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Sample records for einstein gravitation theory

  1. Actuality of the Einstein theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    Problems of actuality of the Einstein theory of gravitation are lightened. The great Einstein theory of gravitation is shown to remain a reliable base of understanding of modern physical world pattern and its inevitable further inexhaustible precising. The main GRT difficulties are enumirated: determination of reference systems, presence of singularities in the theory, absence of consistent determination of the gravity energy, impossibility of accounting the relations between atomic, gravitational and cosmological characteristics. The attention is paid to gauge, twistor problems and to unified interaction theory. The great contribution of the soviet science in the theory of gravitation is stressed

  2. On gravitational wave energy in Einstein gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folomeshkin, V.N.; Vlasov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    By the example of precise wave solutions for the Einstein equations it is shown that a standard commonly adopted formulation of energy-momentum problem with pseudotensors provides us either with a zero or sign-variable values for the energy of gravitational waves. It is shown that if in the Einstein gravitational theory a strict transition to the limits of weak fields is realised then the theory gives us an unambiguous zero result for weak gravitational waves. The well-known non-zero result arises due to incorrect transition to weak field approximation in the Einstein gravitation theory

  3. The Foundations of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Erwin; Brose, Translated by Henry L.; Einstein, Preface by Albert; Turner, Introduction by H. H.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; 1. The special theory of relativity as a stepping-stone to the general theory of relativity; 2. Two fundamental postulates in the mathematical formulation of physical laws; 3. Concerning the fulfilment of the two postulates; 4. The difficulties in the principles of classical mechanics; 5. Einstein's theory of gravitation; 6. The verification of the new theory by actual experience; Appendix; Index.

  4. The Excellence of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirac, P. A. M.

    1979-01-01

    This article is adapted from a presentation made in 1978 at the symposium on the Impact of Modern Scientific Ideas on Society organized by UNESCO in Ulm, West Germany. It discusses Einstein's theory of gravitation and how it started a new line of activity for physicists. (HM)

  5. Gravitational curvature: an introduction to Einstein's theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, T.

    1979-01-01

    The basic aspects of general relativity are presented from a geometric point of view. The content of the book is well indicated by chapter headings: aspects of special relativity, clocks and gravitational potential, a heuristic derivation of Einstein's equations, the geometry of Einstein's equations, the Schwarzschild solution, the classical motion of a continuum, the relativistic equations of motion, light rays and Fermat's principle, electromagnetism in three-space and Minkowski space, electromagnetism in general relativity, the interior solution, and cosmology. 28 figures

  6. The large number hypothesis and Einstein's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun-Kau Lau

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to reconcile the large number hypothesis (LNH) with Einstein's theory of gravitation, a tentative generalization of Einstein's field equations with time-dependent cosmological and gravitational constants is proposed. A cosmological model consistent with the LNH is deduced. The coupling formula of the cosmological constant with matter is found, and as a consequence, the time-dependent formulae of the cosmological constant and the mean matter density of the Universe at the present epoch are then found. Einstein's theory of gravitation, whether with a zero or nonzero cosmological constant, becomes a limiting case of the new generalized field equations after the early epoch

  7. Superenergy tensors in the Einstein-Cartan theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garecki, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper we study systematically a generalization of the notion of ''superenergy tensors'' which has been introduced previously in the framework of the General Theory of Relativity on the Einstein-Cartan Theory of Gravitation. It is shown, by means of expansion in the normal coordinate system that the generalization is analytically simple only for the Einstein formulation of conservation laws. (author)

  8. Einstein and Rastall theories of gravitation in comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, F.; Moradpour, H.; Licata, I.; Heydarzade, Y.; Corda, C.

    2018-01-01

    We profit by a recent paper of Visser claiming that Rastall gravity is equivalent to Einstein gravity to compare the two gravitational theories in a general way. Our conclusions are different from Visser's ones. We indeed argue that these two theories are not equivalent. In fact, Rastall theory of gravity is an "open" theory when compared to Einstein general theory of relativity. Thus, it is ready to accept the challenges of observational cosmology and quantum gravity.

  9. Einstein equation and Yang-Mills theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stedile, E.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of Yang Mills theory of gravitation being a candidate as a gauge model for the Poincare group is pointed out. If the arguments favoring this theory are accepted then Einstein's equations can be derived by a different method in which they arise from a dynamical equation for the torsion field, in a particular case. (author) [pt

  10. Einstein and Rastall theories of gravitation in comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darabi, F.; Heydarzade, Y. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradpour, H.; Corda, C. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Licata, I. [ISEM, Institute for Scientific Methodology, Palermo, PA (Italy); School of Advanced International Studies on Applied Theoretical and Non Linear Methodologies in Physics, Bari (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    We profit by a recent paper of Visser claiming that Rastall gravity is equivalent to Einstein gravity to compare the two gravitational theories in a general way. Our conclusions are different from Visser's ones. We indeed argue that these two theories are not equivalent. In fact, Rastall theory of gravity is an ''open'' theory when compared to Einstein general theory of relativity. Thus, it is ready to accept the challenges of observational cosmology and quantum gravity. (orig.)

  11. Iz ''general relativity'' necessary for the Einstein gravitation theory gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Main principles of relativity and gravitation theories are deeply analyzed. Problems of boundaries of applicability for these theories and possible ways of their change and generalization are discussed. It is shown that the notion of general relativity does not introduce any post-newton physics - it only deals with coordinate transformations. It is supposed that ''general relativity'' is a physically senseless phrase which can be considered only as a historical remainder of an interesting philosophic discourse. The paper reveals that there exists appropriate physical substantiation of the Einstein gravitation theory not including a physically senseless concept of general relativity and promoting its fundamental relations with the experiment

  12. Gravitational catalysis of merons in Einstein-Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Oh, Seung Hun; Salgado-Rebolledo, Patricio

    2017-10-01

    We construct regular configurations of the Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in various dimensions. The gauge field is of meron-type: it is proportional to a pure gauge (with a suitable parameter λ determined by the field equations). The corresponding smooth gauge transformation cannot be deformed continuously to the identity. In the three-dimensional case we consider the inclusion of a Chern-Simons term into the analysis, allowing λ to be different from its usual value of 1 /2 . In four dimensions, the gravitating meron is a smooth Euclidean wormhole interpolating between different vacua of the theory. In five and higher dimensions smooth meron-like configurations can also be constructed by considering warped products of the three-sphere and lower-dimensional Einstein manifolds. In all cases merons (which on flat spaces would be singular) become regular due to the coupling with general relativity. This effect is named "gravitational catalysis of merons".

  13. Gravitational curvature an introduction to Einstein's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Frankel, Theodore Thomas

    1979-01-01

    This classic text and reference monograph applies modern differential geometry to general relativity. A brief mathematical introduction to gravitational curvature, it emphasizes the subject's geometric essence, replacing the often-tedious analytical computations with geometric arguments. Clearly presented and physically motivated derivations express the deflection of light, Schwarzchild's exterior and interior solutions, and the Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations. A perfect choice for advanced students of mathematics, this volume will also appeal to mathematicians interested in physics. It stresses

  14. The large numbers hypothesis and the Einstein theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirac, P.A.M.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the relations between large dimensionless numbers leads to the belief that G, expressed in atomic units, varies with the epoch while the Einstein theory requires G to be constant. These two requirements can be reconciled by supposing that the Einstein theory applies with a metric that differs from the atomic metric. The theory can be developed with conservation of mass by supposing that the continual increase in the mass of the observable universe arises from a continual slowing down of the velocity of recession of the galaxies. This leads to a model of the Universe that was first proposed by Einstein and de Sitter (the E.S. model). The observations of the microwave radiation fit in with this model. The static Schwarzchild metric has to be modified to fit in with the E.S. model for large r. The modification is worked out, and also the motion of planets with the new metric. It is found that there is a difference between ephemeris time and atomic time, and also that there should be an inward spiralling of the planets, referred to atomic units, superposed on the motion given by ordinary gravitational theory. These are effects that can be checked by observation, but there is no conclusive evidence up to the present. (author)

  15. The use of exterior forms in Einstein's gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirring, W.; Wallner, R.

    1978-01-01

    Cartan's calculus is used to reformulate the general variational principle and conservation laws in terms of exterior forms. In applying this method to Einstein's gravitation theory, we do not only benefit from the great economy of Cartan's formalism but also gain a deeper understanding of fundamental results already known. So the existence of superpotential-forms may be deduced from d o d identical to 0 and as a consequence the vanishing of total energy and momentum in a closed universe is affirmed in a more general way. Simple expressions for the sundry superpotential are obtained quite naturally. As a byproduct, Einstein's equations are rewritten in a form where the coderivative of a 2-form (the superpotential-form) is a current, and therefore resembles the inhomogeneous Maxwell equations. In passing from the Lagrangian to the Hamiltonian 4-form, the ADM formalism is immediately entered without lengthy calculations [pt

  16. Does the source energy change when gravitaion waves are emitted in the einstein's gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in the Einstein's gravitation theory the total ''energy'' of a plane gravitational wave calculated with any pseudotensor is equal to zero. The known Einstein's result, according to which the energy of a sourceis decreased when plane weak gravitational waves are emitted, have no place in the Einstein's gravitational theory. The examples are given of exact wave solutions for which the pseudotensor is strictly equal to zero. The energy-momentum of any weak gravitational waves is always equal to zero in the Einstein's gravitation theory. When such waves are emitted the energy of the source cannot change, although these waves are real curvature waves. By the means in the Einstein's gravitation theory the energy, e, is in essenc generated from nothing

  17. On coordinates and coordinate transformation in Einstein's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou Peiyuan

    1983-01-01

    This investigation is a further exposition of the significance of coordinates and their transformation in Einstein's theory of gravitation. The author considers the static axisymmetric field as an example, starts with its metric in the cylindrical coordinates, transforms this metric and the field equations into the Weyl-Levi-Civita system of coordinates, and supplements them with the harmonic condition. Both of the field equations and the harmonic condition are then transformed back to the original Cartesian system. Solutions for the static fields of an infinite plane with uniform surface density and an infinite rod with uniform linear density of matter, and of a body with spherical symmetry, are obtained again to show the necessity of the harmonic condition in their solutions. The fact that under the harmonic condition the solutions of the field equations for these problems contain their corresponding Newtonian potentials as approximations, is a strong support to the argument that the harmonic condition should be a physical supplement to Einstein's theory of gravitation. (Auth.)

  18. Theory of a gauge gravitational field at localization of the Einstein group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunyak, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    Theory of a gauge gravitational field when localizing a group of movements of the Einstein homogeneous static Universe (the R x SO Einstein group (4)) has been formulated. Proceeding from tetrade components of the Einstein Universe the relation between the Riemann metrics and gauge fields of the Einstein group has been established. Metric coherence with torsion transforming to the Kristoffel coherence of the Einstein Universe has been found when switching out gauge fields. It is shown that within the limit of infinite radius of the Einstein Universe curvature the given Einstein-invariant gauge theory transforms to the tetrade gravitation theory with localized triade rotations. Exact solutions in the form of nonsingular cosmological models have been obtained

  19. Axially symmetric stationary black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhardt, R [Chile Univ., Santiago. Departamento de Fisica

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of the theory of black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory are reviewed in this paper. First explicit vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations are searched for when the space-time admits 2 isometries (axially symmetric and stationary), which could be considered as candidates for black holes. Then the Liapounov stability of these solutions is studied. A generalization of the Ernst potential is introduced for solutions of Einstein's vacuum field equations with axial symmetry only, and this allows to construct a dynamical system. Using the theory of ''multiple integrals in the calculus of variations'' it is possible to show that the weakest casuality condition (chronology) is a necessary condition for the Liapounov stability. Finally, it is shown that the Kerr solution is Liapounov stable under a given topology.

  20. Axially symmetric stationary black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhardt, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of the thepry of black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory are reviewed in this paper. First explicit vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations are searched for when the space-time admits 2 isometries (axially symmetric and stationary), which could be considered as candidates for black holes. Then the Liapounov stability of these solutions is studied. A generalization of the Ernst potential is introduced for solutions of Einstein's vacuum field equations with axial symmetry only, and this allows to construct a dynamical system. Using the theory of ''multiple integrals in the calculus of variations'' it is possible to show that the weakest casuality condition (chronology) is a necessary condition for the Liapounov stability. Finally, it is shown that the Kerr solution is Liapounov stable under a given topology

  1. Formal framework for a nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, Friedrich W.; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2009-01-01

    The analogy between electrodynamics and the translational gauge theory of gravity is employed in this paper to develop an ansatz for a nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation. Working in the linear approximation, we show that the resulting nonlocal theory is equivalent to general relativity with 'dark matter'. The nature of the predicted dark matter, which is the manifestation of the nonlocal character of gravity in our model, is briefly discussed. It is demonstrated that this approach can provide a basis for the Tohline-Kuhn treatment of the astrophysical evidence for dark matter.

  2. Gravitation: Field theory par excellence Newton, Einstein, and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, H.

    1984-01-01

    Newtonian gravity satifies the two principles of equivalence m/sub i/ = m/sub p/ (the passive principle) and m/sub a/ = m/sub p/ (the active principle). A relativistic gauge field concept in D = s+1 dimensional curved-space will, in general, violate these two principles as in m/sub p/ = αm/sub i/, m/sub a/ = lambdam/sub p/ where α = D: 3 and lambda measures the presence of the field stress-energy t/sup ν//sub μ/ in the field equations. It is shown that α = 1, lambda = 0 corresponds to general relativity and α = 1, lambda = 1 to the theory of the author. It is noted that the correspondence limit of general relativity is not Newton's theory but a theory suggested by Robert Hooke a few years before Newton published his in Principia. The gauge is independent of the two principles but had to do with local special relativistic correspondence and compatibility with quantum mechanics. It is shown that unless α = 1, lambda = 1 the generalized theory cannot predict correctly many observables effects, including the 532'' per century Newtonian part in Mercury's perihelion advance

  3. Einstein-Cartan Theory of Gravitation: Kinematical Parameters and Maxwell Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, L. N.

    2015-03-01

    In the space-time manifold of Einstein-Cartan Theory (ECT) of gravitation, the expressions for the time-like kinematical parameters are derived and the propagation equation for expansion is obtained.It has been observed that when the spin tensor is u-orthogonal the spin of the gravitating matter has no influence on the propagation equation of expansion while it has influence when it is not u-orthogonal. The usual formula for the curl of gradient of a scalar function is not zero in ECT. So is the case with the divergence of the curl of a vector.Their expressions on the space-time manifold of ECT are derived. A new derivative operator d ∗ is introduced to develop the calculus on space-time manifold of ECT. It is obtained by taking the covariant derivative of an associated tensor of a form with respect to an asymmetric connections. We have used this differential operator to obtain the form of the Maxwell's equations in the ECT of gravitation. Cartan's equations of structure are also derived through the new derivative operator. It has been shown that unlike the consequences of exterior derivative in Einstein space-time, the repetition of d ∗ on a form of any degree is not zero.

  4. Qui sera le nouvel Einstein ? Vers une nouvelle theorie de la gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M.

    1999-10-01

    Un debat de plus d'un siecle a resurgi ces toutes dernieres annees avec une vigueur nouvelle. L'enjeu ? Mettre fin, ni plus ni moins, a l'une des contradictions les plus inouies de la physique fondamentale, en reconciliant mecanique quantique et relativite generale. En effet, a l'heure ou la gravitation semble enfin sur le point de fusionner avec les trois autres forces de la nature. il est certain que la relativite d'Einstein doit etre bientot remplacer par une autre theorie... Reste quye tous les physiciens sont loin de s'accorder sur la marche a suivree. Gravitation quantique, relativite d'echelle, supersymetrie, les candidates ne manquent pas.

  5. Einstein-Rosen gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Maftei, Gh.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the behaviour of the gravitational waves in the approximation of the far matter fields, considering the indirect interaction between the matter sources and the gravitational field, in a cosmological model based on the Einstein-Rosen solution, Because the properties of the gravitational waves obtained as the solutions of Einstein fields equations (the gravitational field equations) are most obvious in the weak gravitational fields we consider here, the gravitational field in the linear approximation. Using the Newman-Penrose formalism, we calculate in the null-tetradic base (e a ), the spin coefficients, the directional derivates and the tetradic components of Ricci and Weyl tensors. From the Einstein field equations we obtained the solution for b(z, t) what described the behaviour of gravitational wave in Einstein-Rosen Universe and in the particular case, when t → ∞, p(z, t) leads us to the primordial gravitational waves in the Einstein-Rosen Universe. (authors)

  6. Gravitational nonminimally coupled electromagnetic fields: a possible solution to some idiosincrasies of Einstein-Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accioly, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    A theory of nonminimal coupling of electromagnetism and gravitation in the framework of Riomannian geometry is constructed. As a consequence the main difficulties concerning the Einstein-Maxwell theory are cleared away. The theory works as a kind of correction to the Einstein-Maxwell one for regions with strong curvature and for times much greater than the Planck time. A Reissner-Nordstroem-type solution is exhibited and comments are made on a parameter which somewhat resembles the ''Schwarzschild radius''. A mechanism of charge creation via nonminimal coupling is also discussed. We calculate the propagation of photons in a Robertson-Walker background and find that the effect of the nonminimal coupling in this case may be to deviate the photon from the null geodesics, increasing its velocity beyond the flat-space value. Taking into account this results, the observed isotropy of the background radiation can be explained in a simple way, regardless of any assumption about the state of the Universe prior to the Planck time. (author) [pt

  7. Teaching possibilities of some elements of Albert Einstein's Gravitation theory in frame of physics courses taught at technical universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordache, Dan-Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    As in the period of creation of the 'monumental' works of A. Einstein (1905-1920, mainly), when many outstanding physicists [theoreticians, inclusively, as Albert Einstein (alumni of the Polytechnics from Geneva), as Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac, Alexandru Proca (alumni of Bucharest Polytechnics), et al., finished their academic studies to different Polytechnics Universities, presently many students of technical Universities obtained (as high-school students) some outstanding results in the Physics field. Particularly, the leadership of the Faculty of Control Systems and Computers of the Bucharest University has found that 'the best students in their divisions are winners at the Physics Olympics Contests'. These students and many of their colleagues (those with special scientific aptitudes) want to know more details about the most difficult scientific creation of Albert Einstein: the Gravitation Theory. Taking into account that the Einstein's Gravitation Theory is particularly difficult (from mathematical point of view, especially), and the duration of the Physics study in our technical universities is so restricted (totally 42 to 98 teaching hours, depending on the technical division profile), we have to answer to the question: what elements of the Einstein's gravity theory could be presented in frame of Physics courses taught in our technical universities? After accomplishing our analysis, we concluded as possible and useful - for the scientific training of the best students 'engineers' - the assimilation of the following elements of the Einstein's gravity theory: - The time and space concepts in the Einstein's gravitation theory, in connection with the equation of electromagnetic waves in ideal media and - eventually - in relation with the Larmor's theory of the electrical dipole radiation [which needs the expressions in curvilinear coordinates of the gradient and divergence (the main elements of the mathematical theory of fields)]; - The applications of the

  8. Gravitational waves in Einstein-æther and generalized TeVeS theory after GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yungui; Hou, Shaoqi; Liang, Dicong; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios

    2018-04-01

    In this work we discuss the polarization contents of Einstein-æther theory and the generalized tensor-vector-scalar (TeVeS) theory, as both theories have a normalized timelike vector field. We derive the linearized equations of motion around the flat spacetime background using the gauge-invariant variables to easily separate physical degrees of freedom. We find the plane wave solutions and identify the polarizations by examining the geodesic deviation equations. We find that there are five polarizations in Einstein-æther theory and six polarizations in the generalized TeVeS theory. In particular, the transverse breathing mode is mixed with the pure longitudinal mode. We also discuss the experimental tests of the extra polarizations in Einstein-æther theory using pulsar timing arrays combined with the gravitational-wave speed bound derived from the observations on GW 170817 and GRB 170817A. It turns out that it might be difficult to use pulsar timing arrays to distinguish different polarizations in Einstein-æther theory. The same speed bound also forces one of the propagating modes in the generalized TeVeS theory to travel much faster than the speed of light. Since the strong coupling problem does not exist in some parameter subspaces, the generalized TeVeS theory is excluded in these parameter subspaces.

  9. Gravitation Theory: Empirical Status from Solar System Experiments: All observations to date are consistent with Einstein's general relativity theory of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtvedt, K L

    1972-12-15

    I have reviewed the historical and contemporary experiments that guide us in choosing a post-Newtonian, relativistic gravitational theory. The foundation experiments essentially constrain gravitation theory to be a metric theory in which matter couples solely to one gravitational field, the metric field, although other cosmological gravitational fields may exist. The metric field for any metric theory can be specified (for the solar system, for our present purposes) by a series of potential terms with several parameters. A variety of experiments specify (or put limits on) the numerical values of the seven parameters in the post-Newtonian metric field, and other such experiments have been planned. The empirical results, to date, yield values of the parameters that are consistent with the predictions of Einstein's general relativity.

  10. Generalization of Einstein's gravitational field equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Frédéric

    2017-12-01

    The Riemann tensor is the cornerstone of general relativity, but as is well known it does not appear explicitly in Einstein's equation of gravitation. This suggests that the latter may not be the most general equation. We propose here for the first time, following a rigorous mathematical treatment based on the variational principle, that there exists a generalized 4-index gravitational field equation containing the Riemann curvature tensor linearly, and thus the Weyl tensor as well. We show that this equation, written in n dimensions, contains the energy-momentum tensor for matter and that of the gravitational field itself. This new 4-index equation remains completely within the framework of general relativity and emerges as a natural generalization of the familiar 2-index Einstein equation. Due to the presence of the Weyl tensor, we show that this equation contains much more information, which fully justifies the use of a fourth-order theory.

  11. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - The Correct Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Quantum Gravitation provides a clear, definitive Scientific explanation of Gravity and Gravitation. It is harmonious with Newtonian and Quantum Mechanics, and with distinct Scientific Logic. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 certain, Scientific proofs and 21 more good indications. With this theory the Physical Forces are obviously Unified. See: OBSCURANTISM ON EINSTEIN GRAVITATION? http://www.santilli- Foundation.org/inconsistencies-gravitation.php and Einstein's Theory of Relativity versus Classical Mechanics http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/einstein/

  12. Einstein's theory recovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebestyen, A.

    1980-11-01

    It is shown that a consequent treatment of local Lorentz invariance and of the group of translations as a gauge symmetry group necessarily leads to theories in which torsion has no place. It is also shown that the requirement of symmetry under Lorentz gauge tranformations leads to the emergence of the conventional √-gR additive term, responsible for the effects of gravitation, in the Lagrangian. It is thus proved that Einstein's general relativity is a unique consequence of the requirements of invariance under translations and Lorentz transformations. (author)

  13. Beyond Einstein Gravity A Survey of Gravitational Theories for Cosmology and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Beyond Einstein’s Gravity is a graduate level introduction to extended theories of gravity and cosmology, including variational principles, the weak-field limit, gravitational waves, mathematical tools, exact solutions, as well as cosmological and astrophysical applications. The book provides a critical overview of the research in this area and unifies the existing literature using a consistent notation. Although the results apply in principle to all alternative gravities, a special emphasis is on scalar-tensor and f(R) theories. They were studied by theoretical physicists from early on, and in the 1980s they appeared in attempts to renormalize General Relativity and in models of the early universe. Recently, these theories have seen a new lease of life, in both their metric and metric-affine versions, as models of the present acceleration of the universe without introducing the mysterious and exotic dark energy. The dark matter problem can also be addressed in extended gravity. These applications are contr...

  14. Gravitation and source theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, H.

    1975-01-01

    Schwinger's source theory is applied to the problem of gravitation and its quantization. It is shown that within the framework of a flat-space the source theory implementation leads to a violation of probability. To avoid the difficulty one must introduce a curved space-time hence the source concept may be said to necessitate the transition to a curved-space theory of gravitation. It is further shown that the curved-space theory of gravitation implied by the source theory is not equivalent to the conventional Einstein theory. The source concept leads to a different theory where the gravitational field has a stress-energy tensor t/sup nu//sub mu/ which contributes to geometric curvatures

  15. Relativity and Gravitation : 100 Years After Einstein in Prague

    CERN Document Server

    Ledvinka, Tomáš; General Relativity, Cosmology and Astrophysics : Perspectives 100 Years After Einstein's Stay in Prague

    2014-01-01

    In early April 1911 Albert Einstein arrived in Prague to become full professor of theoretical physics at the German part of Charles University. It was there, for the first time, that he concentrated primarily on the problem of gravitation. Before he left Prague in July 1912 he had submitted the paper “Relativität und Gravitation: Erwiderung auf eine Bemerkung von M. Abraham” in which he remarkably anticipated what a future theory of gravity should look like. At the occasion of the Einstein-in-Prague centenary an international meeting was organized under a title inspired by Einstein's last paper from the Prague period: "Relativity and Gravitation, 100 Years after Einstein in Prague". The main topics of the conference included: classical relativity, numerical relativity, relativistic astrophysics and cosmology, quantum gravity, experimental aspects of gravitation, and conceptual and historical issues. The conference attracted over 200 scientists from 31 countries, among them a number of leading experts in ...

  16. The 'gravitating' tensor in the dualistic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanta, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The exact microscopic system of Einstein-type field equations of the dualistic gravitation theory is investigated as well as an analysis of the modified energy-momentum tensor or so called 'gravitating' tensor is presented

  17. Astrophysical observations: lensing and eclipsing Einstein's theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L

    2005-02-11

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Einstein's insights, including gravitational redshifts, gravitational lensing, gravitational waves, the Lense-Thirring effect, and modern cosmology. A complete understanding of cosmology, from the earliest moments to the ultimate fate of the universe, will require developments in physics beyond Einstein, to a unified theory of gravity and quantum physics.

  18. Extension of the Einstein gravitation and the prospects of the unified gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, D.D.; Sardanashvili, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The prospects of development of the gauge theory as a possible universal geometrizated approach to the description of different interactions are discussed. The main propositions, development stages and difficulties of the gauge theory (GT) are considered. The actuality of application of stratified spaces in the GT apparatus is shown. It is emphasized that the GT generalization using the apparatus of stratification is the most successful formalism for realization of self-consistent models of binary objects

  19. Restricted gravity: Abelian projection of Einstein's theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    Treating Einstein's theory as a gauge theory of Lorentz group, we decompose the gravitational connection Γμ into the restricted connection made of the potential of the maximal Abelian subgroup H of Lorentz group G and the valence connection made of G/H part of the potential which transforms covariantly under Lorentz gauge transformation. With this we show that Einstein's theory can be decomposed into the restricted gravity made of the restricted connection which has the full Lorentz gauge invariance which has the valence connection as gravitational source. The decomposition shows the existence of a restricted theory of gravitation which has the full general invariance but is much simpler than Einstein's theory. Moreover, it tells that the restricted gravity can be written as an Abelian gauge theory,

  20. A new theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The author believes that the General Relativity Theory (GRT) suffers from a substantial deficiency since it ignors the fundamental laws of conservation of energy. Einstein neglected the classical concept of the field due to his belief in the truth of the principle of equivalence between forces of inertid gravitation. This equivalence leads, as the author says, to nonequivalence of these forces, making GRT logically contradictory from the physical point of view. The author considers GRT as a certain stage in the course of the study of space-time and gravitation, and suggests a new theory called the Relativistic Theory of Gravitation (RTG) which obeys the fundamental laws of conservation, and which is justified in some of its aspects by astronomical observations. RTG does not suffer from some deficiencies met in Einsteins theory. One is nonunique predictions of gravitation effects within the boundaries of the solar system. Also, RTG refuses some hypothesis as that of black holes. 7 refs

  1. Gravitational effects in field gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.; Vlasov, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities to describe various gravitation effects of field gravitation theory (FGT) are considered. Past-Newtonian approximation of the FGT has been constructed and on the basis of this approximation it has been shown that the field theory allows one to describe the whole set of experimental facts. The comparison of post-Newtonian parameters in FGT with those in the Einstein's theory makes it clear that these two; theories are undistinguishable from the viewpoint of any experiments, realized with post-Newtonian accuracy. Gravitational field of an island type source with spherically symmetrical distribution of matter and unstationary homogeneous model of Universe, which allows to describe the effect of cosmological red shift, are considered

  2. Covariant Theory of Gravitation in the Spacetime with Finsler Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xin-Bing

    2007-01-01

    The theory of gravitation in the spacetime with Finsler structure is constructed. It is shown that the theory keeps general covariance. Such theory reduces to Einstein's general relativity when the Finsler structure is Riemannian. Therefore, this covariant theory of gravitation is an elegant realization of Einstein's thoughts on gravitation in the spacetime with Finsler structure.

  3. The Einstein-Hilbert gravitation with minimum length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, H. L. C.

    2018-05-01

    We study the Einstein-Hilbert gravitation with the deformed Heisenberg algebra leading to the minimum length, with the intention to find and estimate the corrections in this theory, clarifying whether or not it is possible to obtain, by means of the minimum length, a theory, in D=4, which is causal, unitary and provides a massive graviton. Therefore, we will calculate and analyze the dispersion relationships of the considered theory.

  4. Development of Einstein's general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, B.K.

    1980-01-01

    Starting from Poincare's Lorentz-invariant theory of gravity formulated in 1906, development of Einstein's general theory of relativity during 1906-1916 is discussed. Three stages in this development are recognised. In the first stage during 1907-1914, Einstein tried to extend the relativity principle of uniform motion to the frames in non-uniform motion. For this purpose, he introduced the principle of equivalence which made it possible to calculate the effect of homogeneous gravitational field on arbitrary physical processes. During the second stage comprising years 1912-1914 overlapping the first stage, Einstein and Grossmann were struggling to translate physical postulates into the language of the absolute differential calculus. In the period 1915-1916, Einstein formulated the field equations of general relativity. While discussing these developmental stages, theories of gravitation formulated by Abraham, Nordstroem and Mie are also discussed. (M.G.B.)

  5. Gravitational consequences of modern field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Some gravitational consequences of certain extensions of Einstein's general theory of relativity are discussed. These theories are not alternative theories of gravity in the usual sense. It is assumed that general relativity is the appropriate description of all gravitational phenomena which were observed to date.

  6. Field theory approach to gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, H.

    1978-01-01

    A number of authors considered the possibility of formulating a field-theory approach to gravitation with the claim that such an approach would uniquely lead to Einstein's theory of general relativity. In this article it is shown that the field theory approach is more generally applicable and uniqueness cannot be claimed. Theoretical and experimental reasons are given showing that the Einsteinian limit appears to be unviable

  7. Generalization of Einstein's gravitational field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    The Riemann tensor is the cornerstone of general relativity, but as is well known it does not appear explicitly in Einstein's equation of gravitation. This suggests that the latter may not be the most general equation. We propose here for the first time, following a rigorous mathematical treatment based on the variational principle, that there exists a generalized 4-index gravitational field equation containing the Riemann curvature tensor linearly, and thus the Weyl tensor as well. We show that this equation, written in n dimensions, contains the energy-momentum tensor for matter and that of the gravitational field itself. This new 4-index equation remains completely within the framework of general relativity and emerges as a natural generalization of the familiar 2-index Einstein equation. Due to the presence of the Weyl tensor, we show that this equation contains much more information, which fully justifies the use of a fourth-order theory. (orig.)

  8. Generalization of Einstein's gravitational field equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, Frederic [Ecole Normale Superieure Paris-Saclay, Departement de Physique, Cachan (France)

    2017-12-15

    The Riemann tensor is the cornerstone of general relativity, but as is well known it does not appear explicitly in Einstein's equation of gravitation. This suggests that the latter may not be the most general equation. We propose here for the first time, following a rigorous mathematical treatment based on the variational principle, that there exists a generalized 4-index gravitational field equation containing the Riemann curvature tensor linearly, and thus the Weyl tensor as well. We show that this equation, written in n dimensions, contains the energy-momentum tensor for matter and that of the gravitational field itself. This new 4-index equation remains completely within the framework of general relativity and emerges as a natural generalization of the familiar 2-index Einstein equation. Due to the presence of the Weyl tensor, we show that this equation contains much more information, which fully justifies the use of a fourth-order theory. (orig.)

  9. Generalized field theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, H.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that if, on empirical grounds, one rules out the existence of cosmic fields of Dicke-Brans (scalar) and Will Nordvedt (vector, tensor) type, then the most general experimentally viable and theoretically reasonable theory of gravitation seems to be a LAMBDA-dependent generalization of Einstein and Yilmez theories, which reduces to the former for LAMBDA=0 and to the latter for LAMBDA=1

  10. Equations of motion derived from a generalization of Einstein's equation for the gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mociutchi, C.

    1980-01-01

    The extended Einstein's equation, combined with a vectorial theory of maxwellian type of the gravitational field, leads to: a) the equation of motion; b) the equation of the trajectory for the static case of spherical symmetry, the test particle having a rest mass other than zero, and c) the propagation of light on null geodesics. All the basic tests of the theory given by Einstein's extended equation. Thus, the new theory of gravitation suggested by us is competitive. (author)

  11. Possible role of torsion in gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieh, H.T.

    1983-01-01

    Torsion is of interest in an indirect way, in that it has the potential of being an important ingredient in a future successful quantum theory of gravitation. Einstein's theory of gravitation, despite its simplicity and elegance, and its successes in large-scale gravitational phenomena, can only be regarded as a macroscopic classical theory. It is a non-renormalizable quantum field theory, and, therefore, lacks the status of a good microscopic theory. It is the search for a successful quantum field theory of gravitation that poses as one of the great challenges to theoretical physics today. (Auth.)

  12. On the structure of translational gauge theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Guided by decoupling processes in general gauge theories, we examine the translation limit in U 4 -theories. It is shown that this leads to Einstein's gravity theory as the appropriate choice for a translational gauge theory of gravitation. (Author)

  13. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, C. M.

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  14. The theory of space, time and gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Fock, V

    2015-01-01

    The Theory of Space, Time, and Gravitation, 2nd Revised Edition focuses on Relativity Theory and Einstein's Theory of Gravitation and correction of the misinterpretation of the Einsteinian Gravitation Theory. The book first offers information on the theory of relativity and the theory of relativity in tensor form. Discussions focus on comparison of distances and lengths in moving reference frames; comparison of time differences in moving reference frames; position of a body in space at a given instant in a fixed reference frame; and proof of the linearity of the transformation linking two iner

  15. Theory of gravitational interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gasperini, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This is the second edition of a well-received book that is a modern, self-contained introduction to the theory of gravitational interactions. The new edition includes more details on gravitational waves of cosmological origin, the so-called brane world scenario, and gravitational time-delay effects. The first part of the book follows the traditional presentation of general relativity as a geometric theory of the macroscopic gravitational field, while the second, more advanced part discusses the deep analogies (and differences) between a geometric theory of gravity and the “gauge” theories of the other fundamental interactions. This fills a gap within the traditional approach to general relativity which usually leaves students puzzled about the role of gravity. The required notions of differential geometry are reduced to the minimum, allowing room for aspects of gravitational physics of current phenomenological and theoretical interest, such as the properties of gravitational waves, the gravitational inter...

  16. Relativity theory and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on relativity theory and gravitation is presented as a preface to the first of the articles submitted to the Journal on general relativity. Newtonian gravitation and and observation, relativity, and the sources of the gravitational field, are all discussed. (UK)

  17. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H.H.v.; Treder, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper concerns Einstein's general relativity, wave mechanics and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations. The principle of equivalence and its association with both wave mechanics and quantum gravity, is discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Loop equations in the theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makeenko, Yu.M.; Voronov, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Loop-space variables (matrices of parallel transport) for the theory of gravitation are described. Loop equations, which are equivalent to the Einstein equations, are derived in the classical case. Loop equations are derived for gravity with cosmological constant as well. An analogy with the loop-space approach in Yang-Mills theory is discussed [ru

  19. The Origin of Gravitational Lensing: A Postscript to Einstein's 1936 Science Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn; Sauer; Stachel

    1997-01-10

    Gravitational lensing, now taken as an important astrophysical consequence of the general theory of relativity, was found even before this theory was formulated but was discarded as a speculative idea without any chance of empirical confirmation. Reconstruction of some of Einstein's research notes dating back to 1912 reveals that he explored the possibility of gravitational lensing 3 years before completing his general theory of relativity. On the basis of preliminary insights into this theory, Einstein had already derived the basic features of the lensing effect. When he finally published the very same results 24 years later, it was only in response to prodding by an amateur scientist.

  20. On Certain Conceptual Anomalies in Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crothers S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of conceptual anomalies occurring in the Standard exposition of Einstein's Theory of Relativity. These anomalies relate to issues in both mathematics and in physics and penetrate to the very heart of Einstein's theory. This paper reveals and amplifies a few such anomalies, including the fact that Einstein's field equations for the so-called static vacuum configuration, $R_{mu u} = 0$, violates his Principle of Equivalence, and is therefore erroneous. This has a direct bearing on the usual concept of conservation of energy for the gravitational field and the conventional formulation for localisation of energy using Einstein's pseudo-tensor. Misconceptions as to the relationship between Minkowski spacetime and Special Relativity are also discussed, along with their relationships to the pseudo-Riemannian metric manifold of Einstein's gravitational field, and their fundamental geometric structures pertaining to spherical symmetry.

  1. Hamiltonian structure of gravitational field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayski, J.

    1992-01-01

    Hamiltonian generalizations of Einstein's theory of gravitation introducing a laminar structure of spacetime are discussed. The concepts of general relativity and of quasi-inertial coordinate systems are extended beyond their traditional scope. Not only the metric, but also the coordinate system, if quantized, undergoes quantum fluctuations

  2. Problem of energy-momentum and theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    General properties of geometrised theories of gravitation are considered. Covariant formulation of conservation laws in arbitrary riemannian space-time is given. In the Einstein theory the symmetric as well as canonical energy-momentum tensor of the system ''matter plus gravitational field'' and in particular, the energy-momentum of free gravitational waves, turns out to be equal to zero. To understand the origin of the problems and difficulties concerning the energy-momentum in the Einstein theory, the gravitational filed is considered in the usual framework of the Lorentz invariant field theory, just like any other physical field. Combination of the approach proposed with the Einstein's idea of geometrization makes it possible to formulate the geometrised gravitation theory, in which there are no inner contradictions, the energy-momentum of gravitational field is defined precisely and all the known experimental facts are described successfully. For strong gravitational fields the predictions of the quasilinear geometrised theory under consideration are different from those of the gravitational theory in the Einstein formulation. Black holes are absent in the theory. Evaluation of the energy-flux of gravitational waves leads to unambiguous results and shows that the gravitational waves transfer the positive-definite energy

  3. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H. von; Treder, H.

    1982-01-01

    We dicusss the meaning and prove the accordance of general relativity, wave mechanics, and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations themselves. Firstly, we have the problem of the influence of gravitational fields on the de Broglie waves, which influence is in accordance with Einstein's weak principle of equivalence and the limitation of measurements given by Heisenberg's uncertainty relations. Secondly, the quantization of the gravitational fields is a ''quantization of geometry.'' However, classical and quantum gravitation have the same physical meaning according to limitations of measurements given by Einstein's strong principle of equivalence and the Heisenberg uncertainties for the mechanics of test bodies

  4. Gauge theory and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Keiji; Nakanishi, Noboru; Nariai, Hidekazu

    1983-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named symposium. They deal with geometrical aspects of gauge theory and gravitation, special problems in gauge theories, quantum field theory in curved space-time, quantum gravity, supersymmetry including supergravity, and grand unification. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  5. Relativistic gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle a relativistic gravitation theory (RGT) is unambiguously constructed with the help of a notion of a gravitational field as a physical field in Faraday-Maxwell spirit, which posesses energy momentum and spins 2 and 0. The source of gravitation field is a total conserved energy-momentum tensor for matter and for gravitation field in Minkowski space. In the RGT conservation laws for the energy momentum and angular momentum of matter and gravitational field hold rigorously. The theory explains the whole set of gravitation experiments. Here, due to the geometrization principle the Riemannian space is of a field origin since this space arises effectively as a result of the gravitation field origin since this space arises effectively as a result of the gravitation field action on the matter. The RGT astonishing prediction is that the Universe is not closed but ''flat''. It means that in the Universe there should exist a ''missing'' mass in some form of matter

  6. Generalized Einstein-Aether theories and the Solar System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvin, Camille; Durrer, Ruth; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Zlosnik, Tom G.; Starkman, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that generalized Einstein-Aether theories may lead to significant modifications to the nonrelativistic limit of the Einstein equations. In this paper we study the effect of a general class of such theories on the Solar System. We consider corrections to the gravitational potential in negative and positive powers of distance from the source. Using measurements of the perihelion shift of Mercury and time delay of radar signals to Cassini, we place constraints on these corrections. We find that a subclass of generalized Einstein-Aether theories is compatible with these constraints

  7. Relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvilli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper a relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) is constructed in a unique way on the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle. In this, a gravitational field is treated as the Faraday-Maxwell spin-2 and spin-0 physical field possessing energy and momentum. The source of a gravitational field is the total conserved energy-momentum tensor of matter and of a gravitational field in Minkowski space. In the RTG, the conservation laws are strictly fulfilled for the energy-momentum and for the angular momentum of matter and a gravitational field. The theory explains the whole available set of experiments on gravitation. In virtue of the geometrization principle, the Riemannian space in our theory is of field origin, since it appears as an effective force space due to the action of a gravitational field on matter. The RTg leads to an exceptionally strong prediction: The Universe is not closed but just ''flat''. This suggests that in the Universe a ''hidden mass'' should exist in some form of matter

  8. Gravitation as Gauge theory of Poincare Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stedile, E.

    1982-08-01

    The geometrical approach to gauge theories, based on fiber-bundles, is shown in detail. Several gauge formalisms for gravitation are examined. In particular, it is shown how to build gauge theories for non-semisimple groups. A gravitational theory for the Poincare group, with all the essential characteristics of a Yang-Mills theory is proposed. Inonu-Wigner contractions of gauge theories are introduced, which provide a Lagrangian formalism, equivalent to a Lagrangian de Sitter theory supplemented by weak constraints. Yang and Einstein theories for gravitation become particular cases of a Yang-Mills theory. The classical limit of the proposed formalism leads to the Poisson equation, for the static case. (Author) [pt

  9. Test-particle motion in Einstein's unified field theory. I. General theory and application to neutral test particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    We develop a method for finding the exact equations of structure and motion of multipole test particles in Einstein's unified field theory: the theory of the nonsymmetric field. The method is also applicable to Einstein's gravitational theory. Particles are represented by singularities in the field. The method is covariant at each step of the analysis. We also apply the method and find both in Einstein's unified field theory and in Einstein's gravitational theory the equations of structure and motion of neutral pole-dipole test particles possessing no electromagnetic multipole moments. In the case of Einstein's gravitational theory the results are the well-known equations of structure and motion of a neutral pole-dipole test particle in a given background gravitational field. In the case of Einstein's unified field theory the results are the same, providing we identify a certain symmetric second-rank tensor field appearing in Einstein's theory with the metric and gravitational field. We therefore discover not only the equations of structure and motion of a neutral test particle in Einstein's unified field theory, but we also discover what field in Einstein's theory plays the role of metric and gravitational field

  10. Neutrino fields in Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The spin-coefficient formalism presented elsewhere is here applied to classical neutrino fields in Einstein-Cartan theory. It is shown that the neutrino current vector is tangent to an expansion-free null geodesic congruence with constant and equal twist and shear, which vanish if and only if the congruence is a repeated principal null congruence of the gravitational field. The geodesics are both extremals and autoparallels. All exact solutions for the case of pure radiation fields are obtained, and it is shown that the only possible ghost solutions have a plane wave metric. (author)

  11. Relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the present paper a relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) is unambiguously constructed on the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle. In this a gravitational field is treated as the Faraday--Maxwell spin-2 and spin-0 physical field possessing energy and momentum. The source of a gravitational field is the total conserved energy-momentum tensor of matter and of a gravitational field in Minkowski space. In the RTG the conservation laws are strictly fulfilled for the energy-moment and for the angular momentum of matter and a gravitational field. The theory explains the whole available set of experiments on gravity. By virtue of the geometrization principle, the Riemannian space in our theory is of field origin, since it appears as an effective force space due to the action of a gravitational field on matter. The RTG leads to an exceptionally strong prediction: The universe is not closed but just ''flat.'' This suggests that in the universe a ''missing mass'' should exist in a form of matter

  12. The energy-momentum problem and gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    General properties of geometrized gravitation theories are considered. A covariant formulation of conservation laws in an arbitrary Riemann space-time is presented. In the Einstein theory both symmetric and canonical energy-momentum tensors of the matter and gravitational field system and, in particular, energy-momentum of free gravitational waves prove to be equal to zero. Since gravitational waves carry the curvature and, consequently, affect the detector, this bears witness to an intrinsic contradiction of the Einstein theory. To realize the sources of difficulties concerning energy-momentum in the Einstein theory the gravitational field is treated in the same way as all the other physical fields, i.e. in terms of usual Lorentz-invariant field theory. Unification of this approach with the Einstein idea of geometrization enables to construct the geometrized theory, which is free from contradictions, has clearly defined the notions of gravitation field energy-momentum and satisfactorily describes all known experimental facts. To construct a logically consistent theory one should geometrize only the density of the matter Lagrangian. The gravitation field equations are formulated in terms of the Euclidean space-time with a metric tensor γsub(ik), while the matter motion may be completely described in terms of the non-Euclidean space-time with a metric tensor gsub(ik). For strong gravitational fields the predictions of the quasi-linear theory under consideration appriciably differ from those of the Einstein formulation of the gravitation theory. No black holes are present in the theory. The results of the calculation for the energy flow of gravitational waves are rigorously unambiguous and show that gravitational waves carry positively definite energy

  13. The problem of electric sources in Einstein's Hermite-symmetric field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreisel, E.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility is investigated to introduce a geometric source without A-invariance and Hermite-symmetry breaking of Einstein's Hermitian relativity. It would be very meaningful to interpret a source of this kind as electric current. With this extension Einstein's unitary field theory contains Einstein's gravitation, electromagnetism and the gluonic vacuum of chromodynamics. (author)

  14. The Einstein-Vlasov System/Kinetic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréasson, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide a guide to theorems on global properties of solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov system. This system couples Einstein's equations to a kinetic matter model. Kinetic theory has been an important field of research during several decades in which the main focus has been on non-relativistic and special relativistic physics, i.e., to model the dynamics of neutral gases, plasmas, and Newtonian self-gravitating systems. In 1990, Rendall and Rein initiated a mathematical study of the Einstein-Vlasov system. Since then many theorems on global properties of solutions to this system have been established. This paper gives introductions to kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes and then the Einstein-Vlasov system is introduced. We believe that a good understanding of kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes is fundamental to a good comprehension of kinetic theory in general relativity.

  15. Einstein-Dirac theory in spin maximum I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crumeyrolle, A.

    1975-01-01

    An unitary Einstein-Dirac theory, first in spin maximum 1, is constructed. An original feature of this article is that it is written without any tetrapod technics; basic notions and existence conditions for spinor structures on pseudo-Riemannian fibre bundles are only used. A coupling gravitation-electromagnetic field is pointed out, in the geometric setting of the tangent bundle over space-time. Generalized Maxwell equations for inductive media in presence of gravitational field are obtained. Enlarged Einstein-Schroedinger theory, gives a particular case of this E.D. theory. E. S. theory is a truncated E.D. theory in spin maximum 1. A close relation between torsion-vector and Schroedinger's potential exists and nullity of torsion-vector has a spinor meaning. Finally the Petiau-Duffin-Kemmer theory is incorporated in this geometric setting [fr

  16. On geometrized gravitation theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    General properties of the geometrized gravitation theories have been considered. Geometrization of the theory is realized only to the extent that by necessity follows from an experiment (geometrization of the density of the matter Lagrangian only). Aor a general case the gravitation field equations and the equations of motion for matter are formulated in the different Riemann spaces. A covariant formulation of the energy-momentum conservation laws is given in an arbitrary geometrized theory. The noncovariant notion of ''pseudotensor'' is not required in formulating the conservation laws. It is shown that in the general case (i.e., when there is an explicit dependence of the matter Lagrangian density on the covariant derivatives) a symmetric energy-momentum tensor of the matter is explicitly dependent on the curvature tensor. There are enlisted different geometrized theories that describe a known set of the experimental facts. The properties of one of the versions of the quasilinear geometrized theory that describes the experimental facts are considered. In such a theory the fundamental static spherically symmetrical solution has a singularity only in the coordinate origin. The theory permits to create a satisfactory model of the homogeneous nonstationary Universe

  17. Derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Richard

    2015-04-01

    General relativity cannot describe exchange of classical intrinsic angular momentum and orbital angular momentum. Einstein-Cartan theory fixes this problem in the least invasive way. In the late 20th century, the consensus view was that Einstein-Cartan theory requires inclusion of torsion without adequate justification, it has no empirical support (though it doesn't conflict with any known evidence), it solves no important problem, and it complicates gravitational theory with no compensating benefit. In 1986 the author published a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, with no additional assumptions or parameters. Starting without torsion, Poincaré symmetry, classical or quantum spin, or spinors, it derives torsion and its relation to spin from a continuum limit of general relativistic solutions. The present work makes the case that this computation, combined with supporting arguments, constitutes a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, not just a plausibility argument. This paper adds more and simpler explanations, more computational details, correction of a factor of 2, discussion of limitations of the derivation, and discussion of some areas of gravitational research where Einstein-Cartan theory is relevant.

  18. Gravitation SL(2,C) gauge theory and conservation laws

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe; Nissani, Noah

    1990-01-01

    This monograph gives a comprehensive presentation of the SL(2,C) Gauge Theory of Gravitation along with some recent developments in the problem of Conservation Laws in General Relativity. Emphasis is put on quadratic Lagrangians which yield the Einstein field equations, as compared with Hilbert's original linear Langrangian, thus gravitation follows the other Gauge Fields all of which are derived from nonlinear Lagrangians.

  19. To theory of gravitational interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Minkevich, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    Some principal problems of general relativity theory and attempts of their solution are discussed. The Poincare gauge theory of gravity as natural generalization of Einsteinian gravitation theory is considered. The changes of gravitational interaction in the frame of this theory leading to the solution of principal problems of general relativity theory are analyzed.

  20. Einstein and the quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, A.

    1979-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: The light-quantum hypothesis and its gradual evolution into the photon concept. Early history of the photoelectric effect. The theoretical and experimental reasons why the resistance to the photon was stronger and more protracted than for any other particle proposed to date. Einstein's position regarding the Bohr--Kramers--Slater suggestion, the last bastion of resistance to the photon. Einstein's analysis of fluctuations around thermal equilibrium and his proposal of a duality between particles and waves, in 1909 for electromagnetic radiation (the first time this duality was ever stated) and in January 1925 for matter (prior to quantum mechanics and for reasons independent of those given earlier by de Broglie). His demonstration that long-known specific heat anomalies are quantum effects. His role in the evolution of the third law of thermodynamics. His new derivation of Planck's law in 1917 which also marks the beginning of his concern with the failure of classical causality. His role as one of the founders of quantum statistics and his discovery of the first example of a phase transition derived by using purely statistical methods. His position as a critic of quantum mechanics. Initial doubts on the consistency of quantum mechanics (1926--1930). His view maintained from 1930 until the end of his life: quantum mechanics is logically consistent and quite successful but it is incomplete. His attitude toward success. His criterion of objective reality. Differences in the roles relativity and quantum theory played in Einstein's life. His vision regarding quantum theory in the context of a unified field theory. His last autobiographical sketch, written a few months before his death, concluding with a statement about the quantum theory, a subject to which (by his own account) he had given more thought than even to general relativity

  1. Can one tell Einstein's unimodular theory from Einstein's general relativity?

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    The so called unimodular theory of gravitation is compared with general relativity in the quadratic (Fierz-Pauli) regime, using a quite broad framework, and it is argued that quantum effects allow in principle to discriminate between both theories.

  2. Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nico; Grimberg, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time is a gravitational wave astronomy planetarium show in production by a collaboration of scientists, filmmakers, and artisits from the Center for Gravitational Wave Astonomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Montana State University (MSU). The project builds on the success of the interdisciplinary Celebrating Einstein collaboration. The artists and scientists who created the A Shout Across Time original film and the Black (W)hole immersive art installation for Celebrating Einstein are teaming with the Museum of the Rockies Taylor Planetarium staff and students to create a new full dome Digistar planetarium show that will be freely and widely distributed to planetaria in the US and abroad. The show uses images and animations filmed and collected for A Shout Across Time and for Black (W)hole as well as new images and animations and a new soundtrack composed and produced by the MSU School of Music to use the full capability of planetarium sound systems. The planetarium show will be narrated with ideas drawn from the Celebrating Einstein danced lecture on gravitational waves that the collaboration produced. The combination of products, resources, and team members assembled for this project allows us to create an original planetarium show for a fraction of the cost of a typical show. In addition, STEM education materials for G6-12 students and teachers will be provided to complement and support the show. This project is supported by the Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC), Montana Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), and the American Physical Society (APS).

  3. On the discovery of the gravitational field equations by Einstein and Hilbert: new materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizgin, Vladimir P

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the history of discovery of the equations of gravitational field by Albert Einstein and David Hilbert in November 1915. The proof sheet of Hilbert's lecture report, made on 20 November 1915 and published in March 1916, rediscovered in 1997 in the archive of the university of Goettingen, throws new light on the history of this discovery. We also discuss the early history of the general theory of relativity that led to the expression of the general covariant equations of gravitational field. (from the history of physics)

  4. Gravitation in the 'quasi-classical' theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wignall, J.W.G.; Zangari, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 'quasi-classical' picture of particles as extendend periodic disturbances in a classical nonlinear field, previously shown to imply all the equations of Maxwell electrodynamics with very little formal input, is here applied to the other known long-range force, gravitation. It is shown that the picture's absolute interpretation of inertial mass and four-potential as measures of the local spacing between equal-phase hypersurfaces, together with the empirically established proportionality of gravitational 'charge' to inertial mass, leads naturally to the gravitational red-shift formula, and it thus provides a physical basis for the spacetime curvature that is the central idea of Einstein's general theory of relativity. 16 refs., 1 fig

  5. Cosmological term in general relativity theory and localization of de Sitter and Einstein groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunyak, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of gauge gravitational field with the de Sitter group localization is formulated. proceeding from the de Sitter Universe tetrad components the relationship between Riemann metrics and de Sitter gauge field is established. It is shown that General relativity theory (GRT) with a cosmological term is the simplest variant of the de Sitter gauge gravitation theory passing in the limit of infinite curvature radius of the de Sitter Universe into the Poincare - invariant GRT without cosmological term. Similarly the theory of gauge gravitational field at localization of the dynamical group of the Einstein homogeneous static Universe (Einstein group RxSO(4)) is formulated

  6. Albert Einstein and the relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlickova, E.

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography is presented of Albert Einstein's works, listing his correspondence, biographical literature, articles on A. Einstein published in Czech journals, principal relativity theory monographs and popular, historical and philosophical publications. The bibliographical records are listed alphabetically. Most references give the abbreviations of libraries where the publications are available. (J.P.)

  7. Weak circulation theorems as a way of distinguishing between generalized gravitation theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enosh, M.

    1980-01-01

    It was proved in a previous paper that a generalized circulation theorem characterizes Einstein's theory of gravitation as a special case of a more general theory of gravitation, which is also based on the principle of equivalence. Here the question of whether it is possible to weaken this circulation theorem in such ways that it would imply more general theories than Einstein's is posed. This problem is solved. Principally, there are two possibilities. One of them is essentially Weyl's theory. (author)

  8. Scalar-metric and scalar-metric-torsion gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldersley, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The techniques of dimensional analysis and of the theory of tensorial concomitants are employed to study field equations in gravitational theories which incorporate scalar fields of the Brans-Dicke type. Within the context of scalar-metric gravitational theories, a uniqueness theorem for the geometric (or gravitational) part of the field equations is proven and a Lagrangian is determined which is uniquely specified by dimensional analysis. Within the context of scalar-metric-torsion gravitational theories a uniqueness theorem for field Lagrangians is presented and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are given. Finally, an example of a scalar-metric-torsion theory is presented which is similar in many respects to the Brans-Dicke theory and the Einstein-Cartan theory

  9. Einstein's Equivalence Principle and Invalidity of Thorne's Theory for LIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo C. Y.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical foundation of LIGO's design is based on the equation of motion derived by Thorne. His formula, motivated by Einstein's theory of measurement, shows that the gravitational wave-induced displacement of a mass with respect to an object is proportional to the distance from the object. On the other hand, based on the observed bending of light and Einstein's equivalence principle, it is concluded that such induced displacement has nothing to do with the distance from another object. It is shown that the derivation of Thorne's formula has invalid assumptions that make it inapplicable to LIGO. This is a good counter example for those who claimed that Einstein's equivalence principle is not important or even irrelevant.

  10. Spherically Symmetric Solutions of the Einstein-Bach Equations and a Consistent Spin-2 Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janda, A.

    2006-01-01

    We briefly present a relationship between General Relativity coupled to certain spin-0 and spin-2 field theories and higher derivatives metric theories of gravity. In a special case, described by the Einstein-Bach equations, the spin-0 field drops out from the theory and we obtain a consistent spin-two field theory interacting gravitationally, which overcomes a well known inconsistency of the theory for a linear spin-two field coupled to the Einstein's gravity. Then we discuss basic properties of static spherically symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Bach equations. (author)

  11. Einstein's equations of motion in the gravitational field of an oblate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an earlier paper we derived Einstein's geometrical gravitational field equations for the metric tensor due to an oblate spheroidal massive body. In this paper we derive the corresponding Einstein's equations of motion for a test particle of nonzero rest mass in the gravitational field exterior to a homogeneous oblate ...

  12. String Theory has Einstein's dream come true?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    After having outlined the difficulties that Einstein and others have encountered in trying to unify our understanding of macroscopic/classical and microscopic /quantum physics, I will explain in simple terms how the latest particle theory revolution, string theory, may finally offer a surprisingly simple realization of these long-standing dreams. Einstein thought that his difficulties stemmed from a clash between the classical and the quantum. Yet, paradoxically, superstrings appear to realize his dream thanks to -and not against- quantum mechanics.

  13. Gravitational energy from a combination of a tetrad expression and Einstein's pseudotensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Lau Loi

    2008-01-01

    The energy-momentum for a gravitating system can be considered using the tetrad teleparallel gauge current in orthonormal frames, instead of the more commonly used Einstein pseudotensor, which makes use of holonomic frames. The tetrad expression itself gives a better result for gravitational energy than Einstein's in that it gives a positive gravitational energy in the small sphere approximation. Inspired by an idea of Deser, we propose an alternative quasilocal gravitational energy expression in the small sphere limit which also enjoys the positive energy property by combining the tetrad expression and the Einstein pseudotensor, such that the connection coefficient has a form appropriate to a suitable intermediate between orthonormal and holonomic frames

  14. The Einstein-Vlasov System/Kinetic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Andréasson

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to provide a guide to theorems on global properties of solutions to the Einstein-Vlasov system. This system couples Einstein's equations to a kinetic matter model. Kinetic theory has been an important field of research during several decades in which the main focus has been on nonrelativistic and special relativistic physics, i.e., to model the dynamics of neutral gases, plasmas, and Newtonian self-gravitating systems. In 1990, Rendall and Rein initiated a mathematical study of the Einstein-Vlasov system. Since then many theorems on global properties of solutions to this system have been established. The Vlasov equation describes matter phenomenologically, and it should be stressed that most of the theorems presented in this article are not presently known for other such matter models (i.e., fluid models. This paper gives introductions to kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes and then the Einstein-Vlasov system is introduced. We believe that a good understanding of kinetic theory in non-curved spacetimes is fundamental to good comprehension of kinetic theory in general relativity.

  15. A major point in the relativistic gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draminsky, P.

    1976-01-01

    In this article Draminsky gives his answer to those critics who, while noting his objections to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, have been uncertain what Draminsky would put in its place. Draminsky's theory is based on the same foundation as Einstein's, that real space in a gravitational field is non-Euclidean. This space is contracted or dilated in relation to time in different ways from place to place. The tracks of free particles in such space are geodetic lines calculated from second-order differential equations, the form and solution of which is described. The single assumption required to provide a rigid and exact field equation is that the inertial mass of a particle in a local system of reference is the same as its gravitational mass measured and operative in the reference system: which is the 'identity principle' of Einstein formulated in the only entirely precise manner. (A.D.N.)

  16. Gravitational quasinormal modes of static Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet anti-de Sitter black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Li, Jin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we describe quasinormal modes (QNMs) for gravitational perturbations of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes (BHs) in higher dimensional spacetimes, and derive the corresponding parameters of such black holes in three types of spacetime (flat, de Sitter (dS) and anti-de Sitter (AdS)). Our attention is concentrated on discussing the (in)stability of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS BHs through the temporal evolution of all types of gravitational perturbation fields (tensor, vector and scalar). It is concluded that the potential functions in vector and scalar gravitational perturbations have negative regions, which suppress quasinormal ringing. Furthermore, the influences of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling parameter α, the number of dimensions n and the angular momentum quantum number l on the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS BHs quasinormal spectrum are analyzed. The QNM frequencies have greater oscillation and lower damping rate with the growth of α. This indicates that QNM frequencies become increasingly unstable with large α. Meanwhile, the dynamic evolutions of the perturbation field are compliant with the results of computation from the Horowitz and Hubeny method. Because the number of extra dimensions is connected with the string scale, the relationship between α and properties of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS BHs might be beneficial for the exploitation of string theory and extra-dimensional brane worlds. Supported by FAPESP (2012/08934-0), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205254, 11178018, 11375279, 11605015), the Natural Science Foundation Project of CQ CSTC (2011BB0052), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (106112016CDJXY300002, 106112017CDJXFLX0014, CDJRC10300003)

  17. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation in a gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Hiroaki; Ueda, Masahito

    2004-01-01

    For quantum communication in a gravitational field, the properties of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) correlation are studied within the framework of general relativity. Acceleration and gravity are shown to deteriorate the perfect anticorrelation of an EPR pair of spins in the same direction, and apparently decrease the degree of the violation of Bell's inequality. To maintain the perfect EPR correlation and the maximal violation of Bell's inequality, observers must measure the spins in appropriately chosen different directions which depend on the velocity of the particles, the curvature of the space-time, and the positions of the observers. Near the event horizon of a black hole, the appropriate directions depend so sensitively on the positions of the observers that even a very small uncertainty in the identification of the observers' positions leads to a fatal error in quantum communication, unless the observers fall into the black hole together with the particles

  18. Astrophysically Satisfactory Solutions to Einstein's R-33 Gravitational Field Equations Exterior/Interior to Static Homogeneous Oblate Spheroidal Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formulate solutions to Einstein's geometrical field equations derived using our new approach. Our field equations exterior and interior to the mass distribution have only one unknown function determined by the mass or pressure distribution. Our obtained solutions yield the unknown function as generalizations of Newton's gravitational scalar potential. Thus, our solution puts Einstein's geometrical theory of gravity on same footing with Newton's dynamical theory; with the dependence of the field on one and only one unknown function comparable to Newton's gravitational scalar potential. Our results in this article are of much significance as the Sun and planets in the solar system are known to be more precisely oblate spheroidal in geometry. The oblate spheroidal geometries of these bodies have effects on their gravitational fields and the motions of test particles and photons in these fields.

  19. Perturbed black holes in Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity: stability, ringdown, and gravitational-wave emission

    CERN Document Server

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational waves emitted by distorted black holes---such as those arising from the coalescence of two neutron stars or black holes---carry not only information about the corresponding spacetime but also about the underlying theory of gravity. Although general relativity remains the simplest, most elegant and viable theory of gravitation, there are generic and robust arguments indicating that it is not the ultimate description of the gravitational universe. Here we focus on a particularly appealing extension of general relativity, which corrects Einstein's theory through the addition of terms which are second order in curvature: the topological Gauss-Bonnet invariant coupled to a dilaton. We study gravitational-wave emission from black holes in this theory, and (i) find strong evidence that black holes are linearly (mode) stable against both axial and polar perturbations; (ii) discuss how the quasinormal modes of black holes can be excited during collisions involving black holes, and finally (iii) show that...

  20. A new geometrical gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, T.; Chiba, J.; Oshima, H.

    1981-01-01

    A geometrical gravitational theory is developed. The field equations are uniquely determined apart from one unknown dimensionless parameter ω 2 . It is based on an extension of the Weyl geometry, and by the extension the gravitational coupling constant and the gravitational mass are made to be dynamical and geometrical. The fundamental geometrical objects in the theory are a metric gsub(μν) and two gauge scalars phi and psi. The theory satisfies the weak equivalence principle, but breaks the strong one generally. u(phi, psi) = phi is found out on the assumption that the strong one keeps holding good at least for bosons of low spins. Thus there is the simple correspondence between the geometrical objects and the gravitational objects. Since the theory satisfies the weak one, the inertial mass is also dynamical and geometrical in the same way as is the gravitational mass. Moreover, the cosmological term in the theory is a coscalar of power -4 algebraically made of psi and u(phi, psi), so it is dynamical, too. Finally spherically symmetric exact solutions are given. The permissible range of the unknown parameter ω 2 is experimentally determined by applying the solutions to the solar system. (author)

  1. Einstein and interpretation of quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashlyun, F.

    1982-01-01

    The main problems of the quantum theory, the basis of which was laid by Planck in 1900 as a result of the discovery of elementary quantum of action, are examined. The most important Einstein contributions to the quantum theory are enumerated. The Einstein work about the light quanta, proved wave-particle dualism, stated one of the most complicated problems to the physics. The work on the specific heat capacity of solids shows that the quantum theory should be beyond the limits of the narrow range of the problems on black radiation. The works on the equilibrium of radiation have convincingly demonstrates statistical character of the radiation processes and have marked the way to Heizenberg form of the quantum mechanics. Einstein generalized the idea of wave-particle dualism to the ordinary gas. It helped to prepare the Schroedinger form of quantum mechanics

  2. Canonical quantum theory of gravitational field with higher derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Shoichiro; Kimura, Tadahiko; Kitago, Koichi.

    1981-01-01

    A renormalizable gravitational theory with higher derivatives is canonically quantized in the Landau gauge. Field equations and various equal-time commutation relations are explicitly given. The main results obtained in this work are 1) the equal-time commutation relations involving b sub(μ) exhibit the tensor-like behaviour and 2) the theory has the 16-dimensional Poincare-like superalgebra. These results are just the same as those discovered by Nakanishi in the Einstein case. (author)

  3. Einstein's strugges with quantum theory a reappraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Home, Dipankar

    2007-01-01

    Einstein’s Struggles with Quantum Theory: A Reappraisal by Dipankar Home and Andrew Whitaker provides a detailed account of Albert Einstein’s thinking in regard to quantum physics. Until recently, most of Einstein’s views on quantum physics were dismissed and even ridiculed; some critics even suggested that Einstein was not able to grasp the complexities of the formalism of quantum theory and subtleties of the standard interpretation of this theory known as the Copenhagen interpretation put forward by Niels Bohr and his colleagues. But was that true? Modern scholarship argues otherwise, insist Drs. Home and Whitaker, who painstakingly explain the questions Einstein raised as well as offer a detailed discussion of Einstein’s position and major contributions to quantum theory, connecting them with contemporary studies on fundamental aspects of this theory. This unique book presents a mathematical as well as a non-mathematical route through the theories, controversies, and investigations, making the disc...

  4. Charged spin fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Ritis, R.; Lavorgna, M.; Platania, G.; Stornaiolo, C.

    1985-01-01

    We propose a variational principle describing a charged spin fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory. We show that this fluid can be described by the current vector V/sub i/ which has a potential decomposition and generalizes the results given by Taub. We also derive Maxwell's equations in the presence of spin and torsion. The Eulerian description of the fluid is given by an action integral whose Lagrangian is the pressure plus the free Lagrangians of the gravitational and electromagnetic fields. Finally, we analyze the circulation and Bernoulli theorems using the current vector V/sub i/

  5. The large numbers hypothesis and a relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Y.K.; Prokhovnik, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    A way to reconcile Dirac's large numbers hypothesis and Einstein's theory of gravitation was recently suggested by Lau (1985). It is characterized by the conjecture of a time-dependent cosmological term and gravitational term in Einstein's field equations. Motivated by this conjecture and the large numbers hypothesis, we formulate here a scalar-tensor theory in terms of an action principle. The cosmological term is required to be spatially dependent as well as time dependent in general. The theory developed is appled to a cosmological model compatible with the large numbers hypothesis. The time-dependent form of the cosmological term and the scalar potential are then deduced. A possible explanation of the smallness of the cosmological term is also given and the possible significance of the scalar field is speculated

  6. Einstein and the Special Theory of Relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    some detail how Einstein evolved this theory and get a glimpse of his unique ... The Principle of Relativity: The laws of physics are the same in all inertial frames. .... ing on the railway platform will see them occur at different places. However ...

  7. Compton's Kinematics and Einstein - Ehrenfest's radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, A.V.; Franca, H.M.

    1988-09-01

    The Compton Kinematic relations are obtained from entirely classical arguments, that is, without the corpuscular concept of the photon. The calculations are nonrelativistic and result from Einstein and Ehrenfest's radiation theory modified in order to introduce the effects of the classical zero-point fileds characteristic of Stochastic Electrodynamics. (author) [pt

  8. Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennelly, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations of several problems of gravitation are discussed. The question of the existence of black holes is considered. While black holes like those in Einstein's theory may not exist in other gravity theories, trapped surfaces implying such black holes certainly do. The theories include those of Brans-Dicke, Lightman-Lee, Rosen, and Yang. A similar two-tensor theory of Yilmaz is investigated and found inconsistent and nonviable. The Newman-Penrose formalism for Riemannian geometries is adapted to general gravity theories and used to implement a search for twisting solutions of the gravity theories for empty and nonempty spaces. The method can be used to find the gravitational fields for all viable gravity theories. The rotating solutions are of particular importance for strong field interpretation of the Stanford/Marshall gyroscope experiment. Inhomogeneous cosmologies are examined in Einstein's theory as generalizations of homogeneous ones by raising the dimension of the invariance groups by one more parameter. The nine Bianchi classifications are extended to Rosen's theory of gravity for homogeneous cosmological models

  9. Freud's superpotential in general relativity and in Einstein-Cartan theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Christian G.; Hehl, Friedrich W.

    2018-02-01

    The identification of a suitable gravitational energy in theories of gravity has a long history, and it is well known that a unique answer cannot be given. In the first part of this paper we present a streamlined version of the derivation of Freud's superpotential in general relativity. It is found if we once integrate the gravitational field equation by parts. This allows us to extend these results directly to the Einstein-Cartan theory. Interestingly, Freud's original expression, first stated in 1939, remains valid even when considering gravitational theories in Riemann-Cartan or, more generally, in metric-affine spacetimes.

  10. Einstein-aether as a quantum effective field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    The possibility that Lorentz symmetry is violated in gravitational processes is relatively unconstrained by experiment, in stark contrast with the level of accuracy to which Lorentz symmetry has been confirmed in the matter sector. One model of Lorentz violation in the gravitational sector is Einstein-aether theory, in which Lorentz symmetry is broken by giving a vacuum expectation value to a dynamical vector field. In this paper, we analyse the effective theory for quantized gravitational and aether perturbations. We show that this theory possesses a controlled effective expansion within dimensional regularization, that is, for any process there are a finite number of Feynman diagrams which will contribute to a given order of accuracy. We find that there is no log running of the 2-derivative phenomenological parameters, justifying the use of experimental constraints for these parameters obtained over many orders of magnitude in energy scale. Given the stringent experimental bounds on 2-derivative Lorentz-violating operators, we estimate the size of matter Lorentz violation which arises due to loop effects. This amounts to an estimation of the natural size of coefficients for Lorentz-violating dimension-6 matter operators, which in turn can be used to obtain a new bound on the 2-derivative parameters of this theory.

  11. Theory of gravitational-inertial field of universe. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davtyan, O.K.

    1978-01-01

    A generalization of the real world tensor by the introduction of a inertial field tensor is proposed. On the basis of variational equations a system of more general covariant equations of the gravitational-inertial field is obtained. In the Einstein approximation these equations reduce to the field equations of Einstein. The solution of fundamental problems in the general theory of relativity by means of the new equations gives the same results as the solution by means of Einstein's equations. However, application of these equations to the cosmologic problem gives a result different from that obtained by Friedmann's theory. In particular, the solution gives the Hubble law as the law of motion of a free body in the inertial field - in contrast to Galileo-Newton's law. (author)

  12. Lorentz covariant theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagundes, H.V.

    1974-12-01

    An alternative method for the calculation of second order effects, like the secular shift of Mercury's perihelium is developed. This method uses the basic ideas of thirring combined with the more mathematical approach of Feyman. In the case of a static source, the treatment used is greatly simplified. Besides, Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann's Lagrangian for a system of two particles and spin-orbit and spin-spin interactions of two particles with classical spin, ie, internal angular momentum in Moller's sense, are obtained from the Lorentz covariant theory

  13. Gravitation and bilocal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollendorf, F.

    1975-01-01

    The starting point is the conjecture that a field theory of elementary particles can be constructed only in a bilocal version. Thus the 4-dimensional space time has to be replaced by the 8-dimensional manifold R 8 of all ordered pairs of space time events. With special reference to the Schwarzschild metric it is shown that the embedding of the time space into the manifold R 8 yields a description of the gravitational field. (orig.) [de

  14. Gravitation, Thermodynamics, and Quantum Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    During the past 30 years, research in general relativity has brought to light strong hints of a very deep and fundamental relationship between gravitation, thermodynamics, and quantum theory. The most striking indication of such a relationship comes from black hole thermodynamics, where it appears that certain laws of black hole mechanics are, in fact, simply the ordinary laws of thermodynamics applied to a system containing a black hole. This article will review the present status of black h...

  15. HST image of Gravitational Lens G2237 + 305 or 'Einstein Cross'

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) Faint Object Camera (FOC) science image was taken from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of Gravitational Lens G2237 + 305 or 'Einstein Cross'. The gravitational lens G2237 + 305 or 'Einstein Cross' shows four images of a very distant quasar which has been multiple-imaged by a relatively nearby galaxy acting as a gravitational lens. The angular separation between the upper and lower images is 1.6 arc seconds. Photo was released from Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 09-12-90.

  16. Gravitation theory - Empirical status from solar system experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtvedt, K. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Review of historical and recent experiments which speak in favor of a post-Newtonian relativistic gravitational theory. The topics include the foundational experiments, metric theories of gravity, experiments designed to differentiate among the metric theories, and tests of Machian concepts of gravity. It is shown that the metric field for any metric theory can be specified by a series of potential terms with several parameters. It is pointed out that empirical results available up to date yield values of the parameters which are consistent with the prediction of Einstein's general relativity.

  17. Einstein's theory of unified fields

    CERN Document Server

    Tonnelat, Marie Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    First published in1966, here is presented a comprehensive overview of one of the most elusive scientific speculations by the pre-eminent genius of the 20th century. The theory is viewed by some scientists with deep suspicion, by others with optimism, but all agree that it represents an extreme challenge. As the author herself affirms, this work is not intended to be a complete treatise or 'didactic exposition' of the theory of unified fields, but rather a tool for further study, both by students and professional physicists. Dealing with all the major areas of research whic

  18. General relativity: An introduction to the theory of the gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephani, H.

    1985-01-01

    The entire treatment presented here is framed by questions which led to and now lead out of the general theory of relativity: can an absolute acceleration be defined meaningfully? Do gravitational effects propagate with infinite velocity as Newton required? Can the general theory correctly reflect the dynamics of the whole universe while consistently describing stellar evolution? Can a theory which presupposes measurement of properties of space through the interaction of matter be made compatible with a theory in which dimensions of the objects measured are so small that location loses meaning? The book gives the mathematics necessary to understand the theory and begins in Riemannian geometry. Contents, abridged: Foundations of Riemannian geometry. Foundations of Einstein's theory of gravitation. Linearised theory of gravitation, far fields and gravitational waves. Invariant characterisation of exact solutions. Gravitational collapse and black holes. Cosmology. Non-Einsteinian theories of gravitation. Index

  19. The curious history of relativity how Einstein's theory of gravity was lost and found again

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenstaedt, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Black holes may obliterate most things that come near them, but they saved the theory of general relativity. Einstein's theory was quickly accepted as the true theory of gravity after its publication in 1915, but soon took a back seat in physics to quantum mechanics and languished for decades on the blackboards of mathematicians. Not until the existence of black holes by Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose in the 1960s, after Einstein's death, was the theory revived. Almost one hundred years after general relativity replaced Newton's theory of gravitation, The Curious History of Relativity tells the story of both events surrounding general relativity and the techniques employed by Einstein and the relativists to construct, develop, and understand his almost impenetrable theory. Jean Eisenstaedt, one of the world's leading experts on the subject, also discusses the theory's place in the evolution of twentieth-century physics. He describes the main stages in the development of general relativity: its beginnings,...

  20. The Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, J

    2003-01-01

    Since the scalar-tensor theory of gravitation was proposed almost 50 years ago, it has recently become a robust alternative theory to Einstein's general relativity due to the fact that it appears to represent the lower level of a more fundamental theory and can serve both as a phenomenological theory to explain the recently observed acceleration of the universe, and to solve the cosmological constant problem. To my knowledge The Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation by Y Fujii and K Maeda is the first book to develop a modern view on this topic and is one of the latest titles in the well-presented Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics series. This book is an excellent readable introduction and up-to-date review of the subject. The discussion is well organized; after a comprehensible introduction to the Brans-Dicke theory and the important role played by conformal transformations, the authors review cosmologies with the cosmological constant and how the scalar-tensor theory can serve to explain the accelerating universe, including discussions on dark energy, quintessence and braneworld cosmologies. The book ends with a chapter devoted to quantum effects. To make easy the lectures of the book, each chapter starts with a summary of the subject to be dealt with. As the book proceeds, important issues like conformal frames and the weak equivalence principle are fully discussed. As the authors warn in the preface, the book is not encyclopedic (from my point of view the list of references is fairly short, for example, but this is a minor drawback) and the choice of included topics corresponds to the authors' interests. Nevertheless, the book seems to cover a broad range of the most essential aspects of the subject. Long and 'boring' mathematical derivations are left to appendices so as not to interrupt the flow of the reasoning, allowing the reader to focus on the physical aspects of each subject. These appendices are a valuable help in entering into the mathematical

  1. Finding Horndeski theories with Einstein gravity limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManus, Ryan; Lombriser, Lucas; Peñarrubia, Jorge, E-mail: ryanm@roe.ac.uk, E-mail: llo@roe.ac.uk, E-mail: jorpega@roe.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    The Horndeski action is the most general scalar-tensor theory with at most second-order derivatives in the equations of motion, thus evading Ostrogradsky instabilities and making it of interest when modifying gravity at large scales. To pass local tests of gravity, these modifications predominantly rely on nonlinear screening mechanisms that recover Einstein's Theory of General Relativity in regions of high density. We derive a set of conditions on the four free functions of the Horndeski action that examine whether a specific model embedded in the action possesses an Einstein gravity limit or not. For this purpose, we develop a new and surprisingly simple scaling method that identifies dominant terms in the equations of motion by considering formal limits of the couplings that enter through the new terms in the modified action. This enables us to find regimes where nonlinear terms dominate and Einstein's field equations are recovered to leading order. Together with an efficient approximation of the scalar field profile, one can then further evaluate whether these limits can be attributed to a genuine screening effect. For illustration, we apply the analysis to both a cubic galileon and a chameleon model as well as to Brans-Dicke theory. Finally, we emphasise that the scaling method also provides a natural approach for performing post-Newtonian expansions in screened regimes.

  2. Translational spacetime symmetries in gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, R J

    2006-01-01

    How to include spacetime translations in fibre bundle gauge theories has been a subject of controversy, because spacetime symmetries are not internal symmetries of the bundle structure group. The standard method for including affine symmetry in differential geometry is to define a Cartan connection on an affine bundle over spacetime. This is equivalent to (1) defining an affine connection on the affine bundle, (2) defining a zero section on the associated affine vector bundle and (3) using the affine connection and the zero section to define an 'associated solder form', whose lift to a tensorial form on the frame bundle becomes the solder form. The zero section reduces the affine bundle to a linear bundle and splits the affine connection into translational and homogeneous parts; however, it violates translational equivariance/gauge symmetry. This is the natural geometric framework for Einstein-Cartan theory as an affine theory of gravitation. The last section discusses some alternative approaches that claim to preserve translational gauge symmetry

  3. Translational spacetime symmetries in gravitational theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, R J [MathWorks, Inc., 3 Apple Hill Drive, Natick, MA 01760 (United States)

    2006-02-07

    How to include spacetime translations in fibre bundle gauge theories has been a subject of controversy, because spacetime symmetries are not internal symmetries of the bundle structure group. The standard method for including affine symmetry in differential geometry is to define a Cartan connection on an affine bundle over spacetime. This is equivalent to (1) defining an affine connection on the affine bundle, (2) defining a zero section on the associated affine vector bundle and (3) using the affine connection and the zero section to define an 'associated solder form', whose lift to a tensorial form on the frame bundle becomes the solder form. The zero section reduces the affine bundle to a linear bundle and splits the affine connection into translational and homogeneous parts; however, it violates translational equivariance/gauge symmetry. This is the natural geometric framework for Einstein-Cartan theory as an affine theory of gravitation. The last section discusses some alternative approaches that claim to preserve translational gauge symmetry.

  4. The Lorentz Theory of Electrons and Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Stanley

    1969-01-01

    Traces the development of Lorentz's theory of electrons as applied to the problem of the electrodynamics of moving bodies. Presents evidence that the principle of relativity did not play an important role in Lorentz's theory, and that though Lorentz eventually acknowledged Einstein's work, he was unwilling to completely embrace the Einstein…

  5. The confrontation between gravitation theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    After an introductory section, an analysis is given of the foundations of gravitation theory - principles of equivalence, the fundamental criteria for the viability of a gravitational theory, and the experiments that support those criteria. One of the principal conclusions is that the correct, viable theory of gravity must in all probability be a 'metric' theory. Attention is focussed on solar-system tests, using a 'theory of theories' known as the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism that encompasses most metric theories of gravity and that is ideally suited to the solar-system arena. Gravitational radiation is discussed as a possible tool for testing gravitational theory. The binary pulsar, a new , 'stellar-system' testing ground is studied. Tests of gravitation theory in a cosmic arena are described. (U.K.)

  6. The outlooks of Helmholtz, Plank and Einstein on the unified physical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treder, G.Yu.

    1982-01-01

    The outlooks of Helmholtz, Planck and Einstein on the unified physical theory are exposed. Planck formulated the Einstein relativistic mechanics in the canonical form stemming from the suggested by Helmholtz approach that the principle of action is the unified formal principle of physics. Einstein and his companious proceeded from machroscopic fields in the attempts to prove the unified geometric field theory. The sense of Planck length as ''the smallest length in physics'' is determined, on the one hand, by the Heizenberg uncerntainty principle for the measurement process, and on the other hand by the universal proportionality between inertia and gravity. It results from geometrical nature and gravitational potential, i. e. from Einstein interpretation of the equivalence principle

  7. Energy in the Einstein-aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eling, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the energy of a theory with a unit vector field (the aether) coupled to gravity. Both the Weinberg and Einstein type energy-momentum pseudotensors are employed. In the linearized theory we find expressions for the energy density of the 5 wave modes. The requirement that the modes have positive energy is then used to constrain the theory. In the fully nonlinear theory we compute the total energy of an asymptotically flat spacetime. The resulting energy expression is modified by the presence of the aether due to the nonzero value of the unit vector at infinity and its 1/r falloff. The question of nonlinear energy positivity is also discussed, but not resolved

  8. Gravitation, gauge theories and differential geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, T.; Chicago Univ., IL; Chicago Univ., IL; Gilkey, P.B.; California Univ., Los Angeles; Hanson, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to outline various mathematical ideas, methods, and results, primarily from differential geometry and topology, and to show where they can be applied to Yang-Mills gauge theories and Einstein's theory of gravitation.We have several goals in mind. The first is to convey to physicists the bases for many mathematical concepts by using intuitive arguments while avoiding the detailed formality of most textbooks. Although a variety of mathematical theorems will be stated, we will generally give simple examples motivating the results instead of presenting abstract proofs. Another goal is to list a wide variety of mathematical terminology and results in a format which allows easy reference. The reader then has the option of supplementing the descriptions given here by consulting standard mathematical references and articles such as those listed in the bibliography. Finally, we intend this article to serve the dual purpose of acquainting mathematicians with some basic physical concepts which have mathematical ramifications; physical problems have often stimuladed new directions in mathematical thought. (orig./WL)

  9. The Einstein@Home search for gravitational waves and neutron stars

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Einstein@Home is a volunteer distributed computing project with more than 300,000 participants. Like other volunteer computing projects, Einstein@Home harvests idle computer cycles from the the laptop and desktop computers of the general public. This provides enormous computing power, on the scale of some of the world's fastest supercomputers, but at very low cost. I describe the current status of the Einstein@Home search for new neutron stars, using data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), from the Arecibo and Parkes radio telescopes, and from the Fermi gamma-ray satellite. The sensitivity of these searches is limited by computing power, so the Einstein@Home approach allows the detection of weaker signals than more conventional approaches. In the past 18 months, Einstein@Home has discovered more than 20 new radio and gamma-ray pulsars, including a number of particularly interesting and exotic systems.

  10. Hydrodynamics, fields and constants in gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanyukovich, K.P.; Mel'nikov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    Results of original inveatigations into problems of standard gravitation theory and its generalizations are presented. The main attention is paid to the application of methods of continuous media techniques in the gravitation theory; to the specification of the gravitation role in phenomena of macro- and microworld, accurate solutions in the case, when the medium is the matter, assigned by hydrodynamic energy-momentum tensor; and to accurate solutions for the case when the medium is the field. GRT generalizations are analyzed, such as the new cosmologic hypothesis which is based on the gravitation vacuum theory. Investigations are performed into the quantization of cosmological models, effects of spontaneous symmetry violation and particle production in cosmology. Graeity theory with fundamental Higgs field is suggested in the framework of which in the atomic unit number one can explain possible variations of the effective gravitational bonds, and in the gravitation bond, variations of masses of all particles

  11. The Theory of Vortical Gravitational Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper treats of vortical gravitational fields, a tensor of which is the rotor of the general covariant gravitational inertial force. The field equations for a vortical gravitational field (the Lorentz condition, the Maxwell-like equations, and the continuity equation are deduced in an analogous fashion to electrodynamics. From the equations it is concluded that the main kind of vortical gravitational fields is “electric”, determined by the non-stationarity of the acting gravitational inertial force. Such a field is a medium for traveling waves of the force (they are different to the weak deformation waves of the space metric considered in the theory of gravitational waves. Standing waves of the gravitational inertial force and their medium, a vortical gravitational field of the “magnetic” kind, are exotic, since a non-stationary rotation of a space body (the source of such a field is a very rare phenomenon in the Universe.

  12. Can Malin's gravitational-field equations be modified to obtain a viable theory of gravity to obtain a viable theory of gravity to obtain a viable theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, L.L.; Prestage, J.

    1976-01-01

    Malin's gravitational theory, which was recently shown by Lindblom and Nester to be incorrect, is modified by means of a recently proposed method for obtaining viable gravitational theories. The resulting self-consistent theory, which is in effect a Rastall-type modification of the Einstein theory, exhibits nonconservation of momentum, yet agrees with all experimental limits known to date within the PPN framework

  13. Parametrized tests of post-Newtonian theory using Advanced LIGO and Einstein Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    General relativity has very specific predictions for the gravitational waveforms from inspiralling compact binaries obtained using the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation. We investigate the extent to which the measurement of the PN coefficients, possible with the second generation gravitational-wave detectors such as the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the third generation gravitational-wave detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET), could be used to test post-Newtonian theory and to put bounds on a subclass of parametrized-post-Einstein theories which differ from general relativity in a parametrized sense. We demonstrate this possibility by employing the best inspiralling waveform model for nonspinning compact binaries which is 3.5PN accurate in phase and 3PN in amplitude. Within the class of theories considered, Advanced LIGO can test the theory at 1.5PN and thus the leading tail term. Future observations of stellar mass black hole binaries by ET can test the consistency between the various PN coefficients in the gravitational-wave phasing over the mass range of 11-44M · . The choice of the lower frequency cutoff is important for testing post-Newtonian theory using the ET. The bias in the test arising from the assumption of nonspinning binaries is indicated.

  14. Equilibrium thermodynamics in modified gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, C.-Q.; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    We show that it is possible to obtain a picture of equilibrium thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in the expanding cosmological background for a wide class of modified gravity theories with the Lagrangian density f(R,φ,X), where R is the Ricci scalar and X is the kinetic energy of a scalar field φ. This comes from a suitable definition of an energy-momentum tensor of the 'dark' component that respects to a local energy conservation in the Jordan frame. In this framework the horizon entropy S corresponding to equilibrium thermodynamics is equal to a quarter of the horizon area A in units of gravitational constant G, as in Einstein gravity. For a flat cosmological background with a decreasing Hubble parameter, S globally increases with time, as it happens for viable f(R) inflation and dark energy models. We also show that the equilibrium description in terms of the horizon entropy S is convenient because it takes into account the contribution of both the horizon entropy S in non-equilibrium thermodynamics and an entropy production term.

  15. Solitons, gauge theories and the 'great Einstein theorem'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresden, M.; Chen, S.F.

    1976-01-01

    A field theory is said to be of 'Einstein type' if it has the property that the field equations imply the equations of motion. It is known that general relativity is of Einstein type, it is demonstrated here that the Yang-Mills gauge theory is of Einstein type. The relationship between the singularities in the solutions of the field equations and soliton type is analyzed. (Auth.)

  16. Outline of a classical theory of quantum physics and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallop, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    It is argued that in the manner in which the Galilean-Newtonian physics may be said to have explained the Ptolemaic-Copernican theories in terms which have since been called classical, so also Milner's theories of the structure of matter may be said to explain present day quantum and relativistic theory. In both cases the former employ the concept of force and the latter, by contrast, are geometrical theories. Milner envisaged space as being stressed, whereas Einstein thought of it as strained. Development of Milner's theory from criticisms and suggestions made by Kilmister has taken it further into the realms of quantum and gravitational physics, where it is found to give a more physically comprehensible explanation of the phenomena. Further, it shows why present day quantum theory is cast in a statistical form. The theory is supported by many predictions such as the ratio of Planck's constant to the mass of the electron, the value of the fine structure constant and reason for apparent variations in past measurements, the magnetic moment of the electron and proton of the stable particles such as the neutron Λ and Σ together with the kaon, and a relation between the universal gravitational constant and Hubble's constant - all within published experimental accuracy. The latest results to be accounted for by the theory are the masses of the newly discovered psi particles and confirmation of the value of the decay of Newton's gravitational constant obtained from lunar measurements. (author)

  17. Covariant theory of gravitation in the framework of special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R. S.; Brentan, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we study the magnetic effects of gravity in the framework of special relativity. Imposing covariance of the gravitational force with respect to the Lorentz transformations, we show from a thought experiment that a magnetic-like force must be present whenever two or more bodies are in motion. The exact expression for this gravitomagnetic force is then derived purely from special relativity and the consequences of such a covariant theory are developed. For instance, we show that the gravitomagnetic fields satisfy a system of differential equations similar to the Maxwell equations of electrodynamics. This implies that the gravitational waves spread out with the speed of light in a flat spacetime, which is in agreement with the recent results concerning the gravitational waves detection. We also propose that the vector potential can be associated with the interaction momentum in the same way as the scalar potential is usually associated with the interaction energy. Other topics are also discussed, for example, the transformation laws for the fields, the energy and momentum stored in the gravitomagnetic fields, the invariance of the gravitational mass and so on. We remark that is not our intention here to propose an alternative theory of gravitation but, rather, only a first approximation for the gravitational phenomena, so that it can be applied whenever the gravitational force can be regarded as an ordinary effective force field and special relativity can be used with safety. To make this point clear we present briefly a comparison between our approach and that based on the (linearized) Einstein's theory. Finally, we remark that although we have assumed nothing from the electromagnetic theory, we found that gravity and electricity share many properties in common -these similarities, in fact, are just a requirement of special relativity that must apply to any physically acceptable force field.

  18. New exact solutions of Einstein's field equations: gravitational force can also be repulsive!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, W.

    1988-01-01

    This article has not been written for specialists of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations but for physicists who are interested in nontrivial information on this topic. We recall the history and some basic properties of exact solutions of Einstein's vacuum equations. We show that the field equations for stationary axisymmetric vacuum gravitational fields can be expressed by only one nonlinear differential equation for a complex function. This compact form of the field equations allows the generation of almost all stationary axisymmetric vacuum gravitational fields. We present a new stationary two-body solution of Einstein's equations as an application of this generation technique. This new solution proves the existence of a macroscopic, repulsive spin-spin interaction in general relativity. Some estimates that are related to this new two-body solution are given

  19. Vectorial-tensorial conservative theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mociutchi, C.; Ionescu-Pallas, N.

    1975-01-01

    Gravitation is considered as a mixing of interactions and a suggestion for a vectorial-tensorial theory with parametric coupling is given. The self consistent character of the theory leads to a system of equations for the proposed tensorial-vectorial theory of gravitation. If the weight of the vectorial component is low enough i.e. epsilon much smaller than 1, then this theory can correctly reproduce all the experimental verifications

  20. Possible Experiments to test Einstein's Special Relativity Theory

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Victor Otto

    2011-01-01

    All of the experiments supporting Einstein's Special Relativity Theory are also supportive of the Lorentz ether theory, or many other ether theories. However, a growing number of experiments show deviations from Einstein's Special Relativity Theory, but are supporting more extended theories. Some of these experiments are reviewed and analyzed. Unfortunately, many experiments are not of high quality, never repeated and mostly both. It is proposed that the most promising experiments should be r...

  1. Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Peter D

    2003-01-01

    Albert Einstein re-wrote the textbooks of science in 1905: physics since has been little more than a series of footnotes to the theories of a 26-year-old patent-office clerk. Einstein's science and emotional life come together in this vivid portrait of a rebellious and contradictory figure, a pacifist whose legendary equation E=mc2 opened scientists' eyes to the terrible power within every atom. 'To punish me for my contempt for authority,' he lamented, 'Fate has made me an authority myself.'

  2. Minimal gravitational coupling in the Newtonian theory and the covariant Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, C.; Kuenzle, H.P.

    1983-02-01

    The role of the Bargmann group (11-dimensional extended Galilei group) in non relativistic gravitation theory is investigated. The generalized Newtonian gravitation theory (Newton-Cartan theory) achieves the status of a gauge theory about as much as General Relativity and couples minimally to a complex scalar field leading to a fourdimensionally covariant Schroedinger equation. Matter current and stress-energy tensor follow correctly from the Lagrangian. This theory on curved Newtonian space-time is also shown to be a limit of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon theory

  3. Minimal gravitational coupling in the Newtonian theory and the covariant Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, C.; Kuenzle, H.P.

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Bargmann group (11-dimensional extended Galilei group) in nonrelativistic gravitation theory is investigated. The generalized Newtonian gravitation theory (Newton-Cartan theory) achieves the status of a gauge theory about as much as general relativity and couples minimally to a complex scalar field leading to a four-dimensionally covariant Schroedinger equation. Matter current and stress-energy tensor follow correctly from the Lagrangian. This theory on curved Newtonian space-time is also shown to be a limit of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon theory. (author)

  4. Twistor theory and the Einstein equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    R. Penrose has argued that the goal of twistor theory with regard to the vacuum Einstein equations ought to consist of some kind of unification of twistor-theoretic description of anti-self-dual (a.s.d.) and self-dual (s.d.) space-times. S.d. space-times currently possess a description only in terms of dual twistor space, however, rather than twistor space. In this paper, suggestions due to Penrose for providing a purely twistor space description of s.d. space-times are investigated. It is shown how the points of certain s.d. space-times define mappings on twistor space and the geometry of these mappings is studied. The families of mappings for two particular s.d. space-times are presented explicitly. (author)

  5. Gravitational torque frequency analysis for the Einstein elevator experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashenberg, Joshua [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lorenzini, Enrico C [University of Padova, Padua (Italy)

    2007-09-07

    Testing the principle of equivalence with a differential acceleration detector that spins while free falling requires a reliable extraction of a very small violation signal from the noise in the output signal frequency spectrum. The experiment is designed such that the violation signal is modulated by the spin of the test bodies. The possible violation signal is mixed with the intrinsic white noise of the detector and the colored noise associated with the modulation of gravitational perturbations, through the spin, and inertial-motion-related noise. In order to avoid false alarms the frequencies of the gravitational disturbances and the violation signal must be separate. This paper presents a model for the perturbative gravitational torque that affects the measurement. The torque is expanded in an asymptotic series to the fourth order and then expressed as a frequency spectrum. A spectral analysis shows the design conditions for frequency separation between the perturbing torque and the violation signal.

  6. Time, gravitation, and the Universe: the evolution of relativistic theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitrow, G J

    1974-12-31

    An account is given of the historical development or the theory of relativity, particularly from Newton' s mechanics and Maxwell's electrodynamics, and with reference to the importance of the work of 19th century mathematicians such as Riemann, Klein and Neumann, leading to the work of Poincare, Minkowski, Lorentz and Einstein. The Michelson-Morley, Kennedy-Thorndike and IvesStillwell experiments are discussed, the use of the radar concept in relativity, and the discovery in 1965 of the universal black-body microwave radiation. Gravitation and cosmological problems are considered in historical review. (UK)

  7. Hyperunified field theory and gravitational gauge-geometry duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2018-01-01

    A hyperunified field theory is built in detail based on the postulates of gauge invariance and coordinate independence along with the conformal scaling symmetry. All elementary particles are merged into a single hyper-spinor field and all basic forces are unified into a fundamental interaction governed by the hyper-spin gauge symmetry SP(1, D h - 1). The dimension D h of hyper-spacetime is conjectured to have a physical origin in correlation with the hyper-spin charge of elementary particles. The hyper-gravifield fiber bundle structure of biframe hyper-spacetime appears naturally with the globally flat Minkowski hyper-spacetime as a base spacetime and the locally flat hyper-gravifield spacetime as a fiber that is viewed as a dynamically emerged hyper-spacetime characterized by a non-commutative geometry. The gravitational origin of gauge symmetry is revealed with the hyper-gravifield that plays an essential role as a Goldstone-like field. The gauge-gravity and gravity-geometry correspondences bring about the gravitational gauge-geometry duality. The basic properties of hyperunified field theory and the issue on the fundamental scale are analyzed within the framework of quantum field theory, which allows us to describe the laws of nature in deriving the gauge gravitational equation with the conserved current and the geometric gravitational equations of Einstein-like type and beyond. (orig.)

  8. Hyperunified field theory and gravitational gauge-geometry duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue-Liang [International Centre for Theoretical Physics Asia-Pacific (ICTP-AP), Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing (China)

    2018-01-15

    A hyperunified field theory is built in detail based on the postulates of gauge invariance and coordinate independence along with the conformal scaling symmetry. All elementary particles are merged into a single hyper-spinor field and all basic forces are unified into a fundamental interaction governed by the hyper-spin gauge symmetry SP(1, D{sub h} - 1). The dimension D{sub h} of hyper-spacetime is conjectured to have a physical origin in correlation with the hyper-spin charge of elementary particles. The hyper-gravifield fiber bundle structure of biframe hyper-spacetime appears naturally with the globally flat Minkowski hyper-spacetime as a base spacetime and the locally flat hyper-gravifield spacetime as a fiber that is viewed as a dynamically emerged hyper-spacetime characterized by a non-commutative geometry. The gravitational origin of gauge symmetry is revealed with the hyper-gravifield that plays an essential role as a Goldstone-like field. The gauge-gravity and gravity-geometry correspondences bring about the gravitational gauge-geometry duality. The basic properties of hyperunified field theory and the issue on the fundamental scale are analyzed within the framework of quantum field theory, which allows us to describe the laws of nature in deriving the gauge gravitational equation with the conserved current and the geometric gravitational equations of Einstein-like type and beyond. (orig.)

  9. Hyperunified field theory and gravitational gauge-geometry duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    2018-01-01

    A hyperunified field theory is built in detail based on the postulates of gauge invariance and coordinate independence along with the conformal scaling symmetry. All elementary particles are merged into a single hyper-spinor field and all basic forces are unified into a fundamental interaction governed by the hyper-spin gauge symmetry SP(1, D_h-1). The dimension D_h of hyper-spacetime is conjectured to have a physical origin in correlation with the hyper-spin charge of elementary particles. The hyper-gravifield fiber bundle structure of biframe hyper-spacetime appears naturally with the globally flat Minkowski hyper-spacetime as a base spacetime and the locally flat hyper-gravifield spacetime as a fiber that is viewed as a dynamically emerged hyper-spacetime characterized by a non-commutative geometry. The gravitational origin of gauge symmetry is revealed with the hyper-gravifield that plays an essential role as a Goldstone-like field. The gauge-gravity and gravity-geometry correspondences bring about the gravitational gauge-geometry duality. The basic properties of hyperunified field theory and the issue on the fundamental scale are analyzed within the framework of quantum field theory, which allows us to describe the laws of nature in deriving the gauge gravitational equation with the conserved current and the geometric gravitational equations of Einstein-like type and beyond.

  10. On the relativity and equivalence principles in the gauge theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, D.; Sardanashvily, G.

    1981-01-01

    One sees the basic ideas of the gauge gravitation theory still not generally accepted in spite of more than twenty years of its history. The chief reason lies in the fact that the gauge character of gravity is connected with the whole complex of problems of Einstein General Relativity: about the reference system definition, on the (3+1)-splitting, on the presence (or absence) of symmetries in GR, on the necessity (or triviality) of general covariance, on the meaning of equivalence principle, which led Einstein from Special to General Relativity |1|. The real actuality of this complex of interconnected problems is demonstrated by the well-known work of V. Fock, who saw no symmetries in General Relativity, declared the unnecessary Equivalence principle and proposed even to substitute the designation ''chronogeometry'' instead of ''general relativity'' (see also P. Havas). Developing this line, H. Bondi quite recently also expressed doubts about the ''relativity'' in Einstein theory of gravitation. All proposed versions of the gauge gravitation theory must clarify the discrepancy between Einstein gravitational field being a pseudo-Riemannian metric field, and the gauge potentials representing connections on some fiber bundles and there exists no group, whose gauging would lead to the purely gravitational part of connection (Christoffel symbols or Fock-Ivenenko-Weyl spinorial coefficients). (author)

  11. Quantum field theory in gravitational background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narnhofer, H.

    1986-01-01

    The author suggests ignoring the influence of the quantum field on the gravitation as the first step to combine quantum field theory and gravitation theory, but to consider the gravitational field as fixed and thus study quantum field theory on a manifold. This subject evoked interest when thermal radiation of a black hole was predicted. The author concentrates on the free quantum field and can split the problem into two steps: the Weyl-algebra of the free field and the Wightman functional on the tangent space

  12. Introduction to the theory of gravitational radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damour, T.

    1987-01-01

    In these lectures our attention is restricted to the analytical investigations of the theory of gravitational radiation. There exist already several reviews concerning this topic and, in particular, a recent detailed review, by Thorne, where gravitational radiation theory is put in a form suitable for astrophysical studies. This is why the scope of these lectures is limited to supplement the existing reviews in two ways. First, both the basic concepts of gravitational radiation theory, and the precise conditions, as well as the limitations, of validity of some of the well-known results in this theory are presented. Indeed, as these results have been, or will be, applied in astrophysics, it is important to have clearly in mind both what they mean, and when they can be legitimately applied. Second, a progress report on some of the ongoing analytical research in gravitational radiation theory is presented. 144 references

  13. Cylindrically symmetric solutions of a scalar--tensor theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, T.

    1975-01-01

    The cylindrically symmetric solutions for the Einstein--Rosen metric of a scalar--tensor theory proposed by Dunn have been obtained. A method has been given by which one can obtain, under certain conditions, solutions of this scalar--tensor theory from known solutions of the empty space field equations of Einstein's theory of gravitation. It is also found that one of the solutions of the scalar--tensor theory is nonsingular in the sense of Bonnor. Further some special solutions are obtained which reduce to the well-known solution of Levi-Civita and a time dependent solution obtained by Misra and Radhakrishna

  14. Emergent cosmos in Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, H.; Heydarzade, Y.; Darabi, F.; Hashemi, M.

    2018-01-01

    Based on Padmanabhan's proposal, the accelerated expansion of the universe can be driven by the difference between the surface and bulk degrees of freedom in a region of space, described by the relation dV/dt = N sur - N bulk where N sur and N bulk = -N em + N de are the degrees of freedom assigned to the surface area and the matter-energy content inside the bulk such that the indices ''em'' and ''de'' represent energy-momentum and dark energy, respectively. In the present work, the dynamical effect of the Weyssenhoff perfect fluid with intrinsic spin and its corresponding spin degrees of freedom in the framework of Einstein-Cartan (EC) theory are investigated. Based on the modification of Friedmann equations due to the spin-spin interactions, a correction term for Padmanabhan's original relation dV/dt = N sur + N em - N de including the number of degrees of freedom related with these spin interactions is obtained through the modification in N bulk term as N bulk = -N em + N spin + N de leading to dV/dt = N sur + N em - N spin - N de in which N spin is the corresponding degrees of freedom related with the intrinsic spin of the matter content of the universe. Moreover, the validity of the unified first law and the generalized second law of thermodynamics for the Einstein-Cartan cosmos are investigated. Finally, by considering the covariant entropy conjecture and the bound resulting from the emergent scenario, a total entropy bound is obtained. Using this bound, it is shown that the for the universe as an expanding thermodynamical system, the total effective Komar energy never exceeds the square of the expansion rate with a factor of (3)/(4π). (orig.)

  15. Nonlinear Lorentz-invariant theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nonlinear Lorentz-invariant theory of gravitation and a Lorentz-invariant Hamiltonian for a particle with spin in the gravitational field are developed. The equations of motions are studied. The theory is applied to the three well known tests of General Relativity. In the special case of the red shift of spectral lines and of the deflection of light, the theory gives the same results as the General Theory of Relativity, whereas in the case of the perihelion of the Mercury, the theory gives 40,3'', in good agreement with experimental results of Dicke. (author)

  16. Einstein's enigma or black holes in my bubble bath

    CERN Document Server

    Vishveshwara, C V

    2006-01-01

    A funny rendition of the story of gravitation theory from the early historic origins to the developments in astrophysics, focusing on Albert Einstein''s theory of general relativity and black-hole physics.

  17. Analog quantum simulation of gravitational waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, Tupac; Sabin, Carlos; Fuentes, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    We show how to vary the physical properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in order to mimic an effective gravitational-wave spacetime. In particular, we focus in the simulation of the recently discovered creation of particles by a real spacetime distortion in box-type traps. We show that, by modulating the speed of sound in the BEC, the phonons experience the effects of a simulated spacetime ripple with experimentally amenable parameters. These results will inform the experimental programme of gravitational wave astronomy with cold atoms. (orig.)

  18. Analog quantum simulation of gravitational waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, Tupac; Sabin, Carlos; Fuentes, Ivette [University of Nottingham, School of Mathematical Sciences, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-04

    We show how to vary the physical properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in order to mimic an effective gravitational-wave spacetime. In particular, we focus in the simulation of the recently discovered creation of particles by a real spacetime distortion in box-type traps. We show that, by modulating the speed of sound in the BEC, the phonons experience the effects of a simulated spacetime ripple with experimentally amenable parameters. These results will inform the experimental programme of gravitational wave astronomy with cold atoms. (orig.)

  19. A variational principle giving gravitational 'superpotentials', the affine connection, Riemann tensor, and Einstein field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachel, J.

    1977-01-01

    A first-order Lagrangian is given, from which follow the definitions of the fully covariant form of the Riemann tensor Rsub(μνkappalambda) in terms of the affine connection and metric; the definition of the affine connection in terms of the metric; the Einstein field equations; and the definition of a set of gravitational 'superpotentials' closely connected with the Komar conservation laws (Phys. Rev.; 113:934 (1959)). Substitution of the definition of the affine connection into this Lagrangian results in a second-order Lagrangian, from which follow the definition of the fully covariant Riemann tensor in terms of the metric, the Einstein equations, and the definition of the gravitational 'superpotentials'. (author)

  20. Einstein-aether theory with a Maxwell field: General formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakin, Alexander B., E-mail: Alexander.Balakin@kpfu.ru [Department of General Relativity and Gravitation, Institute of Physics, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya str. 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Lemos, José P.S., E-mail: joselemos@ist.utl.pt [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica-CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico-IST, Universidade de Lisboa-UL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    We extend the Einstein-aether theory to include the Maxwell field in a nontrivial manner by taking into account its interaction with the time-like unit vector field characterizing the aether. We also include a generic matter term. We present a model with a Lagrangian that includes cross-terms linear and quadratic in the Maxwell tensor, linear and quadratic in the covariant derivative of the aether velocity four-vector, linear in its second covariant derivative and in the Riemann tensor. We decompose these terms with respect to the irreducible parts of the covariant derivative of the aether velocity, namely, the acceleration four-vector, the shear and vorticity tensors, and the expansion scalar. Furthermore, we discuss the influence of an aether non-uniform motion on the polarization and magnetization of the matter in such an aether environment, as well as on its dielectric and magnetic properties. The total self-consistent system of equations for the electromagnetic and the gravitational fields, and the dynamic equations for the unit vector aether field are obtained. Possible applications of this system are discussed. Based on the principles of effective field theories, we display in an appendix all the terms up to fourth order in derivative operators that can be considered in a Lagrangian that includes the metric, the electromagnetic and the aether fields.

  1. Selfinteraction force in a theory of gravitation with higher derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankiewicz, C.

    1981-01-01

    Approximate equations of motion are derived from gravitational field equations with higher derivatives. The approximation takes into account the selfinteraction force. The selfinteraction force coincides with the analogous force resulting from the Einstein field equations. (author)

  2. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.; Adams, P.J.; Hsieh, S.; Tsiang, E.

    1977-01-01

    By associating the mathematical operation of scale transformation with the physics of using different dynamical systems to measure space-time distances, we formulate a scale-covariant theory of gravitation. Corresponding to each dynamical system of units is a gauge condition which determines the otherwise arbitrary gauge function. For gravitational units, the gauge condition is chosen so that the standard Einstein equations are recovered. Assuming the atomic units, derivable from atomic dynamics, to be distinct from the gravitational units, a different gauge condition must be imposed. It is suggested that Dirac's large-number hypothesis be used for the determination of this condition so that gravitational phenomena can be described in atomic units. The result allows a natural interpretation of the possible variation of the gravitational constant without compromising the validity of general relativity. A geometrical interpretation of the scale-covariant theory is possible if the covariant tensors in Riemannian space are replaced by cocovariant cotensors in an integrable Weyl space. A scale-invariant action principle is constructed from the metrical potentials of the integrable Weyl space. Application of the dynamical equations in atomic units to cosmology yields a family of homogeneous solutions characterized by R approx. t for large cosmological times. Equations of motion in atomic units are solved for spherically symmetric gravitational fields. Expressions for perihelion shift and light deflection are derived. They do not differ from the predictions of general relativity except for secular variations, having the age of the universe as a time scale. Similar variations of periods and radii for planetary orbits are also derived

  3. Gauging the twisted Poincare symmetry as a noncommutative theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Tureanu, A.; Oksanen, M.; Zet, G.

    2009-01-01

    Einstein's theory of general relativity was formulated as a gauge theory of Lorentz symmetry by Utiyama in 1956, while the Einstein-Cartan gravitational theory was formulated by Kibble in 1961 as the gauge theory of Poincare transformations. In this framework, we propose a formulation of the gravitational theory on canonical noncommutative space-time by covariantly gauging the twisted Poincare symmetry, in order to fulfil the requirement of covariance under the general coordinate transformations, an essential ingredient of the theory of general relativity. It appears that the twisted Poincare symmetry cannot be gauged by generalizing the Abelian twist to a covariant non-Abelian twist, nor by introducing a more general covariant twist element. The advantages of such a formulation as well as the related problems are discussed and possible ways out are outlined.

  4. Emergent cosmos in Einstein-Cartan theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, H. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heydarzade, Y.; Darabi, F. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, M. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    Based on Padmanabhan's proposal, the accelerated expansion of the universe can be driven by the difference between the surface and bulk degrees of freedom in a region of space, described by the relation dV/dt = N{sub sur} - N{sub bulk} where N{sub sur} and N{sub bulk} = -N{sub em} + N{sub de} are the degrees of freedom assigned to the surface area and the matter-energy content inside the bulk such that the indices ''em'' and ''de'' represent energy-momentum and dark energy, respectively. In the present work, the dynamical effect of the Weyssenhoff perfect fluid with intrinsic spin and its corresponding spin degrees of freedom in the framework of Einstein-Cartan (EC) theory are investigated. Based on the modification of Friedmann equations due to the spin-spin interactions, a correction term for Padmanabhan's original relation dV/dt = N{sub sur} + N{sub em} - N{sub de} including the number of degrees of freedom related with these spin interactions is obtained through the modification in N{sub bulk} term as N{sub bulk} = -N{sub em} + N{sub spin} + N{sub de} leading to dV/dt = N{sub sur} + N{sub em} - N{sub spin} - N{sub de} in which N{sub spin} is the corresponding degrees of freedom related with the intrinsic spin of the matter content of the universe. Moreover, the validity of the unified first law and the generalized second law of thermodynamics for the Einstein-Cartan cosmos are investigated. Finally, by considering the covariant entropy conjecture and the bound resulting from the emergent scenario, a total entropy bound is obtained. Using this bound, it is shown that the for the universe as an expanding thermodynamical system, the total effective Komar energy never exceeds the square of the expansion rate with a factor of (3)/(4π). (orig.)

  5. Through an understanding of thermoluminescence phenomena from Einstein radiation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto H, B; Vazquez C, G A; Azorin, J [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work we made an outline of Einstein's radiation theory and its connection with elementary TL theory. We did not pretend in this paper to discuss advanced TL theories in these terms. Our main goal was to explore the simplest relationships among radiation theory, such as, transition probabilities and mean time-lives with kinetic parameters of the Randall-Wilkins model. (Author)

  6. Through an understanding of thermoluminescence phenomena from Einstein radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto H, B.; Vazquez C, G.A.; Azorin, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we made an outline of Einstein's radiation theory and its connection with elementary TL theory. We did not pretend in this paper to discuss advanced TL theories in these terms. Our main goal was to explore the simplest relationships among radiation theory, such as, transition probabilities and mean time-lives with kinetic parameters of the Randall-Wilkins model. (Author)

  7. Gauge theory and gravitation: an approach to a fiber bundle formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, L.A. de.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis is composed of two different parts. A formal complete and rigorous mathematical part-of topics of differential manilfolds, exterior calculus, riemannian geometry, principal fiber bundle (p.f.) with connections and linear connections and a second part of application of this mathematical formalism concerning physical theories, particularly the Maxwell eletromagnetism (EM), gauge theory of Yang-Mills (Y-M), the GRT, and the gravitation theory of Einstein-Cartan. (E.C.) [pt

  8. Fundamentals of the relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    An extended exposition of the relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) proposed by Logunov, Vlasov, and Mestvirishvili is presented. The RTG was constructed uniquely on the basis of the relativity principle and the geometrization principle by regarding the gravitational field as a physical field in the spirit of Faraday and Maxwell possessing energy, momentum, and spins 2 and 0. In the theory, conservation laws for the energy, momentum, and angular momentum for the matter and gravitational field taken together are strictly satisfied. The theory explains all the existing gravitational experiments. When the evolution of the universe is analyzed, the theory leads to the conclusion that the universe is infinite and flat, and it is predicted to contain a large amount of hidden mass. This missing mass exceeds by almost 40 times the amount of matter currently observed in the universe. The RTG predicts that gravitational collapse, which for a comoving observer occurs after a finite proper time, does not lead to infinite compression of matter but is halted at a certain finite density of the collapsing body. Therefore, according to the RTG there cannot be any objects in nature in which the gravitational contraction of matter to infinite density occurs, i.e., there are no black holes

  9. Gravitational waves: Einstein latest victory; Ondas gravitacionales: la ultima victoria de Einstein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabadell, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The world of theoretical physics is once again celebrating success: the LIGO observatory in the United States has confirmed the direct detection of general relativity: gravitational waves. The almost imperceptible distortions of space-time had been generated by the fusion of black holes of 30 times the mass of the Sun located at a distance of some 1,300 million light years from us. (Author)

  10. Equations for the gravitational field and local conserved quantities in the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoff, S.

    1979-07-01

    By utilization of the method of Lagrangians with covariant derivatives (MLCD) the different energy-momentum tensors (canonical, generalized canonical, symmetrical) and the relations between them are considered. On this basis, Einstein's theory of gravitation is studied as a field theory with a Lagrangian density of the type Lsub(g)=√-g.Lsub(g)(gsub(ij),Rsub(A)), (Rsub(A)=Rsub(ijkl)). It is shown that the energy-momentum tensors of the gravitational field can be defined for this theory. The symmetrical energy-momentum tensor of the gravitational field sub(gs)Tsub(k)sup(i), which in the general case is not a local conserved quantity (sub(gs)Tsub(k)sup(i)sub(;i) unequal 0) (in contrast to the material fields satisfying condition sub(Ms)Tsub(k)sup(i)sub(;i) = 0), is equal to zero for the gravitational field in vacuum (cosmological constant Λ = 0). Equations of the gravitational field of a new type are suggested, leading to equations of motion (sub(Ms)Tsub(k)sup(i) + sub(gs)Tsub(k)sup(i))sub(;i) = 0. The equations corresponding to the Lagrangian density Lsub(g)=(√-g/kappasub(o)) (R - lambda approximately), lambda approximately = const., are considered. The equations of Einstein Rsub(ij) = 0 are obtained in the case of gravitational field in vacuum. Some particular cases are examined as an illustration to material fields and the corresponding gravitational equations. (author)

  11. The effective action in Einstein-Maxwell theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Davila, Jose Manuel; Schubert, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Considerable work has been done on the one-loop effective action in combined electromagnetic and gravitational fields, particularly as a tool for determining the properties of light propagation in curved space. After a short review of previous work, I present some recent results obtained using the worldline formalism. In particular, I will discuss various ways of generalizing the QED Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian to the Einstein-Maxwell case.

  12. The role of Einstein's general relativity theory in today's physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicak, J.

    The relationships are discussed of the general relativity theory to other fields of today's physics. Recent results are reported of studies into gravitational radiation, relativistic astrophysics, cosmology and the quantum theory. (Z.M.)

  13. An application of information theory to stochastic classical gravitational fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J.; Angulo, J. C.; Angulo, J. M.

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study lies on the incorporation of the concepts developed in the Information Theory (entropy, complexity, etc.) with the aim of quantifying the variation of the uncertainty associated with a stochastic physical system resident in a spatiotemporal region. As an example of application, a relativistic classical gravitational field has been considered, with a stochastic behavior resulting from the effect induced by one or several external perturbation sources. One of the key concepts of the study is the covariance kernel between two points within the chosen region. Using this concept and the appropriate criteria, a methodology is proposed to evaluate the change of uncertainty at a given spatiotemporal point, based on available information and efficiently applying the diverse methods that Information Theory provides. For illustration, a stochastic version of the Einstein equation with an added Gaussian Langevin term is analyzed.

  14. Unified Maxwell-Einstein and Yang-Mills-Einstein supergravity theories in five dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenaydin, Murat; Zagermann, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Unified N = 2 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories (MESGTs) are supergravity theories in which all the vector fields, including the graviphoton, transform in an irreducible representation of a simple global symmetry group of the Lagrangian. As was established long time ago, in five dimensions there exist only four unified Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories whose target manifolds are symmetric spaces. These theories are defined by the four simple euclidean Jordan algebras of degree three. In this paper, we show that, in addition to these four unified MESGTs with symmetric target spaces, there exist three infinite families of unified MESGTs as well as another exceptional one. These novel unified MESGTs are defined by non-compact (minkowskian) Jordan algebras, and their target spaces are in general neither symmetric nor homogeneous. The members of one of these three infinite families can be gauged in such a way as to obtain an infinite family of unified N = 2 Yang-Mills-Einstein supergravity theories, in which all vector fields transform in the adjoint representation of a simple gauge group of the type SU(N,1). The corresponding gaugings in the other two infinite families lead to Yang-Mills-Einstein supergravity theories coupled to tensor multiplets. (author)

  15. Cosmological singularities and bounce in Cartan-Einstein theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucat, Stefano; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2017-10-01

    We consider a generalized Einstein-Cartan theory, in which we add the unique covariant dimension four operators to general relativity that couples fermionic spin current to the torsion tensor (with an arbitrary strength). Since torsion is local and non-dynamical, when integrated out it yields an effective four-fermion interaction of the gravitational strength. We show how to renormalize the theory, in the one-loop perturbative expansion in generally curved space-times, obtaining the first order correction to the 2PI effective action in Schwinger-Keldysh (in-in) formalism. We then apply the renormalized theory to study the dynamics of a collapsing universe that begins in a thermal state and find that—instead of a big crunch singularity—the Universe with torsion undergoes a bounce. We solve the dynamical equations (a) classically (without particle production); (b) including the production of fermions in a fixed background in the Hartree-Fock approximation and (c) including the quantum backreaction of fermions onto the background space-time. In the first and last cases the Universe undergoes a bounce. The production of fermions due to the coupling to a contracting homogeneous background speeds up the bounce, implying that the quantum contributions from fermions is negative, presumably because fermion production contributes negatively to the energy-momentum tensor. When compared with former works on the subject, our treatment is fully microscopic (namely, we treat fermions by solving the corresponding Dirac equations) and quantum (in the sense that we include fermionic loop contributions).

  16. Cosmological singularities and bounce in Cartan-Einstein theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucat, Stefano; Prokopec, Tomislav, E-mail: s.lucat@students.uu.nl, E-mail: t.prokopec@uu.nl [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Spinoza Institute and EMME$\\Phi$, Utrecht University, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-10-01

    We consider a generalized Einstein-Cartan theory, in which we add the unique covariant dimension four operators to general relativity that couples fermionic spin current to the torsion tensor (with an arbitrary strength). Since torsion is local and non-dynamical, when integrated out it yields an effective four-fermion interaction of the gravitational strength. We show how to renormalize the theory, in the one-loop perturbative expansion in generally curved space-times, obtaining the first order correction to the 2PI effective action in Schwinger-Keldysh ( in-in ) formalism. We then apply the renormalized theory to study the dynamics of a collapsing universe that begins in a thermal state and find that—instead of a big crunch singularity—the Universe with torsion undergoes a bounce . We solve the dynamical equations (a) classically (without particle production); (b) including the production of fermions in a fixed background in the Hartree-Fock approximation and (c) including the quantum backreaction of fermions onto the background space-time. In the first and last cases the Universe undergoes a bounce. The production of fermions due to the coupling to a contracting homogeneous background speeds up the bounce, implying that the quantum contributions from fermions is negative, presumably because fermion production contributes negatively to the energy-momentum tensor. When compared with former works on the subject, our treatment is fully microscopic (namely, we treat fermions by solving the corresponding Dirac equations) and quantum (in the sense that we include fermionic loop contributions).

  17. Einstein's pathway to the special theory of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2015-01-01

    This book pieces together the jigsaw puzzle of Einstein's journey to discovering the special theory of relativity. Between 1902 and 1905, Einstein sat in the Patent Office and may have made calculations on old pieces of paper that were once patent drafts. One can imagine Einstein trying to hide from his boss, writing notes on small sheets of paper, and, according to reports, seeing to it that the small sheets of paper on which he was writing would vanish into his desk-drawer as soon as he heard footsteps approaching his door. He probably discarded many pieces of papers and calculations and flu

  18. Gravitational perturbation theory and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, R A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Astrophysik

    1975-01-01

    This article presents methods and results for a gravitational perturbation theory which treats massless fields as linearized perturbations of an arbitrary gravitational vacuum background spacetime. The formalism is outlined for perturbations of type (22) spacetimes. As an application, high-frequency radiation emitted by particles moving approximately on relativistic circular geodesic orbits is computed. More precisely, the test particle assumption is made; throughout it is therefore assumed that the reaction of the radiation on the particle motion is negligible. In particular, these orbits are studied in the gravitational field of a spherically symmetric (Schwarzschild-) black hole as well as of a rotating (Kerr-) black hole. In this model, the outgoing radiation is highly focussed and of much higher fequency than the orbital frequency, i.e. one is dealing with 'gravitational synchrotron radiation'.

  19. Ghost properties of generalized theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.B.; Moffat, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    We investigate theories of gravitation, in which spacetime is non-Riemannian and the metric g/sub munu/ is nonsymmetric, for ghosts and tachyons, using a spin-projection operator formalism. Ghosts are removed not by gauge invariance but by a Lagrange multiplier W/sub μ/, which occurs due to the breaking of projective invariance in the theory. Unified theories based on a Lagrangian containing a term lambdag/sup munu/g/sub / are proved to contain ghosts or tachyons

  20. Einstein and the Special Theory of Relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    picture books for children. Supurna Sinha ... no contact with other contemporary great thinkers. This isolation ... do not remember if I knew of it at all when I wrote my first paper .... words of R S Shankland: "I asked Professor Einstein how long.

  1. Effective equivalence of the Einstein-Cartan and Einstein theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nester, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    I prove that, for any choice of minimally coupled source field Lagrangian for the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity, there exists a related minimally coupled source field Lagrangian for the Einstein theory which produces the same field equations for the metric and source field. By using a standard first-order form for source Lagrangians, the converse is also demonstrated. This establishes a one-to-one correspondence between source Lagrangians for the two theories which clearly reveals their similarities and their differences. Because of this ''equivalence,'' one can view either theory, in terms of the other, as minimal coupling for a related Minkowski source Lagrangian or as nonminimal coupling for the same Minkowski source Lagrangian. Consequently the two theories are, in this sense, indistinguishable. Some other implications of this ''equivalence'' are discussed

  2. Theory of gravitation with an alternative to black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, D.B.; Johnson, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A gauge theory of gravitation is proposed in which the Lagrangian is constructed from vierbein-based invariants rather than local affine connections. The vierbein invariants are more basic than the connection-based invariants: involving coefficients of lower-order differential forms, providing a reasonable field energy-momentum tensor, and not requiring arbitrary introduction of quantities into the gauge-theory formalism in the special case of scalar wave functions. Covariance of the equations notwithstanding, the speed of light measured with atomic clocks and rigid rulers is hypothesized to be independent of direction in a gravitational field. This hypothesis constrains the Lagrangian for variations which give the field equations in the operationally significant class of coordinate systems whose time and spatial intervals are directly measurable with these same clocks and rulers. Out of the general family of quadratic Lagrangians permitted by this constraint, only two possible Lagrangians are selected by the standard weak-field observational tests (perihelion precession, light deflection, etc.) of the general theory of relativity. Although both of these Lagrangians give solutions which agree with the standard weak-field observational tests of the general theory of relativity, they do give different predictions in other situations: For a static spherically symmetric field, one Lagrangian gives the standard isotropic Schwarzschild metric of the Einstein general theory of relativity, while the second yields a metric of exponential form. Thus, the second predicts that a very massive body does not create a black hole, but a ''dark red hole''. The source terms for gravitational radiation differ for the two Lagrangians. A cosmology is predicted in which the expanding universe has zero curvature and involves the continuous creation of matter following a big bang

  3. Einstein, the exponential metric, and a proposed gravitational Michelson-Morley experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, H.

    1979-01-01

    An early but potentially important remark of Einstein on the exponential nature of time-dilation is discussed. Using the same argument for the length-contraction, plus two alternative kinematical assumptions, the Schwarzschild and exponential metrics are derived. A gravitational Michelson-Morley experiment with one arm directed along the vertical is proposed to test the metrics. The experiment may be considered as a laboratory test of the Schwarzschild field and possibly a test of the black-hole interpretation of collapsed matter

  4. Einstein-Ehrenfest's radiation theory and Compton-Debye's kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, A.V.; Franca, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    Einstein and Ehrenfest's radiation theory is modified in order to introduce the efeects of random zero-point fields, characteristics of classical stochastic electrodynamics. As a result, the Compton and Debye's kinematic relations are obtained within the realm of a completely undulatory theory, that is, without having to consider the corpuscular character of the photon. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  5. Theory of antennas for gravitational radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Narihara, Kazumichi; Fujimoto, Masakatsu.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of antennas for gravitational radiation is presented. On the basis of the eigenmode system and the structure symmetry, the emission and reception characteristics and the directivity pattern of antennas are treated. The antenna thermal noise is discussed in connection with the coupling constant of vibration sensors and with the effect of cold-damping. (auth.)

  6. Gravitational generation of mass in soliton theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhevnikov, I.R.; Rybakov, Yu.P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that in the framework of a simple scalar field model, that admits soliton solutions, with gravitational field interactions being specially included, one succeeds in ensuring for a scalar field a correct spacial asymptotics that depends on the system mass. Theory, the quantum relation of a corpuscular-wave dualism is fulfilled for soliton solutions in such a model

  7. A bi-metric theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, N.

    1975-01-01

    The bi-metric theory of gravitation proposed previously is simplified in that the auxiliary conditions are discarded, the two metric tensors being tied together only by means of the boundary conditions. Some of the properties of the field of a particle are investigated; there is no black hole, and it appears that no gravitational collapse can take place. Although the proposed theory and general relativity are at present observationally indistinguishable, some differences are pointed out which may some day be susceptible of observation. An alternative bi-metric theory is considered which gives for the precession of the perihelion 5/6 of the value given by general relativity; it seems less satisfactory than the present theory from the aesthetic point of view. (author)

  8. Through an understanding of thermoluminescence phenomena from Einstein radiation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto H, B.; Vazquez C, G.A.; Azorin, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work we made an outline of Einstein's radiation theory and its connection with elementary TL theory. We did not pretend in this paper to discuss advanced TL theories in these terms. Our main goal was to explore the simplest relationships among radiation theory, such as, transition probabilities and mean time-lives with kinetic parameters of the Randall-Wilkins model. (Author)

  9. Gravitational Collapse of Charged Matter in Einstein-DeSitter Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, K.; Krishnan, V.

    1997-11-01

    Gravitational collapse of charged matter in expanding universe is studied. We consider a quasi neutral electron-ion-massive grain plasma in which all the three species are expanding at the same rate i.e., ni ∝ 1/R^3 [ ni is the number density of the i^ th species and R is the scale factor ]. In Einstein-DeSitter universe the scale factor R goes as ~ t^2/3. The electrons and ions follow Boltzmann's relation. The stability of this equilibrium is studied on Jeans times scale. Depending on the ratio a = fracq d^2Gmd^2 the growth of gravitational collapse is further moderated from t^2/3 growth. For a=1, the instability is completely quenched. In curvature and radiation dominated universe, there is no additional effect due to finite charge of the matter.

  10. Gravitational lensing in metric theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereno, Mauro

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational lensing in metric theories of gravity is discussed. I introduce a generalized approximate metric element, inclusive of both post-post-Newtonian contributions and a gravitomagnetic field. Following Fermat's principle and standard hypotheses, I derive the time delay function and deflection angle caused by an isolated mass distribution. Several astrophysical systems are considered. In most of the cases, the gravitomagnetic correction offers the best perspectives for an observational detection. Actual measurements distinguish only marginally different metric theories from each other

  11. Explanation of the anomalous secular increase of the moon orbit eccentricity by the new theory of gravitation (NTG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziefle, Reiner Georg

    2013-03-01

    Present day gravitational physics experiences a huge success in obtaining better and better experimental results. In some cases, the observations do not fit with the present knowledge of established physics. Phenomena, like the increase of the Astronomical Unit by 7 m per century or the so-called anomalous secular increase of the eccentricity of the lunar orbit by about 9 × 10^-12 per year, which can neither be explained by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, nor by the Newtonian Theory of Gravitation, can be explained by the New Theory of Gravitation

  12. Total Energy of Charged Black Holes in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Korunur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the energy content (including matter and fields of the Møller energy-momentum complex in the framework of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion (EMDA theory using teleparallel gravity. We perform the required calculations for some specific charged black hole models, and we find that total energy distributions associated with asymptotically flat black holes are proportional to the gravitational mass. On the other hand, we see that the energy of the asymptotically nonflat black holes diverge in a limiting case.

  13. Cosmological tests of a scale covariant theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Friedmann models with #betta# = 0 are subjected to several optical and radio tests within the standard and scale covariant theories of gravitation. Within standard cosmology, both interferometric and scintillation data are interpreted in terms of selection effects and evolution. Within the context of scale covariant cosmology are derived: (1) the full solution to Einstein's gravitational equations in atomic units for a matter dominated universe, (2) the study of the magnitude vs. redshift relation for elliptical galaxies, (3) the derivation of the evolutionary parameter used in (2), (4) the isophotal angular diameter vs. redshift relation, (5) the metric angular diameter vs. redshift relation, (6) the N(m) vs. magnitude relation for QSO's and their m vs z relation, and finally (7) the integrated and differential expressions for the number count vs. radio flux test. The results, both in graphical and tabular form, are presented for four gauges (i.e. parametrized relations between atomic and gravitational units). No contradiction between the new theory and the data is found with any of the tests studied. For some gauges, which are suggested by a recent analysis of the time variation of the Moon's period which is discussed in the text in terms of the new theory, the effect of the deceleration parameter on cosmological predictions is enhanced over standard cosmology and it is possible to say that the data are more easily reconciled with an open universe. Within the same gauge, the main features of both the N(m) vs. m and m-z test are accounted for by the same simple evolutionary parametrization whereas different evolutionary rates were indicated by interpretation within standard cosmology. The same consistency, lacking in standard cosmology on this level of analysis, is achieved for the integrated and differential number count - radio flux tests within the same gauge

  14. Notes on gauge theory and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    In order to investigate whether Einstein's general relativity theory (GRT) fits into the general scheme of a gauge theory, first the concept of a (classical) gauge theory is outlined in an introductionary spacetime approach. Having thus fixed the notation and the main properties of gauge fields, GRT is examined to find out what the gauge potentials and the corresponding gauge group might be. In this way the possibility of interpreting GRT as a gauge theory of the 4-dimensional translation group T(4) = (R 4 , +), and where the gauge potentials are incorporated in a T(4)-invariant way via orthonormal anholonomic basis 1-forms is considered. To include also the spin aspect a natural extension of GRT is given by gauging also the Lorentz group, whereby a Riemann-Cartan spacetime (U 4 -spacetime) comes into play. (Auth.)

  15. A background-dependent approach to the theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldoni, R.

    1976-01-01

    Using the covariant formulation of Newton's gravitational equation as derived previously by the present author (Goldoni, Gen. Relativ. Gravitation; 7:731 (1976)) as a starting point, relativistic gravitational equations are found which are supposed to hold in any conceivable universe, describe a purely geometrical theory of gravitation and explicitly incorporate Mach's principle. (U.K.)

  16. Lagrange multipliers and gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, F.D.

    1977-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier variational method is extended to nonlinear Lagrangians in a Riemann space, where it is shown explicitly for the quadratic Lagrangians that, as expected, this approach is equivalent to the Hilbert variational method. It is not, in general, equivalent to the Palatini variational method. The nonvanishing Lagrange multipliers for the quadratic Lagrangians are explicitly obtained in covariant form. A similiar analysis is then carried out in a Riemann--Cartan torsional metric space for the specific Lagrangians g/sup 1/2/R tilde and g/sup 1/2/R/sub uv/tilde R/sup uv/tilde. The possible relevance of the R/sub uv/R/sup u anti v/ invariant to an action-principle formulation of the Rainich--Misner--Wheeler (RMW) already-unified theory is also discussed. It is then pointed out how a different use of the Lagrange multiplier technique in the language of the 3 + 1 canonical formalism developed by Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner (ADM) permits the recasting of the equations of motion for quadratic and general higher-order invariants into the ADM canonical formalism. In general, without this Lagrange multiplier approach, the higher-order ADM problem could not be solved. This is done explicitly for the simplest quadratic Langrangian g/sup 1/2/R 2 as an example

  17. From Newton to Einstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the history of scientific thought in terms of the theories of inertia and absolute space, relativity and gravitation. Describes how Sir Isaac Newton used the work of earlier scholars in his theories and how Albert Einstein used Newton's theories in his. (CW)

  18. Unified theory of gravitation, electromagnetism, and the Yang-Mills field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchsenius, K.

    1976-01-01

    The recent modification and extension of Einstein's nonsymmetric unified field theory for gravitation and electromagnetism is generalized to include the Yang-Mills field theory. The generalization consists in assuming that the components of the linear connection and of the fundamental tensor are not ordinary c numbers but are matrices related to some unitary symmetry. As an example we consider the SU(2) case. The theory is applied to the gauge-covariant formulation of electrically and isotopically charged spin-1/2 field theories

  19. Black hole dynamics in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Eric W.; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    We consider the properties and dynamics of black holes within a family of alternative theories of gravity, namely Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. We analyze the dynamical evolution of individual black holes as well as the merger of binary black hole systems. We do this for a wide range of parameter values for the family of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories, investigating, in the process, the stability of these black holes. We examine radiative degrees of freedom, explore the impact of the scalar field on the dynamics of merger, and compare with other scalar-tensor theories. We argue that the dilaton can largely be discounted in understanding merging binary systems and that the end states essentially interpolate between charged and uncharged, rotating black holes. For the relatively small charge values considered here, we conclude that these black hole systems will be difficult to distinguish from their analogs within General Relativity.

  20. Concerning the equivalence of Lorentz's and Einstein's theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clube, S.V.M.

    1978-01-01

    A clear distinction is drawn between derivations of the Lorentz transformations by Lorentz and Einstein. The choice as to which derivation is correct is still open to experimental test. Possible reasons are given for preferring the Lorentz derivation in terms of a material aether, and the role of covariance in physical theory is considered to be heuristic rather than fundamental. The existence of a material aether also permits one to question the fundamental role of fields in modern theory

  1. BOOK REVIEW: The Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2003-10-01

    Since the scalar-tensor theory of gravitation was proposed almost 50 years ago, it has recently become a robust alternative theory to Einstein's general relativity due to the fact that it appears to represent the lower level of a more fundamental theory and can serve both as a phenomenological theory to explain the recently observed acceleration of the universe, and to solve the cosmological constant problem. To my knowledge The Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation by Y Fujii and K Maeda is the first book to develop a modern view on this topic and is one of the latest titles in the well-presented Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics series. This book is an excellent readable introduction and up-to-date review of the subject. The discussion is well organized; after a comprehensible introduction to the Brans-Dicke theory and the important role played by conformal transformations, the authors review cosmologies with the cosmological constant and how the scalar-tensor theory can serve to explain the accelerating universe, including discussions on dark energy, quintessence and braneworld cosmologies. The book ends with a chapter devoted to quantum effects. To make easy the lectures of the book, each chapter starts with a summary of the subject to be dealt with. As the book proceeds, important issues like conformal frames and the weak equivalence principle are fully discussed. As the authors warn in the preface, the book is not encyclopedic (from my point of view the list of references is fairly short, for example, but this is a minor drawback) and the choice of included topics corresponds to the authors' interests. Nevertheless, the book seems to cover a broad range of the most essential aspects of the subject. Long and 'boring' mathematical derivations are left to appendices so as not to interrupt the flow of the reasoning, allowing the reader to focus on the physical aspects of each subject. These appendices are a valuable help in entering into the mathematical

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Gravitational Waves, Volume 1: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Eric

    2008-10-01

    discussion is helpful, as it clarifies some of the puzzling aspects of general covariance. Next the treatment becomes more sophisticated: the waves are allowed to propagate in an arbitrary background spacetime, and the energy momentum carried by the wave is identified by the second-order perturbation of the Einstein tensor. In chapter 2 the waves are given a field-theoretic foundation that is less familiar (but refreshing) to a relativist, but would appeal to a practitioner of effective field theories. In an interesting section of chapter 2, the author gives a mass to the (classical) graviton and explores the physical consequences of this proposal. In chapter 3 the author returns to the standard linearized theory and develops the multipolar expansion of the gravitational-wave field in the context of slowly-moving sources; at leading order he obtains the famous quadrupole formula. His treatment is very detailed, and it includes a complete account of symmetric-tracefree tensors and tensorial spherical harmonics. It is, however, necessarily limited to sources with negligible internal gravity. Unfortunately (and this is a familiar complaint of relativists) the author omits to warn the reader of this important limitation. In fact, the chapter opens with a statement of the virial theorem of Newtonian gravity, which may well mislead the reader to believe that the linearized theory can be applied to a system bound by gravitational forces. This misconception is confirmed when, in chapter 4, the author applies the quadrupole formula to gravitationally-bound systems such as an inspiraling compact binary, a rigidly rotating body, and a mass falling toward a black hole. This said, the presentation of these main sources of gravitational waves is otherwise irreproachable, and a wealth of useful information is presented in a clear and lucid manner. For example, the discussion of inspiraling compact binaries includes a derivation of the orbital evolution of circular and eccentric orbits

  3. Lattice Gauge Theories Have Gravitational Duals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellerman, Simeon

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we examine a certain threebrane solution of type IIB string theory whose long-wavelength dynamics are those of a supersymmetric gauge theory in 2+1 continuous and 1 discrete dimension, all of infinite extent. Low-energy processes in this background are described by dimensional deconstruction, a strict limit in which gravity decouples but the lattice spacing stays finite. Relating this limit to the near-horizon limit of our solution we obtain an exact, continuum gravitational dual of a lattice gauge theory with nonzero lattice spacing. H-flux in this translationally invariant background encodes the spatial discreteness of the gauge theory, and we relate the cutoff on allowed momenta to a giant graviton effect in the bulk

  4. Gravitational waves as a new probe of Bose–Einstein condensate Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Bhupal Dev

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There exists a class of ultralight Dark Matter (DM models which could give rise to a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC in the early universe and behave as a single coherent wave instead of individual particles in galaxies. We show that a generic BEC-DM halo intervening along the line of sight of a gravitational wave (GW signal could induce an observable change in the speed of GWs, with the effective refractive index depending only on the mass and self-interaction of the constituent DM particles and the GW frequency. Hence, we propose to use the deviation in the speed of GWs as a new probe of the BEC-DM parameter space. With a multi-messenger approach to GW astronomy and/or with extended sensitivity to lower GW frequencies, the entire BEC-DM parameter space can be effectively probed by our new method in the near future.

  5. Coupled Maxwell-pseudoscalar field from the Einstein-Mayer theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanta, M.N.; Gupta, Y.K.

    1987-01-01

    A coupled system of field equations representing interacting gravitational, electromagnetic and pseudoscalar fields is obtained using the five-dimensional formalism of Einstein and Mayer (1931-1932). Solutions of the system for concrete cases are under investigation. (author)

  6. General Relativistic Theory of the VLBI Time Delay in the Gravitational Field of Moving Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2003-01-01

    The general relativistic theory of the gravitational VLBI experiment conducted on September 8, 2002 by Fomalont and Kopeikin is explained. Equations of radio waves (light) propagating from the quasar to the observer are integrated in the time-dependent gravitational field of the solar system by making use of either retarded or advanced solutions of the Einstein field equations. This mathematical technique separates explicitly the effects associated with the propagation of gravity from those associated with light in the integral expression for the relativistic VLBI time delay of light. We prove that the relativistic correction to the Shapiro time delay, discovered by Kopeikin (ApJ, 556, L1, 2001), changes sign if one retains direction of the light propagation but replaces the retarded for the advanced solution of the Einstein equations. Hence, this correction is associated with the propagation of gravity. The VLBI observation measured its speed, and that the retarded solution is the correct one.

  7. Gravitational Goldstone fields from affine gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Romualdo; Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2000-08-01

    In order to facilitate the application of standard renormalization techniques, gravitation should be described, in the pure connection formalism, as a Yang-Mills theory of a certain spacetime group, say the Poincaré or the affine group. This embodies the translational as well as the linear connection. However, the coframe is not the standard Yang-Mills-type gauge field of the translations, since it lacks the inhomogeneous gradient term in the gauge transformations. By explicitly restoring this ``hidden'' piece within the framework of nonlinear realizations, the usual geometrical interpretation of the dynamical theory becomes possible, and in addition one can avoid the metric or coframe degeneracy which would otherwise interfere with the integrations within the path integral. We claim that nonlinear realizations provide the general mathematical scheme for the foundation of gauge theories of spacetime symmetries. When applied to construct the Yang-Mills theory of the affine group, tetrads become identified with nonlinear translational connections; the anholonomic metric no longer constitutes an independent gravitational potential, since its degrees of freedom reveal a correspondence to eliminateable Goldstone bosons. This may be an important advantage for quantization.

  8. New theory of space-time and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Logunov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the general theory of relativity is not satisfactory physical theory, since in it there are no laws of conservation for the matter and gravitational field taken together and it does not satisfy the principle of correspondence with Newton's theory. In the present paper, we construct a new theory of gravitation which possesses conservation laws, can describe all the existing gravitational experiments, satisfies the correspondence principle, and predicts a number of fundamental consequences

  9. Modifications of Einstein's theory of gravity at large distances

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years modified gravity theories have been proposed as extensions of Einstein's theory of gravity. Their main motivation is to explain the latest cosmological and astrophysical data on dark energy and dark matter. The study of general relativity at small scales has already produced important results (cf e.g. LNP 863 Quantum Gravity and Quantum Cosmology) while its study at large scales is challenging because recent and upcoming observational results will provide important information on the validity of these modified theories.   In this volume, various aspects of modified gravity at large scales will be discussed: high-curvature gravity theories; general scalar-tensor theories; Galileon theories and their cosmological applications; F(R) gravity theories; massive, new massive and topologically massive gravity; Chern-Simons modifications of general relativity (including holographic variants) and higher-spin gravity theories, to name but a few of the most important recent developments.   Edite...

  10. A possible realization of Einstein's causal theory underlying quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1979-06-01

    It is shown that a new microscopic mechanics formulated earlier can be looked upon as a possible causal theory underlying quantum mechanics, which removes Einstein's famous objections against quantum theory. This approach is free from objections raised against Bohm's hidden variable theory and leads to a clear physical picture in terms of familiar concepts, if self interactions are held responsible for deviations from classical behaviour. The new level of physics unfolded by this approach may reveal novel frontiers in high-energy physics. (author)

  11. Einstein-Cartan-Dirac theory in (1+2)-dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dereli, Tekin [Koc University, Department of Physics, Istanbul (Turkey); Oezdemir, Nese [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Physics Engineering, Istanbul (Turkey); Sert, Oezcan [Pamukkale University, Department of Physics, Denizli (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    Einstein-Cartan theory is formulated in (1+2) dimensions using the algebra of exterior differential forms. A Dirac spinor is coupled to gravity and the field equations are obtained by a variational principle. The space-time torsion is found to be given algebraically in terms of a quadratic spinor condensate field. Circularly symmetric, exact solutions that collapse to AdS{sub 3} geometry in the absence of the Dirac condensate are found. (orig.)

  12. Estimating cosmological parameters by the simulated data of gravitational waves from the Einstein Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Yang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the constraint ability of the gravitational wave (GW) as the standard siren on the cosmological parameters by using the third-generation gravitational wave detector: the Einstein Telescope. The binary merger of a neutron with either a neutron or black hole is hypothesized to be the progenitor of a short and intense burst of γ rays; some fraction of those binary mergers could be detected both through electromagnetic radiation and gravitational waves. Thus we can determine both the luminosity distance and redshift of the source separately. We simulate the luminosity distances and redshift measurements from 100 to 1000 GW events. We use two different algorithms to constrain the cosmological parameters. For the Hubble constant H0 and dark matter density parameter Ωm, we adopt the Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. We find that with about 500-600 GW events we can constrain the Hubble constant with an accuracy comparable to Planck temperature data and Planck lensing combined results, while for the dark matter density, GWs alone seem not able to provide the constraints as good as for the Hubble constant; the sensitivity of 1000 GW events is a little lower than that of Planck data. It should require more than 1000 events to match the Planck sensitivity. Yet, for analyzing the more complex dynamical property of dark energy, i.e., the equation of state w , we adopt a new powerful nonparametric method: the Gaussian process. We can reconstruct w directly from the observational luminosity distance at every redshift. In the low redshift region, we find that about 700 GW events can give the constraints of w (z ) comparable to the constraints of a constant w by Planck data with type-Ia supernovae. Those results show that GWs as the standard sirens to probe the cosmological parameters can provide an independent and complementary alternative to current experiments.

  13. About the origins of the general theory of relativity: Einstein's search for the truth

    OpenAIRE

    Trainer, M.

    2005-01-01

    On the 20th June 1933 Professor Einstein addressed a large and enthusiastic audience in the Victorian Gothic Bute Hall of the University of Glasgow. Einstein spoke 'About the Origins of the General Theory of Relativity'. In 1905 Einstein had changed the face of physics forever with the publication of his radical new ideas on special relativity. His general theory of relativity was introduced to the world in 1915. However in 1933, Einstein faced another challenge—survival in a world of change....

  14. Variational principle for a prototype Rastall theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype of Rastall's theory of gravity, in which the divergence of the energy-momentum tensor is proportional to the gradient of the scalar curvature, is shown to be derivable from a variational principle. Both the proportionality factor and the unrenormalized gravitational constant are found to be covariantly constant, but not necessarily constant. The prototype theory is, therefore, a gravitational theory with variable gravitational constant

  15. Connection between Einstein equations, nonlinear sigma models, and self-dual Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, N.; Whiting, B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors analyze the connection between nonlinear sigma models self-dual Yang-Mills theory, and general relativity (self-dual and non-self-dual, with and without killing vectors), both at the level of the equations and at the level of the different type of solutions (solitons and calorons) of these theories. They give a manifestly gauge invariant formulation of the self-dual gravitational field analogous to that given by Yang for the self-dual Yang-Mills field. This formulation connects in a direct and explicit way the self-dual Yang-Mills and the general relativity equations. They give the ''R gauge'' parametrization of the self-dual gravitational field (which corresponds to modified Yang's-type and Ernst equations) and analyze the correspondence between their different types of solutions. No assumption about the existence of symmetries in the space-time is needed. For the general case (non-self-dual), they show that the Einstein equations contain an O nonlinear sigma model. This connection with the sigma model holds irrespective of the presence of symmetries in the space-time. They found a new class of solutions of Einstein equations depending on holomorphic and antiholomorphic functions and we relate some subclasses of these solutions to solutions of simpler nonlinear field equations that are well known in other branches of physics, like sigma models, SineGordon, and Liouville equations. They include gravitational plane wave solutions. They analyze the response of different accelerated quantum detector models, compare them to the case when the detectors are linterial in an ordinary Planckian gas at a given temperature, and discuss the anisotropy of the detected response for Rindler observers

  16. Variational formulation of two scalar-tetradic theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, D.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we obtain two scalar-tetradic theories of gravitation (theories A and B) from a variational principle. In these theories the gravitational energy is localized and the principle of equivalence holds. They combine some aspects of Moller theory and the Brans-Dicke theory. The first-order approximations and an introduction to the study of both theories in the static spherically symmetric case are presented

  17. Bose-Einstein condensation of light: general theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2013-08-01

    A theory of Bose-Einstein condensation of light in a dye-filled optical microcavity is presented. The theory is based on the hierarchical maximum entropy principle and allows one to investigate the fluctuating behavior of the photon gas in the microcavity for all numbers of photons, dye molecules, and excitations at all temperatures, including the whole critical region. The master equation describing the interaction between photons and dye molecules in the microcavity is derived and the equivalence between the hierarchical maximum entropy principle and the master equation approach is shown. The cases of a fixed mean total photon number and a fixed total excitation number are considered, and a much sharper, nonparabolic onset of a macroscopic Bose-Einstein condensation of light in the latter case is demonstrated. The theory does not use the grand canonical approximation, takes into account the photon polarization degeneracy, and exactly describes the microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic Bose-Einstein condensation of light. Under certain conditions, it predicts sub-Poissonian statistics of the photon condensate and the polarized photon condensate, and a universal relation takes place between the degrees of second-order coherence for these condensates. In the macroscopic case, there appear a sharp jump in the degrees of second-order coherence, a sharp jump and kink in the reduced standard deviations of the fluctuating numbers of photons in the polarized and whole condensates, and a sharp peak, a cusp, of the Mandel parameter for the whole condensate in the critical region. The possibility of nonclassical light generation in the microcavity with the photon Bose-Einstein condensate is predicted.

  18. New gravitational forces from quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.; Goldman, T.; Hughes, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    When a classical theory is quantized, new physical effects result. The prototypical example is the Lamb Shift of quantum electrodynamics. Even though this phenomenon could be parametrized by the ''Uehling Potential,'' it was always realized that it was a quantum aspect of electromagnetism, not a ''new force'' of nature. So, too, with theories of quantum gravity. Generically they predict that there will be spin-1 (graviphoton) and spin-0 (graviscalar) partners of the spin-2 graviton. At some level, these partners will generate new effects. Among them are (1) non-Newtonian gravitational forces and (2) substance dependance (violation of the Principle of Equivalence). We discuss these ideas in the context of recent experiments. (Experiments usually test only one of the above effects, which could be distinct.) We contrast these ideas with the alternative point of view, that there actually may be a ''fifth force'' of nature. 20 refs

  19. Chern-Simons forms in gravitation theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanelli, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The Chern-Simons (CS) form evolved from an obstruction in mathematics into an important object in theoretical physics. In fact, the presence of CS terms in physics is more common than one may think: they seem to play an important role in high Tc superconductivity and in recently discovered topological insulators. In classical physics, the minimal coupling in electromagnetism and to the action for a mechanical system in Hamiltonian form are examples of CS functionals. CS forms are also the natural generalization of the minimal coupling between the electromagnetic field and a point charge when the source is not point like but an extended fundamental object, a membrane. They are found in relation with anomalies in quantum field theories, and as Lagrangians for gauge fields, including gravity and supergravity. A cursory review of the role of CS forms in gravitation theories is presented at an introductory level. (topical review)

  20. Chern-Simons forms in gravitation theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanelli, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    The Chern-Simons (CS) form evolved from an obstruction in mathematics into an important object in theoretical physics. In fact, the presence of CS terms in physics is more common than one may think: they seem to play an important role in high Tc superconductivity and in recently discovered topological insulators. In classical physics, the minimal coupling in electromagnetism and to the action for a mechanical system in Hamiltonian form are examples of CS functionals. CS forms are also the natural generalization of the minimal coupling between the electromagnetic field and a point charge when the source is not point like but an extended fundamental object, a membrane. They are found in relation with anomalies in quantum field theories, and as Lagrangians for gauge fields, including gravity and supergravity. A cursory review of the role of CS forms in gravitation theories is presented at an introductory level.

  1. Gauge formulation of gravitation theories. I. The Poincare, de Sitter, and conformal cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.A.; Niederle, J.

    1982-01-01

    The gauge formulations of various gravitation theories are discussed. They are based on the approach in which we have the group Diff R 4 acting on x/sup μ/ and in which we attach to every x/sup μ/ a tangent space with the group of action H. Group H does not act on x/sup μ/ and plays the role of an internal (global) symmetry group in the standard Yang-Mills theory. The matter fields in the theory transform according to representations of H and are assumed to be scalars of Diff R 4 . The full invariance group of the Lagrangian is then of the form H/sup loc/xDiff R 4 . Here H/sup loc/ is a local gauge group obtained from H exactly as in the Yang-Mills theory. The approach has two characteristic features: (i) The group H/sup loc/ must be spontaneously broken in order to exclude redundant gauge fields (the Lorentz connections) from the theory in a way covariant with respect to the gauge transformations. (ii) To different H there correspond different gravitational theories, all invariant under Diff R 4 but differing in backgrounds. Thus if H is isomorphic to the Poincare group the corresponding gauge theory turns out to be equivalent to the usual Einstein or Einstein-Cartan theory of gravity in the Minkowski space as a background. The other choices for H considered in the paper are the de Sitter groups and the conformal group. They yield the Einstein theory with a negative (or positive) cosmological term in the corresponding de Sitter space and the Weyl or Cartan-Weyl theory (depending on realization of the conformal group), respectively

  2. A new theory of space-time and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Logunov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Field theory of gravitation is constructed. It uses a symmetrical second rank tensor field in pseudoeuclidean space-time for describing the gravitational field. The theory is based on the condition of the presence of conservation laws for gravitational field and matter taken together and on the geometrization principle. The field theory of gravitation has the same post-newtonian parame-- ters as the general relativity theory (GRT) which implies that both theories are indistinguishable from the viewpoint of any post- newtonian experiment. The description of the effects in strong gravitational fields as well as properties of gravitational waves in the field theory of gravitation and GRT differ significantly from each other. The distinctions between two theories include also the itational red shifti curving of light trajectories and timabsence in the field theory of gravitation of the effects of grav.. delay/ in processes of propagation of gravitational waves in external fields. These distinctions made it possible to suggest a number of experiments with gravitational waves in which the predictions of the field theory of gravitation can be compared with those of the GRT. Model of the Universe in the field theory of gravitation makes it possible to describe the cosmological red shift of the frequency. Character of the evolution in this mode is determined by the delay parameter q 0 : at q 0 0 >4-3/2xα the ''expansion'' at some moment will ''change'' to contraction'' and the Universe will return to the singular state, where α=8πepsilon 0 /3M 2 (H is the Hubble constant) [ru

  3. Generalized absorber theory and the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized form of Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory is used to explain the quantum-mechanical paradox proposed by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR). The advanced solutions of the electromagnetic wave equation and of relativistic quantum-mechanical wave equations are shown to play the role of ''verifier'' in quantum-mechanical ''transactions,'' providing microscopic communication paths between detectors across spacelike intervals in violation of the EPR locality postulate. The principle of causality is discussed in the context of this approach, and possibilities for experimental tests of the theory are examined

  4. Quantum Regge Calculus of Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Shesheng

    2009-01-01

    We study the Quantum Regge Calculus of Einstein-Cartan theory to describe quantum dynamics of Euclidean space-time discretized as a 4-simplices complex. Tetrad field e μ (x) and spin-connection field ω μ (x) are assigned to each 1-simplex. Applying the torsion-free Cartan structure equation to each 2-simplex, we discuss parallel transports and construct a diffeomorphism and local gauge-invariant Einstein-Cartan action. Invariant holonomies of tetrad and spin-connection fields along large loops are also given. Quantization is defined by a bounded partition function with the measure of SO(4)-group valued ω μ (x) fields and Dirac-matrix valued e μ (x) fields over 4-simplices complex.

  5. Relativistic theory of gravitation and new notions of space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The principal insurmountable difficulties of the general theory of relativity, which make one reject GRT are briefly summarised. Relativistic theory of graviton (RTG) and its principles are presented. RTG has not these difficulties and explains the whole of the observed and experimental data, besides it predicts new notions about the evolution of the Universe and gravitational collapse. RTG is a further development of the ideas put forward by Poincare, Minkovski, Einstein and Hilbert. It delivers a blow at dogmatism, and so deeply penetrating into GRT. Indeed, much time and afforts are needed to make this dogmatism the property of history

  6. Regular reduction of relativistic theories of gravitation with a quadratic Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel, L.; Zia, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    We consider those relativistic theories of gravitation which generalize Einstein's theory in the sense that their field equations derive from a scalar Lagrangian which, besides the matter term, contains a linear combination of the Ricci scalar, its square, and the square of the Ricci tensor. Using a generalization of a technique which has been used to deal with some dynamical systems, we regularly and covariantly reduce the corresponding fourth-order differential equations to second-order ones. We examine, in particular, at a low order of approximation, these reduced equations in cosmology, and for static and spherically symmetric interior solutions with constant density

  7. Relativity and equivalence principles in the gauge theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, D.; Sardanashvili, G.

    1981-01-01

    Roles of relativity (RP) and equivalence principles (EP) in the gauge theory of gravity are shown. RP in the gravitational theory in formalism of laminations can be formulated as requirement of covariance of equations relative to the GL + (4, R)(X) gauge group. In such case RP turns out to be identical to the gauge principle in the gauge theory of a group of outer symmetries, and the gravitational theory can be directly constructed as the gauge theory. In general relativity theory the equivalence theory adds RP and is intended for description of transition to a special relativity theory in some system of reference. The approach described takes into account that in the gauge theory, besides gauge fields under conditions of spontaneous symmetry breaking, the Goldstone and Higgs fields can also arise, to which the gravitational metric field is related, what is the sequence of taking account of RP in the gauge theory of gravitation [ru

  8. Collapse of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive self-interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2016-10-01

    We study the collapse of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive self-interaction. Equilibrium states in which the gravitational attraction and the attraction due to the self-interaction are counterbalanced by the quantum pressure (Heisenberg's uncertainty principle) exist only below a maximum mass Mmax=1.012 ℏ/√{G m |as| } where asMmax the system is expected to collapse and form a black hole. We study the collapse dynamics by making a Gaussian ansatz for the wave function and reducing the problem to the study of the motion of a particle in an effective potential. We find that the collapse time scales as (M /Mmax-1 )-1 /4 for M →Mmax+ and as M-1 /2 for M ≫Mmax. Other analytical results are given above and below the critical point corresponding to a saddle-node bifurcation. We apply our results to QCD axions with mass m =10-4 eV /c2 and scattering length as=-5.8 ×10-53 m for which Mmax=6.5 ×10-14M⊙ and R =3.3 ×10-4R⊙. We confirm our previous claim that bosons with attractive self-interaction, such as QCD axions, may form low mass stars (axion stars or dark matter stars) but cannot form dark matter halos of relevant mass and size. These mini axion stars could be the constituents of dark matter. They can collapse into mini black holes of mass ˜10-14M⊙ in a few hours. In that case, dark matter halos would be made of mini black holes. We also apply our results to ultralight axions with mass m =1.93 ×10-20 eV /c2 and scattering length as=-8.29 ×10-60 fm for which Mmax=0.39 ×1 06M⊙ and R =33 pc . These ultralight axions could cluster into dark matter halos. Axionic dark matter halos with attractive self-interaction can collapse into supermassive black holes of mass ˜1 06M⊙ (similar to those reported at the center of galaxies) in about one million years. We point out the limitations of the Gaussian ansatz to describe the late stages of the collapse dynamics. We also mention the possibility that, instead of forming a black hole

  9. On the relation between the Einstein and the Komar expressions for the energy of the gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown, that the interpretation of the Einstein energy-momentum ''pseudo-tensor'',''covariantized'' with the help of a background metric, as the energy-momentum tensor of the gravitational field with respect to a background field, is consistent with a geometric hamiltonian analysis. It is also shown, that the von Freud superpotential and the Komar superpotential describe the dynamics of the gravitational field in different function spaces, subject to different boundary conditions. One can pass from one superpotential to the other by performing a Legendre transformation on the boundary. It is explained why the ADM and the von Freud energy expressions are the same, for asymptotically flat space-times

  10. On the relation between the Einstein and the Komar expressions for the energy of the gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, P.T.

    1983-09-01

    It is shown that the interpretation of the Einstein energy-momentum ''pseudo-tensor'', ''covariantized'' with the help of a background metric, as the energy-momentum tensor of the gravitational field with respect to a background field is consistent with a geometric Hamiltonian analysis. It is also shown that the von Freud superpotential and the Komar superpotential describe the dynamics of the gravitational field in different function spaces, subject to different boundary conditions. One can pass from one superpotential to the other by performing a Legendre transformation on the boundary. (author)

  11. Solar-System Tests of Gravitational Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Irwin

    1997-01-01

    We are engaged in testing gravitational theory by means of observations of objects in the solar system. These tests include an examination of the Principle Of Equivalence (POE), the Shapiro delay, the advances of planetary perihelia, the possibility of a secular variation G in the "gravitational constant" G, and the rate of the de Sitter (geodetic) precession of the Earth-Moon system. These results are consistent with our preliminary results focusing on the contribution of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR), which were presented at the seventh Marcel Grossmann meeting on general relativity. The largest improvement over previous results comes in the uncertainty for (eta): a factor of five better than our previous value. This improvement reflects the increasing strength of the LLR data. A similar analysis presented at the same meeting by a group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory gave a similar result for (eta). Our value for (beta) represents our first such result determined simultaneously with the solar quadrupole moment from the dynamical data set. These results are being prepared for publication. We have shown how positions determined from different planetary ephemerides can be compared and how the combination of VLBI and pulse timing information can yield a direct tie between planetary and radio frames. We have continued to include new data in our analysis as they became available. Finally, we have made improvement in our analysis software (PEP) and ported it to a network of modern workstations from its former home on a "mainframe" computer.

  12. Hundred years of the Einstein theory of photoeffect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Although H. Hertz discovered the photo-effect experimentally in 1887, the attempts to describe the results obtained in the frame of pre-Einstein theories failed. After publication of Einstein's paper in 1905 the laws of photo-effect became clear, opening new directions in research. The theory of photo-effect has been developed since at first by inclusion of new processes, such as Compton effect, photo-pair production and so on, in which conservation of both energy and momentum plays an equally important role. For many years the atomic photoionization theory was bound to one-electron model, starting with very simple potentials. But even the most sophisticated ones, such as Hartree - Fock approach, failed to describe the experimental findings at the middle of the 60th of the 20th century. It opened the door to the many - electron effects in photoionization. It appeared that along with modification of one-electron picture collective effects are decisively important. The discovery of atomic Giant resonances in photo-effect was a remarkable milestone in atomic photo-effects history. With prediction and observation of other resonances, such as auto-ionization, interference, intra-doublet and phase, the theory included interesting additional physics of electron correlations. Some of these resonances are very well seen in the partial cross-sections, the others require investigation of the dipole and non-dipole angular distribution and photoelectrons spin polarization. A separate domain became the photoionization of two or even three electrons by a single photon, which is until now not completely understood theoretically both in near threshold and in the high photon energy region, where its contribution is much less than that of Compton ionization. The theory of atomic photo-effect is not limited to atoms and ions, both positive and negative. As targets, it considers now multi-atomic formations, such as molecules, fullerenes, and metallic clusters, for all of

  13. On the fundamental principles of the relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper expounds consistently within the frames of the Special Relativity Theory the fundamental postulates of the Relativistic Theory of Gravitation (RTG) which make it possible to obtain the unique complete system of the equations for gravitational field. Major attention has been paid to the analysis of the gauge group and of the causality principle. Some results related to the evolution of the Friedmann Universe, to gravitational collapse, etc. being the consequences of the RTG equations are also presented. 7 refs

  14. Einstein's Theory A Rigorous Introduction for the Mathematically Untrained

    CERN Document Server

    Grøn, Øyvind

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the theory of relativity and the mathematics used in its processes. Three elements of the book make it stand apart from previously published books on the theory of relativity. First, the book starts at a lower mathematical level than standard books with tensor calculus of sufficient maturity to make it possible to give detailed calculations of relativistic predictions of practical experiments. Self-contained introductions are given, for example vector calculus, differential calculus and integrations. Second, in-between calculations have been included, making it possible for the non-technical reader to follow step-by-step calculations. Thirdly, the conceptual development is gradual and rigorous in order to provide the inexperienced reader with a philosophically satisfying understanding of the theoryEinstein's Theory: A Rigorous Introduction for the Mathematically Untrained aims to provide the reader with a sound conceptual understanding of both the special and genera...

  15. Holographic Fermions in Anisotropic Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Fang, Li-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the holographic Fermionic system dual to an anisotropic charged black brane bulk in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion gravity theory. We consider the minimal coupling between the Dirac field and the gauge field in the bulk gravity theory and mainly explore the dispersion relation exponents of the Green functions of the dual Fermionic operators in the dual field theory. We find that along both the anisotropic and the isotropic directions the Fermi momentum will be effected by the anisotropy of the bulk theory. However, the anisotropy has influence on the dispersion relation which is almost linear for massless Fermions with charge q=2. The universal properties that the mass and the charge of the Fermi possibly correspond to nonlinear dispersion relation are also investigated

  16. Proca stars: Gravitating Bose–Einstein condensates of massive spin 1 particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Brito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish that massive complex Abelian vector fields (mass μ can form gravitating solitons, when minimally coupled to Einstein's gravity. Such Proca stars (PSs have a stationary, everywhere regular and asymptotically flat geometry. The Proca field, however, possesses a harmonic time dependence (frequency w, realizing Wheeler's concept of geons for an Abelian spin 1 field. We obtain PSs with both a spherically symmetric (static and an axially symmetric (stationary line element. The latter form a countable number of families labelled by an integer m∈Z+. PSs, like (scalar boson stars, carry a conserved Noether charge, and are akin to the latter in many ways. In particular, both types of stars exist for a limited range of frequencies and there is a maximal ADM mass, Mmax, attained for an intermediate frequency. For spherically symmetric PSs (rotating PSs with m=1,2,3, Mmax≃1.058MPl2/μ (Mmax≃1.568,2.337,3.247MPl2/μ, slightly larger values than those for (mini-boson stars. We establish perturbative stability for a subset of solutions in the spherical case and anticipate a similar conclusion for fundamental modes in the rotating case. The discovery of PSs opens many avenues of research, reconsidering five decades of work on (scalar boson stars, in particular as possible dark matter candidates.

  17. The underlying principles of relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the main statements of relativistic theory of gravitation, constructed in result of critical analysis of the general theory of relativity. The principle of geometrization is formulated

  18. Heuristic introduction to gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.D.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rough and somewhat heuristic theoretical background and introduction to gravitational radiation, its generation, and its detection based on Einstein's general theory of relativity

  19. Correct Linearization of Einstein's Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly Einstein's equations can be reduced to a wave form (linearly dependent from the second derivatives of the space metric in the absence of gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. As shown here, the origin of the problem is that one uses the general covariant theory of measurement. Here the wave form of Einstein's equations is obtained in the terms of Zelmanov's chronometric invariants (physically observable projections on the observer's time line and spatial section. The obtained equations depend on solely the second derivatives even if gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. The correct linearization proves: the Einstein equations are completely compatible with weak waves of the metric.

  20. Cosmological viability of the bimetric theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krygier, B.; Krempec-Krygier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The approximate solutions of field equations for flat radiative cosmological models in the second version of bimetric gravitation theory are discussed. They indicate that these cosmological models are ever expanding. The apparent magnitude-redshift relations for flat dust cosmological models for different theories of gravitation are described and compared. One can reject Dirac's additive creation theory and the first version of Rosen's bimetric theory on the basis of this observational test. (author)

  1. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  2. On Certain Conceptual Anomalies in Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crothers S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of conceptual anomalies occurring in the Standard exposition of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. These anomalies relate to issues in both mathematics and in physics and penetrate to the very heart of Einstein’s theory. This paper reveals and amplifies a few such anomalies, including the fact that Einstein’s field equations for the so-called static vacuum configuration, R = 0 , violates his Principle of Equiv- alence, and is therefore erroneous. This has a direct bearing on the usual concept of conservation of energy for the gravitational field and the conventional formulation for localisation of energy using Einstein’s pseudo-tensor. Misconceptions as to the relationship between Minkowski spacetime and Special Relativity are also discussed, along with their relationships to the pseudo-Riemannian metric manifold of Einstein’s gravitational field, and their fundamental geometric structures pertaining to spherical symmetry.

  3. Compact stars in alternative theories of gravity: Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Read, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework to study slowly rotating compact stars in a rather general class of alternative theories of gravity, with the ultimate goal of investigating constraints on alternative theories from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave observations of compact stars. Our Lagrangian includes as special cases scalar-tensor theories (and indirectly f(R) theories) as well as models with a scalar field coupled to quadratic curvature invariants. As a first application of the formalism, we discuss (for the first time in the literature) compact stars in Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We show that compact objects with central densities typical of neutron stars cannot exist for certain values of the coupling constants of the theory. In fact, the existence and stability of compact stars sets more stringent constraints on the theory than the existence of black hole solutions. This work is a first step in a program to systematically rule out (possibly using Bayesian model selection) theories that are incompatible with astrophysical observations of compact stars.

  4. Dynamical systems with classical spin in the Einstein-Maxwell-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorin, R.M. de.

    1984-01-01

    By using variational precedures, spinning charged particles and fluids, with magnetic dipole moment, are analysed. Electromagnetic and gravitational interactions are also dynamically considered. A relativistic formalism which describes the space-time as a Riemann-Cartan manifold caraccterized by curvature and torsion tensors was adopted. The specific features of the Einstein-Maxell-Cartan theory have been analised in detail for the considered models. Also the holonomy of the local Lorentz Frames and constraints has been studied, and as a consequence it has been possible to generate new equations of motion for particles with spin. It has also been possible to derive the complete differential system which includes the fluid, the electromagnetic, the curvature and the torsion fields. (author) [pt

  5. Einstein: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos-Buchwald, Diana

    2015-04-01

    In late 1915, Albert Einstein (1879-1955) completed as series of papers on a generalized theory of gravitation that were to constitute a major conceptual change in the history of modern physics and the crowning achievement of his scientific career. But this accomplishment came after a decade of intense intellectual struggle and was received with muted enthusiasm. Einstein's previously unpublished writings and massive correspondence, edited by the Einstein Papers Project, provide vivid insights into the historical, personal, and scientific context of the formulation, completion, and reception of GR during the first decades of the 20th century.

  6. A comment on a proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Jr, W.A.; Buonamano, V.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity is analysed and it is shown that it falls into the set of unsatisfactory proposals that attempt to make an experimental distinction between Einstein's special theory of relativity and a ''Lorentzian type'' special theory of relativity

  7. Comment on a proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jr, W A [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil); Buonamano, V [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Instituto de Matematica

    1976-08-11

    A proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity is analysed and it is shown that it falls into the set of unsatisfactory proposals that attempt to make an experimental distinction between Einstein's special theory of relativity and a ''Lorentzian type'' special theory of relativity.

  8. Chaotic inflation in modified gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felice, Antonio De; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Elliston, Joseph; Tavakol, Reza

    2011-01-01

    We study chaotic inflation in the context of modified gravitational theories. Our analysis covers models based on (i) a field coupling ω(φ) with the kinetic energy X = −(1/2)g μν ∂ μ φ∂ ν φ and a nonmimimal coupling ζφ 2 R/2 with a Ricci scalar R, (ii) Brans-Dicke (BD) theories, (iii) Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity, and (iv) gravity with a Galileon correction. Dilatonic coupling with the kinetic energy and/or negative nonminimal coupling are shown to lead to compatibility with observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies for the self-coupling inflaton potential V(φ) = λφ 4 /4. BD theory with a quadratic inflaton potential, which covers Starobinsky's f(R) model f(R) = R+R 2 /(6M 2 ) with the BD parameter ω BD = 0, gives rise to a smaller tensor-to-scalar ratio for decreasing ω BD . In the presence of a GB term coupled to the field φ, we express the scalar/tensor spectral indices n s and n t as well as the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in terms of two slow-roll parameters and place bounds on the strength of the GB coupling from the joint data analysis of WMAP 7yr combined with other observations. We also study the Galileon-like self-interaction Φ(φ)X□φ with exponential coupling Φ(φ)∝e μφ . Using a CMB likelihood analysis we put bounds on the strength of the Galileon coupling and show that the self coupling potential can in fact be made compatible with observations in the presence of the exponential coupling with μ > 0

  9. Relativistic theory of gravitation and the graviton rest mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunsov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines a graviton rest mass (m) introduced in the framework of the relativistic theory of gravitation and obtains equations that describe a massive gravitational field. Under the assumption that the entire hidden mass of the matter in the Universe is due to the existence of a massive gravitational field, an upper bound on the rest mass is obtained: m ≤ 0.64 x 10 --65 g

  10. Two-fluid static spherical configurations with linear mass function in the Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallakhmetov, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the Einstein-Cartan theory, two-fluid static spherical configurations with linear mass function are considered. One of these modelling anisotropic matter distributions within star and the other fluid is a perfect fluid representing a source of torsion. It is shown that the solutions of the Einstein equations for anisotropic relativistic spheres in General Relativity may generate the solutions in the Einstein-Cartan theory. Some exact solutions are obtained

  11. Modified Einstein and Finsler Like Theories on Tangent Lorentz Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Stavrinos, Panayiotis; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2014-01-01

    We study modifications of general relativity, GR, with nonlinear dispersion relations which can be geometrized on tangent Lorentz bundles. Such modified gravity theories, MGTs, can be modeled by gravitational Lagrange density functionals $f(\\mathbf{R},\\mathbf{T},F)$ with generalized/ modified scalar curvature $\\mathbf{R}$, trace of matter field tensors $\\mathbf{T}$ and modified Finsler like generating function $F$. In particular, there are defined extensions of GR with extra dimensional "velocity/ momentum" coordinates. For four dimensional models, we prove that it is possible to decouple and integrate in very general forms the gravitational fields for $f(\\mathbf{R},\\mathbf{T},F)$--modified gravity using nonholonomic 2+2 splitting and nonholonomic Finsler like variables $F$. We study the modified motion and Newtonian limits of massive test particles on nonlinear geodesics approximated with effective extra forces orthogonal to the four-velocity. We compute the constraints on the magnitude of extra-acceleration...

  12. Einstein algebras and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.

    1992-01-01

    A purely algebraic structure called an Einstein algebra is defined in such a way that every spacetime satisfying Einstein's equations is an Einstein algebra but not vice versa. The Gelfand representation of Einstein algebras is defined, and two of its subrepresentations are discussed. One of them is equivalent to the global formulation of the standard theory of general relativity; the other one leads to a more general theory of gravitation which, in particular, includes so-called regular singularities. In order to include other types of singularities one must change to sheaves of Einstein algebras. They are defined and briefly discussed. As a test of the proposed method, the sheaf of Einstein algebras corresponding to the space-time of a straight cosmic string with quasiregular singularity is constructed. 22 refs

  13. Gravitation. [Book on general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misner, C. W.; Thorne, K. S.; Wheeler, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    This textbook on gravitation physics (Einstein's general relativity or geometrodynamics) is designed for a rigorous full-year course at the graduate level. The material is presented in two parallel tracks in an attempt to divide key physical ideas from more complex enrichment material to be selected at the discretion of the reader or teacher. The full book is intended to provide competence relative to the laws of physics in flat space-time, Einstein's geometric framework for physics, applications with pulsars and neutron stars, cosmology, the Schwarzschild geometry and gravitational collapse, gravitational waves, experimental tests of Einstein's theory, and mathematical concepts of differential geometry.

  14. A note on a generalisation of Weyl's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dereli, T.; Tucker, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    A scale-invariant gravitational theory due to Bach and Weyl is generalised by the inclusion of space-time torsion. The difference between the arbitrary and zero torsion constrained variations of the Weyl action is elucidated. Conformal rescaling properties of the gravitational fields are discussed. A new class of classical solutions with torsion is presented. (author)

  15. The Higgs sector of gravitational gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclerc, M.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational gauge theories with de Sitter, Poincare and affine symmetry group are investigated under the aspect of the breakdown of the initial symmetry group down to the Lorentz subgroup. As opposed to the nonlinear realization approach, in the dynamical symmetry breaking procedure, the structure subgroup is not chosen arbitrarily, but is dictated by the symmetry of the groundstate of a Higgs field. We review the theory of spontaneously broken de Sitter gravity by Stelle and West and apply a similar approach to the case of the Poincare and affine groups. We will find that the Poincare case is almost trivial. The translational Higgs field reveals itself as pure gauge, i.e., it is expressed entirely in terms of the Nambu-Goldstone bosons and does not appear in the Lagrangian after the symmetry breaking. The same holds for the translational part of the affine group. The Higgs field provoking the breakdown of the general linear group leads to the determination of the Lorentzian signature of the metric in the groundstate. We show that the Higgs field remains in its groundstate, i.e., that the metric will have Lorentzian signature, unless we introduce matter fields that explicitely couple to the symmetric part of the connection. Furthermore, we present arguments that the Lorentzian signature is actually the only possible choice for physical spacetime, since the symmetry breaking mechanism works only if the stability subgroup is taken to be the Lorentz group. The other four-dimensional rotation groups are therefore ruled out not only on physical, but also on theoretical grounds. Finally, we show that some features, like the necessity of the introduction of a dilaton field, that seem artificial in the context of the affine theory, appear most natural if the gauge group is taken to be the special linear group in five dimensions. We also present an alternative model which is based on the spinor representation of the Lorentz group and is especially adopted to the

  16. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories and gravitation. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheck, Florian

    2018-04-01

    Scheck's successful textbook presents a comprehensive treatment, ideally suited for a one-semester course. The textbook describes Maxwell's equations first in their integral, directly testable form, then moves on to their local formulation. The first two chapters cover all essential properties of Maxwell's equations, including their symmetries and their covariance in a modern notation. Chapter 3 is devoted to Maxwell's theory as a classical field theory and to solutions of the wave equation. Chapter 4 deals with important applications of Maxwell's theory. It includes topical subjects such as metamaterials with negative refraction index and solutions of Helmholtz' equation in paraxial approximation relevant for the description of laser beams. Chapter 5 describes non-Abelian gauge theories from a classical, geometric point of view, in analogy to Maxwell's theory as a prototype, and culminates in an application to the U(2) theory relevant for electroweak interactions. The last chapter 6 gives a concise summary of semi-Riemannian geometry as the framework for the classical field theory of gravitation. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the Schwarzschild solution of Einstein's equations and the classical tests of general relativity. The new concept of this edition presents the content divided into two tracks: the fast track for master's students, providing the essentials, and the intensive track for all wanting to get in depth knowledge of the field. Cleary labeled material and sections guide students through the preferred level of treatment. Numerous problems and worked examples will provide successful access to Classical Field Theory.

  17. Ghost properties of algebraically extended theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.F.; Mann, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Recently a technique for extending general relativity called algebraic extension was shown to yield only five classes of gravitational theories (general relativity plus four extensions). The particle spectra of these theories are analysed and it is shown that only one of these extensions is ghost free. Two inequivalent theories are shown to result from this extension at the linearised level. One of these is the linearised version of Moffat's theory of gravitation; the other is a new theory which possesses an additional gauge invariance which has been associated with a closed string. (author)

  18. Domain wall universe in the Einstein-Born-Infeld theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2009-01-01

    In this Letter, we discuss the dynamics of a domain wall universe embedded into the charged black hole spacetime of the Einstein-Born-Infeld (EBI) theory. There are four kinds of possible spacetime structures, i.e., those with no horizon, the extremal one, those with two horizons (as the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole), and those with a single horizon (as the Schwarzshild black hole). We derive the effective cosmological equations on the wall. In contrast to the previous works, we take the contribution of the electrostatic energy on the wall into account. By examining the properties of the effective potential, we find that a bounce can always happen outside the (outer) horizon. For larger masses of the black hole, the height of the barrier between the horizon and bouncing point in the effective potential becomes smaller, leading to longer time scales of bouncing process. These results are compared with those in the previous works.

  19. Holographic renormalization of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the boundary value problem with a mixed boundary condition that involves the gauge and scalar fields in the context of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories. In particular, the expectation value of the dual scalar operator can be a function of the expectation value of the current operator. The properties are prevalent in a fixed charge ensemble because the conserved charge is shared by both fields through the dilaton coupling, which is also responsible for non-Fermi liquid properties. We study the on-shell action and the stress energy tensor to note practical importances of the boundary value problem. In the presence of the scalar fields, physical quantities are not fully fixed due to the finite boundary terms that manifest in the massless scalar or the scalar with mass saturating the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound.

  20. Spontaneous compactification in six-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Salam, A.; Strathdee, J.

    1982-10-01

    A discrete set of solutions to the classical Einstein-Maxwell equations in six-dimensional spacetime is considered. These solutions have the form of a product of four-dimensional constant curvature spacetime with a 2-sphere. The Maxwell field has support on the 2-sphere where it represents a monopole of magnetic charge, n = +-1, +-2,... The spectrum of massless and massive states is obtained for the special case of the flat 4-space, and the solution is shown to be classically stable. The limiting case where the radius of the 2-sphere becomes small is considered and a dimensionally reduced effective Lagrangian for the long range modes is derived. This turns out to be an SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory with chiral couplings. (author)

  1. Violations of Einstein's Relativity: Motivations, Theory, and Phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    One of the most difficult questions in present-day physics concerns a fundamental theory of space, time, and matter that incorporates a consistent quantum description of gravity. There are various theoretical approaches to such a quantum-gravity theory. Nevertheless, experimental progress is hampered in this research field because many models predict deviations from established physics that are suppressed by some power of the Planck scale, which currently appears to be immeasurably small. However, tests of relativity theory provide one promising avenue to overcome this phenomeno-logical obstacle: many models for underlying physics can accommodate a small breakdown of Lorentz symmetry, and numerous feasible Lorentz-symmetry tests have Planck reach. Such mild violations of Einstein's relativity have therefore become the focus of recent research efforts. This mini course provides a brief survey of the key ideas in this research field and is geared at both experimentalists and theorists. In particular, several theoretical mechanisms leading to deviations from relativity theory are presented; the standard theoretical framework for relativity violations at currently accessible energy scales (i.e., the SME) is reviewed, and various present and near-future experimental efforts within this field are discussed.

  2. Reply to the "Certain Conceptual Anomalies in Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper answers twelve most common questions on the basics of Einstein's theory of relativity. The answers remove most key problems with a real, solid understanding of the theory.

  3. A generalization of the Newton-Cartan theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsure, Nitin

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that even in the absence of the equivalence principle, the Newtonian theory of gravitation can be given a geometric form in a five-dimensional manifold. The fifth dimension is taken as the ratio of gravitational and inertial mass, which is allowed to be different for different particles. The resulting pondoromotive and field equations in this 5-dimensional space (which are generalizations of Cartan's formulation of Newtonian gravitation) are formulated and their consequences are discussed. It is argued that as general relativity is a 'metric' theory, a similar generalization of general relativity is not possible. (author)

  4. Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Misner, Charles W; Wheeler, John Archibald

    2017-01-01

    First published in 1973, Gravitation is a landmark graduate-level textbook that presents Einstein’s general theory of relativity and offers a rigorous, full-year course on the physics of gravitation. Upon publication, Science called it “a pedagogic masterpiece,” and it has since become a classic, considered essential reading for every serious student and researcher in the field of relativity. This authoritative text has shaped the research of generations of physicists and astronomers, and the book continues to influence the way experts think about the subject. With an emphasis on geometric interpretation, this masterful and comprehensive book introduces the theory of relativity; describes physical applications, from stars to black holes and gravitational waves; and portrays the field’s frontiers. The book also offers a unique, alternating, two-track pathway through the subject. Material focusing on basic physical ideas is designated as Track 1 and formulates an appropriate one-semester graduate-level...

  5. Relativistic theory of gravitation and nonuniqueness of the predictions of general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Loskutov, Yu.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that while the predictions of relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) for the gravitational effects are unique and consistent with the experimental data available, the relevant predictions of general relativity theory are not unique. Therewith the above nonuniqueness manifests itself in some effects in the first order in the gravitational interaction constant in others in the second one. The absence in GRT of the energy-momentum and angular momentum conservation laws for the matter and gravitational field taken together and its inapplicability to give uniquely determined predictions for the gravitational phenomena compel to reject GRT as a physical theory

  6. Spacetime and gravitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczyński, W.; Trautman, A.

    This book is a revised translation of the Polish original "Czasoprzestrzeń i grawitacja", Warszawa (Poland), Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, 1984. Ideas about space and time are at the root of one's understanding of nature, both at the intuitive level of everyday experience and in the framework of sophisticated physical theories. These ideas have led to the development of geometry and its applications to physics. The contemporary physical theory of space and time, including its extention to the phenomena of gravitation, is Einstein's theory of relativity. The book is a short introduction to this theory. A great deal of emphasis is given to the geometrical aspects of relativity theory and its comparison with the Newtonian view of the world. There are short chapters on the origins of Einstein's theory, gravitational waves, cosmology, spinors and the Einstein-Cartan theory.

  7. Einstein gravity 3-point functions from conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami-Jeddi, Nima; Hartman, Thomas; Kundu, Sandipan; Tajdini, Amirhossein

    2017-12-01

    We study stress tensor correlation functions in four-dimensional conformal field theories with large N and a sparse spectrum. Theories in this class are expected to have local holographic duals, so effective field theory in anti-de Sitter suggests that the stress tensor sector should exhibit universal, gravity-like behavior. At the linearized level, the hallmark of locality in the emergent geometry is that stress tensor three-point functions 〈 T T T 〉, normally specified by three constants, should approach a universal structure controlled by a single parameter as the gap to higher spin operators is increased. We demonstrate this phenomenon by a direct CFT calculation. Stress tensor exchange, by itself, violates causality and unitarity unless the three-point functions are carefully tuned, and the unique consistent choice exactly matches the prediction of Einstein gravity. Under some assumptions about the other potential contributions, we conclude that this structure is universal, and in particular, that the anomaly coefficients satisfy a ≈ c as conjectured by Camanho et al. The argument is based on causality of a four-point function, with kinematics designed to probe bulk locality, and invokes the chaos bound of Maldacena, Shenker, and Stanford.

  8. Two theorems on flat space-time gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnino, M.; Chimento, L.

    1980-01-01

    The first theorem states that all flat space-time gravitational theories must have a Lagrangian with a first term that is an homogeneous (degree-1) function of the 4-velocity usup(i), plus a functional of nsub(ij)usup(i)usup(j). The second theorem states that all gravitational theories that satisfy the strong equivalence principle have a Lagrangian with a first term gsub(ij)(x)usup(i)usup(j) plus an irrelevant term. In both cases the theories must issue from a unique variational principle. Therefore, under this condition it is impossible to find a flat space-time theory that satisfies the strong equivalence principle. (author)

  9. Einstein and modern cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabell, R.

    1979-01-01

    Einstein applied his gravitation theory to a universe model with positively curved space in 1917. In order to maintain a static universe he introduced the cosmological constant, which in the light of later nonstatic universe models, he described as his life's greatest mistake. The best known such model is the Einstein-de Sitter model, which is here discussed in some detail. The 'big bang' theory is also discussed leading to the cosmic background radiation. The early phase of the 'big bang' cosmology, the first ten seconds, and the first minutes are discussed, leading to the transparent stage. (JIW)

  10. Nonmetric theories of gravity and the gravitational frequency shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coley, A.A.; Sarmiento G, A.F.; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City)

    1988-01-01

    A class of nonmetric theories of gravity called metric-affine theories is investigated, emphasizing a subclass of theories called Weyl-affine theories. An experimental configuration is modeled in which the gravitational redshift of light signals conecting an artificial satellite to the earth is measured. A situation in which both bodies are forced to follow circular orbits around the sun with angular speeds determined by the solar gravitational field is considered along with the more realistic situation in which the artificial satellite and the earth are both allowed to follow general coplanar orbits. The latter is found to give rise to more severe constraints. It is found that theories under investigation must coincide with their metric counterparts up to first order in the Newtonian gravitational potential U and that any nonmetric effects within the solar neighborhood can only manifest themselves at most through small contributions at the U-squared level or at the U-cubed level. 34 references

  11. The 5D Fully-Covariant Theory of Gravitation and Its Astrophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxi Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we comprehensively review the five-dimensional (5D fully-covariant theory of gravitation developed by Zhang two decades ago and its recent applications in astrophysics and cosmology. This 5D gravity describes not only the fields, but also the matter and its motion in a 5D spacetime. The greatest advantage of this theory is that there does not exist any unknown parameter, so that we can apply it to explain astrophysical and cosmological issues by quantitatively comparing the results obtained from it with observations and to predict new effects that could not be derived from any other gravitational theories. First, the 5D covariant description of matter and its motion enabled Zhang to analytically derive the fifteenth component of the 5D energy-momentum tensor of matter ( T - 44 , which significantly distinguishes this 5D gravity from other 5D gravitational theories that usually assumed a T - 44 with an unknown parameter, called the scalar charge s, and, thus, to split the 5D covariant field equation into (4 + 1 splitting form as the gravitational, electromagnetic, and scalar field equations. The gravitational field equation turns into the 4D Einstein’s field equation of general relativity if the scalar field is equal to unity. Then, Zhang solved the field equations and obtained an exact static spherically-symmetric external solution of the gravitational, electromagnetic and scalar fields, in which all integral constants were completely determined with a perfect set of simple numbers and parameters that only depend on the mass and electric charge of the matter, by comparing with the obtained weak internal solution of the fields at a large radial distance. In the Einstein frame, the exact field solution obtained from the 5D fully-covariant theory of gravitation reduces to the Schwarzschild solution when the matter is electrically neutral and the fields are weak in strength. This guarantees that the four fundamental tests (light

  12. 5D black hole solution in Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.

    2007-01-01

    By adopting the 5D version of the Wu-Yang ansatz we present in closed form a black hole solution in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet theory. In the Einstein-Yang-Mills limit, we recover the 5D black hole solution already known

  13. Gravitational theory with the local quadratic Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentyukov, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    It is suggested that the vacuum gravitational equations should be derived from the local Lagrangian containing only first-order derivatives. As an example we demonstrate the properties of the derived equations by studying of the exact spherically-symmetric solutions. 23 refs

  14. Albert Einstein and the problem of unification of fundamental interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, H.

    1986-01-01

    Albert Einstein's attempts to construct a unified field theory of electromagnetic and gravitational interactions are presented and commented from the standpoint of the present day physics. 16 refs. (author)

  15. A noteworthy dimensionless constant in gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayos, F.; Lobo, J.A.; Llanta, E.

    1986-01-01

    A simple problem of gravitation is studied classically and in the Schwarzchild framework. A relationship is found between the parameters that define the trajectories of two particles (the first in radial motion and the second in a circular orbit) which are initially together and meet again after one revolution of particle 2. Dimensional analysis is the clue to explain the appearance of a dimensionless constant in the Newtonian case. (author)

  16. Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Prasanna, A R

    2017-01-01

    This book suitable for post graduates in Physics and Astrophysics aims at introducing the theory of general relativity as an important background for doing astrophysics. Starting from a detailed discussion of the various mathematical concepts for doing general relativity, the book introduces the geometric description of gravity. It gives a brief historical perspective to classical mechanics and electrodynamics making an attempt to establish the necessity of special relativity as propounded by Einstein extending to General Relativity. This book is a good starting point for post graduates wanting to pursue the modern topics of Cosmology, High energy astrophysics and related areas.

  17. EXTENDED EINSTEIN`S THEORY OF WAVES IN THE PRESENCE OF TENSIONS IN SPACE-TIME TENSIONS TEORÍA EXTENDIDA DE ONDAS DE EINSTEIN EN LA PRESENCIA DE TENSIONES EN EL ESPACIO-TIEMPO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Torres-Silva

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A modification of Einstein's dynamics in the presence of certain states of space-time tension is proposed. The structure of the equations of motion for gravitational disturbances is very similar to Maxwell's equations for micro and macroscopic chiral bodies characterized by T, when the operators and are like . The unification limit between the electromagnetism and gravity is discussed. As an application of this theory we mention the birefringence effect in GPS (Global Positioning Systems systems.Se propone una modificación a la dinámica de Einstein en presencia de ciertos tipos de tensión del espacio tiempo. La estructura de las ecuaciones de movimiento para las perturbaciones gravitacionales es muy similar a las ecuaciones de Maxwell para cuerpos quirales micro y macroscópicos caracterizados por T, cuando los operadores de y son como . Se discute el límite de unificación del electromagnetismo y la gravitación en el tiempo de Planck. Como aplicación de esta teoría se menciona el efecto de la birrefringencia en sistemas GPS (Global Positioning Systems.

  18. Stability of the Einstein static universe in modified theories of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Hollenstein, Lukas; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the stability analysis of the Einstein static universe in various modified theories of gravity, like f(R) gravity, Gauss-Bonnet or f(G) gravity, and Horava-Lifshitz gravity.

  19. Test of gauge invariance and unitarity of the quantized Einstein theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.P.; Underwood, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Explicit calculations at the 1-loop level verify that the usual quantized Einstein theory of gravity is indeed gauge independent and unitary for all values of the gauge parameter α. This lends nontrivial support to a general formal proof

  20. Special relativity of non-inertial motions: A complementary theory to Einstein's SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocanu, C.I.

    1999-01-01

    In order to describe physical reality a special (gravity-free) relativity is needed that is founded upon general non-uniform motions as they occur in our environment and hold for the non-inertial reference frame of our laboratory. Such a generalized form of special relativity can be build upon an extension, at relativistic velocities, of Maxwell-Hertz electrodynamics (MHE), which is valid for non-uniform motions, but at small velocities only. The new electromagnetic theory called (in honor to Hertz) Hertz's Relativistic Electrodynamics (HRE), is completely independent and built-up in a completely different way as regards Einstein's Special Relativity (ESR). HRE, a coordinate-free formulation does not need postulates, but confirms the constancy principle of speed of light in vacuum. All experiments of first and second order in v/c are correctly interpreted. To this theory a Hertzian kinematics and dynamics are associated. HRE with its corresponding mechanics forms Hertz's Special Relativity (HSR), as a complementary theory to ESR. According to the principle of complementarity and neglecting the gravitational effects, the Extended Special Relativity (ExSR) is a double faced theory which becomes either ESR, when the motion is inertial or HSR when the motion is non-inertial. The complementarity of both theories assumes that the two descriptions cannot be employed for the same motion, being mutually exclusive. Consequently, to every statement of one of the ExSR corresponds a complementary statement of the other ExSR. The completeness of ESR with HSR ensures an extended view over the relativity in our physical world. (author)

  1. Motion of spinning particles. Post-Newtonian approximation in the Einstein-Cartan theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccaletti, D; Agostini, W; Festa, P [Rome Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica

    1979-01-11

    The equations of motion of spinning particles are obtained in the post-Newtonian approximation of the Einstein-Cartan theory. The starting point of the calculation is the Hehl combined equation and a semi-classical model is assumed for the system of spinning particles. Comparison is made with an analogous quantum result obtained in the context of Gupta quantization of the linearized Einstein theory.

  2. Results of the deepest all-sky survey for continuous gravitational waves on LIGO S6 data running on the Einstein@Home volunteer distributed computing project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acemese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwa, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Arker, Bd.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Be, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitoss, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Boutfanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, O.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, C.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreyer, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Egizenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholel, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, O.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Far, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.M.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, J. -D; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritsche, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garuti, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gi, K.; Glaetke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Granta, A.; Gras, S.; Cray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonsta, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howel, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, O.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Lyer, B. R.; Fzumi, K.; Jaccimin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Wads, k; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keh, M. S.; Keite, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kimbre, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kisse, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringe, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Liick, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ivia, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; Maclnnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magafia-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magafia; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Manse, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matiehard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mende, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Miche, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecehia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Hang, S.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Ram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, . J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powel, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, .; Punturo, M.; Purrer, PuppoM.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, RosiliskaS.; Ruggi, RiidigerP.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabe, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Sielleez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazus, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sunil, Suns; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepariczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tomasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Tome, C.; Tot, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifire, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozz, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Valente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bake, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; Van Heilningen, J. V.; Van Vegge, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vaslith, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Vvang, G.; Wang, O.; Wang, X.; Wiang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Wiarner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weliels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; WilIke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Whinkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; De Witte, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S.J.; Zhu, X.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report results of a deep all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars in data from the S6 LIGO science run. The search was possible thanks to the computing power provided by the volunteers of the Einstein@Home distributed computing project. We find no significant

  3. The second postulate of Einstein's theory of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMorris, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    This paper argues that Einstein in his original publication on special relativity uses two separate principles concerning the velocity of light: (i) its value, c(s), is independent of the motion of its source; (ii) its value, c(o), is independent of the motion of the observer. Where commentators have not been plainly ignorant of the existence of both principles in Einstein's work, they have been uncertain as to which one should be put forward. Uncertainty has arisen in the literature because Einstein occassionally uses constant velocity of light without any qualification. This paper sets out specifically to clear up the uncertainty as to whether c(s) or c(o) is being referred to in the early sections. It is established that c(s) is used right up to the middle of the third section, when c(o) is introduced for the first time. The paper also emphasises that there was no need to introduce c(o) before this point. It clarifies another (neglected) point also, that in so far as Einstein uses c(s), this constancy of the wave propagation is not peculiar to light; but in so far as he uses c(o) it is. The occassion is also taken to point out a contradiction and a logical infelicity occurring in Einstein's paper. The intention here is to show that Einstein's original oaper, at least up to the derivation of the Lorentz transformation equations, was not as satisfactory as it could have been. (auth.)

  4. LIGO GW150914 and GW151226 gravitational wave detection and generalized gravitation theory (MOG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Moffat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of gravitational waves in a generalized gravitation theory is investigated. The linearized field equations and the metric tensor quadrupole moment power and the decrease in radius of an inspiralling binary system of two compact objects are derived. The generalized Kerr metric describing a spinning black hole is determined by its mass M and the spin parameter a=cS/GM2. The LIGO-Virgo collaboration data is fitted with smaller binary black hole masses in agreement with the current electromagnetic, observed X-ray binary upper bound for a black hole mass, M≲10M⊙.

  5. Some problems of modern gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Possible role of gravitation in high-energy physics and cosmology is under study. A problem of the limiting elementary particle mass is considered. Maximum value of the elementary partjcle mass is chosen to be msub(p)=(h/2πc/kappa)sup(1/2) approximately equal to 10 -5 g. The presented combination of universal constants is called the Plank mass, which is considered as possible characteristics of real physical objects called ''maximons''. These superheavy elementary particles may play an important part in the Universe evolution. Emphasis is paid to the scenario of the Universe evolution, according to which maximons are formed just in the first moments of the Universe expansion, and, then, form a normal substance interacting with each other. Reasons confirming the oscillating Universe model are presented

  6. Einstein's General Theory of Relativity-with Modern Applications in Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrabes, C

    2008-01-01

    forms and on vectors (exterior covariant and Lie derivatives) are presented, and emphasis is given to the Cartan formalism as it is later systematically used to derive the curvature tensor and for solutions of the Einstein field equations. One also finds the properties of hypersurfaces, such as the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures and the Gauss-Codazzi relations. This makes this part of the book very useful and convenient since those important elements are gathered in one place. However the density of exposition in this part might appear a bit steep to a reader without some previous knowledge of differential geometry. Part III deals with Einstein's field equations, and their applications to gravitational waves and black holes. The field equations are derived from a variational principle, the geometrical part (Einstein tensor) from the Einstein-Hilbert action, and the matter part (stress-energy tensor) from a generic action integral for matter. Various examples of stress-energy tensors and in particular, for fluids, are considered, and several are used later in cosmology (for instance quintessence and Lorentz invariant vacuum energy). A short chapter on the linear approximation and gravitational waves then follows and it is good to see a section on gravito-electromagnetism. This part ends with a chapter devoted to black holes which is perhaps the weakest part of the book as it is quite sketchy. However this is to be expected in a book with an emphasis on cosmology, and such topics are extensively described in other books. The rest of the book (parts IV and V) is essentially concerned with cosmology. The authors give a detailed description of the applications of the Einstein field equations to a universe with various matter contents, and present in a successful way the recent developments in this domain. The first chapter of part IV describes the standard homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model. It is followed by an interesting chapter dealing with universes

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Einstein's General Theory of Relativity—with Modern Applications in Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrabès, C.

    2008-09-01

    forms and on vectors (exterior covariant and Lie derivatives) are presented, and emphasis is given to the Cartan formalism as it is later systematically used to derive the curvature tensor and for solutions of the Einstein field equations. One also finds the properties of hypersurfaces, such as the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures and the Gauss Codazzi relations. This makes this part of the book very useful and convenient since those important elements are gathered in one place. However the density of exposition in this part might appear a bit steep to a reader without some previous knowledge of differential geometry. Part III deals with Einstein's field equations, and their applications to gravitational waves and black holes. The field equations are derived from a variational principle, the geometrical part (Einstein tensor) from the Einstein Hilbert action, and the matter part (stress energy tensor) from a generic action integral for matter. Various examples of stress energy tensors and in particular, for fluids, are considered, and several are used later in cosmology (for instance quintessence and Lorentz invariant vacuum energy). A short chapter on the linear approximation and gravitational waves then follows and it is good to see a section on gravito-electromagnetism. This part ends with a chapter devoted to black holes which is perhaps the weakest part of the book as it is quite sketchy. However this is to be expected in a book with an emphasis on cosmology, and such topics are extensively described in other books. The rest of the book (parts IV and V) is essentially concerned with cosmology. The authors give a detailed description of the applications of the Einstein field equations to a universe with various matter contents, and present in a successful way the recent developments in this domain. The first chapter of part IV describes the standard homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model. It is followed by an interesting chapter dealing with universes

  8. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-07-14

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials.

  9. Relativistic gravitation theory for the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.

    2004-01-01

    The modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) paradigm of Milgrom can boast of a number of successful predictions regarding galactic dynamics; these are made without the assumption that dark matter plays a significant role. MOND requires gravitation to depart from Newtonian theory in the extragalactic regime where dynamical accelerations are small. So far relativistic gravitation theories proposed to underpin MOND have either clashed with the post-Newtonian tests of general relativity, or failed to provide significant gravitational lensing, or violated hallowed principles by exhibiting superluminal scalar waves or an a priori vector field. We develop a relativistic MOND inspired theory which resolves these problems. In it gravitation is mediated by metric, a scalar, and a 4-vector field, all three dynamical. For a simple choice of its free function, the theory has a Newtonian limit for nonrelativistic dynamics with significant acceleration, but a MOND limit when accelerations are small. We calculate the β and γ parameterized post-Newtonian coefficients showing them to agree with solar system measurements. The gravitational light deflection by nonrelativistic systems is governed by the same potential responsible for dynamics of particles. To the extent that MOND successfully describes dynamics of a system, the new theory's predictions for lensing by that system's visible matter will agree as well with observations as general relativity's predictions made with a dynamically successful dark halo model. Cosmological models based on the theory are quite similar to those based on general relativity; they predict slow evolution of the scalar field. For a range of initial conditions, this last result makes it easy to rule out superluminal propagation of metric, scalar, and vector waves

  10. Non-singular cosmologies in the conformally invariant gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kembhavi, A.K.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that in the framework of a conformally invariant gravitation theory, the singularity which is present in some anisotropic universes in general relativity is due to a wrong choice of conformal frame. Frames exist in which these models can be made singularity free. (author)

  11. Hydrodynamical equations for spherical gravitational collapse in terms of a generalized theory of gravitation with higher derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1986-06-01

    In similar to Misner and Sharp's formalism in general relativity for a spherical gravitational collapse, a formalism for the spherical gravitational collapse is presented on the basis of a generalized theory of gravitation in the sense of Utiyama-DeWitt (which was later extended by Parker's school and Zel'dovich's one). The resulted formalism is somewhat similar to that developed by me in 1972 based on the scalar-tensor theory of gravity. (author)

  12. More accurate theory for Bose-Einstein condensation fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2008-01-01

    Bose-Einstein statistics is derived in the thermodynamic limit when the ratio of system size to thermal de Broglie wavelength goes to infinity. However, according to the experimental setup of Bose-Einstein condensation of harmonically trapped Bose gas of alkali atoms, the ratio near the condensation temperature (T o ) is 30-50. And, at ultralow temperatures well below T o , this ratio becomes comparable to 1. We argue that finite size as well as the ultralow temperature induces corrections to Bose-Einstein statistics. From the corrected statistics we plot condensation fraction versus temperature graph. This theoretical plot satisfies well with the experimental plot [A. Griesmaier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 160401

  13. Einstein's opponents the public controversy about the theory of relativity in the 1920s

    CERN Document Server

    Wazeck, Milena

    2014-01-01

    This detailed account of the controversy surrounding the publication of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity explores the ferocious popular and academic opposition which at one time encircled one of the most important scientific breakthroughs of the twentieth century. Based on extensive archival research, this fascinating discourse includes a compelling and entertaining examination of the contemporary literature created by Einstein's detractors. Exploring the arguments and strategies, social contexts, and motivations of Einstein's detractors, and providing unique insights into the dynamics of scientific controversies, this book is ideal for anyone interested in the history and philosophy of physics, popular science, and the public understanding of science.

  14. Effective gravitational coupling in modified teleparallel theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Habib; Capozziello, Salvatore; D'Agostino, Rocco; Luongo, Orlando

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, we consider an extended form of teleparallel Lagrangian f (T ,ϕ ,X ) , as function of a scalar field ϕ , its kinetic term X and the torsion scalar T . We use linear perturbations to obtain the equation of matter density perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. The gravitational coupling is modified in scalar modes with respect to the one of general relativity, albeit vector modes decay and do not show any significant effects. We thus extend these results by involving multiple scalar field models. Further, we study conformal transformations in teleparallel gravity and we obtain the coupling as the scalar field is nonminimally coupled to both torsion and boundary terms. Finally, we propose the specific model f (T ,ϕ ,X )=T +∂μϕ ∂μϕ +ξ T ϕ2 . To check its goodness, we employ the observational Hubble data, constraining the coupling constant, ξ , through a Monte Carlo technique based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Hence, fixing ξ to its best-fit value got from our numerical analysis, we calculate the growth rate of matter perturbations and we compare our outcomes with the latest measurements and the predictions of the Λ CDM model.

  15. First low-frequency Einstein@Home all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Advanced LIGO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Deelman, E.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Duncan, J.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gabel, M.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mayani, R.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. 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M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahi, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.-F.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Anderson, D. P.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report results of a deep all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars in data from the first Advanced LIGO observing run. This search investigates the low frequency range of Advanced LIGO data, between 20 and 100 Hz, much of which was not explored in initial LIGO. The search was made possible by the computing power provided by the volunteers of the Einstein@Home project. We find no significant signal candidate and set the most stringent upper limits to date on the amplitude of gravitational wave signals from the target population, corresponding to a sensitivity depth of 48.7 [1 /√{Hz }] . At the frequency of best strain sensitivity, near 100 Hz, we set 90% confidence upper limits of 1.8 ×1 0-25. At the low end of our frequency range, 20 Hz, we achieve upper limits of 3.9 ×1 0-24. At 55 Hz we can exclude sources with ellipticities greater than 1 0-5 within 100 pc of Earth with fiducial value of the principal moment of inertia of 1038 kg m2 .

  16. Principle of equivalence and a theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelupsky, D.

    1985-01-01

    We examine a well-known thought experiment often used to explain why we should expect a ray of light to be bent by gravity; according to this the light bends downward in the gravitational field because this is just what an observer would see if there were no field and he were accelerating upward instead. We show that this description of the action of Newtonian gravity in a flat space-time corresponds to an old two-index symmetric tensor field theory of gravitation

  17. Quantum field theory in a gravitational shock wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimcik, C.

    1988-01-01

    A scalar massless non-interacting quantum field theory on an arbitrary gravitational shock wave background is exactly solved. S-matrix and expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor are computed for an arbitrarily polarized sourceless gravitational shock wave and for a homogeneous infinite planar shell shock wave, all performed in any number of space-time dimensions. Expectation values of the energy density in scattering states exhibit a singularity which lies exactly at the location of the curvature singularity found in the infinite shell collision. (orig.)

  18. Foundations of gravitation theory: the principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugan, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    A new framework is presented within which to discuss the principle of equivalence and its experimental tests. The framework incorporates a special structure imposed on the equivalence principle by the principle of energy conservation. This structure includes relations among the conceptual components of the equivalence principle as well as quantitative relations among the outcomes of its experimental tests. One of the most striking new results obtained through use of this framework is a connection between the breakdown of local Lorentz invariance and the breakdown of the principle that all bodies fall with the same acceleration in a gravitational field. An extensive discussion of experimental tests of the equivalence principle and their significance is also presented. Within the above framework, theory-independent analyses of a broad range of equivalence principle tests are possible. Gravitational redshift experiments. Doppler-shift experiments, the Turner-Hill and Hughes-Drever experiments, and a number of solar-system tests of gravitation theories are analyzed. Application of the techniques of theoretical nuclear physics to the quantitative interpretation of equivalence principle tests using laboratory materials of different composition yields a number of important results. It is found that current Eotvos experiments significantly demonstrate the compatibility of the weak interactions with the equivalence principle. It is also shown that the Hughes-Drever experiment is the most precise test of local Lorentz invariance yet performed. The work leads to a strong, tightly knit empirical basis for the principle of equivalence, the central pillar of the foundations of gravitation theory

  19. The quantum cosmology of Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in Eight-dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Bing; Li Xinzhou

    1991-01-01

    The quantum cosmology of Einstein-Yang-Mills has been studied. The Hartle-Hawking's proposal for the boundary conditions of the universe is extended to Eight-dimensional Einstein-Yong-Mills theory. A miniuperspace wave function is calculated in the classical limit corresponding to a superposition of classical solutions in which four of the dimensions remain small while the other four behave like an inflationary universe

  20. Test-particle motion in Einstein's unified field theory. III. Magnetic monopoles and charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper (paper I), we developed a method for finding the exact equations of structure and motion of multipole test particles in Einstein's unified field theory: the theory of the nonsymmetric field. In that paper we also applied the method and found in Einstein's unified field theory the equations of structure and motion of neutral pole-dipole test particles possessing no electromagnetic multipole moments. In a second paper (paper II), we applied the method and found in Einstein's unified field theory the exact equations of structure and motion of charged test particles possessing no magnetic monopole moments. In the present paper (paper III), we apply the method and find in Einstein's unified field theory the exact equations of structure and motion of charged test particles possessing magnetic monopole moments. It follows from the form of these equations of structure and motion that in general in Einstein's unified field theory a test particle possessing a magnetic monopole moment in a background electromagnetic field must also possess spin

  1. Gravitation and vacuum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevikyan, R.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents equations that describe particles with spins s = 0, 1/2, 1 completely and which also describe 2s + 2 limiting fields as E → ∞. It is shown that the ordinary Hilbert-Einstein action for the gravitation field must be augmented by the action for the Bose vacuum field. This means that one must introduce in the gravitational equations a cosmological term proportional to the square of the strength of the Bose vacuum field. It is shown that the theory of gravitation describes three realities: matter, field, and vacuum field. A new form of matter--the vacuum field--is introduced into field theory

  2. The variation of G and the quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirac, P.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Einstein theory of gravitation has had enormous success. Various tests have been made and every time the Einstein theory has been confirmed and rival theories have been knocked out. The author discusses the Large Numbers Hypothesis within the framework of the Einstein theory. (Auth.)

  3. Gravitational theory in atomic scale units in Dirac cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, W.

    1984-01-01

    The implication of Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH) that there are two cosmological space-time metrics, gravitational (E) and atomic (A), is used to formulate the gravitational laws for a general mass system in atomic scale units within such a cosmology. The gravitational laws are illustrated in application to the case of a single spherical mass immersed in the smoothed out expanding universe. The condition is determined for such a metric to apply approximately just outside a typical member of a cosmic distribution of such masses. Conversely, the condition is given when the influence of the universe as a whole can be neglected outside such a mass. In the latter situation, which applies in particular to stars, a Schwarzschild-type metric is derived which incorporates variable G in accordance with the LNH. The dynamics of freely moving particles and photons in such a metric are examined according to the theory and observational tests are formulated. (author)

  4. An overview of gravitational waves theory, sources and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    This book describes detection techniques used to search for and analyze gravitational waves (GW). It covers the whole domain of GW science, starting from the theory and ending with the experimental techniques (both present and future) used to detect them. The theoretical sections of the book address the theory of general relativity and of GW, followed by the theory of GW detection. The various sources of GW are described as well as the methods used to analyse them and to extract their physical parameters. It includes an analysis of the consequences of GW observations in terms of astrophysics as well as a description of the different detectors that exist and that are planned for the future. With the recent announcement of GW detection and the first results from LISA Pathfinder, this book will allow non-specialists to understand the present status of the field and the future of gravitational wave science

  5. Perturbations and quasi-normal modes of black holes in Einstein-Aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplya, R.A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a new method for calculation of quasi-normal modes of black holes, when the effective potential, which governs black hole perturbations, is known only numerically in some region near the black hole. This method can be applied to perturbations of a wide class of numerical black hole solutions. We apply it to the black holes in the Einstein-Aether theory, a theory where general relativity is coupled to a unit time-like vector field, in order to observe local Lorentz symmetry violation. We found that in the non-reduced Einstein-Aether theory, real oscillation frequency and damping rate of quasi-normal modes are larger than those of Schwarzschild black holes in the Einstein theory

  6. Bipolar outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon - Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyambuya, Golden Gadzirayi

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of a series on the Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (ASTG). This theory is built on Laplace-Poisson's well known equation and it has been shown that the ASTG is capable of explaining, from a purely classical physics standpoint, the precession of the perihelion of solar planets as a consequence of the azimuthal symmetry emerging from the spin of the Sun. This symmetry has and must have an influence on the emergent gravitational field. We show herein that the emergent equations from the ASTG, under some critical conditions determined by the spin, do possess repulsive gravitational fields in the polar regions of the gravitating body in question. This places the ASTG on an interesting pedestal to infer the origins of outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon. Outflows are a ubiquitous phenomenon found in star forming systems and their true origin is a question yet to be settled. Given the current thinking on their origin, the direction that the present paper takes is nothing short of an asymptotic break from conventional wisdom; at the very least, it is a complete paradigm shift because gravitation is not at all associated with this process, but rather it is thought to be an all-attractive force that only tries to squash matter together onto a single point. Additionally, we show that the emergent Azimuthally Symmetric Gravitational Field from the ASTG strongly suggests a solution to the supposed Radiation Problem that is thought to be faced by massive stars in their process of formation. That is, at ∼ 8-10 M sun , radiation from the nascent star is expected to halt the accretion of matter. We show that in-falling material will fall onto the equatorial disk and from there, this material will be channeled onto the forming star via the equatorial plane, thus accretion of mass continues well past the value of ∼ 8-10 M sun , albeit via the disk. Along the equatorial plane, the net force (with the radiation force included) on any

  7. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L. Danilishin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  8. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  9. On quantum field theory in gravitational background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, R.; Narnhofer, H.; Stein, U.

    1984-02-01

    We discuss Quantum Fields on Riemannian space-time. A principle of local definitness is introduced which is needed beyond equations of motion and commutation relations to fix the theory uniquely. It also allows to formulate local stability. In application to a region with a time-like Killing vector field and horizons it yields the value of the Hawking temperature. The concept of vacuum and particles in a non stationary metric is treated in the example of the Robertson-Walker metric and some remarks on detectors in non inertial motion are added. (orig.)

  10. Ghost-Free Massive $f(R)$ Theories Modelled as Effective Einstein Spaces and Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Vacaru, Sergiu I

    2014-01-01

    We study how massive ghost-free gravity $f(R)$-modified theories, MGFTs, can be encoded into generic off-diagonal Einstein spaces. Using "auxiliary" connections completely defined by the metric fields and adapted to nonholonomic frames with associated to nonlinear connection structure, we decouple and integrate in certain general forms the field equations in MGFT. Imposing additional nonholonomic constraints, we can generate Levi--Civita, LC, configurations and mimic MGFT effects via off-diagonal interactions of effective Einstein and/or Einstein-Cartan gravity with nonholonomically induced torsion. The cosmological evolution of ghost-free off--diagonal Einstein spaces is investigated. Certain compatibility of MGFT cosmology to small off-diagonal deformations of $\\Lambda $CDM models is established. %

  11. Gravitational and electromagnetic potentials of the stationary Einstein-Maxwell field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    Associated with the stationary Einstein-Maxwell field equations is an infinite hierarchy of potentials. The basic characteristics of these potentials are examined in general and then in greater detail for the particular case of the Reissner-Nordstrom metric. Thier essential utility in the process of solution generation is elucidated, and the necessary equations for solution generation are developed. Appropriate generating functions, which contain the complete infinite hierarchy of potentials, are developed and analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the inherent gauge freedom of these generating functions. Two methods of solution generation, which yield asymptotically flat solutions in vacuum, are generalized to include electromagnetism. One method, using potentials consistent with the Harrison transformation and the Reissner-Nordstrom metric, is discussed in detail, and its resultant difficulties are explored

  12. Gravitational Theories near the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Sanjeev

    2018-03-01

    Upcoming Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) are promising probes of gravity in or near the galactic center (GC). Effects of alternative theories of gravity, namely the Brans–Dicke theory (BDT) and f(R) gravity, are studied near the GC black hole by calculating departure from general relativity (GR) in periastron advance of the S stars and light deflection. For these estimations, black hole spin and quadrupole moments are taken in the ranges χ = 0.1–2.0 and {J}2={10}-6{--}2.0, respectively. Periastron advance ({\\dot{θ }}prec}) has been calculated for hypothetical S stars with orbital period one-fifth of S0-2 and eccentricity e = 0.8. The difference between BDT and GR ({{{Δ }}}th}{\\dot{θ }}prec}) lies in the range 10‑3–2.3 μas yr‑1, even for a large departure from GR. The difference between quadrupoles {J}2={10}-6 and J 2 = 2.0 lies in the range {{{Δ }}}{J2}{\\dot{θ }}prec}=0.268{--}0.281 μ {as} {yr}}-1. These ranges are not only outside the astrometric capability of the ELTs, but are also contaminated by stellar perturbations. Parameter degeneracy among χ, J 2, and {ω }BD} is discussed. For black hole–S-star distances, D LS = 100 and 50 au, the difference in light deflection between BDT and GR lies in the range d{(δ φ )}defl}={10}-5{--}{10}-1 μ {as}, making it difficult to distinguish them. From the relation between scalaron mass, {M}\\psi in f(R) gravity, and calculated d{(δ φ )}defl}, it is found that {M}\\psi ={10}-18{--}{10}-17 {eV} can form a stable “dark cloud” near the black hole. Scalarons with {10}-21 {eV} are found to bring d{(δ φ )}defl} close to the astrometric range of the ELTs. Prospects for these scalarons in the tests of gravity are discussed.

  13. f(R)-theories of gravity and gravitational baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambiase, G; Scarpetta, G [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); INFN - Gruppo Collegato di Salerno (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    The mechanism for generating the baryon asymmetry in the Universe is discussed in the framework of f(R)-theories of gravity. The gravitational baryogenesis, based on the coupling between the Ricci scalar curvature R and the baryon current, allows to determine the form of gravity Lagrangian, i.e. L(R) {approx} R{sup n}. The current bound on the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis data lead to n = 0.97.

  14. Spherically symmetric star model in the gravitational gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsou, C [Peking Observatory, China; Ch' en, S; Ho, T; Kuo, H

    1976-12-01

    It is shown that a star model, which is black hole-free and singularity-free, can be obtained naturally in the gravitational gauge theory, provided the space-time is torsion-free and the matter is spinless. The conclusion in a sense shows that the discussions about the black hole and the singularity based on general relativity may not describe nature correctly.

  15. A Gravitational Wave Detector Based on an Atom Interferometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational waves are tiny perturbations in the curvature of space-time that arise from accelerating masses – according to Einstein's general theory of relativity....

  16. Gravitational waves from binary black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is almost a century since Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves as one of the consequences of his general theory of relativity. A brief historical overview including Chandrasekhar's contribution to the subject is first presented. The current status of the experimental search for gravitational waves and the ...

  17. The metric-affine gravitational theory as the gauge theory of the affine group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    The metric-affine gravitational theory is shown to be the gauge theory of the affine group, or equivalently, the gauge theory of the group GL(4,R) of tetrad deformations in a space-time with a locally Minkowskian metric. The identities of the metric-affine theory, and the relationship between them and those of general relativity and Sciama-Kibble theory, are derived. (Auth.)

  18. Unified theory of gravitation and electromagnetism based on the conformal group SOsub(4,2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavsic, M.

    1977-01-01

    It is done a ''minimal'' change in the existing 4-dimensional relativity, by extending it to the 6-dimensional conformal (etasup(a))-space (flat or curved one) with the metric tensor gsub(ab) (a, b=0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6), where all components of the 6-vector etasup(a)=(etasup(μ)=kxsup(μ), k, lambda) are considered as independent physical degrees of freedom. All basic equations of (special and general) relativity in 6-dimensional (flat or curved) conformal (etasup(a))-space have the same form as the corresponding equations in the 4-dimensional space. The novel feature of such an extended theory (named ''conformal relativity'') is the introduction of the scale degree of freedom k, which can be different from 1 and can change along the particle world-line. However, if k=1, then the conformal relativity reduces to the usual 4-dimensional relativity. Geodesics in the curved (etasup(a))-space correspond to the motion of electrically charged test particles in gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The field equations for the metric tensor gsub(ab) are Einstein equations, extended to the (etasup(a))-space; they describe a gravitational and electromagnetic field

  19. Energy-momentum complex in Moeller's tetrad theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhail, F.I.; Lashin, E.I.

    1991-08-01

    Moeller's tetrad theory of gravitation is examined with regard to the energy-momentum complex. The energy-momentum complex as well as the superpotential associated with Moeller's theory are derived. Moeller's field equations are solved in the case of ''general'' spherical symmetry. Two different solutions, giving rise to the same metric, are obtained. The energy associated with one solution is found to be twice the energy associated with the other. An avenue out of this inconsistency is suggested. (author). 20 refs, 1 tab

  20. On tree amplitudes of supersymmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamo, Tim; Casali, Eduardo; Roehrig, Kai A.; Skinner, David [Department of Applied Mathematics & Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-29

    We present a new formula for all single trace tree amplitudes in four dimensional super Yang-Mills coupled to Einstein supergravity. Like the Cachazo-He-Yuan formula, our expression is supported on solutions of the scattering equations, but with momenta written in terms of spinor helicity variables. Supersymmetry and parity are both manifest. In the pure gravity and pure Yang-Mills sectors, it reduces to the known twistor-string formulae. We show that the formula behaves correctly under factorization and sketch how these amplitudes may be obtained from a four-dimensional (ambi)twistor string.

  1. Rotating black holes in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen

    2011-04-15

    We construct generalizations of the Kerr black holes by including higher-curvature corrections in the form of the Gauss-Bonnet density coupled to the dilaton. We show that the domain of existence of these Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton (EGBD) black holes is bounded by the Kerr black holes, the critical EGBD black holes, and the singular extremal EGBD solutions. The angular momentum of the EGBD black holes can exceed the Kerr bound. The EGBD black holes satisfy a generalized Smarr relation. We also compare their innermost stable circular orbits with those of the Kerr black holes and show the existence of differences which might be observable in astrophysical systems.

  2. On possible conceptual difficulties of quantum field theories involving gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper outlines principles on the basis of which one would conclude that the gravitational radius of test bodies can impose fundamental limitations on the measurability of coordinates and time in quantum theory, limitations of the type ΔxΔT(>=)(thetak)/csup(4)(more precisely Δrsub(gr)ΔT(>=)(thetak)/csup(4)) as a consequence of the relation ΔEΔT(>=)theta. Corresponding limitations arise for measurability of the average electrostatic field Δanti ΣΔT(>=)(theta√k)/rsub(gr)sup(2)c and of the gravitational field (the Cristoffel symbols [sub(μγ)sup(α)]):Δ[sub(44)sup(1)]ΔT(>=)(thetak)/(rsub(gr)sup(2)c)

  3. A Unified Theory of Interaction: Gravitation and Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener P.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A theory is proposed from which the basic equations of gravitation and electromagnetism are derived from a single Lagrangian. The total energy of an atom can be expressed in a power series of the fine structure constant, $alpha$. Specific selections of these terms yield the relativistic correction to the Bohr values of the hydrogen spectrum and the Sommerfeld-Dirac equation for the fine structure spectrum of the hydrogen atom. Expressions for the classical electron radius and some of the Large Number Coincidences are derived. A Lorentz-type force equation is derived for both gravitation and electrodynamics. Electron spin is shown to be an effect of fourth order in $alpha$.

  4. The NASA Beyond Einstein Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's legacy is incomplete, his theory of General relativity raises -- but cannot answer --three profound questions: What powered the big bang? What happens to space, time, and matter at the edge of a black hole? and What is the mysterious dark energy pulling the Universe apart? The Beyond Einstein program within NASA's Office of Space Science aims to answer these questions, employing a series of missions linked by powerful new technologies and complementary approaches towards shared science goals. The Beyond Einstein program has three linked elements which advance science and technology towards two visions; to detect directly gravitational wave signals from the earliest possible moments of the BIg Bang, and to image the event horizon of a black hole. The central element is a pair of Einstein Great Observatories, Constellation-X and LISA. Constellation-X is a powerful new X-ray observatory dedicated to X-Ray Spectroscopy. LISA is the first spaced based gravitational wave detector. These powerful facilities will blaze new paths to the questions about black holes, the Big Bang and dark energy. The second element is a series of competitively selected Einstein Probes, each focused on one of the science questions and includes a mission dedicated resolving the Dark Energy mystery. The third element is a program of technology development, theoretical studies and education. The Beyond Einstein program is a new element in the proposed NASA budget for 2004. This talk will give an overview of the program and the missions contained within it.

  5. Higher-dimensional string theory in Lyra geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmic strings as source of gravitational field in general relativity was discussed by ... tensor theory of gravitation and constructed an analog of Einstein field ... As string concept is useful before the particle creation and can explain galaxy for-.

  6. Are black holes in alternative theories serious astrophysical candidates? The case for Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, Paolo; Cardoso, Vitor

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Einstein's theory will get some as yet unknown corrections, possibly large in the strong-field regime. An ideal place to look for these modifications is in the vicinities of compact objects such as black holes. Here, we study dilatonic black holes, which arise in the framework of Gauss-Bonnet couplings and one-loop corrected four-dimensional effective theory of heterotic superstrings at low energies. These are interesting objects as a prototype for alternative, yet well-behaved gravity theories: they evade the 'no-hair' theorem of general relativity but were proven to be stable against radial perturbations. We investigate the viability of these black holes as astrophysical objects and try to provide some means to distinguish them from black holes in general relativity. We start by extending previous works and establishing the stability of these black holes against axial perturbations. We then look for solutions of the field equations describing slowly rotating black holes and study geodesic motion around this geometry. Depending on the values of mass, dilaton charge, and angular momentum of the solution, one can have differences in the innermost-stable-circular-orbit location and orbital frequency, relative to black holes in general relativity. In the most favorable cases, the difference amounts to a few percent. Given the current state-of-the-art, we discuss the difficulty of distinguishing the correct theory of gravity from electromagnetic observations or even with gravitational-wave detectors.

  7. The existence of superluminal particles is consistent with the kinematics of Einstein's special theory of relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Székely, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Within an axiomatic framework of kinematics, we prove that the existence of faster than light particles is logically independent of Einstein's special theory of relativity. Consequently, it is consistent with the kinematics of special relativity that there might be faster than light particles.

  8. 100 years of Einstein's Theory of Brownian Motion:from Pollen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    theory of heat", Einstein developed a quantitative the-. 1. Debashish ... were quite different from those proposed by the .... and Ramsey tried to rule out the mechanism based on ... minds us of Stiglers law of eponymy: "No scientific dis- covery is ...

  9. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Yang-Mills theory and cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Dadhich, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Exact nonstatic spherically symmetric black-hole solutions of the higher dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills equations for a null dust with Yang-Mills gauge charge are obtained by employing Wu-Yang ansatz, namely, HD-EYM Vaidya solution. It is interesting to note that gravitational contribution of Yang-Mills (YM) gauge charge for this ansatz is indeed opposite (attractive rather than repulsive) that of Maxwell charge. It turns out that the gravitational collapse of null dust with YM gauge charge admits strong curvature shell focusing naked singularities violating cosmic censorship. However, there is significant shrinkage of the initial data space for a naked singularity of the HD-Vaidya collapse due to presence of YM gauge charge. The effect of YM gauge charge on structure and location of the apparent and event horizons is also discussed.

  10. Gravitation and electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Apsel, D

    1979-01-01

    Through an examination of the Bohm-Aharonov experiment, a new theory of gravitation and electromagnetism is proposed. The fundamental assumption of the theory is that the motion of a particle in a combination of gravitational and electromagnetic fields is determined from a variational principle of the form delta integral /sub A//sup B /d tau =0. The form of the physical time is determined from an examination of the Maxwell-Einstein action function. The field and motion equations are formally identical to those of Maxwell-Einstein theory. The theory predicts that even in a field-free region of space, electromagnetic potentials can alter the phase of a wave function and the lifetime of a charged particle. The phase alteration has been observed in the Bohm-Aharonov experiment. There is an indication that the lifetime alteration has shown up in a recent CERN storage ring experiment. Experimental tests are proposed. (11 refs).

  11. Cosmological reconstruction and Om diagnostic analysis of Einstein-Aether theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqua, Antonio [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Chattopadhyay, Surajit [Pailan College of Management and Technology, Bengal Pailan Park, Kolkata-700 104 (India); Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Raza, Muhammad [Department of Mathematics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: toto.pasqua@gmail.com, E-mail: surajcha@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: d.momeni@yahoo.com, E-mail: mraza@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@gmail.com [Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia—Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada)

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze the cosmological models in Einstein-Aether gravity, which is a modified theory of gravity in which a time-like vector field breaks the Lorentz symmetry. We use this formalism to analyse different cosmological models with different behavior of the scale factor. In this analysis, we use a certain functional dependence of the Dark Energy (DE) on the Hubble parameter H . It will be demonstrated that the Aether vector field has a non-trivial effect on these cosmological models. We also perform the Om diagnostic in Einstein-Aether gravity and we fit the parameters of the cosmological models using recent observational data.

  12. Dark matter as a ghost free conformal extension of Einstein theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barvinsky, A.O.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss ghost free models of the recently suggested mimetic dark matter theory. This theory is shown to be a conformal extension of Einstein general relativity. Dark matter originates from gauging out its local Weyl invariance as an extra degree of freedom which describes a potential flow of the pressureless perfect fluid. For a positive energy density of this fluid the theory is free of ghost instabilities, which gives strong preference to stable configurations with a positive scalar curvature and trace of the matter stress tensor. Instabilities caused by caustics of the geodesic flow, inherent in this model, serve as a motivation for an alternative conformal extension of Einstein theory, based on the generalized Proca vector field. A potential part of this field modifies the inflationary stage in cosmology, whereas its rotational part at the post inflationary epoch might simulate rotating flows of dark matter

  13. Hypersurface Homogeneous Cosmological Model in Modified Theory of Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katore, S. D.; Hatkar, S. P.; Baxi, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    We study a hypersurface homogeneous space-time in the framework of the f (R, T) theory of gravitation in the presence of a perfect fluid. Exact solutions of field equations are obtained for exponential and power law volumetric expansions. We also solve the field equations by assuming the proportionality relation between the shear scalar (σ ) and the expansion scalar (θ ). It is observed that in the exponential model, the universe approaches isotropy at large time (late universe). The investigated model is notably accelerating and expanding. The physical and geometrical properties of the investigated model are also discussed.

  14. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The General Theory of Relativity (GR), created by Albert Einstein between 1907 and 1915, is a theory both of gravitation and of spacetime structure. It is based on the assumption that matter, via its energy-momentum, interacts with the metric of spacetime, which is considered (in contrast to Newtonian physics and SPECIAL RELATIVITY) as a dynamical field having degrees of freedom of its own (GRAVI...

  15. Progress in gravitational wave detection: Interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2002-01-01

    A gravitational wave (GW) is a physical entity of space-time derived from Einstein's theory of general relativity. Challenging projects to observe gravitational waves are being conducted throughout the world. A Japanese project involving a 300 m baseline laser interferometer, TAMA, achieved 1000 hr of continuous observation with the best sensitivity in the world during the summer of 2001. After achieving promising results, the realization of LCGT (Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope) will become possible in the near future

  16. Bohr's Electron was Problematic for Einstein: String Theory Solved the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, William

    2013-04-01

    Neils Bohr's 1913 model of the hydrogen electron was problematic for Albert Einstein. Bohr's electron rotates with positive kinetic energies +K but has addition negative potential energies - 2K. The total net energy is thus always negative with value - K. Einstein's special relativity requires energies to be positive. There's a Bohr negative energy conflict with Einstein's positive energy requirement. The two men debated the problem. Both would have preferred a different electron model having only positive energies. Bohr and Einstein couldn't find such a model. But Murray Gell-Mann did! In the 1960's, Gell-Mann introduced his loop-shaped string-like electron. Now, analysis with string theory shows that the hydrogen electron is a loop of string-like material with a length equal to the circumference of the circular orbit it occupies. It rotates like a lariat around its centered proton. This loop-shape has no negative potential energies: only positive +K relativistic kinetic energies. Waves induced on loop-shaped electrons propagate their energy at a speed matching the tangential speed of rotation. With matching wave speed and only positive kinetic energies, this loop-shaped electron model is uniquely suited to be governed by the Einstein relativistic equation for total mass-energy. Its calculated photon emissions are all in excellent agreement with experimental data and, of course, in agreement with those -K calculations by Neils Bohr 100 years ago. Problem solved!

  17. Quantum Field Theoretic Derivation of the Einstein Weak Equivalence Principle Using Emqg Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01

    We provide a quantum field theoretic derivation of Einstein's Weak Equivalence Principle of general relativity using a new quantum gravity theory proposed by the authors called Electro-Magnetic Quantum Gravity or EMQG (ref. 1). EMQG is based on a new theory of inertia (ref. 5) proposed by R. Haisch, A. Rueda, and H. Puthoff (which we modified and called Quantum Inertia). Quantum Inertia states that classical Newtonian Inertia is a property of matter due to the strictly local electrical force ...

  18. Linearized analysis of (2+1)-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Jiro.

    1989-08-01

    On the basis of previous result by Hosoya and Nakao that (2+1)-dimensional gravity reduces the geodesic motion in moduli space, we investigate the effects of matter fields on the geodesic motion using the linearized theory. It is shown that the transverse-traceless parts of energy-momentum tensor make the deviation from the geodesic motion. This result is important for the Einstein-Maxwell theory due to the existence of global modes of Maxwell fields on torus. (author)

  19. Unification of Gravitation and Electromagnetism in a Relativistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A theory of gravitation is considered in a relativistic version of Finslerian geometry. It is found that both the geodesic equations and the Finslerian analogue of the Einstein\\'s field equations have terms that involve the electromagnetic field tensor, thereby pointing out to the geometrization of electrodynamics and hence to a ...

  20. Construction and analysis of a functional renormalization-group equation for gravitation in the Einstein-Cartan approach; Konstruktion und Analyse einer funktionalen Renormierungsgruppengleichung fuer Gravitation im Einstein-Cartan-Zugang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Jan-Eric

    2011-03-11

    Whereas the Standard Model of elementary particle physics represents a consistent, renormalizable quantum field theory of three of the four known interactions, the quantization of gravity still remains an unsolved problem. However, in recent years evidence for the asymptotic safety of gravity was provided. That means that also for gravity a quantum field theory can be constructed that is renormalizable in a generalized way which does not explicitly refer to perturbation theory. In addition, this approach, that is based on the Wilsonian renormalization group, predicts the correct microscopic action of the theory. In the classical framework, metric gravity is equivalent to the Einstein-Cartan theory on the level of the vacuum field equations. The latter uses the tetrad e and the spin connection {omega} as fundamental variables. However, this theory possesses more degrees of freedom, a larger gauge group, and its associated action is of first order. All these features make a treatment analogue to metric gravity much more difficult. In this thesis a three-dimensional truncation of the form of a generalized Hilbert-Palatini action is analyzed. Besides the running of Newton's constant G{sub k} and the cosmological constant {lambda}{sub k}, it also captures the renormalization of the Immirzi parameter {gamma}{sub k}. In spite of the mentioned difficulties, the spectrum of the free Hilbert-Palatini propagator can be computed analytically. On its basis, a proper time-like flow equation is constructed. Furthermore, appropriate gauge conditions are chosen and analyzed in detail. This demands a covariantization of the gauge transformations. The resulting flow is analyzed for different regularization schemes and gauge parameters. The results provide convincing evidence for asymptotic safety within the (e,{omega}) approach as well and therefore for the possible existence of a mathematically consistent and predictive fundamental quantum theory of gravity. In particular, one

  1. Einstein. A centenary volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    The subject is divided as follows: part 1, reminiscences (of Einstein and his life, by various authors); part 2, Einstein and his work (includes accounts of special and general relativity, gravitation, the development of quantum physics and concepts of space and time); part 3, Einstein's letters; part 4, Einstein's writings (including accounts of electrodynamics of moving bodies, general relativity, method of theoretical physics and an elementary derivation of the equivalence of mass and energy). (U.K.)

  2. Palatini approach to Born-Infeld-Einstein theory and a geometric description of electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollick, Dan N.

    2004-01-01

    The field equations associated with the Born-Infeld-Einstein action are derived using the Palatini variational technique. In this approach the metric and connection are varied independently and the Ricci tensor is generally not symmetric. For sufficiently small curvatures the resulting field equations can be divided into two sets. One set, involving the antisymmetric part of the Ricci tensor R or μν , consists of the field equation for a massive vector field. The other set consists of the Einstein field equations with an energy momentum tensor for the vector field plus additional corrections. In a vacuum with R or μν =0 the field equations are shown to be the usual Einstein vacuum equations. This extends the universality of the vacuum Einstein equations, discussed by Ferraris et al., to the Born-Infeld-Einstein action. In the simplest version of the theory there is a single coupling constant and by requiring that the Einstein field equations hold to a good approximation in neutron stars it is shown that mass of the vector field exceeds the lower bound on the mass of the photon. Thus, in this case the vector field cannot represent the electromagnetic field and would describe a new geometrical field. In a more general version in which the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of the Ricci tensor have different coupling constants it is possible to satisfy all of the observational constraints if the antisymmetric coupling is much larger than the symmetric coupling. In this case the antisymmetric part of the Ricci tensor can describe the electromagnetic field

  3. On Certain Conceptual Anomalies in Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Crothers S. J.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of conceptual anomalies occurring in the Standard exposition of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. These anomalies relate to issues in both mathematics and in physics and penetrate to the very heart of Einstein’s theory. This paper reveals and amplifies a few such anomalies, including the fact that Einstein’s field equations for the so-called static vacuum configuration, R = 0 , violates his Principle of Equiv- alence, and is therefore ...

  4. Construction and analysis of a functional renormalization-group equation for gravitation in the Einstein-Cartan approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, Jan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Whereas the Standard Model of elementary particle physics represents a consistent, renormalizable quantum field theory of three of the four known interactions, the quantization of gravity still remains an unsolved problem. However, in recent years evidence for the asymptotic safety of gravity was provided. That means that also for gravity a quantum field theory can be constructed that is renormalizable in a generalized way which does not explicitly refer to perturbation theory. In addition, this approach, that is based on the Wilsonian renormalization group, predicts the correct microscopic action of the theory. In the classical framework, metric gravity is equivalent to the Einstein-Cartan theory on the level of the vacuum field equations. The latter uses the tetrad e and the spin connection ω as fundamental variables. However, this theory possesses more degrees of freedom, a larger gauge group, and its associated action is of first order. All these features make a treatment analogue to metric gravity much more difficult. In this thesis a three-dimensional truncation of the form of a generalized Hilbert-Palatini action is analyzed. Besides the running of Newton's constant G k and the cosmological constant Λ k , it also captures the renormalization of the Immirzi parameter γ k . In spite of the mentioned difficulties, the spectrum of the free Hilbert-Palatini propagator can be computed analytically. On its basis, a proper time-like flow equation is constructed. Furthermore, appropriate gauge conditions are chosen and analyzed in detail. This demands a covariantization of the gauge transformations. The resulting flow is analyzed for different regularization schemes and gauge parameters. The results provide convincing evidence for asymptotic safety within the (e,ω) approach as well and therefore for the possible existence of a mathematically consistent and predictive fundamental quantum theory of gravity. In particular, one finds a pair of non-Gaussian fixed

  5. Revisiting conserved charges in higher curvature gravitational theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodrati, M. [University of Michigan, Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hajian, K. [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Physics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Setare, M.R. [University of Kurdistan, Department of Science, Campus of Bijar, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Restricting the covariant gravitational phase spaces to the manifold of parametrized families of solutions, the mass, angular momenta, entropies, and electric charges can be calculated by a single and simple method. In this method, which has been called the ''solution phase space method,'' conserved charges are unambiguous and regular. Moreover, assuming the generators of the charges to be exact symmetries, entropies and other conserved charges can be calculated on almost arbitrary surfaces, not necessarily horizons or asymptotics. Hence, the first law of thermodynamics would be a local identity relating the exact symmetries to which the mass, angular momentum, electric charge, and entropy are attributed. In this paper, we apply this powerful method to the f(R) gravitational theories accompanied by the terms quadratic in the Riemann and Ricci tensors. Furthermore, conserved charges and the first law of thermodynamics for some of their black hole solutions are exemplified. The examples include warped AdS{sub 3}, charged static BTZ, and 3-dimensional z = 3 Lifshitz black holes. (orig.)

  6. Revisiting conserved charges in higher curvature gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodrati, M.; Hajian, K.; Setare, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Restricting the covariant gravitational phase spaces to the manifold of parametrized families of solutions, the mass, angular momenta, entropies, and electric charges can be calculated by a single and simple method. In this method, which has been called the ''solution phase space method,'' conserved charges are unambiguous and regular. Moreover, assuming the generators of the charges to be exact symmetries, entropies and other conserved charges can be calculated on almost arbitrary surfaces, not necessarily horizons or asymptotics. Hence, the first law of thermodynamics would be a local identity relating the exact symmetries to which the mass, angular momentum, electric charge, and entropy are attributed. In this paper, we apply this powerful method to the f(R) gravitational theories accompanied by the terms quadratic in the Riemann and Ricci tensors. Furthermore, conserved charges and the first law of thermodynamics for some of their black hole solutions are exemplified. The examples include warped AdS 3 , charged static BTZ, and 3-dimensional z = 3 Lifshitz black holes. (orig.)

  7. Theory and numerics of gravitational waves from preheating after inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Kofman, Lev; Bergman, Amanda; Felder, Gary; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Preheating after inflation involves large, time-dependent field inhomogeneities, which act as a classical source of gravitational radiation. The resulting spectrum might be probed by direct detection experiments if inflation occurs at a low enough energy scale. In this paper, we develop a theory and algorithm to calculate, analytically and numerically, the spectrum of energy density in gravitational waves produced from an inhomogeneous background of stochastic scalar fields in an expanding universe. We derive some generic analytical results for the emission of gravity waves by stochastic media of random fields, which can test the validity/accuracy of numerical calculations. We contrast our method with other numerical methods in the literature, and then we apply it to preheating after chaotic inflation. In this case, we are able to check analytically our numerical results, which differ significantly from previous works. We discuss how the gravity-wave spectrum builds up with time and find that the amplitude and the frequency of its peak depend in a relatively simple way on the characteristic spatial scale amplified during preheating. We then estimate the peak frequency and amplitude of the spectrum produced in two models of preheating after hybrid inflation, which for some parameters may be relevant for gravity-wave interferometric experiments

  8. Revisiting conserved charges in higher curvature gravitational theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrati, M.; Hajian, K.; Setare, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Restricting the covariant gravitational phase spaces to the manifold of parametrized families of solutions, the mass, angular momenta, entropies, and electric charges can be calculated by a single and simple method. In this method, which has been called the "solution phase space method," conserved charges are unambiguous and regular. Moreover, assuming the generators of the charges to be exact symmetries, entropies and other conserved charges can be calculated on almost arbitrary surfaces, not necessarily horizons or asymptotics. Hence, the first law of thermodynamics would be a local identity relating the exact symmetries to which the mass, angular momentum, electric charge, and entropy are attributed. In this paper, we apply this powerful method to the f( R) gravitational theories accompanied by the terms quadratic in the Riemann and Ricci tensors. Furthermore, conserved charges and the first law of thermodynamics for some of their black hole solutions are exemplified. The examples include warped AdS_3, charged static BTZ, and 3-dimensional z=3 Lifshitz black holes.

  9. Static solutions with nontrivial boundaries for the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotti, Gustavo; Oliva, Julio; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The classification of a certain class of static solutions for the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in vacuum is performed in d≥5 dimensions. The class of metrics under consideration is such that the spacelike section is a warped product of the real line and an arbitrary base manifold. It is shown that for a generic value of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling, the base manifold must be necessarily Einstein, with an additional restriction on its Weyl tensor for d>5. The boundary admits a wider class of geometries only in the special case when the Gauss-Bonnet coupling is such that the theory admits a unique maximally symmetric solution. The additional freedom in the boundary metric enlarges the class of allowed geometries in the bulk, which are classified within three main branches, containing new black holes and wormholes in vacuum.

  10. On Born's deformed reciprocal complex gravitational theory and noncommutative gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Born's reciprocal relativity in flat spacetimes is based on the principle of a maximal speed limit (speed of light) and a maximal proper force (which is also compatible with a maximal and minimal length duality) and where coordinates and momenta are unified on a single footing. We extend Born's theory to the case of curved spacetimes and construct a deformed Born reciprocal general relativity theory in curved spacetimes (without the need to introduce star products) as a local gauge theory of the deformed Quaplectic group that is given by the semi-direct product of U(1,3) with the deformed (noncommutative) Weyl-Heisenberg group corresponding to noncommutative generators [Z a ,Z b ]≠0. The Hermitian metric is complex-valued with symmetric and nonsymmetric components and there are two different complex-valued Hermitian Ricci tensors R μν ,S μν . The deformed Born's reciprocal gravitational action linear in the Ricci scalars R,S with Torsion-squared terms and BF terms is presented. The plausible interpretation of Z μ =E μ a Z a as noncommuting p-brane background complex spacetime coordinates is discussed in the conclusion, where E μ a is the complex vielbein associated with the Hermitian metric G μν =g (μν) +ig [μν] =E μ a E-bar ν b η ab . This could be one of the underlying reasons why string-theory involves gravity

  11. Gravitational Wave Polarizations in f (R Gravity and Scalar-Tensor Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Yungui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory opens a new era to use gravitational waves to test alternative theories of gravity. We investigate the polarizations of gravitational waves in f (R gravity and Horndeski theory, both containing scalar modes. These theories predict that in addition to the familiar + and × polarizations, there are transverse breathing and longitudinal polarizations excited by the massive scalar mode and the new polarization is a single mixed state. It would be very difficult to detect the longitudinal polarization by interferometers, while pulsar timing array may be the better tool to detect the longitudinal polarization.

  12. Einstein's steady-state theory: an abandoned model of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac; McCann, Brendan; Nahm, Werner; Mitton, Simon

    2014-09-01

    We present a translation and analysis of an unpublished manuscript by Albert Einstein in which he attempted to construct a `steady-state' model of the universe. The manuscript, which appears to have been written in early 1931, demonstrates that Einstein once explored a cosmic model in which the mean density of matter in an expanding universe is maintained constant by the continuous formation of matter from empty space. This model is very different to previously known Einsteinian models of the cosmos (both static and dynamic) but anticipates the later steady-state cosmology of Hoyle, Bondi and Gold in some ways. We find that Einstein's steady-state model contains a fundamental flaw and suggest that it was abandoned for this reason. We also suggest that he declined to explore a more sophisticated version because he found such theories rather contrived. The manuscript is of historical interest because it reveals that Einstein debated between steady-state and evolving models of the cosmos decades before a similar debate took place in the cosmological community.

  13. Rastall's and related theories are conservative gravitational theories although physically inequivalent to general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, L.L.; Alabama Univ., Huntsville

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that (1) the proper framework for testing Rastall's theory and its generalisations is in the case of non-negligible (i.e. discernible) gravitational effects such as gravity gradients; 2) these theories have conserved integral four-momentum and angular momentum; and (3) the Nordtvedt effect then provides limits on the parameters which arise as the result of the non-zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor. (author)

  14. Rastall's and related theories are conservative gravitational theories although physically inequivalent to general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    The proper framework for testing Rastall's theory and its generalizations is in the case of non-negligible (i.e. discernible) gravitational effects such as gravity gradients. These theories have conserved integral four-momentum and angular momentum. The Nordtvedt effect then provides limits on the parameters which arise as the result of the non-zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor.

  15. Cosmic censorship and Weak Gravity Conjecture in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ten-Yeh; Wen, Wen-Yu

    2018-06-01

    We explore the cosmic censorship in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory following Wald's thought experiment to destroy a black hole by throwing in a test particle. We discover that at probe limit the extremal charged dilaton black hole could be destroyed by a test particle with specific energy. Nevertheless the censorship is well protected if backreaction or self-force is included. At the end, we discuss an interesting connection between Hoop Conjecture and Weak Gravity Conjecture.

  16. Black Hole Solution of Einstein-Born-Infeld-Yang-Mills Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new four-dimensional black hole solution of Einstein-Born-Infeld-Yang-Mills theory is constructed; several degenerated forms of the black hole solution are presented. The related thermodynamical quantities are calculated, with which the first law of thermodynamics is checked to be satisfied. Identifying the cosmological constant as pressure of the system, the phase transition behaviors of the black hole in the extended phase space are studied.

  17. GRG computer algebra system in gravitation and general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhitnikov, V.V.; Obukhova, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    The main concepts and capabilities of the GRG specialized computer agebra system intended for performing calculations in the gravitation theory are described. The GRG system is written in the STANDARD LISP language. The program consists of two parts: the first one - for setting initial data, the second one - for specifying a consequence of calculations. The system can function in three formalisms: a coordinate, a tetradic with the Lorentz basis and a spinor ones. The major capabilities of the GRG system are the following: calculation of connectivity and curvature according to the specified metrics, tetrad and torsion; metric type determination according to Petrov; calculation of the Bianchi indentities; operation with an electromagnetic field; tetradic rotations; coordinate conversions

  18. Theory of second order tide forces and gravitational wave experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammelo, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Theory of tide forces square by vector radius is presented. The mechanism of 10 18 time gravitational wave pressure increase in case of radiation from pulsars and 10 15 time one in case of standard burst of radiation from astrophysical catastrophe is proposed. This leads to secular shifts of longitudinally free receivers by 10 -16 cm during 10 5 s in the first case and by 10 -19 cm during 10 s in the second one. A possibility of increase effect modulation is available. It is indicated that it is possible to construct a device which produces more energy at the expense of square tide forces than at the expense of linear ones. 21 refs

  19. From Newton's laws to Einstein's theory of relativity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fang, Li-chih; Chʻu, Yao-chʻüan; Fang, Li Zhi; Fang, L. Z; Li, Zhi Fang; Fang, Lizhi

    1987-01-01

    ...-Morley Experiment Constant New Velocity of Light Speed The of COMPOSITION OF SPEED OF LIGHT The Law of CHAPTER Salviati's Theory of W h o IV TO ship Two Relativity Shot First? CHAPTER V A ROD Space and * T h e Lifetime Moving Lorentz F R O M GALILEO'S PRINCIPLE OF RELATIVITY THE S P E C I A L T H E O R Y OF RELATIVITY principles of th...

  20. Einstein's universe

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Nigel

    1979-01-01

    This brilliantly written book unlocks the astounding implications of Einstein's revolutionary theories on the nature of science, time and motion. It far surpasses any previous explanation of Relativity for laymen.

  1. Gravitational-wave physics and astronomy an introduction to theory, experiment and data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Creighton, Jolien D E

    2011-01-01

    This most up-to-date, one-stop reference combines coverage of both theory and observational techniques, with introductory sections to bring all readers up to the same level. Written by outstanding researchers directly involved with the scientific program of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the book begins with a brief review of general relativity before going on to describe the physics of gravitational waves and the astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation. Further sections cover gravitational wave detectors, data analysis, and the outlook of gravitation

  2. Einsteins dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: the search for meaning; Einstein's dream; curved space; Einstein and warped space-time and extreme wraping; early unified field theories; star death; beyond the white dwarf; the early universe; the hadron, Lepton, and Radiation eras; the redshift controversy; other universes; the final fate of the universe; the missing mass; bounce; fate of the open universe; the world of particles and fields; Dirac's equation; Yukawa; gauge theory; quantum chromodynamics; supergravity and superstrings; twistors and heaven; and the new Einstein

  3. Einstein's error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterflood, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    In discussing Einstein's Special Relativity theory it is claimed that it violates the principle of relativity itself and that an anomalous sign in the mathematics is found in the factor which transforms one inertial observer's measurements into those of another inertial observer. The apparent source of this error is discussed. Having corrected the error a new theory, called Observational Kinematics, is introduced to replace Einstein's Special Relativity. (U.K.)

  4. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory and cosmic censorship violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniceto, Pedro; Pani, Paolo; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2016-01-01

    We construct exact, time-dependent, black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling, a. For a=1 this theory arises as the four-dimensional low-energy effective description of heterotic string theory. These solutions represent electrically charged, spherically symmetric black holes emitting or absorbing charged null fluids and generalize the Vaidya and Bonnor-Vaidya solutions of general relativity and of Einstein-Maxwell theory, respectively. The a=1 case stands out as special, in the sense that it is the only choice of the coupling that allows for a time-dependent dilaton field in this class of solutions. As a by-product, when a=1 we show that an electrically charged black hole in this theory can be overcharged by bombarding it with a stream of electrically charged null fluid, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity. This provides an example of cosmic censorship violation in an exact dynamical solution to low-energy effective string theory and in a case in which the total stress-energy tensor satisfies all energy conditions. When a≠1, our solutions necessarily have a time-independent scalar field and consequently cannot be overcharged.

  5. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory and cosmic censorship violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniceto, Pedro [CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Pani, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, “Sapienza” Università di Roma & Sezione INFN Roma 1,Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Rocha, Jorge V. [Departament de Física Fonamental, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB),Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-05-19

    We construct exact, time-dependent, black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling, a. For a=1 this theory arises as the four-dimensional low-energy effective description of heterotic string theory. These solutions represent electrically charged, spherically symmetric black holes emitting or absorbing charged null fluids and generalize the Vaidya and Bonnor-Vaidya solutions of general relativity and of Einstein-Maxwell theory, respectively. The a=1 case stands out as special, in the sense that it is the only choice of the coupling that allows for a time-dependent dilaton field in this class of solutions. As a by-product, when a=1 we show that an electrically charged black hole in this theory can be overcharged by bombarding it with a stream of electrically charged null fluid, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity. This provides an example of cosmic censorship violation in an exact dynamical solution to low-energy effective string theory and in a case in which the total stress-energy tensor satisfies all energy conditions. When a≠1, our solutions necessarily have a time-independent scalar field and consequently cannot be overcharged.

  6. Physical consequences of the interpretation of the skew part of gμν in Einstein's nonsymmetric unified field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voros, J.

    1995-01-01

    The electromagnetic interaction in the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann (EIH) equations of motion for charged particles in Einstein's unified field theory (EUFT) is found to be automatically precluded by the conventional identification of the skew part of the fundamental tensor with the Faraday tensor. It is shown that an alternative identification, suggested by observations of Einstein, Bergmann and Papapetrou, would lead to the expected electromagnetic interaction, were it not for the intervention of an infelicitous (radiation) gauge. Therefore, an EIH analysis of EUFT is inconclusive as a test of the physical viability of the theory, and it follows that EUFT cannot be considered necessarily unphysical on the basis of such an analysis. It is concluded that, historically, Einstein's unified field theory was rejected for the wrong reason. 26 refs

  7. Classical field theory on electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories and gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, Florian

    2012-01-01

    The book describes Maxwell's equations first in their integral, directly testable form, then moves on to their local formulation. The first two chapters cover all essential properties of Maxwell's equations, including their symmetries and their covariance in a modern notation. Chapter 3 is devoted to Maxwell theory as a classical field theory and to solutions of the wave equation. Chapter 4 deals with important applications of Maxwell theory. It includes topical subjects such as metamaterials with negative refraction index and solutions of Helmholtz' equation in paraxial approximation relevant for the description of laser beams. Chapter 5 describes non-Abelian gauge theories from a classical, geometric point of view, in analogy to Maxwell theory as a prototype, and culminates in an application to the U(2) theory relevant for electroweak interactions. The last chapter 6 gives a concise summary of semi-Riemannian geometry as the framework for the classical field theory of gravitation. The chapter concludes wit...

  8. Einstein's Relativity The Ultimate Key to the Cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Cooperstock, Fred I

    2012-01-01

    This richly illustrated book is unique in bringing Einstein's relativity to a higher level for the non-specialist than has ever been attempted before, using nothing more than grade-school algebra. Bondi's approach with spacetime diagrams is simplified and expanded, clarifying the famous asymmetric aging-of-twins paradox. Einstein's theory of gravity, general relativity, is simplified for the reader using spacetime diagrams. The theory is applied to important topics in physics such as gravitational waves, gravitational collapse and black holes, time machines, the relationship to the quantum world, galactic motions and cosmology.

  9. Theory of elementary excitations in unstable Bose-Einstein condensates and the instability of sonic horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, U.; Kiss, T.; Oehberg, P.

    2003-01-01

    Like classical fluids, quantum gases may suffer from hydrodynamic instabilities. Our paper develops a quantum version of the classical stability analysis in fluids, the Bogoliubov theory of elementary excitations in unstable Bose-Einstein condensates. In unstable condensates the excitation modes have complex frequencies. We derive the normalization conditions for unstable modes such that they can serve in a mode decomposition of the noncondensed component. Furthermore, we develop approximative techniques to determine the spectrum and the mode functions. Finally, we apply our theory to sonic horizons - sonic black and white holes. For sonic white holes the spectrum of unstable modes turns out to be intrinsically discrete, whereas black holes may be stable

  10. An outline of Albert Einstein's contribution to quantum theory up to 1925

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoetterud, K.

    1979-01-01

    Einstein's paper of 1905 in which he introduces the concept of light quanta, or photons, and which was mentioned as the basis of his Nobel Prize in 1920, is discussed. His discussion of the static coutent in Planck's Radiation Law and his comments on Bohr's atom model are also treated. His work on the quantum theory of radiation is treated at more length and his comments on the direction of radiation processes are quoted. Finally brief mention is made of his contributions in quantum statistics and the quantum theory of the solid state. (JIW)

  11. Gravitational waves — A review on the theoretical foundations of gravitational radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkes, Alain

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we review the theoretical foundations of gravitational waves in the framework of Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Following Einstein’s early efforts, we first derive the linearized Einstein field equations and work out the corresponding gravitational wave equation. Moreover, we present the gravitational potentials in the far away wave zone field point approximation obtained from the relaxed Einstein field equations. We close this review by taking a closer look on the radiative losses of gravitating n-body systems and present some aspects of the current interferometric gravitational waves detectors. Each section has a separate appendix contribution where further computational details are displayed. To conclude, we summarize the main results and present a brief outlook in terms of current ongoing efforts to build a spaced-based gravitational wave observatory.

  12. Stability of Einstein static universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal derivative coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qihong [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zunyi Normal College, School of Physics and Electronic Science, Zunyi (China); Wu, Puxun [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Yu, Hongwei [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China)

    2018-01-15

    The emergent mechanism provides a possible way to resolve the big-bang singularity problem by assuming that our universe originates from the Einstein static (ES) state. Thus, the existence of a stable ES solution becomes a very crucial prerequisite for the emergent scenario. In this paper, we study the stability of an ES universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal coupling between the kinetic term of a scalar field and the Einstein tensor. We find that the ES solution is stable under both scalar and tensor perturbations when the model parameters satisfy certain conditions, which indicates that the big-bang singularity can be avoided successfully by the emergent mechanism in the non-minimally kinetic coupled gravity. (orig.)

  13. Stability of Einstein static universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal derivative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qihong; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    The emergent mechanism provides a possible way to resolve the big-bang singularity problem by assuming that our universe originates from the Einstein static (ES) state. Thus, the existence of a stable ES solution becomes a very crucial prerequisite for the emergent scenario. In this paper, we study the stability of an ES universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal coupling between the kinetic term of a scalar field and the Einstein tensor. We find that the ES solution is stable under both scalar and tensor perturbations when the model parameters satisfy certain conditions, which indicates that the big-bang singularity can be avoided successfully by the emergent mechanism in the non-minimally kinetic coupled gravity.

  14. Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravity: The Gauss-Bonnet-Katz boundary term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Merino, Nelson; Olea, Rodrigo

    2018-05-01

    We propose a boundary term to the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet action for gravity, which uses the Chern-Weil theorem plus a dimensional continuation process, such that the extremization of the full action yields the equations of motion when Dirichlet boundary conditions are imposed. When translated into tensorial language, this boundary term is the generalization to this theory of the Katz boundary term and vector for general relativity. The boundary term constructed in this paper allows to deal with a general background and is not equivalent to the Gibbons-Hawking-Myers boundary term. However, we show that they coincide if one replaces the background of the Katz procedure by a product manifold. As a first application we show that this Einstein Gauss-Bonnet Katz action yields, without any extra ingredients, the expected mass of the Boulware-Deser black hole.

  15. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  16. The universe as a topological defect in a higher-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, A.; Shiraishi, K.

    1989-04-01

    An interpretation is suggested that a spontaneous compactification of space-time can be regarded as a topological defect in a higher-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills (EYM) theory. We start with D-dimensional EYM theory in our present analysis. A compactification leads to a D-2 dimensional effective action of Abelian gauge-Higgs theory. We find a 'vortex' solution in the effective theory. Our universe appears to be confined in a center of a 'vortex', which has D-4 large dimensions. In this paper we show an example with SU (2) symmetry in the original EYM theory, and the resulting solution is found to be equivalent to the 'instanton-induced compactification'. The cosmological implication is also mentioned. (author)

  17. Einstein and general relativity: historical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1978-01-01

    The place of Einstein in 20th-century physics is discussed. The basic ideas that led Einstein to his theory of gravitation by the sheer power of speculative thought are described in the most general terms. The prediction of the bending of starlight by the Sun and the eclipse expedition of 1919 are recounted. The author feels that ''the general theory of relativity is incredibly rich in its content;...one finds a glittering face at almost every turn.'' The prediction of black holes by general relativity is noted

  18. More about a successful vector-tensor theory of gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, R. [Departamento de Estadísica, Matemática e Informática, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Elche, Alicante (Spain); Sáez, D., E-mail: rdale@umh.es, E-mail: diego.saez@uv.es [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    The vector-tensor (VT) theory of gravitation revisited in this article was studied in previous papers, where it was proved that VT works and deserves attention. New observational data and numerical codes have motivated further development which is presented here. New research has been planed with the essential aim of proving that current cosmological observations, including Planck data, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and so on, may be explained with VT, a theory which accounts for a kind of dark energy which has the same equation of state as vacuum. New versions of the codes CAMB and COSMOMC have been designed for applications to VT, and the resulting versions have been used to get the cosmological parameters of the VT model at suitable confidence levels. The parameters to be estimated are the same as in general relativity (GR), plus a new parameter D . For D = 0, VT linear cosmological perturbations reduces to those of GR, but the VT background may explain dark energy. The fits between observations and VT predictions lead to non vanishing | D | upper limits at the 1σ confidence level. The value D = 0 is admissible at this level, but this value is not that of the best fit in any case. Results strongly suggest that VT may explain current observations, at least, as well as GR; with the advantage that, as it is proved in this paper, VT has an additional parameter which facilitates adjustments to current observational data.

  19. Einstein today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspect, A.; Grangier, Ph.; Bouchet, F.R.; Brunet, E.; Derrida, B.; Cohen-Tannoudji, C.; Dalibard, J.; Laloe, F.; Damour, Th.; Darrigol, O.; Pocholle, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The most important contributions of Einstein involve 5 fields of physics : the existence of quanta (light quanta, stimulated radiation emission and Bose-Einstein condensation), relativity, fluctuations (Brownian motion and thermodynamical fluctuations), the basis of quantum physics and cosmology (cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe). Diverse and renowned physicists have appreciated the development of modern physics from Einstein's ideas to the knowledge of today. This book is a collective book that gathers their work under 7 chapters: 1) 1905, a new beginning; 2) from the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen's article to quantum information (cryptography and quantum computers); 3) the Bose-Einstein condensation in gases; 4) from stimulated emission to the today's lasers; 5) Brownian motion and the fluctuation-dissipation theory; 6) general relativity; and 7) cosmology. (A.C.)

  20. Strong field effects on binary systems in Einstein-aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Brendan Z.

    2007-01-01

    'Einstein-aether' theory is a generally covariant theory of gravity containing a dynamical preferred frame. This article continues an examination of effects on the motion of binary pulsar systems in this theory, by incorporating effects due to strong fields in the vicinity of neutron star pulsars. These effects are included through an effective approach, by treating the compact bodies as point particles with nonstandard, velocity dependent interactions parametrized by dimensionless sensitivities. Effective post-Newtonian equations of motion for the bodies and the radiation damping rate are determined. More work is needed to calculate values of the sensitivities for a given fluid source; therefore, precise constraints on the theory's coupling constants cannot yet be stated. It is shown, however, that strong field effects will be negligible given current observational uncertainties if the dimensionless couplings are less than roughly 0.1 and two conditions that match the PPN parameters to those of pure general relativity are imposed. In this case, weak field results suffice. There then exists a one-parameter family of Einstein-aether theories with 'small-enough' couplings that passes all current observational tests. No conclusion can be reached for larger couplings until the sensitivities for a given source can be calculated

  1. Particle content and degrees of freedom of a gravitational field in 4th order theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moebius, K.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Potsdam-Babelsberg. Einstein-Laboratorium fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1988-01-01

    In gravitational theories of 4-th order, the influence of certain properties of the field equations (tracelessness, conformal invariance, scale invariance respectively their breaking) for the 'particle content' (number of degrees of freedom, mass, spin) is investigated. Using the plane-wave ansatz valid in linearized theory it is possible to determine the mass content of the theory, but one cannot get assertions about the number of degrees of freedom and the spin states corresponding to the field quanta. In the linearized theory, this can be done with a spin projection formalism. Using the Cauchy initial value problem and a counting method first developed by Einstein one can get, however, a useful definition of the concept of the degrees of freedom for the full nonlinear theory. This is due to the fact that this method allows to incorporate the concrete structure of the field equations (and thus their nonlinearities). Analysing different general-relativistic field theories via these approaches the influence of the various structures of nonlinearities is discussed. It is, in particular, shown that those results obtained by the spin projection formalism can be reproduced by 'nonlinear methods'. (author)

  2. Structure of gauge and gravitational anomalies*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Gaume, L.; Ginsparg, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown how the form of the gauge and gravitational anomalies in quantum field theories may be derived from classical index theorems. The gravitational anomaly in both Einstein and Lorentz form is considered and their equivalence is exhibited. The formalism of gauge and gravitational theories is reviewed using the language of differential geometry, and notions from the theory of characteristic classes necessary for understanding the classical index theorems are introduced. The treatment of known topological results includes a pedagogical derivation of the Wess-Zumino effective Lagrangian in abitrary even dimension. The relation between various forms of the anomaly present in the literature is also clarified

  3. Explaining the large numbers by a hierarchy of ''universes'': a unified theory of strong and gravitational interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldirola, P.; Recami, E.

    1978-01-01

    By assuming covariance of physical laws under (discrete) dilatations, strong and gravitational interactions have been described in a unified way. In terms of the (additional, discrete) ''dilatational'' degree of freedom, our cosmos as well as hadrons can be considered as different states of the same system, or rather as similar systems. Moreover, a discrete hierarchy can be defined of ''universes'' which are governed by force fields with strengths inversely proportional to the ''universe'' radii. Inside each ''universe'' an equivalence principle holds, so that its characteristic field can be geometrized there. It is thus easy to derive a whole ''numerology'', i.e. relations among numbers analogous to the so-called Weyl-Eddington-Dirac ''large numbers''. For instance, the ''Planck mass'' happens to be nothing but the (average) magnitude of the strong charge of the hadron quarks. However, our ''numerology'' connects the (gravitational) macrocosmos with the (strong) microcosmos, rather than with the electromagnetic ones (as, e.g., in Dirac's version). Einstein-type scaled equations (with ''cosmological'' term) are suggested for the hadron interior, which - incidentally - yield a (classical) quark confinement in a very natural way and are compatible with the ''asymptotic freedom''. At last, within a ''bi-scale'' theory, further equations are proposed that provide a priori a classical field theory of strong interactions (between different hadrons). The relevant sections are 5.2, 7 and 8. (author)

  4. Gravity's kiss the detection of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Scientists have been trying to confirm the existence of gravitational waves for fifty years. Then, in September 2015, came a "very interesting event" (as the cautious subject line in a physicist's email read) that proved to be the first detection of gravitational waves. In Gravity's Kiss, Harry Collins -- who has been watching the science of gravitational wave detection for forty-three of those fifty years and has written three previous books about it -- offers a final, fascinating account, written in real time, of the unfolding of one of the most remarkable scientific discoveries ever made. Predicted by Einstein in his theory of general relativity, gravitational waves carry energy from the collision or explosion of stars. Dying binary stars, for example, rotate faster and faster around each other until they merge, emitting a burst of gravitational waves. It is only with the development of extraordinarily sensitive, highly sophisticated detectors that physicists can now confirm Einstein's prediction. This is...

  5. Semiclassical strings in Sasaki-Einstein manifolds and long operators in N = 1 gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, Sergio; Kruczenski, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We study the AdS/CFT relation between an infinite class of 5-d Y p,q Sasaki-Einstein metrics and the corresponding quiver theories. The long BPS operators of the field theories are matched to massless geodesics in the geometries, providing a test of AdS/CFT for these cases. Certain small fluctuations (in the BMN sense) can also be successfully compared. We then go further and find, using an appropriate limit, a reduced action, first order in time derivatives, which describes strings with large R-charge. In the field theory we consider holomorphic operators with large winding numbers around the quiver and find, interestingly, that, after certain simplifying assumptions, they can be described effectively as strings moving in a particular metric. Although not equal, the metric is similar to the one in the bulk. We find it encouraging that a string picture emerges directly from the field theory and discuss possible ways to improve the agreement

  6. Conformal symmetry and the Higgs effect in the Einstein-Weinberg-Salam unified theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervushin, V.N.; Smirichinski, V.I.; Pawlowski, M.M.

    1997-11-01

    We consider the unification of the Einstein theory of gravity with a conformal invariant version of the standard model for electroweak interaction without the Higgs potential. In this theory, the evolution of the Universe and the elementary particle masses have one and the same cosmological origin. In the flat space limit, we get the σ-model version of the standard model. The cosmological consequences of such a unification are studied. The red shift formula and Hubble law are obtained under the conventional Friedmann assumption of homogeneous matter distribution. We show that the considered theory leads to a very small vacuum density of the Higgs field ρ Cosmic φ = 10 -34 ρ cr in contrast with the theory with the Higgs potential ρ Higgs φ =0 54 ρ cr . (author)

  7. Lie-algebra expansions, Chern-Simons theories and the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, Jose D.; Hassaine, Mokhtar; Troncoso, Ricardo; Zanelli, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Starting from gravity as a Chern-Simons action for the AdS algebra in five dimensions, it is possible to modify the theory through an expansion of the Lie algebra that leads to a system consisting of the Einstein-Hilbert action plus non-minimally coupled matter. The modified system is gauge invariant under the Poincare group enlarged by an Abelian ideal. Although the resulting action naively looks like general relativity plus corrections due to matter sources, it is shown that the non-minimal couplings produce a radical departure from GR. Indeed, the dynamics is not continuously connected to the one obtained from Einstein-Hilbert action. In a matter-free configuration and in the torsionless sector, the field equations are too strong a restriction on the geometry as the metric must satisfy both the Einstein and pure Gauss-Bonnet equations. In particular, the five-dimensional Schwarzschild geometry fails to be a solution; however, configurations corresponding to a brane-world with positive cosmological constant on the worldsheet are admissible when one of the matter fields is switched on. These results can be extended to higher odd dimensions

  8. Traversable Lorentzian wormholes in the vacuum low energy effective string theory in Einstein and Jordan frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, K.K.; Zhang Yuanzhong

    2004-01-01

    Three new classes (II-IV) of solutions of the vacuum low energy effective string theory in four dimensions are derived. Wormhole solutions are investigated in those solutions including the class I case both in the Einstein and in the Jordan (string) frame. It turns out that, of the eight classes of solutions investigated (four in the Einstein frame and four in the corresponding string frame), massive Lorentzian traversable wormholes exist in five classes. Nontrivial massless limit exists only in class I Einstein frame solution while none at all exists in the string frame. An investigation of test scalar charge motion in the class I solution in the two frames is carried out by using the Plebanski-Sawicki theorem. A curious consequence is that the motion around the extremal zero (Keplerian) mass configuration leads, as a result of scalar-scalar interaction, to a new hypothetical 'mass' that confines test scalar charges in bound orbits, but does not interact with neutral test particles

  9. Symmetries in tetrad theories. [of gravitational fields and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinea, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    The isometry conditions for gravitational fields are given directly at the tetrad level, rather than in terms of the metric. As an illustration, an analysis of the curvature collineations and Killing fields for a twisting type-N vacuum gravitational field is made.

  10. Test-particle motion in the nonsymmetric gravitation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, J. W.

    1987-06-01

    A derivation of the motion of test particles in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory (NGT) is given using the field equations in the presence of matter. The motion of the particle is governed by the Christoffel symbols, which are formed from the symmetric part of the fundamental tensor gμν, as well as by a tensorial piece determined by the skew part of the contracted curvature tensor Rμν. Given the energy-momentum tensor for a perfect fluid and the definition of a test particle in the NGT, the equations of motion follow from the conservation laws. The tensorial piece in the equations of motion describes a new force in nature that acts on the conserved charge in a body. Particles that carry this new charge do not follow geodesic world lines in the NGT, whereas photons do satisfy geodesic equations of motion and the equivalence principle of general relativity. Astronomical predictions, based on the exact static, spherically symmetric solution of the field equations in a vacuum and the test-particle equations of motion, are derived in detail. The maximally extended coordinates that remove the event-horizon singularities in the static, spherically symmetric solution are presented. It is shown how an inward radially falling test particle can be prevented from forming an event horizon for a value greater than a specified critical value of the source charge. If a test particle does fall through an event horizon, then it must continue to fall until it reaches the singularity at r=0.

  11. Gravitational radiation in relativistic theory of gravity with a nonzero graviton mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, A.A.; Chugreev, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation of gravitation waves have been analysed in the linear approximation of the relative theory of gravity, with the mass of graviton being nonzero. It is shown that the main contribution to the energy loss due to gravitational radiation has been described by the well-known quadrupole formula. Linear approximation applicability conditions have been analysed

  12. Thin-shell wormholes with a generalized Chaplygin gas in Einstein-Born-Infeld theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Figueroa Aguirre, Griselda [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-11-15

    We construct spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes supported by a generalized Chaplygin gas in Born-Infeld electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity, and we analyze their stability under radial perturbations. For different values of the Born-Infeld parameter and the charge, we compare the results with those obtained in a previous work for Maxwell electrodynamics. The stability region in the parameter space reduces and then disappears as the value of the Born-Infeld parameter is modified in the sense of a larger departure from Maxwell theory. (orig.)

  13. Einstein's creative thinking and the general theory of relativity: a documented report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A

    1979-01-01

    A document written by Albert Einstein has recently come to light in which the eminent scientist described the actual sequence of his thoughts leading to the development of the general theory of relativity. The key creative thought was an instance of a type of creative cognition the author has previously designated "Janusian thinking," Janusian thinking consists of actively conceiving two or more opposite or antithetical concepts, ideas, or images simultaneously. This form of high-level secondary process cognition has been found to operate widely in art, science, and other fields.

  14. Thin-shell wormholes with a generalized Chaplygin gas in Einstein-Born-Infeld theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Figueroa Aguirre, Griselda

    2012-01-01

    We construct spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes supported by a generalized Chaplygin gas in Born-Infeld electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity, and we analyze their stability under radial perturbations. For different values of the Born-Infeld parameter and the charge, we compare the results with those obtained in a previous work for Maxwell electrodynamics. The stability region in the parameter space reduces and then disappears as the value of the Born-Infeld parameter is modified in the sense of a larger departure from Maxwell theory. (orig.)

  15. Bose-Einstein condensate collapse: A comparison between theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, C.M.; Robins, N.P.; Hope, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    We solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation numerically for the collapse induced by a switch from positive to negative scattering lengths. We compare our results with experiments performed with Bose-Einstein condensates of 85 Rb, in which the scattering length was controlled using a Feshbach resonance. Building on previous theoretical work we identify quantitative differences between the predictions of mean-field theory and the results of the experiments. In addition to the previously reported difference between the predicted and observed critical atom number for collapse, we also find that the predicted collapse times systematically exceed those observed experimentally

  16. Summary of session C1: experimental gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmerzahl, C

    2008-01-01

    The fact that gravity is a metric theory follows from the Einstein equivalence principle. This principle consists of (i) the universality of free fall, (ii) the universality of the gravitational redshift and (iii) the local validity of Lorentz invariance. Many experiments searching for deviations from standard general relativity test the various aspects of the Einstein equivalence principle. Here we report on experiments covering the whole Einstein equivalence principle. Until now all experiments have been in agreement with the Einstein equivalence principle. As a consequence, gravity has to be described by a metric theory. Any metric theory of gravity leads to effects such as perihelion shift, deflection of light, gravitational redshift, gravitational time delay, Lense-Thirring effect, Schiff effect, etc. A particular theory of that sort is Einstein's general relativity. For weak gravitational fields which are asymptotically flat any deviation from Einstein's general relativity can be parametrized by a few constants, the PPN parameters. Many astrophysical observations and space experiments are devoted to a better measurement of the effects and, thus, of the PPN parameters. It is clear that gravity is best tested for intermediate ranges, that is, for distances between 1 m and several astronomical units. It is highly interesting to push forward our domain of experience and to strengthen the experimental foundation of gravity also beyond these scales. This point is underlined by the fact that many quantum gravity and unification-inspired theories suggest deviation from the standard laws of gravity at very small or very large scales. In this session summary we briefly outline the status and report on the talks presented in session C1 about experimental gravitation

  17. Einstein in matrix form. Exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludyk, Guenter [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Physics and Electrical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    Derives the fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of special and general relativity using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. Provides necessary mathematical tools in a user-friendly way, either directly in the text or in the appendices. Appendices contain an introduction to classical dynamics as a refresher of known fundamental physics. Rehearses vector and matrix calculus, differential geometry, and some special solutions of general relativity in the appendices. This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the ''Black Hole'' phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  18. Einstein in matrix form. Exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludyk, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Derives the fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of special and general relativity using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. Provides necessary mathematical tools in a user-friendly way, either directly in the text or in the appendices. Appendices contain an introduction to classical dynamics as a refresher of known fundamental physics. Rehearses vector and matrix calculus, differential geometry, and some special solutions of general relativity in the appendices. This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the ''Black Hole'' phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  19. The Metaphysical and Ontological Symbolism of Total Gravitational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Having laid a firm foundation in SPACETIME for a detailed analysis of total gravitational collapse, by linking Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity (STR) to the General Theory (GTR) in the context of the Quantum Principle and within the all-embracing framework of GUT (the Grande Unification Theory), we proceed with an ...

  20. Einstein locality, EPR locality, and the significance for science of the nonlocal character of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    The immense difference between Einstein locality and EPR locality is discussed. The latter provides a basis for establishing the nonlocal character of quantum theory, whereas the former does not. A model representing Heisenberg's idea of physical reality is introduced. It is nondeterministic and holistic: the objects, measuring devices, and their environment are treated as an inseparable entity, with, however, macroscopically localizable attributes. The EPR principle that no disturbance can propagate faster than light is imposed without assuming any structure incompatible with orthodox quantum thinking. This locality requirement renders the model incompatible with rudimentary predictions of quantum theory. A more general proof not depending on any model is also given. A recent argument that purports to show that quantum theory is compatible with EPR locality is examined. It illustrates the importance of the crucial one-world assumption. The significance for science of the failure of EPR locality is discussed

  1. Amplitude relations in heterotic string theory and Einstein-Yang-Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlotterer, Oliver [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2016-11-11

    We present all-multiplicity evidence that the tree-level S-matrix of gluons and gravitons in heterotic string theory can be reduced to color-ordered single-trace amplitudes of the gauge multiplet. Explicit amplitude relations are derived for up to three gravitons, up to two color traces and an arbitrary number of gluons in each case. The results are valid to all orders in the inverse string tension α{sup ′} and generalize to the ten-dimensional superamplitudes which preserve 16 supercharges. Their field-theory limit results in an alternative proof of the recently discovered relations between Einstein-Yang-Mills amplitudes and those of pure Yang-Mills theory. Similarities and differences between the integrands of the Cachazo-He-Yuan formulae and the heterotic string are investigated.

  2. Theory of gravitational-inertial field of universe. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davtyan, O.K.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the equations of the gravitational-inertial field to the problem of free motion in the inertial field (to the cosmologic problem) leads to results according to which (1) all Galaxies in the Universe 'disperse' from each other according to Hubble's law, (2) the 'dispersion' of bodies represents a free motion in the inertial field and Hubble's law represents a law of motion of free body in the inertial field, (3) for arbitrary mean distribution densities of space masses different from zero the space is Lobachevskian. All critical systems (with Schwarzschild radius) are specific because they exist in maximal-inertial and gravitational potentials. The Universe represents a critical system, it exists under the Schwarzschild radius. In high-potential inertial and gravitational fields the material mass in a static state or in motion with deceleration is subject to an inertial and gravitational 'annihilation'. At the maximal value of inertial and gravitational potentials (= c 2 ) the material mass is being completely 'evaporated' transforming into radiation mass. The latter is being concentrated in the 'horizon' of the critical system. All critical systems-black holes-represent geon systems, i.e. local formations of gravitational-electromagnetic radiations, held together by their own gravitational and inertial fields. The Universe, being a critical system, is 'wrapped' in a geon crown. (author)

  3. The Light-Velocity Postulate: The Essential Difference between the Theories of Lorentz-Poincare and Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Seiya

    2005-01-01

    Einstein, who had already developed the light-quantum theory, knew the inadequacy of Maxwell's theory in the microscopic sphere. Therefore, in writing his paper on special relativity, he had to set up the light-velocity postulate independently of the relativity postulate in order to make the electromagnetic foundation of physics compatible with…

  4. Self-gravitating static non-critical black holes in 4 D Einstein-Klein-Gordon system with nonminimal derivative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunara, Bobby Eka; Yaqin, Ainol

    2018-06-01

    We study static non-critical hairy black holes of four dimensional gravitational model with nonminimal derivative coupling and a scalar potential turned on. By taking an ansatz, namely, the first derivative of the scalar field is proportional to square root of a metric function, we reduce the Einstein field equation and the scalar field equation of motions into a single highly nonlinear differential equation. This setup implies that the hair is secondary-like since the scalar charge-like depends on the non-constant mass-like quantity in the asymptotic limit. Then, we show that near boundaries the solution is not the critical point of the scalar potential and the effective geometries become spaces of constant scalar curvature.

  5. Geometrical Aspects of non-gravitational interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Roldan, Omar; Barros Jr, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we look for a geometric description of non-gravitational forces. The basic ideas are proposed studying the interaction between a punctual particle and an electromagnetic external field. For this purpose, we introduce the concept of proper space-time, that allow us to describe this interaction in a way analogous to the one that the general relativity theory does for gravitation. The field equations that define this geometry are similar to the Einstein's equations, where in general...

  6. Plane symmetric cosmological model with thick domain walls in Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, D.; Bayaskar, S.; Patil, V.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated plane symmetric cosmological model in presence of thick domain walls in Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation, some geometrical and physical behavior of the model are discussed. (authors)

  7. Why are predictions of general relativity theory for gravitational effects non-unique?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loskutov, Yu.M.

    1990-01-01

    Reasons of non-uniqueness of predictions of the general relativity theory (GRT) for gravitational effects are analyzed in detail. To authors' opinion, the absence of comparison mechanism of curved and plane metrics is the reason of non-uniqueness

  8. Field equations of the gauge theory of gravitation originate from a quadratic Lagrangian with torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogala, B.

    1983-01-01

    The equations of the gauge theory of gravitation are derived from a complex quadratic Lagrangian with torsion. The derivation is performed in a coordinate basis in a completely covariant way. (author)

  9. Uniqueness of exterior axisymmetric solution for a rotating charged body in the relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabut, P.V.; Chugreev, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    The relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG), which is constructed on the basis of Minkowski spacetime, the geometrization principle, and the notion of the gravitational field var-phi mn as a physical field in the spirit of Faraday and Maxwell, explains all known gravitational experiments and gives a new prediction for the evolution of the universe, collapse, etc. The RTG determines the structure of the gravitational field as a field possessing spins 2 and 0 and all conservation laws for energy, momentum, and angular momentum. An exact solution of the complete simultaneous system of equations of the relativistic theory of gravitation and Maxwell's equations is found in the axisymmetric case for an electrically charged rotating body. The uniqueness of this solution is proved

  10. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.H.; Adams, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    We present generalized Einstein equations, invariant under scale transformations, and study several astrophysical tests. It is assumed that the dynamics of atoms or clocks used as measuring apparatus is given a priori. Connection with gauge fields and broken symmetries is made through the cosmological constant

  11. Test-particle motion in the nonsymmetric gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A derivation of the motion of test particles in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory (NGT) is given using the field equations in the presence of matter. The motion of the particle is governed by the Christoffel symbols, which are formed from the symmetric part of the fundamental tensor g/sub μ//sub ν/, as well as by a tensorial piece determined by the skew part of the contracted curvature tensor R/sub μ//sub ν/. Given the energy-momentum tensor for a perfect fluid and the definition of a test particle in the NGT, the equations of motion follow from the conservation laws. The tensorial piece in the equations of motion describes a new force in nature that acts on the conserved charge in a body. Particles that carry this new charge do not follow geodesic world lines in the NGT, whereas photons do satisfy geodesic equations of motion and the equivalence principle of general relativity. Astronomical predictions, based on the exact static, spherically symmetric solution of the field equations in a vacuum and the test-particle equations of motion, are derived in detail. The maximally extended coordinates that remove the event-horizon singularities in the static, spherically symmetric solution are presented. It is shown how an inward radially falling test particle can be prevented from forming an event horizon for a value greater than a specified critical value of the source charge. If a test particle does fall through an event horizon, then it must continue to fall until it reaches the singularity at r = 0

  12. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  13. Einstein in matrix form exact derivation of the theory of special and general relativity without tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ludyk, Günter

    2013-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theories of Special and General Relativity. The target audience are physicists, engineers and applied scientists who are looking for an understandable introduction to the topic - without too much new mathematics. The fundamental equations of Einsteins theory of Special and General Relativity are derived using matrix calculus, without the help of tensors. This feature makes the book special and a valuable tool for scientists and engineers with no experience in the field of tensor calculus. In part I the foundations of Special Relativity are developed, part II describes the structure and principle of General Relativity. Part III explains the Schwarzschild solution of spherical body gravity and examines the "Black Hole" phenomenon. Any necessary mathematical tools are user friendly provided, either directly in the text or in the appendices.

  14. Post-Newtonian (and higher order) observational constraints on gravitation field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordtvedt, K.

    1982-01-01

    The empirically confirmed premise that gravity is a metric theory is accepted. The general class of all Lagrangian-based metric field theories of gravity is considered. A collection of observational tests of gravitational phenomena which points to a specific metric theory of gravity and rules out alternatives is created

  15. On the de Sitter and Nariai spacetimes in a generalized theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1985-07-01

    A possibility of obtaining the de Sitter and Nariai spacetimes in a generalized theory of gravitation (which was in succession proposed by Utiyama-DeWitt, Parker-Fulling-Hu and Gurovich-Starobinski) is examined. It is shown that the generalized theory with a suitable fixation of three parameters admit both spacetimes, just like the general theory of relativity. (author)

  16. Effective Gravitational Theories in String Theory and the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Andreas Vigand

    an effective theory for higher dimensional extended black holes in a uid/elastic perturbative derivative expansion. Moreover, we show that the approach is quite universal and can be extended to various supergravities. Finally, we consider a new generalization of the method, which allows us to treat (SUGRA...... as low/high spin. As a byproduct of our analysis, we find a new stationary dipole-charged black hole solution on the AdS S backgrounds of type IIB/M-theory. We finally consider, via a double scaling extremal limit, a novel null-wave zero-temperature giant graviton exhibiting a BPS spectrum. Finally......We consider various aspects of effective gravitational theories, including supergravity, within the framework of the blackfold approach. The thesis is naturally split into three parts. In the first part of the thesis, we explore the blackfold approach and explain how it is possible to write down...

  17. Analysis of Weyl-affine theories of gravity in terms of the gravitational frequency shift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coley, A.A.; Sarmiento, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    A subclass of nonmetric theories of gravity, called Weyl-affine theories of gravity (WATGs), is analyzed by calculating their predictions for the gravitational frequency shift undergone by a wave signal in a planned solar probe. The analysis is carried out using a formalism in a spherically symmetric and static gravitational field. One of the advantages of the formalism is that any possible ''nonmetricity'' is contained in an arbitrary function, λ, of the Newtonian gravitational potential, U. The numerical results are calculated for a situation modeling a future experiment in the solar system. In the calculations, the metric components and the function, λ, are expanded up to third order in U. Within the limits of the gravitational redshift experiments performed to date, it is found that WATGs must coincide with their metric counterparts (i.e., λ is unity). It is hoped that the planned solar probe will test the nature of the theories under investigation to a higher degree of accuracy

  18. Geometrodynamics of gauge fields on the geometry of Yang-Mills and gravitational gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, Eckehard W

    2016-01-01

    This monograph aims to provide a unified, geometrical foundation of gauge theories of elementary particle physics. The underlying geometrical structure is unfolded in a coordinate-free manner via the modern mathematical notions of fibre bundles and exterior forms. Topics such as the dynamics of Yang-Mills theories, instanton solutions and topological invariants are included. By transferring these concepts to local space-time symmetries, generalizations of Einstein's theory of gravity arise in a Riemann-Cartan space with curvature and torsion. It provides the framework in which the (broken) Poincaré gauge theory, the Rainich geometrization of the Einstein-Maxwell system, and higher-dimensional, non-abelian Kaluza-Klein theories are developed. Since the discovery of the Higgs boson, concepts of spontaneous symmetry breaking in gravity have come again into focus, and, in this revised edition, these will be exposed in geometric terms. Quantizing gravity remains an open issue: formulating it as a de Sitter t...

  19. Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malament, David B

    2012-01-01

    In Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory, David B. Malament presents the basic logical-mathematical structure of general relativity and considers a number of special topics concerning the foundations of general relativity and its relation to Newtonian gravitation theory. These special topics include the geometrized formulation of Newtonian theory (also known as Newton-Cartan theory), the concept of rotation in general relativity, and Gödel spacetime. One of the highlights of the book is a no-go theorem that can be understood to show that there is

  20. First low-frequency Einstein@Home all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in Advanced LIGO data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Deelman, E.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Duncan, J.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gabel, M.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Gonzalez, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kraemer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Hernandez, I. Magana; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mayani, R.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Rynge, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahi, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y. -F.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Anderson, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report results of a deep all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves from isolated neutron stars in data from the first Advanced LIGO observing run. This search investigates the low frequency range of Advanced LIGO data, between 20 and 100 Hz, much of which was not explored in initial LIGO.

  1. Incompressible Navier-Stokes equation from Einstein-Maxwell and Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Chao; Tian Yu; Wu Xiaoning; Ling Yi

    2012-01-01

    The dual fluid description for a general cutoff surface at radius r=r c outside the horizon in the charged AdS black brane bulk space-time is investigated, first in the Einstein-Maxwell theory. Under the non-relativistic long-wavelength expansion with parameter ε, the coupled Einstein-Maxwell equations are solved up to O(ε 2 ). The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with external force density is obtained as the constraint equation at the cutoff surface. For non-extremal black brane, the viscosity of the dual fluid is determined by the regularity of the metric fluctuation at the horizon, whose ratio to entropy density η/s is independent of both the cutoff r c and the black brane charge. Then, we extend our discussion to the Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell case, where the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with external force density is also obtained at a general cutoff surface. In this case, it turns out that the ratio η/s is independent of the cutoff r c but dependent on the charge density of the black brane.

  2. On the propagation problem in gravitational radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damour, T.

    1986-01-01

    The authors emphasize that a suitable combination of analytical and numerical methods might be useful to overcome the limitations of both methods. In particular, analytical methods are needed, on the one hand to provide boundary conditions to numerical codes, and on the other hand to relate the gravitational field at the outer edge of the grid with the asymptotic outgoing wave form. The authors present an explicit formula which solves approximately the latter ''propagation problem'' in a simplified situation which might be relevant to the problem of computing the gravitational wave form emitted during the three-dimensional collapse of a star

  3. Propagation of gravitational waves in the generalized tensor-vector-scalar theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagi, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Efforts are underway to improve the design and sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors, with the hope that the next generation of these detectors will observe a gravitational wave signal. Such a signal will not only provide information on dynamics in the strong gravity regime that characterizes potential sources of gravitational waves, but will also serve as a decisive test for alternative theories of gravitation that are consistent with all other current experimental observations. We study the linearized theory of the tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity with generalized vector action, an alternative theory of gravitation designed to explain the apparent deficit of visible matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies without postulating yet-undetected dark matter. We find the polarization states and propagation speeds for gravitational waves in vacuum, and show that in addition to the usual transverse-traceless propagation modes, there are two more mixed longitudinal-transverse modes and two trace modes, of which at least one has longitudinal polarization. Additionally, the propagation speeds are different from the speed of light.

  4. Scalar-tetrad theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, J.

    1981-01-01

    A general theory of gravitation is constructed using a tetrad and a scalar field. The resulting theory, called a scalar-tetrad theory, does not contain Einstein's or the Brans-Dicke theories as special cases. However, there is a range of scalar-tetrad theories with the same post-Newtonian limit as Einstein's theory. Two particular models are interesting because of their simplicity. (author)

  5. Mass spectrum in 5D Warped Einstein Universe and El Naschie's quantum golden field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariescu, Marina-Aura; Dariescu, Ciprian; Pirghie, Ana-Camelia

    2009-01-01

    The present paper deals with the massive bosons evolving in a 5D manifold, where the four-dimensional slices are the S 3 xR spacetime. By solving the Einstein equations with a perfect fluid source, we find the expression of the warp factor and write down the corresponding Gordon equation in the bulk, near one of the degenerated vacua of an effective potential with a spontaneously broken Z 2 -symmetry. We obtain the general form of the wave functions and analyze how the Kaluza-Klein-type spectrum is affecting the mass of the scalar on the brane. By inspecting the mass spectrum, we point out a connection with the golden mean based El Naschie's field theory.

  6. Einstein-Maxwell-axion theory: dyon solution with regular electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Zayats, Alexei E. [Kazan Federal University, Department of General Relativity and Gravitation, Institute of Physics, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    In the framework of the Einstein-Maxwell-axion theory we consider static spherically symmetric solutions which describe a magnetic monopole in the axionic environment. These solutions are interpreted as the solutions for an axionic dyon, the electric charge of which is composite, i.e. in addition to the standard central electric charge it includes an effective electric charge induced by the axion-photon coupling. We focus on the analysis of those solutions which are characterized by the electric field regular at the center. Special attention is paid to the solutions with the electric field that is vanishing at the center, and that has the Coulombian asymptote, and thus displays an extremum at some distant sphere. Constraints on the electric and effective scalar charges of such an object are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Einstein-Maxwell-axion theory: dyon solution with regular electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Zayats, Alexei E.

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the Einstein-Maxwell-axion theory we consider static spherically symmetric solutions which describe a magnetic monopole in the axionic environment. These solutions are interpreted as the solutions for an axionic dyon, the electric charge of which is composite, i.e. in addition to the standard central electric charge it includes an effective electric charge induced by the axion-photon coupling. We focus on the analysis of those solutions which are characterized by the electric field regular at the center. Special attention is paid to the solutions with the electric field that is vanishing at the center, and that has the Coulombian asymptote, and thus displays an extremum at some distant sphere. Constraints on the electric and effective scalar charges of such an object are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Raychaudhuri equation in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan theory with spin-density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Krisch, Jean P.; Ray, John R.; Smalley, Larry L.

    1988-01-01

    The physical implications of the Raychaudhuri equation for a spinning fluid in a Riemann-Cartan spacetime is developed and discussed using the self-consistent Lagrangian based formulation for the Einstein-Cartan theory. It was found that the spin-squared terms contribute to expansion (inflation) at early times and may lead to a bounce in the final collapse. The relationship between the fluid's vorticity and spin angular velocity is clarified and the effect of the interaction terms between the spin angular velocity and the spin in the Raychaudhuri equation investigated. These results should prove useful for studies of systems with an intrinsic spin angular momentum in extreme astrophysical or cosmological problems.

  9. An exact solution in Einstein-Cartan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The exact solution of the field equations of the Einstein-Cartan theory is obtained for an artificial dust of radially polarized spins, with spherical symmetry and static. For a best estimation of the effect due the spin, the energy-momentum metric tensor is considered null. The gravitational field dynamics is studied for several torsion strengths, through the massive and spinless test-particle moviment, in particular for null torsion Schwarzschild solutions is again obtained. It is observed that the gravitational effects related to the torsin (spin) sometimes are attractives sometimes are repulsives, depending of the torsion values and of the test-particle position and velocity. (L.C.) [pt

  10. A theory of some gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribbin, John.

    1990-01-01

    This paper looks at Einstein's Theory of General Relativity and lists its accomplishments in explaining many problems in gravitation and astrophysics. It was Einstin's genius that led to our present comprehensive theory of gravity. Various ideas central to the theory are explained, such as the bending of space and time by massive objects, geodesics, the origin of the universe. In astrophysics, recent discoveries such as black holes, quasars, gravitational lenses, gravitational radiation, such as that coming from pulsars, can all be explained and understood using Einstein's ideas. (UK)

  11. Work in progress Tim Radford on research that aims to find a tiny error in Einstein's theory of special relativity

    CERN Multimedia

    Radford, T

    2004-01-01

    "Ben Varcoe wants to find a relatively small mistake in Einstein's theory of special relativity. To do this, he will slow light down from 300,000 km per second to 10 metres per second - about the speed of Darren Campbell - and see how it behaves" (1 page)

  12. Exact interior solutions for static spheres in the Einstein-Cartan theory with two sources of torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Gallakhmetov, A M

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the problem of existence of exact interior solutions for static spherically symmetric configurations in the Einstein-Cartan theory (ECT), the distributions of perfect fluid and non-minimally coupled scalar field are considered. The exact solutions in the one-torsion ECT and two-torsion one are obtained. Some consequences of two sources of torsion are discussed.

  13. Einstein and the history of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Stachel, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a collection of essays by the authors and other people that deal with scientific opinions that led Einstein and his contemporaries to their views of general relativity. Some of the essays explore Einstein's passage from the special theory through a sequence of gravitational theories to the discovery of the field equations of the grand theory in November 1915. Two other essays discuss Einstein's public and private exchanges with Max Abraham and Tullio Levi-Civita in 1913 and 1914. A sympathetic picture of H.A. Lorentz's reaction to the general theory of relativity is included, and a careful and insightful essay on the early understanding of the Schwarzschild-Droste solution to the field equations of general relativity is presented. One paper presents a discussion on the state of the enterprise of general relativity between 1925 and 1928, and a short essay details the history of steps toward quantum gravitational through canonical quantization. A discussion of the history of derivations of the geodesic equation of motion from the field equation and conservation laws of the general theory is presented. The early history of geometrical unified field theories is included

  14. Note on the evolution of the gravitational potential in Rastall scalar field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, J.C.; Hamani Daouda, M.; Piattella, O.F.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the gravitational potential in Rastall scalar field theories. In a single component model a consistent perturbation theory, formulated in the Newtonian gauge, is possible only for γ=1, which is the General Relativity limit. On the other hand, the addition of another canonical fluid component allows to consider the case γ≠1.

  15. Feynman graph derivation of Einstein quadrupole formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dass, N.D.H.; Soni, V.

    1980-11-01

    The one graviton transition operator, and consequently, the classical energy loss formula for gravitational radiation are derived from the Feynman graphs of helicity +- 2 theories of gravitation. The calculations are done both for the case of electromagnetic and gravitational scattering. The departure of the in and out states from plane waves owing to the long range nature of gravitation is taken into account to improve the Born approximation calculations. This also includes a long range modification of the graviton wave function which is shown to be equivalent to the classical problem of the true light cones deviating logarithmically at large distances from the flat space light cones. The transition from the S-matrix elements calculated graphically to the graviton transition operator is done by using complimentarity of space-time and momentum descriptions. The energy loss formula derived originally by Einstein is shown to be correct. (Auth.)

  16. Certain problems in the current theory of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, M. A.

    1984-04-01

    A number of problems (considered by the author to be the most significant) connected with the possible role of gravitation in the elementary-particle physics and cosmology are examined. Particular attention is given to the problems of self-energy, the limit mass of elementary particles, maximons and the evolution of the universe, the origin of the universe, and the physical meaning of Planck's length.

  17. Bose-Einstein condensation in magnetic traps. Introduction to the theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitaevskii, Lev P

    1998-01-01

    The recent realization of Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases opens new possibilities for the observation of macroscopic quantum phenomena. There are two important features of these systems - weak interaction and significant spatial inhomogeneity. Because of this a non-trivial 'zeroth-order' theory exists, compared to the 'first-order' Bogolubov theory. The zeroth-order theory is based on the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate ψ-function. The equation is classical in its essence but contains the constant ℎ explicitly. Phenomena such as collective modes, interference, tunneling, Josephson-like current and quantized vortex lines can be described using this equation. Elementary excitations define the thermodynamic behavior of the system and result in a Landau-type damping of collective modes. Fluctuations of the phase of the condensate wave function restrict the monochromaticity of the Josephson current. Fluctuations of the numbers of quanta result in quantum collapse-revival of the collective oscillations. (special issue)

  18. A benign property of the ghost mode in massive theory of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugreev, Yu. V.

    2018-01-01

    It was shown in the frameworks of massive gravitational theories having in linear approximation mass term {m^2}( {φ ^{α β }}{φ_{α β }} - 1/2{φ ^2}} ) in the lagrangian, that created some time ago spherically-symmetric static sources should possess inside their light cone not only Yukawa potential, but also nonstationary component. It leads to the long ( 1/ m) period of gravitational evaporation of such sources with the mass loss Ṁ m 2 M 2 The magnitude of the flux is c 4/ v 4 times ( c—speed of light, v—velocity of the source particles) bigger then negative gravitational radiation flux corresponding to the ghost scalar mode in the spectrum of such gravitational field, with stabilizing the source.

  19. The Bohr--Einstein ''weighing-of-energy'' debate and the principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Bohr--Einstein debate over the ''weighing of energy'' and the validity of the time--energy uncertainty relation is reexamined in the context of gravitation theories that do not respect the equivalence principle. Bohr's use of the equivalence principle is shown to be sufficient, but not necessary, to establish the validity of this uncertainty relation in Einstein's ''weighing-of-energy'' gedanken experiment. The uncertainty relation is shown to hold in any energy-conserving theory of gravity, and so a failure of the equivalence principle does not engender a failure of quantum mechanics. The relationship between the gravitational redshift and the equivalence principle is reviewed

  20. Classical and quantum dynamics of a gravitational theory with absolute teleparallelism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeredo Campos, R. de.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamics of an alternative theory of gravitation with absolute teleparallelism is sustied. In the Cauchy problem of this theory four constraint relations are obtained, as in general relativity, because of the existence of the manifold mapping group. Propagation equations for the dynamical variables are also derived by applying Dirac's Hamiltonian methods. In addition, an algebra of generators related to the global Lorentz group and the correspondence principle leading to a quantum version of the theory are also discussed. (author) [pt

  1. Einstein's Enigma of black holes in my bubble bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishveshwara, C.

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's Enigma or Black Holes in My Bubble Bath is a humorous and informal rendition of the story of gravitation theory from the early historic origins to the latest developments in astrophysics, focusing on Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity and black-hole physics. Through engaging conversations and napkin-scribbled diagrams come tumbling the rudiments of relativity, spacetime and much of modern physics, narrated with high didactic and literary talent, and each embedded in casual lessons given by a worldly astrophysicist to his friend. Join the intellectual fun and exalt in the frothy ideas while vicariously taking relaxing baths in this magical bathtub. (orig.)

  2. Effective gravitational wave stress-energy tensor in alternative theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Leo C.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The inspiral of binary systems in vacuum is controlled by the stress-energy of gravitational radiation and any other propagating degrees of freedom. For gravitational waves, the dominant contribution is characterized by an effective stress-energy tensor at future null infinity. We employ perturbation theory and the short-wavelength approximation to compute this stress-energy tensor in a wide class of alternative theories. We find that this tensor is generally a modification of that first computed by Isaacson, where the corrections can dominate over the general relativistic term. In a wide class of theories, however, these corrections identically vanish at asymptotically flat, future, null infinity, reducing the stress-energy tensor to Isaacson's. We exemplify this phenomenon by first considering dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which corrects the action via a scalar field and the contraction of the Riemann tensor and its dual. We then consider a wide class of theories with dynamical scalar fields coupled to higher-order curvature invariants and show that the gravitational wave stress-energy tensor still reduces to Isaacson's. The calculations presented in this paper are crucial to perform systematic tests of such modified gravity theories through the orbital decay of binary pulsars or through gravitational wave observations.

  3. An explanation of forms of planetary orbits and estimation of angular shift of the Mercury' perihelion using the statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    estimated on the basis of the linear size of its kernel, i.e. the thickness of a visible part of the solar corona. Really, NASA' astronomer S. Odenwald in his notice «How thick is the solar corona?» wrote: "The corona actually extends throughout the entire solar system as a "wind" of particles, however, the densist parts of the corona is usually seen not more than about 1-2 solar radii from the surface or about 690,000 to 1.5 million kilometers at the equator. Near the poles, it seems to be a bit flatter..." [6]. In the fact, as mentioned in [5], a recession of plots of dependences of relative brightness of components of spectrum of the Solar corona occurs on distance of 3-3.5 radii from the center, i.e. on 2-2.5 radii from the edge of the solar disk. Thus, accepting thickness of a visible part of the solar corona equal to Δ = 2R (here R is radius of the solar disk) we find that r* = R + Δ = 3R , where r* =1/ α . In other words, the parameter of gravitational compression 2 α =1/ r* of a spheroidal body in case of the Sun with its corona (for which the equatorial radius ofdisk R = 6.955ṡ108 m) can be estimated by the value [2]-[5]: 2.29701177718 10 (m ) (3 ) 1 19 2 2 = ≈ ṡ - - R α . (1) So, the procedure of finding α is based on the known 3σ -rule in the statistical theory. Really, as shown in the monograph [5], namely the solar corona accounting under calculation of perturbed orbit of the planet of Mercury allows to find the estimation of a displacement of perihelion of Mercury' orbit for the one period within the framework of the statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies. As it is known, on a way of specification of the law of Newton using the general relativity theory the Mercury problem solving was found [5]. Nevertheless, from a common position of the statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies the points of view as Leverrier (about existence of an unknown matter) and Einstein (about insufficiency of the theory of Newton) practically

  4. Vacuum-field solutions of Ross and Sen-Dunn theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krori, K.D.; Nandy, D.

    1978-01-01

    Vacuum-field solutions of Ross (Phys. Rev.; D5:284 (1972)) and Sen-Dunn (J. Math. Phys.; 12:578 (1971)) theories of gravitation have been obtained with the aid of a Friedmann-type metric. Non-static solutions are found showing that the Birkhoff theorem holds for neither theory. It has been observed that the two theories have a limited scope for vacuum solution as against the Brans-Dicke theory. Mach's principle, however, holds for both the theories. (author)

  5. Einstein was right!

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Karl

    2014-01-01

    All modern books on Einstein emphasize the genius of his relativity theory and the corresponding corrections and extensions of the ancient space-time concept. However, Einstein's opposition to the use of probability in the laws of nature and particularly in the laws of quantum mechanics is criticized and often portrayed as outdated. The author of Einstein Was Right! takes a unique view and shows that Einstein created a ""Trojan horse"" ready to unleash forces against the use of probability as a basis for the laws of nature. Einstein warned that the use of probability would, in the final analys

  6. Einstein and relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullwick, E.G.

    1979-01-01

    Einstein published his Special Theory of Relativity in 1905 and in 1915 his General Theory which predicted the bending of light rays passing near the sun. This prediction was apparently confirmed experimentally in 1919 bringing Einstein popular acclaim. Einstein's work is reviewed and the question of whether he was in fact first in the field is examined with especial reference to the work of Maxwell, Lorentz and Poincare. (U.K.)

  7. Final fate of spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a dust cloud in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    We give a model of the higher-dimensional spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a dust cloud including the perturbative effects of quantum gravity. The n(≥5)-dimensional action with the Gauss-Bonnet term for gravity is considered and a simple formulation of the basic equations is given for the spacetime M≅M 2 xK n-2 with a perfect fluid and a cosmological constant. This is a generalization of the Misner-Sharp formalism of the four-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime with a perfect fluid in general relativity. The whole picture and the final fate of the gravitational collapse of a dust cloud differ greatly between the cases with n=5 and n≥6. There are two families of solutions, which we call plus-branch and the minus-branch solutions. A plus-branch solution can be attached to the outside vacuum region which is asymptotically anti-de Sitter in spite of the absence of a cosmological constant. Bounce inevitably occurs in the plus-branch solution for n≥6, and consequently singularities cannot be formed. Since there is no trapped surface in the plus-branch solution, the singularity formed in the case of n=5 must be naked. On the other hand, a minus-branch solution can be attached to the outside asymptotically flat vacuum region. We show that naked singularities are massless for n≥6, while massive naked singularities are possible for n=5. In the homogeneous collapse represented by the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker solution, the singularity formed is spacelike for n≥6, while it is ingoing-null for n=5. In the inhomogeneous collapse with smooth initial data, the strong cosmic censorship hypothesis holds for n≥10 and for n=9 depending on the parameters in the initial data, while a naked singularity is always formed for 5≤n≤8. These naked singularities can be globally naked when the initial surface radius of the dust cloud is fine-tuned, and then the weak cosmic censorship hypothesis is violated

  8. Energy aspect of the correspondence principle in gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitskevich, N.V.; Nesterov, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    The correspondence of different definitions of invariant values in the general relativity theory with the Newton theory is considered. The analysis is carried out in the system of reference of a single Fermi-observer. It turns out that of the values considered the Papapetru pseudotensor only satisfies the correspondence principle

  9. Conservation laws in the SLsub(2,C) gauge theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissani, N.

    1983-01-01

    A one-parameter family of new Lagrangian densities for the SLsub(2,C) gauge theory of gravitation is proposed. The relation between the laws of conservation and the SLsub(2,C) symmetry of general relativity through the Noether theorem is investigated

  10. On the dimensional reduction of a gravitational theory containing higher-derivative terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, M.D.

    1990-02-01

    From the higher-dimensional gravitational theory L-circumflex=R-circumflex-2Λ-circumflex-α-circumflex 1 R-circumflex 2 =α-circumflex 2 R-circumflex AB R-circumflex AB -α-circumflex 3 R-circumflex ABCD R-circumflex ABCD , we derive the effective four-dimensional Lagrangian L. (author). 12 refs

  11. Born--Infeld theory of electroweak and gravitational fields: Possible correction to Newton and Coulomb laws

    OpenAIRE

    Palatnik, Dmitriy

    2002-01-01

    In this note one suggests a possibility of direct observation of the $\\theta$-parameter, introduced in the Born--Infeld theory of electroweak and gravitational fields, developed in quant-ph/0202024. Namely, one may treat $\\theta$ as a universal constant, responsible for correction to the Coulomb and Newton laws, allowing direct interaction between electrical charges and masses.

  12. Attractive versus repulsive interactions in the Bose-Einstein condensation dynamics of relativistic field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, J.; Boguslavski, K.; Chatrchyan, A.; Jaeckel, J.

    2017-10-01

    We study the impact of attractive self-interactions on the nonequilibrium dynamics of relativistic quantum fields with large occupancies at low momenta. Our primary focus is on Bose-Einstein condensation and nonthermal fixed points in such systems. For a model system, we consider O (N ) -symmetric scalar field theories. We use classical-statistical real-time simulations as well as a systematic 1 /N expansion of the quantum (two-particle-irreducible) effective action to next-to-leading order. When the mean self-interactions are repulsive, condensation occurs as a consequence of a universal inverse particle cascade to the zero-momentum mode with self-similar scaling behavior. For attractive mean self-interactions, the inverse cascade is absent, and the particle annihilation rate is enhanced compared to the repulsive case, which counteracts the formation of coherent field configurations. For N ≥2 , the presence of a nonvanishing conserved charge can suppress number-changing processes and lead to the formation of stable localized charge clumps, i.e., Q balls.

  13. Black-hole solutions with scalar hair in Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, G.; Bakopoulos, A.; Kanti, P.

    2018-04-01

    In the context of the Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet theory, with a general coupling function between the scalar field and the quadratic Gauss-Bonnet term, we investigate the existence of regular black-hole solutions with scalar hair. Based on a previous theoretical analysis, which studied the evasion of the old and novel no-hair theorems, we consider a variety of forms for the coupling function (exponential, even and odd polynomial, inverse polynomial, and logarithmic) that, in conjunction with the profile of the scalar field, satisfy a basic constraint. Our numerical analysis then always leads to families of regular, asymptotically flat black-hole solutions with nontrivial scalar hair. The solution for the scalar field and the profile of the corresponding energy-momentum tensor, depending on the value of the coupling constant, may exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior, an unusual feature that highlights the limitations of the existing no-hair theorems. We also determine and study in detail the scalar charge, horizon area, and entropy of our solutions.

  14. Einstein's Cosmos (German Title: Einsteins Kosmos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Dick, Wolfgang R.

    The different contributions of the present volume illuminate the interaction between Einstein and his colleagues when the foundations of modern cosmology were laid: First, the relativistic effects in the solar system, the gravitational redshift in the solar spectrum, and Einstein's relations with Freundlich and Eddington. Second, the cosmological models of Einstein, de Sitter, Friedmann, and Lemaître, which were discussed controversely till the end of the 1920s. Other scientists have also widened or critically questioned Einstein's insight and knowledge: Schwarzschild, Selety, Silberstein, and Mandl, whose life and work is discussed in separate articles. In those days, politics more than ever in history had influenced the lifes of scientists. Therefore, some comments on the ``political cosmos'' that has influenced decisively Einstein's life are also given. A special role in popularizing Einstein's world view was played by Archenhold Observatory in Berlin. A list of Einstein memorial places and a bibliographic list conclude the present book. All papers are written in German, and have English abstracts.

  15. Theoretical physics 3. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories, and gravitation. 4. ed.; Theoretische Physik 3. Klassische Feldtheorie. Von Elektrodynamik, nicht-Abelschen Eichtheorien und Gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheck, Florian [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2017-09-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Maxwell's equations together with their symmetry and covariance, the Maxwell theory as classical field theory, simple applications of Maxwell's theory, local gauge theories, classical field theory of gravitation. (HSI)

  16. Interplay of gravitation and linear superposition of different mass eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, D.V.

    1998-01-01

    The interplay of gravitation and the quantum-mechanical principle of linear superposition induces a new set of neutrino oscillation phases. These ensure that the flavor-oscillation clocks, inherent in the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, redshift precisely as required by Einstein close-quote s theory of gravitation. The physical observability of these phases in the context of the solar neutrino anomaly, type-II supernova, and certain atomic systems is briefly discussed. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  17. What is Gravitational Lensing? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leauthaud, Alexie [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics (BCCP); Nakajima, Reiko [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics (BCCP)

    2009-07-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Gravitational lensing is explained by Einstein's general theory of relativity: galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which are very massive objects, act on spacetime by causing it to become curved. Alexie Leauthaud and Reiko Nakajima, astrophysicists with the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, will discuss how scientists use gravitational lensing to investigate the nature of dark energy and dark matter in the universe.

  18. Constraining Relativistic Generalizations of Modified Newtonian Dynamics with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-07-21

    In the weak-field limit of general relativity, gravitational waves obey linear equations and propagate at the speed of light. These properties of general relativity are supported by the observation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays as well as by LIGO's recent detection of gravitation waves. We argue that two existing relativistic generalizations of modified Newtonian dynamics, namely, the generalized Einstein-aether theory and bimetric modified Newtonian dynamics, display fatal inconsistencies with these observations.

  19. Bose-Einstein condensed supermassive black holes: a case of renormalized quantum field theory in curved space-time

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nieuwenhuizen, T.M.; Špička, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2010), s. 256-268 ISSN 1386-9477. [International Conference on Frontiers of Quantum and Mesoscopic Thermodynamics (FQMT '08). Praha, 28.07.2008-02.08.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : supermassive black hole * quantum held theory * Bose-Einstein condensation * renormalization Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.304, year: 2010

  20. A Study of Schrödinger–Type Equations Appearing in Bohmian Mechanics and in the Theory of Bose–Einstein Condensates

    KAUST Repository

    Sierra Nunez, Jesus Alfredo

    2018-01-01

    The Schrödinger equations have had a profound impact on a wide range of fields of modern science, including quantum mechanics, superfluidity, geometrical optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, and the analysis of dispersive phenomena in the theory

  1. Einstein A to Z

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Karen C

    2004-01-01

    Einstein was the twentieth century's most celebrated scientist - a man who developed the theory of relativity, revolutionised physics and became an iconic genius in the popular imagination. Essays range from the reasonably scientific including the theory of relativity, to the odd and engaging, such as Einstein's brain, his favourite jokes and films.

  2. Albert Einstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In a single year, 1905, Albert Einstein made several dramatic contributions to physics. He deduced the true nature of Brownian motion (doing much to underline the molecular and atomic nature of matter), he demonstrated the particle nature of light in a way which was accessible to experimental investigation (the work for which he received the Nobel prize) and, most dramatically of all, he conceived the special theory of relativity

  3. How Einstein Discovered the Special Theory of Relativity -R-ES ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The international physics community had set aside the year 2005 as the ... and Cosmology Research. Centre ... Einstein told Bernard Cohen that he thought that the ... search journal was available. A book by ..... creative ability. In spite of his ...

  4. Gravitational dynamics in s+1+1 dimensions II. Hamiltonian theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Zoltan; Gergely, Laszlo A.

    2008-01-01

    We develop a Hamiltonian formalism of braneworld gravity, which singles out two preferred, mutually orthogonal directions. One is a unit twist-free field of spatial vectors with integral lines intersecting perpendicularly the brane. The other is a temporal vector field with respect to which we perform the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition of the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian. The gravitational variables arise from the projections of the spatial metric and their canonically conjugated momenta as tensorial, vectorial and scalar quantities defined on the family of hypersurfaces containing the brane. They represent the gravitons, a gravi-photon, and a gravi-scalar, respectively. From the action we derive the canonical evolution equations and the constraints for these gravitational degrees of freedom both on the brane and outside it. By integrating across the brane, the dynamics also generates the tensorial and scalar projection of the Lanczos equation. The vectorial projection of the Lanczos equation arises in a similar way from the diffeomorphism constraint. Both the graviton and the gravi-scalar are continuous across the brane, however the momentum of the gravi-vector has a jump, related to the energy transport (heat flow) on the brane

  5. Anisotropic cosmological models in f (R, T) theory of gravitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    indirect evidence for the late time accelerated expansion of the Universe. ... Bertolami et al [9] proposed a generalization of f (R) theory of gravity ..... For the purpose of reference, we set the origin of the time coordinate at the bounce of.

  6. Canonical quantum theory of gravitational field with higher derivatives, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Shoichiro; Kimura, Tadahiko

    1983-01-01

    A formulation which is invariant under an additional BRS transformation with nilpotency of order two is presented for the canonical theory of the renormalizable quantum gravity with higher derivatives. The canonical quantization is carried out and various equal time (anti-) commutation relations are derived. The asymptotic fields are reanalyzed. The physical particle contents are just the same as those obtained in previous papers. (author)

  7. Cosmological consequences of the relativistic theory of gravitation with massive gravitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chugreev, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that a number of problems are inherent in the standard scenario of the development of a homogeneous and isotropic (Friedmannian) universe. Above all there are the problems of the singularity, horizon, flatness, and concentration of fossil monopoles. Strictly speaking, to analyze these questions it is necessary to use a quantum theory of gravitation. The aim of the present paper is to show how the introduction of a graviton mass in the relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) leads to the resolution of these problems already at the classical level, i.e., without recourse to quantum theory. Moreover, we do not need any of the great diversity of inflationary stages in the development of the universe, in which it expands exponentially. The equation of state will always have the form p = ωρ, with ω > 0

  8. The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Deborah [SLAC; Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology

    2013-07-23

    Bard's talk explains the phenomenon known as gravitational lensing and how astrophysicists use it to explore the 95 percent of the universe that remains unseen: dark matter and dark energy. One of the most surprising predictions made by Einstein's theory of relativity is that light doesn't travel through the universe in a straight line. The gravitational field of massive objects will deflect the path of light traveling past, giving some very dramatic effects. We see multiple images of quasars, galaxies smeared into arcs and circles and magnified images of the most distant objects in the universe. This explains how gravitational lensing was first observed and discusses how scientists use this phenomenon to study everything from exoplanets to dark matter to the structure of the universe and the mysterious dark energy.

  9. Conversations With Albert Einstein. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankland, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses Einstein's views on the role of Michelson-Morley, Fizeau, and Miller experiments in the development of relativity and his attitude toward the theories of new quantum mechanics. Indicates that Einstein's opposition to quantum mechanics is beyond dispute. (CC)

  10. Relativity in Combinatorial Gravitational Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Linfan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A combinatorial spacetime $(mathscr{C}_G| uboverline{t}$ is a smoothly combinatorial manifold $mathscr{C}$ underlying a graph $G$ evolving on a time vector $overline{t}$. As we known, Einstein's general relativity is suitable for use only in one spacetime. What is its disguise in a combinatorial spacetime? Applying combinatorial Riemannian geometry enables us to present a combinatorial spacetime model for the Universe and suggest a generalized Einstein gravitational equation in such model. Forfinding its solutions, a generalized relativity principle, called projective principle is proposed, i.e., a physics law ina combinatorial spacetime is invariant under a projection on its a subspace and then a spherically symmetric multi-solutions ofgeneralized Einstein gravitational equations in vacuum or charged body are found. We also consider the geometrical structure in such solutions with physical formations, and conclude that an ultimate theory for the Universe maybe established if all such spacetimes in ${f R}^3$. Otherwise, our theory is only an approximate theory and endless forever.

  11. The gravitational sector of 2d (0,2) F-theory vacua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrie, Craig [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität,Philosophenweg 19, Heidelberg, 69120 (Germany); Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford,Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Weigand, Timo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität,Philosophenweg 19, Heidelberg, 69120 (Germany)

    2017-05-19

    F-theory compactifications on Calabi-Yau fivefolds give rise to two-dimensional N=(0,2) supersymmetric field theories coupled to gravity. We explore the dilaton supergravity defined by the moduli sector of such compactifications. The massless moduli spectrum is found by uplifting Type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau fourfolds. This spectrum matches expectations from duality with M-theory on the same elliptic fibration. The latter defines an N=2 Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics related to the 2d (0,2) F-theory supergravity via circle reduction. Using our recent results on the gravitational anomalies of duality twisted D3-branes wrapping curves in Calabi-Yau fivefolds we show that the F-theory spectrum is anomaly free. We match the classical Chern-Simons terms of the M-theory Super Quantum Mechanics to one-loop contributions to the effective action by S{sup 1} reduction of the dual F-theory.

  12. The gravitational sector of 2d (0,2) F-theory vacua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, Craig; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura; Weigand, Timo

    2017-01-01

    F-theory compactifications on Calabi-Yau fivefolds give rise to two-dimensional N=(0,2) supersymmetric field theories coupled to gravity. We explore the dilaton supergravity defined by the moduli sector of such compactifications. The massless moduli spectrum is found by uplifting Type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau fourfolds. This spectrum matches expectations from duality with M-theory on the same elliptic fibration. The latter defines an N=2 Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics related to the 2d (0,2) F-theory supergravity via circle reduction. Using our recent results on the gravitational anomalies of duality twisted D3-branes wrapping curves in Calabi-Yau fivefolds we show that the F-theory spectrum is anomaly free. We match the classical Chern-Simons terms of the M-theory Super Quantum Mechanics to one-loop contributions to the effective action by S 1 reduction of the dual F-theory.

  13. Einstein, the Universe, and All That: An Introduction to Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Black holes) an expanding universe) space and time inextricably tied together) GPS ... What was this Einstein guy thinking?!? In this tutorial) I'll give an overview of Einstein's theories of relativity and the wild things they say about our Universe. What really happens when a particle crosses an event horizon? What is the future of the Universe? And how can we know it? Wh I'll try to touch on these questions and in so doing) give the talks in the Cosmology) Gravitation and Relativity sessions some context.

  14. Gravitational instability theory of galaxy formation and clustering - Some recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall, S.M.; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass.)

    1980-01-01

    Some recent developments in the gravitational instability theory of galaxy formation and clustering are discussed including a comparison with observational data. On the theoretical side, N-body computer simulations have helped to sharpen the predictions of the theory and several new ideas have emerged on the roles of dissipation in protogalactic fragmentation and in galaxy collisions. On the observational side, the clustering properties of galaxies have been analyzed in new ways that demand a detailed comparison with theory. More and better measurements of the sizes, masses, and rotations of galaxies continue to accumulate

  15. Scalar-tensor theory of gravitation: generalizations and experimental limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duruisseau, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Several theories with scalar field can be derived from different variational principles. Here a very general variational principle is considered and it is proved that, in the exterior case without electromagnetic field, the solution for a particular case generates the set of solutions for the general case. This is applied to the exterior solution in the static case with spherical symmetry without electromagnetic field. The predictions are investigated for the classic effects and the event horizons and some limitations for the variational principles which generalize the usual limitations are obtained. In all these cases the Schwarzschild solution with his horizon appears as a very particular case. (author)

  16. Gauge theories of gravitation a reader with commentaries

    CERN Document Server

    Blagojevic, Milutin

    2013-01-01

    In the last five decades, the gauge approach to gravity has represented a research area of increasing importance for our understanding of the physics of fundamental interactions. A full clarification of the gauge dynamics of gravity is expected to be the last missing link to the hidden structure of a consistent unification of all the fundamental interactions, based on the gauge principle. The aim of the present reprint volume, with commentaries by Milutin Blagojevi & 263; and Friedrich W Hehl, is to introduce graduate and advanced undergraduate students of theoretical or mathematical physics, or any other interested researcher, to the field of classical gauge theories of gravity. This is not just an ordinary reprint volume; it is a guide to the literature on gauge theories of gravity. The reader is encouraged first to study the introductory commentaries and to become familiar with the basic content of the reprints and related ideas, then he/she can choose to read a specific reprint or reprints, and after ...

  17. Newtonian and non-newtonian limits of gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel', A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The nonrelativistic limit of the exact stationary axially-symmetric vacuum solution to Einstein equations, which is called the unified (generalized) Kerr-NUT solution, is investigated. Potentials for nonrelativistic gravitational fields, corresponding to this solution, have been calculated. The character of the c→infinity limit (c is the velocity of light) has been shown to depend on the structure of parameters of the Kerr-NUT solution. An example is given that shows the possibility of the existence of a nonrelativistic limit having an absolutely new, non-Newton (vortex) character. From the mathematically proved possibility of the existence of nonrelativistic vortex fields there follow also some implications of a more fundamental character. The Newton limit is commonly supposed to be the only nonrelativistic limit in the Einstein theory. Now there arises a dilemma: either gravitational fields having a non-Newton limit exist in nature and thus the Newton theory does not embrace all gravitational phenomena of nonrelativistic character or in the Newton solutions to the nonrelativistic gravitational equations a certain element of the Einstein theory is revealed that is alien to the true nonrelativistic theory of gravitation. In the former case, one cannot exclude the possibility that owing to a comprehensive analysis of properties, possible sources, etc. the vortex soltions to Einstein equations may prove important in cosmological and astrophysical applications of the general relativity theory. In the latter case, a detailed analysis of the non-Newton-limit solutions will at least enable one to gain a deeper insight into the structure of Einstein equations and their solutions

  18. Newtonian and non-newtonian limits of gravitational fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppel, A A [Tartuskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., (USSR)

    1975-09-01

    The nonrelativistic limit of the exact stationary axially-symmetric vacuum solution to Einstein equations, which is called the unified (generalized) Kerr-NUT solution, is investigated. Potentials for nonrelativistic gravitational fields, corresponding to this solution, have been calculated. The character of the c..-->..infinity limit (c is the velocity of light) has been shown to depend on the structure of parameters of the Kerr-NUT solution. An example is given that shows the possibility of the existence of a nonrelativistic limit having an absolutely new, non-Newton (vortex) character. From the mathematically proved possibility of the existence of nonrelativistic vortex fields there follow also some implications of a more fundamental character. The Newton limit is commonly supposed to be the only nonrelativistic limit in the Einstein theory. Now there arises a dilemma: either gravitational fields having a non-Newton limit exist in nature and thus the Newton theory does not embrace all gravitational phenomena of nonrelativistic character or in the Newton solutions to the nonrelativistic gravitational equations a certain element of the Einstein theory is revealed that is alien to the true nonrelativistic theory of gravitation. In the former case, one cannot exclude the possibility that owing to a comprehensive analysis of properties, possible sources, etc. the vortex soltions to Einstein equations may prove important in cosmological and astrophysical applications of the general relativity theory. In the latter case, a detailed analysis of the non-Newton-limit solutions will at least enable one to gain a deeper insight into the structure of Einstein equations and their solutions.

  19. Einstein versus the Simple Pendulum Formula: Does Gravity Slow All Clocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    According to the Newtonian formula for a simple pendulum, the period of a pendulum is inversely proportional to the square root of "g", the gravitational field strength. Einstein's theory of general relativity leads to the result that time slows down where gravity is intense. The two claims look contradictory and can muddle student and…

  20. Einstein Gravity Explorer–a medium-class fundamental physics mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiller, S.; Tino, G.M.; Gill, E.

    2008-01-01

    The Einstein Gravity Explorer mission (EGE) is devoted to a precise measurement of the properties of space-time using atomic clocks. It tests one of the most fundamental predictions of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity, the gravitational redshift, and thereby searches for hints of quantum

  1. Towards a unified gauge theory of gravitational and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, F.W.; Sijacki, D.

    1980-01-01

    The space-time properties of leptons and hadrons is studied and it is found necessary to extend general relativity to the gauge theory based on the four-dimensional affine group. This group translates and deforms the tetrads of the locally Minkowskian space-time. Its conserved currents, momentum, and hypermomentum, act as sources in the two field equations of gravity. A Lagrangian quadratic in torsion and curvature allows for the propagation of two independent gauge fields: translational e-gravity mediated by the tetrad coefficients, and deformational GAMMA-gravity mediated by the connection coefficients. For macroscopic matter e-gravity coincides with general relativity up to the post-Newtonian approximation of fourth order. For microscopic matter GAMMA-gravity represents a strong Yang-Mills type interaction. In the linear approximation, for a static source, a confinement potential is found. (author)

  2. Exact Solutions of the Field Equations for Empty Space in the Nash Gravitational Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Aadne

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available John Nash has proposed a new theory of gravity. We define a Nash-tensor equal to the curvature tensor appearing in the Nash field equations for empty space, and calculate its components for two cases: 1. A static, spherically symmetric space; and 2. The expanding, homogeneous and isotropic space of the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW universe models. We find the general, exact solution of Nash’s field equations for empty space in the static case. The line element turns out to represent the Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. Also we find the simplest non-trivial solution of the field equations in the cosmological case, which gives the scale factor corresponding to the de Sitter spacetime. Hence empty space in the Nash theory corresponds to a space with Lorentz Invariant Vacuum Energy (LIVE in the Einstein theory. This suggests that dark energy may be superfluous according to the Nash theory. We also consider a radiation filled universe model in an effort to find out how energy and matter may be incorporated into the Nash theory. A tentative interpretation of the Nash theory as a unified theory of gravity and electromagnetism leads to a very simple form of the field equations in the presence of matter. It should be noted, however, that the Nash theory is still unfinished. A satisfying way of including energy momentum into the theory has yet to be found.

  3. Einstein today; Einstein aujourd'hui

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspect, A.; Grangier, Ph. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique a Orsay, 91 - Orsay (France); Bouchet, F.R. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, 75 - Paris (France); Brunet, E.; Derrida, B. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France); Cohen-Tannoudji, C. [Academie des Sciences, 75 - Paris (France); Dalibard, J.; Laloe, F. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel. UMR 8552 (ENS, UPMC, CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Damour, Th. [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques, 91 - Bures sur Yvette (France); Darrigol, O. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Groupe Histoire des Sciences Rehseis, 75 - Paris (France); Pocholle, J.P. [Thales Research et Technology France, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2005-07-01

    The most important contributions of Einstein involve 5 fields of physics : the existence of quanta (light quanta, stimulated radiation emission and Bose-Einstein condensation), relativity, fluctuations (Brownian motion and thermodynamical fluctuations), the basis of quantum physics and cosmology (cosmological constant and the expansion of the universe). Diverse and renowned physicists have appreciated the development of modern physics from Einstein's ideas to the knowledge of today. This book is a collective book that gathers their work under 7 chapters: 1) 1905, a new beginning; 2) from the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen's article to quantum information (cryptography and quantum computers); 3) the Bose-Einstein condensation in gases; 4) from stimulated emission to the today's lasers; 5) Brownian motion and the fluctuation-dissipation theory; 6) general relativity; and 7) cosmology. (A.C.)

  4. A centennial gift from Einstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, T. D.

    2017-06-01

    The 1919 detection of the apparent displacement of background stars near the edge of the eclipsed Sun's disk provided one of the first convincing proofs of Einstein's theory of general relativity (1, 2). Almost 100 years later, Sahu et al. report on page 1046 of this issue the first measurement of the gravitational deflection of starlight by a star other than the Sun (3). Using the superior angular resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), they measured shifts in the apparent position of a distant background star as a nearby dense stellar remnant called a white dwarf passed almost in front of it in 2014. Because of the relative distances involved, the deflections they observed were about 1000 times smaller than those seen in 1919, but also in agreement with general relativity theory.

  5. Traversible wormholes and the negative-stress-energy problem in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, J.W.; Svoboda, T.

    1991-01-01

    The stress-energy tensor for a a general spherically symmetric matter distribution in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory (NGT) is determined using a heuristic argument. Using this tensor and the NGT field equations, it is shown that a wormhole threaded with matter must necessarily have a radial tension greater than the mass-energy density in the throat region. Hence, as in general relativity, a traversible wormhole in NGT must contain matter with a negative stress energy

  6. Particle linear theory on a self-gravitating perturbed cubic Bravais lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, B.

    2008-01-01

    Discreteness effects are a source of uncontrolled systematic errors of N-body simulations, which are used to compute the evolution of a self-gravitating fluid. We have already developed the so-called ''particle linear theory''(PLT), which describes the evolution of the position of self-gravitating particles located on a perturbed simple cubic lattice. It is the discrete analogue of the well-known (Lagrangian) linear theory of a self-gravitating fluid. Comparing both theories permits us to quantify precisely discreteness effects in the linear regime. It is useful to develop the PLT also for other perturbed lattices because they represent different discretizations of the same continuous system. In this paper we detail how to implement the PLT for perturbed cubic Bravais lattices (simple, body, and face-centered) in a cubic simulation box. As an application, we will study the discreteness effects--in the linear regime--of N-body simulations for which initial conditions have been set up using these different lattices.

  7. Path integral measure for gravitational interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Fujikawa

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that the path-integral variables as well as the local measure for gravitational interactions are uniquely specified if one imposes the anomaly-free condition on the Becchi-Rouet-Stora supersymmetry associated with general coordinate transformations. This prescription is briefly illustrated for the Einstein gravity and supergravity in four space-time dimensions and the relativistic string theory in two dimensions.

  8. Einstein and Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicak, J.

    1979-01-01

    A commemorative publication is submitted issued on the occasion of Albert Einstein's centenary remembering Einstein's sojourn and work in Prague. In addition to the article Ueber den Einfluss der Schwerkraft auf die Ausbreitung des Lichtes the publications contains the author's preface to the Czech edition of his Theory, the list of studies written by Einstein while in Prague, an assay on the great physicist's life and work, and extracts from the memoires of Philipp Frank published under the title Einstein, His Life and Times. (L.O.)

  9. On the question of establishing the equivalence of general relativity and relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulyabov, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: (author)In the construction of physical theories are several paradigms (according to Vladimirov Yu. S.). Depending on the number of entities are used paradigms include trialist (3 entities), dualist (2 entities) and monistic (1 entity). In trialist paradigm uses the following entities: geometry (G), particle (P) and field (F). Go to the dualist paradigms performed in the following ways: two entities take over the functions of the third, two entities merged into a single synthesis. Is also possible to limit the dualistic theory, which summarized the essence in addition assume the functions of a third. In turn, by way of grouping the entities dualistic theory can be divided into geometric (unification of geometry and field), relational (unification of geometry and particles) and field (unification of fields and particles). For the connection of the two theories should be to go to the common denominator: to trialist or monistic theories. Since the monistic theory at the moment completely unknown, may be used only trialist theory. General relativity is a typical representative of the geometric dualistic paradigm. However geometrized only gravity. Other fields non-geometrized. In turn, the relativistic theory of gravitation is a typical trialist theory. To establish a correspondence between theories should to geometrize material field in the general theory of relativity. It is proposed to implement this on the basis of a multi-dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory

  10. Background Killing vectors and conservation laws in Rosen's bimetric theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israelit, M.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of global energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum in Rosen's bimetric theories of gravitation is considered from the point of view of motions of the background space-time. It turns out that by means of background Killing vectors global mechanical integrals for matter and field can be defined in a correct manner. For the flat-background bimetric theory conditions are obtained which have been imposed on the algebraic structure of the matter tensor Tsub(μ)sup(ν) in order to get global mechanical conservation laws. For bimetric gravitation theories based on a cosmological (nonflat) background the set of Killing vectors is found. For these theories the obtained restrictions on the algebraic structure of Tsub(μ)sup(ν) lead to global generation laws (instead of conservation laws in the flat-background theory) for mechanical quantities. In particular cases the generation effect vanishes and then conservation laws exist. By means of the method developed in this paper, Rosen's homogeneous isotropic universe in the framework of the cosmological-background bimetric theory with k = 1 is considered. It turns out that such a universe does not generate globally, but will generate locally. The global energy of this universe is found to be zero. (author)

  11. Einstein-Friedmann equation, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behaviours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Nakano, Shingo; Ohta, Shigetoshi; Mori, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Tanji

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the Einstein-Friedmann equation [Case 1] on the basis of the bifurcation theory and shown that the chaotic behaviours in the Einstein-Friedmann equation [Case 1] are reduced to the pitchfork bifurcation and the homoclinic bifurcation. We have obtained the following results: (i) 'The chaos region diagram' (the p-λ plane) in the Einstein-Friedmann equation [Case 1]. (ii) 'The chaos inducing chart' of the homoclinic orbital systems in the unforced differential equations. We have discussed the non-integrable conditions in the Einstein-Friedmann equation and proposed the chaotic model: p=p 0 ρ n (n≥0). In case n≠0,1, the Einstein-Friedmann equation is not integrable and there may occur chaotic behaviours. The cosmological constant (λ) turns out to play important roles for the non-integrable condition in the Einstein-Friedmann equation and also for the pitchfork bifurcation and the homoclinic bifurcation in the relativistic field equation. With the use of the E-infinity theory, we have also discussed the physical quantities in the gravitational field equations, and obtained the formula logκ=-10(1/φ) 2 [1+(φ) 8 ]=-26.737, which is in nice agreement with the experiment (-26.730).

  12. Kinetic theory of collective exitations and damping in Bose-Einstein condensed gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the frequencies and damping rates of the low-lying collective modes of a Bose-Einstein condensed gas at nonzero temperature. We use a complex nonlinear Schrödinger equation to determine the dynamics of the condensate atoms. In this manner we take into account both collisions between

  13. Kinetic theory of collective excitations and damping in Bose-Einstein condensed gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the frequencies and damping rates of the low-lying collective modes of a Bose-Einstein condensed gas at nonzero temperature. We use a complex nonlinear Schrödinger equation to determine the dynamics of the condensate atoms, and couple it to a Boltzmann equation for the noncondensate

  14. Bogoliubov theory of the Hawking effect in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, U; Kiss, T; Oehberg, P

    2003-01-01

    Artificial black holes may demonstrate some of the elusive quantum properties of the event horizon, in particular Hawking radiation. One promising candidate is a sonic hole in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We clarify why Hawking radiation emerges from the condensate and how this condensed-matter analogue reflects some of the intriguing aspects of quantum black holes

  15. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  16. Broken symmetry of Lie groups of transformation generating general relativistic theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, L.

    1981-01-01

    Invariant varieties of suitable semisimple groups of transformations can serve as models of the space-time of the universe. The metric is expressible in terms of the basis vectors of the group. The symmetry of the group is broken by introducing a gauge formalism in the space of the basis vectors with the adjoint group as gauge group. The gauge potentials are expressible in terms of the basis vectors for the case of the De Sitter group. The resulting gauge theory is equivalent to De Sitter covariant general relativity. Group covariant generalizations of gravitational theory are discussed. (Auth.)

  17. Conservation laws and radiation in the scale covariant theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesham, A.

    1988-01-01

    The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are derived in the scale covariant theory of gravitation. The entropy problem which exists in the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker models can be solved in the present context. Since the weak and strong energy conditions may be violated, a big bang singularity may be avoided, in contrast to general relativity. Since beta is shown to be constant during the radiation-dominated era, the difficulties in the theory associated with nucleosynthesis are avoided. 10 references

  18. Quantum metrology for gravitational wave astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Roman; Mavalvala, Nergis; McClelland, David E; Lam, Ping K

    2010-11-16

    Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts that accelerating mass distributions produce gravitational radiation, analogous to electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charges. These gravitational waves (GWs) have not been directly detected to date, but are expected to open a new window to the Universe once the detectors, kilometre-scale laser interferometers measuring the distance between quasi-free-falling mirrors, have achieved adequate sensitivity. Recent advances in quantum metrology may now contribute to provide the required sensitivity boost. The so-called squeezed light is able to quantum entangle the high-power laser fields in the interferometer arms, and could have a key role in the realization of GW astronomy.

  19. Leading gravitational corrections and a unified universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Leading order gravitational corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action can lead to a consistent picture of the universe by unifying the epochs of inflation and dark energy in a single framework. While the leading local correction induces an inflationary phase in the early universe, the leading...... nonlocal term leads to an accelerated expansion of the universe at the present epoch. We argue that both the leading UV and IR terms can be obtained within the framework of a covariant effective field theory of gravity. The perturbative gravitational corrections therefore provide a fundamental basis...

  20. Gravitation relativiste

    CERN Document Server

    Hakim, Rémi

    1994-01-01

    Il existe à l'heure actuelle un certain nombre de théories relativistes de la gravitation compatibles avec l'expérience et l'observation. Toutefois, la relativité générale d'Einstein fut historiquement la première à fournir des résultats théoriques corrects en accord précis avec les faits.