WorldWideScience

Sample records for elastic helical springs

  1. The Green's matrix and the boundary integral equations for analysis of time-harmonic dynamics of elastic helical springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Sergey V

    2011-03-01

    Helical springs serve as vibration isolators in virtually any suspension system. Various exact and approximate methods may be employed to determine the eigenfrequencies of vibrations of these structural elements and their dynamic transfer functions. The method of boundary integral equations is a meaningful alternative to obtain exact solutions of problems of the time-harmonic dynamics of elastic springs in the framework of Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. In this paper, the derivations of the Green's matrix, of the Somigliana's identities, and of the boundary integral equations are presented. The vibrational power transmission in an infinitely long spring is analyzed by means of the Green's matrix. The eigenfrequencies and the dynamic transfer functions are found by solving the boundary integral equations. In the course of analysis, the essential features and advantages of the method of boundary integral equations are highlighted. The reported analytical results may be used to study the time-harmonic motion in any wave guide governed by a system of linear differential equations in a single spatial coordinate along its axis. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  2. The energy of naturally curved elastic rods with an application to the stretching and contraction of a free helical spring as a model for DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Gerald S., E-mail: jerrymanning@rcn.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8087 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    We give a contemporary and direct derivation of a classical, but insufficiently familiar, result in the theory of linear elasticity—a representation for the energy of a stressed elastic rod with central axis that intrinsically takes the shape of a general space curve. We show that the geometric torsion of the space curve, while playing a crucial role in the bending energy, is physically unrelated to the elastic twist. We prove that the twist energy vanishes in the lowest-energy states of a rod subject to constraints that do not restrict the twist. The stretching and contraction energies of a free helical spring are computed. There are local high-energy minima. We show the possibility of using the spring to model the chirality of DNA. We then compare our results with an available atomic level energy simulation that was performed on DNA unconstrained in the same sense as the free spring. We find some possible reflections of springlike behavior in the mechanics of DNA, but, unsurprisingly, the base pairs lend a material substance to the core of DNA that a spring does not capture.

  3. The energy of naturally curved elastic rods with an application to the stretching and contraction of a free helical spring as a model for DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Gerald S.

    2015-09-01

    We give a contemporary and direct derivation of a classical, but insufficiently familiar, result in the theory of linear elasticity—a representation for the energy of a stressed elastic rod with central axis that intrinsically takes the shape of a general space curve. We show that the geometric torsion of the space curve, while playing a crucial role in the bending energy, is physically unrelated to the elastic twist. We prove that the twist energy vanishes in the lowest-energy states of a rod subject to constraints that do not restrict the twist. The stretching and contraction energies of a free helical spring are computed. There are local high-energy minima. We show the possibility of using the spring to model the chirality of DNA. We then compare our results with an available atomic level energy simulation that was performed on DNA unconstrained in the same sense as the free spring. We find some possible reflections of springlike behavior in the mechanics of DNA, but, unsurprisingly, the base pairs lend a material substance to the core of DNA that a spring does not capture.

  4. Mechanics of patterned helical Si springs on Si substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D L; Ye, D X; Khan, F; Tang, F; Lim, B K; Picu, R C; Wang, G C; Lu, T M

    2003-12-01

    The elastic response, including the spring constant, of individual Si helical-shape submicron springs, was measured using a tip-cantilever assembly attached to a conventional atomic force microscope. The isolated, four-turn Si springs were fabricated using oblique angle deposition with substrate rotation, also known as the glancing angle deposition, on a templated Si substrate. The response of the structures was modeled using finite elements, and it was shown that the conventional formulae for the spring constant required modifications before they could be used for the loading scheme used in the present experiment.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigations of shape memory alloy helical springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Ricardo A A; Pacheco, Pedro M C L; Savi, Marcelo A

    2010-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) belong to the class of smart materials and have been used in numerous applications. Solid phase transformations induced either by stress or temperature are behind the remarkable properties of SMAs that motivate the concept of innovative smart actuators for different purposes. The SMA element used in these actuators can assume different forms and a spring is an element usually employed for this aim. This contribution deals with the modeling, simulation and experimental analysis of SMA helical springs. Basically, a one-dimensional constitutive model is assumed to describe the SMA thermomechanical shear behavior and, afterwards, helical springs are modeled by considering a classical approach for linear-elastic springs. A numerical method based on the operator split technique is developed. SMA helical spring thermomechanical behavior is investigated through experimental tests performed with different thermomechanical loadings. Shape memory and pseudoelastic effects are treated. Numerical simulations show that the model results are in close agreement with those obtained by experimental tests, revealing that the proposed model captures the general thermomechanical behavior of SMA springs

  6. Structural analysis of compression helical spring used in suspension system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akshat; Misra, Sheelam; Jindal, Arun; Lakhian, Prateek

    2017-07-01

    The main aim of this work has to develop a helical spring for shock absorber used in suspension system which is designed to reduce shock impulse and liberate kinetic energy. In a vehicle, it increases comfort by decreasing amplitude of disturbances and it improves ride quality by absorbing and dissipating energy. When a vehicle is in motion on a road and strikes a bump, spring comes into action quickly. After compression, spring will attempt to come to its equilibrium state which is on level road. Helical springs can be made lighter with more strength by reducing number of coils and increasing the area. In this research work, a helical spring is modeled and analyzed to substitute the existing steel spring which is used in suspension. By using different materials, stress and deflection of helical spring can be varied. Comparability between existing spring and newly replaced spring is used to verify the results. For finding detailed stress distribution, finite element analysis is used to find stresses and deflection in both the helical springs. Finite element analysis is a method which is used to find proximate solutions of a physical problem defined in a finite domain. In this research work, modeling of spring is accomplished using Solid Works and analysis on Ansys.

  7. Flow-induced vibration of helical coil compression springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, F.E.; King, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Helical coil compression springs are used in some nuclear fuel assembly designs to maintain holddown and to accommodate thermal expansion. In the reactor environment, the springs are exposed to flowing water, elevated temperatures and pressures, and irradiation. Flow parallel to the longitudinal axis of the spring may excite the spring coils and cause vibration. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the flow-induced vibration (FIV) response characteristics of the helical coil compression springs. Experimental tests indicate that a helical coil spring responds like a single circular cylinder in cross-flow. Two FIV excitation mechanisms control spring vibration. Namely: 1) Turbulent Buffeting causes small amplitude vibration which increases as a function of velocity squared. 2) Vortex Shedding causes large amplitude vibration when the spring natural frequency and Strouhal frequency coincide. Several methods can be used to reduce or to prevent vortex shedding large amplitude vibrations. One method is compressing the spring to a coil pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2 thereby suppressing the vibration amplitude. Another involves modifying the spring geometry to alter its stiffness and frequency characteristics. These changes result in separation of the natural and Strouhal frequencies. With an understanding of how springs respond in the flowing water environment, the spring physical parameters can be designed to avoid large amplitude vibration. (orig.)

  8. Passive base isolation with superelastic nitinol SMA helical springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Bin; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Han; Song, Gangbing

    2014-01-01

    Seismic isolation of structures such as multi-story buildings, nuclear reactors, bridges, and liquid storage tanks should be designed to preserve structural integrity. By implementing seismic isolation technology, the deformation of superstructures can be dramatically reduced, consequently helping to protect their safety as well. In this paper, an innovative type of passive base isolation system, which is mainly composed of superelastic nitinol SMA helical springs, is developed. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, a two-story experimental steel frame model is constructed, and two superelastic SMA helical springs are thermo-mechanically built in the laboratory. To describe the nonlinear mechanical properties of the superelastic SMA helical springs under reciprocating load, a phenomenological model is presented in terms of a series of tensile tests. Afterwards, a numerical model of the two-story frame with the suggested isolation system is set up to simulate the response of the isolated frame subjected to an earthquake. Both the experimental and the numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed base isolation system can remarkably suppress structural vibrations and has improved isolation effects when compared with a steel spring isolation system. Due to the capabilities of energy dissipation as well as fully re-centering, it is very applicable to utilize the suggested isolation system in base isolated structures to resist earthquakes. (paper)

  9. Vibration of helical springs in cross water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axisa, F.; Brunet, G.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present new experimental data on vortex-shedding induced vibration on helical springs subjected to cross-flows. Intense locked-in vibration were observed on the natural modes of axial displacement. A simplified model is tentatively proposed to interpret the experimental data which is based on an analogy with vortex-shedding as observed on straight tube rows

  10. Manufacture of conical springs with elastic medium technology improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurguzov, S. A.; Mikhailova, U. V.; Kalugina, O. B.

    2018-01-01

    This article considers the manufacturing technology improvement by using an elastic medium in the stamping tool forming space to improve the conical springs performance characteristics and reduce the costs of their production. Estimation technique of disk spring operational properties is developed by mathematical modeling of the compression process during the operation of a spring. A technique for optimizing the design parameters of a conical spring is developed, which ensures a minimum voltage value when operated in the edge of the spring opening.

  11. Helical Birods: An Elastic Model of Helically Wound Double-Stranded Rods

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Christopher

    2014-03-11

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. We consider a geometrically accurate model for a helically wound rope constructed from two intertwined elastic rods. The line of contact has an arbitrary smooth shape which is obtained under the action of an arbitrary set of applied forces and moments. We discuss the general form the theory should take along with an insight into the necessary geometric or constitutive laws which must be detailed in order for the system to be complete. This includes a number of contact laws for the interaction of the two rods, in order to fit various relevant physical scenarios. This discussion also extends to the boundary and how this composite system can be acted upon by a single moment and force pair. A second strand of inquiry concerns the linear response of an initially helical rope to an arbitrary set of forces and moments. In particular we show that if the rope has the dimensions assumed of a rod in the Kirchhoff rod theory then it can be accurately treated as an isotropic inextensible elastic rod. An important consideration in this demonstration is the possible effect of varying the geometric boundary constraints; it is shown the effect of this choice becomes negligible in this limit in which the rope has dimensions similar to those of a Kirchhoff rod. Finally we derive the bending and twisting coefficients of this effective rod.

  12. A semi-analytical study on helical springs made of shape memory polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghani, M; Naghdabadi, R; Arghavani, J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the responses of shape memory polymer (SMP) helical springs under axial force are studied both analytically and numerically. In the analytical solution, we first derive the response of a cylindrical tube under torsional loadings. This solution can be used for helical springs in which both the curvature and pitch effects are negligible. This is the case for helical springs with large ratios of the mean coil radius to the cross sectional radius (spring index) and also small pitch angles. Making use of this solution simplifies the analysis of the helical springs to that of the torsion of a straight bar with circular cross section. The 3D phenomenological constitutive model recently proposed for SMPs is also reduced to the 1D shear case. Thus, an analytical solution for the torsional response of SMP tubes in a full cycle of stress-free strain recovery is derived. In addition, the curvature effect is added to the formulation and the SMP helical spring is analyzed using the exact solution presented for torsion of curved SMP tubes. In this modified solution, the effect of the direct shear force is also considered. In the numerical analysis, the 3D constitutive equations are implemented in a finite element program and a full cycle of stress-free strain recovery of an SMP (extension or compression) helical spring is simulated. Analytical and numerical results are compared and it is shown that the analytical solution gives accurate stress distributions in the cross section of the helical SMP spring besides the global load–deflection response. Some case studies are presented to show the validity of the presented analytical method. (paper)

  13. 76 FR 72722 - Helical Spring Lock Washers From China and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... Spring Lock Washers From China and Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty orders on helical spring lock washers from China and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States within a reasonably...

  14. Evaluation of mechanical integrity for helical coil hold-down spring of PLUS7TM fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ki Sung; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Jung Tack; Kim, Kyu Tae

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear fuel assembly is subject to hydraulic forces generated by primary coolant flow during reactor operation. These forces may be sufficient to overcome the fuel assembly weight thereby allowing the fuel assembly to lift off of its support. To provide a positive hold-down margin against the upward coolant flow forces, helical coil springs or leaf springs are installed in the fuel assemblies. An advanced fuel for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNP), PLUS7 fuel has developed to get the thermal margin increase, failure free and high seismic resistance, etc. And the new designed helical coil hold-down spring was introduced into PLUS7 fuel assembly. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the mechanical integrity for the helical coil hold-down spring of PLUS7 fuel assembly

  15. Improved Riccati Transfer Matrix Method for Free Vibration of Non-Cylindrical Helical Springs Including Warping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Free vibration equations for non-cylindrical (conical, barrel, and hyperboloidal types helical springs with noncircular cross-sections, which consist of 14 first-order ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients, are theoretically derived using spatially curved beam theory. In the formulation, the warping effect upon natural frequencies and vibrating mode shapes is first studied in addition to including the rotary inertia, the shear and axial deformation influences. The natural frequencies of the springs are determined by the use of improved Riccati transfer matrix method. The element transfer matrix used in the solution is calculated using the Scaling and Squaring method and Pad'e approximations. Three examples are presented for three types of springs with different cross-sectional shapes under clamped-clamped boundary condition. The accuracy of the proposed method has been compared with the FEM results using three-dimensional solid elements (Solid 45 in ANSYS code. Numerical results reveal that the warping effect is more pronounced in the case of non-cylindrical helical springs than that of cylindrical helical springs, which should be taken into consideration in the free vibration analysis of such springs.

  16. Modelling, characterisation and uncertainties of stabilised pseudoelastic shape memory alloy helical springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar; Savi, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical behaviour of pseudoelastic shape memory alloy helical springs is of concern discussing stabilised and cyclic responses. Constitutive description of the shape memory alloy is based on the framework developed by Lagoudas and co-workers incorporating two modifications related t...

  17. 76 FR 57075 - Helical Spring Lock Washers From China and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... Lock Washers From China and Taiwan Scheduling of expedited five-year reviews concerning the antidumping duty orders on helical spring lock washers from China and Taiwan. AGENCY: United States International... China and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within a...

  18. Analysis of the Residual Stresses in Helical Cylindrical Springs at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Creep is one of the basic properties of materials, its speed significantly depends on the temperature. Helical cylindrical springs are widely used in the elements of heating systems. This results in necessity of taking into account the effect of temperature on the stress-strain state of the spring. The object of research is a helical cylindrical spring used at high temperatures. Under this condition the spring state stability should be ensured.The paper studies relaxation of stress state and generation of residual stresses. Calculations are carried out in ABAQUS environment. The purpose of this work is to discuss the law of relaxation and residual stress in the spring.This paper describes the basic creep theories of helical cylindrical spring material. The calculation formulas of shear stress relaxation for a fixed compression ratio are obtained. Distribution and character of stress contour lines in the cross section of spring are presented. The stress relaxation – time relationships are discussed. The approximate formula for calculating relaxation shear stresses in the cross section of helical springs is obtained.The paper investigates creep ratio and law of residual stress variation in the cross-section of spring at 650℃. Computer simulation in ABAQUS environment was used. Research presents a finite element model of the spring creep in the cross-section.The paper conducts analysis of the stress changes for the creep under constant load. Under constant load stresses are quickly decreased in the around area of cross-section and are increased in the centre, i.e. the maximum and minimum stresses come close with time. Research work shows the possibility for using the approximate formula to calculate the relaxation shear stress in the cross section of spring and can provide a theoretical basis for predicting the service life of spring at high temperatures.In research relaxation processes of stress state are studied. Finite element model is cre

  19. Multilevel analysis of elastic morphology: The mantis shrimp's spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, M V; Patek, S N

    2015-09-01

    Spring systems, whether natural or engineered, are composed of compliant and rigid regions. Biological springs are often similar to monolithic structures that distribute compliance and rigidity across the whole system. For example, to confer different amounts of compliance in distinct regions within a single structure, biological systems typically vary regional morphology through thickening or elongation. Here, we analyze the monolithic spring in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) raptorial appendages to rapidly acquire or process prey. We quantified the shape of cross-sections of the merus segment of the raptorial appendage. We also examined specific regions of the merus that are hypothesized to either store elastic energy or provide structural support to permit energy storage in other regions of the system. We found that while all mantis shrimp contain thicker ventral bars in distal cross-sections, differences in thickness are more pronounced in high-impact "smasher" mantis shrimp than in the slower-striking "spearer" mantis shrimp. We also found that spearer cross-sections are more circular while those of smashers are more eccentric with elongation along the dorso-ventral axis. The results suggest that the regional thickening of ventral bars provides structural support for resisting spring compression and also reduces flexural stiffness along the system's long axis. This multilevel morphological analysis offers a foundation for understanding the evolution and mechanics of monolithic systems in biology. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Helicity in proton–proton elastic scattering and the spin structure of the pomeron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ewerz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss different models for the spin structure of the nonperturbative pomeron: scalar, vector, and rank-2 symmetric tensor. The ratio of single-helicity-flip to helicity-conserving amplitudes in polarised high-energy proton–proton elastic scattering, known as the complex r5 parameter, is calculated for these models. We compare our results to experimental data from the STAR experiment. We show that the spin-0 (scalar pomeron model is clearly excluded by the data, while the vector pomeron is inconsistent with the rules of quantum field theory. The tensor pomeron is found to be perfectly consistent with the STAR data.

  1. Helical Birods: An Elastic Model of Helically Wound Double-Stranded Rods

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    as an isotropic inextensible elastic rod. An important consideration in this demonstration is the possible effect of varying the geometric boundary constraints; it is shown the effect of this choice becomes negligible in this limit in which the rope has dimensions

  2. Analysis of Helical Stainless Steel 08X18H10 Spring Relaxation at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to study a cylindrical helical spring to be applied at high temperatures. The aim of this work is to study the regularity of relaxation stresses in spring and evaluate its long-term stresses.The work allowed us to establish relaxation dependencies of springs under high temperatures. According to the results of creep tests at 600°, the theoretical equation of steel creep was defined concretely. It was then used for the analysis at 350°.The paper presents a created finite element model of spring relaxation. It is the stainless steel 08Х18Н10 spring to be used at the temperature of 350°.In this paper describes the basic theory of creep, considers the relationship between the creep speed and parameters. The changing compression force of springs is analyzed under fixed compression amount.The paper also analyzes the changing length of springs in the free state after various stages of high-temperature relaxation test. It determines the results of compression forces and free length under different amount of compression.The analysis to compare the theoretical calculation of the compression forces with the experimental results is conducted. Computer modeling is created in Abaqus for calculation. Spring relaxation experiments are carried out under fixed compression amount and at the temperature of 350°. It is shown that the simulation results, which are carried out in Abaqus coincide with experimental results. The study shows that it is possible to use the creep equation parameters, based on the experimental results at high temperatures, to predict creep and relaxation properties of springs, which work at less high temperatures. The work results can be used as a basis in designing the springs working at high temperatures.

  3. Modeling of mechanical response of NiTi shape memory alloy subjected to combined thermal and non-proportional mechanical loading: A case study on helical spring actuator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frost, Miroslav; Sedlák, Petr; Kadeřávek, Lukáš; Heller, Luděk; Šittner, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 14 (2016), s. 1927-1938 ISSN 1045-389X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-28306P; GA ČR GA14-15264S; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape memory alloys * R-phase * modeling * elastic anisotropy * helical spring Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.255, year: 2016 http://jim.sagepub.com/content/27/14/1927.full.pdf

  4. 76 FR 61343 - Certain Helical Spring Lock Washers From Taiwan and the People's Republic of China: Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... Spring Lock Washers From Taiwan and the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited Third Five-Year Sunset Reviews of the Antidumping Duty Orders AGENCY: Import Administration, International... duty orders on certain helical spring lock washers (``lock washers'') from Taiwan and the People's...

  5. 76 FR 75873 - Certain Helical Spring Lock Washers From Taiwan and the People's Republic of China: Continuation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Spring Lock Washers From Taiwan and the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty... on certain helical spring lock washers from Taiwan and the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') would be likely to lead to a continuation or recurrence of dumping and material injury to an industry in...

  6. Spontaneous formation of non-uniform double helices for elastic rods under torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongyuan; Zhao, Shumin; Xia, Minggang; He, Siyu; Yang, Qifan; Yan, Yuming; Zhao, Hanqiao

    2017-01-01

    The spontaneous formation of double helices for filaments under torsion is common and significant. For example, the research on the supercoiling of DNA is helpful for understanding the replication and transcription of DNA. Similar double helices can appear in carbon nanotube yarns, cables, telephone wires and so forth. We noticed that non-uniform double helices can be produced due to the surface friction induced by the self-contact. Therefore an ideal model was presented to investigate the formation of double helices for elastic rods under torque. A general equilibrium condition which is valid for both the smooth surface and the rough surface situations is derived by using the variational method. By adding further constraints, the smooth and rough surface situations are investigated in detail respectively. Additionally, the model showed that the specific process of how to twist and slack the rod can determine the surface friction and hence influence the configuration of the double helix formed by rods with rough surfaces. Based on this principle, a method of manufacturing double helices with designed configurations was proposed and demonstrated. Finally, experiments were performed to verify the model and the results agreed well with the theory. - Highlights: • An ideal model is conceived to investigate the spontaneous formation of double helices for rods under torsion. • Variational method is used to obtain a universal result for the double helix formation process • Self-contact and surface friction is considered to analyze the non-uniform double helix. • A novel method of producing double helix with arbitrary configuration is proposed and demonstrated. • The experiment results agree well with the theory.

  7. Spontaneous formation of non-uniform double helices for elastic rods under torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongyuan [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Shumin, E-mail: zhaosm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xia, Minggang [Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); He, Siyu [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yang, Qifan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yan, Yuming [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Hanqiao [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2017-02-19

    The spontaneous formation of double helices for filaments under torsion is common and significant. For example, the research on the supercoiling of DNA is helpful for understanding the replication and transcription of DNA. Similar double helices can appear in carbon nanotube yarns, cables, telephone wires and so forth. We noticed that non-uniform double helices can be produced due to the surface friction induced by the self-contact. Therefore an ideal model was presented to investigate the formation of double helices for elastic rods under torque. A general equilibrium condition which is valid for both the smooth surface and the rough surface situations is derived by using the variational method. By adding further constraints, the smooth and rough surface situations are investigated in detail respectively. Additionally, the model showed that the specific process of how to twist and slack the rod can determine the surface friction and hence influence the configuration of the double helix formed by rods with rough surfaces. Based on this principle, a method of manufacturing double helices with designed configurations was proposed and demonstrated. Finally, experiments were performed to verify the model and the results agreed well with the theory. - Highlights: • An ideal model is conceived to investigate the spontaneous formation of double helices for rods under torsion. • Variational method is used to obtain a universal result for the double helix formation process • Self-contact and surface friction is considered to analyze the non-uniform double helix. • A novel method of producing double helix with arbitrary configuration is proposed and demonstrated. • The experiment results agree well with the theory.

  8. Spring Tire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Benzing, Jim; Kish, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The spring tire is made from helical springs, requires no air or rubber, and consumes nearly zero energy. The tire design provides greater traction in sandy and/or rocky soil, can operate in microgravity and under harsh conditions (vastly varying temperatures), and is non-pneumatic. Like any tire, the spring tire is approximately a toroidal-shaped object intended to be mounted on a transportation wheel. Its basic function is also similar to a traditional tire, in that the spring tire contours to the surface on which it is driven to facilitate traction, and to reduce the transmission of vibration to the vehicle. The essential difference between other tires and the spring tire is the use of helical springs to support and/or distribute load. They are coiled wires that deform elastically under load with little energy loss.

  9. Extension of elastic stiffness formula for leaf type holddown spring assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-09-01

    Based on the Euler beam theory and the strain energy method, an elastic stiffness formula of the holddown spring assembly consisting of several leaves was previously derived. The formula was known to be useful to estimate the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly only with the geometric data and the material properties of the leaf. Recently, it was reported that the elastic stiffness from the formula deviated much from the test results as the number of leaves was increased. In this study, in order to resolve such an increasing deviation as the increasing number of leaves, the formula has been extended to be able to consider normal forces and friction forces acting on interfaces between the leaves. The elastic stiffness analysis on specimens of leaf type holddown springs has been carried out using the extended formula and the analysis results are compared with the test results. As a result of comparisons, it is found that the extended formula is able to evaluate the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly within an error range of 10%, irrespective of the number of leaves. In addition, it is found that the effect of shear forces and axial forces on the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly is only below 0.2% of the elastic stiffness, and therefore the greatest portion of the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly is attributed to the bending moment. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Twist and Stretch of Helices Explained via the Kirchhoff-Love Rod Model of Elastic Filaments

    KAUST Repository

    Đuričković, Bojan

    2013-09-05

    In various single-molecule experiments, a chiral polymer, such as DNA, is simultaneously pulled and twisted. We address an elementary but fundamental question raised by various authors: does the molecule overwind or unwind under tension? We show that within the context of the classic Kirchhoff-Love rod model of elastic filaments, both behaviors are possible, depending on the precise constitutive relations of the polymer. More generally, our analysis provides an effective linear response theory for helical structures that relates axial force and axial torque to axial translation and rotation. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  11. Verification and sensitivity analysis on the elastic stiffness of the leaf type holddown spring assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam

    1998-01-01

    The elastic formula of leaf type hold down spring(HDS) assembly is verified by comparing the values of elastic stiffness with the characteristic test results of the HDS's specimens. The comparisons show that the derived elastic stiffness formula is useful in reliably estimating the elastic stiffness of leaf type HDS assembly. The elastic stiffness sensitivity of leaf type HDS assembly is analyzed using the formula and its gradient vectors obtained from the mid-point formula. As a result of sensitivity analysis, the elastic stiffness sensitivity with respect to each design variable is quantified and design variables of large sensitivity are identified. Among the design variables, leaf thickness is identified as the most sensitive design variable to the elastic of leaf type HDS assembly. In addition, the elastic stiffness sensitivity, with respect to design variable, is in power-law type correlation to the base thickness of the leaf. (author)

  12. NRC Information No. 89-43: Permanent deformation of torque switch helical springs in Limitorque SMA-type motor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Problems with the helical springs were discovered during a series of dynamic tests that were conducted with a motor-operated wedge-gate valve from the decommissioned Shippingport Atomic Power Station (Shippingport). The valve was installed in a portion of the piping system that had been modified to simulate the stiffness of a typical US piping system. The valve was 30 years old and had its original Limitorque SMA-type motor operator. One of the main objectives of these tests was to determine the operating capability of the valve when subjected to simultaneous internal hydraulic and seismic loadings. This was typically accomplished by operating the valve to achieve maximum hydraulic loading during maximum seismic loading. During testing, an operability problem with the valve motor operator occurred. The design of the SMA-type motor operator is such that the torque switch helical spring is in its most compressed condition when the valve is closed. Thus, a normally closed valve is more likely to experience permanent deformation of the helical torque spring. A review of the Shippingport records indicated that both of these valves had been used as normally closed valves at Shippingport. Thus, normally closed, safety-related valves with Limitorque SMA-type motor operators may not accomplish their intended safety-related function because the original torque switch setting may result in lower output torque caused by the permanent deformation of their torque switch helical springs

  13. Derivation of the extended elastic stiffness formula of the holddown spring assembly comprised of several leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kang, H. S.; Yoon, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Based on the Euler beam theory and the elastic strain energy method, the elastic stiffness formula of the holddown spring assembly consisting of several leaves was previously derived. Even though the previous formula was known to be useful to estimate the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly, recently it was reported that the elastic stiffness from the previous formula deviated greatly from the test results as the number of leaves was increased. The objective of this study is to extend the previous formula in order to resolve such an increasing deviation when increasing the number of leaves. Additionally, considering the friction forces acting on the interfaces between the leaves, we obtained an extended elastic stiffness formula. The characteristic test and the elastic stiffness analysis on the various kinds of specimens of the holddown spring assembly have been carried out; the validity of the extended formula has been verified by the comparison of their results. As a result of comparisons, it is found that the extended formula is able to evaluate the elastic stiffness of the holddown spring assembly within the maximum error range of +12%, irrespective of the number of the leaves. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Full base isolation for earthquake protection by helical springs and viscodampers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueffmann, G.K.

    1985-01-01

    GERB, a company specializing in vibration isolation has developed a new system for the three dimensional earthquake protection of whole structures, based on helical springs with definite linear flexibility of similar order in all three dimensions and velocity proportional viscodampers, also highly effective in all degrees of freedom. This system has already been successfully used for the installation of big diesel- and turbo-generators in seismic zones for quite a long time, where earthquake protection has been combined with conventional vibration control concepts. Tests on the shaking table of the Earthquake Research Institute at Skopje/Yugoslavia with a model of a 5-story-steel-frame-building comparing a fixed base and spring viscodamper supported installation have shown high stress relief in the structure at limited amplitudes. This system will give not only more protection for buildings and the people inside, but the extra cost equals the savings in the structure. Some unique advantages of this system are: no creep, deterioration or fatigue with time, easy inspection, simple replacement of elements if necessary and also simple modification of the system for example in case of load changes, static uncoupling from the subfoundation (independence of settlements) and low influence of travelling wave effects. (orig.)

  15. Spring or string: does tendon elastic action influence wing muscle mechanics in bat flight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konow, Nicolai; Cheney, Jorn A; Roberts, Thomas J; Waldman, J Rhea S; Swartz, Sharon M

    2015-10-07

    Tendon springs influence locomotor movements in many terrestrial animals, but their roles in locomotion through fluids as well as in small-bodied mammals are less clear. We measured muscle, tendon and joint mechanics in an elbow extensor of a small fruit bat during ascending flight. At the end of downstroke, the tendon was stretched by elbow flexion as the wing was folded. At the end of upstroke, elastic energy was recovered via tendon recoil and extended the elbow, contributing to unfurling the wing for downstroke. Compared with a hypothetical 'string-like' system lacking series elastic compliance, the tendon spring conferred a 22.5% decrease in muscle fascicle strain magnitude. Our findings demonstrate tendon elastic action in a small flying mammal and expand our understanding of the occurrence and action of series elastic actuator mechanisms in fluid-based locomotion. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. A clinical study of space closure with nickel-titanium closed coil springs and an elastic module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, R H; Rudge, S J; Mair, L H

    1998-07-01

    A previous study has shown that a 150-gram nickel-titanium closed coil spring (Sentalloy, GAC International Inc.) closed spaces more quickly and more consistently than an elastic module (Alastik, Unitec/3M). This study used the same friction sensitive sliding mechanics of pitting the six anterior teeth against the second bicuspid and first molars, to examine the rate of space closure of 100-gram and 200-gram nickel-titanium closed coil springs. The results for the three springs and elastic module were compared. The nickel-titanium closed coil springs produced a more consistent space closure than the elastic module. The 150- and 200-gram springs produced a faster rate of space closure than the elastic module or the 100-gram spring. No significant difference was noted between the rates of closure for the 150- and the 200-gram springs.

  17. Fluid-elastic Instability of Helical Tubes Subjected to Single-Phase External Flow and Two-Phase Internal Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Chull Jo; Myung Jo Jhung; Woong Sik Kim; Hho Jung Kim

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the fluid-elastic instability characteristics of steam generator helical type tubes in operating nuclear power plants. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted by a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and participation factor, modal analyses are performed for helical type tubes with various conditions. Investigated are the effects of the helix angle, the number of supports and the status of the inner fluid on the modal, and fluid-elastic instability characteristics of the tubes, which are expressed in terms of the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape, and stability ratio. (authors)

  18. ANALYSIS OF HOLLOW COIL HELICAL EXTENSION SPRING AND THE STUDY OF OPTIMIZING THE WEIGHT

    OpenAIRE

    Naman Gupta*1, Manas purohit2 & Deepika potghan3

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows the study which deals with the weight reduction for tensile extension spring by changing the solid spring to hollow one. The springs which are generally used are in solid form due to which the weight of entire body in which the spring is attached gets increased. The forces which can be act on spring may be linear push or linear pull or radial type. This spring deflect by pulling and regain its shape when pulling is neglect. The weight of tensile spring is reduced by changing ...

  19. A fast mass spring model solver for high-resolution elastic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mianlun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Zhu, Weixu; Zhang, Guian

    2017-03-01

    Real-time simulation of elastic objects is of great importance for computer graphics and virtual reality applications. The fast mass spring model solver can achieve visually realistic simulation in an efficient way. Unfortunately, this method suffers from resolution limitations and lack of mechanical realism for a surface geometry model, which greatly restricts its application. To tackle these problems, in this paper we propose a fast mass spring model solver for high-resolution elastic objects. First, we project the complex surface geometry model into a set of uniform grid cells as cages through *cages mean value coordinate method to reflect its internal structure and mechanics properties. Then, we replace the original Cholesky decomposition method in the fast mass spring model solver with a conjugate gradient method, which can make the fast mass spring model solver more efficient for detailed surface geometry models. Finally, we propose a graphics processing unit accelerated parallel algorithm for the conjugate gradient method. Experimental results show that our method can realize efficient deformation simulation of 3D elastic objects with visual reality and physical fidelity, which has a great potential for applications in computer animation.

  20. One-Dimensional Mass-Spring Chains Supporting Elastic Waves with Non-Conventional Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There are two classes of phononic structures that can support elastic waves with non-conventional topology, namely intrinsic and extrinsic systems. The non-conventional topology of elastic wave results from breaking time reversal symmetry (T-symmetry of wave propagation. In extrinsic systems, energy is injected into the phononic structure to break T-symmetry. In intrinsic systems symmetry is broken through the medium microstructure that may lead to internal resonances. Mass-spring composite structures are introduced as metaphors for more complex phononic crystals with non-conventional topology. The elastic wave equation of motion of an intrinsic phononic structure composed of two coupled one-dimensional (1D harmonic chains can be factored into a Dirac-like equation, leading to antisymmetric modes that have spinor character and therefore non-conventional topology in wave number space. The topology of the elastic waves can be further modified by subjecting phononic structures to externally-induced spatio-temporal modulation of their elastic properties. Such modulations can be actuated through photo-elastic effects, magneto-elastic effects, piezo-electric effects or external mechanical effects. We also uncover an analogy between a combined intrinsic-extrinsic systems composed of a simple one-dimensional harmonic chain coupled to a rigid substrate subjected to a spatio-temporal modulation of the side spring stiffness and the Dirac equation in the presence of an electromagnetic field. The modulation is shown to be able to tune the spinor part of the elastic wave function and therefore its topology. This analogy between classical mechanics and quantum phenomena offers new modalities for developing more complex functions of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials.

  1. Dynamic elastic-plastic response of a 2-DOF mass-spring system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The objective of the work presented here arose from abnormal, drop scenarios and specifically the question of how the accelerations and accumulation of plastic strains of internal components could be a ected by the material properties of the external structure. In some scenarios, the impact loads can induce cyclic motion of the internal components. Therefore, a second objective was to explore di erences that could be expected when simulations are conducted using isotropic hardening vs. kinematic hardening plasticity models. The simplest model that can be used to investigate the objectives above is a two-degree-offreedom mass/spring model where the springs exhibit elastic-plastic behavior. The purpose of this memo is to develop such model and present a few results that address the objectives.

  2. Simulations of Mechanical Response of Superelastic NiTi Helical Spring and its Relation to Fatigue Resistance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Petr; Frost, Miroslav; Kruisová, Alena; Hiřmanová, Klára; Heller, Luděk; Šittner, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2014), s. 2591-2598 ISSN 1059-9495 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13616S; GA ČR GA14-15264S; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-28306P Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100761203 Program:M Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : helical spring * non-proportional loading * numerical modeling * R-phase * shape memory alloys Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) Impact factor: 0.998, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11665-014-0906-y

  3. Residual stresses in cold-coiled helical compression springs for automotive suspensions measured by neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Brand, P. C.; Drews, A. R.; Krause, A.; Lowe-Ma, C.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 367, 1-2 (2004), s. 306-311 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : residual stress, automotive springs, neutron diffraction Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  4. An evaluation of the transition temperature range of super-elastic orthodontic NiTi springs using differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwart, O; Rollinger, J M; Burger, A

    1999-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the transition temperature ranges (TTR) of four types of super-elastic orthodontic nickel-titanium coil springs (Sentalloy). A knowledge of the TTR provides information on the temperature at which a NiTi wire or spring can assume superelastic properties and when this quality disappears. The spring types in this study can be distinguished from each other by their characteristic TTR during cooling and heating. For each tested spring type a characteristic TTR during heating (austenite transformation) and cooling (martensite transformation) was evaluated. The hysteresis of the transition temperature, found between cooling and heating, was 3.4-5.2 K. Depending on the spring type the austenite transformation started (As) at 9.7-17.1 degrees C and finished (Af) at 29.2-37 degrees C. The martensite transformation starting temperature (Ms) was evaluated at 32.6-25.4 degrees C, while Mf (martensite transformation finishing temperature) was 12.7-6.5 degrees C. The results show that the springs become super-elastic when the temperature increases and As is reached. They undergo a loss of super-elastic properties and a rapid decrease in force delivery when they are cooled to Mf. For the tested springs, Mf and As were found to be below room temperature. Thus, at room temperature and some degrees lower, all the tested springs exert super-elastic properties. For orthodontic treatment this means the maintenance of super-elastic behaviour, even when mouth temperature decreases to about room temperature as can occur, for example, during meals.

  5. Twist and Stretch of Helices Explained via the Kirchhoff-Love Rod Model of Elastic Filaments

    KAUST Repository

    Đuričković, Bojan; Goriely, Alain; Maddocks, John H.

    2013-01-01

    that within the context of the classic Kirchhoff-Love rod model of elastic filaments, both behaviors are possible, depending on the precise constitutive relations of the polymer. More generally, our analysis provides an effective linear response theory

  6. Failure analysis of a helical compression spring for a heavy vehicle's suspension system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youli Zhu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzed why a compression coil spring fractured at the transition position from the bearing coil to the first active coil in service, while the nominal stress here should always be much less than that at the inside coil position of a fully active coil. Visual observations indicated that a wear scar was formed on the first active coil and the fracture surface showed radiating ridges emanating from the wear scar. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crescent shaped region and beach marks, typical of fatigue failure. ZnCaph phosphate layer and painting around the contact zone were worn out due to contact and friction and resulted in corrosion and corrosion pits induced local stress concentration. Stress analysis indicated severe stress singularities at the edges of the contact zone, which facilitated cycle slip and fatigue crack nucleation. Recommendations were also made for improving the fatigue performance of the suspension springs.

  7. Measurements of the spin rotation parameter R in high energy elastic scattering and helicity amplitudes at Serpukhov energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierrard, J.; Bruneton, C.; Bystricky, J.; Cozzika, G.; Deregel, J.; Ducros, Y.; Gaidot, A.; Khantine-Langlois, F.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Merlo, J.P.; Miyashita, S.; Movchet, J.; Raoul, J.C.; Van Rossum, L.; Kanavets, V.P.

    1975-01-01

    The spin rotation parameter R in pp and π + p elastic scattering at 45GeV/c has been measured at the Serpukhov accelerator, for /t/ ranging from 0.2 to 0.5(GeV/c) 2 . The results are presented, together with previous R measurements at 3.8, 6, 16 and 40GeV/c, and are compared with the predictions of Regge pole models. The equality of the values for R in proton-proton and pion-proton scattering, within the experimental errors, is a test of factorization of the residues. An s-channel helicity amplitude analysis for pion-nucleon scattering at 40GeV/c is made using all available data. Significant results are obtained for the non flip amplitude in isoscalar exchange and for flip amplitudes on both isovector and isoscalar exchanges. The helicity flip in isoscalar exchange is non negligible. The energy dependence of this amplitude, at 6, 16 and 40GeV/c, is compared with predictions of Regge pole models [fr

  8. Optimal elastic coupling in form of one mechanical spring to improve energy efficiency of walking bipedal robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Fabian; Römer, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.roemer@kit.edu; Fidlin, Alexander; Seemann, Wolfgang [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This paper presents a method to optimize the energy efficiency of walking bipedal robots by more than 80 % in a speed range from 0.3 to 2.3 m/s using elastic couplings—mechanical springs with movement speed independent parameters. The considered planar robot consists of a trunk, two two-segmented legs, two actuators in the hip joints, two actuators in the knee joints and an elastic coupling between the shanks. It is modeled as underactuated system to make use of its natural dynamics and feedback controlled via input–output linearization. A numerical optimization of the joint angle trajectories as well as the elastic couplings is performed to minimize the average energy expenditure over the whole speed range. The elastic couplings increase the swing leg motion’s natural frequency thus making smaller steps more efficient which reduce the impact loss at the touchdown of the swing leg. The process of energy turnover is investigated in detail for the robot with and without elastic coupling between the shanks. Furthermore, the influences of the elastic couplings’ topology and of joint friction are analyzed. It is shown that the optimization of the robot’s motion and elastic coupling towards energy efficiency leads to a slightly slower convergence rate of the controller, yet no loss of stability, but a lower sensitivity with respect to disturbances. The optimal elastic coupling discovered via numerical optimization is a linear torsion spring with transmissions between the shanks. A design proposal for this elastic coupling—which does not affect the robot’s trunk and parallel shank motion and can be used to enhance an existing robot—is given for planar as well as spatial robots.

  9. Free vibration analysis of a cracked shear deformable beam on a two-parameter elastic foundation using a lattice spring model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, M.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-05-01

    The free vibration of a shear deformable beam with multiple open edge cracks is studied using a lattice spring model (LSM). The beam is supported by a so-called two-parameter elastic foundation, where normal and shear foundation stiffnesses are considered. Through application of Timoshenko beam theory, the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are taken into account. In the LSM, the beam is discretised into a one-dimensional assembly of segments interacting via rotational and shear springs. These springs represent the flexural and shear stiffnesses of the beam. The supporting action of the elastic foundation is described also by means of normal and shear springs acting on the centres of the segments. The relationship between stiffnesses of the springs and the elastic properties of the one-dimensional structure are identified by comparing the homogenised equations of motion of the discrete system and Timoshenko beam theory.

  10. Fluisd elastic instability and fretting-wear characteristics of steam generator helical tubes subjected to single-phase external flow and two-phase internal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Jhung, Myung Jo; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the fluid elastic instability characteristics of steam generator (SG) helical type tubes and the safety assessment of the potential for fretting-wear damages caused by foreign object in operating nuclear power plants. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted by a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and participation factor, modal analyses are performed for helical type tubes with various conditions. Special emphases are on the effects of coil diameter and the number of turns on the modal and instability characteristics of tubes, which are expressed in terms of the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and stability ratio. Also, the wear rate of helical type tube caused by foreign object is calculated using the Archard formula and the remaining life of the tube is predicted, and discussed in this study is the effect of the flow velocity and vibration of the tube on the remaining life of the tube. In addition, addressed is the effect of the external pressure on the vibration and fretting wear characteristics of the tube

  11. Analysis of elastic stiffness for the leaf type holddown spring assembly with uniformly tapered thickness considering the point of taper runout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-04-01

    In the case that the point of taper runout is outside the bent region of spring base, a formula to evaluate the elastic stiffness of the leaf type holddown spring (HDS) assembly with uniformly tapered thickness from t{sub 0} to t{sub 1} (t{sub 0}>t{sub 1}) has been analytically derived by applying the engineering beam theory and Casiliano`s theorem based on strain energy. It has found that taper runouts for the 14x14 and 17x17 type KOFA HDS were up to 2.2 mm and effects on their elastic stiffnesses were about 3.70%, and that the elastic stiffness of the HDS was mainly caused by bending moment. And in addition, for the HDS designed/manufactured from Westinghouse, elastic stiffnesses from the derived formula were in good agreement with those from the Westinghouse`s empirical formula. Therefore, the derived formula could be applicable to evaluating the elastic stiffness of any HDS with tapered thickness only with the informations of the geometric data and material properties of leaf springs regardness of the manufacturing companies. 11 tabs., 4 figs., 25 refs. (Author) .new.

  12. Brownian dynamics simulations with stiff finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Fraenkel springs as approximations to rods in bead-rod models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chen; Jain, Semant; Larson, Ronald G

    2006-01-28

    A very stiff finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE)-Fraenkel spring is proposed to replace the rigid rod in the bead-rod model. This allows the adoption of a fast predictor-corrector method so that large time steps can be taken in Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations without over- or understretching the stiff springs. In contrast to the simple bead-rod model, BD simulations with beads and FENE-Fraenkel (FF) springs yield a random-walk configuration at equilibrium. We compare the simulation results of the free-draining bead-FF-spring model with those for the bead-rod model in relaxation, start-up of uniaxial extensional, and simple shear flows, and find that both methods generate nearly identical results. The computational cost per time step for a free-draining BD simulation with the proposed bead-FF-spring model is about twice as high as the traditional bead-rod model with the midpoint algorithm of Liu [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 5826 (1989)]. Nevertheless, computations with the bead-FF-spring model are as efficient as those with the bead-rod model in extensional flow because the former allows larger time steps. Moreover, the Brownian contribution to the stress for the bead-FF-spring model is isotropic and therefore simplifies the calculation of the polymer stresses. In addition, hydrodynamic interaction can more easily be incorporated into the bead-FF-spring model than into the bead-rod model since the metric force arising from the non-Cartesian coordinates used in bead-rod simulations is absent from bead-spring simulations. Finally, with our newly developed bead-FF-spring model, existing computer codes for the bead-spring models can trivially be converted to ones for effective bead-rod simulations merely by replacing the usual FENE or Cohen spring law with a FENE-Fraenkel law, and this convertibility provides a very convenient way to perform multiscale BD simulations.

  13. The law of elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cesare Masin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight-a cognitive law analogous to Hooke¿s law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined either in series or in parallel. This total elongation was longer for serial than for parallel springs, and increased proportionally to the number of serial springs and inversely proportionally to the number of parallel springs. The results suggest that participants integrated load weight with imagined elasticity rather than with spring length.

  14. The Law of Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  15. Pulling Helices inside Bacteria: Imperfect Helices and Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Jun F.; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2009-04-01

    We study steady-state configurations of intrinsically-straight elastic filaments constrained within rod-shaped bacteria that have applied forces distributed along their length. Perfect steady-state helices result from axial or azimuthal forces applied at filament ends, however azimuthal forces are required for the small pitches observed for MreB filaments within bacteria. Helix-like configurations can result from distributed forces, including coexistence between rings and imperfect helices. Levels of expression and/or bundling of the polymeric protein could mediate this coexistence.

  16. Helical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin [Townes Laser Institute, CREOL—The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric [Micro-Photonics Laboratory – Center for Optical Material Science, Clemson, Anderson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  17. On the bi-orthogonality conditions for multi-modal elastic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The bi-orthogomality conditions in terms of generalised forces and displacements are derived from the reciprocity relations for a hierarchy of elastic waveguides, which support several travelling and evanescent modes (free waves). In the simple cases of waves in a straight beam and axisymmetric...... waves in a thin elastic cylindrical shell, these conditions are formulated as identities in an explicit form via wavenumbers. The forced vibrations of these waveguides under localised excitation are also considered with these identities being employed. The bi-orthogonality conditions in more advanced...... cases, specifically, for non-axisymmetric waves in an elastic cylindrical shell and for waves in an elastic helical spring, are derived, but not presented in an explicit form via wavenumbers. The results obtained for the hierarchy of waveguides are discussed in view of the classical bi...

  18. The study on stress-strain state of the spring at high temperature using ABAQUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical helical springs are widely used in the elements of thermal energy devices. It is necessary to guarantee the stability of the stress state of spring in high temperature. Relaxation phenomenon of stress is studied in this paper. Calculations are carried out in the environment of ABAQUS. The verification is taken out using analytical calculations.This paper describes the distribution and character of stress contour lines on the cross section of spring under the condition of instantaneous load, explicates the relaxation law with time. Research object is cylindrical helical spring, that working at high temperature. The purpose of this work is to get the stress relaxation law of spring, and to guarantee the long-term strength.This article presents the basic theory of helical spring. Establishes spring mathematical model of creep under the loads of compression and torsion. The stress formulas of each component in the cross section of spring are given. The calculation process of relaxation is analyzed in the program ABAQUS.In this paper compare the analytical formulas of spring stress with the simulation results, which are created by program ABAQUS.Finite element model for stress creep analysis in the cross section is created, material of spring – stainless steel 10X18N9T, springs are used at the temperature 650℃.At the beginning, stress-stain of spring is in the elastic state. Analyzes the change law of creep stress under the condition of constant load and a fixed compression.When analyzing under the condition of a fixed compression, the stresses are quickly decreased in most area in the cross section of spring, and the point of minimum shear stress gradually moves to the direction of outer diameter, because of this, stresses in a small area near the center increase slowly at first then decrease gradually with time. When analyzing under the condition of constant load, the stresses are quickly decreased in the around area and in creased

  19. Helical beating of an actuated elastic filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coq, Nais; Roure, Olivia du; Fermigier, Marc; Bartolo, Denis

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the propulsive force resulting from the rotation of a flexible filament in the low Reynolds number regime. Using a simple linear model, we establish the nonlinear torque-force relations for two torque-driven actuation modes. When the rotation of the filament is induced by two perpendicular transverse oscillating torques, the propulsive force increases monotonically with the torque amplitude. Conversely, when a constant axial torque is applied, the torque-force characteristics displays an unstable branch, related to a discontinuous transition in the shape of the filament. We characterize this shape transition using two geometrical parameters, quantifying the wrapping around and the collapse on the axis of the filament. The proposed theoretical description correctly accounts for our experimental observations and reveals a strong dependence of the filament dynamics on the anchoring conditions.

  20. Helicity content and tokamak applications of helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is approximately conserved by the turbulence associated with resistive instabilities of plasmas. To generalize the application of the concept of helicity, the helicity content of an arbitrary bounded region of space will be defined. The definition has the virtues that both the helicity content and its time derivative have simple expressions in terms of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes, the average toroidal loop voltage and the electric potential on the bounding surface, and the volume integral of E-B. The application of the helicity concept to tokamak plasmas is illustrated by a discussion of so-called MHD current drive, an example of a stable tokamak q profile with q less than one in the center, and a discussion of the possibility of a natural steady-state tokamak due to the bootstrap current coupling to tearing instabilities

  1. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  2. Helical type vacuum container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, Kimio.

    1989-01-01

    Helical type vacuum containers in the prior art lack in considerations for thermal expansion stresses to helical coils, and there is a possibility of coil ruptures. The object of the present invention is to avoid the rupture of helical coils wound around the outer surface of a vacuum container against heat expansion if any. That is, bellows or heat expansion absorbing means are disposed to a cross section of a helical type vacuum container. With such a constitution, thermal expansion of helical coils per se due to temperature elevation of the coils during electric supply can be absorbed by expansion of the bellows or absorption of the heat expansion absorbing means. Further, this can be attained by arranging shear pins in the direction perpendicular to the bellows axis so that the bellows are not distorted when the helical coils are wound around the helical type vacuum container. (I.S.)

  3. Spring in the Arab Spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, G.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Column Gert Borg | Spring in the Arab Spring door dr. Gert Borg, onderzoeker bij Islam en Arabisch aan de Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen en voormalig directeur van het Nederlands-Vlaams Instituut Caïro Spring If, in Google, you type "Arab Spring" and hit the button, you get more than

  4. A note on helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I.; Newmann, E.T.; Porter, J.; Winicour, J.; Lukacs, B.; Perjes, Z.; Sebestyen, A.

    1981-03-01

    The authors give a formal definition of the helicity operator for integral spin fields, which does not involve their momentum-space decomposition. The discussion is based upon a representation of the Pauli-Lubanski operator in terms of the action on tensor fields by the Killing vectors associated with the generators of the Poincare group. This leads to an identification of the helicity operator with the duality operator defined by the space-time alternating tensor. Helicity eigenstates then correspond to self-dual or anti-self-dual fields, in agreement with usage implicit in the literature. In addiition, the relationship between helicity eigenstates which are intrinsically non-classical, and states of right or left circular polarization in classical electrodynamics are discussed. (author)

  5. Helical CT defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrando, R.; Fiorini, G.; Beghello, A.; Cicio, G.R.; Derchi, L.E.; Consigliere, M.; Resasco, M.; Tornago, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the possible role of Helical CT defecography in pelvic floor disorders by comparing the results of the investigations with those of conventional defecography. The series analyzed consisted of 90 patients, namely 62 women and 28 men, ranging in age 24-82 years. They were all submitted to conventional defecography, and 18 questionable cases were also studied with Helical CT defecography. The conventional examination was performed during the 4 standard phases of resting, squeezing, Valsalva and straining; it is used a remote-control unit. The parameters for Helical CT defecography were: 5 mm beam collimation, pitch 2, 120 KV, 250 m As and 18-20 degrees gantry inclination to acquire coronal images of the pelvic floor. The rectal ampulla was distended with a bolus of 300 mL nonionic iodinated contrast agent (dilution: 3g/cc). The patient wore a napkin and was seated on the table, except for those who could not hold the position and were thus examined supine. Twenty-second helical scans were performed at rest and during evacuation; multiplanar reconstructions were obtained especially on the sagittal plane for comparison with conventional defecographic images. Coronal Helical CT defecography images permitted to map the perineal floor muscles, while sagittal reconstructions provided information on the ampulla and the levator ani. To conclude, Helical CT defecography performed well in study of pelvic floor disorders and can follow conventional defecography especially in questionable cases [it

  6. Just Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Konda, Madhusudhan

    2011-01-01

    Get a concise introduction to Spring, the increasingly popular open source framework for building lightweight enterprise applications on the Java platform. This example-driven book for Java developers delves into the framework's basic features, as well as advanced concepts such as containers. You'll learn how Spring makes Java Messaging Service easier to work with, and how its support for Hibernate helps you work with data persistence and retrieval. Throughout Just Spring, you'll get your hands deep into sample code, beginning with a problem that illustrates dependency injection, Spring's co

  7. Beginning Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Caliskan, Mert

    2015-01-01

    Get up to speed quickly with this comprehensive guide toSpring Beginning Spring is the complete beginner's guide toJava's most popular framework. Written with an eye towardreal-world enterprises, the book covers all aspects of applicationdevelopment within the Spring Framework. Extensive samples withineach chapter allow developers to get up to speed quickly byproviding concrete references for experimentation, building askillset that drives successful application development byexploiting the full capabilities of Java's latest advances. Spring provides the exact toolset required to build anent

  8. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-01-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation

  9. Helical-D pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The open-quotes helical-Dclose quotes geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a open-quotes dynamoclose quotes process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1

  10. Review of the helicity formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, F.; Cerrada, M.; Fernandez, E.

    1972-01-01

    Our purpose in these notes has been to present a brief and general review of the helicity formalism. We begin by discussing Lorentz invariance, spin and helicity ideas, in section 1 . In section 2 we deal with the construction of relativistic states and scattering amplitudes in the helicity basis and we study their transformation properties under discrete symmetries. Finally we present some more sophisticated topics like kinematical singularities of helicity amplitudes, kinematical constraints and crossing relations 3, 4, 5 respectively. (Author) 8 refs

  11. Helical Confinement Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beidler, C; Brakel, R; Burhenn, R; Dinklage, A; Erckmann, V; Feng, Y; Geiger, J; Hartmann, D; Hirsch, M; Jaenicke, R; Koenig, R; Laqua, H P; Maassberg, H; Wagner, F; Weller, A; Wobig, H [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Stellarators, conceived 1951 by Lyman Spitzer in Princeton, are toroidal devices that confine a plasma in a magnetic field which originates from currents in coils outside the plasma. A plasma current driven by external means, for example by an ohmic transformer, is not required for confinement. Supplying the desired poloidal field component by external coils leads to a helically structured plasma topology. Thus stellarators - or helical confinement devices - are fully three-dimensional in contrast to the toroidal (rotational) symmetry of tokamaks. As stellarators can be free of an inductive current, whose radial distribution depends on the plasma parameters, their equilibrium must not be established via the evolving plasma itself, but to a first order already given by the vacuum magnetic field. They do not need an active control (like positional feedback) and therefore cannot suffer from its failure. The outstanding conceptual advantage of stellarators is the potential of steady state plasma operation without current drive. As there is no need for current drive, the recirculating power is expected to be smaller than in equivalent tokamaks. The lack of a net current avoids current driven instabilities; specifically, no disruptions, no resistive wall modes and no conventional or neoclassical tearing modes appear. Second order pressure-driven currents (Pfirsch-Schlueter, bootstrap) exist but they can be modified and even minimized by the magnetic design. The magnetic configuration of helical devices naturally possesses a separatrix, which allows the implementation of a helically structured divertor for exhaust and impurity control. (author)

  12. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  13. Spring performance tester for miniature extension springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzbrenner, Bradley; Boyce, Brad

    2017-05-16

    A spring performance tester and method of testing a spring are disclosed that has improved accuracy and precision over prior art spring testers. The tester can perform static and cyclic testing. The spring tester can provide validation for product acceptance as well as test for cyclic degradation of springs, such as the change in the spring rate and fatigue failure.

  14. Elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates the following five aspects of engineering-material solid-state elastic constants: general properties, interrelationships, relationships to other physical properties, changes during cooling from ambient to near-zero temperature, and near-zero-temperature behavior. Topics considered include compressibility, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Hooke's law, elastic-constant measuring methods, thermodynamic potentials, higher-order energy terms, specific heat, thermal expansivity, magnetic materials, structural phase transitions, polymers, composites, textured aggregates, and other-phenomena correlations. Some of the conclusions concerning polycrystalline elastic properties and their temperature dependence are: elastic constants are physical, not mechanical, properties which relate thermodynamically to other physical properties such as specific heat and thermal expansivity; elastic constants at low temperatures are nearly temperature independent, as required by the third law of thermodynamics; and elastic constants can be used to study directional properties of materials, such as textured aggregates and composites

  15. Coulomb double helical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Tetsuo; Ishihara, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Structures of Coulomb clusters formed by dust particles in a plasma are studied by numerical simulation. Our study reveals the presence of various types of self-organized structures of a cluster confined in a prolate spheroidal electrostatic potential. The stable configurations depend on a prolateness parameter for the confining potential as well as on the number of dust particles in a cluster. One-dimensional string, two-dimensional zigzag structure and three-dimensional double helical structure are found as a result of the transition controlled by the prolateness parameter. The formation of stable double helical structures resulted from the transition associated with the instability of angular perturbations on double strings. Analytical perturbation study supports the findings of numerical simulations.

  16. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average β and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned

  17. Theory of the change of elastic constants by interstitials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, N.; Dederichs, P.H.; Lehmann, C.; Leibfried, G.; Scholz, A.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of the change of elastic constants by point-defects, in particular by interstitials, is briefly summarized. The typical effects of spring changes in a defect lattice on the elastic data are discussed qualitatively. Numerical results for the change of elastic constants by self-interstitials and vacancies are given and compared with experimental data for Cu and Al

  18. Experimental measurement of fluid force coefficients for helical tube arrays in air cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shifang; Liu Reilan

    1993-01-01

    A helical coil steam generator is extensively used in the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGCR) and Sodium Cooled Reactor (SCR) nuclear power stations because of its compact structure, good heat-exchange, and small volume. The experimental model is established by the structure parameter of 200MW HTGCR. The fluid elastic instability of helical tube arrays in air cross flow is studied in this experiment, and the fluid force coefficients of helical tube arrays having the same notational direction of two adjacent layers in air cross flow are obtained. As compared to the fluid force coefficients of cylinder tube arrays, the fluid force coefficients of helical tube arrays are smaller in the low velocity area, and greater in the high velocity area. The experimental results help the study of the dynamic characteristics of helical tube arrays in air cross flow

  19. Using Euler buckling springs for vibration isolation

    CERN Document Server

    Winterflood, J; Blair, D G

    2002-01-01

    Difficulties in obtaining ideal vertical vibration isolation with mechanical springs are identified as being due to the mass of the elastic element which is in turn due to its energy storage requirement. A new technique to minimize this energy is presented - being an Euler column undergoing elastic buckling. The design of a high performance vertical vibration isolation stage based on this technique is presented together with its measured performance.

  20. Using Euler buckling springs for vibration isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterflood, J; Barber, T; Blair, D G

    2002-01-01

    Difficulties in obtaining ideal vertical vibration isolation with mechanical springs are identified as being due to the mass of the elastic element which is in turn due to its energy storage requirement. A new technique to minimize this energy is presented - being an Euler column undergoing elastic buckling. The design of a high performance vertical vibration isolation stage based on this technique is presented together with its measured performance

  1. Helical Tomotherapy Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balog, John; Soisson, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed

  2. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moult, I.; Stewart, I.W.; Tackmann, F.J.; Waalewijn, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are

  3. Comparative spring mechanics in mantis shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patek, S N; Rosario, M V; Taylor, J R A

    2013-04-01

    Elastic mechanisms are fundamental to fast and efficient movements. Mantis shrimp power their fast raptorial appendages using a conserved network of exoskeletal springs, linkages and latches. Their appendages are fantastically diverse, ranging from spears to hammers. We measured the spring mechanics of 12 mantis shrimp species from five different families exhibiting hammer-shaped, spear-shaped and undifferentiated appendages. Across species, spring force and work increase with size of the appendage and spring constant is not correlated with size. Species that hammer their prey exhibit significantly greater spring resilience compared with species that impale evasive prey ('spearers'); mixed statistical results show that species that hammer prey also produce greater work relative to size during spring loading compared with spearers. Disabling part of the spring mechanism, the 'saddle', significantly decreases spring force and work in three smasher species; cross-species analyses show a greater effect of cutting the saddle on the spring force and spring constant in species without hammers compared with species with hammers. Overall, the study shows a more potent spring mechanism in the faster and more powerful hammering species compared with spearing species while also highlighting the challenges of reconciling within-species and cross-species mechanical analyses when different processes may be acting at these two different levels of analysis. The observed mechanical variation in spring mechanics provides insights into the evolutionary history, morphological components and mechanical behavior, which were not discernible in prior single-species studies. The results also suggest that, even with a conserved spring mechanism, spring behavior, potency and component structures can be varied within a clade with implications for the behavioral functions of power-amplified devices.

  4. Thermoelastic properties on Cu-Zn-Al shape memory springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto do Nascimento Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper present a thermomechanical study of actuators in form of helical springs made from shape memory alloy wires that can work as actuator and/or as sensor. These abilities are due to the martensitic transformation. This transformation is a diffusionless phase transition that occurs by a cooperative atomic rearrange mechanism. In this work, helical spring actuators were manufactured from Cu-Zn-Al shape memory alloy wires. The springs were submitted to constant tensile loads and thermal cycles. This procedure allows to determine thermoelastic properties of the shape memory springs. Thermomechanical properties were analyzed during 50 thermal cycles in the temperature range from 20 to 130 °C. Results of variations in critical transformation temperatures, thermoelastic strain and thermal hysteresis are discussed based on defects rearrangement and martensitic transformation theory.

  5. Flexible helical yarn swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A P; Leshansky, A M; Pismen, L M

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the motion of a flexible Stokesian flagellar swimmer realised as a yarn made of two intertwined elastomer fibres, one active, that can reversibly change its length in response to a local excitation causing transition to the nematic state or swelling, and the other one, a passive isotropic elastomer with identical mechanical properties. A propagating chemical wave may provide an excitation mechanism ensuring a constant length of the excited region. Generally, the swimmer moves along a helical trajectory, and the propagation and rotation velocity are very sensitive to the ratio of the excited region to the pitch of the yarn, as well as to the size of a carried load. External excitation by a moving actuating beam is less effective, unless the direction of the beam is adjusted to rotation of the swimmer.

  6. LHD helical divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, N.; Watanabe, T.; Ji Hantao

    1993-07-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) now under construction is a heliotron/torsatron device with a closed divertor system. The edge LHD magnetic structure has been studied in detail. A peculiar feature of the configuration is existence of edge surface layers, a complicated three dimensional magnetic structure which does not, however, seem to hamper the expected divertor functions. Two divertor operational modes are being considered for the LHD experiment, high density, cold radiative divertor operation as a safe heat removal scheme and high temperature divertor plasma operation. In the latter operation, a divertor plasma with temperature of a few kev, generated by efficient pumping, expects to lead to significant improvement in core plasma confinement. Conceptual designs of the LHD divertor components are under way. (author)

  7. Elastic Beanstalk

    CERN Document Server

    Vliet, Jurg; Wel, Steven; Dowd, Dara

    2011-01-01

    While it's always been possible to run Java applications on Amazon EC2, Amazon's Elastic Beanstalk makes the process easier-especially if you understand how it works beneath the surface. This concise, hands-on book not only walks you through Beanstalk for deploying and managing web applications in the cloud, you'll also learn how to use this AWS tool in other phases of development. Ideal if you're a developer familiar with Java applications or AWS, Elastic Beanstalk provides step-by-step instructions and numerous code samples for building cloud applications on Beanstalk that can handle lots

  8. Theoretical aspects of magnetic helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic helicity, usually defined as K=integralA.Bdv, where A is the vector potential and B the magnetic field, measures the topological linkage of magnetic fluxes. Helicity manifests itself in the twistedness and knottedness of flux tubes. Its significance is that it is an ideal MHD invariant. While the helicity formalism has proven very useful in understanding reversed field pinch and spheromak behavior, some problems exist in applying the method consistently for complex (e.g., toroidal) conductor geometries or in situations where magnetic flux penetrates conducting walls. Recent work has attempted to generalize K to allow for all possible geometries

  9. Appraisal of elastic follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1981-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide indications to choose what fraction of a self limiting stress can be considered as secondary. At first, considerations are given to a simple structure which could be called ''creep relaxation tensile test''. A bar (with constant cross section) is loaded by an elastic spring in order to obtain a given elongation of the assembly. The stress evolution is studied. Then the creep damage is computed, and compared to the damage corresponding to the elastic computed stress. This comparison gives the fraction of the self limiting stress which must be considered as primary. This involve the structural parameter 0 which is the initial value of the ratio of elastic energy to dissipating power. Extension of the rule is made with the help of KACHANOV approximation. As a conclusion a procedure is described which determines what fraction of a self limiting stress must be considered as primary

  10. Godbillon Vey Helicity and Magnetic Helicity in Magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Hu, Q.; Anco, S.; Zank, G. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Godbillon-Vey invariant arises in homology theory, and algebraic topology, where conditions for a layered family of 2D surfaces forms a 3D manifold were elucidated. The magnetic Godbillon-Vey helicity invariant in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a helicity invariant that occurs for flows, in which the magnetic helicity density hm= A\\cdotB=0 where A is the magnetic vector potential and B is the magnetic induction. Our purpose is to elucidate the evolution of the magnetic Godbillon-Vey field η =A×B/|A|2 and the Godbillon-Vey helicity hgv}= η \\cdot∇ × η in general MHD flows in which the magnetic helicity hm≠q 0. It is shown that hm acts as a source term in the Godbillon-Vey helicity transport equation, in which hm is coupled to hgv via the shear tensor of the background flow. The transport equation for hgv depends on the electric field potential ψ , which is related to the gauge for A, which takes its simplest form for the advected A gauge in which ψ =A\\cdot u where u is the fluid velocity.

  11. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-09-10

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices.

  12. Elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leader, Elliot

    1991-01-01

    With very few unexplained results to challenge conventional ideas, physicists have to look hard to search for gaps in understanding. An area of physics which offers a lot more than meets the eye is elastic and diffractive scattering where particles either 'bounce' off each other, emerging unscathed, or just graze past, emerging relatively unscathed. The 'Blois' workshops provide a regular focus for this unspectacular, but compelling physics, attracting highly motivated devotees

  13. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Amsterdam Univ.

    2015-08-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d-dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for pp → H+0,1,2 jets, pp → W/Z/γ+0,1,2 jets, and pp → 2,3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e + e - and e - p collisions.

  14. Top Nozzle Holddown Spring Optimization of KSNP Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong Ki; Park, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong Koo; Lee, Joon Ro; Kim, Jae Won

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear fuel assembly for Korea Standard Nuclear Power (KSNP) Plant has 4 helical compression springs at the upper end of it. The springs, in conjunction with the fuel assembly weight, apply a holddown force against excess of buoyancy forces and the upward hydraulic forces due to the reactor coolant flow. Thus the holddown spring is to be designed such that the positive net downward force will be maintained for all normal and anticipated transient flow and temperature conditions in the nuclear reactor. With satisfying these in-reactor requirements of the fuel assembly holddown spring. Under the assumption that spring density is constant, the volume nozzle holddown spring. Under the assumption that spring density is constant, the volume minimization is executed by using the design variables, viz., wire diameter, mean coil diameter, minimization is executed by using the design variables, viz., wire diameter, mean coil diameter are within the compatible range of the fuel assembly structural components. Based on these conditions, the optimum design of the holddown spring is obtained considering the reactor operating condition and by using ANSYS code. The optimized spring has the properties that are a decreased volume and increased stiffness, compared with the existing one even if the absolute values are very similar each other. The holddown spring design features and the algorithm developed in this study could be directly applicable to the current commercial production. Therefore, it could be used to enhance the design efficiency and the functional performance of the spring, and to reduce a material cost a little

  15. Prediction of Spring Rate and Initial Failure Load due to Material Properties of Composite Leaf Spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sung Ha; Choi, Bok Lok

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented analysis methods for adapting E-glass fiber/epoxy composite (GFRP) materials to an automotive leaf spring. It focused on the static behaviors of the leaf spring due to the material composition and its fiber orientation. The material properties of the GFRP composite were directly measured based on the ASTM standard test. A reverse implementation was performed to obtain the complete set of in-situ fiber and matrix properties from the ply test results. Next, the spring rates of the composite leaf spring were examined according to the variation of material parameters such as the fiber angles and resin contents of the composite material. Finally, progressive failure analysis was conducted to identify the initial failure load by means of an elastic stress analysis and specific damage criteria. As a result, it was found that damage first occurred along the edge of the leaf spring owing to the shear stresses

  16. Transport barrier in Helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on the transport barrier in Helical plasmas are reviewed. There are two mechanisms of transport improvement, that results in the formation of the transport barrier. One is the improvement of neoclassical transport by reducing the ripple loss with radial electric field, which exist only in helical plasma. The other is the improvement of anomalous transport due to the suppression of fluctuations associated with a radial electric field shear both in tokamak and helical plasma. The formation of the transport barrier can be triggered by the radial electric field shear associated with the transition of the radial electric field (L/H transition or ion-electron root transition) or the peaked density or the optimization of magnetic field shear. The mechanisms of transport barrier formation are also discussed. (author). 60 refs

  17. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buniy, Roman V., E-mail: roman.buniy@gmail.com [Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); Kephart, Thomas W., E-mail: tom.kephart@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  18. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buniy, Roman V.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫ Ω trF μν F μν d 4 x subject to the local constraint ε μναβ trF μν F αβ =0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity

  19. Toroidal helical quartz forming machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, K.W.; Cole, T.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Scyllac fusion experimental machine used 10 cm diameter smooth bore discharge tubes formed into a simple toroidal shape prior to 1974. At about that time, it was discovered that a discharge tube was required to follow the convoluted shape of the load coil. A machine was designed and built to form a fused quartz tube with a toroidal shape. The machine will accommodate quartz tubes from 5 cm to 20 cm diameter forming it into a 4 m toroidal radius with a 1 to 5 cm helical displacement. The machine will also generate a helical shape on a linear tube. Two sets of tubes with different helical radii and wavelengths have been successfully fabricated. The problems encountered with the design and fabrication of this machine are discussed

  20. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift

  1. Resonant helical fields in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, V.

    1990-01-01

    Poincare maps of magnetic field lines of a toroidal helical system were made. The magnetic field is a linear superposition of the magnetic fields produced by a toroidal plasma in equilibrium and by external helical currents. Analytical expression for the Poincare maps was no obtained since the magnetic field do not have symmetry. In order to obtain the maps, the equation minus derivative of l vector times B vector = 0 was numerically integrated. In the Poincare maps, the principal and the secondary magnetic island were observed. (author)

  2. Helical system. History and current state of helical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper described the following: (1) history of nuclear fusion research of Japan's original heliotron method, (2) worldwide development of nuclear fusion research based on helical system such as stellarator, and (3) worldwide meaning of large helical device (LHD) aiming to demonstrate the steady-state performance of heliotron type in the parameter area extrapolable to the core plasma, and research results of LHD. LHD demonstrated that the helical system is excellent in steady operation performance at the world's most advanced level. In an experiment using deuterium gas in 2017, LHD achieved to reach 120 million degrees of ion temperature, which is one index of nuclear fusion condition, demonstrated the realization of high-performance plasma capable of extrapolating to future nuclear fusion reactors, and established the foundation for full-scale research toward the realization of nuclear fusion reactor. Besides experimental research, this paper also described the helical-type stationary nuclear fusion prototype reactor, FFHR-d1, which was based on progress of large-scale simulation at the world's most advanced level. A large-scale superconducting stellarator experimental device, W7-X, with the same scale as LHD, started experiment in December 2015, whose current state is also touched on here. (A.O.)

  3. Helicity and evanescent waves. [Energy transport velocity, helicity, Lorentz transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudin, J L; Platzeck, A M [La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina); Albano, J R [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    1978-02-20

    It is shown that the projection of the angular momentum of a circularly polarized electromagnetic evanescent wave along the mean velocity of energy transport (=helicity) can be reverted by a Lorentz transformation, in spite of the fact that this velocity is c.

  4. Nonlinear Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y. B.; Ogden, R. W.

    2001-05-01

    This collection of papers by leading researchers in the field of finite, nonlinear elasticity concerns itself with the behavior of objects that deform when external forces or temperature gradients are applied. This process is extremely important in many industrial settings, such as aerospace and rubber industries. This book covers the various aspects of the subject comprehensively with careful explanations of the basic theories and individual chapters each covering a different research direction. The authors discuss the use of symbolic manipulation software as well as computer algorithm issues. The emphasis is placed firmly on covering modern, recent developments, rather than the very theoretical approach often found. The book will be an excellent reference for both beginners and specialists in engineering, applied mathematics and physics.

  5. Vibro-spring particle size distribution analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Ketan Shantilal

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and development of an automated pre-production particle size distribution analyser for particles in the 20 - 2000 μm size range. This work is follow up to the vibro-spring particle sizer reported by Shaeri. In its most basic form, the instrument comprises a horizontally held closed coil helical spring that is partly filled with the test powder and sinusoidally vibrated in the transverse direction. Particle size distribution data are obtained by stretching the spring to known lengths and measuring the mass of the powder discharged from the spring's coils. The size of the particles on the other hand is determined from the spring 'intercoil' distance. The instrument developed by Shaeri had limited use due to its inability to measure sample mass directly. For the device reported here, modifications are made to the original configurations to establish means of direct sample mass measurement. The feasibility of techniques for measuring the mass of powder retained within the spring are investigated in detail. Initially, the measurement of mass is executed in-situ from the vibration characteristics based on the spring's first harmonic resonant frequency. This method is often erratic and unreliable due to the particle-particle-spring wall interactions and the spring bending. An much more successful alternative is found from a more complicated arrangement in which the spring forms part of a stiff cantilever system pivoted along its main axis. Here, the sample mass is determined in the 'static mode' by monitoring the cantilever beam's deflection following the wanton termination of vibration. The system performance has been optimised through the variations of the mechanical design of the key components and the operating procedure as well as taking into account the effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the system's response. The thesis also describes the design and development of the ancillary mechanisms. These include the pneumatic

  6. Parameterization and measurements of helical magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.; Okamura, M.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic fields with helical symmetry can be parameterized using multipole coefficients (a n , b n ). We present a parameterization that gives the familiar multipole coefficients (a n , b n ) for straight magnets when the helical wavelength tends to infinity. To measure helical fields all methods used for straight magnets can be employed. We show how to convert the results of those measurements to obtain the desired helical multipole coefficients (a n , b n )

  7. Applications of 2D helical vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we show how the assumption of helical symmetry in the context of 2D helical vortices can be exploited to analyse and to model various cases of rotating flows. From theory, examples of three basic applications of 2D dynamics of helical vortices embedded in flows with helical symmetry...... of the vorticity field are addressed. These included some of the problems related to vortex breakdown, instability of far wakes behind rotors and vortex theory of ideal rotors....

  8. Mechanics of anisotropic spring networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Schwarz, J M; Das, Moumita

    2014-12-01

    We construct and analyze a model for a disordered linear spring network with anisotropy. The modeling is motivated by, for example, granular systems, nematic elastomers, and ultimately cytoskeletal networks exhibiting some underlying anisotropy. The model consists of a triangular lattice with two different bond occupation probabilities, p(x) and p(y), for the linear springs. We develop an effective medium theory (EMT) to describe the network elasticity as a function of p(x) and p(y). We find that the onset of rigidity in the EMT agrees with Maxwell constraint counting. We also find beyond linear behavior in the shear and bulk modulus as a function of occupation probability in the rigid phase for small strains, which differs from the isotropic case. We compare our EMT with numerical simulations to find rather good agreement. Finally, we discuss the implications of extending the reach of effective medium theory as well as draw connections with prior work on both anisotropic and isotropic spring networks.

  9. Thermal springs of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

  10. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  11. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  12. The helical tomotherapy thread effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, M.W.; Fenwick, J.; James, J.A.; Jeraj, R.; Kapatoes, J.M.; Keller, H.; Mackie, T.R.; Olivera, G.; Soisson, E.T.

    2005-01-01

    Inherent to helical tomotherapy is a dose variation pattern that manifests as a 'ripple' (peak-to-trough relative to the average). This ripple is the result of helical beam junctioning, completely unique to helical tomotherapy. Pitch is defined as in helical CT, the couch travel distance for a complete gantry rotation relative to the axial beam width at the axis of rotation. Without scattering or beam divergence, an analytical posing of the problem as a simple integral predicts minima near a pitch of 1/n where n is an integer. A convolution-superposition dose calculator (TomoTherapy, Inc.) included all the physics needed to explore the ripple magnitude versus pitch and beam width. The results of the dose calculator and some benchmark measurements demonstrate that the ripple has sharp minima near p=0.86(1/n). The 0.86 factor is empirical and caused by a beam junctioning of the off-axis dose profiles which differ from the axial profiles as well as a long scatter tail of the profiles at depth. For very strong intensity modulation, the 0.86 factor may vary. The authors propose choosing particular minima pitches or using a second delivery that starts 180 deg off-phase from the first to reduce these ripples: 'Double threading'. For current typical pitches and beam widths, however, this effect is small and not clinically important for most situations. Certain extremely large field or high pitch cases, however, may benefit from mitigation of this effect

  13. Computational Elastic Knots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Elastic rods have been studied intensively since the 18th century. Even now the theory of elastic rods is still developing and enjoying popularity in computer graphics and physical-based simulation. Elastic rods also draw attention from architects

  14. Instant Spring Tool Suite

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A tutorial guide that walks you through how to use the features of Spring Tool Suite using well defined sections for the different parts of Spring.Instant Spring Tool Suite is for novice to intermediate Java developers looking to get a head-start in enterprise application development using Spring Tool Suite and the Spring framework. If you are looking for a guide for effective application development using Spring Tool Suite, then this book is for you.

  15. Pressurizer safety valve serviceability enhancement by spring compression stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratiu, M.D.; Moisidis, N.T. [California Consulting Engineering and Technology (CALCET), San Leandro, California (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The proactive maintenance of the spring-loaded-self-actuated Pressurizer Safety Valve (PSV) has caused frequent concerns pertaining the spring self actuated reliability due to set point drift, spurious openings, and seat leakage. The exhaustive testing performed on a Crosby PSV model 6M6 has revealed that the principal cause of these malfunctions is the spring compression elastic instability during service. The spring lateral deformations measurements performed validated the analytical shapes for spring compression: symmetrical bending - for coaxial supported ends - restraining any support displacement, and asymmetrical bending induced by the potential misalignment of the supported top end. The source of the spring compression instability appears on the tested Crosby PSV induced by the top end lateral displacement during long term operation. The testing with restrained displacement at the spring top has shown consistent set-point reproducibility, less than +/- 1 per cent. To eliminate the asymmetrical spring buckling, a design review of the PSV is proposed including the guided fixture at the top and the decrease of spring coil slenderness ratio H/D, corresponding to the general analytical elastic stability for the asymmetrical compression. (authors)

  16. Pressurizer safety valve serviceability enhancement by spring compression stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratiu, M.D.; Moisidis, N.T.

    2007-01-01

    The proactive maintenance of the spring-loaded-self-actuated Pressurizer Safety Valve (PSV) has caused frequent concerns pertaining the spring self actuated reliability due to set point drift, spurious openings, and seat leakage. The exhaustive testing performed on a Crosby PSV model 6M6 has revealed that the principal cause of these malfunctions is the spring compression elastic instability during service. The spring lateral deformations measurements performed validated the analytical shapes for spring compression: symmetrical bending - for coaxial supported ends - restraining any support displacement, and asymmetrical bending induced by the potential misalignment of the supported top end. The source of the spring compression instability appears on the tested Crosby PSV induced by the top end lateral displacement during long term operation. The testing with restrained displacement at the spring top has shown consistent set-point reproducibility, less than +/- 1 per cent. To eliminate the asymmetrical spring buckling, a design review of the PSV is proposed including the guided fixture at the top and the decrease of spring coil slenderness ratio H/D, corresponding to the general analytical elastic stability for the asymmetrical compression. (authors)

  17. Helical wire stress analysis of unbonded flexible riser under irregular response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Ji, Chunyan

    2017-06-01

    A helical wire is a critical component of an unbonded flexible riser prone to fatigue failure. The helical wire has been the focus of much research work in recent years because of the complex multilayer construction of the flexible riser. The present study establishes an analytical model for the axisymmetric and bending analyses of an unbonded flexible riser. The interlayer contact under axisymmetric loads in this model is modeled by setting radial dummy springs between adjacent layers. The contact pressure is constant during the bending response and applied to determine the slipping friction force per unit helical wire. The model tracks the axial stress around the angular position at each time step to calculate the axial force gradient, then compares the axial force gradient with the slipping friction force to judge the helical wire slipping region, which would be applied to determine the bending stiffness for the next time step. The proposed model is verified against the experimental data in the literature. The bending moment-curvature relationship under irregular response is also qualitatively discussed. The stress at the critical point of the helical wire is investigated based on the model by considering the local flexure. The results indicate that the present model can well simulate the bending stiffness variation during irregular response, which has significant effect on the stress of helical wire.

  18. Generalized helicity and its time derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Marklin, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Spheromaks can be sustained against resistive decay by helicity injection because they tend to obey the minimum energy principle. This principle states that a plasma-laden magnetic configuration will relax to a state of minimum energy subject to the constraint that the magnetic helicity is conserved. Use of helicity as a constraint on the minimization of energy was first proposed by Woltjer in connection with astrophysical phenomena. Helicity does decay on the resistive diffusion time. However, if helicity is created and made to flow continuoiusly into a confinement geometry, these additional linked fluxes can relax and sustain the configuration indefinitely against the resistive decay. In this paper we will present an extension of the definition of helicity to include systems where B vector can penetrate the boundary and the penetration can be varying in time. We then discuss the sustainment of RFPs and spheromaks in terms of helicity injection

  19. Normal Spin Asymmetries in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Gorchtein; P.A.M. Guichon; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the two-photon exchange contribution to observables which involve lepton helicity flip in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. This contribution is accessed through the single spin asymmetry for a lepton beam polarized normal to the scattering plane. We estimate this beam normal spin asymmetry at large momentum transfer using a parton model and we express the corresponding amplitude in terms of generalized parton distributions. We further discuss this observable in the quasi-RCS kinematics which may be dominant at certain kinematical conditions and find it to be governed by the photon helicity-flip RCS amplitudes

  20. Normal Spin Asymmetries in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorchtein, M.; Guichon, P.A.M.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the two-photon exchange contribution to observables which involve lepton helicity flip in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. This contribution is accessed through the single spin asymmetry for a lepton beam polarized normal to the scattering plane. We estimate this beam normal spin asymmetry at large momentum transfer using a parton model and we express the corresponding amplitude in terms of generalized parton distributions. We further discuss this observable in the quasi-RCS kinematics which may be dominant at certain kinematical conditions and find it to be governed by the photon helicity-flip RCS amplitudes

  1. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  2. Helical CT of ureteral disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cikman, Pablo; Bengio, Ruben; Bulacio, Javier; Zirulnik, Esteban; Garimaldi, Jorge

    2000-01-01

    Among the new applications of helical CT is the study of the ureteral pathology. The objective of this paper was to evaluate patients with suspected pathology of this organ and the repercussion in the therapeutic plans. We studied 23 patients with a helical CT protocol, without IV contrast injection and performed multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). We called this procedure Pielo CT. Thirteen ureteral stones were detected, 6 calculi, 2 urinary tract tumors, dilatation of the system in a patient with neo-bladder. In 2 patients, in whom ureteral pathology was ruled out, we found other alterations that explained the symptoms, (gallbladder stones, disk protrusion). The Pielo CT let decide a therapeutical approach in 20 or 21 patients with ureteral pathology. (author)

  3. Helicity formalism and spin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Caruso, F.; Piovano, U.

    1990-01-01

    The helicity formalism and the technique to compute amplitudes for interaction processes involving leptons, quarks, photons and gluons are reviewed. Explicit calculations and examples of exploitation of symmetry properties are shown. The formalism is then applied to the discussion of several hadronic processes and spin effects: the experimental data, when related to the properties of the elementary constituent interactions, show many not understood features. Also the nucleon spin problem is briefly reviewed. (author)

  4. Radiation characteristics of helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, Robert; Mackie, Thomas R.; Balog, John; Olivera, Gustavo; Pearson, Dave; Kapatoes, Jeff; Ruchala, Ken; Reckwerdt, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a dedicated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) system with on-board imaging capability (MVCT) and therefore differs from conventional treatment units. Different design goals resulted in some distinctive radiation field characteristics. The most significant differences in the design are the lack of flattening filter, increased shielding of the collimators, treatment and imaging operation modes and narrow fan beam delivery. Radiation characteristics of the helical tomotherapy system, sensitivity studies of various incident electron beam parameters and radiation safety analyses are presented here. It was determined that the photon beam energy spectrum of helical tomotherapy is similar to that of more conventional radiation treatment units. The two operational modes of the system result in different nominal energies of the incident electron beam with approximately 6 MeV and 3.5 MeV in the treatment and imaging modes, respectively. The off-axis mean energy dependence is much lower than in conventional radiotherapy units with less than 5% variation across the field, which is the consequence of the absent flattening filter. For the same reason the transverse profile exhibits the characteristic conical shape resulting in a 2-fold increase of the beam intensity in the center. The radiation leakage outside the field was found to be negligible at less than 0.05% because of the increased shielding of the collimators. At this level the in-field scattering is a dominant source of the radiation outside the field and thus a narrow field treatment does not result in the increased leakage. The sensitivity studies showed increased sensitivity on the incident electron position because of the narrow fan beam delivery and high sensitivity on the incident electron energy, as common to other treatment systems. All in all, it was determined that helical tomotherapy is a system with some unique radiation characteristics, which have been to a large extent

  5. Pro Spring Batch

    CERN Document Server

    Minella, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Since its release, Spring Framework has transformed virtually every aspect of Java development including web applications, security, aspect-oriented programming, persistence, and messaging. Spring Batch, one of its newer additions, now brings the same familiar Spring idioms to batch processing. Spring Batch addresses the needs of any batch process, from the complex calculations performed in the biggest financial institutions to simple data migrations that occur with many software development projects. Pro Spring Batch is intended to answer three questions: *What? What is batch processing? What

  6. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  7. Computational Elastic Knots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-05-01

    Elastic rods have been studied intensively since the 18th century. Even now the theory of elastic rods is still developing and enjoying popularity in computer graphics and physical-based simulation. Elastic rods also draw attention from architects. Architectural structures, NODUS, were constructed by elastic rods as a new method of form-finding. We study discrete models of elastic rods and NODUS structures. We also develop computational tools to find the equilibria of elastic rods and the shape of NODUS. Applications of elastic rods in forming torus knot and closing Bishop frame are included in this thesis.

  8. Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedek, George [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Casparay, Alfred H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    In this project, we are developing a new system for measuring forces within and between nanoscale biological molecules based on mesoscopic springs made of cholesterol helical ribbons. These ribbons self-assemble in a wide variety of complex fluids containing sterol, a mixture of surfactants and water [1] and have spring constants in the range from 0.5 to 500 pN/nm [2-4]. By the end of this project, we have demonstrated that the cholesterol helical ribbons can be used for measuring forces between biological objects and for mapping the strain fields in hydrogels.

  9. Magnetic helicity and active filament configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Poedts, S.; Soenen, A.; Zuccarello, F. P.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The role of magnetic helicity in active filament formation and destabilization is still under debate. Aims: Although active filaments usually show a sigmoid shape and a twisted configuration before and during their eruption, it is unclear which mechanism leads to these topologies. In order to provide an observational contribution to clarify these issues, we describe a filament evolution whose characteristics seem to be directly linked to the magnetic helicity transport in corona. Methods: We applied different methods to determine the helicity sign and the chirality of the filament magnetic field. We also computed the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints. Results: All the observational signatures provided information on the positive helicity and sinistral chirality of the flux rope containing the filament material: its forward S shape, the orientation of its barbs, the bright and dark threads at 195 Å. Moreover, the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints showed a clear accumulation of positive helicity. Conclusions: The study of this event showed a correspondence between several signatures of the sinistral chirality of the filament and several evidences of the positive magnetic helicity of the filament magnetic field. We also found that the magnetic helicity transported along the filament footpoints showed an increase just before the change of the filament shape observed in Hα images. We argued that the photospheric regions where the filament was rooted might be the preferential ways where the magnetic helicity was injected along the filament itself and where the conditions to trigger the eruption were yielded.

  10. Development of top nozzle holddown spring for 17x17 next generation fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, H. K.; Lee, J. N.; Jeon, K. R.

    2002-01-01

    Two conceptual holddown spring designs were developed for 17x17 Next Generation Fuel(NGF) top nozzle. One spring pack concept uses three 0.175 inch thick leaves. The other uses four 0.155 inch thick leaves. The room temperature elastic-plastic properties of each spring pack are calculated using the elastic-plastic model derived from classic beam theory and the exiting spring characteristics test. The stress analysis and spring characteristics of each spring pack are also analyzed using FEM(ANSYS 5.7) to verify the elastic-plastic model. The results of the elastic-plastic model have a good agreement to the results of finite element analysis. It is concluded that the 3-leaf 0.175 inch spring pack concept and 4-leaf 0.155 inch spring pack concept are both viable candidates for 17x17 NGF. A series of load-deflection tests will be used to verify the elastic-plastic model and finite element model

  11. New formulae for magnetic relative helicity and field line helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-01

    We consider a magnetic field {B} occupying the simply connected domain D and having all its field lines tied to the boundary S of D. We assume here that {B} has a simple topology, i.e., the mapping {M} from positive to negative polarity areas of S associating to each other the two footpoints of any magnetic line, is continuous. We first present new formulae for the helicity H of {B} relative to a reference field {{B}}r having the same normal component {B}n on S, and for its field line helicity h relative to a reference vector potential {{C}}r of {{B}}r. These formulae make immediately apparent the well known invariance of these quantities under all the ideal MHD deformations that preserve the positions of the footpoints on S. They express indeed h and H either in terms of {M} and {B}n, or in terms of the values on S of a pair of Euler potentials of {B}. We next show that, for a specific choice of {{C}}r, the field line helicity h of {B} fully characterizes the magnetic mapping {M} and then the topology of the lines. Finally, we give a formula that describes the rate of change of h in a situation where the plasma moves on the perfectly conducting boundary S without changing {B}n and/or non-ideal processes, described by an unspecified term {N} in Ohm’s law, are at work in some parts of D.

  12. Spring 5 & reactive streams

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Clozel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Spring is a framework widely used by the world-wide Java community, and it is also extensively used at CERN. The accelerator control system is constituted of 10 million lines of Java code, spread across more than 1000 projects (jars) developed by 160 software engineers. Around half of this (all server-side Java code) is based on the Spring framework. Warning: the speakers will assume that people attending the seminar are familiar with Java and Spring’s basic concepts. Spring 5.0 and Spring Boot 2.0 updates (45 min) This talk will cover the big ticket items in the 5.0 release of Spring (including Kotlin support, @Nullable and JDK9) and provide an update on Spring Boot 2.0, which is scheduled for the end of the year. Reactive Spring (1h) Spring Framework 5.0 has been released - and it now supports reactive applications in the Spring ecosystem. During this presentation, we'll talk about the reactive foundations of Spring Framework with the Reactor project and the reactive streams specification. We'll al...

  13. Wave Propagation in Finite Element and Mass-Spring-Dashpot Lattice Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holt-Phoenix, Marianne S

    2006-01-01

    ...), and a mass-spring-dashpot lattice model (MSDLM) are investigated. Specifically, the error in the ultrasonic phase speed with variations in Poisson's ratio and angle of incidence is evaluated in each model of an isotropic elastic solid...

  14. Steady-state MreB helices inside bacteria: dynamics without motors

    OpenAIRE

    Allard, Jun F.; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    Within individual bacteria, we combine force-dependent polymerization dynamics of individual MreB protofilaments with an elastic model of protofilament bundles buckled into helical configurations. We use variational techniques and stochastic simulations to relate the pitch of the MreB helix, the total abundance of MreB, and the number of protofilaments. By comparing our simulations with mean-field calculations, we find that stochastic fluctuations are significant. We examine the quasi-static ...

  15. MHD stability analysis of helical system plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    Several topics of the MHD stability studies in helical system plasmas are reviewed with respect to the linear and ideal modes mainly. Difference of the method of the MHD stability analysis in helical system plasmas from that in tokamak plasmas is emphasized. Lack of the cyclic (symmetric) coordinate makes an analysis more difficult. Recent topic about TAE modes in a helical system is also described briefly. (author)

  16. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation in SCET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Nikhef, Amsterdam

    2016-05-01

    Helicity amplitudes are the fundamental ingredients of many QCD calculations for multi-leg processes. We describe how these can seamlessly be combined with resummation in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), by constructing a helicity operator basis for which the Wilson coefficients are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. This basis is crossing symmetric and has simple transformation properties under discrete symmetries.

  17. Spring integration essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for developers who are either already involved with enterprise integration or planning to venture into the domain. Basic knowledge of Java and Spring is expected. For newer users, this book can be used to understand an integration scenario, what the challenges are, and how Spring Integration can be used to solve it. Prior experience of Spring Integration is not expected as this book will walk you through all the code examples.

  18. Pro Spring Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Lui, M; Chan, Andy; Long, Josh

    2011-01-01

    Pro Spring Integration is an authoritative book from the experts that guides you through the vast world of enterprise application integration (EAI) and application of the Spring Integration framework towards solving integration problems. The book is:. * An introduction to the concepts of enterprise application integration * A reference on building event-driven applications using Spring Integration * A guide to solving common integration problems using Spring Integration What makes this book unique is its coverage of contemporary technologies and real-world information, with a focus on common p

  19. Coil spring venting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed

  20. Design and Vibration Suppression Control of a Modular Elastic Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel mechatronic design philosophy is introduced to develop a compact modular rotary elastic joint for a humanoid manipulator. The designed elastic joint is mainly composed of a brushless direct current (DC motor, harmonic reducer, customized torsional spring, and fail-safe brake. The customized spring considerably reduces the volume of the elastic joint and facilitates the construction of a humanoid manipulator which employs this joint. The large central hole along the joint axis brings convenience for cabling and the fail-safe brake can guarantee safety when the power is off. In order to reduce the computational burden on the central controller and simplify system maintenance, an expandable electrical system, which has a double-layer control structure, is introduced. Furthermore, a robust position controller for the elastic joint is proposed and interpreted in detail. Vibration of the elastic joint is suppressed by means of resonance ratio control (RRC. In this method, the ratio between the resonant and anti-resonant frequency can be arbitrarily designated according to the feedback of the nominal spring torsion. Instead of using an expensive torque sensor, the spring torque can be obtained by calculating the product of spring stiffness and deformation, due to the high linearity of the customized spring. In addition, to improve the system robustness, a motor-side disturbance observer (DOb and an arm-side DOb are employed to estimate and compensate for external disturbances and system uncertainties, such as model variation, friction, and unknown external load. Validity of the DOb-based RRC is demonstrated in the simulation results. Experimental results show the performance of the modular elastic joint and the viability of the proposed controller further.

  1. Bio-inspired device: a novel smart MR spring featuring tendril structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Park, Chun-Yong; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-01-01

    Smart materials such as piezoelectric patches, shape memory alloy, electro and magneto rheological fluid, magnetostrictive materials, etc are involved by far to design intelligent and high performance smart devices like injectors, dental braces, dampers, actuators and sensors. In this paper, an interesting smart device is proposed by inspiring on the structure of the bio climber plant. The key enabling concept of this proposed work is to design the smart spring damper as a helical shaped tendril structure using magneto-rheological (MR) fluid. The proposed smart spring consists of a hollow helical structure filled with MR fluid. The viscosity of the MR fluid decides the damping force of helical shaped smart spring, while the fluid intensity in the vine decides the strength of the tendril in the climber plant. Thus, the proposed smart spring can provide a new concept design of the damper which can be applicable to various damping system industries with tuneable damping force. The proposed smart spring damper has several advantageous such as cost effective, easy implementation compared with the conventional damper. In addition, the proposed spring damper can be easily designed to adapt different damping force levels without any alteration. (letter)

  2. Bio-inspired device: a novel smart MR spring featuring tendril structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Park, Chun-Yong; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-01-01

    Smart materials such as piezoelectric patches, shape memory alloy, electro and magneto rheological fluid, magnetostrictive materials, etc are involved by far to design intelligent and high performance smart devices like injectors, dental braces, dampers, actuators and sensors. In this paper, an interesting smart device is proposed by inspiring on the structure of the bio climber plant. The key enabling concept of this proposed work is to design the smart spring damper as a helical shaped tendril structure using magneto-rheological (MR) fluid. The proposed smart spring consists of a hollow helical structure filled with MR fluid. The viscosity of the MR fluid decides the damping force of helical shaped smart spring, while the fluid intensity in the vine decides the strength of the tendril in the climber plant. Thus, the proposed smart spring can provide a new concept design of the damper which can be applicable to various damping system industries with tuneable damping force. The proposed smart spring damper has several advantageous such as cost effective, easy implementation compared with the conventional damper. In addition, the proposed spring damper can be easily designed to adapt different damping force levels without any alteration.

  3. Elasticities for U.S. Wheat Food Use by Class

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    We conceptualize wheat for food use as an input into flour production and derive demand functions to quantify price responsiveness and economic substitutability across wheat classes. Cost, price, and substitution elasticities are estimated for hard red winter, hard red spring, soft red wheat, soft white winter, and durum wheat. In general, hard red winter and spring wheat varieties are much more responsive to their own price than are soft wheat varieties and durum wheat. Morishima elasticitie...

  4. Mockito for Spring

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    If you are an application developer with some experience in software testing and want to learn more about testing frameworks, then this technology and book is for you. Mockito for Spring will be perfect as your next step towards becoming a competent software tester with Spring and Mockito.

  5. Analytical Technique of Selection of Constructive Parameters Pneumatichydraulic Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tsipilev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article "Technique for Analytical Selection of Design Parameters of Pneumatichydraulic Springs concerns the ride smoothness of high-speed vehicles. Author of article Tsipilev A.A. is an assistant at chair "Multi-purpose Tracked Vehicles and Mobile Robots" of BMSTU. The article represents a synthesis of known information on the springing systems and an analysis of relation between spring design data and running gear. It describes standard units of running gear of vehicle in the context of springing systems. Classification of springing systems is considered. Modernization general policy for existing suspensions and prospects for creation of new ones are given. The article considers a design of various pneumatic-hydraulic springs to be set on domestic tracked vehicles. A developed technique allows us to have elastic characteristics of pneumatic-hydraulic springs of various types using these design data and kinematics of the running gear. The article provides recommendations to calculate characteristics of springing systems. The adequacy analysis of the given technique based on the comparison of real and rated characteristics of the existing suspension is conducted. This article can be useful to the experts dealing with springing systems of wheel and tracked vehicles.

  6. Beta-helical polymers from isocyanopeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Donners, J.J.J.M.; Gelder, de R.; Graswinckel, W.S.; Metselaar, G.A.; Rowan, A.E.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Polymerization of isocyanopeptides results in the formation of high molecular mass polymers that fold in a proteinlike fashion to give helical strands in which the peptide chains are arranged in ß-sheets. The ß-helical polymers retain their structure in water and unfold in a cooperative process at

  7. Magnetic islands created by resonant helical windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Heller, M.V.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-01-01

    The triggering of disruptive instabilities by resonant helical windings in large aspect-ratio tokamaks is associated to destruction of magnetic surfaces. The Chirikov condition is applied to estimate analytically the helical winding current thresholds for ergodization of the magnetic field lines. (Autor) [pt

  8. Helicity amplitudes for matter-coupled gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrovandi, R.; Novaes, S.F.; Spehler, D.

    1992-07-01

    The Weyl-van der Waerden spinor formalism is applied to the evaluation of helicity invariant amplitudes in the framework of linearized gravitation. The graviton couplings to spin-0, 1 - 2 , 1, and 3 - 2 particles are given, and, to exhibit the reach of this method, the helicity amplitudes for the process electron + positron → photon + graviton are obtained. (author)

  9. Stiffness versus architecture of single helical polyisocyanopeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, van A.M.; Schwartz, E.; Brocorens, P.; Koepf, M.; Beljonne, D.; Maan, J.C.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Kouwer, P.H.J.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Engelkamp, H.; Blank, K.; Rowan, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Helical structures play a vital role in nature, offering mechanical rigidity, chirality and structural definition to biological systems. Little is known about the influence of the helical architecture on the intrinsic properties of polymers. Here, we offer an insight into the nano architecture of

  10. Shape modification for decreasing the spring stiffness of double-plate nozzle type spacer grid spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. H.; Kang, H. S.; Song, K. N.; Yun, K. H.; Kim, H. K.

    2001-01-01

    Nozzle of the double-plated grid plays the role of the spirng to support a fuel rod as well as the coolant path in grid. The nozzle was known to be necessary to reduce the spring stiffness for supporting performance. In this study, the contact analysis between the fuel rod and the newly designed nozzle was performed by ABAQUS computer code to propose the preferable shape in term of spring performance. Two small cut at the upper and lower part of the nozzle appeared to have a minor effect in decreasing the nozzle stiffness. A long slot at the center of the nozzle was turned out not only to decrease the spring constant as desired but also to increase the elastic displacement

  11. Dynamics of zonal flows in helical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, H; Watanabe, T-H

    2005-03-25

    A theory for describing collisionless long-time behavior of zonal flows in helical systems is presented and its validity is verified by gyrokinetic-Vlasov simulation. It is shown that, under the influence of particles trapped in helical ripples, the response of zonal flows to a given source becomes weaker for lower radial wave numbers and deeper helical ripples while a high-level zonal-flow response, which is not affected by helical-ripple-trapped particles, can be maintained for a longer time by reducing their bounce-averaged radial drift velocity. This implies a possibility that helical configurations optimized for reducing neoclassical ripple transport can simultaneously enhance zonal flows which lower anomalous transport.

  12. High-Power Actuation from Molecular Photoswitches in Enantiomerically Paired Soft Springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aßhoff, Sarah J.; Lancia, Federico; Iamsaard, S.; Matt, B.D.; Kudernac, Tibor; Fletcher, Stephen P.; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Motion in plants often relies on dynamic helical systems as seen in coiling tendrils, spasmoneme springs, and the opening of chiral seedpods. Developing nanotechnology that would allow molecular-level phenomena to drive such movements in artificial systems remains a scientific challenge. Herein, we

  13. Helicity non-conserving form factor of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, E.; Furget, C.; Knox, S. [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)] [and others

    1994-04-01

    The study of the hadron structure in the high Q{sup 2} range contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the confinement of quarks and gluons. Among the numerous experimental candidates sensitive to these mechanisms, the helicity non-conserving form factor of the proton is a privileged observable since it is controlled by non-perturbative effects. The authors investigate here the feasibility of high Q{sup 2} measurements of this form factor by means of the recoil polarization method in the context of the CEBAF 8 GeV facility. For that purpose, they discuss the development of a high energy proton polarimeter, based on the H({rvec p},pp) elastic scattering, to be placed at the focal plane of a new hadron spectrometer. It is shown that this experimental method significantly improves the knowledge of the helicity non-conserving form factor of the proton up to 10 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}.

  14. Topology of helical fluid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    function for the topology of the streamline pattern in incompressible flows. On this basis, we perform a comprehensive study of the topology of the flow field generated by a helical vortex filament in an ideal fluid. The classical expression for the stream function obtained by Hardin (Hardin, J. C. 1982...... the zeroes of a single real function of one variable, and we show that three different flow topologies can occur, depending on a single dimensionless parameter. By including the self-induced velocity on the vortex filament by a localised induction approximation, the stream function is slightly modified...... and an extra parameter is introduced. In this setting two new flow topologies arise, but not more than two critical points occur for any combination of parameters....

  15. Helically coiled tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a heat exchanger such as a steam generator for a nuclear reactor, two or more bundles of helically coiled tubes are arranged in series with the tubes in each bundle integrally continuing through the tube bundles arranged in series therewith. Pitch values for the tubing in any pair of tube bundles, taken transverse to the path of the reactor coolant flow about the tubes, are selected as a ratio of two unequal integers to permit efficient operation of each tube bundle while maintaining the various tube bundles of the heat exchanger within a compact envelope. Preferably, the helix angle and tube pitch parallel to the path of coolant flow are constant for all tubes in a single bundle so that the tubes are of approximately the same length within each bundle

  16. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Keshav N., E-mail: keshav1001@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  17. Elastic scattering and quasi-elastic transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments are presented which it will be possible to carry out at GANIL on the elastic scattering of heavy ions: diffraction phenomena if the absorption is great, refraction phenomena if absorption is low. The determination of the optical parameters can be performed. The study of the quasi-elastic transfer reactions will make it possible to know the dynamics of the nuclear reactions, form exotic nuclei and study their energy excitation spectrum, and analyse the scattering and reaction cross sections [fr

  18. Evidence for Mixed Helicity in Erupting Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglach, K.; Wang, Y.-M.; Kliem, B.

    2009-09-01

    Erupting filaments are sometimes observed to undergo a rotation about the vertical direction as they rise. This rotation of the filament axis is generally interpreted as a conversion of twist into writhe in a kink-unstable magnetic flux rope. Consistent with this interpretation, the rotation is usually found to be clockwise (as viewed from above) if the post-eruption arcade has right-handed helicity, but counterclockwise if it has left-handed helicity. Here, we describe two non-active-region filament events recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in which the sense of rotation appears to be opposite to that expected from the helicity of the post-event arcade. Based on these observations, we suggest that the rotation of the filament axis is, in general, determined by the net helicity of the erupting system, and that the axially aligned core of the filament can have the opposite helicity sign to the surrounding field. In most cases, the surrounding field provides the main contribution to the net helicity. In the events reported here, however, the helicity associated with the filament "barbs" is opposite in sign to and dominates that of the overlying arcade.

  19. HEMISPHERIC HELICITY TREND FOR SOLAR CYCLE 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Juan; Zhang Mei

    2011-01-01

    Using vector magnetograms obtained with the Spectro-polarimeter (SP) on board Hinode satellite, we studied two helicity parameters (local twist and current helicity) of 64 active regions that occurred in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. Our analysis gives the following results. (1) The 34 active regions of the solar cycle 24 follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule, whereas the 30 active regions of the solar cycle 23 do not. (2) When combining all 64 active regions as one sample, they follow the hemispheric helicity sign rule as in most other observations. (3) Despite the so-far most accurate measurement of vector magnetic field given by SP/Hinode, the rule is still weak with large scatters. (4) The data show evidence of different helicity signs between strong and weak fields, confirming previous result from a large sample of ground-based observations. (5) With two example sunspots we show that the helicity parameters change sign from the inner umbra to the outer penumbra, where the sign of penumbra agrees with the sign of the active region as a whole. From these results, we speculate that both the Σ-effect (turbulent convection) and the dynamo have contributed in the generation of helicity, whereas in both cases turbulence in the convection zone has played a significant role.

  20. Learning Spring application development

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Ravi Kant

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for those who are interested in learning the core features of the Spring Framework. Prior knowledge of Java programming and web development concepts with basic XML knowledge is expected.

  1. Cyanobacteria in ambient springs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cantonati, M.; Komárek, Jiří; Montejano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 4 (2015), s. 865-888 ISSN 0960-3115 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Springs * Cyanoprokaryotes * Radiation * Nitrogen Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.258, year: 2015

  2. Spring Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Spring Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1968 and covered an area from Cape Hatteras, NC, to Nova Scotia, Canada, at depths >27m....

  3. Numerical investigation of elastic mechanical properties of graphene structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgantzinos, S.K.; Giannopoulos, G.I.; Anifantis, N.K.

    2010-01-01

    The computation of the elastic mechanical properties of graphene sheets, nanoribbons and graphite flakes using spring based finite element models is the aim of this paper. Interatomic bonded interactions as well as van der Waals forces between carbon atoms are simulated via the use of appropriate spring elements expressing corresponding potential energies provided by molecular theory. Each layer is idealized as a spring-like structure with carbon atoms represented by nodes while interatomic forces are simulated by translational and torsional springs with linear behavior. The non-bonded van der Waals interactions among atoms which are responsible for keeping the graphene layers together are simulated with the Lennard-Jones potential using appropriate spring elements. Numerical results concerning the Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio for graphene structures are derived in terms of their chilarity, width, length and number of layers. The numerical results from finite element simulations show good agreement with existing numerical values in the open literature.

  4. Polymorphic transformation of helical flagella of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sookkyung; Howard Berg Collaboration; William Ko Collaboration; Yongsam Kim Collaboration; Wanho Lee Collaboration; Charles Peskin Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as E. coli swim in an aqueous environment by utilizing the rotation of flagellar motors and alternate two modes of motility, runs and tumbles. Runs are steady forward swimming driven by bundles of flagellar filaments whose motors are turning CCW; tumbles involve a reorientation of the direction of swimming triggered by motor reversals. During tumbling, the helical flagellum undergoes polymorphic transformations, which is a local change in helical pitch, helical radius, and handedness. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of structural conformation and how this polymorphic transition plays a role in bacterial swimming. National Science Foundation.

  5. Modelling simple helically delivered dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kissick, Michael W; Mackie, T Rock

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we described quality assurance procedures for Hi-Art helical tomotherapy machines. Here, we develop further some ideas discussed briefly in that paper. Simple helically generated dose distributions are modelled, and relationships between these dose distributions and underlying characteristics of Hi-Art treatment systems are elucidated. In particular, we describe the dependence of dose levels along the central axis of a cylinder aligned coaxially with a Hi-Art machine on fan beam width, couch velocity and helical delivery lengths. The impact on these dose levels of angular variations in gantry speed or output per linear accelerator pulse is also explored

  6. Masters of the springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    flanked by villages that relied on these water recourses for agricultural production. The springs emerged in the zone separating the cemeteries from the settlements. The freshwater springs were actively incorporated into the religious landscape of the dead, by consistently erecting mounds of a particular...... for water - a process which perhaps also is evidenced by temple constructions at Barbar, Umm al-Sujur and Abu Zaydan....

  7. Plasmoid behavior in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, R.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is well known that an ablation cloud; a high density and low temperature plasmoid, drifts to the lower field side in tokamak plasmas, which leads to a good performance on fueling in tokamak. Such a good performance, however, has not been obtained yet in the planar axis heliotron; Large Helical Device (LHD) experiments, even if a pellet has been injected from the high field side. The purpose of the study is to clarify the difference on the plasmoid motion between tokamak and LHD plasmas by using the MHD simulation including ablation processes. It is found in tokamaks that the drift motion is induced by a tire tube force and 1/R force in the major radius direction, and that the pressure and density of the plasmoid have oscillation due to fast compressional Alfven wave. On the other hand, the upper and lower portions surrounding the plasmoid center drift to the higher field side, because 1/R force by magnetic field becomes negative in the major radius direction since the magnetic field surrounding the plasmoid is accumulated by the extremely large ablation pressure and the magnetic pressure perturbation becomes positive. It is also found that the plasmoid does not drift when the perturbation of the plasmoid is small. In addition, the motion of the plasmoid is investigated in LHD plasmas in four cases that the plasmoids are initially located at the inner and outer sides of the torus on the vertically and horizontally elongated poloidal cross sections. The plasmoids drift to the lower field sides in all cases. However, in the case that it is located at the inner side of the torus on the horizontally elongated poloidal cross section, it is found that the plasmoid drifts in the negative direction of the major radius and subsequently drifts in the positive direction of it. In other words, the plasmoid finally drifts in the positive direction of the major radius the same as the plasmoid located at the outer side of the torus. This fact might be one of the

  8. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  9. Measurement of the parity violation in quasi-elastic electroweak electron-scattering from 9Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achenbach, W.; Andresen, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of the Parity Violation in Quasi-Elastic Electroweak Electron-Scattering from 9 Be in the energy range of about 300 MeV is fulfilled. The measurement of the parity violating asymmetry is obtained by a comparison of scattering for a + helicity beam to that for a - helicity beams. To permit a meaningful comparison required that the + helicity and the - helicity beams being identical in all other respects. Measurements at different energies and targets (hydrogen, deuterium) in the medium energy region will allow to determine α, β, γ, δ in a model-independent way. Regarding future experiments at the Mainz microtron cw accelerator, coincidence experiments will open new experimental possibilities for large solid angle detector systems

  10. Helical Piezoelectric Energy Harvester and Its Application to Energy Harvesting Garments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsung Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a helical piezoelectric energy harvester, examine its application to clothes in the form of an energy harvesting garment, and analyze its design and characteristics. The helical harvester is composed of an elastic core and a polymer piezoelectric strap twining the core. The fabricated harvester is highly elastic and can be stretched up to 158% of its initial length. Following the experiments using three different designs, the maximum output power is measured as 1.42 mW at a 3 MΩ load resistance and 1 Hz motional frequency. The proposed helical harvesters are applied at four positions of stretchable tight-fitting sportswear, namely shoulder, arm joint, knee, and hip. The maximum output voltage is measured as more than 20 V from the harvester at the knee position during intended body motions. In addition, electric power is also generated from this energy harvesting garment during daily human motions, which is about 3.9 V at the elbow, 3.1 V at the knee, and 4.4 V at the knee during push-up, walking, and squatting motions, respectively.

  11. Helicity and Filament Channels? The Straight Twist!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and most puzzling features of the coronal magnetic field is that it appears to have smooth magnetic structure with little evidence for non-potentiality except at special locations, photospheric polarity inversions lines where the non-potentiality is observed as a filament channel. This characteristic feature of the closed-field corona is highly unexpected given that photospheric motions continuously tangle its magnetic field. Although reconnection can eliminate some of the injected structure, it cannot destroy the helicity, which should build up to produce observable complexity. We propose that an inverse cascade process transports the injected helicity from the interior of closed flux regions to their boundaries, polarity inversion lines, creating filament channels. We describe how the helicity is injected and transported and calculate the relevant rates. We argue that one process, helicity transport, can explain both the observed lack and presence of structure in the coronal magnetic field.

  12. Spin versus helicity in processes involving transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We construct the spin formalism in order to deal in a direct and natural way with processes involving transversity which are now of increasing popularity. The helicity formalism which is more appropriate for collision processes of definite helicity has been so far used also to manage processes with transversity, but at the price of computing numerous helicity amplitudes generally involving unnecessary kinematical variables.In a second step we work out the correspondence between both formalisms and retrieve in another way all results of the helicity formalism but in simpler forms.We then compute certain processes for comparison.A special process:the quark dipole magnetic moment is shown to be exclusively treated within the spin formalism as it is directly related to the transverse spin of the quark inside the baryon.

  13. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Park, S.Y.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude

  14. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  15. Using helical compressors for coke gas condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privalov, V E; Rezunenko, Yu I; Lelyanov, N V; Zarnitzkii, G Eh; Gordienko, A A; Derebenko, I F; Venzhega, A G; Leonov, N P; Gorokhov, N N

    1982-08-01

    Coke oven gas compression is discussed. Presently used multilevel piston compressors are criticized. The paper recommends using helical machines which combine advantages of using volume condensing compressors and compact high-efficiency centrifugal machines. Two kinds of helical compressors are evaluated: dry and oil-filled; their productivities and coke oven gas chemical composition are analyzed. Experiments using helical compressors were undertaken at the Yasinovskii plant. Flowsheet of the installation is shown. Performance results are given in a table. For all operating conditions content of insolubles in oil compounds is found to be lower than the acceptable value (0.08%). Compressor productivity measurements with variable manifold pressure are evaluated. Figures obtained show that efficient condensation of raw coke oven gas is possible. Increasing oil-filled compressor productivity is recommended by decreasing amount of oil injected and simultaneously increasing rotation speed. The dry helical compressor with water seal is found to be most promising for raw coke oven gas condensation. (10 refs.)

  16. Topology Counts: Force Distributions in Circular Spring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Knut M.; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O.; Sharma, Abhinav; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wardetzky, Max

    2018-02-01

    Filamentous polymer networks govern the mechanical properties of many biological materials. Force distributions within these networks are typically highly inhomogeneous, and, although the importance of force distributions for structural properties is well recognized, they are far from being understood quantitatively. Using a combination of probabilistic and graph-theoretical techniques, we derive force distributions in a model system consisting of ensembles of random linear spring networks on a circle. We show that characteristic quantities, such as the mean and variance of the force supported by individual springs, can be derived explicitly in terms of only two parameters: (i) average connectivity and (ii) number of nodes. Our analysis shows that a classical mean-field approach fails to capture these characteristic quantities correctly. In contrast, we demonstrate that network topology is a crucial determinant of force distributions in an elastic spring network. Our results for 1D linear spring networks readily generalize to arbitrary dimensions.

  17. Topology Counts: Force Distributions in Circular Spring Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Knut M; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O; Sharma, Abhinav; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F; Wardetzky, Max

    2018-02-09

    Filamentous polymer networks govern the mechanical properties of many biological materials. Force distributions within these networks are typically highly inhomogeneous, and, although the importance of force distributions for structural properties is well recognized, they are far from being understood quantitatively. Using a combination of probabilistic and graph-theoretical techniques, we derive force distributions in a model system consisting of ensembles of random linear spring networks on a circle. We show that characteristic quantities, such as the mean and variance of the force supported by individual springs, can be derived explicitly in terms of only two parameters: (i) average connectivity and (ii) number of nodes. Our analysis shows that a classical mean-field approach fails to capture these characteristic quantities correctly. In contrast, we demonstrate that network topology is a crucial determinant of force distributions in an elastic spring network. Our results for 1D linear spring networks readily generalize to arbitrary dimensions.

  18. Helicity evolution at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g 1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of α s ln 2  (1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of α s ln (1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation effects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-N c and large-N c   N f limits. As a cross-check, in the ladder approximation, our equations map onto the same ladder limit of the infrared evolution equations for the g 1 structure function derived previously by Bartels, Ermolaev and Ryskin http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002880050285.

  19. Dynamics of helicity transport and Taylor relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Malkov, M.

    2003-01-01

    A simple model of the dynamics of Taylor relaxation is derived using symmetry principles alone. No statistical closure approximations are invoked or detailed plasma model properties assumed. Notably, the model predicts several classes of nondiffusive helicity transport phenomena, including traveling nonlinear waves and superdiffusive turbulent pulses. A universal expression for the scaling of the effective magnetic Reynolds number of a system undergoing Taylor relaxation is derived. Some basic properties of intermittency in helicity transport are examined

  20. Multiple helical modes of vortex breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery

    2011-01-01

    Experimental observations of vortex breakdown in a rotating lid-driven cavity are presented. The results show that vortex breakdown for cavities with high aspect ratios is associated with the appearance of stable helical vortex multiplets. By using results from stability theory generalizing Kelvi......’s problem on vortex polygon stability, and systematically exploring the cavity flow, we succeeded in identifying two new stable vortex breakdown states consisting of triple and quadruple helical multiplets....

  1. Modeling of a light elastic beam by a system of rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šalinić Slaviša

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has shown that a light elastic beam, in the case of small elastic deformations, can be modeled by a kinematic chain without branching composed of rigid bodies which are connected by passive revolute or prismatic joints with corresponding springs in them. Elastic properties of the beam are modeled by the springs introduced. The potential energy of the elastic beam is expressed as a function of components of the vector of elastic displacement and the vector of elastic rotation calculated for the elastic centre of the beam, which results in the diagonal stiffness matrix of the beam. As the potential energy of the introduced system of bodies with springs is expressed in the function of relative joint displacements, the diagonal stiffness matrix is obtained. In addition, these two stiffness matrices are equal. The modeling process has been demonstrated on the example of an elastic beam rotating about a fixed vertical axis, with a rigid body whose mass is considerably larger than the beam mass fixed to its free end. Differential equations of motion have been formed for this mechanical system. The modeling technique described here aims at expanding of usage of well developed methods of dynamics of systems of rigid bodies to the analysis of systems with elastic bodies. .

  2. On the helicity of open magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We reconsider the topological interpretation of magnetic helicity for magnetic fields in open domains, and relate this to the relative helicity. Specifically, our domains stretch between two parallel planes, and each of these ends may be magnetically open. It is demonstrated that, while the magnetic helicity is gauge-dependent, its value in any gauge may be physically interpreted as the average winding number among all pairs of field lines with respect to some orthonormal frame field. In fact, the choice of gauge is equivalent to the choice of reference field in the relative helicity, meaning that the magnetic helicity is no less physically meaningful. We prove that a particular gauge always measures the winding with respect to a fixed frame, and propose that this is normally the best choice. For periodic fields, this choice is equivalent to measuring relative helicity with respect to a potential reference field. However, for aperiodic fields, we show that the potential field can be twisted. We prove by construction that there always exists a possible untwisted reference field.

  3. Diffusion in a tokamak with helical magnetic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, Masahiro

    1975-05-01

    In a tokamak with helical magnetic cells produced by a resonant helical magnetic field, diffusion in the collisional regime is studied. The diffusion coefficient is greatly enhanced near the resonant surface even for a weak helical magnetic field. A theoretical model for disruptive instabilities based on the enhanced transport due to helical magnetic cells is discussed. This may explain experiments of the tokamak with resonant helical fields qualitatively. (author)

  4. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications and want to sharpen your understanding of the core elements and applications, this is the book for you. It is assumed that you've got working knowledge of JSON and, if you want to extend ElasticSearch, of Java and related technologies.

  5. Elasticity theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saada, Adel S; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    2013-01-01

    Elasticity: Theory and Applications reviews the theory and applications of elasticity. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is concerned with the kinematics of continuous media; the second part focuses on the analysis of stress; and the third part considers the theory of elasticity and its applications to engineering problems. This book consists of 18 chapters; the first of which deals with the kinematics of continuous media. The basic definitions and the operations of matrix algebra are presented in the next chapter, followed by a discussion on the linear transformation of points. The study of finite and linear strains gradually introduces the reader to the tensor concept. Orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are examined in detail, along with the similarities between stress and strain. The chapters that follow cover torsion; the three-dimensional theory of linear elasticity and the requirements for the solution of elasticity problems; the method of potentials; and topics related to cylinders, ...

  6. Steady-state helices of the actin homolog MreB inside bacteria: Dynamics without motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Jun F.; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2007-09-01

    Within individual bacteria, we combine force-dependent polymerization dynamics of individual MreB protofilaments with an elastic model of protofilament bundles buckled into helical configurations. We use variational techniques and stochastic simulations to relate the pitch of the MreB helix, the total abundance of MreB, and the number of protofilaments. By comparing our simulations with mean-field calculations, we find that stochastic fluctuations are significant. We examine the quasistatic evolution of the helical pitch with cell growth, as well as time scales of helix turnover and de novo establishment. We find that while the body of a polarized MreB helix treadmills toward its slow-growing end, the fast-growing tips of laterally associated protofilaments move toward the opposite fast-growing end of the MreB helix. This offers a possible mechanism for targeted polar localization without cytoplasmic motor proteins.

  7. Pro Spring security

    CERN Document Server

    Scarioni, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Security is a key element in the development of any non-trivial application. The Spring Security Framework provides a comprehensive set of functionalities to implement industry-standard authentication and authorization mechanisms for Java applications. Pro Spring Security will be a reference and advanced tutorial that will do the following: Guides you through the implementation of the security features for a Java web application by presenting consistent examples built from the ground-up. Demonstrates the different authentication and authorization methods to secure enterprise-level applications

  8. Instant Spring security starter

    CERN Document Server

    Jagielski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A concise guide written in an easy-to-follow format following the Starter guide approach.This book is for people who have not used Spring Security before and want to learn how to use it effectively in a short amount of time. It is assumed that readers know both Java and HTTP protocol at the level of basic web programming. The reader should also be familiar with Inversion-of-Control/Dependency Injection, preferably with the Spring framework itsel

  9. Non-integrability of the generalized spring-pendulum problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J; Przybylska, Maria; Weil, Jacques-Arthur

    2004-01-01

    We investigate a generalization of the three-dimensional spring-pendulum system. The problem depends on two real parameters (k, a), where k is the Young modulus of the spring and a describes the nonlinearity of elastic forces. We show that this system is not integrable when k ≠ -a. We carefully investigated the case k = -a when the necessary condition for integrability given by the Morales-Ruiz-Ramis theory is satisfied. We discuss an application of the higher order variational equations for proving the non-integrability in this case

  10. Mercury content in Hot Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, R

    1974-01-01

    A method of determination of mercury in hot spring waters by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Further, the mercury content and the chemical behavior of the elementary mercury in hot springs are described. Sulfide and iodide ions interfered with the determination of mercury by the reduction-vapor phase technique. These interferences could, however, be minimized by the addition of potassium permanganate. Waters collected from 55 hot springs were found to contain up to 26.0 ppb mercury. High concentrations of mercury have been found in waters from Shimoburo Springs, Aomori (10.0 ppb), Osorezan Springs, Aomori (1.3 approximately 18.8 ppb), Gosyogake Springs, Akita (26.0 ppb), Manza Springs, Gunma (0.30 approximately 19.5 ppb) and Kusatu Springs, Gunma (1.70 approximately 4.50 ppb). These hot springs were acid waters containing a relatively high quantity of chloride or sulfate.

  11. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  12. Spring batch essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, P Raja Malleswara

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Java developer with basic knowledge of Spring and some experience in the development of enterprise applications, and want to learn about batch application development in detail, then this book is ideal for you. This book will be perfect as your next step towards building simple yet powerful batch applications on a Java-based platform.

  13. Dynamic helical CT mammography of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Fukushima, Hitoshi; Okamura, Ryuji; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Urata, Yoji; Mukaihara, Sumio; Hayakawa, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dynamic helical computed tomography (CT)-mammography could assist in selecting the most appropriate surgical method in women with breast cancer. Preoperative contrast-enhanced helical CT scanning of the breast was performed on 133 female patients with suspicion of breast cancer at the same time as clinical, mammographic, and/or ultrasonographic examinations. The patients were scanned in the prone position with a specially designed CT-compatible device. A helical scan was made with rapid intravenous bolus injection (3 ml/s) of 100 ml of iodine contrast material. Three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed, and CT findings were correlated with surgical and histopathological findings. Histopathological analysis revealed 84 malignant lesions and seven benign lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy levels of the CT scanning were 94.6%, 58.6%, and 78.9%. Helical scanning alone revealed additional contralateral carcinomas in three of four patients and additional ipsilateral carcinomas in three of five patients. However, the technique gave false-positive readings in 24 patients. The preoperative CT-mammogram altered the surgical method in six patients. Dynamic helical CT-mammography in the prone position may be one of the choices of adjunct imaging in patients with suspected breast cancer scheduled for surgery. (author)

  14. Introduction to the m = 1 helicity source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platts, D.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Wright, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The m = 1 Helicity Source, formerly called the Kinked Z-pinch, was developed as part of the Electrode Studies program at Los Alamos. The Electrode Studies program was initiated to study the control of electrode erosion in long discharge duration spheromak sources. Erosion control is necessary to reduce plasma impurities and to obtain adequate electrode lifetimes. The first task of the Electrode Studies program is to determine, from among a variety of configurations including the coaxial one, a helicity source geometry with good prospects for erosion control. The more efficient the helicity source the easier it will be to control erosion, but the source most also be easy to diagnose and modify if it is to be a useful test bed. The various erosion control techniques which have been proposed will require extensive experimentation to evaluate and optimize. Proposed techniques include, using refractory metals, profiling of the electrodes and magnetic fields, and various gas injection schemes including porous electrodes. It is considered necessary to do these experiments on an optimized helicity source so that the electrode geometries and plasma properties will be relevant. Therefore the present Electrode Studies program is aimed at developing an improved helicity source design

  15. Elastic coupling of limb joints enables faster bipedal walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J.C.; Kuo, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The passive dynamics of bipedal limbs alone are sufficient to produce a walking motion, without need for control. Humans augment these dynamics with muscles, actively coordinated to produce stable and economical walking. Present robots using passive dynamics walk much slower, perhaps because they lack elastic muscles that couple the joints. Elastic properties are well known to enhance running gaits, but their effect on walking has yet to be explored. Here we use a computational model of dynamic walking to show that elastic joint coupling can help to coordinate faster walking. In walking powered by trailing leg push-off, the model's speed is normally limited by a swing leg that moves too slowly to avoid stumbling. A uni-articular spring about the knee allows faster but uneconomical walking. A combination of uni-articular hip and knee springs can speed the legs for improved speed and economy, but not without the swing foot scuffing the ground. Bi-articular springs coupling the hips and knees can yield high economy and good ground clearance similar to humans. An important parameter is the knee-to-hip moment arm that greatly affects the existence and stability of gaits, and when selected appropriately can allow for a wide range of speeds. Elastic joint coupling may contribute to the economy and stability of human gait. PMID:18957360

  16. Numerical Analysis of Small Deformation of Flexible Helical Flagellum of Swimming Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yasunari; Goto, Tomonobu

    Formulations are conducted to numerically analyze the effect of flexible flagellum of swimming bacteria. In the present model, a single-flagellate bacterium is assumed to consist of a rigid cell body of the prolate spheroidal shape and a flexible flagellum of the helical form. The resistive force theory is applied to estimate the force exerted on the flagellum. The torsional as well as the bending moments determine the curvature and the torsion of the deformed flagellum according to the Kirchhoff model for an elastic rod. The unit tangential vector along the deformed flagellum is calculated by applying evolution equations for space curves, and also a deformed shape of the flagellum is obtained.

  17. Clinical application of helical CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Huiliang; Zhu Xinjin; Liang Rujian; Liang Jianhao; Ou Weiqian; Wen Haomao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of 16-slice helical CT colonography in the diagnosis of colon tumor and polypus. Methods: 16-slice helical CT volumetric scanning was performed in 18 patients with colonic disease, including colonic tumor (n=16) and colonic polypus (n=2). 3D images, virtual endoscopy and multiplanar reformation were obtained in the AW4.1 workstation. CT appearances were compared with operation and fiberoptic colonoscopy. Results: Satisfied results were achieved from 18 patients, no difference found in results between CT colonography and operation in 16 patients with colonic tumor. Conclusion: 16-slice helical CT colonography is of great value in preoperative staging of colonic tumor and have a high value in clinical application. (authors)

  18. Helicity antenna showers for hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nadine; Skands, Peter [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Lifson, Andrew [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton, VIC (Australia); ETH Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    We present a complete set of helicity-dependent 2 → 3 antenna functions for QCD initial- and final-state radiation. The functions are implemented in the Vincia shower Monte Carlo framework and are used to generate showers for hadron-collider processes in which helicities are explicitly sampled (and conserved) at each step of the evolution. Although not capturing the full effects of spin correlations, the explicit helicity sampling does permit a significantly faster evaluation of fixed-order matrix-element corrections. A further speed increase is achieved via the implementation of a new fast library of analytical MHV amplitudes, while matrix elements from Madgraph are used for non-MHV configurations. A few examples of applications to QCD 2 → 2 processes are given, comparing the newly released Vincia 2.200 to Pythia 8.226. (orig.)

  19. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-08

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range.

  20. Helicity antenna showers for hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Lifson, Andrew; Skands, Peter

    2017-10-01

    We present a complete set of helicity-dependent 2→ 3 antenna functions for QCD initial- and final-state radiation. The functions are implemented in the Vincia shower Monte Carlo framework and are used to generate showers for hadron-collider processes in which helicities are explicitly sampled (and conserved) at each step of the evolution. Although not capturing the full effects of spin correlations, the explicit helicity sampling does permit a significantly faster evaluation of fixed-order matrix-element corrections. A further speed increase is achieved via the implementation of a new fast library of analytical MHV amplitudes, while matrix elements from Madgraph are used for non-MHV configurations. A few examples of applications to QCD 2→ 2 processes are given, comparing the newly released Vincia 2.200 to Pythia 8.226.

  1. Neutrino's helicity in a gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pansart, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    By using approximated solutions of Dirac's equation, we show that there is no helicity reversal for light neutrinos in the Schwarzschild metric nor in an expanding universe. The actual coupling between a particle spin and the angular momentum of a heavy rotating body induces a possible helicity reversal but with an unobservable probability proportional to m 2 p / E 2 , where m p is the particle mass and E its energy. In these calculations, the helicity is defined through the spin orientation with respect to the current and not with respect to the linear momentum. This definition gives simple expressions and is equal to the usual definition in the case of a flat space. (N.T.)

  2. Single-superfield helical-phase inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketov, Sergei V., E-mail: ketov@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-ohsawa 1-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Terada, Takahiro, E-mail: takahiro@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-10

    Large-field inflation in supergravity requires the approximate global symmetry needed to protect flatness of the scalar potential. In helical-phase inflation, the U(1) symmetry of the Kähler potential is assumed, the phase part of the complex scalar of a chiral superfield plays the role of inflaton, and the radial part is strongly stabilized. The original model of helical phase inflation, proposed by Li, Li and Nanopoulos (LLN), employs an extra (stabilizer) superfield. We propose a more economical new class of the helical phase inflationary models without a stabilizer superfield. As the specific examples, the quadratic, the natural, and the Starobinsky-type inflationary models are studied in our approach.

  3. Resonant helical fields in the TBR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, O.W.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of external resonant helical fields (RHF) in the tokamak TBR plasma discharges was investigated. These fields were created by helical windings wounded on the TBR vessel with the same helicity of rational magnetic surfaces, producing resonant efects on these surfaces. The characteristics of the MHZ activity (amplitude, frequency and poloidal and toroidal wave numbers, m=2,3,4 and n=1, respectively) during the plasma discharges were modified by eletrical winding currents of the order of 2% of the plasma current. These characterisitics were measured for diferent discharges safety factors at the limiter (q) between 3 and 4, with and without the RHF, with the atenuation of the oscillation amplitudes and the increasing of their frequencies. The existente of expontaneous and induced magnetic islands were investigated. The data were compared with results obtained in other tokamaks. (author) [pt

  4. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Otto G; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction–diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general. (paper)

  5. Statistical mechanics of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, JH

    2012-01-01

    Advanced, self-contained treatment illustrates general principles and elastic behavior of solids. Topics include thermoelastic behavior of crystalline and polymeric solids, interatomic force laws, behavior of solids, and thermally activated processes. 1983 edition.

  6. Elasticity of energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stam, M.

    2004-01-01

    Insight is given into the price elasticities of several energy carriers. Next, attention is paid to the impact of the discussion on changes of the Regulating Energy Levy (REB, abbreviated in Dutch) in the Netherlands [nl

  7. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  8. Turbulent Helicity in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhetiani, Otto G.; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Vazaeva, Natalia V.

    2018-05-01

    We consider the assumption postulated by Deusebio and Lindborg (J Fluid Mech 755:654-671, 2014) that the helicity injected into the Ekman boundary layer undergoes a cascade, with preservation of its sign (right- or alternatively left-handedness), which is a signature of the system rotation, from large to small scales, down to the Kolmogorov microscale of turbulence. At the same time, recent direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in the steppe region of southern Russia near Tsimlyansk Reservoir show the opposite sign of helicity from that expected. A possible explanation for this phenomenon may be the joint action of different scales of atmospheric flows within the boundary layer, including the sea-breeze circulation over the test site. In this regard, we consider a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and Prandtl's jet-like slope-wind profile to describe the planetary boundary-layer wind structure. The latter solution mimics a hydrostatic shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated surface. A 180°-wide sector on the hodograph plane exists, within which the relative orientation of the Ekman and Prandtl velocity profiles favours the left rotation with height of the resulting wind velocity vector in the lowermost part of the boundary layer. This explains the negative (left-handed) helicity cascade toward small-scale turbulent motions, which agrees with the direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in Tsimlyansk. A simple turbulent relaxation model is proposed that explains the measured positive values of the relatively minor contribution to turbulent helicity from the vertical components of velocity and vorticity.

  9. Mastering ElasticSearch

    CERN Document Server

    Kuc, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    A practical tutorial that covers the difficult design, implementation, and management of search solutions.Mastering ElasticSearch is aimed at to intermediate users who want to extend their knowledge about ElasticSearch. The topics that are described in the book are detailed, but we assume that you already know the basics, like the query DSL or data indexing. Advanced users will also find this book useful, as the examples are getting deep into the internals where it is needed.

  10. Elastic characteristics and microplastic deformation of amorphous alloys on iron base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pol'dyaeva, G.P.; Zakharov, E.K.; Ovcharov, V.P.; Tret'yakov, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation results of elasticity and microplasticity properties (modulus of normal elasticity E, elasticity limit σsub(0.01) and yield limit σsub(0.2)) of three amorphous alloys on iron base Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 70 Cr 10 B 20 and Fe 70 Cr 5 Ni 5 B 20 are given. Amorphous band of the alloys is obtained using the method of melt hardening. It is shown that amorphous alloys on iron base possess high elasticity and yield limits and hardness and are very perspective for the use as spring materials

  11. Elastic characteristics and microplastic deformation of amorphous alloys on iron base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol' dyaeva, G.P.; Zakharov, E.K.; Ovcharov, V.P.; Tret' yakov, B.N. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii, Moscow (USSR))

    1983-01-01

    Investigation results of elasticity and microplasticity properties (modulus of normal elasticity E, elasticity limit sigmasub(0.01) and yield limit sigmasub(0.2)) of three amorphous alloys on iron base Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/, Fe/sub 70/Cr/sub 10/B/sub 20/ and Fe/sub 70/Cr/sub 5/Ni/sub 5/B/sub 20/ are given. Amorphous band of the alloys is obtained using the method of melt hardening. It is shown that amorphous alloys on iron base possess high elasticity and yield limits and hardness and are very perspective for the use as spring materials.

  12. Nonideal, helical, vortical magnetohydrodynamic steady states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agim, Y.Z.; Montgomery, D.

    1991-01-01

    The helically-deformed profiles of driven, dissipative magnetohydrodynamic equilibria are constructed through second order in helical amplitude. The resultant plasma configurations are presented in terms of contour plots of magnetic flux function, pressure, current flux function and the mass flux function, along with the stability boundary at which they are expected to appear. For the Wisconsin Phaedrus-T Tokamak, plasma profiles with significant m = 3, n = 1 perturbation seem feasible; for these, the plasma pressure peaks off-axis. For the smaller aspect ratio case, the configuration with m 1,n =1 is thought to be relevant to the density perturbation observed in JET after a pellet injection. (author)

  13. Equilibrium calculations for helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.

    1984-04-01

    An average method based on a vacuum flux coordinate system is presented. This average method permits the study of helical axis stellarators with toroidally dominated shifts. An ordering is introduced, and to lowest order the toroidally averaged equilibrium equations are reduced to a Grad-Shafranov equation. Also, to lowest order, a Poisson-type equation is obtained for the toroidally varying corrections to the equilibium. By including these corrections, systems that are toroidally dominated, but with significant helical distortion to the equilibrium, may be studied. Numerical solutions of the average method equations are shown to agree well with three-dimensional calculations

  14. Helical post stellarator. Part 1: Vacuum configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-08-01

    Results on a novel type of stellarator configuration, the Helical Post Stellarator (HPS), are presented. This configuration is different significantly from all previously known stellarators due to its unique geometrical characteristics and unique physical properties. Among those are: the magnetic field has only one toroidal period (M = 1), the plasma has an extremely low aspect ratio, A ∼ 1, and the variation of the magnetic field, B, along field lines features a helical ripple on the inside of the torus. Among the main advantages of a HPS for a fusion program are extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform, large plasma volume, and improved particle transport characteristics

  15. Equilibrium studies of helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Harris, J.H.; Rome, J.A.; Cantrell, J.L.; Lynch, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium properties of helical axis stellarators are studied with a 3-D equilibrium code and with an average method (2-D). The helical axis ATF is shown to have a toroidally dominated equilibrium shift and good equilibria up to at least 10% peak beta. Low aspect ratio heliacs, with relatively large toroidal shifts, are shown to have low equilibrium beta limits (approx. 5%). Increasing the aspect ratio and number of field periods proportionally is found to improve the equilibrium beta limit. Alternatively, increasing the number of field periods at fixed aspect ratio which raises and lowers the toroidal shift improves the equilibrium beta limit

  16. Conversion from mutual helicity to self-helicity observed with IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. P.; Peter, H.; Chen, F.; Zhang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. In the upper atmosphere of the Sun observations show convincing evidence for crossing and twisted structures, which are interpreted as mutual helicity and self-helicity. Aims: We use observations with the new Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to show the conversion of mutual helicity into self-helicity in coronal structures on the Sun. Methods: Using far UV spectra and slit-jaw images from IRIS and coronal images and magnetograms from SDO, we investigated the evolution of two crossing loops in an active region, in particular, the properties of the Si IV line profile in cool loops. Results: In the early stage two cool loops cross each other and accordingly have mutual helicity. The Doppler shifts in the loops indicate that they wind around each other. As a consequence, near the crossing point of the loops (interchange) reconnection sets in, which heats the plasma. This is consistent with the observed increase of the line width and of the appearance of the loops at higher temperatures. After this interaction, the two new loops run in parallel, and in one of them shows a clear spectral tilt of the Si IV line profile. This is indicative of a helical (twisting) motion, which is the same as to say that the loop has self-helicity. Conclusions: The high spatial and spectral resolution of IRIS allowed us to see the conversion of mutual helicity to self-helicity in the (interchange) reconnection of two loops. This is observational evidence for earlier theoretical speculations. Movie associated with Fig. 1 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Bioinspired spring origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Jakob A.; Arrieta, Andres F.; Studart, André R.

    2018-03-01

    Origami enables folding of objects into a variety of shapes in arts, engineering, and biological systems. In contrast to well-known paper-folded objects, the wing of the earwig has an exquisite natural folding system that cannot be sufficiently described by current origami models. Such an unusual biological system displays incompatible folding patterns, remains open by a bistable locking mechanism during flight, and self-folds rapidly without muscular actuation. We show that these notable functionalities arise from the protein-rich joints of the earwig wing, which work as extensional and rotational springs between facets. Inspired by this biological wing, we establish a spring origami model that broadens the folding design space of traditional origami and allows for the fabrication of precisely tunable, four-dimensional–printed objects with programmable bioinspired morphing functionalities.

  18. Nonlinear elastic waves in materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rushchitsky, Jeremiah J

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the book is a coherent treatment of the theory of propagation in materials of nonlinearly elastic waves of displacements, which corresponds to one modern line of development of the nonlinear theory of elastic waves. The book is divided on five basic parts: the necessary information on waves and materials; the necessary information on nonlinear theory of elasticity and elastic materials; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – longitudinal, vertically and horizontally polarized transverse plane nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – cylindrical and torsional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of two-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – Rayleigh and Love nonlinear elastic surface waves. The book is addressed first of all to people working in solid mechanics – from the students at an advanced undergraduate and graduate level to the scientists, professional...

  19. Dynamic response of beams on elastic foundations to impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, B.B.; Sinha, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    The beam considered is a Timoshenko beam in which the effects of rotatory inertia and shear deformations are included and the foundation model consists of Winkler-Zimmermann type having Hookean linear elastic springs. The analysis is very useful for predicting the dynamic response of structural components of aircraft or nuclear reactors or even runways if that component may be mathematically idealized as a beam on elastic foundation. The effect of rotatory inertia and shear deformation is very much pronounced and hence should not be neglected in solving such impact problems. In general the effect of foundation modulus is to further increase the values of frequencies of vibrations. (orig./HP)

  20. Spring cleaning: rural water impacts, valuation, and property rights institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Michael; Leino, Jessica; Miguel, Edward; Zwane, Alix Peterson

    2011-01-01

    Using a randomized evaluation in Kenya, we measure health impacts of spring protection, an investment that improves source water quality. We also estimate households' valuation of spring protection and simulate the welfare impacts of alternatives to the current system of common property rights in water, which limits incentives for private investment. Spring infrastructure investments reduce fecal contamination by 66%, but household water quality improves less, due to recontamination. Child diarrhea falls by one quarter. Travel-cost based revealed preference estimates of households' valuations are much smaller than both stated preference valuations and health planners' valuations, and are consistent with models in which the demand for health is highly income elastic. We estimate that private property norms would generate little additional investment while imposing large static costs due to above-marginal-cost pricing, private property would function better at higher income levels or under water scarcity, and alternative institutions could yield Pareto improvements.

  1. Dynamics and deformability of α-, 310- and π-helices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narwani Tarun Jairaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein structures are often represented as seen in crystals as (i rigid macromolecules (ii with helices, sheets and coils. However, both definitions are partial because (i proteins are highly dynamic macromolecules and (ii the description of protein structures could be more precise. With regard to these two points, we analyzed and quantified the stability of helices by considering α-helices as well as 310- and π-helices. Molecular dynamic (MD simulations were performed on a large set of 169 representative protein domains. The local protein conformations were followed during each simulation and analyzed. The classical flexibility index (B-factor was confronted with the MD root mean square flexibility (RMSF index. Helical regions were classified according to their level of helicity from high to none. For the first time, a precise quantification showed the percentage of rigid and flexible helices that underlie unexpected behaviors. Only 76.4% of the residues associated with α-helices retain the conformation, while this tendency drops to 40.5% for 310-helices and is never observed for π-helices. α-helix residues that do not remain as an α-helix have a higher tendency to assume β-turn conformations than 310- or π-helices. The 310-helices that switch to the α-helix conformation have a higher B-factor and RMSF values than the average 310-helix but are associated with a lower accessibility. Rare π-helices assume a β-turn, bend and coil conformations, but not α- or 310-helices. The view on π-helices drastically changes with the new DSSP (Dictionary of Secondary Structure of Proteins assignment approach, leading to behavior similar to 310-helices, thus underlining the importance of secondary structure assignment methods.

  2. Review of the helicity formalism; Revision del formalismo de helicidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, F; Cerrada, M; Fernandez, E

    1972-07-01

    Our purpose in these notes has been to present a brief and general review of the helicity formalism. We begin by discussing Lorentz invariance, spin and helicity ideas, in section 1 . In section 2 we deal with the construction of relativistic states and scattering amplitudes in the helicity basis and we study their transformation properties under discrete symmetries. Finally we present some more sophisticated topics like kinematical singularities of helicity amplitudes, kinematical constraints and crossing relations 3, 4, 5 respectively. (Author) 8 refs.

  3. Torsional mode ultrasonic helical waveguide sensor for re-configurable temperature measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Periyannan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an ultrasonic torsional mode based technique, configured in the form of a helicalspring-like” waveguide, for multi-level temperature measurement. The multiple sensing levels can be repositioned by stretching or collapsing the spring to provide simultaneous measurements at different desired spacing in a given area/volume. The transduction is performed using piezo-electric crystals that generate and receive T(0,1 mode in a pulse echo mode. The gage lengths and positions of measurements are based on machining multiple reflector notches in the waveguide at required positions. The time of fight (TOF measurements between the reflected signals from the notches provide local temperatures that compare well with co-located thermocouples.

  4. Exabyte helical scan devices at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Kaczar, K.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Votava, M.; White, V.; Hockney, G.; Bracker, S.; de Miranda, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    Exabyte 8mm helical scan storage devices are in use at Fermilab in a number of applications. These devices have the functionality of magnetic tape, but use media which is much more economical and much more dense than conventional 9 track tape. 6 refs., 3 figs

  5. Helical axial injection concept for cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for an external beam injection system using a helical beam path centered on the cyclotron axis is described. This system could be used to couple two accelerator stages, with or without intermediate stripping, in cases where conventional axial injection or radial injection are not practical.

  6. Helical axial injection concept for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for an external beam injection system using a helical beam path centered on the cyclotron axis is described. This system could be used to couple two accelerator stages, with or without intermediate stripping, in cases where conventional axial injection or radial injection are not practical

  7. Electron image reconstruction of helical protein assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, A.F.M.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of projections of large ordered biological systems obtained by electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens is described. The biological structures amenable to this approach are constructed from a large number of identical protein molecules, which are arranged according to helical symmetry. Electron images of these structures generally contain sufficient information in order to calculate a three-dimensional density map. (Auth.)

  8. Adaptive radiotherapy using helical tomotherapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeswani, Sam; Ruchala, Kenneth; Olivera, Gustavo; Mackie, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    As commonly known in the field, adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the use of feedback to modify a radiotherapy treatment. There are numerous ways in which this feedback can be received and used, and this presentation will discuss some of the implementations of ART being investigated with a helical TomoTherapy system

  9. Topological characteristics of helical repeat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Barford, D

    The recent elucidation of protein structures based upon repeating amino acid motifs, including the armadillo motif, the HEAT motif and tetratricopeptide repeats, reveals that they belong to the class of helical repeat proteins. These proteins share the common property of being assembled from tandem

  10. A Prospective Evaluation of Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Rodrigues, George; Lewis, Craig; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Yu, Edward; Hammond, Alex; Perera, Francisco; Ash, Robert; Dar, A. Rashid; Lock, Michael; Baily, Laura; Coad, Terry C; Trenka, Kris C.; Warr, Barbara; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report results from two clinical trials evaluating helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Patients were enrolled in one of two prospective trials of HT (one for palliative and one for radical treatment). Both an HT plan and a companion three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan were generated. Pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography was used for daily image guidance. Results: From September 2004 to January 2006, a total of 61 sites in 60 patients were treated. In all but one case, a clinically acceptable tomotherapy plan for treatment was generated. Helical tomotherapy plans were subjectively equivalent or superior to 3D-CRT in 95% of plans. Helical tomotherapy was deemed equivalent or superior in two thirds of dose-volume point comparisons. In cases of inferiority, differences were either clinically insignificant and/or reflected deliberate tradeoffs to optimize the HT plan. Overall imaging and treatment time (median) was 27 min (range, 16-91 min). According to a patient questionnaire, 78% of patients were satisfied to very satisfied with the treatment process. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy demonstrated clear advantages over conventional 3D-CRT in this diverse patient group. The prospective trials were helpful in deploying this technology in a busy clinical setting

  11. Helicity-flip in particle production on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeldt, G.

    1977-01-01

    Coherent nuclear production processes are generally analyzed assuming helicity conserving production amplitudes. In view of the uncertainties of the actual helicity structure this could be a dangerous assumption. It is shown that helicity-flip contributions might be part of the explanation of the small effective (pππ)-nucleon cross sections observed in coherent production. (Auth.)

  12. A real-scale helical coil winding trial of the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senba, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Tamaki, T.; Asano, K.; Suzuki, S.; Yamauchi, T.; Uchida, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Yamagiwa, T.; Suzuki, S.; Miyoshi, R.; Sasa, H.; Watanabe, S.; Tatemura, M.; Hatada, N.; Yamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Yanagi, N.; Satow, T.; Yamamoto, J.; Motojima, O.

    1995-01-01

    A real-scale helical coil winding trial of the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been conducted for a study of coil winding configuration and winding methods and for exhibiting the state of the art. It includes construction and test run of a specifically designed winding machine and development of various manufacturing methods for accurate coil winding. It has been carried out in Hitachi Works before in situ winding, and has provided much needed engineering data for construction of the LHD. (orig.)

  13. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Bearing capacity of helical pile foundation in peat soil from different, diameter and spacing of helical plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatnanta, F.; Satibi, S.; Muhardi

    2018-03-01

    In an area dominated by thick peat soil layers, driven piles foundation is often used. These piles are generally skin friction piles where the pile tips do not reach hard stratum. Since the bearing capacity of the piles rely on the resistance of their smooth skin, the bearing capacity of the piles are generally low. One way to increase the bearing capacity of the piles is by installing helical plates around the pile tips. Many research has been performed on helical pile foundation. However, literature on the use of helical pile foundation on peat soil is still hardly found. This research focus on the study of axial bearing capacity of helical pile foundation in peat soil, especially in Riau Province. These full-scale tests on helical pile foundation were performed in a rectangular box partially embedded into the ground. The box is filled with peat soil, which was taken from Rimbo Panjang area in the district of Kampar, Riau Province. Several helical piles with different number, diameter and spacing of the helical plates have been tested and analysed. The tests result show that helical pile with three helical plates of uniform diameter has better bearing capacity compared to other helical piles with varying diameter and different number of helical plates. The bearing capacity of helical pile foundation is affected by the spacing between helical plates. It is found that the effective helical plates spacing for helical pile foundation with diameter of 15cm to 35cm is between 20cm to 30cm. This behaviour may be considered to apply to other type of helical pile foundations in peat soil.

  15. Pyrolysis of Helical Coordination Polymers for Metal-Sulfide-Based Helices with Broadband Chiroptical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kenji; Yeom, Bongjun; Sada, Kazuki

    2017-06-27

    Fabrication of chiroptical materials with broadband response in the visible light region is vital to fully realize their potential applications. One way to achieve broadband chiroptical activity is to fabricate chiral nanostructures from materials that exhibit broadband absorption in the visible light region. However, the compounds used for chiroptical materials have predominantly been limited to materials with narrowband spectral response. Here, we synthesize Ag 2 S-based nanohelices derived from helical coordination polymers. The right- and left-handed coordination helices used as precursors are prepared from l- and d-glutathione with Ag + and a small amount of Cu 2+ . The pyrolysis of the coordination helices yields right- and left-handed helices of Cu 0.12 Ag 1.94 S/C, which exhibit chiroptical activity spanning the entire visible light region. Finite element method simulations substantiate that the broadband chiroptical activity is attributed to synergistic broadband light absorption and light scattering. Furthermore, another series of Cu 0.10 Ag 1.90 S/C nanohelices are synthesized by choosing the l- or d-Glu-Cys as starting materials. The pitch length of nanohelicies is controlled by changing the peptides, which alters their chiroptical properties. The pyrolysis of coordination helices enables one to fabricate helical Ag 2 S-based materials that enable broadband chiroptical activity but have not been explored owing to the lack of synthetic routes.

  16. A hybrid deterministic-probabilistic approach to model the mechanical response of helically arranged hierarchical strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraldi, M.; Perrella, G.; Ciervo, M.; Bosia, F.; Pugno, N. M.

    2017-09-01

    Very recently, a Weibull-based probabilistic strategy has been successfully applied to bundles of wires to determine their overall stress-strain behaviour, also capturing previously unpredicted nonlinear and post-elastic features of hierarchical strands. This approach is based on the so-called "Equal Load Sharing (ELS)" hypothesis by virtue of which, when a wire breaks, the load acting on the strand is homogeneously redistributed among the surviving wires. Despite the overall effectiveness of the method, some discrepancies between theoretical predictions and in silico Finite Element-based simulations or experimental findings might arise when more complex structures are analysed, e.g. helically arranged bundles. To overcome these limitations, an enhanced hybrid approach is proposed in which the probability of rupture is combined with a deterministic mechanical model of a strand constituted by helically-arranged and hierarchically-organized wires. The analytical model is validated comparing its predictions with both Finite Element simulations and experimental tests. The results show that generalized stress-strain responses - incorporating tension/torsion coupling - are naturally found and, once one or more elements break, the competition between geometry and mechanics of the strand microstructure, i.e. the different cross sections and helical angles of the wires in the different hierarchical levels of the strand, determines the no longer homogeneous stress redistribution among the surviving wires whose fate is hence governed by a "Hierarchical Load Sharing" criterion.

  17. Systematic periodicity in waviness of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes explained by helical buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Mehdi

    2017-09-01

    A hypothesis is proposed in this work to account for the geometry of individual vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) that not only justifies the directionality of their growth, but also explains the origin of the waviness frequently reported for these nanotube forests. Such waviness has fundamental effects on the transport/conduction properties of VACNTs, either through or along them, regarding phenomena such as mass, stress, heat and electricity. Despite the general opinion about randomness of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) tortuosity, we demonstrate here that rules of helical buckling of tubular strings is applicable to VACNTs, based on which a regular 3D helical geometry is proposed for VACNTs, with a 2D sine wave shape side-profile. In this framework, gradual increase of the total free surface energy by growth of CNTs ensues their partial cohesion, driven by van der Waals interactions, to reduce the excess surface energy. On the other hand, their cohesion is accompanied by their deformation and loss of straightness, which in turn, translates to buildup of an elastic strain energy in the system. The balance of the two energies along with the spatial constraints on each CNT at its contact points with neighboring CNTs, is manifested in its helical buckling, that is systematically influenced by nanostructural characteristics of VACNTs, such as their diameter, wall thickness and inter-CNT spacing.

  18. Effect of pressurization on helical guided wave energy velocity in fluid-filled pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Brennan; Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The effect of pressurization stresses on helical guided waves in a thin-walled fluid-filled pipe is studied by modeling leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate bordered by fluid. Fluid pressurization produces hoop and longitudinal stresses in a thin-walled pipe, which corresponds to biaxial in-plane stress in a plate waveguide model. The effect of stress on guided wave propagation is accounted for through nonlinear elasticity and finite deformation theory. Emphasis is placed on the stress dependence of the energy velocity of the guided wave modes. For this purpose, an expression for the energy velocity of leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate is derived. Theoretical results are presented for the mode, frequency, and directional dependent variations in energy velocity with respect to stress. An experimental setup is designed for measuring variations in helical wave energy velocity in a thin-walled water-filled steel pipe at different levels of pressure. Good agreement is achieved between the experimental variations in energy velocity for the helical guided waves and the theoretical leaky Lamb wave solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  20. Shells on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Y.C.; Kedia, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    No realistic analytical work in the area of Shells on Elastic Foundations has been reported in the literature. Various foundation models have been proposed by several authors. These models involve one or more than one parameters to characterise the foundation medium. Some of these models cannot be used to derive the basic equations governing the behaviour of shells on elastic foundations. In the present work, starting from an elastic continuum hypothesis, a mathematical model for foundation has been derived in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates by the help of principle of virtual displacements, treating one of the virtual displacements as known to satisfy certain given conditions at its edge surfaces. In this model, several foundation parameters can be considered and it can also be used for layered medium of both finite and infinite thickness. (Auth.)

  1. Distributed temperature sensors development using an stepped-helical ultrasonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the design and development of the distributed ultrasonic waveguide temperature sensors using some stepped-helical structures. Distributed sensing has several applications in various industries (oil, glass, steel) for measurement of physical parameters such as level, temperature, viscosity, etc. This waveguide incorporates a special notch or bend for obtaining ultrasonic wave reflections from the desired locations (Gage-lengths) where local measurements are desired. In this paper, a multi-location measurement wave-guide, with a measurement capability of 18 locations in a single wire, has been fabricated. The distribution of these sensors is both in the axial as well as radial directions using a stepped-helical spring configuration. Also, different high temperature materials have been chosen for the wave-guide. Both lower order axi-symmetric guided ultrasonic modes (L(0,1) and T(0,1)) were employed. These wave modes were generated/received (pulse-echo approach) using conventional longitudinal and shear transducers, respectively. Also, both the wave modes were simultaneously generated/received and compared using shear transducer for developing the distributed helical wave-guide sensors. The effect of dispersion of the wave modes due to curvature effects will also be discussed.

  2. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  3. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun

    2011-06-26

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun; Wu, Ying; Sheng, Ping; Zhang, Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. ElasticSearch server

    CERN Document Server

    Rogozinski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    This book is a detailed, practical, hands-on guide packed with real-life scenarios and examples which will show you how to implement an ElasticSearch search engine on your own websites.If you are a web developer or a user who wants to learn more about ElasticSearch, then this is the book for you. You do not need to know anything about ElastiSeach, Java, or Apache Lucene in order to use this book, though basic knowledge about databases and queries is required.

  6. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  7. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of {nabla}B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  8. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, T.; Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of ∇B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  9. Biot-Savart helicity versus physical helicity: A topological description of ideal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahihi, Taliya; Eshraghi, Homayoon

    2014-08-01

    For an isentropic (thus compressible) flow, fluid trajectories are considered as orbits of a family of one parameter, smooth, orientation-preserving, and nonsingular diffeomorphisms on a compact and smooth-boundary domain in the Euclidian 3-space which necessarily preserve a finite measure, later interpreted as the fluid mass. Under such diffeomorphisms the Biot-Savart helicity of the pushforward of a divergence-free and tangent to the boundary vector field is proved to be conserved and since these circumstances present an isentropic flow, the conservation of the "Biot-Savart helicity" is established for such flows. On the other hand, the well known helicity conservation in ideal flows which here we call it "physical helicity" is found to be an independent constant with respect to the Biot-Savart helicity. The difference between these two helicities reflects some topological features of the domain as well as the velocity and vorticity fields which is discussed and is shown for simply connected domains the two helicities coincide. The energy variation of the vorticity field is shown to be formally the same as for the incompressible flow obtained before. For fluid domains consisting of several disjoint solid tori, at each time, the harmonic knot subspace of smooth vector fields on the fluid domain is found to have two independent base sets with a special type of orthogonality between these two bases by which a topological description of the vortex and velocity fields depending on the helicity difference is achieved since this difference is shown to depend only on the harmonic knot parts of velocity, vorticity, and its Biot-Savart vector field. For an ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow three independent constant helicities are reviewed while the helicity of magnetic potential is generalized for non-simply connected domains by inserting a special harmonic knot field in the dynamics of the magnetic potential. It is proved that the harmonic knot part of the vorticity

  10. Hot springs in Hokuriku District

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K. (Hot Springs Research Center, Japan)

    1971-01-01

    In the Hokuriku district including Toyama, Ishikawa, and Fukui Prefectures, hot springs of more than 25/sup 0/C were investigated. In the Toyama Prefecture, there are 14 hot springs which are located in an area from the Kurobe River to the Tateyama volcano and in the mountainous area in the southwest. In Ishikawa Prefecture there are 16 hot springs scattered in Hakusan and its vicinity, the Kaga mountains, and in the Noto peninsula. In northern Fukui Prefecture there are seven hot springs. The hot springs in Shirakawa in Gifu Prefecture are characterized as acid springs producing exhalations and H/sub 2/S. These are attributed to the Quaternary volcanoes. The hot springs of Wakura, Katayamazu, and Awara in Ishikawa Prefecture are characterized by a high Cl content which is related to Tertiary andesite. The hot springs of Daishoji, Yamanaka, Yamashiro, Kuritsu, Tatsunokuchi, Yuwaku, and Yunotani are characterized by a low HCO/sub 3/ content. The Ca and SO/sub 4/ content decreases from east to west, and the Na and Cl content increases from west to east. These fluctuations are related to the Tertiary tuff and rhyolite. The hot springs of Kuronagi, Kinshu, and Babadani, located along the Kurobe River are characterized by low levels of dissolved components and high CO/sub 2/ and HCO/sub 3/ content. These trends are related to late Paleozoic granite. Hot springs resources are considered to be connected to geothermal resources. Ten tables, graphs, and maps are provided.

  11. Weldon Spring dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Hill, G.S.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-09-01

    In response to a request by the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) for assistance to the Department of the Army (DA) on the decommissioning of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, the Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed limited dose assessment calculations for that site. Based upon radiological measurements from a number of soil samples analyzed by ORNL and from previously acquired radiological data for the Weldon Spring site, source terms were derived to calculate radiation doses for three specific site scenarios. These three hypothetical scenarios are: a wildlife refuge for hunting, fishing, and general outdoor recreation; a school with 40 hr per week occupancy by students and a custodian; and a truck farm producing fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy products which may be consumed on site. Radiation doses are reported for each of these scenarios both for measured uranium daughter equilibrium ratios and for assumed secular equilibrium. Doses are lower for the nonequilibrium case

  12. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallard, B.W.; Hooper, E.B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R.H.; Hill, D.N.; McLean, H.S.; Wood, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX

  13. Estimation of macroscopic elastic characteristics for hierarchical anisotropic solids based on probabilistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolina, Irina Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical properties of a cable are of great importance in design and strength calculation of flexible cables. The problem of determination of elastic properties and rigidity characteristics of a cable modeled by anisotropic helical elastic rod is considered. These characteristics are calculated indirectly by means of the parameters received from statistical processing of experimental data. These parameters are considered as random quantities. With taking into account probable nature of these parameters the formulas for estimation of the macroscopic elastic moduli of a cable are obtained. The calculating expressions for macroscopic flexural rigidity, shear rigidity and torsion rigidity using the macroscopic elastic characteristics obtained before are presented. Statistical estimations of the rigidity characteristics of some cable grades are adduced. A comparison with those characteristics received on the basis of deterministic approach is given.

  14. Fracton-Elasticity Duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretko, Michael; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by recent studies of fractons, we demonstrate that elasticity theory of a two-dimensional quantum crystal is dual to a fracton tensor gauge theory, providing a concrete manifestation of the fracton phenomenon in an ordinary solid. The topological defects of elasticity theory map onto charges of the tensor gauge theory, with disclinations and dislocations corresponding to fractons and dipoles, respectively. The transverse and longitudinal phonons of crystals map onto the two gapless gauge modes of the gauge theory. The restricted dynamics of fractons matches with constraints on the mobility of lattice defects. The duality leads to numerous predictions for phases and phase transitions of the fracton system, such as the existence of gauge theory counterparts to the (commensurate) crystal, supersolid, hexatic, and isotropic fluid phases of elasticity theory. Extensions of this duality to generalized elasticity theories provide a route to the discovery of new fracton models. As a further consequence, the duality implies that fracton phases are relevant to the study of interacting topological crystalline insulators.

  15. Autonomic Vertical Elasticity of Docker Containers with ElasticDocker

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dhuraibi , Yahya; Paraiso , Fawaz; Djarallah , Nabil; Merle , Philippe

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Elasticity is the key feature of cloud computing to scale computing resources according to application workloads timely. In the literature as well as in industrial products, much attention was given to the elasticity of virtual machines, but much less to the elasticity of containers. However, containers are the new trend for packaging and deploying microservices-based applications. Moreover, most of approaches focus on horizontal elasticity, fewer works address vertica...

  16. Spring viremia of carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahne, W.; Bjorklund, H.V.; Essbauer, S.; Fijan, N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    pring viremia of carp (SVC) is an important disease affecting cyprinids, mainly common carp Cyprinus carpio. The disease is widespread in European carp culture, where it causes significant morbidity and mortality. Designated a notifiable disease by the Office International des Epizooties, SVC is caused by a rhabdovirus, spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV). Affected fish show destruction of tissues in the kidney, spleen and liver, leading to hemorrhage, loss of water-salt balance and impairment of immune response. High mortality occurs at water temperatures of 10 to 17°C, typically in spring. At higher temperatures, infected carp develop humoral antibodies that can neutralize the spread of virus and such carp are protected against re-infection by solid immunity. The virus is shed mostly with the feces and urine of clinically infected fish and by carriers. Waterborne transmission is believed to be the primary route of infection, but bloodsucking parasites like leeches and the carp louse may serve as mechanical vectors of SVCV. The genome of SVCV is composed of a single molecule of linear, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA containing 5 genes in the order 3¹-NPMGL-5¹ coding for the viral nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein, and polymerase, respectively. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral proteins, and sequence homologies between the genes and gene junctions of SVCV and vesicular stomatitis viruses, have led to the placement of the virus as a tentative member of the genus Vesiculovirus in the family Rhabdoviridae. These methods also revealed that SVCV is not related to fish rhabdoviruses of the genus Novirhabdovirus. In vitro replication of SVCV takes place in the cytoplasm of cultured cells of fish, bird and mammalian origin at temperatures of 4 to 31°C, with an optimum of about 20°C. Spring viremia of carp can be diagnosed by clinical signs, isolation of virus in cell culture and molecular methods. Antibodies directed

  17. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  18. Helical CT of congenital ossicular anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Hisato; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari

    2001-01-01

    Since January 1996 to December 2000, 26 cases of congenital ossicular anomaly could be diagnosed with helical CT. All cases were unilateral. In 8 patients with malformation of the external ear, CT showed malleoincudal fixation (n=5), malleoincudal fixation and deformed incuts long process (n=1), deformed incus long process (n=1), and partial fusion of malleus neck and incus long process (n=1). In 18 patients with normal external ear, CT showed defect of the incus long process (n=5), defect of both the incus long process and stapes superstructure (n=8, 2 patients with congenital cholesteatoma, 1 with hypoplastic oval window), defect of the stapes superstructure (n=2, 1 patient with oval window absence), defect of the malleus manubrium (n=1), ossification of the stampede's tendon (n=1), and monopod stapes (n=1). Helical CT can evaluate the auditory ossicular chain in detail and is useful for diagnosing congenital ossicular anomaly. (author)

  19. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-12-30

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  20. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, O B; Clarke, J A; Bailey, I R; Dainton, J B; Malysheva, L I; Barber, D P; Cooke, P; Baynham, E; Bradshaw, T; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Ivanyushenkov, Y; Rochford, J; Moortgat-Pick, G A

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of ∼10MeV∼10MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of ∼100nTorr∼100nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4–6mm4–6mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100–200m100–200m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING HELICAL SNAKE MAGNETS: CONSTRUCTION AND MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, W.W.; Anerella, M.; Courant, E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to collide polarized protons, the RHIC project will have two snakes in each ring and four rotators around each of two interaction regions. Two snakes on opposite sides of each ring can minimize depolarization during acceleration by keeping the spin tune at a half. Since the spin direction is normally along the vertical direction in a flat ring, spin rotators must be used around an interaction point to have longitudinal polarization in a collider experiment. Each snake or rotator will be composed of four helical dipoles to provide the required rotation of spin with minimal transverse orbit excursions in a compact length of 10m. The basic helical dipole is a superconducting magnet producing a transverse dipole field which is twisted about the magnet axis through 360 o in a length of 2.4 m. The design and construction of the magnets is described in this paper

  2. Buoyant Helical Twin-Axial Wire Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    February 2017 The below identified patent application is available for licensing. Requests for information should be addressed to...300169 1 of 9 BUOYANT HELICAL TWIN-AXIAL WIRE ANTENNA CROSS REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0001] This application is a divisional...application and claims the benefit of the filing date of United States Patent Application No. 14/280,889; filed on May 19, 2014; and entitled “Twin-Axial

  3. Molecular Dynamics with Helical Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 21 (2014), s. 1552-1559 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic boundary conditions * helical symmetry * molecular dynamics * protein structure * amyloid fibrils Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.589, year: 2014

  4. Simplification of the helical TEN2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, K.-H.

    1980-04-01

    The observation that the helical TEN2 laser can effectively be simplified by giving up the use of decoupling elements as well as by abolishing the segmentation of the electrode structure is examined. Although, as a consequence of this simplification, the operating pressure range was slightly decreased, the output power could be improved by roughly 30%, a result which is attributed to the new electrode geometry exhibiting lower inductance and lower damping losses.

  5. Field of a helical Siberian Snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    To preserve the spin polarization of a beam of high energy protons in a circular accelerator, magnets with periodic magnetic field, called Siberian Snakes are being used. Recently, it was proposed to build Siberian Snakes with superconducting helical dipoles. In a helical, or twisted dipole, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the axis of the helix and rotates around it as one proceeds along the magnet. In an engineering study of a 4 Tesla helical snake, the coil geometry is derived, by twisting, from the geometry of a cosine superconducting dipole. While waiting for magnetic measurement data on such a prototype, an analytical expression for the field of the helice is important, to calculate the particle trajectories and the spin precession in the helix. This model will also allow to determine the optical characteristics of the snake, as an insertion in the lattice of the accelerator. In particular, one can calculate the integrated multipoles through the magnet and the equivalent transfer matrix. An expression for the field in the helix body, i.e., excluding the fringe field was given in a classical paper. An alternate expression can be found by elaborating on the treatment of the field of a transverse wiggler obtained under the rather general conditions that the variables are separable. This expression exactly satisfies Maxwell`s div and curl equations for a stationary field, {del} {center_dot} B = 0, {del} x B = 0. This approach is useful in that it will allow one to use much of the work already done on the problem of inserting wigglers and undulators in the lattice of a circular accelerator.

  6. Conversion of light into macroscopic helical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Aßhoff, Sarah J.; Matt, Benjamin; Kudernac, Tibor; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Fletcher, Stephen P.; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    A key goal of nanotechnology is the development of artificial machines capable of converting molecular movement into macroscopic work. Although conversion of light into shape changes has been reported and compared to artificial muscles, real applications require work against an external load. Here, we describe the design, synthesis and operation of spring-like materials capable of converting light energy into mechanical work at the macroscopic scale. These versatile materials consist of molecular switches embedded in liquid-crystalline polymer springs. In these springs, molecular movement is converted and amplified into controlled and reversible twisting motions. The springs display complex motion, which includes winding, unwinding and helix inversion, as dictated by their initial shape. Importantly, they can produce work by moving a macroscopic object and mimicking mechanical movements, such as those used by plant tendrils to help the plant access sunlight. These functional materials have potential applications in micromechanical systems, soft robotics and artificial muscles.

  7. Spring security 3.x cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Mankale, Anjana

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a cookbook style exploring various security solutions provided by Spring Security for various vulnerabilities and threat scenarios that web applications may be exposed to at the authentication and session level layers.This book is for all Spring-based application developers as well as Java web developers who wish to implement robust security mechanisms into web application development using Spring Security.Readers are assumed to have a working knowledge of Java web application development, a basic understanding of the Spring framework, and some knowledge of the fundamentals o

  8. Manipulating acoustic wave reflection by a nonlinear elastic metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinxin; Gusev, Vitalyi E.; Bertoldi, Katia; Tournat, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    The acoustic wave reflection properties of a nonlinear elastic metasurface, derived from resonant nonlinear elastic elements, are theoretically and numerically studied. The metasurface is composed of a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with quadratic elastic nonlinearity. The possibility of converting, during the reflection process, most of the fundamental incoming wave energy into the second harmonic wave is shown, both theoretically and numerically, by means of a proper design of the nonlinear metasurface. The theoretical results from the harmonic balance method for a monochromatic source are compared with time domain simulations for a wave packet source. This protocol allows analyzing the dynamics of the nonlinear reflection process in the metasurface as well as exploring the limits of the operating frequency bandwidth. The reported methodology can be applied to a wide variety of nonlinear metasurfaces, thus possibly extending the family of exotic nonlinear reflection processes.

  9. Non-linear elastic deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Ogden, R W

    1997-01-01

    Classic in the field covers application of theory of finite elasticity to solution of boundary-value problems, analysis of mechanical properties of solid materials capable of large elastic deformations. Problems. References.

  10. Helical waves in easy-plane antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Yuriy G.; Li, Xi-Lai; Xu, Xinyi; Kim, Ki Wook

    2017-12-01

    Effective spin torques can generate the Néel vector oscillations in antiferromagnets (AFMs). Here, it is theoretically shown that these torques applied at one end of a normal AFM strip can excite a helical type of spin wave in the strip whose properties are drastically different from characteristic spin waves. An analysis based on both a Néel vector dynamical equation and the micromagnetic simulation identifies the direction of magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor as the two key parameters determining the dynamics. Helical wave propagation requires the hard axis of the easy-plane AFM to be aligned with the traveling direction, while the damping limits its spatial extent. If the damping is neglected, the calculation leads to a uniform periodic domain wall structure. On the other hand, finite damping decelerates the helical wave rotation around the hard axis, ultimately causing stoppage of its propagation along the strip. With the group velocity staying close to spin-wave velocity at the wave front, the wavelength becomes correspondingly longer away from the excitation point. In a sufficiently short strip, a steady-state oscillation can be established whose frequency is controlled by the waveguide length as well as the excitation energy or torque.

  11. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine; Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  12. Superconducting Helical Snake Magnet for the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Willen, Erich; Escallier, John; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Jain, Animesh K; Luccio, Alfredo U; MacKay, William W; Marone, Andrew; Muratore, Joseph F; Okamura, Masahiro; Plate, Stephen R; Roser, Thomas; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wanderer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting helical magnet has been built for polarized proton acceleration in the Brookhaven AGS. This "partial Snake" magnet will help to reduce the loss of polarization of the beam due to machine resonances. It is a 3 T magnet some 1940 mm in magnetic length in which the dipole field rotates with a pitch of 0.2053 degrees/mm for 1154 mm in the center and a pitch of 0.3920 degrees/mm for 393 mm in each end. The coil cross-section is made of two slotted cylinders containing superconductor. In order to minimize residual offsets and deflections of the beam on its orbit through the Snake, a careful balancing of the coil parameters was necessary. In addition to the main helical coils, a solenoid winding was built on the cold bore tube inside the main coils to compensate for the axial component of the field that is experienced by the beam when it is off-axis in this helical magnet. Also, two dipole corrector magnets were placed on the same tube with the solenoid. A low heat leak cryostat was built so that t...

  13. Total scalp irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, Nigel; Jaradat, Hazim; Welsh, James; Tome, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Homogeneous irradiation of the scalp poses technical and dosimetric challenges due to the extensive, superficial, curved treatment volume. Conventional treatments on a linear accelerator use multiple matched electron fields or a combination of electron and photon fields. Problems with these techniques include dose heterogeneity in the target due to varying source-to-skin distance (SSD) and angle of beam incidence, significant dose to the brain, and the potential for overdose or underdose at match lines between the fields. Linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans have similar problems. This work presents treatment plans for total scalp irradiation on a helical tomotherapy machine. Helical tomotherapy is well-suited for scalp irradiation because it has the ability to deliver beamlets that are tangential to the scalp at all points. Helical tomotherapy also avoids problems associated with field matching and use of more than one modality. Tomotherapy treatment plans were generated and are compared to plans for treatment of the same patient on a linac. The resulting tomotherapy plans show more homogeneous target dose and improved critical structure dose when compared to state-of-the-art linac techniques. Target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the best tomotherapy plan was slightly higher than for the linac plan, while the volume of brain tissue receiving over 30 Gy was reduced by two thirds. Furthermore, the tomotherapy plan can be more reliably delivered than linac treatments, because the patient is aligned prior to each treatment based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)

  14. THE EFFECTS OF SPATIAL SMOOTHING ON SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY PARAMETERS AND THE HEMISPHERIC HELICITY SIGN RULE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocker, Stella Koch [Department of Physics, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074 (United States); Petrie, Gordon, E-mail: socker@oberlin.edu, E-mail: gpetrie@nso.edu [National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The hemispheric preference for negative/positive helicity to occur in the northern/southern solar hemisphere provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. Previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulence. Using Hinode /SOT-SP data spanning 2006–2013, we studied the effects of two spatial smoothing tests that imitate atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We studied in detail the effects of atmospheric seeing on the helicity distributions across various field strengths for active regions (ARs) NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, in addition to studying the average helicities of 179 ARs with and without smoothing. We found that, rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, spatial smoothing modified existing trends by reducing random noise and by regressing outliers toward the mean, or removing them altogether. Furthermore, the average helicity parameter values of the 179 ARs did not conform to the hemisphere rule: independent of smoothing, the weak-vertical-field values tended to be negative in both hemispheres, and the strong-vertical-field values tended to be positive, especially in the south. We conclude that spatial smoothing does not significantly affect the overall statistics for space-based data, and thus seeing from atmospheric turbulence seems not to have significantly affected previous studies’ ground-based results on the hemisphere rule.

  15. Designing interactively with elastic splines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Fisker, Ann-Sofie

    2018-01-01

    We present an algorithm for designing interactively with C1 elastic splines. The idea is to design the elastic spline using a C1 cubic polynomial spline where each polynomial segment is so close to satisfying the Euler-Lagrange equation for elastic curves that the visual difference becomes neglig...... negligible. Using a database of cubic Bézier curves we are able to interactively modify the cubic spline such that it remains visually close to an elastic spline....

  16. Bundling of elastic filaments induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Page, William; Poole, Robert J.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Peritrichous bacteria swim in viscous fluids by rotating multiple helical flagellar filaments. As the bacterium swims forward, all its flagella rotate in synchrony behind the cell in a tight helical bundle. When the bacterium changes its direction, the flagellar filaments unbundle and randomly reorient the cell for a short period of time before returning to their bundled state and resuming swimming. This rapid bundling and unbundling is, at its heart, a mechanical process whereby hydrodynamic interactions balance with elasticity to determine the time-varying deformation of the filaments. Inspired by this biophysical problem, we present in this paper what is perhaps the simplest model of bundling whereby two or more straight elastic filaments immersed in a viscous fluid rotate about their centerline, inducing rotational flows which tend to bend the filaments around each other. We derive an integrodifferential equation governing the shape of the filaments resulting from mechanical balance in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. We show that such equation may be evaluated asymptotically analytically in the long-wavelength limit, leading to a local partial differential equation governed by a single dimensionless bundling number. A numerical study of the dynamics predicted by the model reveals the presence of two configuration instabilities with increasing bundling numbers: first to a crossing state where filaments touch at one point and then to a bundled state where filaments wrap along each other in a helical fashion. We also consider the case of multiple filaments and the unbundling dynamics. We next provide an intuitive physical model for the crossing instability and show that it may be used to predict analytically its threshold and adapted to address the transition to a bundling state. We then use a macroscale experimental implementation of the two-filament configuration in order to validate our theoretical predictions and obtain excellent agreement. This long

  17. Approximation by planar elastic curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Gravesen, Jens; Nørbjerg, Toke Bjerge

    2016-01-01

    We give an algorithm for approximating a given plane curve segment by a planar elastic curve. The method depends on an analytic representation of the space of elastic curve segments, together with a geometric method for obtaining a good initial guess for the approximating curve. A gradient......-driven optimization is then used to find the approximating elastic curve....

  18. The Properties Of Rattan Calamus Caesius (Rattan Sega) And Its Application In Spring Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebayang, Darwin; King, Ting Ing; Wahab, Razak bin

    2004-01-01

    Rattan is one of the natural resources in the Peninsular of Malaysia, Indonesia, etc. The lack of information of the properties of rattan is a reason why this material is not known as engineering materials. The flexibility or the plasticity of the rattan is actually a strong point to develop it as an engineering materials such as a reinforced of the cement to resist the earthquake or as a spring. This paper therefore shows the properties of rattan calamus caesius (Rattan Sega) and its application as spring. The determination of the properties of rattan was conducted according to ASTM standard with a suitable modification. This research shows the plasticity of the rattan which makes it remain in spring form. The stiffness coefficient of the spring was measured based on the relation of the force and displacement. The value of the stiffness of spring gained from measurement was compared with the analytical method which is valid in an elastic region

  19. A study on calculation method for mechanical impedance of air spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changgeng, Shuai; Penghui, Li; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approximate analytic method of obtaining the mechanical impedance of air spring. The sound pressure distribution in cylindrical air spring is calculated based on the linear air wave theory. The influences of different boundary conditions on the acoustic pressure field distribution in cylindrical air spring are analysed. A 1-order ordinary differential matrix equation for the state vector of revolutionary shells under internal pressure is derived based on the non-moment theory of elastic thin shell. Referring to the transfer matrix method, a kind of expanded homogeneous capacity high precision integration method is introduced to solve the non-homogeneous matrix differential equation. Combined the solved stress field of shell with the calculated sound pressure field in air spring under the displacement harmonic excitation, the approximate analytical expression of the input and transfer mechanical impedance for the air spring can be achieved. The numerical simulation with the Comsol Multiphysics software verifies the correctness of theoretical analysis result. (paper)

  20. Cryo-EM Structure Determination Using Segmented Helical Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, S A; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Treating helices as single-particle-like segments followed by helical image reconstruction has become the method of choice for high-resolution structure determination of well-ordered helical viruses as well as flexible filaments. In this review, we will illustrate how the combination of latest hardware developments with optimized image processing routines have led to a series of near-atomic resolution structures of helical assemblies. Originally, the treatment of helices as a sequence of segments followed by Fourier-Bessel reconstruction revealed the potential to determine near-atomic resolution structures from helical specimens. In the meantime, real-space image processing of helices in a stack of single particles was developed and enabled the structure determination of specimens that resisted classical Fourier helical reconstruction and also facilitated high-resolution structure determination. Despite the progress in real-space analysis, the combination of Fourier and real-space processing is still commonly used to better estimate the symmetry parameters as the imposition of the correct helical symmetry is essential for high-resolution structure determination. Recent hardware advancement by the introduction of direct electron detectors has significantly enhanced the image quality and together with improved image processing procedures has made segmented helical reconstruction a very productive cryo-EM structure determination method. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrodynamic studies of CNT nanofluids in helical coil heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babita; Sharma, S. K.; Mital Gupta, Shipra; Kumar, Arinjay

    2017-12-01

    Helical coils are extensively used in several industrial processes such as refrigeration systems, chemical reactors, recovery processes etc to accommodate a large heat transfer area within a smaller space. Nanofluids are getting great attention due to their enhanced heat transfer capability. In heat transfer equipments, pressure drop is one of the major factors of consideration for pumping power calculations. So, the present work is aimed to study hydrodynamics of CNT nanofluids in helical coils. In this study, pressure drop characteristics of CNT nanofluid flowing inside horizontal helical coils are investigated experimentally. The helical coil to tube diameter was varied from 11.71 to 27.34 keeping pitch of the helical coil constant. Double distilled water was used as basefluid. SDBS and GA surfactants were added to stablilize CNT nanofluids. The volumetric fraction of CNT nanofluid was varied from 0.003 vol% to 0.051 vol%. From the experimental data, it was analyzed that the friction factor in helical coils is greater than that of straight tubes. Concentration of CNT in nanofluids also has a significant influence on the pressure drop/friction factor of helical coils. At a constant concentration of CNT, decreasing helical coil to tube diameter from 27.24 to 11.71, fanning friction factor of helical coil; f c increases for a constant value of p/d t. This increase in the value of fanning friction factor can be attributed to the secondary flow of CNT nanofluid in helical coils.

  2. Elasticity in Elastics-An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisetty, Supradeep Kumar; Nimagadda, Chakrapani; Begam, Madhoom Ponnachi; Nalamotu, Raghuveer; Srivastav, Trilok; Gs, Shwetha

    2014-04-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement results from application of forces to teeth. Elastics in orthodontics have been used both intra-orally and extra- orally to a great effect. Their use, combined with good patient co-operation provides the clinician with the ability to correct both anteroposterior and vertical discrepancies. Force decay over a period of time is a major problem in the clinical usage of latex elastics and synthetic elastomers. This loss of force makes it difficult for the clinician to determine the actual force transmitted to the dentition. It's the intent of the clinician to maintain optimal force values over desired period of time. The majority of the orthodontic elastics on the market are latex elastics. Since the early 1990s, synthetic products have been offered in the market for latex-sensitive patients and are sold as nonlatex elastics. There is limited information on the risk that latex elastics may pose to patients. Some have estimated that 0.12-6% of the general population and 6.2% of dental professionals have hypersensitivity to latex protein. There are some reported cases of adverse reactions to latex in the orthodontic population but these are very limited to date. Although the risk is not yet clear, it would still be inadvisable to prescribe latex elastics to a patient with a known latex allergy. To compare the in-vitro performance of latex and non latex elastics. Samples of 0.25 inch, latex and non latex elastics (light, medium, heavy elastics) were obtained from three manufacturers (Forestadent, GAC, Glenroe) and a sample size of ten elastics per group was tested. The properties tested included cross sectional area, internal diameter, initial force generated by the elastics, breaking force and the force relaxation for the different types of elastics. Force relaxation testing involved stretching the elastics to three times marketed internal diameter (19.05 mm) and measuring force level at intervals over a period of 48 hours. The data were

  3. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb 3 Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb 3 Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb 3 Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the

  4. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  5. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES OF THE METAL-PLATE SPRINGS PRODUCTION AND HARDENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klubovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A methods and technology of the periodic rolling billets variable profile. Given schematic diagrams and technical specification of equipment for making plastic and surface treatment of small leaf springs and the guide bearings air suspension trucks. An assessment of the influence of ultrasonic vibrations on the structure and operating characteristics of the elastic elements of the suspension of vehicles.

  6. Introduction to linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Phillip L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Linear Elasticity, 3rd Edition, provides an applications-oriented grounding in the tensor-based theory of elasticity for students in mechanical, civil, aeronautical, and biomedical engineering, as well as materials and earth science. The book is distinct from the traditional text aimed at graduate students in solid mechanics by introducing the subject at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The author's presentation allows students to apply the basic notions of stress analysis and move on to advanced work in continuum mechanics, plasticity, plate and shell theory, composite materials, viscoelasticity and finite method analysis. This book also:  Emphasizes tensor-based approach while still distilling down to explicit notation Provides introduction to theory of plates, theory of shells, wave propagation, viscoelasticity and plasticity accessible to advanced undergraduate students Appropriate for courses following emerging trend of teaching solid mechan...

  7. DEPENDENCE OF AIR SPRING PARAMETERS ON THROTTLE RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Reidemeister

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In this paper it is necessary to conduct: 1 research and analyse the influence of throttle element pneumatic resistance on elastic and damping parameters of air spring; 2 to obtain the dependence of air spring parameters on throttle element pneumatic resistance value. Methodology. The work presents the elaborated model of the air spring as a dynamic system with three phase coordinates (cylinder pressure, auxiliary reservoir pressure, cylinder air mass. Stiffness and viscosity coefficients were determined on the basis of system response to harmonic kinematic disturbance. The data for the analysis are obtained by changing the capacity of the connecting element and the law of pressure variation between the reservoir and the cylinder. The viscosity coefficient is regarded as the viscosity ratio of the hydraulic damper, which for one oscillation cycle consumes the same energy as the air spring. The process of air condition change inside the cylinder (reservoir is considered to be adiabatic; the mass air flow through the connecting element depends on the pressure difference. Findings. We obtained the curves for spring viscosity and stiffness coefficients dependence on the throttle resistance at three different laws, linking airflow through the cylinder with the pressure difference in cylinder and reservoir. At both maximum and minimum limiting resistance values the spring viscosity tends to zero, reaching its peak in the mean resistance values. Stiffness increases monotonically with increasing resistance, tends to the limit corresponding to the absence of an auxiliary reservoir (at high resistance and the increase in cylinder volume by the reservoir volume (at low resistance. Originality.The designed scheme allows determining the optimal parameters of elastic and damping properties of the pneumatic system as function of the throttle element air resistance. Practical value.The ability to predict the parameters of elastic and damping properties

  8. Spheres of discharge of springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Abraham E.; Stevens, Lawrence E.

    2009-02-01

    Although springs have been recognized as important, rare, and globally threatened ecosystems, there is as yet no consistent and comprehensive classification system or common lexicon for springs. In this paper, 12 spheres of discharge of springs are defined, sketched, displayed with photographs, and described relative to their hydrogeology of occurrence, and the microhabitats and ecosystems they support. A few of the spheres of discharge have been previously recognized and used by hydrogeologists for over 80 years, but others have only recently been defined geomorphologically. A comparison of these spheres of discharge to classification systems for wetlands, groundwater dependent ecosystems, karst hydrogeology, running waters, and other systems is provided. With a common lexicon for springs, hydrogeologists can provide more consistent guidance for springs ecosystem conservation, management, and restoration. As additional comprehensive inventories of the physical, biological, and cultural characteristics are conducted and analyzed, it will eventually be possible to associate spheres of discharge with discrete vegetation and aquatic invertebrate assemblages, and better understand the habitat requirements of rare or unique springs species. Given the elevated productivity and biodiversity of springs, and their highly threatened status, identification of geomorphic similarities among spring types is essential for conservation of these important ecosystems.

  9. Spring valve for well completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbatov, P T

    1966-07-22

    A spring-loaded valve for well completion consists of a housing with a spring-loaded closing element. In order to protect the closing element from corrosion which might lower the pressure drop, the closing element is made in the form of a piston. It is tightly connected with sealing elements. The housing has orifices, overlapping the piston in the initial position.

  10. Zirconium elasticity modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, G.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are the limit and the intermediate values of the Young modulus E, modulus of shear G and of linear modulus of compression K obtainable at various temperatures (4.2 to 1133 K) for single crystals of α-zirconium. Determined and presented are the corrected isotropic elasticity characteristics of E, G, K over the above range of temperatures of textured and non-textured α-Zr

  11. pp-elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E; Cantale, G; Degli-Agosti, S; Hausammann, R; Heer, E; Hess, R; Lechanoine-LeLuc, C; Leo, W; Morenzoni, S; Onel, Y [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the elastic pp experimental program at SIN was to measure enough spin dependent parameters in order to do a direct experimental reconstruction of the elastic scattering amplitudes at a few energies between 400 and 600 MeV and at several angles between 38/sup 0/ cm and 90/sup 0/ cm. This reconstruction was not possible until recently due to lack of experimental data. Information instead has come mainly from phase shift analysis (PSA). The only way to extract the elastic scattering amplitudes without any hypotheses except those of basic symmetries, is to measure a sufficient set of spin dependent parameters at a given angle and energy. With this in view, the authors have measured at 448, 494, 515, 536 and 579 MeV, the polarization, the spin correlation parameters Asub(00nn), Asub(00ss), Asub(00kk), Asub(00ks), the 2-spin parameters Dsub(n0n0), Ksub(n00n), Dsub(s'0s0), Dsub(s'0k0) and the 3-spin parameters Msub(s'0sn), Msub(s'0kn) between 34/sup 0/ cm and 118/sup 0/ cm. A few of these parameters have also been measured at 560 and 470 MeV and at a few energies below 448 MeV. The indices refer to the polarization orientation of the scattered, recoil, beam and target particle respectively.

  12. Spring-block Model for Barkhausen Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, K.; Brechet, Y.; Neda, Z.

    2005-01-01

    A simple mechanical spring-block model is used for studying Barkhausen noise (BN). The model incorporates the generally accepted physics of domain wall movement and pinning. Computer simulations on this model reproduces the main features of the hysteresis loop and Barkhausen jumps. The statistics of the obtained Barkhausen jumps follows several scaling laws, in qualitative agreement with experimental results. The model consists of a one-dimensional frictional spring-block system. The blocks model the Bloch-walls that separate inversely oriented magnetic domains, and springs correspond to the magnetized regions. Three types of realistic forces are modelled with this system: 1. the force resulting from the magnetic energy of the neighboring domains in external magnetic field (modelled by forces having alternating orientations and acting directly on the blocks); 2. the force resulting from the magnetic self-energy of each domain (modelled by the elastic forces of the springs); 3. the pinning forces acting on the domain walls (modelled by position dependent static friction acting on blocks). The dynamics of the system is governed by searching for equilibrium: one particular domain wall can jump to the next pinning center if the resultant of forces 1. and 2. is greater then the pinning force. The external magnetic field is successively increased (or decreased) and the system is relaxed to mechanical equilibrium. During the simulations we are monitoring the variation of the magnetization focusing on the shape of the hysteresis loop, power spectrum, jump size (avalanche size) distribution, signal duration distribution, signal area distribution. The simulated shape of the hysteresis loops fulfills all the requirements for real magnetization phenomena. The power spectrum indicates different behavior in the low (1/f noise) and high (white noise) frequency region. All the relevant distribution functions show scaling behavior over several decades of magnitude with a naturally

  13. Linear magnetic spring and spring/motor combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Paul J. (Inventor); Stolfi, Fred R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic spring, or a spring and motor combination, providing a linear spring force characteristic in each direction from a neutral position, in which the spring action may occur for any desired coordinate of a typical orthogonal coordinate system. A set of magnets are disposed, preferably symmetrically about a coordinate axis, poled orthogonally to the desired force direction. A second set of magnets, respectively poled opposite the first set, are arranged on the sprung article. The magnets of one of the sets are spaced a greater distance apart than those of the other, such that an end magnet from each set forms a pair having preferably planar faces parallel to the direction of spring force, the faces being offset so that in a neutral position the outer edge of the closer spaced magnet set is aligned with the inner edge of the greater spaced magnet set. For use as a motor, a coil can be arranged with conductors orthogonal to both the magnet pole directions and the direction of desired spring force, located across from the magnets of one set and fixed with respect to the magnets of the other set. In a cylindrical coordinate system having axial spring force, the magnets are radially poled and motor coils are concentric with the cylinder axis.

  14. System assessment of helical reactors in comparison with tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Imagawa, S.; Muroga, T.; Sagara, A.; Okamura, S.

    2002-10-01

    A comparative assessment of tokamak and helical reactors has been performed using equivalent physics/engineering model and common costing model. Higher-temperature plasma operation is required in tokamak reactors to increase bootstrap current fraction and to reduce current-drive (CD) power. In helical systems, lower-temperature operation is feasible and desirable to reduce helical ripple transport. The capital cost of helical reactor is rather high, however, the cost of electricity (COE) is almost same as that of tokamak reactor because of smaller re-circulation power (no CD power) and less-frequent blanket replacement (lower neutron wall loading). The standard LHD-type helical reactor with 5% beta value is economically equivalent to the standard tokamak with 3% beta. The COE of lower-aspect ratio helical reactor is on the same level of high-β N tokamak reactors. (author)

  15. Elastic properties of Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Shigeru; Furuta, Tadahiko; Hwang, Junghwan; Nishino, Kazuaki; Saito, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements under tensile loading and dynamic mechanical analysis were performed to investigate the mechanisms of elastic deformation in Gum Metal. Tensile stress-strain curves for Gum Metal indicate that cold working substantially decreases the elastic modulus while increasing the yield strength, thereby confirming nonlinearity in the elastic range. The gradient of each curve decreased continuously to about one-third its original value near the elastic limit. As a result of this decrease in elastic modulus and nonlinearity, elastic deformability reaches 2.5% after cold working. Superelasticity is attributed to stress-induced martensitic transformations, although the large elastic deformation in Gum Metal is not accompanied by a phase transformation

  16. A bountiful spring harvest

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Although we recently put the clocks forward and spring has officially begun, the view from my window looks more autumnal – befitting of the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, rather than that of sowing seeds for the future. Which, in a way is appropriate. With the LHC paused, we are reaping a kind of harvest in the form of recognition for our efforts.   Two weeks ago, I was in Edinburgh, on behalf of everyone at CERN, to collect the Edinburgh medal, which we shared with Peter Higgs. I particularly like the citation for this honour: “The Edinburgh Medal is awarded each year to men and women of science and technology whose professional achievements are judged to have made a significant contribution to the understanding and well-being of humanity.” I like this, because it underlines a fact that needs to be shouted louder – that fundamental science does more than build the sum of human knowledge, it is also the foundation of human well-being. A few d...

  17. Spring comes for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Butin, F.

    2004-01-01

    (First published in the CERN weekly bulletin 24/2004, 7 June 2004.) A short while ago the ATLAS cavern underwent a spring clean, marking the end of the installation of the detector's support structures and the cavern's general infrastructure. The list of infrastructure to be installed in the ATLAS cavern from September 2003 was long: a thousand tonnes of mechanical structures spread over 13 storeys, two lifts, two 65-tonne overhead travelling cranes 25 metres above cavern floor, with a telescopic boom and cradle to access the remaining 10 metres of the cavern, a ventilation system for the 55 000 cubic metre cavern, a drainage system, a standard sprinkler system and an innovative foam fire-extinguishing system, as well as the external cryogenic system for the superconducting magnets and the liquid argon calorimeters (comprising, amongst other things, two helium refrigeration units, a nitrogen refrigeration unit and 5 km of piping for gaseous or liquid helium and nitrogen), not to mention the handling eq...

  18. Exploring the Local Elastic Properties of Bilayer Membranes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieffet, Gilles; Botero, Alonso; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane mechanical elastic properties regulate a variety of cellular processes involving local membrane deformation, such as ion channel function and vesicle fusion. In this work, we used molecular dynamics simulations to estimate the local elastic properties of a membrane. For this, we calculated...... the stretching process in molecular detail, allowing us to fit this profile to a previously proposed continuum elastic model. Through this approach, we calculated an effective membrane spring constant of 42 kJ-2.mol-1, which is in good agreement with the PMF calculation. Furthermore, the solvation energy we...

  19. A Study of the Preload Force in Metal-Elastomer Torsion Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikora Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neidhart type suspension units composed of metal-elastomer torsion springs can be a good alternative to steel helical springs in applications such as vibration absorbers or vehicle suspension systems. Assembling this type of spring requires initial preload of the elastomeric working elements, which determines their operating properties. The results of experimental tests and numerical simulations concerning the preload of elastomeric working elements in Neidhart type suspension units are presented in the paper. The performed research made it possible to propose a new calculation model for determining the preload force value acting on the elastomeric cylindrical elements applied in this type of suspension unit. The results obtained using the proposed model exhibit good convergence with FEM simulation results within the range of the tested geometrical and material properties.

  20. Alteration of helical vortex core without change in flow topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2011-01-01

    topology. The helical symmetry as such is preserved, although the characteristic parameters of helical symmetry of the vortex core transfer from a smooth linear variation to a different trend under the influence of a non-uniform pressure gradient, causing an increase in helical pitch without changing its......The abrupt expansion of the slender vortex core with changes in flow topology is commonly known as vortex breakdown. We present new experimental observations of an alteration of the helical vortex core in wall bounded turbulent flow with abrupt growth in core size, but without change in flow...

  1. Helicity conservation under quantum reconnection of vortex rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccher, Simone; Ricca, Renzo L

    2015-12-01

    Here we show that under quantum reconnection, simulated by using the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation, self-helicity of a system of two interacting vortex rings remains conserved. By resolving the fine structure of the vortex cores, we demonstrate that the total length of the vortex system reaches a maximum at the reconnection time, while both writhe helicity and twist helicity remain separately unchanged throughout the process. Self-helicity is computed by two independent methods, and topological information is based on the extraction and analysis of geometric quantities such as writhe, total torsion, and intrinsic twist of the reconnecting vortex rings.

  2. Superposition of helical beams by using a Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunqing; Qi, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yidong; Weber, Horst

    2010-01-04

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a helical beam is of great interests in the high density optical communication due to its infinite number of eigen-states. In this paper, an experimental setup is realized to the information encoding and decoding on the OAM eigen-states. A hologram designed by the iterative method is used to generate the helical beams, and a Michelson interferometer with two Porro prisms is used for the superposition of two helical beams. The experimental results of the collinear superposition of helical beams and their OAM eigen-states detection are presented.

  3. Progress with helicity injection current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Raman, R.; Nelson, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) experiments in the NSTX and HIT-II devices are reported. NSTX has produced toroidal currents of 0.4 MA and pulse lengths of up to 0.33 s. These discharges nearly fill the NSTX main chamber, and show the n=1 rotating distortion characteristic of high-performance CHI plasmas. CHI has been used in HIT-II to provide a closed flux startup plasma for inductive drive. The CHI startup method saves transformer volt-seconds and greatly improves reproducibility and reliability of inductively driven discharges, even in the presence of diminishing wall conditions. (author)

  4. Heat loss by helicity injection in spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for spheromak buildup and decay including thermal diffusivity associated with magnetic turbulence during helicity injection. It is shown that heat loss by magnetic turbulence scales more favorably than gyroBohm transport. Thus gyroBohm scaling for the proposed ignition experiment would be the conservative choice, though present experiments may be dominated by magnetic turbulence. Because of a change in boundary conditions when the gun is turned off, the model may account for the observed increase in electron temperature in CTX after turnoff

  5. Rotation influence on the plasma helical instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutkin, T.I.; Tsypin, V.S.; Boleslavskaya, G.I.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of the rotation on helical instability of a plasma with the fixed boundaries (HIFB) is investigated taking into account the compressibility. A case of infinitely long cylinder with distributed current is considered. Cases when a rotating plasma is confined by current magnetic field are analytically considered. It is shown that in the case of the fixed boundary taking into account the compressibility in the HIFB increment increases and the picture of the rotation influence on HIFB considerably changes. Besides, it is shown that in the case of high plasma pressures HIFB can stabilize as a result of the rotation

  6. Measurement of elastic ω photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-08-01

    The reaction γp→ωp (ω→π + π - π 0 and π 0 →γγ) has been studied in ep interactions using the ZEUS detector at photon-proton centre-of-mass energies between 70 and 90 GeV and vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 , where t is the squared four momentum transferred at the proton vertex. The elastic ω photoproduction cross section has been measured to be σ γp→ωp =1.21±0.12±0.23 μb. The differential cross section dσ γp→ωp /d vertical stroke t vertical stroke has an exponential shape e -b vertical stroke t vertical stroke with a slope b=10.0±1.2±1.3 GeV -2 . The angular distributions of the decay pions are consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. When compared to low energy data, the features of ω photoproduction as measured at HERA energies are in agreement with those of a soft diffractive process. Previous measurements of the ρ 0 and φ photoproduction cross sections at HERA show a similar behaviour. (orig.)

  7. Running With an Elastic Lower Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Michael S; Kota, Sridhar; Young, Aaron; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many lower limb robotic exoskeletons that have been tested for human walking, few devices have been tested for assisting running. It is possible that a pseudo-passive elastic exoskeleton could benefit human running without the addition of electrical motors due to the spring-like behavior of the human leg. We developed an elastic lower limb exoskeleton that added stiffness in parallel with the entire lower limb. Six healthy, young subjects ran on a treadmill at 2.3 m/s with and without the exoskeleton. Although the exoskeleton was designed to provide ~50% of normal leg stiffness during running, it only provided 24% of leg stiffness during testing. The difference in added leg stiffness was primarily due to soft tissue compression and harness compliance decreasing exoskeleton displacement during stance. As a result, the exoskeleton only supported about 7% of the peak vertical ground reaction force. There was a significant increase in metabolic cost when running with the exoskeleton compared with running without the exoskeleton (ANOVA, P exoskeletons for human running are human-machine interface compliance and the extra lower limb inertia from the exoskeleton.

  8. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  9. Form finding in elastic gridshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Changyeob; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O.; Jawed, Mohammad K.; Reis, Pedro M.

    2018-01-01

    Elastic gridshells comprise an initially planar network of elastic rods that are actuated into a shell-like structure by loading their extremities. The resulting actuated form derives from the elastic buckling of the rods subjected to inextensibility. We study elastic gridshells with a focus on the rational design of the final shapes. Our precision desktop experiments exhibit complex geometries, even from seemingly simple initial configurations and actuation processes. The numerical simulations capture this nonintuitive behavior with excellent quantitative agreement, allowing for an exploration of parameter space that reveals multistable states. We then turn to the theory of smooth Chebyshev nets to address the inverse design of hemispherical elastic gridshells. The results suggest that rod inextensibility, not elastic response, dictates the zeroth-order shape of an actuated elastic gridshell. As it turns out, this is the shape of a common household strainer. Therefore, the geometry of Chebyshev nets can be further used to understand elastic gridshells. In particular, we introduce a way to quantify the intrinsic shape of the empty, but enclosed regions, which we then use to rationalize the nonlocal deformation of elastic gridshells to point loading. This justifies the observed difficulty in form finding. Nevertheless, we close with an exploration of concatenating multiple elastic gridshell building blocks.

  10. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fufei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7–20 Hz range.

  11. The Begg's uprighting spring - Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Sundareswaran, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Uprighting springs, an integral part of the Begg ligsht wire differential force technique is gaining more and more popularity, as a useful adjunct in contemporary preadjusted edgewise appliance systems as well. It can be used with brackets containing vertical slots for mesiodistal crown uprighting, or as braking auxiliaries providing additional anchorage while protracting posteriors. Here, we present a simple and quick chair side method of fabricating and customizing uprighting springs according to the required crown/root movement for correction. This communication would serve as a ready reckoner during fabrication of the springs, thus dispelling the confusion that usually arises regarding direction and position of the coil and active arm.

  12. Mathematical foundations of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Jerrold E

    1994-01-01

    This advanced-level study approaches mathematical foundations of three-dimensional elasticity using modern differential geometry and functional analysis. It is directed to mathematicians, engineers and physicists who wish to see this classical subject in a modern setting with examples of newer mathematical contributions. Prerequisites include a solid background in advanced calculus and the basics of geometry and functional analysis.The first two chapters cover the background geometry ― developed as needed ― and use this discussion to obtain the basic results on kinematics and dynamics of con

  13. Elastic and viscoplastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebensohn, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review crystal elasticity and plasticity-based self-consistent theories and apply them to the determination of the effective response of polycrystalline aggregates. These mean-field formulations, which enable the prediction of the mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline aggregates based on the heterogeneous and/or directional properties of their constituent single crystal grains and phases, are ideal tools to establish relationships between microstructure and properties of these materials, ubiquitous among fuels and structural materials for nuclear systems. (author)

  14. The influence of spring length on the physical parameters of simple harmonic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triana, C A; Fajardo, F

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse the influence of spring length on the simple harmonic motion of a spring-mass system. In particular, we study the effect of changing the spring length on the elastic constant k, the angular frequency ω and the damping factor γ of the oscillations. To characterize the behaviour of these variables we worked with a series of springs of seven different lengths, in which the elastic constant was found by means of the spring-elongation measurement and ω was obtained from the measurement of the oscillation period T of a suspended mass. The oscillatory movement was recorded using a force sensor and the γ value was determined by the fit of the envelope oscillations. Graphical analysis of the results shows that k, ω and γ decrease when the natural spring length increases. This experiment can be performed with equipment normally found in undergraduate physics laboratories. In addition, through graphical analysis students can deduce some relationships between variables that determine the simple harmonic motion behaviour. (paper)

  15. Stress corrosion cracking lifetime prediction of spring screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    A lifetime prediction of holddown spring screw in nuclear fuel assembly was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure and to predict the stress corrosion cracking life of the screw, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Normalized stress intensity factors for PWSCC life prediction was proposed. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.78 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  16. CURRENT AND KINETIC HELICITY OF LONG-LIVED ACTIVITY COMPLEXES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Gosain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We study long-lived activity complexes and their current helicity at the solar surface and their kinetic helicity below the surface. The current helicity has been determined from synoptic vector magnetograms from the NSO/SOLIS facility, and the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows has been determined with ring-diagram analysis applied to full-disk Dopplergrams from NSO/GONG and SDO/HMI. Current and kinetic helicity of activity complexes follow the hemispheric helicity rule with mainly positive values (78%; 78%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 31%) in the southern hemisphere and negative ones (80%; 93%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 22% and 14%, respectively) in the northern hemisphere. The locations with the dominant sign of kinetic helicity derived from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and SDO/HMI data are more organized than those of the secondary sign even if they are not part of an activity complex, while locations with the secondary sign are more fragmented. This is the case for both hemispheres even for the northern one where it is not as obvious visually due to the large amount of magnetic activity present as compared to the southern hemisphere. The current helicity shows a similar behavior. The dominant sign of current helicity is the same as that of kinetic helicity for the majority of the activity complexes (83% with a 95% confidence level of 15%). During the 24 Carrington rotations analyzed here, there is at least one longitude in each hemisphere where activity complexes occur repeatedly throughout the epoch. These ''active'' longitudes are identifiable as locations of strong current and kinetic helicity of the same sign

  17. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Neutrino helicity flips via electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaemers, K.J.F.; Gandhi, R.; Lattimer, J.M.; Department of Earth and Space Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1989-01-01

    Electroweak mechanisms via which neutrinos may flip helicity are examined in detail. Exact and approximate expressions for a variety of flip processes relevant in astrophysics and cosmology, mediated by W, Z, and γ exchange, including their interference, are derived for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos (with emphasis on the former). It is shown that in general flip and nonflip cross sections differ by more than just a multiplicative factor of m/sub ν/ 2 /4E/sub ν/ 2 contrary to what might be expected and that this additional dependence on helicities can be significant. It is also shown that within the context of the standard model with massive neutrinos, for νe yields νe scattering, σ/sub Z//sup flip//σ/sub γ//sup flip/ ∼ 10 4 , independent of particle masses and energies to a good approximation. As an application, using some general considerations and the fact that the observed bar nu/sub e/ burst from SN 1987A lasted several seconds, these weak-interaction flip cross sections are used to rule out μ and tau neutrino masses above 30 keV. Finally, some other consequences for astrophysics in general and supernovae in particular are briefly discussed

  19. Helical type thermonuclear device and control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Yukio.

    1990-01-01

    In a conventional helical type thermonuclear device, electric current flows in the toroidal direction under magnetic fields of helical coils and vertical magnetic coils, by which a circulating electric field is caused. Therefore, there is a problem that electrons as a seed are generated by cosmic rays, etc., the electrons are confined in a magnetic field boundary, are accelerated by the circulating electric field, to reach a high energy level, collide against structures in a vacuum vessel and emit a great amount of X-rays. Then, compensation coils for offsetting the magnetic fields generated upon energization and deenergization of the vertical magnetic coils and the power source therefor are disposed at the positions opposing to each other on both sides of the vertical magnetic coils for controlling the variation coefficient rate of electric current upon energization and deenergization of the vertical magnetic coils. Since the compensation coils also offset the magnetic field generated upon energization and deenergization of the vertical magnetic field coils by this control, the circulating magnetic field is not caused in the vacuum vessel to reduce the X-ray radiation by electrons at high energy level. (N.H.)

  20. Determining How Magnetic Helicity Injection Really Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul M Bellan

    2001-01-01

    OAK-B135 The goal of the Caltech program is to determine how helicity injection works by investigating the actual dynamics and topological evolution associated with magnetic relaxation. A new coaxial helicity injection source has been constructed and brought into operation. The key feature of this source is that it has maximum geometric simplicity. Besides being important for fusion research, this work also has astrophysical implications. Photos obtained using high-speed cameras show a clear sequence of events in the formation process. In particular, they show initial merging/reconnection processes, jet-like expansion, kinking, and separation of the plasma from the source. Various diagnostics have been developed, including laser induced fluorescence and soft x-ray detection using high speed diodes. Gas valves have been improved and a patent disclosure relating to puffed gas valves has been filed. Presentations on this work have been given in the form of invited talks at several university physics departments that were previously unfamiliar with laboratory plasma experiments

  1. On the motion of multiple helical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D. H.; Boersma, J.

    2001-11-01

    The analysis of the self-induced velocity of a single helical vortex (Boersma & Wood 1999) is extended to include equally spaced multiple vortices. This arrangement approximates the tip vortices in the far wake of multi-bladed wind turbines, propellers, or rotors in ascending, descending, or hovering flight. The problem is reduced to finding, from the Biot Savart law, the additional velocity of a helix due to an identical helix displaced azimuthally. The resulting Biot Savart integral is further reduced to a Mellin Barnes integral representation which allows the asymptotic expansions to be determined for small and for large pitch. The Biot Savart integral is also evaluated numerically for a total of two, three and four vortices over a range of pitch values. The previous finding that the self-induced velocity at small pitch is dominated by a term inversely proportional to the pitch carries over to multiple vortices. It is shown that a far wake dominated by helical tip vortices is consistent with the one-dimensional representation that leads to the Betz limit on the power output of wind turbines. The small-pitch approximation then allows the determination of the blade&s bound vorticity for optimum power extraction. The present analysis is shown to give reasonable estimates for the vortex circulation in experiments using a single hovering rotor and a four-bladed propeller.

  2. Perspectives on confinement in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae

    1989-01-01

    A review on recent experimental results and theoretical models on anomalous transport and density limit in toroidal helical devices is presented. Importance of transport problems is discussed. Experiments on Heliotron-E, Wendelstein-VIIA and new devices, i.e., ATF, Wendelstein-VIIAS and CHS, are reviewed and an overview on confinement property is given. From recent experimental results one sees that there are anomalous transport, which increases with temperature, and density limit, and that they limit the energy confinement time as well as the attainable beta value. The confinement characteristics of the scrape off layer plasma and loss cone loss are discussed, and perspectives on the high temperature plasma are given. These anomalous transport and density limit will be difficult obstacles in realizing a reactor grade plasma in helical systems. It is an urgent task to draw a realistic picture of the confinement based on the present data base. The relevant knowledge now would be critically essential for the successful development of the research in 1990's. (author) 102 refs

  3. Neutrino helicity reversal and fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentschura, U D; Wundt, B J

    2014-01-01

    A rather elusive helicity reversal occurs in a gedanken experiment in which a massive left-handed Dirac neutrino, traveling at a velocity u < c, is overtaken on a highway by a speeding vehicle (traveling at velocity v with u < v < c). Namely, after passing the neutrino, looking back, one would see a right-handed neutrino (which has never been observed in nature). The Lorentz-invariant mass of the right-handed neutrino is still the same as before the passing. The gedanken experiment thus implies the existence of right-handed, light neutrinos, which are not completely sterile. Furthermore, overtaking a bunch of massive right-handed Dirac neutrinos leads to gradual de-sterilization. We discuss the helicity reversal and the concomitant sterilization and de-sterilization mechanisms by way of an illustrative example calculation, with a special emphasis on massive Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. We contrast the formalism with a modified Dirac neutrino described by a Dirac equation with a pseudoscalar mass term proportional to the fifth current. (paper)

  4. Quality assurance of a helical tomotherapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, J D; Tome, W A; Jaradat, H A; Hui, S K; James, J A; Balog, J P; DeSouza, C N; Lucas, D B; Olivera, G H; Mackie, T R; Paliwal, B R

    2004-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy has been developed at the University of Wisconsin, and 'Hi-Art II' clinical machines are now commercially manufactured. At the core of each machine lies a ring-gantry-mounted short linear accelerator which generates x-rays that are collimated into a fan beam of intensity-modulated radiation by a binary multileaf, the modulation being variable with gantry angle. Patients are treated lying on a couch which is translated continuously through the bore of the machine as the gantry rotates. Highly conformal dose-distributions can be delivered using this technique, which is the therapy equivalent of spiral computed tomography. The approach requires synchrony of gantry rotation, couch translation, accelerator pulsing and the opening and closing of the leaves of the binary multileaf collimator used to modulate the radiation beam. In the course of clinically implementing helical tomotherapy, we have developed a quality assurance (QA) system for our machine. The system is analogous to that recommended for conventional clinical linear accelerator QA by AAPM Task Group 40 but contains some novel components, reflecting differences between the Hi-Art devices and conventional clinical accelerators. Here the design and dosimetric characteristics of Hi-Art machines are summarized and the QA system is set out along with experimental details of its implementation. Connections between this machine-based QA work, pre-treatment patient-specific delivery QA and fraction-by-fraction dose verification are discussed

  5. Mathematical methods in elasticity imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Habib; Garnier, Josselin; Kang, Hyeonbae; Lee, Hyundae; Wahab, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first to comprehensively explore elasticity imaging and examines recent, important developments in asymptotic imaging, modeling, and analysis of deterministic and stochastic elastic wave propagation phenomena. It derives the best possible functional images for small inclusions and cracks within the context of stability and resolution, and introduces a topological derivative-based imaging framework for detecting elastic inclusions in the time-harmonic regime. For imaging extended elastic inclusions, accurate optimal control methodologies are designed and the effects of uncertainties of the geometric or physical parameters on stability and resolution properties are evaluated. In particular, the book shows how localized damage to a mechanical structure affects its dynamic characteristics, and how measured eigenparameters are linked to elastic inclusion or crack location, orientation, and size. Demonstrating a novel method for identifying, locating, and estimating inclusions and cracks in elastic...

  6. Laurel Springs & DoDEA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jhung, Seung

    2000-01-01

    At the request of the client organization, Laurel Springs School, we developed an in-depth market analysis of comparable educational programs offered within the Department of Defense Education Activities (DoDEA...

  7. Elastic emission polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  8. Heavy ion elastic scatterings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Diffraction and refraction play an important role in particle elastic scattering. The optical model treats correctly and simultaneously both phenomena but without disentangling them. Semi-classical discussions in terms of trajectories emphasize the refractive aspect due to the real part of the optical potential. The separation due to to R.C. Fuller of the quantal cross section into two components coming from opposite side of the target nucleus allows to understand better the refractive phenomenon and the origin of the observed oscillations in the elastic scattering angular distributions. We shall see that the real part of the potential is responsible of a Coulomb and a nuclear rainbow which allows to determine better the nuclear potential in the interior region near the nuclear surface since the volume absorption eliminates any effect of the real part of the potential for the internal partial scattering waves. Resonance phenomena seen in heavy ion scattering will be discussed in terms of optical model potential and Regge pole analysis. Compound nucleus resonances or quasi-molecular states can be indeed the more correct and fundamental alternative

  9. Design guidance for elastic followup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed

  10. Income Elasticity of Environmental Amenities

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Miles; Andrés Pereyra; Máximo Rossi

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the estimation of income elasticities of environmental amenities. The novelty is the application of econometric methods that take into account the problem of measurement errors when estimating these elasticities, which are common in microeconomic data and are not usually considered in the applied literature related with this issue. Our aim is to discuss whether the measurement error has signi…cant e¤ects on the elasticities. Data from the Expenditure Budget...

  11. Spring Small Grains Area Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, W. F.; Mohler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    SSG3 automatically estimates acreage of spring small grains from Landsat data. Report describes development and testing of a computerized technique for using Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to estimate acreage of spring small grains (wheat, barley, and oats). Application of technique to analysis of four years of data from United States and Canada yielded estimates of accuracy comparable to those obtained through procedures that rely on trained analysis.

  12. Marble Canyon spring sampling investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulley, B.

    1985-10-01

    The Mississippian Leadville Limestone is the most permeable formation in the lower hydrostratigraphic unit underlying the salt beds of the Paradox Formation in Gibson Dome, Paradox Basin, Utah, which is being considered as a potential nuclear waste repository site. The closest downgradient outcrop of the Mississippian limestone is along the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Arizona. This report describes the sampling and interpretation of springs in that area to assess the relative contribution of Gibson Dome-type Leadville Limestone ground water to that spring discharge. The high-volume (hundreds of liters per second or thousands of gallons per minute) springs discharging from fault zones in Marble Canyon are mixtures of water recharged west of the Colorado River on the Kaibab Plateau and east of the river in the Kaiparowits basin. No component of Gibson Dome-type Leadville Limestone ground water is evident in major and trace element chemistry or isotopic composition of the Marble Canyon Springs. A low-volume (0.3 liters per second or 5 gallons per minute) spring with some chemical and isotopic characteristics of Gibson Dome-type Leadville Limestone water diluted by Kaiparowits basin-type water issues from a travertine mound in the Bright Angel Shale on the Little Colorado River. However, the stable isotopic composition and bromide levels of that spring discharge, in addition to probable ground-water flow paths, contradict the dilution hypothesis

  13. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... large-scale magnetic field arising due to non-helical interactions and (2) inverse energy flux of magnetic energy caused by helical interactions. Based on our flux results, a primitive model for galactic dynamo has been constructed. Our calculations yield dynamo time-scale for a typical galaxy to be of the order of 108 years.

  14. Alpha-Effect, Current and Kinetic Helicities for Magnetically Driven ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Key words. Sun—dynamo, helicity, turbulent convection. Extended abstract. Recent numerical simulations lead to the result that turbulence is much more mag- netically driven than believed. ... positive (and negative in the northern hemisphere), this being just opposite to what occurs for the current helicity which is negative ...

  15. Space vehicle electromechanical system and helical antenna winding fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Guenther, David; Enemark, Donald; Seitz, Daniel; Martinez, John; Storms, Steven

    2017-12-26

    A space vehicle electromechanical system may employ an architecture that enables convenient and practical testing, reset, and retesting of solar panel and antenna deployment on the ground. A helical antenna winding fixture may facilitate winding and binding of the helical antenna.

  16. Low-energy properties of fractional helical Luttinger liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, T.; Fritz, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371569559; Schuricht, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369284690; Loss, D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the low-energy properties of (quasi) helical and fractional helical Luttinger liquids. In particular, we calculate the Drude peak of the optical conductivity, the density of states, as well as charge transport properties of the interacting system with and without attached Fermi liquid

  17. A helical naphthopyran dopant for photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yuna; Frigoli, Michel; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Tamaoki, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    The first photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystal comprising a photoisomerizable helical naphthopyran derivative dopant and a nematic liquid crystal is reported. An unprecedented helical twisting power switching ratio of over 90% allowed us to demonstrate multi-cycle rotational motion of micro-objects by UV light irradiation.

  18. Helical modes generate antimagnetic rotational spectra in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2018-03-01

    A systematic analysis of the antimagnetic rotation band using r -helicity formalism is carried out for the first time. The observed octupole correlation in a nucleus is likely to play a role in establishing the antimagnetic spectrum. Such octupole correlations are explained within the helical orbits. In a rotating field, two identical fermions (generally protons) with paired spins generate these helical orbits in such a way that its positive (i.e., up) spin along the axis of quantization refers to one helicity (right-handedness) while negative (down) spin along the same quantization-axis decides another helicity (left-handedness). Since the helicity remains invariant under rotation, therefore, the quantum state of a fermion is represented by definite angular momentum and helicity. These helicity represented states support a pear-shaped structure of a rotating system having z axis as the symmetry axis. A combined operation of parity, time-reversal, and signature symmetries ensures an absence of one of the signature partner band from the observed antimagnetic spectrum. This formalism has also been tested for the recently observed negative parity Δ I =2 antimagnetic spectrum in odd-A 101Pd nucleus and explains nicely its energy spectrum as well as the B (E 2 ) values. Further, this formalism is found to be fully consistent with twin-shears mechanism popularly known for such type of rotational bands. It also provides significant clue for extending these experiments in various mass regions spread over the nuclear chart.

  19. Experimental investigation of solar powered diaphragm and helical pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    For several years, many types of solar powered water pumping systems were evaluated, and in this paper, diaphragm and helical solar photovoltaic (PV) powered water pumping systems are discussed. Data were collected on diaphragm and helical pumps which were powered by different solar PV arrays at mul...

  20. Dynamic Analysis of Helical Planetary Gear Sets under Combined Force and Moment Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of a single-stage planetary gear set with helical gears of multishaft automotive automatic transmissions has been studied, in which one component of the planetary gear set is imposed by additional external vertical and axial loading from countershaft gear pair in addition to the moment. Under these combined loading conditions, the contributions of the deflections of the ring gear and the carrier cannot be neglected. A three-dimensional nonlinear time-variant dynamic model considering not only the transverse, torsional, axial, and rotational motions of the gears but also the elasticity of the mounted shafts has been developed by combining the lumped parameter method with finite element method. The natural modes and the forced vibration responses due to static transmission errors have been obtained. The proposed dynamic model is employed to describe the effects of the combined external loading condition and positioning on the dynamic behavior of a four-planet system.

  1. Stimuli-Directed Helical Chirality Inversion and Bio-Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyu Lv

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical structure is a sophisticated ubiquitous motif found in nature, in artificial polymers, and in supramolecular assemblies from microscopic to macroscopic points of view. Significant progress has been made in the synthesis and structural elucidation of helical polymers, nevertheless, a new direction for helical polymeric materials, is how to design smart systems with controllable helical chirality, and further use them to develop chiral functional materials and promote their applications in biology, biochemistry, medicine, and nanotechnology fields. This review summarizes the recent progress in the development of high-performance systems with tunable helical chirality on receiving external stimuli and discusses advances in their applications as drug delivery vesicles, sensors, molecular switches, and liquid crystals. Challenges and opportunities in this emerging area are also presented in the conclusion.

  2. Helicity conservation and twisted Seifert surfaces for superfluid vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Hayder

    2017-04-01

    Starting from the continuum definition of helicity, we derive from first principles its different contributions for superfluid vortices. Our analysis shows that an internal twist contribution emerges naturally from the mathematical derivation. This reveals that the spanwise vector that is used to characterize the twist contribution must point in the direction of a surface of constant velocity potential. An immediate consequence of the Seifert framing is that the continuum definition of helicity for a superfluid is trivially zero at all times. It follows that the Gauss-linking number is a more appropriate definition of helicity for superfluids. Despite this, we explain how a quasi-classical limit can arise in a superfluid in which the continuum definition for helicity can be used. This provides a clear connection between a microscopic and a macroscopic description of a superfluid as provided by the Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations. This leads to consistency with the definition of helicity used for classical vortices.

  3. High performance operational limits of tokamak and helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Kozo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    The plasma operational boundaries of tokamak and helical systems are surveyed and compared with each other. Global confinement scaling laws are similar and gyro-Bohm like, however, local transport process is different due to sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks and ripple transport loss in helical systems. As for stability limits, achievable tokamak beta is explained by ideal or resistive MHD theories. On the other hand, beta values obtained so far in helical system are beyond ideal Mercier mode limits. Density limits in tokamak are often related to the coupling between radiation collapse and disruptive MHD instabilities, but the slow radiation collapse is dominant in the helical system. The pulse length of both tokamak and helical systems is on the order of hours in small machines, and the longer-pulsed good-confinement plasma operations compatible with radiative divertors are anticipated in both systems in the future. (author)

  4. On Helical Projection and Its Application in Screw Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riliang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As helical surfaces, in their many and varied forms, are finding more and more applications in engineering, new approaches to their efficient design and manufacture are desired. To that end, the helical projection method that uses curvilinear projection lines to map a space object to a plane is examined in this paper, focusing on its mathematical model and characteristics in terms of graphical representation of helical objects. A number of interesting projective properties are identified in regard to straight lines, curves, and planes, and then the method is further investigated with respect to screws. The result shows that the helical projection of a cylindrical screw turns out to be a Jordan curve, which is determined by the screw's axial profile and number of flights. Based on the projection theory, a practical approach to the modeling of screws and helical surfaces is proposed and illustrated with examples, and its possible application in screw manufacturing is discussed.

  5. Geometrically Nonlinear Transient Response of Laminated Plates with Nonlinear Elastic Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaochong Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dynamic behavior of laminated plates with nonlinear elastic restraints, a varied constraint force model and a systematic numerical procedure are presented in this work. Several kinds of typical relationships of force-displacement for spring are established to simulate the nonlinear elastic restraints. In addition, considering the restraining moments of flexible pads, the pads are modeled by translational and rotational springs. The displacement- dependent constraint forces are added to the right-hand side of equations of motion and treated as additional applied loads. These loads can be explicitly defined, via an independent set of nonlinear load functions. The time histories of transverse displacements at typical points of the laminated plate are obtained through the transient analysis. Numerical examples show that the present method can effectively treat the geometrically nonlinear transient response of plates with nonlinear elastic restraints.

  6. Engineered elastomeric proteins with dual elasticity can be controlled by a molecular regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2008-08-01

    Elastomeric proteins are molecular springs that confer excellent mechanical properties to many biological tissues and biomaterials. Depending on the role performed by the tissue or biomaterial, elastomeric proteins can behave as molecular springs or shock absorbers. Here we combine single-molecule atomic force microscopy and protein engineering techniques to create elastomeric proteins that can switch between two distinct types of mechanical behaviour in response to the binding of a molecular regulator. The proteins are mechanically labile by design and behave as entropic springs with an elasticity that is governed by their configurational entropy. However, when a molecular regulator binds to the protein, it switches into a mechanically stable state and can act as a shock absorber. These engineered proteins effectively mimic and combine the two extreme forms of elastic behaviour found in natural elastomeric proteins, and thus represent a new type of smart nanomaterial that will find potential applications in nanomechanics and material sciences.

  7. Internal transport barrier physics in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Herranz, J.; Ida, K.; Yamagishi, O.; Yamada, H.; Maaberg, H.; Beidler, C.D.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Castejon, F.; Murakami, S.

    2005-01-01

    The electron internal transport barrier (eITB) has been observed in wide range of helical systems, such as CHS [eg.,1], LHD [eg., 2], TJ-II [eg., 3] and W7-AS [eg., 4]. The eITB isA defined as highly peaked electron temperature (Te) profile with strongly positive radial electric field (Er) in the central region. These observations are reviewed in this paper to understand the device-independent common findings and also to draw the main differences. This is the first report from the International Stellarator Profile Database Activity. The formation of the strong central positive Er has been understood mainly as a result of the ambipolarity of neoclassical electron and ion fluxes, although some additional convective electron flux such as driven by ECRH is required in some situations. This 'neoclassical' physics peculiar to low collisional regime of helical plasmas provides the commonly observed existence of the ECRH power threshold (which is also depending on the density). This is contrastive characteristics to the ITB observed in tokamaks. The dependence of the ECRH power threshold on the magnetic configuration and on the heating scenario among these devices are currently being examined by taking the effective ripple and the trapped particle fraction as parameters to achieve the comprehensive understanding. The roles of low order rational surfaces on the onset of eITB formation and also on its radial size (location of the footpoint of the eITB) have been indicated in inward shifted configurations in LHD (depending on the relative locations of heating position and 2/1 island) and TJ-II (eITB becomes possible at higher density when 3/2 rational is introduced in the plasma core region). It is speculated that, for the latter case, the resonance causes an extra electron flux to trigger the positive Er. The interplay between low order rational surfaces and the formation of eITB still waits for the systematic experiment and theoretical analysis. The external controllability

  8. Patterns of uterine enhancement with helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, H.; Loyer, E.M.; Charnsangavej, C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Box 57, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Minami, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enhancement characteristics of the normal uterine body and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT. Methods: Thirty-eight women scheduled for pelvic CT for non-gynecologic malignancies underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT of the pelvis. Data acquisition was during the arterial phase (30-45 s after the start of injection), the parenchymal phase (90-120 s after the start of injection), and delayed phase (3-9 min after the start of injection). The images were evaluated by four radiologists for the pattern of myometrial and cervical enhancement. Correlation was made with the age and menstrual status of the patients. Results: In the uterine body, three types of enhancement were observed. Type 1 enhancement, seen in 16 patients (42%), was characterized by the visualization of a subendometrial zone of enhancement, 30-120 s after the start of injection. Eight of these patients also showed an enhancing zone in the outer myometrium. Both zones were transitory, and in all cases, the uterus became homogeneous in the delayed phase. This pattern was seen predominantly in premenopausal women with a mean age of 34 years. Type 2 enhancement, seen in 17 cases (45%), was defined by the absence of subendometrial enhancement in the early phase. Enhancement was either diffuse from the outset or originated in the outer myometrium. This pattern was seen nearly equally in premenopausal and postmenopausal women with a mean age of 40 years. Type 3 enhancement was seen in five postmenopausal patients (13%) with a mean age of 53 years and was characterized by faint diffuse enhancement. In the cervix, a zonal pattern of enhancement defining inner and outer stroma was seen in 23 patients (61%). Fifteen patients were premenopausal and eight were postmenopausal. Conclusion: In this study, we have shown a transitory zonal distribution of the contrast in the myometrium and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT

  9. Patterns of uterine enhancement with helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, H.; Loyer, E.M.; Charnsangavej, C.; Minami, M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enhancement characteristics of the normal uterine body and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT. Methods: Thirty-eight women scheduled for pelvic CT for non-gynecologic malignancies underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT of the pelvis. Data acquisition was during the arterial phase (30-45 s after the start of injection), the parenchymal phase (90-120 s after the start of injection), and delayed phase (3-9 min after the start of injection). The images were evaluated by four radiologists for the pattern of myometrial and cervical enhancement. Correlation was made with the age and menstrual status of the patients. Results: In the uterine body, three types of enhancement were observed. Type 1 enhancement, seen in 16 patients (42%), was characterized by the visualization of a subendometrial zone of enhancement, 30-120 s after the start of injection. Eight of these patients also showed an enhancing zone in the outer myometrium. Both zones were transitory, and in all cases, the uterus became homogeneous in the delayed phase. This pattern was seen predominantly in premenopausal women with a mean age of 34 years. Type 2 enhancement, seen in 17 cases (45%), was defined by the absence of subendometrial enhancement in the early phase. Enhancement was either diffuse from the outset or originated in the outer myometrium. This pattern was seen nearly equally in premenopausal and postmenopausal women with a mean age of 40 years. Type 3 enhancement was seen in five postmenopausal patients (13%) with a mean age of 53 years and was characterized by faint diffuse enhancement. In the cervix, a zonal pattern of enhancement defining inner and outer stroma was seen in 23 patients (61%). Fifteen patients were premenopausal and eight were postmenopausal. Conclusion: In this study, we have shown a transitory zonal distribution of the contrast in the myometrium and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT

  10. A helical optical for circular polarized UV-FEL project at the UVSOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, Hiroyuki [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Most of existing storage ring free electron lasers (SRFEL) are restricted those performances by degradation of mirrors in optical cavities. In general, the SRFEL gain at the short wavelength region with high energy electrons is quite low, and the high reflectivity mirrors such as dielectric multilayer mirrors are therefore required. The mirror degradation is considered as a result of irradiation of higher harmonic photons that are simultaneously emitted from planar optical klystron (OK) type undulators, which are commonly used in SRFEL. This problem is getting severer as the lasing wavelength becomes shorter. The UVSOR-FEL had been originally scheduled to be shutdown by 1996 because another undulator project for spectroscopic studies with circular polarized photon would take the FEL`s place. According to suggestion of the insertion device group of the SPring-8, we have designed a helical undulator that is able to vary degree and direction of the polarization easily. In addition, the undulator can be converted into a helical OK by replacing magnets at the center part of undulator in order to coexist with further FEL experiments. Using a calculated magnetic field for magnet configurations of the OK mode, the radiation spectrum at wide wavelength range was simulated by a Fourier transform of Lienard-Wiechert potentials. As a matter of course, some higher harmonics are radiated on the off-axis angle. However it was found out that the higher harmonics is almost negligible as far as inside a solid angle of the Gaussian laser mode. Moreover the gain at the UV region of 250 nm is expected to be much higher than our present FEL because of high brilliant fundamental radiation. The calculated spatial distribution of higher harmonics and the estimated instantaneous gain is presented. Advantages of the helical OK for SRFEL will be discussed in view of our experience, and a possibility of application two-color experiment with SR will be also mentioned.

  11. Failure analysis of top nozzle holddown spring screw for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.; Na, E. G.; Baek, T. H.; Jeon, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    A failure analysis of holddown spring screw was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis and a life prediction of the screw was made using a fracture mechanics approach. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.42 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  12. Questions about elastic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the modelling of mechanical waves by asking the right questions about them and trying to find suitable answers. The questions follow the analytical sequence from elementary understandings to complicated cases, following a step-by-step path towards increased knowledge. The focus is on waves in elastic solids, although some examples also concern non-conservative cases for the sake of completeness. Special attention is paid to the understanding of the influence of microstructure, nonlinearity and internal variables in continua. With the help of many mathematical models for describing waves, physical phenomena concerning wave dispersion, nonlinear effects, emergence of solitary waves, scales and hierarchies of waves as well as the governing physical parameters are analysed. Also, the energy balance in waves and non-conservative models with energy influx are discussed. Finally, all answers are interwoven into the canvas of complexity.

  13. Chaotic coordinates for the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, S. R., E-mail: shudson@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Suzuki, Y. [National Institute for Natural Sciences, National Institute for Fusion Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The theory of quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFM) surfaces is reviewed, and numerical techniques that allow high-order QFM surfaces to be efficiently constructed for experimentally relevant, non-integrable magnetic fields are described. As a practical example, the chaotic edge of the magnetic field in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is examined. A precise technique for finding the boundary surface is implemented, the hierarchy of partial barriers associated with the near-critical cantori is constructed, and a coordinate system, which we call chaotic coordinates, that is based on a selection of QFM surfaces is constructed that simplifies the description of the magnetic field, so that flux surfaces become “straight” and islands become “square.”.

  14. Helical spin rotators and snakes for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsin, V.I.; Shatunov, Yu.M.; Peggs, S.

    1995-01-01

    The RHIC collider, now under construction at BNL, will have the possibility of polarized proton-proton collisions up to a beam energy of 250 Gev. Polarized proton beams of such high energy can be only obtained with the use of siberian snakes, a special kind of spin rotator that rotates the particle spin by 180 degree around an axis lying in the horizontal plane. Siberian snakes help to preserve the beam polarization while numerous spin depolarizing resonances are crossed, during acceleration. In order to collide longitudinally polarized beams, it is also planned to install spin rotators around two interaction regions. This paper discusses snake and spin rotator designs based on sequences of four helical magnets. The schemes that were chosen to be applied at RHIC are presented

  15. ATLAS helicity analyses in beauty hadron decays

    CERN Document Server

    Smizanska, M

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS detector will allow a precise spatial reconstruction of the kinematics of B hadron decays. In combination with the efficient lepton identification applied already at trigger level, ATLAS is expected to provide large samples of exclusive decay channels cleanly separable from background. These data sets will allow spin-dependent analyses leading to the determination of production and decay parameters, which are not accessible if the helicity amplitudes are not separated. Measurement feasibility studies for decays B/sub s //sup 0/ to J/ psi phi and Lambda /sub b//sup 0/ to Lambda J/ psi , presented in this document, show the experimental precisions that can be achieved in determination of B/sub s//sup 0/ and Lambda /sub b //sup 0/ characteristics. (19 refs).

  16. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  17. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  18. Microinstability Studies for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Ku, L.-P.; Tang, W.M.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.; Cooper, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Fully kinetic assessments of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes have been obtained for cases for the Large Helical Device (LHD). This calculation employs the comprehensive linear microinstability code FULL, as recently extended for nonaxisymmetric systems. The code retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. These effects include trapped particles, FLR, transit and bounce and magnetic drift frequency resonances, etc., for any number of plasma species. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped electrons and ion temperature gradients are presented, using numerically-calculated three-dimensional MHD equilibria. These are reconstructed from experimental measurements. Quasilinear fluxes of particles and energy for each species are also calculated. Pairs of LHD discharges with different magnetic axis positions and with and without pellet injection are compared

  19. Characteristic features of edge transport barrier formed in helical divertor configuration of the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, F.

    2006-10-01

    In a helical divertor configuration of the Large Helical Device (LHD), transport barrier was formed through low to high confinement (L-H) transition in the plasma edge region including ergodic field layer of which region is in the magnetic hill. The plasma stored energy or the averaged bulk plasma beta dia > (derived from diamagnetic measurement) starts to increase just after the transition. In the case that both dia > and line-averaged electron density e > at the transition are relatively high as dia >≥1.5% and e >≥2x10 19 m -3 , the increase is hampered by rapid growth of edge MHD modes and/or small ELM like activities just after the transition. On the other hand, the transition at lower e > (≤1.5x10 19 m -3 ) and dia > (<2%) leads to a continuous increase in the stored energy with a time scale longer than the global energy confinement time, without suffering from these MHD activities near the edge. The ETB typically formed in electron density profile extends into ergodic field layer defined in the vacuum field. The width of ETB is almost independent of the toroidal field strength from 0.5T to 1.5T and is much larger than the poloidal ion gyro-radius. When resonant helical field perturbations are applied to expand a magnetic island size at the rational surface of the rotational transform ι/2π=1 near the edge, the L-H transition is triggered at lower electron density compared with the case without the field perturbations. The application of large helical field perturbations also suppresses edge MHD modes and ELM like activities. (author)

  20. Nonlinear Elasticity of Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0206 NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS Mark Dykman and Kirill Moskovtsev Michigan State University...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7600 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...vibration amplitude. 15. SUBJECT TERMS semiconductors , microresonators, microelectromechanical 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  1. Elasticity theory of ultrathin nanofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiangang; Yun, Guohong; Narsu, B; Yao, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    A self-consistent theoretical scheme for describing the elastic behavior of ultrathin nanofilms (UTNFs) was proposed. Taking into account the lower symmetry of an UTNF compared to its bulk counterpart, additional elastic and magnetoelastic parameters were introduced to model the elasticity rigorously. The applications of current theory to several elastic and magnetoelastic systems gave excellent agreement with experiments. More importantly, the surface elastic and magnetoelastic parameters used to fit the experimental results are physically reasonable and in close agreement with those obtained from experiment and simulation. This fact suggests that the additional elastic (magnetoelastic) constants due to symmetry breaking are of great importance in theoretical description of the mechanical properties of UTNFs. And we proved that the elasticity of UTNFs should be described by a three-dimensional model just including the intrinsic surface and bulk parameters, but not the effective surface parameters. It is believed that the theory reported here is a universal strategy for elasticity and magnetoelasticity of ultrathin films. (paper)

  2. Fossilization Processes in Thermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Cady, Sherry; Desmarais, David J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    To create a comparative framework for the study of ancient examples, we have been carrying out parallel studies of the microbial biosedimentology, taphonomy and geochemistry of modem and sub-Recent thermal spring deposits. One goal of the research is the development of integrated litho- and taphofacies models for siliceous and travertline sinters. Thermal springs are regarded as important environments for the origin and early evolution of life on Earth, and we seek to utilize information from the fossil record to reconstruct the evolution of high temperature ecosystems. Microbial contributions to the fabric of thermal spring sinters occur when population growth rates keep pace with, or exceed rates of inorganic precipitation, allowing for the development of continuous biofilms or mats. In siliceous thermal springs, microorganisms are typically entombed while viable. Modes of preservation reflect the balance between rates of organic matter degradation, silica precipitation and secondary infilling. Subaerial sinters are initially quite porous and permeable and at temperatures higher than about 20 C, organic materials are usually degraded prior to secondary infilling of sinter frameworks. Thus, organically-preserved microfossils are rare and fossil information consists of characteristic biofabrics formed by the encrustation and underplating of microbial mat surfaces. This probably accounts for the typically low total organic carbon values observed in thermal spring deposits. In mid-temperature, (approx. 35 - 59 C) ponds and outflows, the surface morphology of tufted Phormidium mats is preserved through mat underplating by thin siliceous: crusts. Microbial taxes lead to clumping of ceils and/or preferred filament orientations that together define higher order composite fabrics in thermal spring stromatolites (e.g. network, coniform, and palisade). At lower temperatures (less than 35 C), Calothrix mats cover shallow terracette pools forming flat carpets or pustular

  3. Cell Elasticity Determines Macrophage Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Naimish R.; Bole, Medhavi; Chen, Cheng; Hardin, Charles C.; Kho, Alvin T.; Mih, Justin; Deng, Linhong; Butler, James; Tschumperlin, Daniel; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Koziel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function. PMID:23028423

  4. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  5. Multipurpose hooks for elastic attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Shashidhar Revankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As certain bracket systems do not include hooks on premolar brackets for elastic attachment, Kobayashi or custom made ligature hooks have proven as an alternative. However, these hooks tend to bend labially when used with heavy elastics and these elastics can even pop loose from the hooks on mouth opening. The following article describes an innovative multipurpose hook which is simple, stiff and inexpensive and can be used for engagement of class II elastics on premolars in case of missing molars as well as engagement of intermaxillary elastics for settling of occlusion in finishing stages. As the hooks can be prefabricated, this saves a lot of chair side time and is more practical for use in day-to-day orthodontic practice.

  6. Measurement of elastic electroproduction of $\\phi$ mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazarian, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hoprich, W.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Kaufmann, O.; Kausch, M.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Krucker, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Kutuev, R.; Lachnit, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstrom, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Metlica, F.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.I.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Siegmon, G.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; von Dombrowski, S.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.

    2000-01-01

    The elastic electroproduction of phi mesons is studied at HERA with the H1 detector for photon virtualities 1 < Q^2 < 15 GeV^2 and hadronic centre of mass energies 40 < W < 130 GeV. The Q^2 and t dependences of the cross section are extracted (t being the square of the four-momentum transfer to the target proton). When plotted as function of (Q^2 + M_V^2) and scaled by the appropriate SU(5) quark charge factor, the phi meson cross section agrees within errors with the cross sections of the vector mesons V = rho, omega and J/psi. A detailed analysis is performed of the phi meson polarisation state and the ratio of the production cross sections for longitudinally and transversely polarised phi mesons is determined. A small but significant violation of s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC) is observed.

  7. Blocky inversion of multichannel elastic impedance for elastic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozayan, Davoud Karami; Gholami, Ali; Siahkoohi, Hamid Reza

    2018-04-01

    Petrophysical description of reservoirs requires proper knowledge of elastic parameters like P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) and density (ρ), which can be retrieved from pre-stack seismic data using the concept of elastic impedance (EI). We propose an inversion algorithm which recovers elastic parameters from pre-stack seismic data in two sequential steps. In the first step, using the multichannel blind seismic inversion method (exploited recently for recovering acoustic impedance from post-stack seismic data), high-resolution blocky EI models are obtained directly from partial angle-stacks. Using an efficient total-variation (TV) regularization, each angle-stack is inverted independently in a multichannel form without prior knowledge of the corresponding wavelet. The second step involves inversion of the resulting EI models for elastic parameters. Mathematically, under some assumptions, the EI's are linearly described by the elastic parameters in the logarithm domain. Thus a linear weighted least squares inversion is employed to perform this step. Accuracy of the concept of elastic impedance in predicting reflection coefficients at low and high angles of incidence is compared with that of exact Zoeppritz elastic impedance and the role of low frequency content in the problem is discussed. The performance of the proposed inversion method is tested using synthetic 2D data sets obtained from the Marmousi model and also 2D field data sets. The results confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method for inversion of pre-stack seismic data.

  8. General architecture of the alpha-helical globule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzin, A G; Finkelstein, A V

    1988-12-05

    A model is presented for the arrangement of alpha-helices in globular proteins. In the model, helices are placed on certain ribs of "quasi-spherical" polyhedra. The polyhedra are chosen so as to allow the close packing of helices around a hydrophobic core and to stress the collective interactions of the individual helices. The model predicts a small set of stable architectures for alpha-helices in globular proteins and describes the geometries of the helix packings. Some of the predicted helix arrangements have already been observed in known protein structures; others are new. An analysis of the three-dimensional structures of all proteins for which co-ordinates are available shows that the model closely approximates the arrangements and packing of helices actually observed. The average deviations of the real helix axes from those in the model polyhedra is +/- 20 degrees in orientation and +/- 2 A in position (1 A = 0.1 nm). We also show that for proteins that are not homologous, but whose helix arrangements are described by the same polyhedron, the root-mean-square difference in the position of the C alpha atoms in the helices is 1.6 to 3.0 A.

  9. MAGNETIC HELICITY FLUX IN THE PRESENCE OF SHEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic helicity has risen to be a major player in dynamo theory, with the helicity of the small-scale field being linked to the dynamo saturation process for the large-scale field. It is a nearly conserved quantity, which allows its evolution equation to be written in terms of production and flux terms. The flux term can be decomposed in a variety of fashions. One particular contribution that has been expected to play a significant role in dynamos in the presence of mean shear was isolated by Vishniac and Cho. Magnetic helicity fluxes are explicitly gauge dependent however, and the correlations that have come to be called the Vishniac-Cho flux were determined in the Coulomb gauge, which turns out to be fraught with complications in shearing systems. While the fluxes of small-scale helicity are explicitly gauge dependent, their divergences can be gauge independent. We use this property to investigate magnetic helicity fluxes of the small-scale field through direct numerical simulations in a shearing-box system and find that in a numerically usable gauge the divergence of the small-scale helicity flux vanishes, while the divergence of the Vishniac-Cho flux remains finite. We attribute this seeming contradiction to the existence of horizontal fluxes of small-scale magnetic helicity with finite divergences.

  10. Magnetic Helicity Flux in the Presence of Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic helicity has risen to be a major player in dynamo theory, with the helicity of the small-scale field being linked to the dynamo saturation process for the large-scale field. It is a nearly conserved quantity, which allows its evolution equation to be written in terms of production and flux terms. The flux term can be decomposed in a variety of fashions. One particular contribution that has been expected to play a significant role in dynamos in the presence of mean shear was isolated by Vishniac & Cho. Magnetic helicity fluxes are explicitly gauge dependent however, and the correlations that have come to be called the Vishniac-Cho flux were determined in the Coulomb gauge, which turns out to be fraught with complications in shearing systems. While the fluxes of small-scale helicity are explicitly gauge dependent, their divergences can be gauge independent. We use this property to investigate magnetic helicity fluxes of the small-scale field through direct numerical simulations in a shearing-box system and find that in a numerically usable gauge the divergence of the small-scale helicity flux vanishes, while the divergence of the Vishniac-Cho flux remains finite. We attribute this seeming contradiction to the existence of horizontal fluxes of small-scale magnetic helicity with finite divergences.

  11. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P. [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Cattaneo, F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago IL 60637 (United States); Mignone, A., E-mail: bodo@oato.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2017-07-10

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  12. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  13. Spring harvest of corn stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizotte, P.L. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. des sols et de genie agroalimentaire; Savoie, P. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Corn stover is typically left behind in the field after grain harvest. Although part of the stover should remain in the field for soil organic matter renewal and erosion protection, half of the stover could be removed sustainably. This represents about one million t dry matter (DM) of stover per year in the province of Quebec. Stover harvested in the fall is very wet. While there are applications for wet stover, the available markets currently require a dry product. Preliminary measurements have shown that stover left in the field throughout the winter becomes very dry, and a considerable amount would still be harvestable in the spring. In the spring of 2009, corn stover was harvested at 2 sites, each subdivided into 2 parcels. The first parcel was cut and raked in the fall of 2008 (fall parcel), while the second parcel was cut and raked in spring 2009. Fibre from both parcels was baled in the spring 2009. At the first site, a large square baler was used in late April to produce bales measuring 0.8 m x 0.9 m x 1.8 m. On the second site a round baler was used in late May to produce bales of 1.2 m in width by 1.45 m in diameter. On the second site, a small square baler was also used to produce bales of 0.35 m x 0.45 m x 0.60 m (spring cutting only). With the large square baler, an average of 3.9 t DM/ha was harvested equally on the fall parcel and the spring parcel, representing a 48 per cent recovery of biomass based on stover yields.

  14. Torsion of cracked nanorods using a nonlocal elasticity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loya, J A; Aranda-Ruiz, J; Fernández-Sáez, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a nonlocal cracked-rod model from which we have analysed the torsional vibrations of a carbon nanotube with a circumferential crack. Several types of boundary conditions, including the consideration of a buckyball at the end of the nanotube, have been studied. The nonlocal Eringen elasticity theory is used to formulate the problem. The cracked rod is modelled by dividing the cracked element into two segments connected by a torsional linear spring whose stiffness is related to the crack severity. The effect of the nonlocal small-scale parameter, crack severity, cracked section position, different boundary conditions and attached mass are examined in this work. (paper)

  15. High-n helicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, N.; Cheng, C.Z.; Okamoto, M.

    1992-05-01

    The high-n Helicity-induced shear Alfven Eigenmodes (HAE) are considered both analytically and numerically for the straight helical magnetic system, where n is the toroidal mode number. The eigenmode equation for the high-n HAE modes is derived along the field line and with the aid of the averaging method is shown to reduce to the Mathieu equation asymptotically. The discrete HAE modes are shown to exist inside the continuum spectrum gaps. The continuous spectrum gaps appear around ω 2 = ω A 2 [N(lι-m)/2] 2 for N = 1,2,.., where ω A is the toroidal Alfven transit frequency, and l, m, and ι are the polarity of helical coils, the toroidal pitch number of helical coils, and the rotational transform, respectively. For the same ω A and ι, the frequency of the helical continuum gap is larger than that of the continuum gap in tokamak plasmas by |l-ι -1 m|. The polarity of helical coils l plays a crucial role in determining the spectrum gaps and the properties of the high-n HAE modes. The spectrum gaps near the magnetic axis are created by the helical ripple with circular flux surfaces for l = 1, and ≥ 3 helicals. For l = 2 helical systems, the spectrum gaps are created by the ellipticity of the flux surfaces. These analytical results for the continuum gaps and the existence of the high-n HAE modes in the continuum gaps are confirmed numerically for the l = 2 case, and we find that the HAE modes exist for mode structures with the even and the odd parities. (author)

  16. Elastic Anisotropy of Basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Shapiro, S.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Kaselow, A.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2005-12-01

    Elastic properties of rocks are sensitive to changes of the in-situ stress and damage state. In particular, seismic velocities are strongly affected by stress-induced formation and deformation of cracks or shear-enhanced pore collapse. The effect of stress on seismic velocities as a result of pore space deformation in isotropic rock at isostatic compression may be expressed by the equation: A+K*P-B*exp (-D*P) (1), where P=Pc-Pp is the effective pressure, the pure difference between confining pressure and pore pressure. The parameter A, K, B and D describe material constants determined using experimental data. The physical meaning of the parameters is given by Shapiro (2003, in Geophysics Vol.68(Nr.2)). Parameter D is related to the stress sensitivity of the rock. A similar relation was derived by Shapiro and Kaselow (2005, in Geophysics in press) for weak anisotropic rocks under arbitrary load. They describe the stress dependent anisotropy in terms of Thomson's (1986, in Geophysics, Vol. 51(Nr.10)) anisotropy parameters ɛ and γ as a function of stress in the case of an initially isotropic rock: ɛ ∝ E2-E3, γ ∝ E3-E2 (2) with Ei=exp (D*Pi). The exponential terms Ei are controlled by the effective stress components Pi. To test this relation, we have conducted a series of triaxial compression tests on dry samples of initially isotropic Etnean Basalt in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame equipped with a pressure cell. Confining pressure was 60, 40 and 20 MPa. Samples were 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. Elastic anisotropy was induced by axial compression of the samples through opening and growth of microcracks predominantly oriented parallel to the sample axis. Ultrasonic P- and S- wave velocities were monitored parallel and normal to the sample axis by an array of 20 piezoceramic transducers glued to the surface. Preamplified full waveform signals were stored in two 12 channel transient recorders. According to equation 2 the anisotropy parameters are

  17. Instant Spring for Android starter

    CERN Document Server

    Dahanne, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Packt Instant Starter: get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks.This is a Starter which gives you an introduction to Spring for Android with plenty of well-explained practical code examples.If you are an Android developer who wants to learn about RESTful web services and OAuth authentication and authorization, and you also want to know how to speed up your development involving those architectures using Spring for Android abstractions, then this book is for you.But core Java developers

  18. Radiation Field of a Square, Helical Beam Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Lottrup

    1952-01-01

    square helices are used. Further, in connection with corresponding rigorous formulas for the field from a circular, helical antenna with a uniformly progressing current wave of constant amplitude the present formulas may be used for an investigation of the magnitude of the error introduced in Kraus......' approximate calculation of the field from a circular, helical antenna by replacing this antenna with an ``equivalent'' square helix. This investigation is carried out by means of a numerical example. The investigation shows that Kraus' approximate method of calculation yields results in fair agreement...

  19. Theoretical modeling of transport barriers in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.; Ohyabu, N.

    2008-10-01

    A unified transport modelling to explain electron Internal Transport Barriers (e-ITB) in helical plasmas and Internal Diffusion Barriers (IDB) observed in Large Helical Device (LHD) is proposed. The e-ITB can be predicted with the effect of zonal flows to obtain the e-ITB in the low collisional regime when the radial variation of the particle anomalous diffusivity is included. Transport analysis in this article can newly show that the particle fuelling induces the IDB formation when this unified transport modelling is used in the high collisional regime. The density limit for the IDB in helical plasmas is also examined including the effect of the radiation loss. (author)

  20. Drift mode calculations for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Ku, L.-P.; Tang, W.M.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.; Cooper, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for a case for the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A.Iiyoshi, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1998, Nucl.Fusion 39, 1245 (1999)]. This calculation retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped particle dynamics and ion temperature gradients are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics equilibria reconstructed from experimental measurements. The effects of helically-trapped particles and helical curvature are investigated

  1. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation....... The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static...... mixers, but in porous media....

  2. Linear local stability of electrostatic drift modes in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, O.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the stability of the drift wave in helical systems. For this purpose, we solve the linear local gyrokinetic-Poisson equation, in the electrostatic regime. As a model of helical plasmas, Large helical Device (LHD) is considered. The equation we apply is rather exact in the framework of linear gyrokinetic theory, where only the approximation is the ballooning representation. In this paper, we consider only collisionless cases. All the frequency regime can be naturally reated without any assumptions, and in such cases, ion temperature gradient modes (ITG), trapped electron modes (TEM), and electron temperature gradient modes (ETG) are expected to become unstable linearly independently. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic Helical Micro- and Nanorobots: Toward Their Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famin Qiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic helical micro- and nanorobots can perform 3D navigation in various liquids with a sub-micrometer precision under low-strength rotating magnetic fields (<10 mT. Since magnetic fields with low strengths are harmless to cells and tissues, magnetic helical micro/nanorobots are promising tools for biomedical applications, such as minimally invasive surgery, cell manipulation and analysis, and targeted therapy. This review provides general information on magnetic helical micro/nanorobots, including their fabrication, motion control, and further functionalization for biomedical applications.

  4. The evaluation method of soil-spring for the analyses of foundation structures on layered bedsoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, S.; Sasaki, F.

    1985-01-01

    When performing the finite element method analysis of foundation structures, such as mat slab of reactor buildings and turbine buildings, it is very important to evaluate and model the soil-spring mechanism between foundation and soil correctly. In this model, this paper presents the method in which soil-spring mechanism is evaluated from the theoretical solution. In this theory the semi-infinite elastic solid is assumed to be made of multi-layered soil systems. From the analytical example, it is concluded that the stress analysis of foundation structures on multi-layered soil systems cannot be evaluated by the conventional methods. (orig.)

  5. bessel functions for axisymmetric elasticity problems of the elastic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    2, 3DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA, NSUKKA. ENUGU STATE. ... theory of elasticity and in the case of vertical applied loads, was first ... partial differential equations in bodies having cylindrical symmetry.

  6. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  7. High energy elastic hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnly, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    The paper deals with the WA7 experiment at the CERN super proton synchrotron (SPS). The elastic differential cross sections of pion-proton, kaon-proton, antiproton-proton, and proton-proton at lower SPS energies over a wide range of momentum transfer were measured. Some theoretical models in the light of the experimental results are reviewed, and a comprehensive impact parameter analysis of antiproton-proton elastic scattering over a wide energy range is presented. A nucleon valence core model for high energy proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is described

  8. CONCERNING THE ELASTIC ORTHOTROPIC MODEL APPLIED TO WOOD ELASTIC PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeu Mascia,Nilson

    2003-01-01

    Among the construction materials, wood reveals an orthotropic pattern, because of unique characteristics in its internal structure with three axes of wood biological directions (longitudinal, tangential and radial). elastic symmetry: longitudinal, tangential and radial, reveals an orthotropic pattern. The effect of grain angle orientation onin the elastic modulus constitutes the fundamental cause forof wood anisotropy. It is responsible for the greatest changes in the values of the constituti...

  9. Spectral dimension of elastic Sierpinski gaskets with general elastic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.H.; Liu, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectral dimension is calculated for a Sierpinski gasket with the most general elastic restoring forces allowed by symmetry. The elastic forces consist of bond-stretching and angle-bending components. The spectral dimension is the same as that for the bond-stretching-force (central-force) model. This demonstrates that on the Sierpinski gasket the two types of forces belong to the same universality class

  10. Chirality-dependent anisotropic elastic properties of a monolayer graphene nanosheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Gang; Zhou, Li-Jun; Kang, Yi-Lan

    2012-04-01

    An analytical approach is presented to predict the elastic properties of a monolayer graphene nanosheet based on interatomic potential energy and continuum mechanics. The elastic extension and torsional springs are utilized to simulate the stretching and angle variation of carbon-carbon bond, respectively. The constitutive equation of the graphene nanosheet is derived by using the strain energy density, and the analytical formulations for nonzero elastic constants are obtained. The in-plane elastic properties of the monolayer graphene nanosheet are proved to be anisotropic. In addition, Young's moduli, Poisson's ratios and shear modulus of the monolayer graphene nanosheet are calculated according to the force constants derived from Morse potential and AMBER force field, respectively, and they were proved to be chirality-dependent. The comparison with experimental results shows a very agreement.

  11. Thermomechanical Analysis of Shape-Memory Composite Tape Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Wang, L. Y.

    2013-06-01

    Intelligent materials and structures have been extensively applied for satellite designs in order to minimize the mass and reduce the cost in the launch of the spacecraft. Elastic memory composites (EMCs) have the ability of high-strain packaging and shape-memory effect, but increase the parts and total weight due to the additional heating system. Shape-memory sandwich structures Li and Wang (J. Intell. Mater. Syst. Struct. 22(14), 1605-1612, 2011) can overcome such disadvantage by using the metal skin acting as the heating element. However, the high strain in the micro-buckled metal skin decreases the deployment efficiency. This paper aims to present an insight into the folding and deployment behaviors of shape-memory composite (SMC) tape springs. A thermomechanical process was analyzed, including the packaging deformation at an elevated temperature, shape frozen at the low temperature and shape recovery after reheating. The result shows that SMC tape springs can significantly decrease the strain concentration in the metal skin, as well as exhibiting excellent shape frozen and recovery behaviors. Additionally, possible failure modes of SMC tape springs were also analyzed.

  12. Spring for It: First Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How do publishers describe the first novels they will be releasing this spring and summer? "Amazing," "fabulous," and "unique" are words that pop up frequently, though hats off to one publicist forthright or cheeky enough to call a work "weird Western/horror." The proof of such praise is in the reading, but why not check out this preview of first…

  13. Open-Coil Retraction Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Janardan Vibhute

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mechanic has become a popular method for space closure with developments in preadjusted edgewise appliance. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and evaluated extensively for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low-load deflection rate (LDR/force decay. With the advent of NiTi springs in orthodontics, LDRs have been markedly reduced. For use of NiTi, clinician has to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. “Open Coil Retraction Spring (OCRS” is developed utilizing NiTi open-coil spring for orthodontic space closure. This paper describes fabrication and clinical application of OCRS which have number of advantages. It sustains low LDR with optimum force magnitude. Its design is adjustable for desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (i.e., it cannot be over activated, and decompression limit of open coil is also controlled by the operator, resp.. A possibility to offset the OCRS away from mucosa helps to reduce its soft-tissue impingement.

  14. Flow-induced vibration of steam generator helical tubes subjected to external liquid cross flow and internal two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Chull Jo; Myung Jo Jhung; Woong Sik Kim; Hho Jung Kim

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper addresses the potential flow-induced vibration problems in a helically-coiled tube steam generator of integral-type nuclear reactor, of which the tubes are subjected to liquid cross flow externally and multi-phase flow externally. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted using a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency and corresponding mode shape of the helical type tubes with various conditions, a finite element analysis code is used. Based on the results of both helical coiled tube steam generator thermal-hydraulic and coiled tube modal analyses, turbulence-induced vibration and fluid-elastic instability analyses are performed. And then the potential for damages on the tubes due to either turbulence-induced vibration or fluid-elastic instability is assessed. In the assessment, special emphases are put on the detailed investigation for the effects of support conditions, coil diameter, and helix pitch on the modal, vibration amplitude and instability characteristics of tubes, from which a technical information and basis needed for designers and regulatory reviewers can be derived. (authors)

  15. Design study of a normal conducting helical snake for AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Junpei; Okamura, Masahiro; Roser, Thomas; MacKay, William W; Luccio, Alfredo U; Takano, Koji

    2004-01-01

    A new normal conducting snake magnet is being fabricated for the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) project, a superconducting type helical dipole magnets had been developed and it performed successfully in high-energy polarized proton acceleration. The new AGS helical snake has the same basic magnetic structure but is more complicated. To achieve no beam shift and no beam deflection in one magnetic device, helical pitches and rotating angles were carefully calculated. Compared to a superconducting magnet, a normal warm magnet must have a large cross- sectional area of conductors which make it difficult to design a magnet with large helical pitch. We developed a modified window frame structure to accommodate the large number of conductors. Its three dimensional magnetic field was simulated by using OPERA3D/TOSCA. 3 Refs.

  16. A 3D printed helical antenna with integrated lens

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2015-01-01

    A novel antenna configuration comprising a helical antenna with an integrated lens is demonstrated in this work. The antenna is manufactured by a unique combination of 3D printing of plastic material (ABS) and inkjet printing of silver nano

  17. Particle orbit analysis for LHD helical axis configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Yamazaki, K.; Motojima, O.

    1993-04-01

    Fast ion orbits for helical magnetic axis configurations in LHD (Large Helical Device) are analyzed and compared with the standard circular axis case. Boundaries between passing and helically trapped particle regions show clear differences: in the non-planar axis case the helically trapped region spreads, near the magnetic axis, over a much wider band across the 90deg pitch angle value and shows a very marked asymmetry. The locally trapped particle region is also wider than in the standard case. The differences in the loss cone boundaries of the two cases are rather small, however, the effects of re-entering criteria are very important in both cases. On the contrary, effects of finite coil size are not significant. (author)

  18. Metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical terahertz waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Anthony, Jessienta; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2015-12-28

    We investigate guidance of Terahertz (THz) radiation in metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1 THz. Our experimental results obtained from THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements are in very good agreement with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. We observe single-mode, low loss and low dispersive propagation of THz radiation in metallic helical waveguides over a broad bandwidth. The 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides have substantially extended the bandwidth of a low loss dielectric tube waveguide as observed from the experimental and simulation results. The high flexibility of the helical design allows an easy incorporation into bench top THz devices.

  19. Helical-axis stellarators with noninterlocking planar coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.

    1983-08-01

    The properties of helical axis stellarator fields generated by unlinked, planar coils are described. It is shown that such fields can have a magnetic well and large rotational transform, implying large equilibrium and stability beta limits

  20. Helical-axis stellarators with noninterlocking planar coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.

    1983-08-01

    The properties of helical axis stellarator fields generated by unlinked, planar coils are described. It is shown that such fields can have a magnetic well and large rotational transform, implying large equilibrium and stability beta limits.

  1. Energy and helicity of magnetic torus knots and braids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberti, Chiara; Ricca, Renzo L.

    2018-02-01

    By considering steady magnetic fields in the shape of torus knots and unknots in ideal magnetohydrodynamics, we compute some fundamental geometric and physical properties to provide estimates for magnetic energy and helicity. By making use of an appropriate parametrization, we show that knots with dominant toroidal coils that are a good model for solar coronal loops have negligible total torsion contribution to magnetic helicity while writhing number provides a good proxy. Hence, by the algebraic definition of writhe based on crossing numbers, we show that the estimated values of writhe based on image analysis provide reliable information for the exact values of helicity. We also show that magnetic energy is linearly related to helicity, and the effect of the confinement of magnetic field can be expressed in terms of geometric information. These results can find useful application in solar and plasma physics, where braided structures are often present.

  2. Investigation into the heat transfer performance of helically ribbed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    The first part of an investigation into flow and heat transfer in annular channels and seven pin clusters is described. One of the main aims of the project is to improve cluster heat transfer prediction codes for helically ribbed surfaces. A study is made of the heat transfer and flow characteristics of a helically ribbed pin in an annular channel. It is shown that the swirling flow, which is induced by the helical ribs, gives rise to substantially enhanced diffusivity levels. This phenomenon had not been taken into account by previous analysis techniques. The methods for analysing heat transfer and pressure drop data from annular channels which were originally developed for non-swirling flow are generalised to accommodate swirling flow. The new methods are shown to be consistent with empirical data. Roughness parameter data is presented for helically ribbed surfaces with an axial rib pitch into height ratio of about 7. (author)

  3. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    interaction of proteins and peptides with membranes (Segrest ... favour surface activity have been described by Eisenberg et ... amphipathicity and propensity for α-helical conformation ..... Membrane destabilisation occurs due to electrostatic.

  4. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, ... Generation of magnetic field in plasma, usually referred to as 'dynamo', is one of the ..... energy fluxes for the inertial-range wave numbers where the same power.

  5. Archaeal Nitrification in Hot Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Daims, H.; Reigstad, L.; Wanek, W.; Wagner, M.; Schleper, C.

    2006-12-01

    Biological nitrification, i.e. the aerobic conversion of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is a major component of the global nitrogen cycle. Until recently, it was thought that the ability to aerobically oxidize ammonia was confined to bacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria. However, it has recently been shown that Archaea of the phylum Crenarchaeota are also capable of ammonia oxidation. As many Crenarchaeota are thermophilic or hyperthermophilic, and at least some of them are capable of ammonia oxidation we speculated on the existence of (hyper)thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Using PCR primers specifically targeting the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene, we were indeed able to confirm the presence of such organisms in several hot springs in Reykjadalur, Iceland. These hot springs exhibited temperatures well above 80 °C and pH values ranging from 2.0 to 4.5. To proof that nitrification actually took place under these extreme conditions, we measured gross nitrification rates by the isotope pool dilution method; we added 15N-labelled nitrate to the mud and followed the dilution of the label by nitrate production from ammonium either in situ (incubation in the hot spring) or under controlled conditions in the laboratory (at 80 °C). The nitrification rates in the hot springs ranged from 0.79 to 2.22 mg nitrate-N per L of mud and day. Controls, in which microorganisms were killed before the incubations, demonstrated that the nitrification was of biological origin. Addition of ammonium increased the gross nitrification rate approximately 3-fold, indicating that the nitrification was ammonium limited under the conditions used. Collectively, our study provides evidence that (1) AOA are present in hot springs and (2) that they are actively nitrifying. These findings have major implications for our understanding of nitrogen cycling of hot environments.

  6. Astronomical optics and elasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaitre, Gerard Rene

    2008-01-01

    Astronomical Optics and Elasticity Theory provides a very thorough and comprehensive account of what is known in this field. After an extensive introduction to optics and elasticity, the book discusses variable curvature and multimode deformable mirrors, as well as, in depth, active optics, its theory and applications. Further, optical design utilizing the Schmidt concept and various types of Schmidt correctors, as well as the elasticity theory of thin plates and shells are elaborated upon. Several active optics methods are developed for obtaining aberration corrected diffraction gratings. Further, a weakly conical shell theory of elasticity is elaborated for the aspherization of grazing incidence telescope mirrors. The very didactic and fairly easy-to-read presentation of the topic will enable PhD students and young researchers to actively participate in challenging astronomical optics and instrumentation projects.

  7. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  8. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic; Ajdari, Amin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells

  9. Acute pulmonary embolism in helical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paslawski, M.

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common condition in which diagnostic and therapeutic delays contribute to substantial morbidity and mortality. Clinical diagnosis is difficult because the signs and symptoms re unspecific, and a differential diagnosis is extensive, including pneumonia or bronchitis, asthma, myocardial infraction, pulmonary edema, anxiety, dissection of the aorta, pericardial tamponade, lung cancer, primary pulmonary hypertension, rib fracture, and pneumothorax. The purpose of the study was to present the use of CT in diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism. A group of 23 patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent CT examination with a helical CT scanner (Somatom Emotion, Siemens) before and after administration of 150 ml of Ultravist. Pulmonary embolism was found in the CT examinations of 13 patients. In two of these it was a central filling defect. Amputation of the artery was found in one. Parietal filling defect in three patients formed an acute angle with the vessel walls. Saddle emboli appearing as filling defects in the contrast column that hung over vessel bifurcations was found in two patients. In five patients,emboli were found in small segmental arteries. CT provides information not only on the pulmonary arteries, but also on the lung parenchyma, hila, mediastinum, and the heart. Alternative findings may be identified by CT chest examination, stablishing alternative diagnoses, including pulmonary disorders (such as pneumonia or fibrosis), pleural abnormalities, and cardiovascular disease (such as aortic dissection or pericardial tamponade). Another advantage of the CT is its widespread availability.(author)

  10. Polymer dynamics driven by a helical filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, Andrew; Shendruk, Tyler; Zoettl, Andreas; Yeomans, Julia

    Microbial flagellates typically inhabit complex suspensions of extracellular polymeric material which can impact the swimming speed of motile microbes, filter-feeding of sessile cells, and the generation of biofilms. There is currently a need to better understand how the fundamental dynamics of polymers near active cells or flagella impacts these various phenomena. We study the hydrodynamic and steric influence of a rotating helical filament on suspended polymers using Stokesian Dynamics simulations. Our results show that as a stationary rotating helix pumps fluid along its long axis, nearby polymers migrate radially inwards and are elongated in the process. We observe that the actuation of the helix tends to increase the probability of finding polymeric material within its pervaded volume. At larger Weissenberg numbers, this accumulation of polymers within the vicinity of the helix is greater. Further, we have analysed the stochastic work performed by the helix on the polymers and we show that this quantity is positive on average and increases with polymer contour length. Our results provide a basis for understanding the microscopic interactions that govern cell dynamics in complex media. This work was supported through funding from the ERC Advanced Grant 291234 MiCE and we acknowledge EMBO funding to TNS (ALTF181-2013).

  11. Electronic Band Structure of Helical Polyisocyanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Benoît; Liégeois, Vincent; Fripiat, Joseph G; Harris, Frank E

    2017-10-19

    Restricted Hartree-Fock computations are reported for a methyl isocyanide polymer (repeating unit -C═N-CH 3 ), whose most stable conformation is expected to be a helical chain. The computations used a standard contracted Gaussian orbital set at the computational levels STO-3G, 3-21G, 6-31G, and 6-31G**, and studies were made for two line-group configurations motivated by earlier work and by studies of space-filling molecular models: (1) A structure of line-group symmetry L9 5 , containing a 9-fold screw axis with atoms displaced in the axial direction by 5/9 times the lattice constant, and (2) a structure of symmetry L4 1 that had been proposed, containing a 4-fold screw axis with translation by 1/4 of the lattice constant. Full use of the line-group symmetry was employed to cause most of the computational complexity to depend only on the size of the asymmetric repeating unit. Data reported include computed bond properties, atomic charge distribution, longitudinal polarizability, band structure, and the convoluted density of states. Most features of the description were found to be insensitive to the level of computational approximation. The work also illustrates the importance of exploiting line-group symmetry to extend the range of polymer structural problems that can be treated computationally.

  12. Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Bechcet's disease: helical computed tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, J.; Caballero, P.; Olivera, M. J.; Cajal, M. L.; Caniego, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects arteries and veins of different sizes and can be associated with pulmonary artery aneurysms. We report the case of a patient with Behcet's disease and a pulmonary artery aneurysm who was studied by means of plain chest X ray, helical computed tomography and pulmonary arteriography. Helical computed tomography is a reliable technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (Author) 9 refs

  13. ADDITIVE SELF-HELICITY AS A KINK MODE THRESHOLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanushenko, A.; Longcope, D. W.; Fan, Y.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose that additive self-helicity, introduced by Longcope and Malanushenko, plays a role in the kink instability for complex equilibria, similar to twist helicity for thin flux tubes. We support this hypothesis by a calculation of additive self-helicity of a twisted flux tube from the simulation of Fan and Gibson. As more twist gets introduced, the additive self-helicity increases, and the kink instability of the tube coincides with the drop of additive self-helicity, after the latter reaches the value of H A /Φ 2 ∼ 1.5 (where Φ is the flux of the tube and H A is the additive self-helicity). We compare the additive self-helicity to twist for a thin subportion of the tube to illustrate that H A /Φ 2 is equal to the twist number, studied by Berger and Field, when the thin flux tube approximation is applicable. We suggest that the quantity H A /Φ 2 could be treated as a generalization of a twist number, when the thin flux tube approximation is not applicable. A threshold on a generalized twist number might prove extremely useful studying complex equilibria, just as the twist number itself has proven useful studying idealized thin flux tubes. We explicitly describe a numerical method for calculating additive self-helicity, which includes an algorithm for identifying a domain occupied by a flux bundle and a method of calculating potential magnetic field confined to this domain. We also describe a numerical method to calculate twist of a thin flux tube, using a frame parallelly transported along the axis of the tube.

  14. Design windows and cost analysis on helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, Y.; Imagawa, S.; Sagara, A.

    2007-01-01

    The LHD type helical reactors are characterized by a large major radius but slender helical coil, which give us different approaches for power plants from tokamak reactors. For searching design windows of helical reactors and discussing their potential as power plants, we have developed a mass-cost estimating model linked with system design code (HeliCos), thorough studying the relationships between major plasma parameters and reactor parameters, and weight of major components. In regard to cost data we have much experience through preparing ITER construction. To compare the weight and cost of magnet systems between tokamak and helical reactors, we broke down magnet systems and cost factors, such as weights of super conducting strands, conduits, support structures, and winding unit costs, through estimating ITER cost data basis. Based on FFHR2m1 deign we considered a typical 3 GWth helical plant (LHD type) with the same magnet size, coil major radius Rc 14 m, magnetic energy 120 GJ, but increasing plasma densities. We evaluated the weight and cost of magnet systems of 3 GWth helical plant, the total magnet weights of 16,000ton and costs of 210 BYen, which are similar values of tokamak reactors (10,200 ton, 110 BYen in ITER 2002 report, and 21,900 ton, 275 BYen in ITER FDR1999). The costs of strands and winding occupy 70% of total magnet costs, and influence entire power plants economics. The design windows analysis and comparative economics studies to optimize the main reactor parameters have been carried out. Economics studies show that it is misunderstanding to consider helical coils are too large and too expensive to achieve power plants. But we should notice that the helical reactor design windows and economics are very sensitive to allowable blanket space (depend on ergodic layer conditions) and diverter configuration for decreasing heat loads. (orig.)

  15. Tokamak startup using point-source dc helicity injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, D J; Bongard, M W; Fonck, R J; Redd, A J; Sontag, A C

    2009-06-05

    Startup of a 0.1 MA tokamak plasma is demonstrated on the ultralow aspect ratio Pegasus Toroidal Experiment using three localized, high-current density sources mounted near the outboard midplane. The injected open field current relaxes via helicity-conserving magnetic turbulence into a tokamaklike magnetic topology where the maximum sustained plasma current is determined by helicity balance and the requirements for magnetic relaxation.

  16. Comparison between helical computed tomography angiography and intraoperative findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abijit Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Helical CT is important in delineating the arterial, venous, and ureteral anatomy and can show the important incidental findings. Left renal donors and males have more variations in their renal anatomy. Technically challenging laparoscopic nephrectomy on the multiple-vessel-side donor is possible with the aid of helical CT. The importance of the CT in evaluating donor renal anatomy for a technically challenging laparoscopic donor nephrectomy is commendable.

  17. Scale Dependence of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k approximately equal to 2AU(sup -1) (or frequency nu approximately equal to 2 microHz) at distances below 2.8AU and at k approximately equal to 30AU(sup -1) (or nu approximately equal to 25 microHz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10(sup 45) Mx(sup 2) cycle(sup -1) at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  18. Concept and development of measurement method of time sensitivity profile (TSP) in X-ray CT. Comparison of non-helical, single-slice helical, and multi-slice helical scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujioka, Katsumi; Ida, Yoshihiro; Ohtsubo, Hironori; Takahashi, Yasukata; Niwa, Masayoshi

    2000-01-01

    We focused on the time element contained in a single CT image, and devised the concept of a time-sensitivity profile (TSP) describing how the time element is translated into an image. We calculated the data collection time range when the helical pitch is changed in non helical scans, single slice helical scans, and multi slice helical scans. We then calculated the time sensitivity profile (TSP) from the weighting applied when the data collection time range is translated into an image. TSP was also measured for each scanning method using our self-made moving phantom. TSPs obtained from the calculation and the experiments were very close. TSP showed interesting characteristics with each scanning method, especially in the case of multi slice helical scanning, in which TSP became shorter as helical pitch increased. We referred to the TSP's FWHM as the effective scanning time. When we conducted multi slice helical scanning at helical pitch 3, the effective scanning time increased to about 24% longer than that of a non helical scan. When we conducted multi slice helical scanning at helical pitch 5 or 6, the effective scanning time was about half that of a non helical scan. The time sensitivity profile (TSP) is a totally new concept that we consider an important element in discussing the time resolution of a CT scanner. The results of this review will provide significant data in determining the scanning parameters when scanning a moving object. (author)

  19. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Alan

    1989-09-15

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago.

  20. A Labor Supply Elasticity Accord?

    OpenAIRE

    Lars Ljungqvist; Thomas J. Sargent

    2011-01-01

    A dispute about the size of the aggregate labor supply elasticity has been fortified by a contentious aggregation theory used by real business cycle theorists. The replacement of that aggregation theory with one more congenial to microeconomic observations opens possibilities for an accord about the aggregate labor supply elasticity. The new aggregation theory drops features to which empirical microeconomists objected and replaces them with life-cycle choices. Whether the new aggregation theo...

  1. Integrodifferential relations in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Kostin, Georgy V

    2012-01-01

    This work treats the elasticity of deformed bodies, including the resulting interior stresses and displacements.It also takes into account that some of constitutive relations can be considered in a weak form. To discuss this problem properly, the method of integrodifferential relations is used, and an advanced numerical technique for stress-strain analysis is presented and evaluated using various discretization techniques. The methods presented in this book are of importance for almost all elasticity problems in materials science and mechanical engineering.

  2. In Situ elastic property sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olness, D.; Hirschfeld, T.; Kishiyama, K.; Steinhaus, R.

    1987-01-01

    Elasticity is an important property of many materials. Loss of elasticity can have serious consequences, such as when a gasket deteriorates and permits leakage of an expensive or hazardous material, or when a damping system begins to go awry. Loss of elasticity can also provide information related to an ancillary activity such as degradation of electrical insulation, loss of plasticizer in a plastic, or changes in permeability of a thin film. In fact, the mechanical properties of most organic compounds are altered when the compound degrades. Thus, a sensor for the mechanical properties can be used to monitor associated characteristics as well. A piezoelectric material in contact with an elastomer forms an oscillating system that can provide real-time elasticity monitoring. This combination constitutes a forced harmonic oscillator with damping provided by the elastomer. A ceramic oscillator with a total volume of a few mm 3 was used as an elasticity sensor. It was placed in intimate contact with an elastomer and then monitored remotely with a simple oscillator circuit and standard frequency counting electronics. Resonant frequency shifts and changes in Q value were observed corresponding to changes in ambient temperature and/or changes in pressure applied to the sample. Elastomer samples pretreated with ozone (to simulate aging) showed changes in Q value and frequency response, even though there were no visible changes in the elastic samples

  3. Recent trend of administration on hot springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Shigeru [Environment Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Agency exercises jurisdiction over Hot Spring Act, and plans to protect the source of the hot spring and to utilize it appropriately. From the aspect of utilization, hot springs are widely used as a means to remedy chronic diseases and tourist spots besides places for recuperation and repose. Statistics on Japanese hot springs showed that the number of hot spring spots and utilized-fountainhead increased in 1987, compared with the number in 1986. Considering the utilized-headspring, the number of naturally well-out springs has stabilized for 10 years while power-operated springs have increased. This is because the demand of hot springs has grown as the number of users has increased. Another reason is to keep the amount of hot water by setting up the power facility as the welled-out amount has decreased. Major point of recent administration on the hot spring is to permit excavation and utilization of hot springs. Designation of National hot spring health resorts started in 1954 in order to ensure the effective and original use of hot springs and to promote the public use of them, for the purpose of arranging the sound circumstances of hot springs. By 1988, 76 places were designated. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter's Hot Springs, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castenholz, Richard W

    2015-01-27

    Although alkaline Hunter's Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73-74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68-70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54-55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47-48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47-48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments.

  5. Development of a lower extremity wearable exoskeleton with double compact elastic module: preliminary experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Long

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a double compact elastic module is designed and implemented in the lower extremity exoskeleton. The double compact elastic module is composed of two parts, i.e., physical human robot interaction (pHRI measurement and the elastic actuation system (EAS, which are called proximal elastic module (PEM and distal elastic module (DEM respectively. The PEM is used as the pHRI information collection device while the DEM is used as the compliance device. A novel compact parallelogram-like structure based torsional spring is designed and developed. An iterative finite element analysis (FEA based optimization process was conducted to find the optimal parameters in the search space. In the PEM, the designed torsional spring has an outer circle with a diameter of 60 mm and an inner hole with a diameter of 12 mm, while in the DEM, the torsional spring has the outer circle with a diameter of 80 mm and the inner circle with a diameter of 16 mm. The torsional spring in the PEM has a thickness of 5 mm and a weight of 60 g, while that in the DEM has a thickness of 10 mm and a weight of 80 g. The double compact elastic module prototype is embedded in the mechanical joint directly. Calibration experiments were conducted on those two elastic modules to obtain the linear torque versus angle characteristic. The calibration experimental results show that this torsional spring in the PEM has a stiffness of 60.2 Nm rad−1, which is capable of withstanding a maximum torque of 4 Nm, while that in the DEM has a stiffness of 80.2 Nm rad−1, which is capable of withstanding a maximum torque of 30 Nm. The experimental results and the simulation data show that the maximum resultant errors are 6 % for the PEM and 4 % for the DEM respectively. In this paper, an assumed regression algorithm is used to learn the human motion intent (HMI based on the pHRI collection. The HMI is defined as the angular position of the human limb joint. A

  6. Temperature dependence of elastic properties of paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrova, I.M.; Pisarevskii, Y.V.; Senyushenkov, P.A.; Krupny, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    New data are presented on the temperature dependence of the elastic wave velocities, elastic stiffness constants, and thermal expansion of paratellurite. It is shown that the external pressure appreciably influences the elastic properties of TeO 2 , especially the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus connected with the crystal soft mode. (author)

  7. Recent Results of Helical Nonneutral Plasmas on Compact Helical System (CHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himura, H.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sanpei, A.; Masamune, S.; Wakabayashi, H.; Isobe, M.

    2006-01-01

    First of all, non-constant space potential φs and electron density ne on magnetic surfaces of helical nonneutral plasmas are verified experimentally. The difference in φs enlarges significantly at the outer region inside the closed magnetic surfaces, and the corresponding equipotential surfaces are inferred to shift upward vertically with respect to magnetic surfaces. Meanwhile, larger value of ne is clearly observed in the downward region (z < 0) of magnetic surfaces, which seems to be consistent with the φs measurement. These results are the first evidence which strongly suggests the equilibrium proposed for nonneutral plasmas confined in closed magnetic surfaces. Secondly, in order to investigate the mechanism of the multiple disruption of helical nonneutral plasmas observed in experiments, space and time evolutions of electron flux are measured carefully inside the magnetic surfaces, when the plasma disruption occurs. Surprisingly, a set of data show that the observed disruption is at first happened at ρ ∼ 0.8, where ρ is the normalized minor radius, and then, it seems to propagate inside magnetic surfaces

  8. Bifurcation of elastic solids with sliding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigoni, D.; Bordignon, N.; Piccolroaz, A.; Stupkiewicz, S.

    2018-01-01

    Lubricated sliding contact between soft solids is an interesting topic in biomechanics and for the design of small-scale engineering devices. As a model of this mechanical set-up, two elastic nonlinear solids are considered jointed through a frictionless and bilateral surface, so that continuity of the normal component of the Cauchy traction holds across the surface, but the tangential component is null. Moreover, the displacement can develop only in a way that the bodies in contact do neither detach, nor overlap. Surprisingly, this finite strain problem has not been correctly formulated until now, so this formulation is the objective of the present paper. The incremental equations are shown to be non-trivial and different from previously (and erroneously) employed conditions. In particular, an exclusion condition for bifurcation is derived to show that previous formulations based on frictionless contact or `spring-type' interfacial conditions are not able to predict bifurcations in tension, while experiments-one of which, ad hoc designed, is reported-show that these bifurcations are a reality and become possible when the correct sliding interface model is used. The presented results introduce a methodology for the determination of bifurcations and instabilities occurring during lubricated sliding between soft bodies in contact.

  9. Muscle-tendon interaction and elastic energy usage in human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishikawa, Masaki; Komi, Paavo V.; Grey, Michael James

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed to explore how the interaction between the fascicles and tendinous tissues is involved in storage and utilization of elastic energy during human walking. Eight male subjects walked with a natural cadence (1.4 +/- 0.1 m/s) on a 10-m-long force plate system. In vivo......-stance phase. In contrast, the soleus fascicles were lengthened until the end of the single-stance phase. These findings suggest that the elastic recoil takes place not as a spring-like bouncing but as a catapult action in natural human walking. The interaction between the muscle fascicles and tendinous...

  10. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices in helical turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, H.

    1996-01-01

    The study of large-scale coherent hydrodynamic (HD) vortex generation has been extended to electrified charged dusty vortices to be termed as electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices, incorporating helical turbulence in electric and magnetic fields into that in fluid velocity, which are all created by an external DC electric field on the background. A new equation of EHD vortices is introduced on the basis of a set of EHD or electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) equations, including equations of state and a full set of Maxwell's equations by using functional techniques for estimating equations for an ensemble average, turbulent background, and additional random field. In fact, EHD vortices for a charged dusty fluid can be more explosive with larger instabilities than HD vortices. In addition, it is inferred that an external DC electric field could provide the origin of additional self-organization to a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines as a manifestation of a new frozen-in field concept for electric fields when the electric Reynolds number is sufficiently high. This is discussed on the basis of a set of general transport equations for fluid vorticity, magnetic and electric fields that are rederived concisely. In particular, a novel concept of electric field line merging-reconnection is developed in close relation to fluid vortex line merging, indicating a coalescence of fluid vortex breakdown or merging point and electric field line reconnection point, X-type or O-type with possible application to tornadic thunderstorms. In fact, a thundercloud charge distribution so as to provide a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines is quite possible without theoretical inconsistency, and is thought most likely to occur from observations available so far. (orig.)

  11. Spring Framework 5: Themes & Trends

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Spring Framework 5.0/5.1, scheduled for release in early/late 2017, focuses on several key themes: reactive web applications based on Reactive Streams, comprehensive support for JDK 9 and HTTP/2, as well as the latest API generations in the Enterprise Java ecosystem. This talk presents the overall story in the context of wider industry trends, highlighting Spring’s unique programming model strategy.

  12. Injector linac of SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, H.; Hori, T.; Suzuki, S.; Yanagida, K.; Itoh, Y.; Mizuno, A.; Taniuchi, T.; Sakaki, H.; Kuba, A.; Fukushima, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Asaka, T.; Yokomizo, H.

    1996-01-01

    The linac that is SPring-8 injector was completed and started operation from August 1. A beam was able to be transported to the final beam dumping at a tail end on August 8. From now on this linac carries out beam adjustment and be scheduled to do a beam injection to a synchrotron in October. The construction and fundamental performance of the linac are described. (author)

  13. Controlling proteins through molecular springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocchi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the mechanical control of proteins-the notion of controlling chemical reactions and processes by mechanics-is conceptually interesting. We give a brief review of the main accomplishments so far, leading to our present approach of using DNA molecular springs to exert controlled stresses on proteins. Our focus is on the physical principles that underlie both artificial mechanochemical devices and natural mechanisms of allostery.

  14. The first CERN Spring Campus

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    From 14 to 16 April, the first edition of the CERN Spring Campus took place in Spain. Taking place over three intensive days, this event brought experts from CERN together at the University of Oviedo, where they met the engineers and scientists of the future in a programme of scientific and technological dissemination and cultural exchange.   The young participants of the first CERN Spring Campus and their instructors show their enthusiasm after the intensive three-day course. “This three-day school focuses on preparing young engineers for the job market, with a particular emphasis on computing,” explains Derek Mathieson, Advanced Information Systems Group Leader in the GS Department and Head of the CERN Spring Campus organising committee. “We organised talks on entrepreneurship and IT, as well as on job interviews and CV writing. It was also an important opportunity for the participants to meet CERN computing engineers to find out what it is like to work in I...

  15. The Morishima Gross elasticity of substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Blackorby, Charles; Primont, Daniel; Russell, R. Robert

    2007-01-01

    We show that the Hotelling-Lau elasticity of substitution, an extension of the Allen-Uzawa elasticity to allow for optimal output-quantity (or utility) responses to changes in factor prices, inherits all of the failings of the Allen-Uzawa elasticity identified by Blackorby and Russell [1989 AER]. An analogous extension of the Morishima elasticity of substitution to allow for output quantity changes preserves the salient properties of the original Hicksian notion of elasticity of substitution.

  16. 75 FR 39241 - Hooper Springs Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Hooper Springs Project AGENCY: Bonneville... (collectively referred to as the Hooper Springs Project). The new BPA substation would be called Hooper Springs... proposed project would address voltage stability and reliability concerns of two of BPA's full requirements...

  17. Wing-pitch modulation in maneuvering fruit flies is explained by an interplay between aerodynamics and a torsional spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatus, Tsevi; Cohen, Itai

    2015-08-01

    While the wing kinematics of many flapping insects have been well characterized, understanding the underlying sensory, neural, and physiological mechanisms that determine these kinematics is still a challenge. Two main difficulties in understanding the physiological mechanisms arise from the complexity of the interaction between a flapping wing and its own unsteady flow, as well as the intricate mechanics of the insect wing hinge, which is among the most complicated joints in the animal kingdom. These difficulties call for the application of reduced-order approaches. Here this strategy is used to model the torques exerted by the wing hinge along the wing-pitch axis of maneuvering fruit flies as a damped torsional spring with elastic and damping coefficients as well as a rest angle. Furthermore, we model the air flows using simplified quasistatic aerodynamics. Our findings suggest that flies take advantage of the passive coupling between aerodynamics and the damped torsional spring to indirectly control their wing-pitch kinematics by modulating the spring parameters. The damped torsional-spring model explains the changes measured in wing-pitch kinematics during roll correction maneuvers through modulation of the spring damping and elastic coefficients. These results, in conjunction with the previous literature, indicate that flies can accurately control their wing-pitch kinematics on a sub-wing-beat time scale by modulating all three effective spring parameters on longer time scales.

  18. The incredible shrinking dewlap: signal size, skin elasticity, and mechanical design in the green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lailvaux, Simon P; Leifer, Jack; Kircher, Bonnie K; Johnson, Michele A

    2015-10-01

    The expression of male secondary sexual traits can be dynamic, changing size, shape, color, or structure over the course of different seasons. However, the factors underlying such changes are poorly understood. In male Anolis carolinensis lizards, a morphological secondary sexual signal called the dewlap changes size seasonally within individuals. Here, we test the hypothesis that seasonal changes in male dewlap size are driven by increased use and extension of the dewlap in spring and summer, when males are breeding, relative to the winter and fall. We captured male green anole lizards prior to the onset of breeding and constrained the dewlap in half of them such that it could not be extended. We then measured dewlap area in the spring, summer, and winter, and dewlap skin and belly skin elasticity in summer and winter. Dewlaps in unconstrained males increase in area from spring to summer and then shrink in the winter, whereas the dewlaps of constrained males consistently shrink from spring to winter. Dewlap skin is significantly more elastic than belly skin, and skin overall is more elastic in the summer relative to winter. These results show that seasonal changes in dewlap size are a function of skin elasticity and display frequency, and suggest that the mechanical properties of signaling structures can have important implications for signal evolution and design.

  19. Low band gap frequencies and multiplexing properties in 1D and 2D mass spring structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Arafa H; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the propagation of elastic waves in 1D and 2D mass spring structures. An analytical and computation model is presented for the 1D and 2D mass spring systems with different examples. An enhancement in the band gap values was obtained by modeling the structures to obtain low frequency band gaps at small dimensions. Additionally, the evolution of the band gap as a function of mass value is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the local resonance property in frequency ranges within the gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice in the 1D and 2D mass spring system. A linear defect formed of a row of specific masses produces an elastic waveguide that transmits at the narrow pass band frequency. The frequency of the waveguides can be selected by adjusting the mass and stiffness coefficients of the materials constituting the waveguide. Moreover, we pay more attention to analyze the wave multiplexer and DE-multiplexer in the 2D mass spring system. We show that two of these tunable waveguides with alternating materials can be employed to filter and separate specific frequencies from a broad band input signal. The presented simulation data is validated through comparison with the published research, and can be extended in the development of resonators and MEMS verification. (paper)

  20. Measuring geomechanical properties of Topopah Spring Tuff at the 1-meter scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, S.C.; Berge, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying physical and chemical properties of Topopah Spring tuff and coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes expected in the near-field environment of the potential waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Investigating the suitability of Topopah Spring tuff as a host rock for radioactive waste disposal includes measuring mechanical properties. Since heterogeneities vary with scale, from vugs and cracks at the hand-sample scale to fractures and vertical variations in degree of welding at the outcrop scale, mechanical properties of the tuff depend on scale. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has planned a Large Block Test (LBT) to investigate rock mass properties and coupled processes at elevated temperatures in Topopah Spring tuff at the scale of a few meters. This paper describes planned laboratory experiments in support of the LBT, to measure elastic properties and mechanical behavior of Topopah Spring tuff at the scale of a few cm to 1 m. The laboratory experiments will include measurement of stress-strain behavior, acoustic emissions during heating, and elastic wave velocities in small blocks of tuff

  1. Coupled thermomechanical behavior of graphene using the spring-based finite element approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgantzinos, S. K., E-mail: sgeor@mech.upatras.gr; Anifantis, N. K., E-mail: nanif@mech.upatras.gr [Machine Design Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, University of Patras, Rio, 26500 Patras (Greece); Giannopoulos, G. I., E-mail: ggiannopoulos@teiwest.gr [Materials Science Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Western Greece, 1 Megalou Alexandrou Street, 26334 Patras (Greece)

    2016-07-07

    The prediction of the thermomechanical behavior of graphene using a new coupled thermomechanical spring-based finite element approach is the aim of this work. Graphene sheets are modeled in nanoscale according to their atomistic structure. Based on molecular theory, the potential energy is defined as a function of temperature, describing the interatomic interactions in different temperature environments. The force field is approached by suitable straight spring finite elements. Springs simulate the interatomic interactions and interconnect nodes located at the atomic positions. Their stiffness matrix is expressed as a function of temperature. By using appropriate boundary conditions, various different graphene configurations are analyzed and their thermo-mechanical response is approached using conventional finite element procedures. A complete parametric study with respect to the geometric characteristics of graphene is performed, and the temperature dependency of the elastic material properties is finally predicted. Comparisons with available published works found in the literature demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  2. Design of a Telescopic Linear Actuator Based on Hollow Shape Memory Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaggiari, Andrea; Spinella, Igor; Dragoni, Eugenio

    2011-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are smart materials exploited in many applications to build actuators with high power to mass ratio. Typical SMA drawbacks are: wires show poor stroke and excessive length, helical springs have limited mechanical bandwidth and high power consumption. This study is focused on the design of a large-scale linear SMA actuator conceived to maximize the stroke while limiting the overall size and the electric consumption. This result is achieved by adopting for the actuator a telescopic multi-stage architecture and using SMA helical springs with hollow cross section to power the stages. The hollow geometry leads to reduced axial size and mass of the actuator and to enhanced working frequency while the telescopic design confers to the actuator an indexable motion, with a number of different displacements being achieved through simple on-off control strategies. An analytical thermo-electro-mechanical model is developed to optimize the device. Output stroke and force are maximized while total size and power consumption are simultaneously minimized. Finally, the optimized actuator, showing good performance from all these points of view, is designed in detail.

  3. Computational study on the effect of a conical spring on handling of buses at low speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan Aravind

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Handling and ride characteristic are dependent to a large extent on the characteristic of a vehicle’s suspension system. This work explores the effect of the use of conical spring in place of conventional cylindrical profiled helical spring design in the handling of a bus at low speeds through full vehicle multi-body simulations. The bus was modelled using standard template available in ADAMSTM software package. The vehicle inertial properties were verified against properties in literature. The conventional spring characteristic (L from ADAMSTM database was taken as reference and compared it with a non-linear characteristic (NL based on literature data. The planned maneuover was to execute a right turn based on standard road dimension inputs from IRC 86:1983 at a constant speed of 30 km/hour with acceleration controlled by software module. Chassis displacements, displacements of spring were tracked to understand handling and ride quality. The variation of chassis displacements showed a significant improvement in ride characteristic of vehicle with most vibrations being damped in NL at time lower than the L characteristic suspension. All through the study, lateral acceleration was well within the rollover threshold and tire interaction forces did not exhibit any significant changes.

  4. Helical Polyacetylenes Induced via Noncovalent Chiral Interactions and Their Applications as Chiral Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Katsuhiro; Yashima, Eiji

    2017-08-01

    Construction of predominantly one-handed helical polyacetylenes with a desired helix sense utilizing noncovalent chiral interactions with nonracemic chiral guest compounds based on a supramolecular approach is described. As with the conventional dynamic helical polymers possessing optically active pendant groups covalently bonded to the polymer chains, this noncovalent helicity induction system can show significant chiral amplification phenomena, in which the chiral information of the nonracemic guests can transfer with high cooperativity through noncovalent bonding interactions to induce an almost single-handed helical conformation in the polymer backbone. An intriguing "memory effect" of the induced macromolecular helicity is observed for some polyacetylenes, which means that the helical conformations induced in dynamic helical polyacetylene can be transformed into metastable static ones by tuning their helix-inversion barriers. Potential applications of helical polyacetylenes with controlled helix sense constructed by the "noncovalent helicity induction and/or memory effect" as chiral materials are also described.

  5. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Takamasa

    2015-01-01

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G 0 , must be equal to G/G 0 = (p − 2/f)/(1 − 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels

  6. Elastic-plastic dynamic analysis of a reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemura, Hajime; Tanaka, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    The basic characteristics of the dynamic response of a reactor building to severe earthquake ground motion are very important for the evaluation of the safety of nuclear plant systems. A computer program for elastic-plastic dynamic analysis of reactor buildings using lumped mass models is developed. The box and cylindrical walls of boiling water reactor buildings are treated as vertical beams. The nonlinear moment-rotation and shear force-shear deformation relationships of walls are based in part upon the experiments of prototype structures. The geometrical non-linearity of the soil rocking spring due to foundation separation is also considered. The nonlinear equation of motion is expressed in incremental form using tangent stiffness matrices, following the algorithm developed by E.L. Wilson et al. The damping matrix in the equation is formulated as the combination of the energy evaluation method and Penzien-Wilson's approach to accomodate the different characteristics of soil and building damping. The analysis examples and the comparison of elastic and elastic-plastic analysis results are presented. (auth.)

  7. Rubber elasticity for percolation network consisting of Gaussian chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi, Kengo, E-mail: kengo.nishi@phys.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: sibayama@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: kengo.nishi@phys.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: sibayama@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Sakai, Takamasa, E-mail: kengo.nishi@phys.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: sakai@tetrapod.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: sibayama@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-11-14

    A theory describing the elastic modulus for percolation networks of Gaussian chains on general lattices such as square and cubic lattices is proposed and its validity is examined with simulation and mechanical experiments on well-defined polymer networks. The theory was developed by generalizing the effective medium approximation (EMA) for Hookian spring network to Gaussian chain networks. From EMA theory, we found that the ratio of the elastic modulus at p, G to that at p = 1, G{sub 0}, must be equal to G/G{sub 0} = (p − 2/f)/(1 − 2/f) if the position of sites can be determined so as to meet the force balance, where p is the degree of cross-linking reaction. However, the EMA prediction cannot be applicable near its percolation threshold because EMA is a mean field theory. Thus, we combine real-space renormalization and EMA and propose a theory called real-space renormalized EMA, i.e., REMA. The elastic modulus predicted by REMA is in excellent agreement with the results of simulations and experiments of near-ideal diamond lattice gels.

  8. Spring Recipes A Problem-solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Josh; Mak, Gary

    2010-01-01

    With over 3 Million users/developers, Spring Framework is the leading "out of the box" Java framework. Spring addresses and offers simple solutions for most aspects of your Java/Java EE application development, and guides you to use industry best practices to design and implement your applications. The release of Spring Framework 3 has ushered in many improvements and new features. Spring Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach, Second Edition continues upon the bestselling success of the previous edition but focuses on the latest Spring 3 features for building enterprise Java applications.

  9. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  10. Predicting the elastic properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chenli; Shen Huishen

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is performed on a double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) to predict its elastic properties based on a double-walled shear deformable shell model. By direct buckling measurement, we present here a method for uniquely determining the effective wall thickness for the shell model. Accounting for two different kinds of DWCNTs by adding an inner or outer tube to a fiducial tube, the mechanical properties of DWCNTs are carefully investigated as compared with those of the fiducial tube. It is found that the predicted values of Young's and shear moduli depend strongly on the construction and helicity of DWCNTs, while the dependence on nanotube length is relatively small. The results also confirm that the temperature variation has a significant effect on the elastic properties of DWCNTs

  11. Phason elasticity and surface roughening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Leihan; Jaric, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The phason elasticity of two-dimensional (2D) equilibrium quasicrystals is discussed in analogy with surface roughening phenomena. Taking a Penrose tiling model as an example, we show that the phason elastic energy is linear in the phason strain at zero temperature (T = 0), but becomes quadratic at any T > 0 and sufficiently small strain. Heuristic and real-space renormalization group arguments are given for the thermal roughening of the hyper-surface which represents quasicrystal tiling. Monte Carlo method is applied to illustrate the logarithmically diverging phason fluctuations and power-law diffraction intensities at T > 0. For three-dimensional systems, we present arguments which suggest a finite temperature transition between two quasicrystal phases, characterized by linear and quadratic phason elastic energy, respectively. (author). 17 refs, 12 figs

  12. Helical CT in evaluation of the bronchial tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perhomaa, M.; Laehde, S.; Rossi, O.; Suramo, I.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a protocol for and to assess the value of helical CT in the imaging of the bronchial tree. Material and Methods: Noncontrast helical CT was performed in 30 patients undergoing fiberoptic bronchoscopy for different reasons. Different protocols were compared; they included overlapping 10 mm, 5 mm, or 3 mm slices and non-tilted, cephalad or caudal tilted images. Ordinary cross-sectional and multiplanar 2D reformats were applied for visualization of the bronchial branches. The effect of increasing the helical pitch was tested in one patient. Results: A total of 92.1-100% of the segmental bronchi present in the helical acquisitions were identified by the different protocols. The collimation had no significant impact on the identification of the bronchial branches, but utilization of 3-mm overlapping slices made it easier to distinguish the nearby branches and provided better longitudinal visualization of the bronchi in 2D reformats. The tilted scans illustrated the disadvantage of not covering all segmental bronchi in one breath-hold. An increase of the pitch from 1 to 1.5 did not cause noticeable blurring of the images. CT and bronchoscopic findings correlated well in the area accessible to bronchoscopy, but CT detected 5 additional pathological lesions (including 2 cancers) in the peripheral lung. Conclusion: Helical CT supplemented with bronchography-like 2D reformats provides an effective method complementary to bronchoscopy in the examination of the bronchial tree. (orig.)

  13. Relativistic helicity and link in Minkowski space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Z.; Kawazura, Y.; Yokoyama, T.

    2014-01-01

    A relativistic helicity has been formulated in the four-dimensional Minkowski space-time. Whereas the relativistic distortion of space-time violates the conservation of the conventional helicity, the newly defined relativistic helicity conserves in a barotropic fluid or plasma, dictating a fundamental topological constraint. The relation between the helicity and the vortex-line topology has been delineated by analyzing the linking number of vortex filaments which are singular differential forms representing the pure states of Banach algebra. While the dimension of space-time is four, vortex filaments link, because vorticities are primarily 2-forms and the corresponding 2-chains link in four dimension; the relativistic helicity measures the linking number of vortex filaments that are proper-time cross-sections of the vorticity 2-chains. A thermodynamic force yields an additional term in the vorticity, by which the vortex filaments on a reference-time plane are no longer pure states. However, the vortex filaments on a proper-time plane remain to be pure states, if the thermodynamic force is exact (barotropic), thus, the linking number of vortex filaments conserves

  14. Chirality of Intermediate Filaments and Magnetic Helicity of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Chae, J.

    2009-05-01

    Filaments that form either between or around active regions (ARs) are called intermediate filaments. Even though there have been many theoretical studies, the origin of the chirality of filaments is still unknown. We investigated how intermediate filaments are related to their associated ARs, especially from the point of view of magnetic helicity and the orientation of polarity inversion lines (PILs). The chirality of filaments has been determined based on the orientations of barbs observed in the full-disk Hα images taken at Big Bear Solar Observatory during the rising phase of solar cycle 23. The sign of magnetic helicity of ARs has been determined using S/inverse-S shaped sigmoids from Yohkoh SXT images. As a result, we have found a good correlation between the chirality of filaments and the magnetic helicity sign of ARs. Among 45 filaments, 42 filaments have shown the same sign as helicity sign of nearby ARs. It has been also confirmed that the role of both the orientation and the relative direction of PILs to ARs in determining the chirality of filaments is not significant, against a theoretical prediction. These results suggest that the chirality of intermediate filaments may originate from magnetic helicity of their associated ARs.

  15. Gynecological applications of helical CT using SmartPrep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurada, Akira; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    SmartPrep is software program for scanning a given region of interest (ROI) at optimal contrast density. An operator can arbitrarily define ROI and preset the CT value at which scanning should be started. After the injection of a contrast medium, system conducts continuous monitoring of the ROI and the operator starts helical scanning of the planned region when the present CT value has been reached. In comparison with conventional helical CT that requires a period of time from the beginning of contrast medium injection to the beginning of scanning, SmartPrep minimizes personal error and better depicts the artery-predominant phase under optimal conditions. In this study we examine the usefulness of contrast-enhanced helical CT using SmartPrep in the evaluation of gynecological disease. When the contrast medium was injected into the dorsal vein of the hand at a rate of 3 ml/sec, strong staining of pelvic arteries was observed in the CT images started at 17 to 23 sec after injection. The early-phase helical CT obtained under these conditions provided good depiction of lesions in cases of placenta accreta and invasive mole, as well as clear demonstration of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of laterality in cases of cervical cancer. Comparison of the early and delayed phase also facilitated easier evaluation of lymph nodes than conventional comparison of simple and contrast-enhanced CT. The results thus suggest the usefulness of contrast-enhanced helical CT using SmartPrep in gynecology. (author)

  16. Helicity and potential vorticity in the surface boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhetiani, Otto; Kurgansky, Michael; Koprov, Boris; Koprov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    An experimental measurement of all three components of the velocity and vorticity vectors, as well as the temperature and its gradient, and potential vorticity, has been developed using four acoustic anemometers. Anemometers were placed at vertices of a tetrahedron, the horizontal base of which was a rectangular triangle with equal legs, and the upper point was exactly above the top of the right angle. The distance from the surface to the tetrahedron its base was 5.5 m, and the lengths of legs and a vertical edge were 5 m. The measurements were carried out of total duration near 100 hours both in stable and unstable stratification conditions (at the Tsimlyansk Scientific Station in a uniform area of virgin steppe 700 x 650 m, August 2012). A covariance-correlation matrix for turbulent variations in all measured values has been calculated. In the daytime horizontal and vertical components of the helicity are of the order of -0.03 and +0.01 m s-2, respectively. The nighttime signs remain unchanged, but the absolute values are several times smaller. It is confirmed also by statistics of a relative helicity. The cospectra and spectral correlation coefficients have been calculated for all helicity components. The time variations in the components of "instantaneous" relative helicity and potential vorticity are considered. Connections of helicity with Monin-Obukhov length and the wind vertical profile structure are discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (Project No 14-27-00134).

  17. Kinetic theory of rf current drive and helicity injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mett, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current drive and helicity injection by plasma waves are examined with the use of kinetic theory. The Vlasov equation yields a general current drive formula that contains resonant and nonresonant (ponderomotivelike) contributions. Standard quasilinear current drive is described by the former, while helicity current drive may be contained in the latter. Since direct analytical comparison of the sizes of the two terms is, in general, difficult, a new approach is taken. Solution of the drift-kinetic equation shows that the standard Landau damping/transit time magnetic pumping quasilinear diffusion coefficient is the only contribution to steady-state current drive to leading order in ε=ρ L /l, where ρ L is the Larmor radius and l is the inhomogeneity scale length. All nonresonant contributions, including the helicity, appear at higher order, after averages are taken over a flux surface, over azimuth, and over time. Consequently, at wave frequencies well below the electron cyclotron frequency, a wave helicity flux perpendicular to the magnetic field does not influence the parallel motion of electrons to leading order and therefore will not drive a significant current. Any current associated with a wave helicity flux is then either ion current (and thus inefficient) or electron current stemming from effects not included in the drift-kinetic treatment, such as cyclotron, collisional, or nonlinear (i.e., not quasilinear)

  18. Reduced bispectrum seeded by helical primordial magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hortúa, Héctor Javier [Universidad Nacional de Colombia-Bogotá, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Física, Carrera 30 Calle 45-03, C.P. 111321 Bogotá (Colombia); Castañeda, Leonardo, E-mail: hjhortuao@unal.edu.co, E-mail: lcastanedac@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Gravitación y Cosmología, Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, cra 45 No 26-85, Edificio Uriel Gutierréz, Bogotá, D.C. (Colombia)

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of helical primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) reduced bispectrum. We derive the full three-point statistics of helical magnetic fields and numerically calculate the even contribution in the collinear configuration. We then numerically compute the CMB reduced bispectrum induced by passive and compensated PMF modes on large angular scales. There is a negative signal on the bispectrum due to the helical terms of the fields and we also observe that the biggest contribution to the bispectrum comes from the non-zero IR cut-off for causal fields, unlike the two-point correlation case. For negative spectral indices, the reduced bispectrum is enhanced by the passive modes. This gives a lower value of the upper limit for the mean amplitude of the magnetic field on a given characteristic scale. However, high values of IR cut-off in the bispectrum, and the helical terms of the magnetic field relaxes this bound. This demonstrates the importance of the IR cut-off and helicity in the study of the nature of PMFs from CMB observations.

  19. l=1 helical axis heliotron device in Kyoto university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, K.; Sano, F.; Mizuuchi, T.; Hanatani, K.; Okada, H.; Obiki, T.

    1999-01-01

    Helical systems are an attractive candidate for magnetic fusion reactor. Recently, there has been great progress in theoretical research of three dimensional magnetic field structures, resulting in several kinds of confinement optimization being proposed for toroidal magnetic confinement system. For example, some sophisticated ideas have appeared on stage such as quasi-helical symmetry and quasi-isodynamic system. To find experimentally which way is the best Optimisation, a new helical axis heliotron device, so called 'Heliotron J', is under construction in the Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Japan. In this conference, the basic concept and the present status will be presented. In the conventional plane axis helical system, it was difficult to have both good particle confinement and good MHD stability simultaneously. The goal of Heliotron J project is to clarify their compatibility in the spatial axis toroidal device. The best way for Optimising the helical magnetic field configuration will be explored by investigating the plasma response to the change in the field components. The main subjects for plasma experiment are: demonstration of the existence of good magnetic flux surfaces, reduction of neoclassical transport in collisionless regime, MHD Stabilisation in high β plasma, controllability of bootstrap current, good confinement of high energy particles

  20. Controllable helical deformations on printed anisotropic composite soft actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Li, Ling; Serjouei, Ahmad; Dong, Longteng; Weeger, Oliver; Gu, Guoying; Ge, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Helical shapes are ubiquitous in both nature and engineering. However, the development of soft actuators and robots that mimic helical motions has been hindered primarily due to the lack of efficient modeling approaches that take into account the material anisotropy and the directional change of the external loading point. In this work, we present a theoretical framework for modeling controllable helical deformations of cable-driven, anisotropic, soft composite actuators. The framework is based on the minimum potential energy method, and its model predictions are validated by experiments, where the microarchitectures of the soft composite actuators can be precisely defined by 3D printing. We use the developed framework to investigate the effects of material and geometric parameters on helical deformations. The results show that material stiffness, volume fraction, layer thickness, and fiber orientation can be used to control the helical deformation of a soft actuator. In particular, we found that a critical fiber orientation angle exists at which the twist of the actuator changes the direction. Thus, this work can be of great importance for the design and fabrication of soft actuators with tailored deformation behavior.

  1. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  2. Heat transfer characteristics of a helical heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San, Jung-Yang; Hsu, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Heat transfer performance of a helical heat exchanger was investigated. The heat exchanger is composed of a helical tube with rectangular cross section and two cover plates. The ε–Ntu relation of the heat exchanger was obtained using a numerical method. In the analysis, the flow in the tube (helical flow) was considered to be mixed and the flow outside the tube (radial flow) was unmixed. In the experiment, the Darcy friction factor (f) and convective heat transfer coefficient (h) of the radial flow were measured. The radial flow was air and the helical flow was water. Four different channel spacing (0.5, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.6 mm) were individually considered. The Reynolds numbers were in the range 307–2547. Two correlations, one for the Darcy friction factor and the other for the Nusselt number, were proposed. - Highlights: ► We analyze the heat transfer characteristics of a helical heat exchanger and examine the effectiveness–Ntu relation. ► Increasing number of turns of the heat exchanger would slightly increase the effectiveness. ► There is an optimum Ntu value corresponding to a maximum effectiveness. ► We measure the Darcy friction factor and Nusselt number of the radial flow and examine the correlations.

  3. Investor response to consumer elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenaa Jensen, Stine; Meibom, Peter; Ravn, H.F.; Straarup, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    In the Nordic electricity system there is considerable uncertainty with respect to the long-term development in production capacity. The process towards liberalisation of the electricity sector started in a situation with a large reserve margin, but this margin is gradually vanishing. Since the potential investors in new production capacity are unaccustomed with investments under the new regime it is unknown if and when investments will take place. The electricity price is the key market signal to potential investors. The price is settled as a balance between supply and demand, and it is generally assumed that the demand side has an important role in this, and increasingly so. However, since consumers have not earlier had the incentive to respond to electricity prices, no reliable estimate of demand elasticity is known. The purpose of the present study is to analyse the role of electricity demand elasticity for investments in new electricity production capacity. Electricity price scenarios generated with a partial equilibrium model (Balmorel) are combined with a model of investment decisions. In this, various scenarios concerning the development in the demand elasticity are used. The simulated investment decisions are taken in a stochastic, dynamic setting, where a key point is the timing of the investment decision in relation to the gathering of new information relative to the stochastic elements. Based on this, the consequences of the development in consumer price elasticity for investments in a base load and a peak load plant are investigated. The main result of the analysis is that peak load investments can be made unprofitable by the development in consumer price elasticity, such that an investor will tend to wait with his peak load investment, until the development in consumer price elasticity has been revealed. (au)

  4. The size-dependent vibration of embedded magneto-electro-elastic cylindrical nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Liao-Liang; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Yang, Jie; Kitipornchai, Sritawat

    2014-01-01

    Based on the nonlocal Love’s shell theory, this paper develops an embedded magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) cylindrical nanoshell model. This model incorporates effects of the small scale parameter and thermo-electro-magnetic loadings. The surrounding elastic medium is described as the Winkler model characterized by the spring. By using this model and the Hamilton principle, the governing equations and boundary conditions are derived for free vibration of the embedded MEE cylindrical nanoshells. The Navier’s method is first utilized to obtain the analytical solution for the simply supported MEE nanoshell. Then, numerical solutions for MEE nanoshells under various boundary conditions are obtained by using the differential quadrature (DQ) method. A detailed parametric study is conducted to highlight the influences of the nonlocal parameter, temperature rise, external electric potential, external magnetic potential, spring constant, radius-to-thickness ratio and length-to-radius ratio on natural frequencies of MEE nanoshells. (paper)

  5. Rotor-bearing system integrated with shape memory alloy springs for ensuring adaptable dynamics and damping enhancement-Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-01-01

    nonlinear coupled dynamics of the rotor-bearing system. The nonlinear forces from the thermomechanical shape memory alloy springs and from the passive magnetic bearings are coupled to the rotor and bearing housing dynamics. The equations of motion describing rotor tilt and bearing housing lateral motion......Helical pseudoelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are integrated into a dynamic system consisting of a rigid rotor supported by passive magnetic bearings. The aim is to determine the utility of SMAs for vibration attenuation via their mechanical hysteresis, and for adaptation of the dynamic...

  6. Spring-back of flexible roll forming bending process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Kim, D H; Jung, D W

    2015-01-01

    Simulations are now widely used in the field of roll forming because of their convenience. Simulations provide a low cost, secure and fast analysis tool. Flexible roll forming provides the desired shapes with a one time forming process. For roll forming, the velocity of the sheet and friction are important factors to attain an ideal shape. Because it is a complicated process, simulations provide a better understanding of the roll forming process. Simulations were peformed using ABAQUS software linked to elastic-plastic modules which we developed taking into account of interactions between these fields [1]. The application of this method makes it possible to highlight the strain-stress and mechanical behaviour laws and the spring-back. Thus, the flexible roll forming and bending process can be well described by the simulation software and guide the actual machine. (paper)

  7. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago

  8. Water hammer in elastic pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.; Tiselj, I.

    2002-01-01

    One dimensional two-fluid six-equation model of two-phase flow, that can be found in computer codes like RELAP5, TRAC, and CATHARE, was upgraded with additional terms, which enable modelling of the pressure waves in elastic pipes. It is known that pipe elasticity reduces the propagation velocity of the shock and other pressure waves in the piping systems. Equations that include the pipe elasticty terms are used in WAHA code, which is being developed within the WAHALoads project of 5't'h EU research program.(author)

  9. Stable single helical C- and I-chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Z; Li Y; Jing X D; Meng F S; Zhao X; Li J H; Qiu Z Y; Yuan Q; Wang W X; Bi L; Liu H; Zhang Y P; Liu C J; Zheng S P; Liu B B

    2016-01-01

    The helicity of stable single helical carbon chains and iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic van der Waals interaction energy. The results show that the optimal helical radius increases linearly with increasing tube radius, which produces a constant separation between the chain structure and the tube wall. The helical angle exhibits a ladder-like decrease with increasing tube radius, indicating that a large tube can produce a small helicity in the helical structures. (paper)

  10. CACTUS SPRING ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Kuizon, Lucia

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies together with a review of historic mining and prospecting activities indicate that the Cactus Spring Roadless Area in California has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Marble bodies occur in the northern part of the roadless area and are possible resources for building stone, crushed and quarried aggregate, and lime and magnesium for Portland cement and industrial applications. It is recommended that the terrane of marble be mapped and sampled carefully in order to evaluate the quantity and quality of the carbonate resources.

  11. Spring 1991 Meeting outstanding papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Atmospheric Sciences Committee has presented Kaye Brubaker and Jichun Shi with Outstanding Student Paper awards for presentations given at the AGU 1991 Spring Meeting, held in Baltimore May 28-31.Brubaker's paper, “Precipitation Recycling Estimated from Atmospheric Data,” presented quantitative estimates of the contribution of locallyevaporated moisture to precipitation over several large continental regions. Recycled precipitation is defined as water that evaporates from the land surface of a specified region and falls again as precipitation within the region. Brubaker applied a control volume analysis based on a model proposed by Budyko.

  12. Natural frequencies of Euler-Bernoulli beam with open cracks on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Jae; Yun, Jong Hak; Seong, Kyeong Youn; Kim, Jae Ho; Kang, Sung Hwang

    2006-01-01

    A study of the natural vibrations of beam resting on elastic foundation with finite number of transverse open cracks is presented. Frequency equations are derived for beams with different end restraints. Euler-Bernoulli beam on Winkler foundation and Euler-Bernoulli beam on Paster nak foundation are investigated. The cracks are modeled by massless substitute spring. The effects of the crack location, size and its number and the foundation constants, on the natural frequencies of the beam, are investigated

  13. New reconstruction algorithm in helical-volume CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Y.; Rifu, T.; Aradate, H.; Hirao, Y.; Ohyama, N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on helical scanning that is an application of continuous scanning CT to acquire volume data in a short time for three-dimensional study. In a helical scan, the patient couch sustains movement during continuous-rotation scanning and then the acquired data is processed to synthesize a projection data set of vertical section by interpolation. But the synthesized section is not thin enough; also, the image may have artifacts caused by couch movement. A new reconstruction algorithm that helps resolve such problems has been developed and compared with the ordinary algorithm. The authors constructed a helical scan system based on TCT-900S, which can perform 1-second rotation continuously for 30 seconds. The authors measured section thickness using both algorithms on an AAPM phantom, and we also compared degree of artifacts on clinical data

  14. Geometric scalings for the electrostatically driven helical plasma state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Cihan; Finn, John M.; Nebel, Richard A.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2017-12-01

    A new plasma state has been investigated [Akcay et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 052503 (2017)], with a uniform applied axial magnetic field in a periodic cylinder of length L = 2 π R , driven by helical electrodes. The drive is single helicity, depending on m θ + k z = m θ - n ζ , where ζ = z / R and k = - n / R . For strong ( m , n ) = ( 1 , 1 ) drive, the state was found to have a strong axial mean current density, with a mean-field safety factor q 0 ( r ) just above the pitch of the electrodes m / n = 1 in the interior. This state has possible applications to DC electrical transformers and tailoring of the current profile in tokamaks. We study two geometric issues of interest for these applications: (i) scaling of properties with the plasma length or aspect ratio and (ii) behavior for different helicities, specifically ( m , n ) = ( 1 , n ) for n > 1 and ( m , n ) = ( 2 , 1 ) .

  15. Effect of loss cone on confinement in toroidal helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Fukuyama, A.; Hanatani, K.

    1988-12-01

    Analytical estimation is given on the loss cone in the toroidal helical devices in the presence of the radial electric field and the modulation of the helical ripple. The minimum energy of particles entering the loss cone is calculated. The modulation is not always effective in reducing the loss in the presence of the radial electric field. The plasma loss due to the loss cone is estimated in the collisionless limit. The radial electric field is estimated in the presence of the loss cone. It is found that the transition to the solution with positive radial electric field, which is necessary to achieve the high-ion-temperature mode, becomes difficult. This difficulty is large for the systems with the small helical ripple. (author)

  16. Geometric analysis of alloreactive HLA α-helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribarics, Reiner; Karch, Rudolf; Ilieva, Nevena; Schreiner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is a valuable tool for the investigation of functional elements in biomolecules, providing information on dynamic properties and processes. Previous work by our group has characterized static geometric properties of the two MHC α-helices comprising the peptide binding region recognized by T cells. We build upon this work and used several spline models to approximate the overall shape of MHC α-helices. We applied this technique to a series of MD simulations of alloreactive MHC molecules that allowed us to capture the dynamics of MHC α-helices' steric configurations. Here, we discuss the variability of spline models underlying the geometric analysis with varying polynomial degrees of the splines.

  17. Imploding to equilibrium of helically symmetric theta pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharky, N.N.

    1978-01-01

    The time-dependent, single-fluid, dissipative magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved in helical coordinates (r,phi), where phi = THETA-kz, k = 2π/L and L is the periodicity length in the z-direction. The two-dimensional numerical calculations simulate theta pinches which have an l = 1 helical field added to them. Given the applied magnetic fields and the initial state of the plasma, we study the time evolution of the system. The plasma is found to experience two kinds of oscillations, occurring on different time scales. These are the radial compression oscillations, and the slower helical oscillations of the plasma column. The plasma motion is followed until these oscillations disappear and an equilibrium is nearly reached. Hence given the amplitude and the rise time of the applied magnetic fields, the calculations allow one to relate the initial state of a cold, homogeneous plasma to its final equilibrium state where it is heated and compressed

  18. Theory of dynamics in long pulse helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Sanuki, H.; Toda, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2001-01-01

    Self-organized dynamics of toroidal helical plasma, which is induced by the nonlinear transport property, is discussed. Neoclassical ripple diffusion is a dominant mechanism that drives the radial electric field. The bifurcation nature of the electric field generation gives rise to the electric field domain interface, across which the electric field changes strongly. This domain interface is an origin of internal transport barrier in helical systems. This nonlinearity gives rise to the self-organized oscillations; the electric field pulsation is one of the examples. Based on the model of density limit, in which the competition between the transport loss and radiation loss is analyzed, dynamics near the density limit of helical systems is also discussed. (author)

  19. Helicity amplitudes and electromagnetic decays of hyperon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauteren, T. van; Ryckebusch, J.; Metsch, B.; Petry, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    We present results for the helicity amplitudes of the lowest-lying hyperon resonances Y * , computed within the framework of the Bonn Constituent-Quark model, which is based on the Bethe-Salpeter approach. The seven parameters entering the model were fitted to the best-known baryon masses. Accordingly, the results for the helicity amplitudes are genuine predictions. Some hyperon resonances are seen to couple more strongly to a virtual photon with finite Q 2 than to a real photon. Other Y * 's, such as the S 01 (1670) Λ-resonance or the S 11 (1620) Σ-resonance, couple very strongly to real photons. We present a qualitative argument for predicting the behaviour of the helicity asymmetries of baryon resonances at high Q 2 . (orig.)

  20. Conformal avoidance helical tomotherapy for dogs with nasopharyngeal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, J.S.; Turek, M.; Mackie, T.R.; Miller, P.; Mehta, M.P.; Forrest, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy provides a unique means of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using a novel treatment unit, which merges features of a linear accelerator with a helical CT scanner. Thanks to the CT imaging capacity, targeted regions can be visualized prior to, during, or immediately after each treatment. Such image-guidance through megavoltage CT will allow the realization and refinement of the concept of adaptive radiotherapy - the reconstruction of the actually delivered daily dose (as opposed to planned dose) accompanied by prescription adjustments when appropriate. In addition to this unique feature, helical tomotherapy promises further improvements in the specific avoidance of critical normal structures, i.e. conformal avoidance, the counterpart of conformal therapy. The first definitive treatment protocol using helical tomotherapy is presently underway for dogs with nasopharyngeal tumors. In general, such tumors can be treated with conventional external beam radiation therapy but at the cost of severe ocular toxicity due to the anatomy of the canine head. These are readily measurable toxicities and are almost universal in incidence; therefore, the canine nasopharyngeal tumor presents an ideal model to assess the ability to conformally avoid critical structures. It is hoped that conformal avoidance helical tomotherapy will improve tumor control via dose-escalation while reducing ocular toxicity in these veterinary patients. A total of 10 fractions are scheduled for these patients; the first 3 dogs have all received at least 7 fractions delivered via helical tomotherapy. Although preliminary, the first 3 dogs treated have not shown any evidence of ocular toxicity in this ongoing study

  1. Divertors for Helical Devices: Concepts, Plans, Results, and Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.; Grigull, P.; McCormick, K.

    2004-01-01

    With Large Helical Device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), the development of helical devices is now taking a large step forward on the path to a steady-state fusion reactor. Important issues that need to be settled in these machines are particle flux and heat control and the impact of divertors on plasma performance in future continuously burning fusion plasmas. The divertor concepts that will initially be explored in these large machines were prepared in smaller-scale devices like Heliotron E, Compact Helical System (CHS), and Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS). While advanced divertor scenarios relevant for W7-X were already studied in W7-AS, other smaller-scale experiments like Heliotron-J, CHS, and National Compact Stellarator Experiment will be used for the further development of divertor concepts. The two divertor configurations that are being investigated are the helical and the island divertor, as well as the local island divertor, which was successfully demonstrated on CHS and just went into operation on LHD. At present, on its route to a fully closed helical divertor, LHD operates in an open helical divertor configuration. W7-X will be equipped right from the start with an actively cooled discrete island divertor that will allow quasi-continuous operation. The divertor design is very similar to the one explored on W7-AS. For sufficiently large island sizes and not too long field line connection lengths, this divertor gives access to a partially detached quasi-steady-state operating scenario in a newly found high-density H-mode operating regime, which benefits from high energy and low impurity confinement times, with edge radiation levels of up to 90% and sufficient neutral compression in the subdivertor region (>10) for active pumping. The basic physics of the different divertor concepts and associated implementation problems, like asymmetries due to drifts, accessibility of essential operating scenarios, toroidal asymmetries due to symmetry breaking error fields

  2. Variation in the helical structure of native collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available The structure of collagen has been a matter of curiosity, investigation, and debate for the better part of a century. There has been a particularly productive period recently, during which much progress has been made in better describing all aspects of collagen structure. However, there remain some questions regarding its helical symmetry and its persistence within the triple-helix. Previous considerations of this symmetry have sometimes confused the picture by not fully recognizing that collagen structure is a highly complex and large hierarchical entity, and this affects and is effected by the super-coiled molecules that make it. Nevertheless, the symmetry question is not trite, but of some significance as it relates to extracellular matrix organization and cellular integration. The correlation between helical structure in the context of the molecular packing arrangement determines which parts of the amino acid sequence of the collagen fibril are buried or accessible to the extracellular matrix or the cell. In this study, we concentrate primarily on the triple-helical structure of fibrillar collagens I and II, the two most predominant types. By comparing X-ray diffraction data collected from type I and type II containing tissues, we point to evidence for a range of triple-helical symmetries being extant in the molecules native environment. The possible significance of helical instability, local helix dissociation and molecular packing of the triple-helices is discussed in the context of collagen's supramolecular organization, all of which must affect the symmetry of the collagen triple-helix.

  3. Three-dimensional deformation response of a NiTi shape memory helical-coil actuator during thermomechanical cycling: experimentally validated numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, B.; Nicholson, D. E.; Saleeb, A. F.; Padula, S. A., II; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2016-09-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators often operate under a complex state of stress for an extended number of thermomechanical cycles in many aerospace and engineering applications. Hence, it becomes important to account for multi-axial stress states and deformation characteristics (which evolve with thermomechanical cycling) when calibrating any SMA model for implementation in large-scale simulation of actuators. To this end, the present work is focused on the experimental validation of an SMA model calibrated for the transient and cyclic evolutionary behavior of shape memory Ni49.9Ti50.1, for the actuation of axially loaded helical-coil springs. The approach requires both experimental and computational aspects to appropriately assess the thermomechanical response of these multi-dimensional structures. As such, an instrumented and controlled experimental setup was assembled to obtain temperature, torque, degree of twist and extension, while controlling end constraints during heating and cooling of an SMA spring under a constant externally applied axial load. The computational component assesses the capabilities of a general, multi-axial, SMA material-modeling framework, calibrated for Ni49.9Ti50.1 with regard to its usefulness in the simulation of SMA helical-coil spring actuators. Axial extension, being the primary response, was examined on an axially-loaded spring with multiple active coils. Two different conditions of end boundary constraint were investigated in both the numerical simulations as well as the validation experiments: Case (1) where the loading end is restrained against twist (and the resulting torque measured as the secondary response) and Case (2) where the loading end is free to twist (and the degree of twist measured as the secondary response). The present study focuses on the transient and evolutionary response associated with the initial isothermal loading and the subsequent thermal cycles under applied constant axial load. The experimental

  4. Nonlinear theory of elastic shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Junior, J.A.

    1979-08-01

    Nonlinear theory of elastic shells is developed which incorporates both geometric and physical nonlinearities and which does not make use of the well known Love-Kirchhoff hypothesis. The resulting equations are formulated in tensorial notation and are reduced to the ones of common use when simplifying assumptions encountered in the especific litterature are taken. (Author) [pt

  5. Outer grid strap protruding spring repair apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widener, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel assembly grid spring repair apparatus for repairing a spring formed on an outer strap of a fuel assembly grid and having a portion protruding outwardly beyond the strap, the apparatus comprising: (a) a support frame defining an opening and having means defining a guide channel extending along the opening in a first direction; (b) means mounted on the frame and being adjustable for attaching the frame to the outer strap of the support grid so that the frame opening is aligned with the outwardly protruding spring on the outer strap; (c) an outer slide having a passageway defined therethrough and being mounted in the guide channel for reciprocable movement along the frame opening in the first direction for aligning the passageway with the outwardly protruding portion of the spring on the outer strap. The outer slide also has means defining a guide way extending along the passageway in a second direction generally orthogonal to the first direction; (d) a spring reset mechanism being operable for resetting the protruding spring to a nonprotruding position relative to the outer strap when the mechanism is aligned with the protruding portion of the spring; and (e) an inner slide supporting the spring reset mechanism and being mounted to the guide way for reciprocable movement along the passageway of the outer slide in the second direction for aligning the spring reset mechanism with the protruding portion of the spring on the outer strap

  6. Point contacts and localization in generic helical liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Christoph P.; Strübi, Grégory; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2013-10-01

    We consider two helical liquids on opposite edges of a two-dimensional topological insulator, which are connected by one or several local tunnel junctions. In the presence of spatially inhomogeneous Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the spin of the helical edge states is momentum dependent, and this spin texture can be different on opposite edges. We demonstrate that this has a strong impact on the electron transport between the edges. In particular, in the case of many random tunnel contacts, the localization length depends strongly on the spin textures of the edge states.

  7. Helical coil alignment in the advanced toroidal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Cole, M.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Nelson, B.E.; Warwick, J.E.; Whitson, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the helical coil design concept, detailed descriptions of the method for installation and alignment, and discussions of segment installation and alignment equipment. Alignment is accomplished by optical methods using electronic theodolites connected to a microcomputer to form a coordinate measurement system. The coordinate measurement system is described in detail, along with target selection and fixturing for manipulation of the helical coil segments during installation. In addition, software is described including vendor-supplied software used in the coordinate measurement system and in-house-developed software used to calibrate segment and positioning fixture motion. 2 refs., 8 figs

  8. Effects of different rod spacers (helical types) on coolant crossmixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.V.; Sviridenko, E.Ya.; Matyukhin, N.M.; Rymkevich, K.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1981-11-01

    The results of investigations (electromagnetic measuring method) on coolant cross mixing in rod clusters with spiral wire spacers with different winding directions, with alternating unfinned and finned rods (case 'fin to rod'), as well as in rod clusters with much space between the rods, (case 'fin to fin') are reported. The local fluid dynamics parameters (distribution of the transversal and longitudinal velocity component) that define the physical processes of the coolant exchange in the rod clusters with helical spacers are explained. The investigation results for different helical spacer types are compared with each other. (orig.) [de

  9. Demonstration of a helical armature for a superconducting generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, P.L.; Kirtley, J.L. Jr.; Hagman, W.H.; Ula, A.H.M.S.

    1979-01-01

    This is a report on the design, construction and testing of an experimental helical armature for a superconducting geneator. Rated at 60 kVA, this armature was built to be operated in conjunction with the rotor of the first experimental superconducting machine built at MIT. It incorporates, in addition to the helical winding form, a high density edge-brazed end turn geometry, molded bar groups, and silicone fluid coolant and insulation impregnant. Tests showed that the thermal performance of the armature was within reasonable limits, magnetic analyses leading to the computation of reactance and voltage geneation were approximately correct. No abnormal cheating was observed. 9 refs

  10. Helically symmetric equilibria with pressure anisotropy and incompressible plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelias, A.; Kuiroukidis, A.; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.

    2018-02-01

    We derive a generalized Grad-Shafranov equation governing helically symmetric equilibria with pressure anisotropy and incompressible flow of arbitrary direction. Through the most general linearizing ansatz for the various free surface functions involved therein, we construct equilibrium solutions and study their properties. It turns out that pressure anisotropy can act either paramegnetically or diamagnetically, the parallel flow has a paramagnetic effect, while the non-parallel component of the flow associated with the electric field has a diamagnetic one. Also, pressure anisotropy and flow affect noticeably the helical current density.

  11. Synthesis, model and stability of helically coiled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejes, Dora; Raffai, Manuella; Hernadi, Klara

    2013-01-01

    . Our experiments focused on the production and development of catalysts for the synthesis of helically coiled CNTs (carbon nanotubes). The catalysts were tested in the decomposition of acetylene by CCVD (Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition) method. The carbon deposit was imaged by TEM (Transmission......Structural model of helically coiled carbon nanotubes is proposed. It is constructed by means of topological coordinate method. Relaxation and cohesive energy calculation are performed by molecular mechanics, using second-generation bond order potential for hydrocarbons introduced by D. W. Brenner...

  12. The role of pressure in rubber elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, A F; Weiner, J H

    2004-06-22

    We describe a series of molecular dynamics computations that reveal an intimate connection at the atomic scale between difference stress (which resists stretches) and pressure (which resists volume changes) in an idealized elastomer, in contrast to the classical theory of rubber elasticity. Our simulations idealize the elastomer as a "pearl necklace," in which the covalent bonds are stiff linear springs, while nonbonded atoms interact through a Lennard-Jones potential with energy epsilon(LJ) and radius sigma(LJ). We calculate the difference stress t(11)-(t(22)+t(33))/2 and mean stress (t(11)+t(22)+t(33))/3 induced by a constant volume extension in the x(1) direction, as a function of temperature T and reduced density rho(*)=Nsigma(IJ) (3)/nu. Here, N is the number of atoms in the simulation cell and nu is the cell volume. Results show that for rho(*)rubber elasticity, which neglects nonbonded interactions. However, data presented by van Krevelen [Properties of Polymers, 3rd ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1990), p. 79] indicate that rubber at standard conditions corresponds to rho(*)=1.2. For rho(*)>1, the system is entropic for kT/epsilon(LJ)>2, but at lower temperatures the difference stress contains an additional energy component, which increases as rho(*) increases and temperature decreases. Finally, the model exhibits a glass transition for rho(*)=1.2 and kT/epsilon(LJ) approximately 2. The atomic-scale processes responsible for generating stress are explored in detail. Simulations demonstrate that the repulsive portion of the Lennard-Jones potential provides a contribution sigma(nbr)>0 to the difference stress, the attractive portion provides sigma(nba) approximately 0, while the covalent bonds provide sigma(b)nbr)0, and Pi(b)nbr)=-APi(nbr)P(2)(theta(b)), sigma(b)=BPi(b)P(2)(theta(b)), where P(2)(theta(b)) is a measure of the anisotropy of the orientation of the covalent bonds, and A and B are coefficients that depend weakly on rho(*) and temperature. For high

  13. Size dependent nanomechanics of coil spring shaped polymer nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiba, Shota; Masui, Kyoko; Taguchi, Natsuo; Hamano, Tomoki; Kawata, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru

    2015-11-27

    Direct laser writing (DLW) via two-photon polymerization (TPP) has been established as a powerful technique for fabrication and integration of nanoscale components, as it enables the production of three dimensional (3D) micro/nano objects. This technique has indeed led to numerous applications, including micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), metamaterials, mechanical metamaterials, and photonic crystals. However, as the feature sizes decrease, an urgent demand has emerged to uncover the mechanics of nanosized polymer materials. Here, we fabricate coil spring shaped polymer nanowires using DLW via two-photon polymerization. We find that even the nanocoil springs follow a linear-response against applied forces, following Hooke's law, as revealed by compression tests using an atomic force microscope. Further, the elasticity of the polymer material is found to become significantly greater as the wire radius is decreased from 550 to 350 nm. Polarized Raman spectroscopy measurements show that polymer chains are aligned in nanowires along the axis, which may be responsible for the size dependence. Our findings provide insight into the nanomechanics of polymer materials fabricated by DLW, which leads to further applications based on nanosized polymer materials.

  14. Heart transplantation and arterial elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colvin-Adams M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monica Colvin-Adams,1 Nonyelum Harcourt,1 Robert LeDuc,2 Ganesh Raveendran,1 Yassir Sonbol,3 Robert Wilson,1 Daniel Duprez11Cardiovascular Division, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Biostatistics University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Cardiovascular Division, St Luke's Hospital System, Sugar Land, TX, USAObjective: Arterial elasticity is a functional biomarker that has predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in nontransplant populations. There is little information regarding arterial elasticity in heart transplant recipients. This study aimed to characterize small (SAE and large (LAE artery elasticity in heart transplant recipients in comparison with an asymptomatic population free of overt cardiovascular disease. A second goal was to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with arterial elasticity in this unique population.Methods: Arterial pulse waveform was registered noninvasively at the radial artery in 71 heart transplant recipients between 2008 and 2010. SAEs and LAEs were derived from diastolic pulse contour analysis. Comparisons were made to a healthy cohort of 1,808 participants selected from our prevention clinic database. Multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate associations between risk factors and SAE and LAE within the heart transplant recipients.Results: LAE and SAE were significantly lower in heart transplant recipients than in the normal cohort (P <0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively. Female sex and history of ischemic cardiomyopathy were significantly associated with reduced LAE and SAE. Older age and the presence of moderate cardiac allograft vasculopathy were also significantly associated with reduced SAE. Transplant duration was associated with increased SAE.Conclusion: Heart transplants are associated with peripheral endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness, as demonstrated by a significant reduction in SAE and LAE when compared with a

  15. Derivation of elastic stiffness formula for leaf type HDS and conceptual design of leaf type HDS of SMART FA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Suh, Jung Min; Lee, Jin Seok

    1997-12-01

    Based on the strain energy method and Euler beam theory, an elastic stiffness formula for the leaf type HDS, now widely used as the holddown spring for the FA of Westinghouse type PWRs, has been derived. Through comparisons with the characteristic test results of the test produced HDSs, it has been found that the derived formula is useful to reliably estimate an elastic stiffness with material properties and the geometric data of an HDS. Through sensitivity analysis of HDS`s elastic stiffness, the elastic stiffness sensitivity with respect to different design variables was identified, as well as the design variables having remarkable sensitivity. In addition, finite element analysis using surface-to-surface contact elements on the contact surface between the leaves shows that the analysis results are in good agreement with the elastic stiffness determined from the derived formula. It is therefore expected that the finite element model and the analysis method will be useful in the analysis of the elasto-plastic behavior of the leaf type HDS in the future. To both reduce the cobalt content, which is considered to be the source of radioactive contamination in the reactor core, and to design the HDS to meet the holddown requirements of the SMART FA, a conceptual design for the HDS of the SMART FA has been performed through two analyses of the elastic characteristics of the HDS : the possibility of substitution of the leaf spring`s material from Inconel 718 to Zircaloy and the effects on the HDS`s elastic characteristics according to the variation of leaf thickness and the number of leaves composing the HDS. (author). 34 refs., 33 tabs., 37 figs.

  16. Helical CT of traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengozzi, E.; Burzi, M.; Miceli, M.; Lipparini, M.; Sartoni Galloni, S.

    2000-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic injuries account for up to 10-20% of fatalities in high-speed deceleration road accidents and have an estimated immediate fatality rate of 80-90%. Untreated survivors to acute trauma (10-20%) have a dismal prognosis: 30% of them die within 6 hours, 40-50% die within 24 hours, and 90% within 4 months. It was investigated the diagnostic accuracy of Helical Computed Tomography (Helical CT) in acute traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta, and the role of this technique in the diagnostic management of trauma patients with a strong suspicion of aortic rupture. It was compared retrospectively the chest Helical CT findings of 256 trauma patients examined June 1995 through August 1999. Chest Helical CT examinations were performed according to trauma score, to associated traumatic lesions and to plain chest radiographic findings. All the examinations were performed with no intravenous contrast agent administration and the pitch 2 technique. After a previous baseline study, contrast-enhanced scans were acquired with pitch 1 in 87 patients. Helical CT showed aortic lesions in 9 of 256 patients examined. In all the 9 cases it was found a mediastinal hematoma and all of them had positive plain chest radiographic findings of mediastinal enlargement. Moreover, in 6 cases aortic knob blurring was also evident on plain chest film and in 5 cases depressed left mainstem bronchus and trachea deviation rightwards were observed. All aortic lesions were identified on axial scans and located at the isthmus of level. Aortic rupture was always depicted as pseudo diverticulum of the proximal descending tract and intimal flap. It was also found that periaortic hematoma in 6 cases and intramural hematoma in 1 case. There were non false positive results in the series: 7 patients with Helical CT diagnosis of aortic rupture were submitted to conventional aortography that confirmed both type and extension of the lesions as detected by Helical CT, and all findings were

  17. Free vibration analysis of magneto-electro-thermo-elastic nanobeams resting on a Pasternak foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandaghian, A. A.; Rahmani, O.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, free vibration analysis of magneto-electro-thermo-elastic (METE) nanobeams resting on a Pasternak foundation is investigated based on nonlocal theory and Timoshenko beam theory. Coupling effects between electric, magnetic, mechanical and thermal loading are considered to derive the equations of motion and distribution of electrical potential and magnetic potential along the thickness direction of the METE nanobeam. The governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained using the Hamilton principle and discretized via the differential quadrature method (DQM). Numerical results reveal the effects of the nonlocal parameter, magneto-electro-thermo-mechanical loading, Winkler spring coefficients, Pasternak shear coefficients and height-to-length ratio on the vibration characteristics of METE nanobeams. It is observed that the natural frequency is dependent on the magnetic, electric, temperature, elastic medium, small-scale coefficient, and height-to-length ratio. These results are useful in the mechanical analysis and design of smart nanostructures constructed from magneto-electro-thermo-elastic materials.

  18. Collusion and the elasticity of demand

    OpenAIRE

    David Collie

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of collusion in infinitely repeated Cournot oligopoly games has generally assumed that demand is linear, but this note uses constant-elasticity demand functions to investigate how the elasticity of demand affects the sustainability of collusion.

  19. Mechanical behaviour of nanoparticles: Elasticity and plastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-03

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Mechanical behaviour of nanoparticles: Elasticity and plastic deformation mechanisms ... The main results in terms of elasticity and plastic deformation mechanisms are then reported ... Pramana – Journal of Physics | News.

  20. Roles of effective helical ripple rates in nonlinear stability of externally induced magnetic islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic islands are externally produced by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in toroidal plasmas. Spontaneous annihilation of RMP-induced magnetic islands called self-healing has been observed in helical systems. A possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by helical ripple-induced neoclassical flows, which give rise to neoclassical viscous torques. In this study, effective helical ripple rates in multi-helicity helical systems are revisited, and a multi-helicity effect on the self-healing is investigated, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands. It is confirmed that effective helical ripple rates are sensitive to magnetic axis positions. It is newly found that self-healing thresholds also strongly depend on magnetic axis positions, which is due to dependence of neoclassical viscous torques on effective helical ripple rates.