress on the specimen and the precise registering of crack growth were proposed. The reliability of suggested method was assessed by evaluating the dispersion of the results obtained, as well as by comparison with the literature data.

  12. Electroless Ni-P Coatings: Preparation and Evaluation of Fracture Toughness and Scratch Hardness

    OpenAIRE

    Sade, Wagner; Proença, Reinaldo Trindade; Moura, Thiago Daniel de Oliveira; Branco, José Roberto Tavares

    2011-01-01

    Ni-P chemical coatings have been used to prevent wear, corrosion and as an alternative for hard chromium, since the latter's deposition processing is very harmful to the human health and the environment. In the present paper, Ni-P coatings with 8 and 10% P were deposited in steel AISI 1020 and thermally treated. Ni-1wt%P coatings with incorporation of hard particles of Al2O3 were also investigated. The microstructure and phase relationships were analyzed and correlated with the fracture tough...

  13. Characterization by notched and precracked Charpy tests of the in-service degradation of RPV steel fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-01-01

    The current engineering and regulatory practice to estimate fracture toughness safety margins for nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) relies heavily on the CVN impact test. Techniques to estimate in-service toughness degradation directly using a variety of precracked specimens are under development worldwide. Emphasis is on their miniaturization. In the nuclear context, it is essential to address many issues such as representativity of the surveillance programs with respect to the vessel in terms of materials and environment, transferability of test results to the structure (constraint and size effects), lower bound toughness certification, creadibility relative to trends of exising databases. An enhanced RPV surveillance strategy in under development in Belgium. It combines state-of-the-art micromechanical and damage modelling to the evaluation of CVN load-deflection signals, tensile stress-strain curves and slow-bend tests of reconstituted precracked Charpy specimens. A probabilistic micromechanical model has been established for static and dynamic transgranular cleavage initiation fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition temperature range. This model allows to project toughness bounds for any steel embrittlement condition from the corresponding CVN and static tensile properties, using a single scaling factor defined by imposing agreement with toughness tests in a single condition. The outstanding finding incorporated by this toughness transfer model is that the microcleavage fracture stress is affected by temperature in the ductile-brittle transition and that this influence is strongly correlated to the flow stress: this explains the shape of the K{sub Ic}n K{sub Id} temperature curves as well as the actual magnitude of the strain rate and irradiation effects. Furthermore, CVN crack arrest loads and fracture appearance are also taken advantage of in order to estimate K{sub Ia} degradation. Finally, the CVN-tensile load-temperature diagram

  14. Elastic-plastic analysis of part-through crack propagation in piping and pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, L.A. de; Ebecken, N.F.F.

    1986-01-01

    The shell structures, often used in the construction of reservoirs, pipings, pressure vessels, nuclear power plants, etc, with part-through crack along its thickness, are analysed, using a computer system developed by the finite element method. The surface is discretized with three-dimensional quadratic elements, degenerated in its mid-surface, such the fracture is simulated by scalar elements (non linear springs). The results are analysed by the stress intensity factor K Sub(I) and the strain energy release rate, which is known as J-integral. The analysis is performed in the elastic and elastic-plastic regime. The basic hipothesis and the formulation adopted in the derivation of the scalar elements are also shown. (Author) [pt

  15. Performance of Chevron-notch short bar specimen in determining the fracture toughness of silicon nitride and aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, D.; Bubsey, R. T.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ease of preparation and testing are advantages unique to the chevron-notch specimen used for the determination of the plane strain fracture toughness of extremely brittle materials. During testing, a crack develops at the notch tip and extends stably as the load is increased. For a given specimen and notch configuration, maximum load always occurs at the same relative crack length independent of the material. Fracture toughness is determined from the maximum load with no need for crack length measurement. Chevron notch acuity is relatively unimportant since a crack is produced during specimen loading. In this paper, the authors use their previously determined stress intensity factor relationship for the chevron-notch short bar specimen to examine the performance of that specimen in determining the plane strain fracture toughness of silicon nitride and aluminum oxide.

  16. A study on rate sensitivity of elasto-plastic fracture toughness of TRIP steel evaluated by a small punch test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available TRIP steel indicates an excellent characteristic in energy absorption because of its high ductility and strength by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT. Recently, some shock absorption members are being used for automotive industries. For good fuel consumption of the automobile, it would realize the weight reduction without decaying performance if TRIP steel can be applied to those members. It can be considered that the fracture toughness is an important factor to evaluate the performance. To evaluate fracture toughness locally at any point of a product of those members, small punch testing method is quite effective. In the present study, first, an impact small punch testing apparatus is established. In addition, elasto-plastic fracture toughness of TRIP steel under impact loading and its rate sensitivity tested at various deflection rates are challenged to evaluate.

  17. Void growth in an elastic-plastic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, A.

    1972-01-01

    The uniaxial deformation of an elastic-plastic medium containing a doubly periodic square array of circular cylindrical voids is studied under plane-strain conditions. Both the effects of geometrical nonlinearities resulting from large deformation and physical nonlinearities arising from plastic material behavior are included in formulating the problem. A variational principle is used as the basis for implementing a finite-element solution. Results are obtained for the change in void shape and size under increasing overall strain, the overall tensile behavior of the material with voids, and the development of the plastic zone about a void.

  18. Shape and size of methane bubbles in muddy aquatic sediments and their dependence on sediment fracture toughness: a modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsman, Regina

    2014-05-01

    Shallow gassy marine sediments abundantly found on continental margins of Israel and worldwide, are a source of a major concern for their contribution to the destabilization of coastal and marine infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. Bubbles are different in the different sediment types. Size of the bubbles residing in the fine-grained muddy sediment exceeds significantly the grain size of sediment, and its shape can be approximated by a large oblate spheroid surrounded by sediment saturated with water. Experimental results indicate that bubble growth is accompanied by fracturing of the fine-grained muddy sediment. Modeling reveals that fracture toughness of the muddy sediments significantly affects bubble shape and size evolution prior its ascent. Small fracture toughness is responsible for generation of the small bubbles with highly asymmetric configuration and with fracturing concentrated mostly on the bubble head. In contrast, bigger fracture toughness is responsible for generation of the large, more symmetric bubbles. Moreover, growing bubble demonstrates a positive allometry resulting in a bigger rate of growth of its surface area that is responsible for the effectiveness of the solute supply from pore water to the bubble interior. This scaling demonstrates a strong correlation with sediment fracture toughness as well. Cross-section of the buoyant bubbles evolves from the elliptic profile to the one resembling an 'inverted tear drop'. Calculated bubbles characteristics in different sediments types demonstrate a good agreement with values reported in the literature.

  19. Effects of consolidation temperature, strength and microstructure on fracture toughness of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, P.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.; Alinger, M.; Hoelzer, D.; Gragg, D.

    2007-01-01

    Fully consolidated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were prepared by attritor milling pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.3 wt% Y 2 O 3 powders, followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) at 1000 o C or 1150 o C at 200 MPa for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed similar bimodal distributions of fine and coarse ferrite grains in both cases. However, as expected, the alloy microhardness decreased with increasing in HIPing temperature. Three point bend tests on single edge notched specimens, with a nominal root radius ρ = 0.15 mm, were used to measure the notch fracture toughness, K ρ , as a function of test temperature. The K ρ curves were found to be similar for both processing conditions. It appears that the coarser ferrite grains control cleavage fracture, in a way that is independent of alloy strength and HIPing temperature

  20. On improving the fracture toughness of a NiAl-based alloy by mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubanic, J.; Koss, D. A.; Locci, I. E.; Nathal, M.

    1991-01-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) has been used to process the NiAl-based alloy Ni-35Al-20Fe, such that a fine-grain (about 2 microns) microstructure is obtained through the addition of 2 vol pct Y2O3 particles. When compared to a conventionally processed, coarse-grained (about 28 microns) Ni-35-20 alloy without the Y2O3 particles, the MA alloy exhibits two to three times higher fracture toughness values, despite a 50-percent increase in yield strength. Room-temperature K(O) values as high as 34 MPa sq rt m are observed, accompanied by a yield strength in excess of 1100 MPa. Fractography confirms a change in fracture characteristics of the fine-grained MA alloy.

  1. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System Polyurethane Foam Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Wells, Doug; Morgan, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the basic fracture properties of Thermal Protection System (TPS) polyurethane foam insulation materials was conducted to validate the methodology used in estimating critical defect sizes in TPS applications on the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. The polyurethane foam found on the External Tank (ET) is manufactured by mixing liquid constituents and allowing them to react and expand upwards - a process which creates component cells that are generally elongated in the foam rise direction and gives rise to mechanical anisotropy. Similarly, the application of successive foam layers to the ET produces cohesive foam interfaces (knitlines) which may lead to local variations in mechanical properties. This study reports the fracture toughness of BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL-1034 closed-cell polyurethane foam as a function of ambient and cryogenic temperatures and knitline/cellular orientation at ambient pressure.

  2. Fractographic and microstructural aspects of fracture toughness testing in irradiated 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, W.H.; Hiser, A.L.; Hawthorne, J.R.; Abramczyk, G.A.; Caskey, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fracture toughness and Charpy impact test results on 304 stainless steel baseplate, weld and heat-affected zone (HAZ) tested at 25 0 C and 125 0 C are correlated with the microstructural and fractographic features observed in these materials. Specimens were collected from several sections of 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) wall thickness piping removed from a process system, and were characterized by different material chemistries and thermomechanical histories. As a result, mechanical properties vary over a considerable range from one pipe section to another. The presence of delta ferrite in some of the samples caused significant degradations in the toughness properties for certain crack orientations. Decreases in Charpy impact energies occur in the same material for different crack orientations. Materials irradiated showed 40% decreases in Charpy impact energy, but little change in fracture morphology. An increase in the test temperature resulted in an expected increase in Charpy energies for all materials. Fractographic features did not change appreciably with respect to the 100 0 C increase in test temperature. In unirradiated specimens, a test temperature increase caused lower J/sub Ic/ and J-R curve values with tearing modules values increased. The latter is due to the large decreases in tensile strength with increasing test temperature. The weld metals tend to have the highest tearing resistance, while the HAZ's tend to have the lowest. 30 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Nanoscale fatigue and fracture toughness measurements of multilayered thin film structures for digital micromirror devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guohua; Bhushan, Bharat; Jacobs, S. Joshua

    2004-07-01

    The digital micromirror device (DMD), which lies at the heart of Digital Light Processing™ projection display technology by Texas Instruments, Dallas, Texas, comprises a surface-micromachined array of mirrors on a base CMOS substrate. The nanomechanical properties of the thin-film structures used are important to the performance of the DMD. In this article, the nanoscale fatigue and fracture toughness of the single and multilayered thin film structures which are of interest in DMDs, i.e., TiN/Si, SiO2/Si, Al alloy/Si, TiN/Al alloy/Si, and SiO2/TiN/Al alloy/Si, were measured using nanoindentation techniques. The multilayered thin film structures with hard films on soft interlayer exhibit shorter fatigue life and higher ductility than the corresponding top hard films. The hardness plays an important role in determining the indentation fatigue life. Longer fatigue life is associated with higher hardness. The fracture toughness of TiN/Si and SiO2/Si was measured using the strain energy release method. .

  4. Fracture toughness prediction for RPV Steels with various degree of embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolin, B.; Gulenko, A.; Shvetsova, V.

    2003-01-01

    In the present report, predictions of the temperature dependence of cleavage fracture toughness are performed on the basis of the Master Curve approach and a probabilistic model named now the Prometey model. These predictions are performed for reactor pressure vessel steels in different states, the initial (as-produced), irradiated state with moderate degree of embrittlement and in the highly embrittled state. Calculations of the K IC (T) curves may be performed with both approaches on the basis of fracture toughness test results from pre-cracked Charpy specimens at some (one) temperature. The calculated curves are compared with test results. It is shown that the K IC (T) curves for the initial state calculated with the Master Curve approach and the probabilistic model show good agreement. At the same time, for highly embrittled RPV steel, the K IC (T) curve predicted with the Master Curve approach is not an adequate fit to the experimental data, whereas the agreement of the test results and the K IC (T) curve calculated with the probabilistic model is good. An analysis is performed for a possible variation of the K IC (T) curve shape and the scatter in K IC results. (author)

  5. Effects of irradiation fluence and creep on fracture toughness of 347/348 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Server, W.L.; Reuter, W.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The postirradiation fracture toughness of Type 347/348 stainless steel was investigated using 5.08-mm thick three-point bend specimens tested at 427 0 C. The J/sub Ic/ values were determined using the single-specimen unloading compliance technique in accordance with ASTM E 813-81. Equivalent values of plane strain fracture toughness, K/sub Ic/, were computed from experimentally determined J/sub Ic/ values for several fluence levels ranging from 2.3 to 4.8 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 1.0 MeV) and for irradiation creep of 0.0, 0.6, 1.1, and 1.8%. The test matrix involved four variables: fluence, creep, helium content, and heat-to-heat variation. Results show that an interpolated trend exists, i.e., K/sub Ic/ decreases with increasing combinations of fluence, creep, and helium content. These results also suggest that irradiation creep has less effect on reducing K/sub Ic/ than has been suggested previously

  6. Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Liu, Ken C [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45 pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

  7. The fracture toughness and DBTT of MoB particle-reinforced MoSi2 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhi; Wang Gang; Jiang Wan

    2005-01-01

    The room temperature fracture toughness and the high temperature DBTT of MoB particle-reinforced MoSi 2 composites were investigated using Vickers indentation technique and MSP testing method, respectively. Modified small punch (MSP) test is a method for evaluation of mechanical properties using very small specimens, and it's appropriate for the determination of strength and DBTT. It was found that the approximate fracture toughness of the composite is 1.3 times that of monolithic MoSi 2 , and its DBTT is 100 C higher than that of monolithic MoSi 2 materials. Cracks deflection is a probable mechanism responsible for this behavior. (orig.)

  8. Development of test practice requirements for a standard method on fracture toughness testing in the transition range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.E.; Zerbst, U.; Heerens, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers the resolution of several issues that are relevant to the ductile to brittle transition range of structural steels. One of this issues was to compare a statistical-based weakest-link method to constraint data adjustment methods for modeling the specimen size effects on fracture toughness. Another was to explore the concept of a universal transition temperature curve shape (Master Curve). Data from a Materials Properties Council round robin activity were used to test the proposals empirically. The findings of this study are inclosed in an activity for the development of a draft standard test procedure ''Test Practice for Fracture Toughness in the Transition Range''. (orig.) [de

  9. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Start A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3-145 dpa at 380-503 °C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180-200 MPa √{m} at 350-450 °C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature ⩾430 °C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 °C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  10. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness of a SMSS Subjected to Common Heat Treatment Cycles in an Aggressive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieta, G.; Leite, R.; Kwietniewski, C.; Clarke, T.; Strohaecker, T.

    2010-12-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) are an alternative to corrosion-prone carbon steels and expensive duplex stainless steels in offshore tubing applications for the oil and gas industry. Due to their differentiated alloying, SMSS exhibit superior toughness, corrosion resistance, and weldability properties when compared with another viable option, conventional martensitic stainless steels. However, when cathodically protected in a seawater environment they can be susceptible to embrittlement due to hydrogen charging. In the present study, SMSS samples were removed from deep water pipelines and their fracture toughness in the as-received condition and with different heat treatments was evaluated. Tests were carried out in air and in harsh environmental and loading conditions, which were ensured by subjecting specimens to cathodic overprotection, simulating effects seen in structures with complex geometries, and to incremental step loads in a synthetic seawater environment, thus favoring hydrogen diffusion to the precrack tip. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were analyzed in order to identify hydrogen-induced embrittlement and fracture toughness values of specimens tested in air were compared to values obtained in environment-assisted experiments. The influence of microstructure was evaluated by control of the retained austenite and δ-ferrite contents of the specimens. The results show a significant drop in the fracture toughness of steel in the studied environment, with a fracture mode which is clearly more brittle and dependent on microstructural characteristics of the samples.

  11. Thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in HT9 steel after irradiation to high doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Anderoglu, Osman; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-06-01

    The HT9 ferritic/martensitic steel with a nominal chemistry of Fe(bal.)12%Cr1%MoVW has been used as a primary core material for fast fission reactors such as FFTF because of its high resistance to radiation-induced swelling and embrittlement. Both static and dynamic fracture test results have shown that the HT9 steel can become brittle when it is exposed to high dose irradiation at a relatively low temperature (steel after irradiation up to 3148 dpa at 378504 °C. A specimen reuse technique has been established and applied to this study: the fracture specimens were tested Charpy specimens or broken halves of Charpy bars (13 × 3 × 4 mm). The post-anneal fracture test results indicated that much of the radiation-induced damage can be recovered by a simple thermal annealing schedule: the fracture toughness was incompletely recovered by 550 °C annealing, while nearly complete or complete recovery occurred after 650 °C annealing. This indicates that thermal annealing is a feasible damage mitigation technique for the reactor components made of HT9 steel. The partial recovery is probably due to the non-removable microstructural damages such as void or gas bubble formation, elemental segregation and precipitation.

  12. Planar Porous Graphene Woven Fabric/Epoxy Composites with Exceptional Electrical, Mechanical Properties, and Fracture Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Sun, Xinying; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Xi; Wu, Ying; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2015-09-30

    Planar interconnected graphene woven fabrics (GWFs) are prepared by template-based chemical vapor deposition and the GWFs are employed as multifunctional filler for epoxy-based composites. Apart from flexibility, transparency, lightweight, and high electrical conductivity, the GWFs have unique morphological features consisting of orthogonally interweaved, inherently percolated, hollow graphene tubes (GTs). The orthogonal GT structure means that the GWF/epoxy composites hold significant anisotropy in mechanical and fracture properties. The composites with 0.62 wt % graphene deliver a combination of excellent electrical and fracture properties: e.g., an electrical conductivity of ~0.18 S/cm; and fracture toughness of 1.67 and 1.78 MPa·m(1/2) when loaded along the 0° and 45° directions relative to the GT direction, respectively, equivalent to notable 57% and 67% rises compared to the solid epoxy. Unique fracture processes in GWF/epoxy composites are identified by in situ examinations, revealing crack tip blunting that occurs when the crack impinges GTs, especially those at 45° to the crack growth direction, as well as longitudinal tearing of hollow GTs as the two major toughening mechanisms.

  13. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Multiphase Polymer Nanocomposites Using Impact and J-Integral via Locus Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture behaviors of fibrillar silicate clay (MMT filled thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO containing polypropylene (PP blended with ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM were systematically investigated using impact test method and J-integral by locus method. Drastic increase in impact strength is observed for all developed compositions and generally shows higher value for the selected phases containing dispersed nanoclay in PP matrix. A fracture mechanics approach has been adopted by mode I test, and the effects of specimen geometry have been investigated. Increase in interlaminar fracture energy value, Gc, and J-integral value, Jc, is marked as the crack propagated through the composite; that is, a rising “R-curve” is observed. Toughness measurements revealed that the fracture toughness increased with increasing clay content reaching maximum at 3 wt% of clay than pure PP. Moreover, enhancement of fracture toughness was more remarkable than that of stiffness. The fracture surfaces taken from different specimens were observed for exploring the fracture mechanisms using transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed a strong particle-matrix adhesion.

  14. Influence of Anisotropic Microcracking Due to Swelling on the Fracture Toughness of a Clay-Bearing Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiennot, M.; Mertz, J.-D.; Bourgès, A.

    2017-11-01

    Flaking is a well-known pattern on rich clay stone. As swelling of clay minerals may induce crack propagation under fatigue, a fracture mechanics approach is proposed to investigate its impact on such decay pattern. A clay-bearing sandstone from the Thüringen region is studied because of the scaling effect observed at its surface when exposed to environmental conditions. Semi-circular bending specimens adapted to stone heritage studies are prepared and three configurations are tested, in order to measure toughness with respect to the bedding of this sandstone. Deformations are measured during relative humidity variations. They are measured anisotropic due to position and orientation of the clay phases within the stone. The influence of such natural dimensional variations on Young modulus and fracture toughness is studied. It appears that the induced damage is oriented and is the consequence of opening of the initial microcracks in the direction perpendicular to the maximum swelling. This damage induces an evolution of the fracture properties and behaviour. Toughness decreases as relative humidity increases depending on the orientation of the microcracking. Moreover, the toughness anisotropy of this sandstone appears during humidification. After several cycles of swelling, the microcracking induces an increase in toughness when notch is perpendicular to them. This may explain some stone deterioration patterns, as flakes subparallel to the stone surface.

  15. Prediction of fracture toughness and durability of adhesively bonded composite joints with undesirable bonding conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaramthota, Vishal

    Advanced composite materials have enabled the conventional aircraft structures to reduce weight, improve fuel efficiency and offer superior mechanical properties. In the past, materials such as aluminum, steel or titanium have been used to manufacture aircraft structures for support of heavy loads. Within the last decade or so, demand for advanced composite materials have been emerging that offer significant advantages over the traditional metallic materials. Of particular interest in the recent years, there has been an upsurge in scientific significance in the usage of adhesively bonded composite joints (ABCJ's). ABCJ's negate the introduction of stress risers that are associated with riveting or other classical techniques. In today's aircraft transportation market, there is a push to increase structural efficiency by promoting adhesive bonding to primary joining of aircraft structures. This research is focused on the issues associated with the durability and related failures in bonded composite joints that continue to be a critical hindrance to the universal acceptance of ABCJ's. Of particular interest are the short term strength, contamination and long term durability of ABCJ's. One of the factors that influence bond performance is contamination and in this study the influence of contamination on composite-adhesive bond quality was investigated through the development of a repeatable and scalable surface contamination procedure. Results showed an increase in the contaminant coverage area decreases the overall bond strength significantly. A direct correlation between the contaminant coverage area and the fracture toughness of the bonded joint was established. Another factor that influences bond performance during an aircraft's service life is its long term strength upon exposure to harsh environmental conditions or when subjected to severe mechanical loading. A test procedure was successfully developed in order to evaluate durability of ABCJ's comprising severe

  16. An Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Vinyl Ester Composites Cured under Microwave Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, H.; Chan, W. L.; Trada, M.; Baddeley, D.

    2007-12-01

    The shrinkage of vinyl ester particulate composites has been reduced by curing the resins under microwave conditions. The reduction in the shrinkage of the resins by microwaves will enable the manufacture of large vinyl ester composite items possible (H.S. Ku, G. Van Erp, J.A.R. Ball, and S. Ayers, Shrinkage Reduction of Thermoset Fibre Composites during Hardening using Microwaves Irradiation for Curing, Proceedings, Second World Engineering Congress, Kuching, Malaysia, 2002a, 22-25 July, p 177-182; H.S. Ku, Risks Involved in Curing Vinyl Ester Resins Using Microwaves Irradiation. J. Mater. Synth. Proces. 2002b, 10(2), p 97-106; S.H. Ku, Curing Vinyl Ester Particle Reinforced Composites Using Microwaves. J. Comp. Mater., (2003a), 37(22), p 2027-2042; S.H. Ku and E. Siores, Shrinkage Reduction of Thermoset Matrix Particle Reinforced Composites During Hardening Using Microwaves Irradiation, Trans. Hong Kong Inst. Eng., 2004, 11(3), p 29-34). In tensile tests, the yield strengths of samples cured under microwave conditions obtained are within 5% of those obtained by ambient curing; it is also found that with 180 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for all duration of exposure to microwaves are also within the 5% of those obtained by ambient curing. While, with 360 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for all duration of exposure to microwaves are 5% higher than those obtained by ambient curing. Whereas, with 540 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for most samples are 5% below those obtained by ambient curing (H. Ku, V.C. Puttgunta, and M. Trada, Young’s Modulus of Vinyl Ester Composites Cured by Microwave Irradiation: Preliminary Results, J. Electromagnet. Waves Appl., 2007, 20(14), p. 1911-1924). This project, using 33% by weight fly ash reinforced vinyl ester composite [VE/FLYSH (33%)], is to further investigate the difference in fracture toughness between microwave cured vinyl ester particulate composites and those cured

  17. Determining the dimensional stability, fracture toughness and flexural strength of light-cured acrylic resin custom tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S B; Geerts, G

    2009-06-01

    Light-cured acrylic resin custom tray material is used in commercial dental laboratories but little evidence-based scientific information on its physical properties is available. This study investigates the dimensional stability of light-cured acrylic resin custom tray material and compares its fracture toughness and flexural strength to a chemically-cured acrylic material. For dimensional stability, 20 light-cured specimens were fabricated and measured 3 times at regular time intervals over 48 hours. Mean shrinkage was calculated for each time interval and the mean values were compared to the standard using the Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. A p-value of materials with a single-edge notch were subjected to a compressive load using the 3-point bending technique. For flexural strength, 1 group (n=20) of each material was subjected to a compressive load using 3-point bending. The highest load before failure was used to calculate the fracture toughness and flexural strength. Differences in fracture toughness and flexural strength values between the 2 groups were compared using ANOVA testing. A p-value of 0.05). The fracture toughness and flexural strength were significantly higher for the light-cured material. Trays made from light-cured acrylic resin can be used immediately following polymerization. The light-cured material is more resistant to bending and crack propagation than the chemically-cured type.

  18. Fracture Toughness and Impact Strength of High-Volume Class-F Fly Ash Concrete Reinforced with Natural San Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat SIDDIQUE

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental investigation carried out to study the effects of addition of natural san fibres on the fracture toughness and impact strength of high-volume fly ash concrete are presented in this paper. San fibres belong to the category of ‘Natural Bast Fibres’, also known as ‘Sunn Hemp’. Its scientific (botanical name is Crotalaria Juncea. It is mostly grown in the Indian Sub-Continent, Brazil, Eastern and Southern Africa, and in some parts of the U.S.A. Initially, a control mixture without fly ash was designed. Then, cement was replaced with three percentages (30, 40 and 50% of low-calcium (Class F fly ash. Three percentages of san fibres (0.30, 0.60 and 0.90%, having 25 mm length, were used. Tests were performed for compressive strength, fracture toughness, and impact strength at the ages of 28 and 91 days.The test results indicated that the replacement of cement with fly ash decreased the compressive strength and fracture toughness, and had no significant effect on the impact strength of plain (control concrete. Addition of san fibres did not affect significantly the compressive strength, increased the fracture toughness and impact strength of high-volume fly ash concrete as the percentage of fibres increased.

  19. Effect of tempering on quasi-static and impact fracture toughness and mechanical properties for 5140 H steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepaczko, J. R.; Solecki, A.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of various thermal treatments, i.e., oil quench and different tempering conditions, on quasi-static and impact fracture toughness, stress-strain characteristics, hardness, and Charpy energy of 5140 H steel were examined. During quasi-static and impact loading notched round tensile specimens were used with a prefatigued crack. A specially designed device together with a pendulum hammer and electronic measuring system was used enabling testing of the opening mode fracture toughness at loading rates up to K1 = 3 x 106 MPa√m per second. It has been found that within the region of the lower tempering temperatures, 500 K≤ 650 K, the critical stress intensity factor KIc determined from impact testing is lower than that obtained during slow loading, whereas at the higher tempering temperatures, 650 K ≤ T* ≤ 900 K, dynamic KIu values show a tendency to be higher than their quasi-static counterparts. This behavior was analyzed quantitatively using the Hahn-Rosenfield model which relates tensile properties to fracture toughness. A good agreement was found between quasi-static experimental results and the model. The relation between Charpy energy Kv and the critical stress intensity factor KIc was also evaluated. Changes of the fracture toughness are discussed within the framework of SEM fractographs taken after quasi-static and impact tests.

  20. Bone fracture toughness and strength correlate with collagen cross-link maturity in a dose-controlled lathyrism mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerny, Erin M B; Gong, Bo; Morris, Michael D; Kohn, David H

    2015-03-01

    Collagen cross-linking is altered in many diseases of bone, and enzymatic collagen cross-links are important to bone quality, as evidenced by losses of strength after lysyl oxidase inhibition (lathyrism). We hypothesized that cross-links also contribute directly to bone fracture toughness. A mouse model of lathyrism using subcutaneous injection of up to 500 mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) was developed and characterized (60 animals across 4 dosage groups). Three weeks of 150 or 350 mg/kg BAPN treatment in young, growing mice significantly reduced cortical bone fracture toughness, strength, and pyridinoline cross-link content. Ratios reflecting relative cross-link maturity were positive regressors of fracture toughness (HP/[DHLNL + HLNL] r(2)  = 0.208, p toughness and strength. Thus, cross-link profile perturbations associated with bone disease may provide insight into bone mechanical quality and fracture risk. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  1. The effect of ceria co-doping on chemical stability and fracture toughness of Y-TZP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutz, M.M.R.; Boutz, M.M.R.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; van Langerak, B.; olde Scholtenhuis, R.J.M.; Kreuwel, K.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    The fracture toughness and ageing resistance of yttria, ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y, Ce-TZP) were evaluated as a function of grain size and ceria content. Very fine grained, fully dense materials could be produced by sinter forging at relatively low temperatures (1150–1200

  2. The effect of subzero treatment on microstructure, fracture toughness, and wear resistance of Vanadis 6 tool steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobotová, J.; Jurči, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 652, JAN (2016), s. 192-204 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Fracture toughness * Tool steel * Ledeburitic steel Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 3.094, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921509315306675

  3. Fracture toughness and fracture behavior of CLAM steel in the temperature range of 450 °C-550 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Liang, Mengtian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Jiang, Man; Liu, Shaojun

    2018-04-01

    In order to analyze the fracture toughness and fracture behavior (J-R curves) of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel under the design service temperature of Test Blanket Module of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the quasi-static fracture experiment of CLAM steel was carried out under the temperature range of 450 °C-550 °C. The results indicated that the fracture behavior of CLAM steel was greatly influenced by test temperature. The fracture toughness increased slightly as the temperature increased from 450 °C to 500 °C. In the meanwhile, the fracture toughness at 550 °C could not be obtained due to the plastic deformation near the crack tip zone. The microstructure analysis based on the fracture topography and the interaction between dislocations and lath boundaries showed two different sub-crack propagation modes: growth along 45° of the main crack direction at 450 °C and growth perpendicular to the main crack at 500 °C.

  4. Marine Shaft Steels (AISI 4140 and AISI 5120 Predicted Fracture Toughness by FE Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran VUKELIC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Optimal selection of material can be considered as one of the most critical steps in engineering design process. That is especially emphasized when dealing with constructions that operate in marine environment; high stresses and harsh operating conditions assert the importance of proper material characterization before its selection. This paper presents comparison of two types of steel usually used in marine shaft manufacturing, chromium-molybdenum steel AISI 4140 and chromium low-alloy steel AISI 5120. Comparison was made using numerically determined J-integral, an important fracture mechanics parameter. J-integral values are determined numerically using finite element (FE stress analysis results of compact tensile (CT and single-edge notched bend (SENB type specimens usually used in standardized J-integral experimental procedures. Obtained J values are plotted versus specimen crack growth values (Δa for different specimen geometries (a/W. Higher resulting values of J-integral for AISI 5120 than AISI 4140 can be noticed. Also, higher a/W ratios correspond to lower J-integral values of materials and vice versa. In addition to that, J-integral values obtained by using FE model of CT specimen give somewhat conservative results when compared with ones obtained by FE model of SENB specimen. Although this procedure differs from experimental analysis, results can be used a suitable fracture parameter value in fracture toughness assessment.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.13823

  5. Fracture toughness and corrosion resistance of semisolid AlSi5 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pola, A.; Montesano, L.; Gelfi, M.; Roberti, R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate fracture toughness and corrosion resistance of semisolid AlSi5 castings, compared to samples obtained from conventional casting operations. In order to have a semisolid microstructure, the melt alloy was treated by means of ultrasound during solidification and then poured into permanent moulds. Mechanical properties of semisolid and conventional castings were compared by means of ultimate tensile strength (R m ), yield stress (Rp 02 ) and hardness (HV) measurements. Fracture mechanics tests were carried out on Single Edge Notched Bend (SENB) specimens, machined from castings, and pre-cracked by fatigue. These tests were performed to determine the effect of the microstructure on the J-Integral resistance (J-R) behavior and to deeply understand the ductile fracture behaviour of semisolid parts. The J-Integral versus spaced crack extension (J-Δa) curves showed an improved resistance of the semisolid microstructure, due to the higher ductility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of semisolid samples was compared to that of castings coming from solidification of fully liquid alloy by means of electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests. It was observed that the globular microstructure offers better quality, in terms of higher mechanical properties, as a consequence of a more uniform distribution of the solute.

  6. An ORMOSIL-Containing Orthodontic Acrylic Resin with Concomitant Improvements in Antimicrobial and Fracture Toughness Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Blizzard, John D.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances. PMID:22870322

  7. Recommended practice for fracture toughness testing of weldments with strength mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornet, P.; Eripret, C.; Wang, Y.Y.; Kirk, M.T.; Gordon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Fracture toughness testing requires relationships between experimentally measured quantities, such as load and displacement, and J and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD).The relationships provided in the presently codified procedures (ASTM E813, E1152, E1290 et BSI 7848:Part 1) were derived under the assumption that the specimens have homogeneous mechanical properties. However, these codified procedures are frequently used for testing of weldments despite their strong mechanical properties variations. As a result, the accuracy of the toughness values (J or CCTOD) is sometimes in question. Systematic finite element studies of mismatched single-edge-notched-bend specimens (SENB) having a crack on the centerline have been conducted to resolve this question. The effect of various parameters on these relationships, such as weld size, degree of mismatch, and crack depth, is investigated. The accuracy of the codified J and CTOD testing procedures when applied to the mismatched SE(B) specimens is examined. This systematic examination is extended to several newly proposed procedures, such as those from Joch et al. and Hornet and Eripret. New J and CTOD estimations procedures are proposed. The expected error in applying the codified and the new procedures are shown are proposed. The expected error in applying the codified and the new procedures are shown in terms of mismatch level and level width. Recommendations are made on the use of those procedures for a variety of weld mismatch and crack depth conditions. (authors)

  8. Computer aided instrumented Charpy test applied dynamic fracture toughness evaluation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    1986-01-01

    Micro computer aided data treatment system and personal computer aided data analysis system were applied to the traditional instrumented Charpy impact test system. The analysis of Charpy absorbed energy (E i , E p , E t ) and load (P y , P m ), and the evaluation of dynamic toughness through whole fracture process, i.e. J Id , J R curve and T mat was examined using newly developed computer aided instrumented Charpy impact test system. E i , E p , E t , P y and P m were effectively analyzed using moving average method and printed out automatically by micro computer aided data treatment system. J Id , J R curve and T mat could be measured by stop block test method. Then, J Id , J R curve and T mat were effectively estimated using compliance changing rate method and key curve method on the load-load point displacement curve of single fatigue cracked specimen by personal computer aided data analysis system. (author)

  9. Crack diffusion coefficient - A candidate fracture toughness parameter for short fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, M. A.; Chudnovsky, A.; Moet, A.

    1987-01-01

    In brittle matrix composites, crack propagation occurs along random trajectories reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the strength field. Considering the crack trajectory as a diffusive process, the 'crack diffusion coefficient' is introduced. From fatigue crack propagation experiments on a set of identical SEN polyester composite specimens, the variance of the crack tip position along the loading axis is found to be a linear function of the effective 'time'. The latter is taken as the effective crack length. The coefficient of proportionality between variance of the crack trajectory and the effective crack length defines the crack diffusion coefficient D which is found in the present study to be 0.165 mm. This parameter reflects the ability of the composite to deviate the crack from the energetically most efficient path and thus links fracture toughness to the microstructure.

  10. Evaluation of toughness degradation by small punch (SP) tests for neutron irradiated structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Toshihei; Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Kimura, Akihiko; Eto, Motokuni; Suzuki, Masahide; Nakajima, Nobuya.

    1992-01-01

    The small punch (SP) test as one of the useful small specimen testing technique (SSTT) has been developed to evaluate the fracture toughness, ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and tensile properties for neutron irradiated structural materials. The SP tests using the miniaturized specimens of φ3 mm TEM disk and 10 mm 2 coupon were performed for six kinds of ferritic steels of F-82, F-82H, HT-9, JFMS, 2.25-1Mo and SQV2A. It was shown that the temperature dependence of SP fracture energies with scatter in miniaturized testing can give reliable information on the DBTT by use of the statistical analysis based on the Weibull distribution. A good correlation between the DBTT of the SP tests and that of the standard CVN test has been obtained for the various nuclear ferritic steels. The SP test was performed for cryogenic austenitic steels as a way of evaluating elastic-plastic fracture toughness, J IC , on the basis of a universal empirical relationship between J IC and SP equivalent fracture strain, ε-bar qf . The SP testing using the neutron irradiated specimens of 2.25Cr-1Mo, F-82, F-82H and HT-9 steels was successfully applied and presented the neutron radiation induced changes on the DBTT, fracture toughness and tensile properties. (author)

  11. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Lucon, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 10 11 n/cm 2 /s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 10 19 n/cm 2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 10 13 n/cm 2 /s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 10 19 n/cm 2 . The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT 0 , were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  12. Evaluation of a high fracture toughness composite ceramic for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The introduction of yttrium partially stabilized zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) has pushed the application limits of all-ceramic restorations. The mechanical properties of these materials can be further improved by the addition of a secondary dopant phase. The aim of this work was to evaluate the properties of a new nano-composite ceramic used as a dental framework material. The properties of a new ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal co-doped with alumina (Ce-TZP-Al) were investigated. Y-TZP was used as control. Sixty bars (20 x 2.5 x 1.5 mm(3)) from each material were prepared by cutting CAD/CAM milling blocks. Twenty specimens were used to measure the 4-point flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity of the tested materials. The remaining specimens were used to measure the fracture toughness using indentation strength (IS), single edge notched beam (SENB), and fractography (FR). The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) was measured using temperature expansion diagrams. The bond strength of the two framework materials to two esthetic veneer ceramics was tested using the microtensile bond strength test (MTBS). Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) were used to analyze the internal structure of the materials. One- and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to analyze the data (alpha= 0.5). The flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of Ce-TZP-Al (856 MPa, 170 GPa) were significantly weaker (p TEC for the two materials was relatively similar, 10.1 microm/ degrees C and 10.4 mum/ degrees C, respectively. Regarding MTBS values, Ce-TZP-Al had significantly lower bond strength values (p nano-composite ceramic, its very low bond strength to esthetic veneers leaves such layered restorations highly susceptible to delamination and chipping under function. Further studies are needed to enhance the surface stability of this high fracture toughness ceramic.

  13. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.

    2015-01-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitatin...

  14. A Modified TSD Specimen for Fracture Toughness Characterization – Fracture Mechanics Analysis and Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2010-01-01

    The tilted sandwich debond (TSD) specimen has been recognized as a viable candidate for characterization of the face/core fracture resistance. Analysis, however, shows that the range of phase angles that can be realized by altering the tilt angle and other parameters of the test is quite limited....

  15. Reference upper shelf fracture toughness properties of PWR pressure vessel materials: neutral/basic flux PWR submerged-arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidbury, D.P.G.

    1987-10-01

    A generic data base, relating to the upper shelf fracture toughness properties (O ≤ T ≤ 300 0 C) of pressurised water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel submerged-arc welds, deposited using neutral or basic fluxes, has been compiled and is presented in summary form within the main body of this report. A comparison with the A533B-1 plate and A508-3 forging data presented in the Second (1982) Report of the Light Water Reactor Study Group suggests the upper shelf fracture toughness properties of RPV submerged-arc welds metals are such that, over the temperature range appropriate to PWR plant operation: (i) initiation toughnesses are generally less than those associated with A533B-1/A508-3 base metals containing < 0.010 wt% S; (ii) enhanced toughnesses, corresponding to 2.0 mm stable crack extension, are comparable with those expected of A533B-1 plate materials containing < 0.010 wt% S. The information gathering exercise has also confirmed that upper shelf toughnesses associated with the use of basic or neutral fluxes are higher than those associated with the use of acidic fluxes. (author)

  16. Analysis of interlaminar fracture toughness and damage mechanisms in composite laminates reinforced with sprayed multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The present work is focused on the nanoreinforcement of prepreg based carbon fiber composite laminates to improve delamination resistance. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were dispersed over the interface between prepreg layers through solvent spraying and the resulting mode I interlaminar fracture toughness was determined. For comparison, baseline samples with neat prepregs were also prepared. Results indicate that the introduction of functionalized MWCNTs can favorably affect the interlaminar fracture toughness, and the associated mechanisms of failure have been investigated. The manufacturing procedures and the interfacial reinforcing mechanism were explored by analyzing (i) the wettability between CNTs-solvent solution and prepreg surface, (ii) CNTs dispersion and (iii) the fractured surfaces through high resolution scanning electron microscopy and Raman mapping. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effects of Laser Quenching on Impact Toughness and Fracture Morphologies of 40CrNiMo High Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejun, Kong; Lei, Zhang

    2014-10-01

    The surface of 40CrNiMo steel was quenched with a CO2 laser, Charpy impact test was conducted at temperatures of 20, 0, and -20 °C, and the impact absorption energies were measured. The fracture morphologies were observed with SEM, and the influence of microhardness, residual stress, and retained austenite on mechanical behavior of impact fracture after laser quenching was discussed. The results show that the hardened layer depth is more than 1 mm after laser quenching, and hardness is about 480-500 HV. The fracture morphology of the sample is dimple rupture at a temperature of 20 °C; with the lower temperature the fracture dimples become smaller. At a temperature of -20 °C, the fracture morphologies change from ductile to brittle, which is mainly cleavage fracture. The increase in surface hardness, production of compressive residual stress, and existence of retained austenite after laser quenching are the main mechanisms of increasing impact toughness.

  18. The fracture toughness of small animal cortical bone measured using arc-shaped tension specimens: Effects of bisphosphonate and deproteinization treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunckler, Michael D; Chu, Ethan D; Baumann, Andrew P; Curtis, Tyler E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Allen, Matthew R; Roeder, Ryan K

    2017-12-01

    Small animal models, and especially transgenic models, have become widespread in the study of bone mechanobiology and metabolic bone disease, but test methods for measuring fracture toughness on multiple replicates or at multiple locations within a single small animal bone are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop a method to measure cortical bone fracture toughness in multiple specimens and locations along the diaphysis of small animal bones. Arc-shaped tension specimens were prepared from the mid-diaphysis of rabbit ulnae and loaded to failure to measure the radial fracture toughness in multiple replicates per bone. The test specimen dimensions, crack length, and maximum load met requirements for measuring the plane strain fracture toughness. Experimental groups included a control group, bisphosphonate treatment group, and an ex vivo deproteinization treatment following bisphosphonate treatment (5 rabbits/group and 15 specimens/group). The fracture toughness of ulnar cortical bone from rabbits treated with zoledronic acid for six months exhibited no difference compared with the control group. Partially deproteinized specimens exhibited significantly lower fracture toughness compared with both the control and bisphosphonate treatment groups. The deproteinization treatment increased tissue mineral density (TMD) and resulted in a negative linear correlation between the measured fracture toughness and TMD. Fracture toughness measurements were repeatable with a coefficient of variation of 12-16% within experimental groups. Retrospective power analysis of the control and deproteinization treatment groups indicated a minimum detectable difference of 0.1MPa·m 1/2 . Therefore, the overall results of this study suggest that arc-shaped tension specimens offer an advantageous new method for measuring the fracture toughness in small animal bones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cyclic Fracture Toughness of Railway Axle and Mechanisms of its Fatigue Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorochak Andriy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main regularities in fatigue fracture of the railway axle material - the OSL steel - are found in this paper. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation are described and systematized, and a physical-mechanical interpretation of the relief morphology at different stages of crack propagation is proposed for fatigue cracks in specimens cut out of the surface, internal and central layers of the axle.

  20. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  1. Investigation on the Effect of Different Pre-Cracking Methods on Fracture Toughness of RT-PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyas Haddadi

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, eight techniques including coping saw, metal slitting saw, razor blade, cubic boron nitride (CBN disc, scoring, die-cutting and guillotining, diamond disc, and laser cutting methods were used to produce pre-cracked fracture toughness (Kc test specimens made of poly(methyl methacrylate/graft-acrylonitrile butadiene styrene blends. The influences of notch shape (radial, rectangular, or angular-shaped and variety of thicknesses, pre-cracking method, chip removing or non-chip removing, and the contact or non-contact methods on the results obtained in fracture toughness tests were investigated. The results were analyzed by two methods, quantitatively and qualitatively, by comparing the obtained Kc results and studying the SEM and optical microscopy images, respectively. The results indicated that the different conditions of a produced pre-crack including; geometry of pre-crack due to geometry of tools, residual stress due to pre-crack creation, heat affected zone, damage of crack tip, and producing crazing around the crack tip could affect the fracture toughness. The maximum difference resulted from different pre-cracking methods was equal to 0.24 MPa.m0.5 and the lowest value of fracture toughness Kc, 2.53 MPa.m0.5, belonged to the scoring method but the highest value, 2.77 MPa.m0.5, belonged to the metal slitting saw method. Also, the results indicated that the effects of notching on toughness of RT-PMMA had a low notch sensitivity and the differences between minimum and maximum Kc values was found about 9%.

  2. 2015 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on the fracture toughness of stainless steels. Fracture toughness variability was investigated for Type 21-6-9 stainless steel using the 7K0004 forging. Fracture toughness specimens were cut from the forging in two different geometric configurations: arc shape and disc shape. The fracture toughness properties were measured at ambient temperature before and after exposure to hydrogen gas and compared to prior studies. There are three main conclusions that can be drawn from the results. First, the fracture toughness properties of actual reservoir forgings and contemporary heats of steel are much higher than those measured in earlier studies that used heats of steel from the 1980s and 1990s and forward extruded forgings which were designed to simulate reservoir microstructures. This is true for as-forged heats as well as forged heats exposed to hydrogen gas. Secondly, the study confirms the well-known observation that cracks oriented parallel to the forging grain flow will propagate easier than those oriented perpendicular to the grain flow. However, what was not known, but is shown here, is that this effect is more pronounced, particularly after hydrogen exposures, when the forging is given a larger upset. In brick forgings, which have a relatively low amount of upset, the fracture toughness variation with specimen orientation is less than 5%; whereas, in cup forgings, the fracture toughness is about 20% lower than that forging to show how specimen geometry affects fracture toughness values. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) specifies minimum specimen section sizes for valid fracture toughness values. However, sub-size specimens have long been used to study tritium effects because of the physical limitation of diffusing hydrogen isotopes into stainless steel at mild temperatures so as to not disturb the underlying forged microstructure. This study shows

  3. Effect of processing on fracture toughness of silicon carbide as determined by Vickers indentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Christine M.; Dutta, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    Several alpha-SiC materials were processed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and by sintering an alpha-SiC powder containing boron and carbon. Several beta-SiC materials were processed by HIPing a beta-SiC powder with boron and carbon additions. The fracture toughnesses K(sub 1c) of these beta- and alpha-SiC materials were estimated from measurements of Vickers indentations. The three formulas used to estimate K(sub 1c) from the indentation fracture patterns resulted in three ranges of K(sub 1c) estimates. Furthermore, each formula measured the effects of processing differently. All three estimates indicated that fine-grained HIPed alpha-SiC has a higher K(sub 1c) than coarsed-grained sintered alpha-SiC. Hot isostatically pressed beta-SiC, which had an ultrafine grain structure, exhibited a K(sub 1c) comparable to that of HIPed alpha-SiC.

  4. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J IC ), mixed-mode I/III (J MC ), and mode III (J IIIC ) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J MC was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J MC and tearing modulus (T M ) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J MC and T M values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of σ i /σ iii was 1.2 to 0.84. The J min was 240 Kj/M 2 , and ratios of J IC /J min and J IIIC /J min were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J MC and T M values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J min remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J min

  5. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 Grade B Plate materials, data analysis. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study on one heat of A302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in tests made on recent production materials of A533 grade B and A508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A302 grade B steels or unique to that particular plate. Seven heats of modified A302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A533 grade B steel were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550F. Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, 1T, 2T, and 4T). The fracture mechanics-based evaluation method covered three test orientations and three test temperatures (80, 400, and 550F). However, the coverage of these variables was contingent upon the amount of material provided. Drop-weight NDT temperature was determined for the T-L orientation only. None of the heats of modified A302 grade B showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550F produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and curve fits were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume deals with the evaluation of data and the discussion of technical findings. 8 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 Grade B Plate materials, data analysis. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study on one heat of A302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in tests made on recent production materials of A533 grade B and A508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A302 grade B steels or unique to that particular plate. Seven heats of modified A302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A533 grade B steel were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550F. Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, 1T, 2T, and 4T). The fracture mechanics-based evaluation method covered three test orientations and three test temperatures (80, 400, and 550F). However, the coverage of these variables was contingent upon the amount of material provided. Drop-weight NDT temperature was determined for the T-L orientation only. None of the heats of modified A302 grade B showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550F produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and curve fits were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume deals with the evaluation of data and the discussion of technical findings. 8 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  7. On the Fracture Toughness and Stable Crack Growth in Shape Memory Alloys Under Combined Thermomechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jape, Sameer Sanjay

    Advanced multifunctional materials such as shape memory alloys (SMAs) offer unprecedented improvement over conventional materials when utilized as high power output solid-state actuators in a plethora of engineering applications, viz. aerospace, automotive, oil and gas exploration, etc., replacing complex multi-component assemblies with compact single-piece adaptive components. These potential applications stem from the material's ability to produce large recoverable actuation strains when subjected to combined thermomechanical loads, via a diffusionless solid-to-solid phase transition between high-temperature cubic austenite and low-temperature monoclinic martensite crystalline phases. To ensure reliable design, functioning and durability of SMA-based actuators, it is imperative to develop a thorough scientific knowledge base and understanding about their fracture properties i.e. crack-initiation and growth during thermal actuation, vis-a-vis the phase transformation metrics (i.e. transformation strains, hysteresis, and temperatures, critical stresses for phase transformation, etc.) and microstructural features (grain size, precipitates, and texture). Systematic experimental and analytical investigation of SMA fracture response based on known theories and methodologies is posed with significant challenges due to the inherent complexity in SMA thermomechanical constitutive response arising out of the shape memory and pseudoelastic effects, martensite detwinning and variant reorientation, thermomechanical coupling, and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP). In this study, a numerical analysis is presented that addresses the fundamental need to study fracture in SMAs in the presence of aforementioned complexities. Finite element modeling with an energetics based fracture toughness criterion and SMA thermomechanical behavior with nonlinearities from thermomechanical coupling and TRIP was conducted. A specific analysis of a prototype boundary value fracture problem

  8. Investigation of Polyaxial Stress-Dependent Permeability of Three-Dimensional Fractured Rocks using TOUGH-DPUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Tang, X.; Lei, Q.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Discontinuities, such as joints, faults and bedding planes, widely exist in crustal rocks, and often dominate hydro-mechanical processes in the subsurface. The understanding of the nontrivial effect of natural fractures on hydrological properties of rock masses is important for many engineering applications (e.g. petroleum recovery, groundwater management and geothermal production). In this work, we study the influence of polyaxial (ture-triaxial) stresses on the permeability of a three-dimensional (3D) fractured rock using a fully-coupled TOUGH-DPUM numerical model. The geomechanical behavior of the 3D fractured rock in response to in-situ stresses is modeled by a certain of discontinuous partition of unity methods (DPUM), which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, variation of stress field, shear and opening of pre-existing fractures, and propagation of new cracks; the fluid flow through the fractured porous media is modeled by TOUGH2, which can capture the flow dynamics in both fractures and porous matrix. Simulation of fully-coupled hydro-mechanical processes is achieved by conservatively linking the solid and fluid fields during the iterative computation. A series of numerical simulations is designed to load the fractured rock using various polyaxial in-situ stresses and the stress-dependent flow permeability is further calculated.

  9. Fracture Toughness and Elastic Modulus of Epoxy-Based Nanocomposites with Dopamine-Modified Nano-Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Liang Koh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of surface treatment and filler shape factor on the fracture toughness and elastic modulus of epoxy-based nanocomposite. Two forms of nanofillers, polydopamine-coated montmorillonite clay (D-clay and polydopamine-coated carbon nanofibres (D-CNF were investigated. It was found that Young’s modulus increases with increasing D-clay and D-CNF loading. However, the fracture toughness decreases with increased D-clay loading but increases with increased D-CNF loading. Explanations have been provided with the aid of fractographic analysis using electron microscope observations of the crack-filler interactions. Fractographic analysis suggests that although polydopamine provides a strong adhesion between the fillers and the matrix, leading to enhanced elastic stiffness, the enhancement prohibits energy release via secondary cracking, resulting in a decrease in fracture toughness. In contrast, 1D fibre is effective in increasing the energy dissipation during fracture through crack deflection, fibre debonding, fibre break, and pull-out.

  10. Fracture Toughness and Elastic Modulus of Epoxy-Based Nanocomposites with Dopamine-Modified Nano-Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kwang Liang; Ji, Xianbai; Dasari, Aravind; Lu, Xuehong; Lau, Soo Khim; Chen, Zhong

    2017-07-10

    This paper examines the effect of surface treatment and filler shape factor on the fracture toughness and elastic modulus of epoxy-based nanocomposite. Two forms of nanofillers, polydopamine-coated montmorillonite clay (D-clay) and polydopamine-coated carbon nanofibres (D-CNF) were investigated. It was found that Young's modulus increases with increasing D-clay and D-CNF loading. However, the fracture toughness decreases with increased D-clay loading but increases with increased D-CNF loading. Explanations have been provided with the aid of fractographic analysis using electron microscope observations of the crack-filler interactions. Fractographic analysis suggests that although polydopamine provides a strong adhesion between the fillers and the matrix, leading to enhanced elastic stiffness, the enhancement prohibits energy release via secondary cracking, resulting in a decrease in fracture toughness. In contrast, 1D fibre is effective in increasing the energy dissipation during fracture through crack deflection, fibre debonding, fibre break, and pull-out.

  11. Directionally Solidified NiAl-Based Alloys Studied for Improved Elevated-Temperature Strength and Room-Temperature Fracture Toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Raj, Sai V.; Locci, Ivan E.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts are underway to replace superalloys used in the hot sections of gas turbine engines with materials possessing better mechanical and physical properties. Alloys based on the intermetallic NiAl have demonstrated potential; however, they generally suffer from low fracture resistance (toughness) at room temperature and from poor strength at elevated temperatures. Directional solidification of NiAl alloyed with both Cr and Mo has yielded materials with useful toughness and elevated-temperature strength values. The intermetallic alloy NiAl has been proposed as an advanced material to extend the maximum operational temperature of gas turbine engines by several hundred degrees centigrade. This intermetallic alloy displays a lower density (approximately 30-percent less) and a higher thermal conductivity (4 to 8 times greater) than conventional superalloys as well as good high-temperature oxidation resistance. Unfortunately, unalloyed NiAl has poor elevated temperature strength (approximately 50 MPa at 1027 C) and low room-temperature fracture toughness (about 5 MPa). Directionally solidified NiAl eutectic alloys are known to possess a combination of high elevated-temperature strength and good room-temperature fracture toughness. Research has demonstrated that a NiAl matrix containing a uniform distribution of very thin Cr plates alloyed with Mo possessed both increased fracture toughness and elevated-temperature creep strength. Although attractive properties were obtained, these alloys were formed at low growth rates (greater than 19 mm/hr), which are considered to be economically unviable. Hence, an investigation was warranted of the strength and toughness behavior of NiAl-(Cr,Mo) directionally solidified at faster growth rates. If the mechanical properties did not deteriorate with increased growth rates, directional solidification could offer an economical means to produce NiAl-based alloys commercially for gas turbine engines. An investigation at the NASA Glenn

  12. Lagrange multipliers in elastic-plastic torsion problem for nonlinear monotone operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrè, S.; Maugeri, A.; Puglisi, D.

    2015-08-01

    The existence of Lagrange multipliers as a Radon measure is ensured for an elastic-plastic torsion problem associated to a nonlinear strictly monotone operator. A regularization of this result, namely the existence of Lp Lagrange multipliers, is obtained under strong monotonicity assumption on the operator. Moreover, the relationships between elastic-plastic torsion problem and the obstacle problem are investigated. Finally, an example of the so-called "Von Mises functions" is provided, namely of solutions of the elastic-plastic torsion problem, associated to nonlinear monotone operators, which are not obtained by means of the obstacle problem in the case f =constant.

  13. Electrical resistivity response due to elastic-plastic deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of many materials is sensitive to changes in the electronic band configurations surrounding the atoms, changes in the electron-phonon interaction cross-sections, and changes in the density of intrinsic defect structures. These changes are most directly dependent on interatomic measures of relative deformation. For this reason, a model for resistivity response is developed in terms of interatomic measures of relative deformation. The relative deformation consists of two terms, a continuous function to describe the recoverable displacement between two atoms in the atomic lattice structure and a functional to describe the nonrecoverable displacement between two atoms as a result of interatomic discontinuities from dislocation kinetics. This model for resistivity extends the classical piezoresistance representation and relates electric resistance change directly to physical mechanisms. An analysis for the resistivity change of a thin foil ideally embedded in a material that undergoes elastic-plastic deformation is presented. For the case of elastic deformations, stress information in the material surrounding the thin foil is inferred for the cases of pure strain coupling boundary conditions, pure stress coupling boundary conditions, and a combination of stress-strain coupling boundary conditions. 42 refs., 4 figs

  14. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, S P; Mahfuz, H; Rondinone, A J; Leventouri, Th

    2016-03-01

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was studied. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6±0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This value is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Center-Cracked Horseshoe Disk Method for Determining the Mode I Fracture Toughness of Rock-Like Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, Hadi; Sarfarazi, V.; Yazdani, M.; Shemirani, Alireza Bagher; Hedayat, Ahmadreza

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a new procedure for determining the fracture toughness of rock-like specimens using the diametric compression test with the center-cracked horseshoe disk (CCHD) method. Using finite element analysis, a dimensionless stress intensity factor was obtained and a formula was rendered for determining mode I fracture toughness. To evaluate the accuracy of the measurement results produced by the CCHD method, fracture toughness experiments were conducted on the same rock-like material using the notched Brazilian disk (NBD) method. The CCHD tests were simulated using a two-dimensional particle flow code for validation of the experimental results, and a great agreement between the pattern of crack initiation and propagation between the experimental and numerical simulations was observed. Lower values of fracture toughness were obtained from CCHD experiments than NBD tests due to purely tensile stress distribution at the tip of the existing notch in CCHD method.

  16. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 grade B plate materials. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A 302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in fabricating reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study at Materials Engineering Associates (MEA) on one particular heat of A 302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in numerous tests made on the more recent production materials of A 533 grade B and A 508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the MEA material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A 302 grade B steels or just unique to that one particular plate. Seven heats of modified A 302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A 533 grade B steel were provided to this project by the General Electric Company of San Jose, California. All plates were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550{degrees}F (288{degrees}C). Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, IT, 2T, and 4T). None of the seven heats of modified A 302 grade showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550{degrees}F (82 to 288{degrees}C) produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and mathematical curve fits to the same were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume is a compilation of all data developed.

  17. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lucon, Enrico [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 1011 n/cm2/s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 1019 n/cm2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 1013 n/cm2/s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 1013 n/cm2/s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 1019n/cm2. The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT0, for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, T0, 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT0, were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  18. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 grade B plate materials. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A 302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in fabricating reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study at Materials Engineering Associates (MEA) on one particular heat of A 302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in numerous tests made on the more recent production materials of A 533 grade B and A 508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the MEA material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A 302 grade B steels or just unique to that one particular plate. Seven heats of modified A 302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A 533 grade B steel were provided to this project by the General Electric Company of San Jose, California. All plates were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550 degrees F (288 degrees C). Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, IT, 2T, and 4T). None of the seven heats of modified A 302 grade showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550 degrees F (82 to 288 degrees C) produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and mathematical curve fits to the same were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume is a compilation of all data developed

  19. 2016 Accomplishments. Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Forging process effects on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-precharged stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-01

    Forged austenitic stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for pressure vessels designed to contain tritium at high pressure. These steels are highly resistant to tritium-assisted fracture but their resistance can depend on the details of the forging microstructure. During FY16, the effects of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-exposed-and-aged Type 304L stainless steel were studied. Forgings were produced from a single heat of steel using four types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy-rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The objective of the study was to characterize the J-Integral fracture toughness properties as a function of the industrial strain rate and temperature. The second objective was to measure the effects of tritium and decay helium on toughness. Tritium and decay helium effects were measured by thermally precharging the as-forged specimens with tritium gas at 34.5 MPa and 350°C and aging for up to five years at -80°C to build-in decay helium prior to testing. The results of this study show that the fracture toughness properties of the as-forged steels vary with forging strain rate and forging temperature. The effect is largely due to yield strength as the higher-strength forgings had the lower toughness values. For non-charged specimens, fracture toughness properties were improved by forging at 871°C versus 816°C and Screw-Press forgings tended to have lower fracture toughness values than the other forgings. Tritium exposures reduced the fracture toughness values remarkably to fracture toughness values averaging 10-20% of as-forged values. However, forging strain rate and temperature had little or no effect on the fracture toughness after tritium precharging and aging. The result was confirmed by fractography which indicated that fracture modes

  20. Effects of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Nanoparticles on the Fracture Toughness of an Epoxy Resin at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Cannon, S. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace (Registered TradeMark) MX130 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/W epoxy resin. Resulting fracture toughness was evaluated by the use of Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electric Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Up to nominal 4.6% addition of the CSR nanoparticles, resulted in a nearly 5 times increase in the measured breaking energy. However, further increases in the amount of CSR nanoparticles had no appreciable affect on the breaking energy.

  1. Thermal stability and fracture toughness of epoxy resins modified with epoxidized castor oil and Al2O3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Lin; Jin, Fanlong; Park, Soojin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the epoxidized castor oil (ECO) and Al 2 O 3 content on the thermal stability and fracture toughness of the diglycidylether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA)/ECO/Al 2 O 3 ternary composites using a range of techniques. The thermal stability of the composites was decreased by the addition of ECO and Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles. The fracture toughness of the composites was improved significantly by the addition of ECO and Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles. The composite containing 3 wt % Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles showed the maximum flexural strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed tortuous cracks in the DGEBA/ECO/Al 2 O 3 composites, which prevented deformation and crack propagation

  2. Crack formation mechanisms during micro and macro indentation of diamond-like carbon coatings on elastic-plastic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, N.B.; Fischer-Cripps, A.C.; Swain, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    of cracking and the fracture mechanisms taking place. In the study various diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel were investigated. Results primarily for one DLC system will be presented here. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.......In the present study crack formation is investigated on both micro and macro scale using spherical indenter tips. in particular, systems consisting of elastic coatings that are well adhered to elastic-plastic substrates are studied. Depth sensing indentation is used on the micro scale and Rockwell...... indentation on the macro scale. The predominant driving force for coating failure and crack formation during indentation is plastic deformation of the underlying substrate. The aim is to relate the mechanisms creating both delamination and cohesive cracking on both scales with fracture mechanical models...

  3. Effect of a home bleaching agent on the fracture toughness of resin composites, using short rod design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, R; Fani, M; Barfi Ghasrodashti, Ar; Nouri Yadkouri, N; Mousavi, Sm

    2014-06-01

    Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. To place various resin composites into distilled water at 37°C for 21 days and determine the effect of immersion time in distilled water, with and without exposure to 10% carbamide peroxide by employing short rod design fracture toughness test. Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI), Esthet (Dentsply), and Estelite (Tokuyama). For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI). Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M (0.5)) was calculated. Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (ptest showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent.

  4. Effect of Chemical Composition on the Optical Properties and Fracture Toughness of Transparent Magnesium Aluminate Spinel Cerami

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dericioglu, A. F.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Kagawa, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 5 (2005), s. 996-1003 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : MgAl2O4 spinel * optical properties * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.103, year: 2005

  5. Prevalent role of porosity and osteonal area over mineralization heterogeneity in the fracture toughness of human cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2016-09-06

    Changes in the distribution of bone mineralization occurring with aging, disease, or treatment have prompted concerns that alterations in mineralization heterogeneity may affect the fracture resistance of bone. Yet, so far, studies assessing bone from hip fracture cases and fracture-free women have not reached a consensus on how heterogeneity in tissue mineralization relates to skeletal fragility. Owing to the multifactorial nature of toughening mechanisms occurring in bone, we assessed the relative contribution of heterogeneity in mineralization to fracture resistance with respect to age, porosity, and area fraction of osteonal tissue. The latter parameters were extracted from quantitative backscattered electron imaging of human cortical bone sections following R-curve tests of single-edge notched beam specimens to determine fracture toughness properties. Microstructural heterogeneity was determined as the width of the mineral distribution (bulk) and as the sill of the variogram (local). In univariate analyses of measures from 62 human donors (21 to 101 years), local but not bulk heterogeneity as well as pore clustering negatively correlated with fracture toughness properties. With age as covariate, heterogeneity was a significant predictor of crack initiation, though local had a stronger negative contribution than bulk. When considering all potential covariates, age, cortical porosity and area fraction of osteons explained up to 50% of the variance in bone׳s crack initiation toughness. However, including heterogeneity in mineralization did not improve upon this prediction. The findings of the present work stress the necessity to account for porosity and microstructure when evaluating the potential of matrix-related features to affect skeletal fragility. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Microstructure and fracture toughness of the in-situ NiAl-Ni(3)Al intermetallic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian

    1997-11-01

    An overview of the toughening mechanisms in the intermetallic-base in-situ composites is presented. Based on the literature review and preliminary research, the two phase (beta+gammasp') region of Ni-Al system was chosen as a model in-situ composite to study fracture toughness of the in-situ NiAl-Nisb3Al intermetallic composites and explore the fracture toughening mechanisms in these intermetallic materials. The composition ranges investigated were 25-35 at.% Al for both as-solidified and as-heat-treated composites. To evaluate fracture toughness, a three point bending of Chevron-notched beam (CNB) specimens were used. The values of fracture toughness were calculated either directly from the maximum load at unstable crack propagation or by using a modified J-integral approach. Compressive testing was also carried out to obtain yield strength of tested in-situ intermetallic composites. Micromechanical properties of individual phases were probed by Vickers microhardness testing. The relationship between fracture toughness (Ksb{Ivm},\\ Ksb{Ivc}) and volume fraction of second phase Vsb{d}, in the following form: Ksb{Ivc}=f(Vsbsp{d}{n}) has been established. Also, boron-doped (0.2 and 0.3 at.%,) Nisb3Al was fabricated. Fracture mechanisms and boron effect on fracture toughness of the Nisb3Al phase were explored. The obtained results of fracture toughness (Ksb{Ivm},\\ Ksb{Ivc}) are compared with the existing models, which describe the second phase toughening mechanisms, and rule of mixtures (ROM). Weibull analysis is also applied for the analysis of the fracture toughness distribution of the investigated Nisb3Al/NiAl in-situ composites. The important features of the K-Delta a and J-Delta a curves by a CNB bend test have been explored in this research. The stress intensity factor K decreases with increasing crack extension (Delta a) and a PLATEAU usually appears with increasing of the crack extension only until the critical crack extension (Delta asb{m}), then K starts to

  7. Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI Series 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O.; Menke, B.H.

    1992-10-01

    The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program obtained a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two high-copper (0.23 and 0.31 wt %) submerged-arc welds to determine the shift and shape of the K Ic curve as a consequence of irradiation. Compact specimens with thicknesses to 101.6 mm (4 in) in the irradiated condition and 203.2 mm (8 in) in the unirradiated condition were tested, in addition to Charpy impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens. Irradiations were conducted at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C and an average fluence of 1.5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>l MeV). The Charpy 41-J temperature shifts are about the same as the corresponding drop-weight NDT temperature shifts. The irradiated welds exhibited substantial numbers of cleavage pop-ins. Mean curve fits using two-parameter (with fixed intercept) nonlinear and linearized exponential regression analysis revealed that the fracture toughness 100 MPa lg-bullet √m shifts exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Analyses of curve shape changes indicated decreases in the slopes of the fracture toughness curves, especially for the higher copper weld. Weibull analyses were performed to investigate development of lower bound curves to the data, including the use of a variable K min parameter which affects the curve shape

  8. Fracture toughness measurements of LPS-SiC: a comparison of the indentation technique and the SEVNB method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Strecker

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Many methods are currently used to measure the fracture toughness of ceramic materials. Methods based on crack-length measurements of cracks introduced into the sample surface by the Vicker's indentor have the advantage that they are easy to use, but are very unreliable due to subcritical crack growth and the difficulty in determining the exact length of the cracks. Furthermore, depending on the crack shape there are many equations to calculate K Ic. Other methods like the Chevron Notch or Single Edge Pre-cracked Beam (SEPB are often difficult to execute or expensive. The simple and inexpensive Single-Edge-V-Notched Beam (SEVNB on the other hand gives reliable values of fracture toughness of ceramic materials. In this method a saw cut is tapered to a sharp V-notch using a razor blade sprinkled with diamond paste. Thus, it is possible to introduce a sharp crack with a notch width of less than 20 micrometers, necessary to conduct valid tests. In this investigation, fracture toughness measurements on LPS-SiC materials carried out by the indentation technique and the SEVNB method have been compared.

  9. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.H.; Teysseyre, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  10. Standard test method for translaminar fracture toughness of laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of translaminar fracture toughness, KTL, for laminated and pultruded polymer matrix composite materials of various ply orientations using test results from monotonically loaded notched specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to room temperature laboratory air environments. 1.3 Composite materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by type of polymer matrix or fiber, provided that the specimen sizes and the test results meet the requirements of this test method. This test method was developed primarily from test results of various carbon fiber – epoxy matrix laminates and from additional results of glass fiber – epoxy matrix, glass fiber-polyester matrix pultrusions and carbon fiber – bismaleimide matrix laminates (1-4, 6, 7). 1.4 A range of eccentrically loaded, single-edge-notch tension, ESE(T), specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but planar size may be variable and adjusted, with asso...

  11. Correlating mode-I fracture toughness and mechanical properties of heat-treated crystalline rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayukh Talukdar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the effect of thermal treatment on the mode-I fracture toughness (FT, three crystalline rocks (two basalts and one tonalite were experimentally investigated. Semi-circular bend specimens of the rocks were prepared following the method suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM and were treated at various temperatures ranging from room temperature (25 °C to 600 °C. Mode-I FT was correlated with tensile strength (TS, ultrasonic velocities, and Young's modulus (YM. Additionally, petrographic and X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out to find the chemical changes resulting from the heat treatment. Further, scanning electron microscopy (SEM was conducted to observe the micro structural changes when subjected to high temperatures. These experiments demonstrate that heat treatment has a strong negative impact on the FT and mechanical properties of the rocks. From room temperature to 600 °C, mode-I FT values of massive basalt, giant plagioclase basalt, and tonalite were reduced by nearly 52%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. Also, at all temperature levels, FT and mechanical properties are found to be exponentially correlated. However, the exact nature of the relationship mainly depends on rock type. Besides, TS was found to be a better indicator of degradation degree than the mode-I FT. SEM images show that micro crack density and structural disintegration of the mineral grains increase with temperature. These physical changes confirm the observed reduction in the stiffness of heat-treated crystalline rocks.

  12. Neutron flux effect on the fracture toughness behavior of Tihange-III RPV material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.; Bertolis, D.

    2015-01-01

    The question whether material test reactor (MTR) data can be used to supplement power reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance data is still debated in the international community and its implications are particularly important in the perspective of long term operation (LTO). However, addressing the flux effect can be confusing if specific material and irradiation variables are not taken into account. This means that the answer to whether there is flux effect or not is neither 'no' nor 'yes' without specifying the application range. Indeed, neutron flux effect was recognized to occur in high Cu-containing steels in the low fluence range. But at high fluence, relevant for long term operation, it becomes difficult to clearly distinguish the differences between high flux and low flux. In this work, we irradiated the low Cu base metal and weld of the Tihange-III surveillance coupon in the BR2 reactor at high flux. The BR2 flux is about two orders of magnitude higher than the flux in the surveillance position. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests were performed on both the surveillance and MTR specimens and compared to assess the neutron flux effect. The results confirm that, at high fluence levels, the flux effect on mechanical properties is not significant, offering therefore the possibility of accelerated irradiation to investigate RPV embrittlement in the high fluence regime relevant for long term operation. (authors)

  13. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  14. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  15. Asperity interaction in elastic-plastic contact of rough surfaces in presence of adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasanta; Banerjee, Atanu

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of asperity interaction in elastic-plastic contact of rough surfaces in the presence of adhesion. The micro-contact model of asperity interactions, developed by Zhao and Chang (2001 Trans. ASME: J. Tribol. 123 857-64), is integrated into the elastic-plastic contact model developed by Roy Chowdhury and Ghosh (1994 Wear 174 9-19) to allow the asperity interaction and elastic-plastic deformation in the presence of surface forces to be considered simultaneously. The well-established elastic and plastic adhesion indices are used to consider the different conditions that arise as a result of varying load and material parameters. Results show that asperity interaction influences the loading-unloading behaviour in elastic-plastic adhesive contact of rough surfaces and in general asperity interactions reduce the effect of surface forces

  16. Formation of bubbles by hydrogen attack and elastic-plastic deformation of the matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, F. D.; Svoboda, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, DEC (2014), s. 110-123 ISSN 0749-6419 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : plastic collapse * corrosion * elastic-plastic material * energy method * thermodynamics Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 5.567, year: 2014

  17. On Elastic-Plastic Analysis of an Overloaded Breech Ring Using NASTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    NASTRAN Code is used in both cases. However, for problems under prescribed displacements, the DMAP sequence should be slightly modified. The maximum...ACrAV^SASk* AD TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCB-TR-81040 ON ELASTIC-PLASTIC ANALYSIS OF AN OVERLOADED BREECH RING USING NASTRAN P. C. T. Chen September...TITLE fand SubHMe; ON ELASTIC-PLASTIC ANALYSIS OF AN OVERLOADED BREECH RING USING NASTRAN 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final 6

  18. Effect of fatigue on fracture toughness and phase transformation of Y-TZP ceramics by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemli, Seçil Karakoca; Yilmaz, Handan; Aydin, Cemal; Bal, Bilge Turhan; Tıraş, Tülay

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fatigue on fracture toughness and phase transformation of yttria-stabilized zirconia polycrystal materials (Cercon and Lava). The specimens were tested for indentation fracture toughness either with or without being subjected to fatigue (20,000 cycles, 2 Hz, 200 N load). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to examine the phase composition of specimens. The indentation images were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy at indentation center (p1), indentation corner (p2), points on crack 100 μm (p3), and 200 μm (p4) away from the corner and a point ∼80 μm away from the crack (p5). Fracture toughness results were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); XRD and Raman spectroscopy results were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. Fracture toughness of Cercon control (CC) and fatigue (CF) groups were 6.8 and 6.9 MPa√m, respectively, with no significant difference (p > 0.01). Fracture toughness of Lava fatigue (LF; 7.3 MPa√m) was significantly higher than Lava control (LC; p toughness of Cercon and Lava, the second being significant. Phase transformation was also detected after fatigue, which is higher in Lava. Analysis of indentations showed that transformation was highest was at the corner, second at center. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The effect of microstructure and strength on the fracture toughness of an 18 Ni, 300 grade maraging steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psioda, J. A.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A 300 grade maraging steel was chosen as a vehicle by which to understand the inverse relationship between strength and toughness in high strength alloys such as the 18 Ni maraging steels. The 18 Ni, 300 grade maraging material was a commercial grade consumable-electrode, vacuum arc remelted heat obtained in the form of forged and annealed plate. The matrix contained a population of second-phase impurity inclusions which was a product of the casting and hot working processes. These inclusions did not change with subsequent precipitation hardening. Changes in microstructure resulting in strength increases were brought about by variations in aging temperature and time. Maximum strength was attained in the 300 grade maraging steel by aging at 427 C (800 F) for 100 hours. Tensile, fatigue precracked Charpy impact, and plane-strain fracture toughness tests were performed at room temperature, 20 C (68 F). With increasing strength the fracture toughness decreases as smaller and smaller inclusions act as sites for void initiation.

  20. Fracture toughness assessment of in-service aged primary circuit elbows using mini-CT specimens taken from outer skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayet-Gendrot, S. [Electricite de France, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Ould, P. [Framatome, Tour Framatome, Paris-la-Defense (France); Meylogan, T. [Electricite de France, SCMI, Avoine (France)

    1998-08-01

    Type CF8M cast duplex stainless steels used in the primary circuit elbows of pressurized water reactors are subject to thermal aging embrittlement at their service temperature, at {proportional_to}300 C. This phenomenon affects their fracture toughness properties. In order to assess the residual fracture toughness of these elbows, estimations are made through predictive formulae based on chemical composition and aging conditions, which provide safe values. However, in the case of the most sensitive materials, it is important to obtain more accurate estimations. A new method of determination was thus considered, based on the testing of mini-CT specimens taken from the skin of in-service elbows. The feasibility of using mini-CT specimens to evaluate the tearing resistance of cast duplex stainless steels seems at first sight difficult, in particular because of the very coarse metallurgical structure of these steels: will small specimens be representative of larger volumes (mainly regular 1T-CT specimens) and will they not induce too much scatter? In order to answer such questions, an experimental validation program has been undertaken: the results show that the method is relevant and lead to propose guidelines which aim at optimizing the experimental data analysis. Then the method is applied to an in-service elbow: the results obtained are found to be in good agreement with the toughness estimations given by our predictive formulae. This subsequently contributes to the validation of the general methodology used for the justification of French primary circuit elbows. (orig.) 7 refs.

  1. Numerical simulation of a Charpy test and correlation of fracture toughness with fracture energy. Vessel steel and duplex stainless steel of the primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breban, P; Eripret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis methods used to evaluate the harmlessness of defects in the components of the primary coolant circuit of pressurized water reactor are based on the knowledge of the failure properties of concerned materials. The toughness is used to be measured through tests performed on normalized samples. But in some cases, especially for the vessel steel submitted to irradiation effects or for cast components in duplex stainless steel sensitive to thermal ageing, these measurements are not available on the material aged in operation. Therefore, fracture resistance has been evaluated through Charpy tests. Toughness is thus obtained on the basis of an empirical correlation. To improve these predictions, a modeling of the Charpy test in the framework of the local approach to fracture has been performed, for both materials. For the vessel steel, a complete evaluation of toughness has been achieved on the basis of a bidimensional viscoplastic modeling under large strain assumptions and a post-treatment with a Weibull model (cleavage fracture). The main hypothesis (partition between plain stress and plain strain areas in the bidimensional modeling) was corrected after a three dimensional calculations with the finite element program Code-Aster. The fracture analysis put into evidence that damage considerations like cavity nucleation and growth have to be introduced in the model in order to improve the description of physical phenomena. Two ways of progress have been suggested and are in course of being investigated, one in the framework of local approach to failure, the other with the help of micro-macro relationship. With regard to the duplex steel, the description of a Charpy (U) test allowed to clearly discriminate between crack initiation and propagation phases. A modeling through an equivalent homogenous material with a damage law based on a modified Gurson potential enables to describe quantitatively both phases of fracture. It clearly appears that a reliable

  2. The influence of Y-TZP surface treatment on topography and ceramic/resin cement interfacial fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, P N G; Bastian, F L; Jardim, P M

    2017-09-01

    Consider the efficacy of glass infiltration etching (SIE) treatment as a procedure to modify the zirconia surface resulting in higher interfacial fracture toughness. Y-TZP was subjected to 5 different surface treatments conditions consisting of no treatment (G1), SIE followed by hydrofluoric acid treatment (G2), heat treated at 750°C (G3), hydrofluoric acid treated (G4) and airborne-particle abrasion with alumina particles (G5). The effect of surface treatment on roughness was evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy providing three different parameters: R a , R sk and surface area variation. The ceramic/resin cement interface was analyzed by Fracture Mechanics K I test with failure mode determined by fractographic analysis. Weibull's analysis was also performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the adhesion zone. G2 and G4 specimens showed very similar, and high R a values but different surface area variation (33% for G2 and 13% for G4) and they presented the highest fracture toughness (K IC ). Weibull's analysis showed G2 (SIE) tendency to exhibit higher K IC values than the other groups but with more data scatter and a higher early failure probability than G4 specimens. Selective glass infiltration etching surface treatment was effective in modifying the zirconia surface roughness, increasing the bonding area and hence the mechanical imbrications at the zirconia/resin cement interface resulting in higher fracture toughness (K IC ) values with higher K IC values obtained when failure probability above 20% was expected (Weibull's distribution) among all the experimental groups. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  4. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP, to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT and vickers hardness number (VHN of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05. Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM, VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching.

  5. Viscoelastic behaviour and fracture toughness of linear-low-density polyethylene reinforced with synthetic boehmite alumina nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pedrazzoli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the present study is to investigate how synthetic boehmite alumina (BA nanoparticles modify the viscoleastic and fracture behaviour of linear low-density polyethylene. Nanocomposites containing up to 8 wt% of untreated and octyl silane-functionalized BA nanoparticles, were prepared by melt compounding and hot pressing. The BA nanoparticles were finely and unformly dispersed within the matrix according to scanning electron microscopy inspection. The results of quasi-static tensile tests indicated that nanoparticles can provide a remarkable stiffening effect at a rather low filler content. Short term creep tests showed that creep stability was significatively improved by nanofiller incorporation. Concurrently, both storage and loss moduli were enhanced in all nanocomposites, showing better result for surface treated nanoparticles. The plane-stress fracture toughness, evaluated by the essential work of fracture approach, manifested a dramatic increase (up to 64% with the BA content, with no significant differences among the various types of BA nanoparticles.

  6. Draft fracture mechanics code case for American Society of Mechanical Engineers NUPACK rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque (United States); Nickell, R. [Applied Science and Technology, Poway (United States); Saegusa, T. [Central Research Inst. for Electric Power Industry, Abiko (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The containment boundaries of most spent-fuel casks certified for use in the United States by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are constructed with stainless steel, a material that is ductile in an engineering sense at all temperatures and for which, therefore, fracture mechanics principles are not relevant for the containment application. Ferritic materials may fail in a nonductile manner at sufficiently low temperatures, so fracture mechanics principles may be applied to preclude nonductile fracture. Because of the need to transport and store spent nuclear fuel safely in all types of climatic conditions, these vessels have regulatory lowest service temperatures that range down to -40 C (-40 F) for transport application. Such low service temperatures represent a severe challenge in terms of fracture toughness to many ferritic materials. Linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics principles provide a methodology for evaluating ferritic materials under such conditions.

  7. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  8. Evaluation of fracture toughness degradation of CrMoV rotor steels based on ultrasonic nonlinearity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyun Jo; Nahm, Seung Hoon; Nam, Young Hyun; Jhang, Kyung Young

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a nondestructive method for estimating the fracture toughness (K IC ) of CrMoV steels used as the rotor material of steam turbines in power plants. To achieve this objective, a number of CrMoV steel samples were heat-treated, and the Fracture Appearance Transition Temperature (FATT) was determined as a function of aging time. Nonlinear ultrasonic was employed as the theoretical basis to explain the harmonic generation in a damaged material, and the nonlinearity parameter of the second harmonic wave was the experimental measure used to be correlated to the fracture toughness of the rotor steel. The nondestructive procedure for estimating the K IC consists of two steps. First, the correlations between the nonlinearity parameter and the FATT are sought. The FATT values are then used to estimate K IC , using the K IC versus excess temperature (i.e.,T-FATT) correlation that is available in the literature for CrMoV rotor steel

  9. A nondestructive method for estimation of the fracture toughness of CrMoV rotor steels based on ultrasonic nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Nahm, Seung-Hoon; Jhang, Kyung-Young; Nam, Young-Hyun

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a nondestructive method for estimating the fracture toughness (K(IC)) of CrMoV steels used as the rotor material of steam turbines in power plants. To achieve this objective, a number of CrMoV steel samples were heat-treated, and the fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT) was determined as a function of aging time. Nonlinear ultrasonics was employed as the theoretical basis to explain the harmonic generation in a damaged material, and the nonlinearity parameter of the second harmonic wave was the experimental measure used to be correlated to the fracture toughness of the rotor steel. The nondestructive procedure for estimating the K(IC) consists of two steps. First, the correlations between the nonlinearity parameter and the FATT are sought. The FATT values are then used to estimate K(IC) using the K(IC) versus excess temperature (i.e., T-FATT) correlation that is available in the literature for CrMoV rotor steel.

  10. Effects of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Nanoparticles on the Cryogenic Fracture Toughness of CSR Modified Epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Magee, Daniel; Schneider, Judy; Cannon, Seth

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at ambient and liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX960 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin. Elastic modulus was calculated using quasi-static tensile data. Fracture toughness was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface morphology. The addition of the CSR nanoparticles increased the breaking energy with negligible change in elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress (UTS). At ambient temperature the breaking energy increased with increasing additions of the CSR nanoparticles up to 13.8wt%, while at LN2 temperatures, it reached a plateau at much lower CSR concentration.

  11. Fracture Toughness of Z3CN20.09M Cast Stainless Steel with Long-Term Thermal Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiwei; Yu, Dunji; Gao, Hongbo; Xue, Fei; Chen, Xu

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated thermal aging tests were performed at 400 °C for nearly 18,000 h on Z3CN20.09M cast stainless steel which was used for primary coolant pipes of nuclear power plants. A series of Charpy impact tests were conducted on Z3CN20.09M after different long-term thermal aging time. The test results indicated that the Charpy impact energy of Z3CN20.09M cast stainless steel decreased rapidly at an early stage and then almost saturated after thermal aging of 10,000 h. Furthermore, J-resistance curves were measured for CT specimens of longitudinal and circumferential pipe orientations. It showed that there was no obvious difference in the fracture characteristics of Z3CN20.09M in different sampling directions. In addition, the observed stretch zone width (SZW) revealed that the value of initiation fracture toughness J SZW was significantly lower than that of fracture toughness J IC, indicating a low actual crack initiation energy due to long-term thermal aging.

  12. An approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture that accounts for fracture toughness, fluid viscosity and leak-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsov, E V

    2016-12-01

    This paper develops a closed-form approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture whose behaviour is determined by an interplay of three competing physical processes that are associated with fluid viscosity, fracture toughness and fluid leak-off. The primary assumption that permits one to construct the solution is that the fracture behaviour is mainly determined by the three-process multiscale tip asymptotics and the global fluid volume balance. First, the developed approximation is compared with the existing solutions for all limiting regimes of propagation. Then, a solution map, which indicates applicability regions of the limiting solutions, is constructed. It is also shown that the constructed approximation accurately captures the scaling that is associated with the transition from any one limiting solution to another. The developed approximation is tested against a reference numerical solution, showing that accuracy of the fracture width and radius predictions lie within a fraction of a per cent for a wide range of parameters. As a result, the constructed approximation provides a rapid solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture, which can be used for quick fracture design calculations or as a reference solution to evaluate accuracy of various hydraulic fracture simulators.

  13. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanal, S.P., E-mail: skhanal2@fau.edu [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Mahfuz, H. [Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Rondinone, A.J. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Leventouri, Th. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was studied. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6 ± 0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This value is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases. - Highlights: • Properties of HAp, CfSWCNT and Nylon composites were studied. • The fracture toughness of the composite material was found up to 3.6 MPa.√m. • Increase of CfSWCNTs above 1 wt.% worsen the nano composites’ properties.

  14. Effects of austempering heat treatment conditions on fracture toughness of austempered ductile cast iron; Kyujo kokuen chutetsu no hakai jinsei ni oyobosu austemper shori no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Y.; Arai, M. [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-03-25

    Discussions were given in various manners to learn effects of treatment conditions with respect to fracture toughness of austempered ductile cast iron. Austenitizing temperature and isothermal transforming conditions that result in comprehensively most excellent fracture toughness including tensile strength were 1173 K and 648 K - 3.6 ks, respectively. The austenitizing temperature as low as 1123 K reduces quantity of residual austenite, resulting in residual inclusion of free ferrite in the structure. If as high as 1223 K, reduction in the fracture toughness is caused under any condition as a result of increase in unstable austenite and growth of austenite into coarse particles. With respect to the isothermal transforming conditions, high fracture toughness may be achieved at a relatively high temperature. However, a structure that has been transformed from austenite to bainite causes a secondary reaction in a short time, and deposits particulates of cementite and graphite, leading to a prediction of decrease in the fracture toughness. Therefore, it is preferable that the treatment time is decreased in order to suppress the secondary reaction. 9 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  16. Strength, fracture toughness and microstructure of a selection of all-ceramic materials. Part II. Zirconia-based dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzato, Massimiliano; Albakry, Mohammad; Ringer, Simon P; Swain, Michael V

    2004-06-01

    The present study is the second part of an investigation of strength, fracture toughness and microstructure of nine all-ceramic materials. In the present study, DC Zirkon, an experimental yttria partially stabilized zirconia, In-Ceram Zirconia slip and In-Ceram Zirconia dry-pressed were compared. Strength was appraised on ten bar-shaped specimens for each material (20 x 4 x 1.2 mm) with the three-point bending method. The fracture toughness (Indentation Strength) was measured on twenty specimens (20 x 4 x 2 mm) for each ceramic. The volume fraction of each phase, the dimensions and shapes of the grains and the crack pattern were investigated with SEM. Phase transformation was investigated with X-ray diffraction. Data were compared with an ANOVA and Sheffé post hoc test (p = 0.05). Means of strength (MPa) and fracture toughness (MPa m(1/2)) values and their standard deviation were: In-Ceram Zirconia dry-pressed 476 (50)1, 4.9 (0.36)1; In-Ceram Zirconia slip 630 (58)2, 4.8 (0.50)1; the experimental yttria partially stabilized zirconia 680 (130)2, 5.5 (0.34)2; DC-Zirkon 840 (140)3, 7.4 (0.62)3. Values with the same superscript number showed no significant statistical difference. Microscope investigation and X-ray diffraction revealed the important role played by the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation and by the relationship between the glassy matrix and the crystalline phase in the strengthening and toughening mechanisms of these ceramics. the zirconia-based dental ceramics are stronger and tougher materials than the conventional glass-ceramics. Better properties can have positive influence on the clinical performance of all-ceramic restorations. Copyright 2003 Academy of Dental Materials

  17. Adhesive friction for elastic-plastic contacting rough surfaces considering asperity interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasanta

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a theoretical study of adhesive friction at the contact between rough surfaces taking asperity interaction into consideration and using an elastic-plastic model of contact deformation that is based on an accurate finite element analysis of an elastic-plastic single asperity contact. The micro-contact model of asperity interactions, developed by Zhao and Chang, is integrated into the improved elastic-plastic rough surface adhesive contact analysis to consider the adhesive friction behaviour of rough surfaces. The model considers a large range of interference values from fully elastic through elastic-plastic to fully plastic regimes of contacting asperities. Two well-established adhesion indices are used to consider different conditions that arise as a result of varying load, surface and material parameters. Results are obtained for the coefficient of friction against applied load for various combinations of these parameters. The results show that the coefficient of friction depends strongly on the applied load for the no-interaction case while it becomes insensitive to the load for interaction consideration. Moreover, the inclusion of elastic-plastic asperities further reduces the friction coefficient

  18. Constraint effects on fracture initiation loads in HSST wide-plate tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    During the period 1984--1987, researchers of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed a unique series of fracture mechanics tests using exceptionally large, SE(T) specimens (a/W=0.2) fabricated from a reactor pressure vessel material, A533B Class 1 steel. This study re-examines fracture initiation loads in the wide-plate tests using two constraint assessment methodologies developed over the past five years: the J-Q toughness locus approach and the toughness scaling approach based on a local failure criterion for cleavage. Both approaches demonstrate a significant loss of constraint in the elastic-plastic fields ahead of the crack in the wide-plate specimens caused by the inherent negative T-stress of the shallow notch SE(T) configuration. Moreover, the 25mm wide machined notch required for specimen fabrication is shown to further reduce constraint by introducing a traction free surface very near the crack tip. Both of these factors combined to reduce near-tip stresses by 10% below those of the small-scale yielding, SSY (T=O), fields. This reduction places fracture results for the wide-plate specimens within the J-Q toughness locus defined by fracture toughness tests on the A533B material and within the constraint corrected J c values defined by the toughness scaling methodology

  19. Fracture toughness of irradiated Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tube using load-ratio method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S. J.; Kim, I. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Tehnology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S.; Ahn, S. B. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The fracture toughness of irradiated Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tube material in Wolsung CANDU site has been evaluated by means of Load-ratio method and Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In case of irradiated pressure tube, measurement of crack extension is very difficult because it is not easy to install conventional measuring instruments. In load ratio method, however, initial crack length, final crack length and load-load line displacement curve are needed to measure crack extension in load ratio method. In this study, Load-ratio method was applied to evaluate fracture toughness and compared with DCPD method. Curved Compact Tension (CCT) specimen was manufactured with axially notch in outlet and inlet of pressure tube. Fracture test performed at temperatures between room temperature and 300 .deg. C At low temperature, the load-load line displacement in the fracture test showed the discontinuous abrupt decreases caused by crack jumping. In crack resistance curve, unstable crack growth stage was showed due to irradiation damage and hydride. The fracture characteristic value (JIC, dJ/da) in the irradiated are lower than those of the unirradiated. The result of Load ratio method was compared with DCPD method. J{sub IC} by Load-ratio method was larger than that of DCPD method and dJ/da was smaller than DCPD method. The reason is that crack initiation is determined at larger load line displacement in load ratio method. To reduce difference between two methods, load-ratio method is modified by means of relationship between crack length and load line displacement.

  20. BWRVIP-140NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project Fracture Toughness and Crack Growth Program on Irradiated Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, J.

    2005-01-01

    To prepare for this project, EPRI and BWRVIP conducted a workshop at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida during February 19-21, 2003 (EPRI report 1007822). Attendees were invited to exchange relevant information on the effects of irradiation on austenitic materials in light water reactors and to produce recommendations for further work. EPRI reviewed the data, recommendations, and conclusions derived from the workshop and developed prioritized test matrices defining new data needs. Proposals were solicited, and selected proposals are the basis for the program described in this report. Results The planned test matrix for fracture toughness testing includes 21 tests on 5 materials

  1. Contribution to the Evaluation of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar for Fracture Toughness Determination of Reactor Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scibetta, M

    1999-06-01

    The subject of this PhD dissertation is the use of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar (CRB) for fracture toughness measurements. The main advantages of CRB are the relatively small size requirements of the testing specimens, the low cost to machine the specimen, the rotating bending fatigue allowing for easy precracking of specimens, the use of standard tensile test fixture and the axisymmetry of the specimen that avoids time consuming 3D finite element calculations. An in-depth study of the most widely used precracking technique for CRB, namely the rotating bending fatigue, is made.

  2. Contribution to the Evaluation of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar for Fracture Toughness Determination of Reactor Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scibetta, M.

    1999-06-01

    The subject of this PhD dissertation is the use of the Circumferentially-Cracked Round Bar (CRB) for fracture toughness measurements. The main advantages of CRB are the relatively small size requirements of the testing specimens, the low cost to machine the specimen, the rotating bending fatigue allowing for easy precracking of specimens, the use of standard tensile test fixture and the axisymmetry of the specimen that avoids time consuming 3D finite element calculations. An in-depth study of the most widely used precracking technique for CRB, namely the rotating bending fatigue, is made

  3. Development of Mini-Compact Tension Test Method for Determining Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of small specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Validation of the mini compact tension specimen (mini-CT) geometry has been performed on previously well characterized Midland beltline Linde 80 (WF-70) weld in the unirradiated condition. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature, To, measured by these Mini-CT specimens is almost the same as To value that was derived from various larger fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, an International collaborative program has been established to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated Linde 80 weld metal. The program is underway and involves the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Central Research Institute for Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The irradiated Mini-CT specimens from broken halves of previously tested Charpy

  4. Effects of Oxides on Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties and Fracture Toughness in Heat Affected Zones of Oxide-Containing API X80 Linepipe Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Sohn, Seok Su; Shin, Sang Yong; Oh, Kyung Shik; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-06-01

    This study is concerned with effects of complex oxides on acicular ferrite (AF) formation, tensile and Charpy impact properties, and fracture toughness in heat affected zones (HAZs) of oxide-containing API X80 linepipe steels. Three steels were fabricated by adding Mg and O2 to form oxides, and various HAZ microstructures were obtained by conducting HAZ simulation tests under different heat inputs. The no. of oxides increased with increasing amount of Mg and O2, while the volume fraction of AF present in the steel HAZs increased with increasing the no. of oxides. The strengths of the HAZ specimens were generally higher than those of the base metals because of the formation of hard microstructures of bainitic ferrite and granular bainite. When the total Charpy absorbed energy was divided into the fracture initiation and propagation energies, the fracture initiation energy was maintained constant at about 75 J at room temperature, irrespective of volume fraction of AF. The fracture propagation energy rapidly increased from 75 to 150 J and saturated when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 30 pct. At 253 K (-20 °C), the total absorbed energy increased with increasing volume fraction of AF, as the cleavage fracture was changed to the ductile fracture when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 45 pct. Thus, 45 vol pct of AF at least was needed to improve the Charpy impact energy, which could be achieved by forming a no. of oxides. The fracture toughness increased with increasing the no. of oxides because of the increased volume fraction of AF formed around oxides. The fracture toughness did not show a visible correlation with the Charpy absorbed energy at room temperature, because toughness properties obtained from these two toughness testing methods had different significations in view of fracture mechanics.

  5. Application of small specimens to fracture mechanics characterization of irradiated pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M.A.; Wallin, K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens were used to characterize the fracture toughness of unirradiated and irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region by means of three-point static bending. Fracture toughness at cleavage instability was calculated in terms of elastic-plastic K Jc values. A statistical size correction based upon weakest-link theory was performed. The concept of a master curve was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties. Initially, size-corrected PCVN data from A 533 grade B steel, designated HSST Plate O2, were used to position the master curve and a 5% tolerance bound for K Jc data. By converting PCVN data to IT compact specimen equivalent K Jc data, the same master curve and 5% tolerance bound curve were plotted against the Electric Power Research Institute valid linear-elastic K Jc database and the ASME lower bound K Ic curve. Comparison shows that the master curve positioned by testing several PCVN specimens describes very well the massive fracture toughness database of large specimens. These results give strong support to the validity of K Jc with respect to K Ic in general and to the applicability of PCVN specimens to measure fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels in particular. Finally, irradiated PCVN specimens of other materials were tested, and the results are compared to compact specimen data. The current results show that PCVNs demonstrate very good capacity for fracture toughness characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels. It provides an opportunity for direct measurement of fracture toughness of irradiated materials by means of precracking and testing Charpy specimens from surveillance capsules. However, size limits based on constraint theory restrict the operational test temperature range for K Jc data from PCVN specimens. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Fracture toughness of 6.4 mm (0.25 inch) Arc-Cast molybdenum and molybdenum-TZM plate at room temperature and 300 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, J.A. jr.; Lipetzky, P.; Mueller, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The fracture toughness of 6.4 mm (0.25 inch) low carbon arc-cast (LCAC) molybdenum and arc-cast molybdenum-TZM alloy plate were measured at room temperature and 300 o C using compact tension specimens. The effect of crack plane orientation (longitudinal vs. transverse) and annealing practice (stress-relieved vs. recrystallized) were evaluated. Depending upon the test temperature either a standard K IC or a J-integral analysis was used to obtain the toughness value. At room temperature, regardless of alloy, orientation, or microstructure, fracture toughness values between 15 and 22 MPa m 1/2 (14 and 20 ksi in 1/2 ) were measured. These K IC values were consistent with measurements by other authors. Increasing temperature improves the toughness, due to the fact that one takes advantage of the ductile-brittle transition behavior of molybdenum. At 300 o C, the fracture toughness of recrystallized LCAC and arc-cast TZM molybdenum were also similar at approximately 64 MPa m 1/2 (58 ksi in 1/2 ). In the stress-relieved condition, however, the toughness of arc-cast TZM (91 MPa m 1/2 / 83 ksi in 1/2 ) was higher than that of the LCAC molybdenum (74 MPa m 1/2 / 67 ksi in 1/2 ). (author)

  7. Effects of toughness anisotropy and combined tension, torsion, and bending loads on fracture behavior of ferritic nuclear pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, R.; Marshall, C.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes work on angled through-wall-crack initiation and combined loading effects on ferritic nuclear pipe performed as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s research program entitled {open_quotes}Short Cracks In Piping an Piping Welds{close_quotes}. The reader is referred to Reference 1 for details of the experiments and analyses conducted as part of this program. The major impetus for this work stemmed from the observation that initially circumferentially oriented cracks in carbon steel pipes exhibited a high tendency to grow at a different angle when the cracked pipes were subjected to bending or bending plus pressure loads. This failure mode was little understood, and the effect of angled crack grown from an initially circumferential crack raised questions about how cracks in a piping system subjected to combined loading with torsional stresses would behave. There were three major efforts undertaken in this study. The first involved a literature review to assess the causes of toughness anisotropy in ferritic pipes and to develop strength and toughness data as a function of angle from the circumferential plane. The second effort was an attempt to develop a screening criterion based on toughness anisotropy and to compare this screening criterion with experimental pipe fracture data. The third and more significant effort involved finite element analyses to examine why cracks grow at an angle and what is the effect of combined loads with torsional stresses on a circumferentially cracked pipe. These three efforts are summarized.

  8. Effects of toughness anisotropy and combined tension, torsion, and bending loads on fracture behavior of ferritic nuclear pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.; Marshall, C.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes work on angled through-wall-crack initiation and combined loading effects on ferritic nuclear pipe performed as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's research program entitled open-quotes Short Cracks In Piping an Piping Weldsclose quotes. The reader is referred to Reference 1 for details of the experiments and analyses conducted as part of this program. The major impetus for this work stemmed from the observation that initially circumferentially oriented cracks in carbon steel pipes exhibited a high tendency to grow at a different angle when the cracked pipes were subjected to bending or bending plus pressure loads. This failure mode was little understood, and the effect of angled crack grown from an initially circumferential crack raised questions about how cracks in a piping system subjected to combined loading with torsional stresses would behave. There were three major efforts undertaken in this study. The first involved a literature review to assess the causes of toughness anisotropy in ferritic pipes and to develop strength and toughness data as a function of angle from the circumferential plane. The second effort was an attempt to develop a screening criterion based on toughness anisotropy and to compare this screening criterion with experimental pipe fracture data. The third and more significant effort involved finite element analyses to examine why cracks grow at an angle and what is the effect of combined loads with torsional stresses on a circumferentially cracked pipe. These three efforts are summarized

  9. Nanoindentation study of electrodeposited Ag thin coating: An inverse calculation of anisotropic elastic-plastic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Guang; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yuxin; Tay, See Leng; Gao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    A new inverse method was proposed to calculate the anisotropic elastic-plastic properties (flow stress) of thin electrodeposited Ag coating utilizing nanoindentation tests, previously reported inverse method for isotropic materials and three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analyses (FEA). Indentation depth was ~4% of coating thickness (~10 μm) to avoid substrate effect and different indentation responses were observed in the longitudinal (L) and the transverse (T) directions. The estimated elastic-plastic properties were obtained in the newly developed inverse method by matching the predicted indentation responses in the L and T directions with experimental measurements considering indentation size effect (ISE). The results were validated with tensile flow curves measured from free-standing (FS) Ag film. The current method can be utilized to characterize the anisotropic elastic-plastic properties of coatings and to provide the constitutive properties for coating performance evaluations.

  10. Optimized Thermo-Mechanical Treatment Condition for Enhancing Fracture Toughness of 9Cr-Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Kang, Suk Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Thak S.; Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The known limitations are the high swelling and low strength in austenitic stainless steels, radiation-induced embrittlement in refractory metals, and phase instability, swelling and radioactivity buildup in irradiation in nickel-based superalloy Recently, the nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs), advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, with an enhanced high-temperature strength and a high swelling resistance were developed. However, the fracture behaviors describing the material resistance to crack initiation and growth in this temperature region have been rarely investigated, although the NFAs were designed to operate at high temperatures, typically above 550 .deg. C. A few recent researches have reported that the fracture toughness of high strength NFAs is very low at above 300 .deg. C. To overcome this drawback of NFAs, the optimized condition for thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs) that can modify the microstructure of the 9Cr base NFA were developed.

  11. Code conforming determination of cumulative usage factors for general elastic-plastic finite element analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, Juergen; Goetz, Andreas; Hilpert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The procedures of fatigue analyses of several relevant nuclear and conventional design codes (ASME, KTA, EN, AD) for power plant components differentiate between an elastic, simplified elastic-plastic and elastic-plastic fatigue check. As a rule, operational load levels will exclude the purely elastic fatigue check. The application of the code procedure of the simplified elastic-plastic fatigue check is common practice. Nevertheless, resulting cumulative usage factors may be overly conservative mainly due to high code based plastification penalty factors Ke. As a consequence, the more complex and still code conforming general elastic-plastic fatigue analysis methodology based on non-linear finite element analysis (FEA) is applied for fatigue design as an alternative. The requirements of the FEA and the material law to be applied have to be clarified in a first step. Current design codes only give rough guidelines on these relevant items. While the procedure for the simplified elastic-plastic fatigue analysis and the associated code passages are based on stress related cycle counting and the determination of pseudo elastic equivalent stress ranges, an adaptation to elastic-plastic strains and strain ranges is required for the elastic-plastic fatigue check. The associated requirements are explained in detail in the paper. If the established and implemented evaluation mechanism (cycle counting according to the peak and valley respectively the rainflow method, calculation of stress ranges from arbitrary load-time histories and determination of cumulative usage factors based on all load events) is to be retained, a conversion of elastic-plastic strains and strain ranges into pseudo elastic stress ranges is required. The algorithm to be applied is described in the paper. It has to be implemented in the sense of an extended post processing operation of FEA e.g. by APDL scripts in ANSYS registered . Variations of principal stress (strain) directions during the loading

  12. An Elastic Plastic Contact Model with Strain Hardening for the LAMMPS Granular Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhr, Bryan [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Brake, Matthew Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component Science and Mechanics; Lechman, Jeremy B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanoscale and Reactive Processes

    2015-03-01

    The following details the implementation of an analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening for normal im pacts into the LAMMPS granular package. The model assumes that, upon impact, the co llision has a period of elastic loading followed by a period of mixed elastic plas tic loading, with contributions to each mechanism estimated by a hyperbolic seca nt weight function. This function is implemented in the LAMMPS source code as the pair style gran/ep/history. Preliminary tests, simulating the pouring of pure nickel spheres, showed the elastic/plastic model took 1.66x as long as similar runs using gran/hertz/history.

  13. Large-displacement analysis of beam-type structures considering elastic-plastic material behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanc, D. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Rijeka, Vukovarska 58, HR-51000 Rijeka (Croatia)], E-mail: dlanc@riteh.hr; Turkalj, G.; Brnic, J. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Rijeka, Vukovarska 58, HR-51000 Rijeka (Croatia)

    2009-01-15

    A one-dimensional finite element analysis is presented for large elastic-plastic displacements in beam-type structures. Spatial displacements and rotations are allowed to be large while strains are assumed to be small. The corresponding equilibrium equations are formulated in the framework of co-rotational description, using the virtual work principle. Material is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic. Elastic-plastic material behavior is modeled supposing isotropic hardening law, while stress-strain curve is approximated as bilinear. An own computer program (BMCA) is developed, and its implementation is tested on several typical examples.

  14. Elastic-plastic deformation of fiber composites with a tetragonal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, E.IU.; Svistkova, L.A. (Permskii Politekhnicheskii Institut, Perm (USSR))

    1991-02-01

    Results of numerical solutions are presented for elastic-plastic problems concerning arbitrary loading of unidirectional composites in the transverse plane. The nucleation and evolution of microplastic zones in the matrix and the effect of this process on the macroscopic characteristics of the composite are discussed. Attention is also given to the effect of the fiber shape on the elastic-plastic deformation of the matrix and to deformation paths realized in simple microdeformation processes. The discussion is illustrated by results obtained for a composite consisting of a VT1-0 titanium alloy matrix reinforced by Ti-Mo fibers.

  15. Continuum and micro-mechanics treatment of constraint in fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Shih, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the fundamental concepts of the J-Q description of crack-tip fields, the fracture toughness locus and micromechanics approaches to predict the variability of macroscopic fracture toughness with constraint under elastic-plastic conditions. While these concepts derived from plane-strain considerations, initial applications in fully 3-D geometries are very promising. Computational results are presented for a surface cracked plate containing a 6:1 semi-elliptical, a=t/4 flaw subjected to remote uniaxial and biaxial tension. Crack-tip stress fields consistent with the J-Q theory are demonstrated to exist at each location along the crack front. The micromechanics model employs the J-Q description of crack-front stresses to interpret fracture toughness values measured on laboratory specimens for fracture assessment of the surface cracked plate. The computational results suggest only a minor effect of the biaxial loading on the crack tip stress fields and, consequently, on the propensity for fracture relative to the uniaxial loading. 45 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  16. A new method of determining the J-integral fracture toughness of very tough polymers: application to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G; Nyman, J S

    1999-01-01

    The thrust of the present work was the development of a new modification to the ASTM E813-89 method for determining the J-integral fracture toughness, JIc, of ductile polymers. The advantages and limitations of the modification, vis a vis the ASTM E813-89 and the hysteresis methods, are presented. The modification was then applied to investigate the effect of sterilization method on the JIc of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) specimens that were subsequently aged (heated, in a cylindrical pressure vessel, in oxygen gas at 507 kPa and 70 degrees C for 14 d). Relative to the unsterilized material, it was found that gamma-irradiating the polymer leads to a significant drop in its JIc, while sterilization using either ethylene oxide or gas plasma produced no effect on its JIc. The clinical implications of the present results for the in vivo performance of UHMWPE counterfaces, and, hence, hip and knee arthroplasties, are fully discussed.

  17. Effects of hydrogen and loading mode on the fracture toughness of a reduced activation ferritic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Hirth, J.P.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    The full spectrum of fracture toughness (J integrals), including pure mode I, different mixed mode I/III and pure mode III, will be examined for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel with 0.1C-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-Fe (by wt%), designated as F-82H. The J integrals of pure mode I (J Ic ) and mixed mode I/III (J mixed ) are determined with single specimen method using standard compact tension specimens and modified compact tension specimens, respectively. The pure mode III integral is measured with multiple specimen method using 'triple-pantleg' specimens. The pure mode III integral is measured with multiple specimen method using 'triple-pantleg' specimens. Effects of hydrogen on the J integrals of pure mode I and mixed mode I/III are also going to be studied. 9 ppm H (about 500 appm) is pre-charged into specimens cathodically. The details of experimental procedure were described in this report. The preliminary results showed that addition of mode III stress (shear stress) to mode I loading had a significant negative effect on the fracture toughness of F-82H. The complete results, analysis and conclusion will be reported in next report. The results would be important to fusion reactor design

  18. On the feasibility of the Chevron Notch Beam method to measure fracture toughness of fine-grained zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailer, Andreas; Stephan, Marc

    2016-10-01

    The fracture toughness determination of fine-grained zirconia ceramics using the chevron notched beam method (CNB) was investigated to assess the feasibility of this method for quality assurance and material characterization. CNB tests were performed using four different yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics under various testing modes and conditions, including displacement-controlled and load-rate-controlled four point bending to assess the influence of slow crack growth and identify most suitable test parameters. For comparison, tests using single-edge V-notch beams (SEVNB) were conducted. It was observed that the CNB method yields well-reproducible results. However, slow crack growth effects significantly affect the measured KIC values, especially when slow loading rates are used. To minimize the effect of slow crack growth, the application of high loading rates is recommended. Despite a certain effort needed for setting up a sample preparation routine, the CNB method is considered to be very useful for measuring and controlling the fracture toughness of zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of mechanical hardness and fracture toughness of Co and Al co-doped ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddheswaran, R.; Mangalaraja, R.V.; Avila, Ricardo E.; Manikandan, D.; Esther Jeyanthi, C.; Ananthakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Combustion synthesized nanocrystalline Co and Al co-doped ZnO powders [(Zn 1−x−y Co x Al y O; x=0.04, 0.03, 0.02; y=0.01, 0.02, 0.03)] were fabricated into cylindrical discs by uni-axial pressing and sintered intentionally at 1000 °C for 2 h to assess the mechanical performance. The crystallinity of the pure and doped ZnO was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The microstructures of the sintered samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the density, porosity, grain size and its distribution. Grains of 0.5–3 μm were observed for the samples sintered at 1000 °C. The mechanical properties such as micro-hardness, fracture toughness and strain hardening co-efficient were investigated by the Vickers indentation method. It was found that the crack mode observed during the indentation on the samples belongs to median cracks under a load of 19.6 N. Also, the hardness was enhanced with increasing mol% of Co, while the trend was reversed with the increase of Al content. In addition, the strain hardening coefficient and fracture toughness were calculated using the indentation data.

  20. Microstructure and fracture toughness in boron added NbSi2(C40)/MoSi2(C11b) duplex crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todai, Mitsuharu; Hagihara, Koji; Kishida, Kyosuke; Inui, Haruyuki; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of B-addition on the microstructure and fracture toughness of (Mo 0.85 Nb 0.15 )Si 2 crystals with an oriented lamellar microstructure was investigated. B-addition led to an increase in the volume fraction of the C11 b phase, which possesses different orientation relationship from that of the fine lamellae, and a reduction in their precipitation rate. The fracture toughness of the B-added crystal with the varied microstructure exhibited a value more than 4.0 MPa m 1/2 , that was significantly higher than that of the ternary crystal.

  1. Dynamic fracture toughness (JId) behavior of armor-grade Q&T steel weldments: Effect of weld metal composition and microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magudeeswaran, Govindaraj; Balasubramanian, Visvalingam; Sathyanarayanan, S.; Madhusudhan Reddy, Gankidi; Moitra, A.; Venugopal, S.; Sasikala, G.

    2009-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel, low hydrogen ferritic steel and high nickel steel consumables are used for the welding of armor-grade quenched and tempered (Q&T) steels. The use of such consumables in the welding of armorgrade Q&T steel leads to the formation of distinct microstructures in the respective welds and has a major influence on the dynamic fracture toughness. Hence, this paper examines how shielded metal arc welding consumables affect the dynamic fracture toughness (J1d) of armor-grade Q&T steel joints. The J1d values of joints fabricated with high nickel steel joints are superior than all other joints.

  2. The Role of Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites Using Four-Point Bending Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazvini Ferooz M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Resin composites are a common type of tooth coloured restorative materials. These materials are brittle and their major shortcomings are sensitivity to flaws and defects, low tensile strength, and susceptibility to catastrophic failure.The role of home bleaching agents on the fracture toughness of resin composites using four-point bending test is scanty. Objectives: To compare the fracture toughness (KIc of resin composites on a fourpoint bending test and to assess the effect of distilled water and a home bleaching agent on the resistance of the materials to fracture. Materials and Methods: seventy-two bar-shaped specimens were prepared from three materials: Rok (SDI, Estelite (Tokuyama, and Vit-l-escence (Ultradent and divided into three groups. Two groups were assigned as “control” and conditioned in distilled water at 37oC for 24 hours or 21 days, respectively. The specimens in the third group (treatment were stored in distilled water for 21 days and bleached using Polanight (SDI for 2 hours daily. For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared and after each time interval loaded in a four-point bending test using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/m. The maximum load to specimen failure was recorded and the KIc was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between materials and treatment (P<0.05. Tukey’s test showed that after 24 hours of immersion in distilled water, KIc was not significantly different between materials; Rok revealed the highest value followed by Estelite and Vit-l-escence. The bleaching agent significantly decreased the KIc values of Estelite and Rok while it did not affect that of Vita-l-escence. Immersion in distilled water for all resin composites caused a significant decrease in KIc. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and 21day

  3. MICROTOUGH - calculation of characteristic upper shelf fracture toughness values from microstructural parameters for high strength structural steels with normalized or quenched and tempered microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenstermann, S.; Dahl, W.; Langenberg, P.; Deimel, P.; Sattler, E.

    2004-01-01

    In modern applications, high strength steels are often utilised to increase the load bearing capacity of components. For safe design it is also necessary that these steels have an adequate fracture toughness. The mechanical properties of high strength structural steels are a result of the production process. In consequence, they are strongly related to the microstructure. Therefore, the aim of the research work in the Microtough project is to develop and apply a new method of quantitative correlation between microstructural parameters and characteristic fracture toughness values. This correlation will on the one hand help for the design of new structural steels with high toughness. On the other hand, it shall allow to characterise the fracture toughness of steel without performing expensive fracture mechanics tests. The research work is carried out in the full temperature range from lower to upper shelf. As both RWTH Aachen University and MPA Uni Stuttgart concentrate on ductile fracture behaviour in their research work, the focus of the presentation lies in the upper shelf. (orig.)

  4. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m -2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  5. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  6. Effect of microstructural types on toughness and microstructural optimization of ultra-heavy steel plate: EBSD analysis and microscopic fracture mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijng 100083 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijng 100083 (China); Wang, Shaoyang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijng 100083 (China)

    2016-03-21

    The uniformity of toughness along thickness direction has long been the critical problem for producing ultra-heavy steel plate. To clarify the rule and mechanism of the influence of microstructures on toughness, different microstructures and their mixtures have been obtained through various heat treatment processes. The microstructures and substructures were characterized by means of optical microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the correlations between misorientation, grain size, microscopic fracture propagation and toughness have been studied in detail using electron backscatter diffraction. Results suggest that after tempering, lath bainite can achieve better toughness property than martensite, whereas granular bainite is detrimental for toughness. Note that firstly generated lath bainite can effectively refine subsequent martensitic packets and blocks, and increase barriers for fracture propagation. Compared with single-phase martensite microstructure, the mixture of martensite+bainite obtains finer substructure and more percentage of large misorientation, which are favorable for hindering the propagation of microcrack, meanwhile it is an ideal microstructural type to achieve the optimal combination of toughness and strength. Besides, functional mechanism of packet boundaries and block boundaries for hindering crack propagation is different, as it is more difficult for crack propagation to bridge between different lattice planes than between different crystallographic orientations.

  7. Polyamide/layered silicate nanocomposites: A correlation between fracture toughness and molecular mobility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotek, Jiří; Kelnar, Ivan; Brus, Jiří; Urbanová, Martina

    -, č. 138 (2009), s. 1-11 ISSN 1618-7229 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500602; GA AV ČR KJB200500601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : nanocomposite * toughness * molecular mobility Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.644, year: 2009

  8. On crystallisation and fracture toughness of poly(phenylene sulphide) under tape placement conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Vanden Poel, G.; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Fibre reinforced thermoplastic tapes are subjected to high heating and cooling rates during the tape placement process. Such high cooling rates can significantly inhibit the crystallisation of the thermoplastic polymer and thereby affect its mechanical properties, such as strength or toughness. In

  9. Effect of dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate mass fraction on fracture toughness and antibacterial properties of CaP nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junling; Zhou, Han; Weir, Michael D.; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Levine, Eric D.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biofilm acids contribute to secondary caries which is a reason for restoration failure. Previous studies synthesized nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM). The objectives of this study were to develop DMAHMD-NACP nanocomposite for double benefits of antibacterial and remineralization capabilities, and investigate the DMAHMD mass fraction effects on fracture toughness and biofilm response of NACP nanocomposite for the first time. Methods DMAHDM was incorporated into NACP nanocomposite at mass fractions of 0% (control), 0.75%, 1.5%, 2.25% and 3%. A single edge V-notched beam method was used to measure fracture toughness Kic. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model using human saliva as inoculum was used to measure the antibacterial properties of composites. Results Kic was about 1 MPa·m1/2 for all composite (mean ± sd; n = 6). Adding DMAHDM from 0% to 3% did not affect Kic (p > 0.1). Lactic acid production by biofilms on composite containing 3% DMAHDM was reduced to less than 1% of that on composite control. Metabolic activity of adherent biofilms on composite containing 3% DMAHDM was reduced to 4% of that on composite control. Biofilm colony-forming unit (CFU) counts were reduced by three orders of magnitude on NACP nanocomposite containing 3% DMAHDM. Conclusions DMAHDM-NACP nanocomposite had good fracture resistance, strong antibacterial potency, and NACP for remineralization (shown in previous studies). The DMAHDM-NACP nanocomposite may be promising for caries-inhibiting dental restorations, and the method of using double agents (DMAHDM and NACP) may have a wide applicability to other dental materials including bonding agents and cements. PMID:26404407

  10. Effect of dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate mass fraction on fracture toughness and antibacterial properties of CaP nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junling; Zhou, Han; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Levine, Eric D; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm acids contribute to secondary caries which is a reason for restoration failure. Previous studies synthesized nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM). The objectives of this study were to develop DMAHMD-NACP nanocomposite for double benefits of antibacterial and remineralization capabilities, and investigate the DMAHMD mass fraction effects on fracture toughness and biofilm response of NACP nanocomposite for the first time. DMAHDM was incorporated into NACP nanocomposite at mass fractions of 0% (control), 0.75%, 1.5%, 2.25% and 3%. A single edge V-notched beam method was used to measure fracture toughness K(IC). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model using human saliva as inoculum was used to measure the antibacterial properties of composites. K(IC) was about 1 MPa×m(1/2) for all composite (mean±sd; n=6). Adding DMAHDM from 0% to 3% did not affect K(IC) (p>0.1). Lactic acid production by biofilms on composite containing 3% DMAHDM was reduced to less than 1% of that on composite control. Metabolic activity of adherent biofilms on composite containing 3% DMAHDM was reduced to 4% of that on composite control. Biofilm colony-forming unit (CFU) counts were reduced by three orders of magnitude on NACP nanocomposite containing 3% DMAHDM. DMAHDM-NACP nanocomposite had good fracture resistance, strong antibacterial potency, and NACP for remineralization (shown in previous studies). The DMAHDM-NACP nanocomposite may be promising for caries-inhibiting dental restorations, and the method of using double agents (DMAHDM and NACP) may have a wide applicability to other dental materials including bonding agents and cements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of copper alloys and their HIP joints with austenitic stainless steel in unirradiated and neutron irradiated condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taehtinen, S.; Pyykkoenen, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Singh, B.N.; Toft, P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Materials Research Dept.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile strength and ductility of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys decreased continuously with increasing temperature up to 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 alloy decreased continuously with increasing temperature from 20 deg C to 350 deg C whereas the fracture toughness of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy remained almost constant at temperatures up to 100 deg C, was decreased significantly at 200 deg C and slightly increased at 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of HIP joints were lower than that of corresponding copper alloy and fracture path in HIP joint specimen was always within copper alloy side of the joint. Neutron irradiation to a dose level of 0.3 dpa resulted in hardening and reduction in uniform elongation to about 2-4% at 200 deg C in both copper alloys. At higher temperatures softening was observed and uniform elongation increased to about 5% and 16% for CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys, respectively. Fracture toughness of CuAl25 IG0 alloy reduced markedly due to neutron irradiation in the temperature range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated CuCrZr alloy also decreased in the range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C, although it remained almost unaffected at temperatures below 200 deg C and decreased significantly at 350 deg C when compared with that of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of fracture toughness values of normal and high strength concrete determined by three point bend and modified disk-shaped compact tension specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seitl, Stanislav; Ríjos, J. D.; Cifuentes, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 42 (2017), s. 56-65 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18702S; GA MŠk LM2015069 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Concrete * Stress intensity factors * T-stress * Compact tension test * Fracture behavior * Fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  13. Crack growth and fracture toughness of amorphous Li-Si anodes: Mechanisms and role of charging/discharging studied by atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrownejad, S. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2017-10-01

    Fracture is the main cause of degradation and capacity fading in lithiated silicon during cycling. Experiments on the fracture of lithiated silicon show conflicting results, and so mechanistic models can help interpret experiments and guide component design. Here, large-scale K-controlled atomistic simulations of crack propagation (R-curve KI vs. Δa) are performed at LixSi compositions x = 0.5 , 1.0 , 1.5 for as-quenched/relaxed samples and at x = 0.5 , 1.0 for samples created by discharging from higher Li compositions. In all cases, the fracture mechanism is void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. In as-quenched materials, with increasing Li content the plastic flow stress and elastic moduli decrease but void nucleation and growth happen at smaller stress, so that the initial fracture toughness KIc ≈ 1.0 MPa√{ m} decreases slightly but the initial fracture energy JIc ≈ 10.5J/m2 is similar. After 10 nm of crack growth, the fracture toughnesses increase and become similar at KIc ≈ 1.9 MPa√{ m} across all compositions. Plane-strain equi-biaxial expansion simulations of uncracked samples provide complementary information on void nucleation and growth. The simulations are interpreted within the framework of Gurson model for ductile fracture, which predicts JIc = ασy D where α ≃ 1 and D is the void spacing, and good agreement is found. In spite of flowing plastically, the fracture toughness of LixSi is low because voids nucleate within nano-sized distances ahead of the crack (D ≈ 1nm). Scaling simulation results to experimental conditions, reasonable agreement with experimentally-estimated fracture toughnesses is obtained. The discharging process facilitates void nucleation but decreases the flow stress (as shown previously), leading to enhanced fracture toughness at all levels of crack growth. Therefore, the fracture behavior of lithiated silicon at a given composition is not a material property but instead depends on the history of charging

  14. Some observations of the influence of δ-ferrite content on the hardness, galling resistance, and fracture toughness of selected commercially available iron-based hardfacing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-11-01

    Iron-based weld hardfacing deposits are used to provide a wear-resistant surface for a structural base material. Iron-based hardfacing alloys that are resistant to corrosion in oxygenated aqueous environments contain high levels of chromium and carbon, which results in a dendritic microstructure with a high volume fraction of interdendrite carbides which provide the needed wear resistance. The ferrite content of the dendrites depends on the nickel content and base composition of the iron-based hardfacing alloy. The amount of ferrite in the dendrites is shown to have a significant influence on the hardness and galling wear resistance, as determined using ASTM G98 methods. Fracture-toughness ( K IC) testing in accordance with ASTM E399 methods was used to quantify the damage tolerance of various iron-based hardfacing alloys. Fractographic and microstructure examinations were used to determine the influence of microstructure on the wear resistance and fracture toughness of the iron-based hardfacing alloys. A crack-bridging toughening model was shown to describe the influence of ferrite content on the fracture toughness. A higher ferrite content in the dendrites of an iron-based hardfacing alloy reduces the tendency for plastic stretching and necking of the dendrites, which results in improved wear resistance, high hardness, and lower fracture-toughness values. A NOREM 02 hardfacing alloy has the most-optimum ferrite content, which results in the most-desired balance of galling resistance and high K IC values.

  15. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers surface properties and the mechanical behavior of the resulting carbon fiber-polymer composites has been studied in terms of the contact angle measurements of fibers and the fracture toughness of composites...

  16. Irradiated dynamic fracture toughness of ASTM A533, Grade B, Class 1 steel plate and submerged arc weldment. Heavy section steel technology program technical report No. 41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.A.; Ceschini, L.J.; Shogan, R.P.; Rao, G.V.

    1976-10-01

    As a result of the Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST), sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation conducted dynamic fracture toughness tests on irradiated HSST Plate 02 and submerged arc weldment material. Testing performed at the Westinghouse Research and Development Laboratory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, included 0.394T compact tension, 1.9T compact tension, and 4T compact tension specimens. This data showed that, in the transition region, dynamic test procedures resulted in lower (compared to static) fracture toughness results, and that weak direction (WR) oriented specimen data were lower than the strong direction (RW) oriented specimen results. Irradiated lower-bound fracture toughness results of the HSST Program material were well above the adjusted ASME Section III K/sub IR/ curve. An irradiated and nonirradiated 4T-CT specimen was tested during a fracture toughness test as a preliminary study to determine the effect of irradiation on the acoustic emission-stress intensity factor relation in pressure vessel grade steel. The results indicated higher levels of acoustic emission activity from the irradiated sample as compared to the unirradiated one at a given stress intensity factor (K) level

  17. Effect of far-field stresses and residual stresses incorporation in predicting fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced yttria stabilized zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Neelima; Nisar, Ambreen; Mohapatra, Pratyasha; Rawat, Siddharth; Ariharan, S.; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-10-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a potential thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications (>1000 °C). YSZ reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was processed via spark plasma sintering to produce dense, crack-free homogeneous sample and avoid any degradation of MWNTs when sintered using conventional routes. Despite porosity, the addition of MWNT has a profound effect in improving the damage tolerance of YSZ by allowing the retention of tetragonal phase. However, at some instances, the crack lengths in the MWNT reinforced YSZ matrices have been found to be longer than the standalone counterparts. Therefore, it becomes inappropriate to apply Anstis equation to calculate fracture toughness values. In this regard, a combined analytical cum numerical method is used to estimate the theoretical fracture toughness and quantitatively analyze the mechanics of matrix cracking in the reinforced composite matrices incorporating the effects of various factors (such as far-field stresses, volume fraction of MWNTs, change in the modulus and Poisson's ratio values along with the increase in porosity, and bridging and phase transformation mechanism) affecting the fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites. The results suggest that the incorporation of far-field stresses cannot be ignored in estimating the theoretical fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites.

  18. Fracture Toughness of Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofiber-Reinforced Polyethylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Adhikari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact fracture behavior of a vapor grown carbon nanofiber (VGCNF reinforced high-density polyethylene (PE composite was evaluated. The samples consisting of pure PE and composites with 10 wt% and 20 wt% of VGCNFs were prepared by a combination of hot-pressing and extrusion methods. Extrusion was used to produce samples with substantially different shear histories. The fracture behavior of these samples was analyzed using the essential work of fracture (EWF approach. The results showed an increase of 292% in the essential work of fracture for the loading of 10 wt%. Further increasing fiber loading to 20 wt% caused the essential work of fracture to increase only 193% with respect to the unmodified material. Evaluation of the fracture surface morphology indicated that the fibril frequency and microvoid size within the various fiber loadings depended strongly on processing conditions.

  19. The influence of particle size on the fracture toughness of a PP-based particle composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Majer, Zdeněk; Šestáková, Lucie; Náhlík, Luboš; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2009), s. 281-286 ISSN 0203-1272 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD106/05/H008; GA ČR GA106/07/1284; GA ČR GA106/08/1409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : particulate composites * microcrack * interface * toughness * numerical investigation * finite element method Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  20. Loading rate effects on strength and fracture toughness of pipe steels used in Task 1 of the IPIRG program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, C.W.; Landow, M.P.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1993-10-01

    Material characterization tests were conducted on laboratory specimens machined from pipes to determine the effect of dynamic loading (i.e., rates comparable to those for high amplitude seismic events) on tensile properties and fracture resistance at 288 C (550 F). Specimens were fabricated from seven different pipes, including carbon steels and stainless steels (both base metal and weld metal), which were to be subjected to full-scale pipe tests in IPIRG Task 1.0. For the stainless steels tested at 288 C (550 F), tensile strength was unchanged, while yield strength and fracture resistance were increased. The increase in fracture resistance was modest for the wrought base metals and substantial for the weld metal and the cast base metal. The carbon steels tested were sensitive to dynamic strain aging, and hence the strength and toughness was affected by both temperature and strain rate effects. The carbon steel base metal and welds exhibited ultimate tensile strength values at 288 C (550 F) that were greater than at room temperature. Furthermore, the ultimate tensile strength at 288 C (550 F) was lowered significantly by increased strain rate and, in the carbon steel base metals, increased strain rate also lowered the fracture resistance, substantially in the base metal of one pipe. In comparing these results to the IPIRG pipe test results to date, it was found that the trends of these tests agree well with the Subtask 1.2 quasi-static and dynamic pipe fracture experiments. Loads measured in the Subtask 1.1 pipe experiments were, however, somewhat higher than would have been expected by the trends observed in the laboratory tests

  1. Loading rate effects on strength and fracture toughness of pipe steels used in Task 1 of the IPIRG program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschall, C.W.; Landow, M.P.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Material characterization tests were conducted on laboratory specimens machined from pipes to determine the effect of dynamic loading (i.e., rates comparable to those for high amplitude seismic events) on tensile properties and fracture resistance at 288 C (550 F). Specimens were fabricated from seven different pipes, including carbon steels and stainless steels (both base metal and weld metal), which were to be subjected to full-scale pipe tests in IPIRG Task 1.0. For the stainless steels tested at 288 C (550 F), tensile strength was unchanged, while yield strength and fracture resistance were increased. The increase in fracture resistance was modest for the wrought base metals and substantial for the weld metal and the cast base metal. The carbon steels tested were sensitive to dynamic strain aging, and hence the strength and toughness was affected by both temperature and strain rate effects. The carbon steel base metal and welds exhibited ultimate tensile strength values at 288 C (550 F) that were greater than at room temperature. Furthermore, the ultimate tensile strength at 288 C (550 F) was lowered significantly by increased strain rate and, in the carbon steel base metals, increased strain rate also lowered the fracture resistance, substantially in the base metal of one pipe. In comparing these results to the IPIRG pipe test results to date, it was found that the trends of these tests agree well with the Subtask 1.2 quasi-static and dynamic pipe fracture experiments. Loads measured in the Subtask 1.1 pipe experiments were, however, somewhat higher than would have been expected by the trends observed in the laboratory tests.

  2. Fracture toughness of partially welded joints of SUS316 stainless steel at 4 K by large bend tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, A.; Tobler, R.L.; Tamura, H.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Yamamoto, J.; Motojima, O.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, S.

    1996-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels in relatively thick sections are specified in support structure designs for huge superconducting magnets in fusion energy machines such as the Large Helical Device (LHD). In the LHD under construction at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, partial welding of SUS 316 stainless steel is employed to fabricate the 100-mm thick coil can and coil support structures. Partial welding lowers the heat input and reduces residual deformation after welding. The main disadvantage is that a sizable crack-like defect remains embedded in the unwelded portion of the primary structural component. Here, SUS 316 stainless steel bars were partially welded and tested in 3-point bending to evaluate the effect of natural cracks on fusion zone toughness at 4 K. The specimens had a cross-section 87.5 mm x 175 mm and were fractured in liquid helium using a 10 MN cryogenic mechanical testing machine. In two tests, unstable fracture occurred at maximum load and at critical stress intensity factors K max = 227 and 228 MPa√m. Results indicate a high resistance to fracture initiation but no stable tearing. Therefore, no resistance to crack propagation may exist in a fusion zone at a weld root under cryogenic temperature

  3. Enhancement of Impact Toughness by Delamination Fracture in a Low-Alloy High-Strength Steel with Al Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjie; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Hongji; Guo, Shengwu; Liu, Yongning

    2016-12-01

    The effect of delamination toughening of martensitic steel was investigated both at room and low temperatures [253 K and 233 K (-20 °C and -40 °C)]. Two low-alloy martensitic steels with and without Al alloying were both prepared. Layered structure with white band and black matrix was observed in Al alloyed steel, while a homogeneous microstructure was displayed in the steel without Al. Both steels achieved high strength (tensile strength over 1600 MPa) and good ductility (elongation over 11 pct), but they displayed stark contrasts on impact fracture mode and Charpy impact energy. Delamination fracture occurred in Al alloyed steel and the impact energies were significantly increased both at room temperature (from 75 to 138 J, i.e., nearly improved up to 2 times) and low temperatures [from 47.9 to 71.3 J at 233 K (-40 °C)] compared with the one without Al. Alloying with Al promotes the segregation of Cr, Mn, Si and C elements to form a network structure, which is martensite with higher carbon content and higher hardness than that of the matrix. And this network structure evolved into a band structure during the hot rolling process. The difference of yield stress between the band structure and the matrix gives rise to a delamination fracture during the impact test, which increases the toughness greatly.

  4. Fracture toughness, compressive strength and load-bearing capacity of short glass fibre-reinforced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the reinforcing effect of short E-glass fibre fillers on fracture related mechanical properties of dental composite resin with a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) polymer matrix. Experimental short fibre composite (FC) resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibres, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using a high speed mixing machine. Test specimens were made bar shaped (3 × 6 × 25 mm3), cylindrical (6 mm length × 3 mm diameter) and cubic (9.5 × 5.5 × 3 mm3) from the experimental FC resin and conventional particulate composite resin (Grandio) as control. The test specimens (n = 8) were either dry stored or water stored (37°C for 30 days) before the mechanical tests. A three-point loading test and compression test were carried out according to ISO 10477 and a static loading test was carried out using a steel ball (Ø 3.0 mm) with a speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Experimental fibre composite had a significantly higher mechanical performance for fracture toughness (14 MNm-1.5), compression strength (129 MPa) and static load-bearing capacity (1584 N) than the control composite (2 MNm-1.5, 112 MPa and 1031 N). The resin with short E-glass fibre fillers and IPN-polymer matrix yielded improved mechanical performance compared to the conventional particulate composite resin.

  5. A Review of the Proposed KIsi Offset-Secant Method for Size-Insensitive Linear-Elastic Fracture Toughness Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mark; Wells, Doug; Allen, Phillip; Wallin, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Recently proposed modifications to ASTM E399 would provide a new size-insensitive approach to analyzing the force-displacement test record. The proposed size-insensitive linear-elastic fracture toughness, KIsi, targets a consistent 0.5mm crack extension for all specimen sizes by using an offset secant that is a function of the specimen ligament length. The KIsi evaluation also removes the Pmax/PQ criterion and increases the allowable specimen deformation. These latter two changes allow more plasticity at the crack tip, prompting the review undertaken in this work to ensure the validity of this new interpretation of the force-displacement curve. This paper provides a brief review of the proposed KIsi methodology and summarizes a finite element study into the effects of increased crack tip plasticity on the method given the allowance for additional specimen deformation. The study has two primary points of investigation: the effect of crack tip plasticity on compliance change in the force-displacement record and the continued validity of linear-elastic fracture mechanics to describe the crack front conditions. The analytical study illustrates that linear-elastic fracture mechanics assumptions remain valid at the increased deformation limit; however, the influence of plasticity on the compliance change in the test record is problematic. A proposed revision to the validity criteria for the KIsi test method is briefly discussed.

  6. Fracture Toughness, Mechanical Property, And Chemical Characterization Of A Critical Modification To The NASA SLS Solid Booster Internal Material System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancoast, Justin; Garrett, William; Moe, Gulia

    2015-01-01

    A modified propellant-liner-insulation (PLI) bondline in the Space Launch System (SLS) solid rocket booster required characterization for flight certification. The chemical changes to the PLI bondline and the required additional processing have been correlated to mechanical responses of the materials across the bondline. Mechanical properties testing and analyses included fracture toughness, tensile, and shear tests. Chemical properties testing and analyses included Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cross-link density, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and wave dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF). The testing identified the presence of the expected new materials and found the functional bondline performance of the new PLI system was not significantly changed from the old system.

  7. Evaluation of fracture toughness and mechanical properties of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as resin matrix for dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Saeed; Yeganeh, Hamid; Atai, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Study and evaluation of fracture toughness, flexural and dynamic mechanical properties, and crosslink density of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems and comparison with corresponding conventional methacrylate system were considered in the present study. Urethane tetra allyl ether monomer (UTAE) was synthesized as ene monomer. Different formulations were prepared based on combination of UTAE, BisGMA/TEGDMA and a tetrathiol monomer (PETMP). The photocuring reaction was conducted under visible light using BD/CQ combination as photoinitiator system. Mechanical properties were evaluated via measuring flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to study the morphology of the fractured specimen's cross section. Viscoelastic properties of the samples were also determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The same study was performed on a conventional methacrylate system. The data were analyzed and compared by ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (significance level=0.05). The results showed improvement in fracture toughness of the specimens containing thiol-ene moieties. DMTA revealed a lower glass transition temperature and more homogenous structure for thiol-ene containing specimens in comparison to the system containing merely methacrylate monomer. The flexural modulus and flexural strength of the specimens with higher thiol-ene content were lower than the neat methacrylate system. The SEM micrographs of the fractured surface of specimens with higher methacrylate content were smooth and mirror-like (shiny) which represent brittle fracture. The thiol-ene-methacrylate system can be used as resin matrix of dental composites with enhanced fracture toughness in comparison to the methacrylate analogous. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.