WorldWideScience

Sample records for eight-node hexahedral finite

  1. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties.

  2. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element's gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element's performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element's behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties

  3. Hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening using pillowing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Matthew L [Pittsburgh, PA; Woodbury, Adam C [Provo, UT; Benzley, Steven E [Provo, UT; Shepherd, Jason F [Edgewood, NM

    2012-06-05

    A techniques for coarsening a hexahedral mesh is described. The technique includes identifying a coarsening region within a hexahedral mesh to be coarsened. A boundary sheet of hexahedral elements is inserted into the hexahedral mesh around the coarsening region. A column of hexahedral elements is identified within the boundary sheet. The column of hexahedral elements is collapsed to create an extraction sheet of hexahedral elements contained within the coarsening region. Then, the extraction sheet of hexahedral elements is extracted to coarsen the hexahedral mesh.

  4. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  5. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  6. Comparison of hexahedral and tetrahedral elements in finite element analysis of the foot and footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadepalli, Srinivas C; Erdemir, Ahmet; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2011-08-11

    Finite element analysis has been widely used in the field of foot and footwear biomechanics to determine plantar pressures as well as stresses and strains within soft tissue and footwear materials. When dealing with anatomical structures such as the foot, hexahedral mesh generation accounts for most of the model development time due to geometric complexities imposed by branching and embedded structures. Tetrahedral meshing, which can be more easily automated, has been the approach of choice to date in foot and footwear biomechanics. Here we use the nonlinear finite element program Abaqus (Simulia, Providence, RI) to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tetrahedral and hexahedral elements under compression and shear loading, material incompressibility, and frictional contact conditions, which are commonly seen in foot and footwear biomechanics. This study demonstrated that for a range of simulation conditions, hybrid hexahedral elements (Abaqus C3D8H) consistently performed well while hybrid linear tetrahedral elements (Abaqus C3D4H) performed poorly. On the other hand, enhanced quadratic tetrahedral elements with improved stress visualization (Abaqus C3D10I) performed as well as the hybrid hexahedral elements in terms of contact pressure and contact shear stress predictions. Although the enhanced quadratic tetrahedral element simulations were computationally expensive compared to hexahedral element simulations in both barefoot and footwear conditions, the enhanced quadratic tetrahedral element formulation seems to be very promising for foot and footwear applications as a result of decreased labor and expedited model development, all related to facilitated mesh generation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Hexahedral Finite Element Mesh Capturing Realistic Geometries of Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, B. Y.; Roberts, B. L.; Sobolik, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) stores crude oil in 60 caverns located at four sites located along the Gulf Coast. As a matter of normal operation of caverns in a salt dome, the continuous mechanical creep of salt, along with the change in internal cavern and casing pressure due to cavern closure and fluid exchanges, impose several mechanical conditions on the skin, well, and casing of a cavern that could potentially create damage. Sandia, on behalf of DOE, is evaluating the structural integrity of the salt surrounding existing caverns in the Bayou Choctaw (BC) salt dome in Louisiana. In reality, the geometry, spacing, and depths of the caverns are irregular. It is not easy to realize the naturally and artificially formed cavern and salt dome for numerical analysis. It is harder to convert the geometries into the meshed mass consisting of only hexahedral finite elements. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element mesh capturing realistic geometries of the Bayou Choctaw site has been constructed using the seismic and sonar survey data obtained from the field (see Figures below). The mesh consists of hexahedral elements because the salt constitutive model is coded using hexahedral elements. Techniques to reduce the number of elements as much as possible to save on computer run time while maintaining computational accuracy are also developed. These methodologies could also be applied to construct computational meshes for the Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry SPR sites. The methodology could be applied to the complicated shape masses for not only various civil and geological structures but also biological applications such as artificial limbs. The newly developed mesh is expected to provide more accurate solutions of geotechnical concerns that arise due to the close proximity of the caverns to each other or to the edge of salt. Also, there are nine abandoned caverns, one of which is believed to be in a quasi-stable condition. Stability issues for these

  8. Predictive Modeling of Defibrillation utilizing Hexahedral and Tetrahedral Finite Element Models: Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triedman, John K.; Jolley, Matthew; Stinstra, Jeroen; Brooks, Dana H.; MacLeod, Rob

    2008-01-01

    ICD implants may be complicated by body size and anatomy. One approach to this problem has been the adoption of creative, extracardiac implant strategies using standard ICD components. Because data on safety or efficacy of such ad hoc implant strategies is lacking, we have developed image-based finite element models (FEMs) to compare electric fields and expected defibrillation thresholds (DFTs) using standard and novel electrode locations. In this paper, we review recently published studies by our group using such models, and progress in meshing strategies to improve efficiency and visualization. Our preliminary observations predict that they may be large changes in DFTs with clinically relevant variations of electrode placement. Extracardiac ICDs of various lead configurations are predicted to be effective in both children and adults. This approach may aid both ICD development and patient-specific optimization of electrode placement, but the simplified nature of current models dictates further development and validation prior to clinical or industrial utilization. PMID:18817926

  9. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements, direct solvers and data space Gauss-Newton, parallelized on SMP computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M. A.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an algorithm for 3D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permits incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used for the forward solution, parameter jacobians, and model update. The forward simulator, jacobians calculations, as well as synthetic and real data inversion are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequency or small material admittivity, the E-field requires divergence correction. Using Hodge decomposition, correction may be applied after the forward solution is calculated. It allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization is computed using the MUMPS library, which shows moderately good scalability through 12 processor cores but limited gains beyond that. The factored matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the jacobians of field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure and several topographic models. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of electromagnetic waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run time tests indicate that for meshes as large as 150x150x60 elements, MT forward response and jacobians can be calculated in ~2.5 hours per frequency. For inversion, we implemented data space Gauss-Newton method, which offers reduction in memory requirement and a significant speedup of the parameter step versus model space approach. For dense matrix operations we use tiling approach of PLASMA library, which shows very good scalability. In synthetic

  10. 3-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor computers - Part II: direct data-space inverse solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    Following the creation described in Part I of a deformable edge finite-element simulator for 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) responses using direct solvers, in Part II we develop an algorithm named HexMT for 3-D regularized inversion of MT data including topography. Direct solvers parallelized on large-RAM, symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) workstations are used also for the Gauss-Newton model update. By exploiting the data-space approach, the computational cost of the model update becomes much less in both time and computer memory than the cost of the forward simulation. In order to regularize using the second norm of the gradient, we factor the matrix related to the regularization term and apply its inverse to the Jacobian, which is done using the MKL PARDISO library. For dense matrix multiplication and factorization related to the model update, we use the PLASMA library which shows very good scalability across processor cores. A synthetic test inversion using a simple hill model shows that including topography can be important; in this case depression of the electric field by the hill can cause false conductors at depth or mask the presence of resistive structure. With a simple model of two buried bricks, a uniform spatial weighting for the norm of model smoothing recovered more accurate locations for the tomographic images compared to weightings which were a function of parameter Jacobians. We implement joint inversion for static distortion matrices tested using the Dublin secret model 2, for which we are able to reduce nRMS to ˜1.1 while avoiding oscillatory convergence. Finally we test the code on field data by inverting full impedance and tipper MT responses collected around Mount St Helens in the Cascade volcanic chain. Among several prominent structures, the north-south trending, eruption-controlling shear zone is clearly imaged in the inversion.

  11. The generation of hexahedral meshes for assembly geometries: A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

    2000-02-14

    The finite element method is being used today to model component assemblies in a wide variety of application areas, including structural mechanics, fluid simulations, and others. Generating hexahedral meshes for these assemblies usually requires the use of geometry decomposition, with different meshing algorithms applied to different regions. While the primary motivation for this approach remains the lack of an automatic, reliable all-hexahedral meshing algorithm, requirements in mesh quality and mesh configuration for typical analyses are also factors. For these reasons, this approach is also sometimes required when producing other types of unstructured meshes. This paper will review progress to date in automating many parts of the hex meshing process, which has halved the time to produce all-hex meshes for large assemblies. Particular issues which have been exposed due to this progress will also be discussed, along with their applicability to the general unstructured meshing problem.

  12. Construction of hexahedral elements mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw SPR site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoung Yoon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Barry L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The three-dimensional finite element mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw site has been constructed using the sonar and seismic survey data obtained from the field. The mesh is consisting of hexahedral elements because the salt constitutive model is coded using hexahedral elements. Various ideas and techniques to construct finite element mesh capturing artificially and naturally formed geometries are provided. The techniques to reduce the number of elements as much as possible to save on computer run time with maintaining the computational accuracy is also introduced. The steps and methodologies could be applied to construct the meshes of Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry strategic petroleum reserve sites. The methodology could be applied to the complicated shape masses for not only various civil and geological structures but also biological applications such as artificial limbs.

  13. Application of modified integration rule to time-domain finite-element acoustic simulation of rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuzono, Takeshi; Otsuru, Toru; Tomiku, Reiji; Okamoto, Noriko

    2012-08-01

    The applicability of the modified integration rule for time-domain finite-element analysis is tested in sound field analysis of rooms involving rectangular elements, distorted elements, and finite impedance boundary conditions. Dispersion error analysis in three dimensions is conducted to evaluate the dispersion error in time-domain finite-element analysis using eight-node hexahedral elements. The results of analysis confirmed that fourth-order accuracy with respect to dispersion error is obtainable using the Fox-Goodwin method (FG) with a modified integration rule, even for rectangular elements. The stability condition in three-dimensional analysis using the modified integration rule is also presented. Numerical experiments demonstrate that FG with a modified integration rule performs much better than FG with the conventional integration rule for problems with rectangular elements, distorted elements, and with finite impedance boundary conditions. Further, as another advantage, numerical results revealed that the use of modified integration rule engenders faster convergence of the iterative solver than a conventional rule for problems with the same degrees of freedom.

  14. Development and validation of a subject-specific finite element model of the functional spinal unit to predict vertebral strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chu-Hee; Landham, Priyan R; Eastell, Richard; Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia; Yang, Lang

    2017-09-01

    Finite element models of an isolated vertebral body cannot accurately predict compressive strength of the spinal column because, in life, compressive load is variably distributed across the vertebral body and neural arch. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a patient-specific finite element model of a functional spinal unit, and then use the model to predict vertebral strength from medical images. A total of 16 cadaveric functional spinal units were scanned and then tested mechanically in bending and compression to generate a vertebral wedge fracture. Before testing, an image processing and finite element analysis framework (SpineVox-Pro), developed previously in MATLAB using ANSYS APDL, was used to generate a subject-specific finite element model with eight-node hexahedral elements. Transversely isotropic linear-elastic material properties were assigned to vertebrae, and simple homogeneous linear-elastic properties were assigned to the intervertebral disc. Forward bending loading conditions were applied to simulate manual handling. Results showed that vertebral strengths measured by experiment were positively correlated with strengths predicted by the functional spinal unit finite element model with von Mises or Drucker-Prager failure criteria ( R 2  = 0.80-0.87), with areal bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry ( R 2  = 0.54) and with volumetric bone mineral density from quantitative computed tomography ( R 2  = 0.79). Large-displacement non-linear analyses on all specimens did not improve predictions. We conclude that subject-specific finite element models of a functional spinal unit have potential to estimate the vertebral strength better than bone mineral density alone.

  15. Stress distribution of new generation of Twisted Files in comparison with ProTaper: A finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Pujari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare and evaluate the stress distribution of new generation of Twisted File in comparison with ProTaper under bending or torsional conditions using a finite - element analysis model. Materials and Methods: Two NiTi files, a ProTaper file and the latest generation nickel titanium file which is the Twisted File of similar tip diameter were scanned using White light scanning system. Through this a real size digitized models of the two brands of NiTi instruments were obtained. Then, the outline of the instrument was extracted from the stacks of 3D data in software. Finally a mesh of linear, eight-noded, hexahedral elements was overlaid onto the rendered 3D image. The behavior of the instrument under bending or torsional loads was then analyzed mathematically in the software (ABAQUS V6, 5-1 taking into consideration the non linear mechanical characteristic of NiTi material. The results were expressed as von Mises stresses and were calculated by the von Mises criteria. Results: Higher stress values were seen in Twisted Files than the ProTaper universal, however, the angular deflection was seen to be more in Twisted Files. Conclusion: As more angular deflection was seen in Twisted File it was more flexible than ProTaper Universal but did not have the uniform stress distribution like the ProTaper universal.

  16. Parallel octree-based hexahedral mesh generation for eulerian to lagrangian conversion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven James

    2010-09-01

    Computational simulation must often be performed on domains where materials are represented as scalar quantities or volume fractions at cell centers of an octree-based grid. Common examples include bio-medical, geotechnical or shock physics calculations where interface boundaries are represented only as discrete statistical approximations. In this work, we introduce new methods for generating Lagrangian computational meshes from Eulerian-based data. We focus specifically on shock physics problems that are relevant to ASC codes such as CTH and Alegra. New procedures for generating all-hexahedral finite element meshes from volume fraction data are introduced. A new primal-contouring approach is introduced for defining a geometric domain. New methods for refinement, node smoothing, resolving non-manifold conditions and defining geometry are also introduced as well as an extension of the algorithm to handle tetrahedral meshes. We also describe new scalable MPI-based implementations of these procedures. We describe a new software module, Sculptor, which has been developed for use as an embedded component of CTH. We also describe its interface and its use within the mesh generation code, CUBIT. Several examples are shown to illustrate the capabilities of Sculptor.

  17. Finite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application of using a skirted foundation system to study the behavior of foundations with structural skirts adjacent to a sand slope and subjected to earthquake loading. The effect of the adopted skirts to safeguard foundation and slope from collapse is studied. The skirts effect on controlling horizontal soil movement and decreasing pore water pressure beneath foundations and beside the slopes during earthquake is investigated. This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts. A two dimensional plain strain program PLAXIS, (dynamic version is adopted. A series of models for the problem under investigation were run under different skirt depths and lactation from the slope crest. The effect of subgrade relative density and skirts thickness is also discussed. Nodal displacement and element strains were analyzed for the foundation with and without skirts and at different studied parameters. The research results showed a great effectiveness in increasing the overall stability of the slope and foundation. The confined soil footing system by such skirts reduced the foundation acceleration therefore it can be tended to damping element and relieved the transmitted disturbance to the adjacent slope. This technique can be considered as a good method to control the slope deformation and decrease the slope acceleration during earthquakes.

  18. High convergence order finite elements with lumped mass matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten skårup

    1996-01-01

    A method for deriving hexahedral finite elements with lumped mass matrices for three-dimensional problems is presented. These elements meet the theoretical conditions for high order convergence, and two numerical examples based on the three-dimensional scalar wave equation show that this is also...... the case in practice and that their accuracy is comparable to elements with consistent mass matrices....

  19. A multipoint flux mixed finite element method on distorted quadrilaterals and hexahedra

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary

    2011-11-06

    In this paper, we develop a new mixed finite element method for elliptic problems on general quadrilateral and hexahedral grids that reduces to a cell-centered finite difference scheme. A special non-symmetric quadrature rule is employed that yields a positive definite cell-centered system for the pressure by eliminating local velocities. The method is shown to be accurate on highly distorted rough quadrilateral and hexahedral grids, including hexahedra with non-planar faces. Theoretical and numerical results indicate first-order convergence for the pressure and face fluxes. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Applicability analysis of hexahedral hollow profiles as component elements of supporting systems for gondola cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Fomin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is presentation of features and results of the conducted works on determination of introduction expedience of hexahedral hollow profiles as the component elements of the modern supporting systems of railway freight gondola cars. Methodology. During the research an introduction methodology of different types of profiles as alternative to the existent supporting elements of the body module for freight car was used. This methodology had been developed by the author before. It is oriented to the reduction in material consumption and providing of strength requirements and operating reliability of the car design under study. The developed methodology includes the procedures of admissible values calculation of the resistance moments of the section of the hexahedral hollow profile, which is being introduced. It also includes the determination of optimum (i.e. characterized by the minimum material consumption when meeting the durability requirements values of height and minimum thickness of profile in the conditions of construction limitations. At the same time the admissible resistance moments are calculated as such, which are equal to the value of existent implementation of supporting element or as such that are determined taking into account the surplus design reserve. The first direction is applied in this work. Findings. As a result of the conducted research the introduction expedience of hexahedral hollow profiles as vertical rods of the lateral and latitude belts of the walls of the butt-end freight gondola cars is grounded and the optimum parameters of such replacements are determined. Originality. The problem of the use expedience of hexahedral hollow profiles as the supporting elements of the freight gondola cars bodies was first considered in the article. To solve this problem the mathematical models describing the dependence of basic strength and mass indexes of the proper profiles on varying the geometrical

  1. The Finite Element Numerical Modelling of 3D Magnetotelluric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal numerical simulation of 3D magnetotelluric was restricted by the methodology complexity and the time-consuming calculation. Boundary values, the variation of weighted residual equation, and the hexahedral mesh generation method of finite element are three major causes. A finite element method for 3D magnetotelluric numerical modeling is presented in this paper as a solution for the problem mentioned above. In this algorithm, a hexahedral element coefficient matrix for magnetoelluric finite method is developed, which solves large-scale equations using preconditioned conjugate gradient of the first-type boundary conditions. This algorithm is verified using the homogeneous model, and the positive landform model, as well as the low resistance anomaly model.

  2. Automated hexahedral meshing of knee cartilage structures - application to data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vila, B; Sánchez-González, P; Oropesa, I; Gomez, E J; Pierce, D M

    2017-11-01

    We propose a fully automated methodology for hexahedral meshing of patient-specific structures of the human knee obtained from magnetic resonance images, i.e. femoral/tibial cartilages and menisci. We select eight patients from the Osteoarthritis Initiative and validate our methodology using MATLAB on a laptop computer. We obtain the patient-specific meshes in an average of three minutes, while faithfully representing the geometries with well-shaped elements. We hope to provide a fundamentally different means to test hypotheses on the mechanisms of disease progression by integrating our patient-specific FE meshes with data from individual patients. Download both our meshes and software at http://im.engr.uconn.edu/downloads.php .

  3. Evaluation of user-guided semi-automatic decomposition tool for hexahedral mesh generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Hsiang-Chun Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric decomposition is essential for all-hexahedral mesh generation. Because fully automatic decomposition methods that can generate high-quality hexahedral meshes for arbitrary volumes have yet to be realized, manual decomposition is still required frequently. Manual decomposition is a laborious process and requires a high level of user expertise. Therefore, a user-guided semi-automatic tool to reduce the human effort and lower the requirement of expertise is necessary. To date, only a few of these approaches have been proposed, and a lack of user evaluation makes it difficult to improve upon this approach. Based on our previous work, we present a user evaluation of a user-guided semi-automatic tool that provides visual guidance to assist users in determining decomposition solutions, accepts sketch-based inputs to create decomposition surfaces, and simplifies the decomposition commands. This user evaluation investigated (1 the usability of the visual guidance, (2 the types of visual guidance essential for decomposition, (3 the effectiveness of the sketch-based decomposition, and (4 the performance differences between beginner and experienced users using the sketch-based decomposition. The result and user feedback indicate that the tool enables users who have limited prior experience or familiarity with the computer-aided engineering software to perform volumetric decomposition more efficiently. The visual guidance increases the success rate of the user’s decomposition solution by 28%. The sketch-based decomposition significantly reduces 46% of the user’s time on creating decomposition surfaces and setting up decomposition commands.

  4. A Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method for Solving the Two- and Three-Dimensional Unsteady Euler Equations Using Quadrilateral and Hexahedral Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeng-Chan; Yu, S. T. John; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we report a version of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) Method in which the 2D and 3D unsteady Euler equations are simulated using structured or unstructured quadrilateral and hexahedral meshes, respectively. In the present method, mesh values of flow variables and their spatial derivatives are treated as independent unknowns to be solved for. At each mesh point, the value of a flow variable is obtained by imposing a flux conservation condition. On the other hand, the spatial derivatives are evaluated using a finite-difference/weighted-average procedure. Note that the present extension retains many key advantages of the original CE/SE method which uses triangular and tetrahedral meshes, respectively, for its 2D and 3D applications. These advantages include efficient parallel computing ease of implementing non-reflecting boundary conditions, high-fidelity resolution of shocks and waves, and a genuinely multidimensional formulation without using a dimensional-splitting approach. In particular, because Riemann solvers, the cornerstones of the Godunov-type upwind schemes, are not needed to capture shocks, the computational logic of the present method is considerably simpler. To demonstrate the capability of the present method, numerical results are presented for several benchmark problems including oblique shock reflection, supersonic flow over a wedge, and a 3D detonation flow.

  5. Mechanical properties of regular hexahedral lattice structure formed by selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Yang, Yongqiang; Wang, Di

    2013-01-01

    The Ti–6Al–4V lattice structure is widely used in the aerospace field. This research first designs a regular hexahedral unit, processes the lattice structure composed of the Ti–6Al–4V units by selective laser melting technology, obtains the experimental fracture load and the compression deformation of them through compression tests, then conducts a simulation of the unit and the lattice structure through ANSYS to analyze the failure point. Later, according to the force condition of the point, the model of maximum load is built, through which the analytical formula of the fracture load of the unit and the lattice structure are obtained. The results of groups of experiments demonstrate that there exists an exponential relationship between the practical fracture load and the porosity of the lattice structure. There also exists a trigonometric function relationship between the compression deformation and the porosity of the lattice structure. The fracture analysis indicates that fracture of the units and lattice structure is brittle fracture due to cleavage fracture. (paper)

  6. Computational methods and modeling. 1. Sampling a Position Uniformly in a Trilinear Hexahedral Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbatsch, Todd J.; Evans, Thomas M.; Hughes, H. Grady

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo particle transport plays an important role in some multi-physics simulations. These simulations, which may additionally involve deterministic calculations, typically use a hexahedral or tetrahedral mesh. Trilinear hexahedrons are attractive for physics calculations because faces between cells are uniquely defined, distance-to-boundary calculations are deterministic, and hexahedral meshes tend to require fewer cells than tetrahedral meshes. We discuss one aspect of Monte Carlo transport: sampling a position in a tri-linear hexahedron, which is made up of eight control points, or nodes, and six bilinear faces, where each face is defined by four non-coplanar nodes in three-dimensional Cartesian space. We derive, code, and verify the exact sampling method and propose an approximation to it. Our proposed approximate method uses about one-third the memory and can be twice as fast as the exact sampling method, but we find that its inaccuracy limits its use to well-behaved hexahedrons. Daunted by the expense of the exact method, we propose an alternate approximate sampling method. First, calculate beforehand an approximate volume for each corner of the hexahedron by taking one-eighth of the volume of an imaginary parallelepiped defined by the corner node and the three nodes to which it is directly connected. For the sampling, assume separability in the parameters, and sample each parameter, in turn, from a linear pdf defined by the sum of the four corner volumes at each limit (-1 and 1) of the parameter. This method ignores the quadratic portion of the pdf, but it requires less storage, has simpler sampling, and needs no extra, on-the-fly calculations. We simplify verification by designing tests that consist of one or more cells that entirely fill a unit cube. Uniformly sampling complicated cells that fill a unit cube will result in uniformly sampling the unit cube. Unit cubes are easily analyzed. The first problem has four wedges (or tents, or A frames) whose

  7. Finite Element Prediction of Multi-Size Particulate Flow through Three-Dimensional Channel: Code Validation

    OpenAIRE

    K. V. Pagalthivarthi; R. J. Visintainer

    2013-01-01

    Multi-size particulate dense slurry flow through three-dimensional rectangular channel is modeled using penalty finite elements with 8-noded hexahedral elements. The methodology previously developed for two-dimensional channel is extended. The computed eddy viscosity of the pure carrier flow is modified to account for the presence of solid particles. Predictions from Spalart-Almaras and k-ε turbulence models are compared to show consistency of trends in results. Results are also found to comp...

  8. Finite element analysis of human joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described

  9. Finite element analysis of human joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  10. A voxel-based finite element model for the prediction of bladder deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bel, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A finite element (FE) bladder model was previously developed to predict bladder deformation caused by bladder filling change. However, two factors prevent a wide application of FE models: (1) the labor required to construct a FE model with high quality mesh and (2) long computation time needed to construct the FE model and solve the FE equations. In this work, we address these issues by constructing a low-resolution voxel-based FE bladder model directly from the binary segmentation images and compare the accuracy and computational efficiency of the voxel-based model used to simulate bladder deformation with those of a classical FE model with a tetrahedral mesh. Methods: For ten healthy volunteers, a series of MRI scans of the pelvic region was recorded at regular intervals of 10 min over 1 h. For this series of scans, the bladder volume gradually increased while rectal volume remained constant. All pelvic structures were defined from a reference image for each volunteer, including bladder wall, small bowel, prostate (male), uterus (female), rectum, pelvic bone, spine, and the rest of the body. Four separate FE models were constructed from these structures: one with a tetrahedral mesh (used in previous study), one with a uniform hexahedral mesh, one with a nonuniform hexahedral mesh, and one with a low-resolution nonuniform hexahedral mesh. Appropriate material properties were assigned to all structures and uniform pressure was applied to the inner bladder wall to simulate bladder deformation from urine inflow. Performance of the hexahedral meshes was evaluated against the performance of the standard tetrahedral mesh by comparing the accuracy of bladder shape prediction and computational efficiency. Results: FE model with a hexahedral mesh can be quickly and automatically constructed. No substantial differences were observed between the simulation results of the tetrahedral mesh and hexahedral meshes (<1% difference in mean dice similarity coefficient to

  11. Finite Element Free Vibration Analysis of Doubly Curved Laminated Composite Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, D.; Bandyopadhyay, J. N.; Sinha, P. K.

    1996-04-01

    A finite element analysis for the free vibration behaviour of doubly curved shells is presented in which eight-noded curved quadrilateral isoparametric finite elements are used. The first order shear deformation theory for thin and shallow shells is used in the formulation. Results are obtained for comparison with those in the existing literature and to investigate the effects of various composite parameters relevant to doubly curved shells, such as fibre orientations and lamination schemes and several geometrical parameters like aspect ratio, smaller height to greater height ratio (for conoids), thickness to radius ratio (for hyperbolic and elliptic paraboloids), and radii of curvature ratio (for elliptic paraboloids).

  12. Finite Element Prediction of Multi-Size Particulate Flow through Three-Dimensional Channel: Code Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Pagalthivarthi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-size particulate dense slurry flow through three-dimensional rectangular channel is modeled using penalty finite elements with 8-noded hexahedral elements. The methodology previously developed for two-dimensional channel is extended. The computed eddy viscosity of the pure carrier flow is modified to account for the presence of solid particles. Predictions from Spalart-Almaras and k-ε turbulence models are compared to show consistency of trends in results. Results are also found to compare well with experimental results from the literature.

  13. QUADRATIC SERENDIPITY FINITE ELEMENTS ON POLYGONS USING GENERALIZED BARYCENTRIC COORDINATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Alexander; Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a finite element construction for use on the class of convex, planar polygons and show it obtains a quadratic error convergence estimate. On a convex n -gon, our construction produces 2 n basis functions, associated in a Lagrange-like fashion to each vertex and each edge midpoint, by transforming and combining a set of n ( n + 1)/2 basis functions known to obtain quadratic convergence. The technique broadens the scope of the so-called 'serendipity' elements, previously studied only for quadrilateral and regular hexahedral meshes, by employing the theory of generalized barycentric coordinates. Uniform a priori error estimates are established over the class of convex quadrilaterals with bounded aspect ratio as well as over the class of convex planar polygons satisfying additional shape regularity conditions to exclude large interior angles and short edges. Numerical evidence is provided on a trapezoidal quadrilateral mesh, previously not amenable to serendipity constructions, and applications to adaptive meshing are discussed.

  14. 3D visualization and finite element mesh formation from wood anatomy samples, Part II – Algorithm approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Koňas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents new original application WOOD3D in form of program code assembling. The work extends the previous article “Part I – Theoretical approach” in detail description of implemented C++ classes of utilized projects Visualization Toolkit (VTK, Insight Toolkit (ITK and MIMX. Code is written in CMake style and it is available as multiplatform application. Currently GNU Linux (32/64b and MS Windows (32/64b platforms were released. Article discusses various filter classes for image filtering. Mainly Otsu and Binary threshold filters are classified for anatomy wood samples thresholding. Registration of images series is emphasized for difference of colour spaces compensation is included. Resulted work flow of image analysis is new methodological approach for images processing through the composition, visualization, filtering, registration and finite element mesh formation. Application generates script in ANSYS parametric design language (APDL which is fully compatible with ANSYS finite element solver and designer environment. The script includes the whole definition of unstructured finite element mesh formed by individual elements and nodes. Due to simple notation, the same script can be used for generation of geometrical entities in element positions. Such formed volumetric entities are prepared for further geometry approximation (e.g. by boolean or more advanced methods. Hexahedral and tetrahedral types of mesh elements are formed on user request with specified mesh options. Hexahedral meshes are formed both with uniform element size and with anisotropic character. Modified octree method for hexahedral mesh with anisotropic character was declared in application. Multicore CPUs in the application are supported for fast image analysis realization. Visualization of image series and consequent 3D image are realized in VTK format sufficiently known and public format, visualized in GPL application Paraview. Future work based on mesh

  15. A simple nodal force distribution method in refined finite element meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jai Hak; Shin, Kyu In; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon

    2017-01-01

    In finite element analyses, mesh refinement is frequently performed to obtain accurate stress or strain values or to accurately define the geometry. After mesh refinement, equivalent nodal forces should be calculated at the nodes in the refined mesh. If field variables and material properties are available at the integration points in each element, then the accurate equivalent nodal forces can be calculated using an adequate numerical integration. However, in certain circumstances, equivalent nodal forces cannot be calculated because field variable data are not available. In this study, a very simple nodal force distribution method was proposed. Nodal forces of the original finite element mesh are distributed to the nodes of refined meshes to satisfy the equilibrium conditions. The effect of element size should also be considered in determining the magnitude of the distributing nodal forces. A program was developed based on the proposed method, and several example problems were solved to verify the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method. From the results, accurate stress field can be recognized to be obtained from refined meshes using the proposed nodal force distribution method. In example problems, the difference between the obtained maximum stress and target stress value was less than 6 % in models with 8-node hexahedral elements and less than 1 % in models with 20-node hexahedral elements or 10-node tetrahedral elements.

  16. 3D controlled-source electromagnetic modeling in anisotropic medium using edge-based finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Xiong, Bin; Han, Muran

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a linear edge-based finite element method for numerical modeling of 3D controlled-source electromagnetic data in an anisotropic conductive medium. We use a nonuniform rectangular mesh in order to capture the rapid change of diffusive electromagnetic field within the regions...... of anomalous conductivity and close to the location of the source. In order to avoid the source singularity, we solve Maxwell's equation with respect to anomalous electric field. The nonuniform rectangular mesh can be transformed to hexahedral mesh in order to simulate the bathymetry effect. The sparse system...

  17. Morphing the feature-based multi-blocks of normative/healthy vertebral geometries to scoliosis vertebral geometries: development of personalized finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadagali, Prasannaah; Peters, James R; Balasubramanian, Sriram

    2018-03-12

    Personalized Finite Element (FE) models and hexahedral elements are preferred for biomechanical investigations. Feature-based multi-block methods are used to develop anatomically accurate personalized FE models with hexahedral mesh. It is tedious to manually construct multi-blocks for large number of geometries on an individual basis to develop personalized FE models. Mesh-morphing method mitigates the aforementioned tediousness in meshing personalized geometries every time, but leads to element warping and loss of geometrical data. Such issues increase in magnitude when normative spine FE model is morphed to scoliosis-affected spinal geometry. The only way to bypass the issue of hex-mesh distortion or loss of geometry as a result of morphing is to rely on manually constructing the multi-blocks for scoliosis-affected spine geometry of each individual, which is time intensive. A method to semi-automate the construction of multi-blocks on the geometry of scoliosis vertebrae from the existing multi-blocks of normative vertebrae is demonstrated in this paper. High-quality hexahedral elements were generated on the scoliosis vertebrae from the morphed multi-blocks of normative vertebrae. Time taken was 3 months to construct the multi-blocks for normative spine and less than a day for scoliosis. Efforts taken to construct multi-blocks on personalized scoliosis spinal geometries are significantly reduced by morphing existing multi-blocks.

  18. A Family of Multipoint Flux Mixed Finite Element Methods for Elliptic Problems on General Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a family of multipoint flux mixed finite element (MFMFE) methods on simplicial, quadrilateral, hexahedral, and triangular-prismatic grids. The MFMFE methods are locally conservative with continuous normal fluxes, since they are developed within a variational framework as mixed finite element methods with special approximating spaces and quadrature rules. The latter allows for local flux elimination giving a cell-centered system for the scalar variable. We study two versions of the method: with a symmetric quadrature rule on smooth grids and a non-symmetric quadrature rule on rough grids. Theoretical and numerical results demonstrate first order convergence for problems with full-tensor coefficients. Second order superconvergence is observed on smooth grids. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. finite induc

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    com. Email: singh_shivaraj@rediffmail.com. In this article we provide a solution to a problem in the famous analysis book [1] by Rudin. It does not use trans- finite induction, and readers may find it more transpar- ent than the treatment in [2]. Here is ...

  20. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-01-01

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here

  1. Final Report of the Project "From the finite element method to the virtual element method"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-20

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a powerful numerical tool that is being used in a large number of engineering applications. The FEM is constructed on triangular/tetrahedral and quadrilateral/hexahedral meshes. Extending the FEM to general polygonal/polyhedral meshes in straightforward way turns out to be extremely difficult and leads to very complex and computationally expensive schemes. The reason for this failure is that the construction of the basis functions on elements with a very general shape is a non-trivial and complex task. In this project we developed a new family of numerical methods, dubbed the Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the numerical approximation of partial differential equations (PDE) of elliptic type suitable to polygonal and polyhedral unstructured meshes. We successfully formulated, implemented and tested these methods and studied both theoretically and numerically their stability, robustness and accuracy for diffusion problems, convection-reaction-diffusion problems, the Stokes equations and the biharmonic equations.

  2. A Centerline Based Model Morphing Algorithm for Patient-Specific Finite Element Modelling of the Left Ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behdadfar, S; Navarro, L; Sundnes, J; Maleckar, M; Ross, S; Odland, H H; Avril, S

    2017-09-20

    Hexahedral automatic model generation is a recurrent problem in computer vision and computational biomechanics. It may even become a challenging problem when one wants to develop a patient-specific finite-element (FE) model of the left ventricle (LV), particularly when only low resolution images are available. In the present study, a fast and efficient algorithm is presented and tested to address such a situation. A template FE hexahedral model was created for a LV geometry using a General Electric (GE) ultrasound (US) system. A system of centerline was considered for this LV mesh. Then, the nodes located over the endocardial and epicardial surfaces are respectively projected from this centerline onto the actual endocardial and epicardial surfaces reconstructed from a patient's US data. Finally, the position of the internal nodes is derived by finding the deformations with minimal elastic energy. This approach was applied to eight patients suffering from congestive heart disease. A FE analysis was performed to derive the stress induced in the LV tissue by diastolic blood pressure on each of them. Our model morphing algorithm was applied successfully and the obtained meshes showed only marginal mismatches when compared to the corresponding US geometries. The diastolic FE analyses were successfully performed in seven patients to derive the distribution of principal stresses. The original model morphing algorithm is fast and robust with low computational cost. This low cost model morphing algorithm may be highly beneficial for future patient-specific reduced-order modelling of the LV with potential application to other crucial organs.

  3. A layered shell containing patches of piezoelectric fibers and interdigitated electrodes: Finite element modeling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Bjerregaard; Nielsen, Martin S.; Santos, Ilmar

    2017-01-01

    The work gives a theoretical and experimental contribution to the problem of smart materials connected to double curved flexible shells. In the theoretical part the finite element modeling of a double curved flexible shell with a piezoelectric fiber patch with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs......) is presented. The developed element is based on a purely mechanical eight-node isoparametric layered element for a double curved shell, utilizing first-order shear deformation theory. The electromechanical coupling of piezoelectric material is added to all elements, but can also be excluded by setting...... the piezoelectric material properties to zero. The electrical field applied via the IDEs is aligned with the piezoelectric fibers, and hence the direct d33 piezoelectric constant is utilized for the electromechanical coupling. The dynamic performance of a shell with a microfiber composite (MFC) patch...

  4. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  5. Dynamic simulation and finite element analysis of the human mandible injury protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi, E-mail: mnavid@iust.ac.ir; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-09-01

    There have been intensive efforts to find a suitable kinetic energy absorbing material for helmet and bulletproof vest design. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is currently in extensive use as scaffolding material for tissue engineering applications. PVA can also be employed instead of commonly use kinetic energy absorbing materials to increase the kinetic energy absorption capacity of current helmet and bulletproof vest materials owing to its excellent mechanical properties. In this study, a combined hexahedral finite element (FE) model is established to determine the potential protection ability of PVA sponge in controlling the level of injury for gunshot wounds to the human mandible. Digital computed tomography data for the human mandible are used to establish a three-dimensional FE model of the human mandible. The mechanism by which a gunshot injures the protected mandible by PVA sponge is dynamically simulated using the LS-DYNA code under two different shot angles. The stress distributions in different parts of the mandible and sponge after injury are also simulated. The modeling results regardless of shot angle reveal that the substantial amount of kinetic energy of the steel ball (67%) is absorbed by the PVA sponge and, consequently, injury severity of the mandible is significantly decreased. The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. The results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and bulletproof vest design to absorb most of the impact energy and reduce the transmitted load. - Highlights: • The ability of PVA sponge to control the injury to the human mandible is computed. • A hexahedral FE model for gunshot wounds to the human mandible is established. • The kinetic energy and injury severity of the mandible is minimized by the sponge. • The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. • PVA suggests as an alternative

  6. Optimization of cardiac defibrillation by three-dimensional finite element modeling of the human thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panescu, D. (EP Technologies, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)); Webster, J.G.; Tompkins, W.J. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)); Stratbucker, R.A. (Radiation Health Center of the State of Nebraska, Omaha, NE (United States))

    1995-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the optimal electrode placement and size to minimize myocardial damage during defibrillation while rendering refractory a critical mass of cardiac tissue of 100%. For this purpose, we developed a 3-D finite element model with 55 388 nodes, 50 913 hexahedral elements, and simulated 16 different organs and tissues, as well as the properties of the electrolyte. The model used a nonuniform mesh with an average spatial resolution of 0.8 cm in all three dimensions. To validate this model, we measured the voltage across 3-cm[sup 2] Ag-AgCl electrodes when currents of 5 mA at 50 kHz were injected into a human subject's thorax through the same electrodes. For the same electrode placements and sizes and the same injected current, the finite element analysis produced results in good agreement with the experimental data. For the optimization of defibrillation, we tested 12 different electrode placements and seven different electrode sizes. The finite element analyses showed that the anterior-posterior electrode placement and an electrode size of about 90 cm[sup 2] offered the least chance of potential myocardial damage and required a shock energy of less than 350 J for 5-ms defibrillation pulses to achieve 100% critical mass. 47 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  8. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere

  9. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  10. STARS: A general-purpose finite element computer program for analysis of engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    STARS (Structural Analysis Routines) is primarily an interactive, graphics-oriented, finite-element computer program for analyzing the static, stability, free vibration, and dynamic responses of damped and undamped structures, including rotating systems. The element library consists of one-dimensional (1-D) line elements, two-dimensional (2-D) triangular and quadrilateral shell elements, and three-dimensional (3-D) tetrahedral and hexahedral solid elements. These elements enable the solution of structural problems that include truss, beam, space frame, plane, plate, shell, and solid structures, or any combination thereof. Zero, finite, and interdependent deflection boundary conditions can be implemented by the program. The associated dynamic response analysis capability provides for initial deformation and velocity inputs, whereas the transient excitation may be either forces or accelerations. An effective in-core or out-of-core solution strategy is automatically employed by the program, depending on the size of the problem. Data input may be at random within a data set, and the program offers certain automatic data-generation features. Input data are formatted as an optimal combination of free and fixed formats. Interactive graphics capabilities enable convenient display of nodal deformations, mode shapes, and element stresses.

  11. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling in anisotropic media using edge-based finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiaojie; Liu, Yun; Wang, Yun; Fu, Li-Yun

    2018-02-01

    It is important to understand how magnetotelluric (MT) modeling can most effectively be performed in general anisotropic media. However, previous studies in this area have mainly focused on the use of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) algorithms. Thus, building on earlier work, it is important to study the performance of three-dimensional (3D) modeling in arbitrary conductivity media; therefore, an edge-based finite element (FE) method has been developed for 3D MT modeling in arbitrary conductivity media. This approach is based on the initial derivation of a series of equivalent variational equations that are based on Maxwell equations, generated using the weighted residual method. Specific values were then obtained for coefficient matrixes of this edge-based FE method using hexahedral meshes, and the algorithm was verified by comparing its results with finite difference (FD) solutions generated using a 2D anisotropic model. Finally, the results of a 3D anisotropic model were analyzed detailed for three conditions; another 3D anisotropic model was designed and its results were compared with two isotropic models'.

  12. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  13. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    plitude waves and finite amplitude waves. This article provides a brief introduction to finite amplitude wave theories. Some of the general characteristics of waves as well as the importance of finite amplitude wave theories are touched upon. 2. Small Amplitude Waves. The topmost and the lowest levels of the waves are re-.

  14. High-Order Curvilinear Finite Element Methods for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics [High Order Curvilinear Finite Elements for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrev, Veselin A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kolev, Tzanio V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rieben, Robert N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-09-20

    The numerical approximation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a movingLagrangian frame is at the heart of many multiphysics simulation algorithms. Here, we present a general framework for high-order Lagrangian discretization of these compressible shock hydrodynamics equations using curvilinear finite elements. This method is an extension of the approach outlined in [Dobrev et al., Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 65 (2010), pp. 1295--1310] and can be formulated for any finite dimensional approximation of the kinematic and thermodynamic fields, including generic finite elements on two- and three-dimensional meshes with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, or hexahedral zones. We discretize the kinematic variables of position and velocity using a continuous high-order basis function expansion of arbitrary polynomial degree which is obtained via a corresponding high-order parametric mapping from a standard reference element. This enables the use of curvilinear zone geometry, higher-order approximations for fields within a zone, and a pointwise definition of mass conservation which we refer to as strong mass conservation. Moreover, we discretize the internal energy using a piecewise discontinuous high-order basis function expansion which is also of arbitrary polynomial degree. This facilitates multimaterial hydrodynamics by treating material properties, such as equations of state and constitutive models, as piecewise discontinuous functions which vary within a zone. To satisfy the Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions at a shock boundary and generate the appropriate entropy, we introduce a general tensor artificial viscosity which takes advantage of the high-order kinematic and thermodynamic information available in each zone. Finally, we apply a generic high-order time discretization process to the semidiscrete equations to develop the fully discrete numerical algorithm. Our method can be viewed as the high-order generalization of the so-called staggered

  15. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wieding

    Full Text Available The use of finite element analysis (FEA has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with

  16. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  17. New magnetic-field-based weighted-residual quasi-static finite element scheme for modeling bulk magnetostriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kidambi S.; Dasgupta, Abhijit

    1998-04-01

    Deformation control of smart structures and damage detection in smart composites by magneto-mechanical tagging are just a few of the increasing number of applications of polydomain, polycrystalline magnetostrictive materials that are currently being researched. Robust computational models of bulk magnetostriction will be of great assistance to designers of smart structures for optimization of performance and development of control strategies. This paper discusses the limitations of existing tools, and reports on the work of the authors in developing a 3D nonlinear continuum finite element scheme for magnetostrictive structures, based on an appropriate Galerkin variational principle and incremental constitutive relations. The unique problems posed by the form of the equations governing magneto-mechanical interactions as well as their impact on the proper choice of variational and finite element discretization schemes are discussed. An adaptation of vectorial edge functions for interpolation of magnetic field in hexahedral elements is outlined. The differences between the proposed finite element scheme and available formations are also discussed in this paper. Computational results obtained from the newly proposed scheme will be presented in a future paper.

  18. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  19. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  20. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  1. Nonlinear Finite Elements Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Columns Strengthened With Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Dewan Abdulla

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study to have better understanding of structural behavior of the reinforced concrete (RC column wrapped by carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP sheets. In this study, 3D F.E model has been presented using ANSYS computer program (Release 16.0 to analyze reinforced concrete columns strengthened with CFRP composites , to evaluate the gain in performance (strength and ductility due to strengthening, and to study the effect of the most important parameters such as: compressive strength of concrete, modulus of elasticity of CFRP and corner radius of square columns. Three dimensional eight-node brick element (SOLID65 was used to represent the concrete, three dimensional spar element (LINK180 represented the steel and using a three dimensional shell element (SHELL41 to represent the CFRP composites. The present study has a comparison between the analytical results from the ANSYS finite element analysis with experimental data. The results of the study show that, external bonded CFRP sheets are very effective in enhancing the axial strength and ductility of the concrete columns. Inspection of

  2. Unconstrained paving and plastering method for generating finite element meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven J.; Blacker, Teddy D.; Kerr, Robert

    2010-03-02

    Computer software for and a method of generating a conformal all quadrilateral or hexahedral mesh comprising selecting an object with unmeshed boundaries and performing the following while unmeshed voids are larger than twice a desired element size and unrecognizable as either a midpoint subdividable or pave-and-sweepable polyhedra: selecting a front to advance; based on sizes of fronts and angles with adjacent fronts, determining which adjacent fronts should be advanced with the selected front; advancing the fronts; detecting proximities with other nearby fronts; resolving any found proximities; forming quadrilaterals or unconstrained columns of hexahedra where two layers cross; and establishing hexahedral elements where three layers cross.

  3. On the implementation of the continuum shell finite element SHB8PS and application to sheet forming simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahouelhadj, A.; Abed-Meraim, F.; Chalal, H.; Balan, T.

    2011-05-01

    In this contribution, the formulation of the SHB8PS continuum shell finite element is extended to anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior models with combined isotropic-kinematic hardening at large deformations. The resulting element is then implemented into the commercial implicit finite element code Abaqus/Standard via the UEL subroutine. The SHB8PS element is an eight-node, three-dimensional brick with displacements as the only degrees of freedom and a preferential direction called the thickness. A reduced integration scheme is adopted using an arbitrary number of integration points along the thickness direction and only one integration point in the other directions. The hourglass modes due to this reduced integration are controlled using a physical stabilization technique together with an assumed strain method for the elimination of locking. Therefore, the element can be used to model thin structures while providing an accurate description of the various through-thickness phenomena. Its performance is assessed through several applications involving different types of non-linearities: geometric, material and that induced by contact. Particular attention is given to springback prediction for a NUMISHEET benchmark problem.

  4. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  5. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  6. Finite element model to study temperature distribution in skin and deep tissues of human limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mamta; Pardasani, K R

    2016-12-01

    The temperature of body tissues is viewed as an indicator of tissue response in clinical applications since ancient times. The tissue temperature depends on various physical and physiological parameters like blood flow, metabolic heat generation, thermal conductivity of tissues, shape and size of organs etc. In this paper a finite element model has been proposed to study temperature distribution in skin and deep tissues of human limbs. The geometry of human limb is taken as elliptical tapered shape. It is assumed that outer surface of the limb is exposed to the environment. The appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on physical conditions of the problem. The model has been developed for a three dimensional steady state case. Hexahedral circular sectoral elements are used to discretize the region. The results have been computed to obtain temperature profiles and study the relation of tissue temperature with the parameters like atmospheric temperature, rate of evaporation, thickness of tissues layers and shape of the limb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Lower Limb-Pelvis Finite Element Model with 3D Active Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Fuhao; Li, Fan; Behr, Michel; Xiao, Zhi; Zhang, Guanjun; Du, Xianping

    2018-01-01

    A lower limb-pelvis finite element (FE) model with active three-dimensional (3D) muscles was developed in this study for biomechanical analysis of human body. The model geometry was mainly reconstructed from a male volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile Chinese male. Tissue materials and structural features were established based on the literature and new implemented experimental tests. In particular, the muscle was modeled with a combination of truss and hexahedral elements to define its passive and active properties as well as to follow the detailed anatomy structure. Both passive and active properties of the model were validated against the experiments of Post-Mortem Human Surrogate (PMHS) and volunteers, respectively. The model was then used to simulate driver's emergency braking during frontal crashes and investigate Knee-Thigh-Hip (KTH) injury mechanisms and tolerances of the human body. A significant force and bending moment variance was noted for the driver's femur due to the effects of active muscle forces during emergency braking. In summary, the present lower limb-pelvis model can be applied in various research fields to support expensive and complex physical tests or corresponding device design.

  8. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  9. Inflation with finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, M.; Michoacan, Univ. Michoacana de S.Nicola de Hidalgo

    1998-01-01

    In this work the inflationary scenario of the Universe with finite temperature is studied. In this context, thermal equilibrium is closely maintained at the end of inflation. The example of the de Sitter expansion is developed

  10. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of acoustic resonator with shape deformation using finite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1987), the eigenvalues i.e. K2 and eigenvectors, i.e. nodal values can be obtained. 5. Numerical calculations. Consider a cubical resonator with each side equal to unity. It is divided into 48 hexahedral elements with 20 nodes. Quadratic mapping functions are used. This is an undeformed resonator and the eigenvalues and ...

  12. Finite element simulation of articular contact mechanics with quadratic tetrahedral elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Rawlins, David S; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-21

    Although it is easier to generate finite element discretizations with tetrahedral elements, trilinear hexahedral (HEX8) elements are more often used in simulations of articular contact mechanics. This is due to numerical shortcomings of linear tetrahedral (TET4) elements, limited availability of quadratic tetrahedron elements in combination with effective contact algorithms, and the perceived increased computational expense of quadratic finite elements. In this study we implemented both ten-node (TET10) and fifteen-node (TET15) quadratic tetrahedral elements in FEBio (www.febio.org) and compared their accuracy, robustness in terms of convergence behavior and computational cost for simulations relevant to articular contact mechanics. Suitable volume integration and surface integration rules were determined by comparing the results of several benchmark contact problems. The results demonstrated that the surface integration rule used to evaluate the contact integrals for quadratic elements affected both convergence behavior and accuracy of predicted stresses. The computational expense and robustness of both quadratic tetrahedral formulations compared favorably to the HEX8 models. Of note, the TET15 element demonstrated superior convergence behavior and lower computational cost than both the TET10 and HEX8 elements for meshes with similar numbers of degrees of freedom in the contact problems that we examined. Finally, the excellent accuracy and relative efficiency of these quadratic tetrahedral elements was illustrated by comparing their predictions with those for a HEX8 mesh for simulation of articular contact in a fully validated model of the hip. These results demonstrate that TET10 and TET15 elements provide viable alternatives to HEX8 elements for simulation of articular contact mechanics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite......, discrete Gabor coefficients. Reconstruction of a signal from its Gabor coefficients is done by the use of a so-called dual window. This thesis presents a number of iterative algorithms to compute dual and self-dual windows. The Linear Time Frequency Toolbox is a Matlab/Octave/C toolbox for doing basic...... discrete time/frequency and Gabor analysis. It is intended to be both an educational and a computational tool. The toolbox was developed as part of this Ph.D. project to provide a solid foundation for the field of computational Gabor analysis....

  14. [Building an effective nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element model of human thoracolumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhi-Li; Cheng, Li-Ming; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Jian-Jie; Yu, Yan

    2011-08-23

    intervertebral disc load-displacement curve were similar to those of in vitro test. The stress distribution results of vertebral cortical bone, posterior complex and cancellous bone were similar to those of other static experiments in a dynamic impact test under the observation of stress cloud. With the advantages of high geometric and mechanical similarity and complete thoracolumbar, hexahedral meshes, nonlinear finite element model may facilitate the impact loading test for a further dynamic analysis of injury mechanism for thoracolumbar burst fracture.

  15. Products of Finite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Asaad, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The study of finite groups factorised as a product of two or more subgroups has become a subject of great interest during the last years with applications not only in group theory, but also in other areas like cryptography and coding theory. It has experienced a big impulse with the introduction of some permutability conditions. The aim of this book is to gather, order, and examine part of this material, including the latest advances made, give some new approach to some topics, and present some new subjects of research in the theory of finite factorised groups.

  16. Undecidability and finite automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrullis, Jörg; Shallit, Jeffrey; Smith, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Using a novel rewriting problem, we show that several natural decision problems about finite automata are undecidable (i.e., recursively unsolvable). In contrast, we also prove three related problems are decidable. We apply one result to prove the undecidability of a related problem about

  17. Robust RBF Finite Automata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šorel, Michal; Šíma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 62, - (2004), s. 93-110 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA MŠk LN00A056 Keywords : radial basis function * neural network * finite automaton * Boolean circuit * computational power Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.641, year: 2004

  18. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  19. Finite unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Mondragon, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik Dept.); Zoupanos, G. (National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Physics Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  20. Finite unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the case of two models with three families the top quark mass is predicted to be 178.8 GeV. (orig.)

  1. Finiteness and GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, D.; Mondragon, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how to obtain phenomenologically viable SU(5) unified models which are finite to all orders before the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A very interesting feature of the models with three families is that they predict the top quark mass to be around 178 GeV. 16 refs

  2. Acoustic transmission in non-uniform ducts with mean flow. I - The method of weighted residuals. II - The finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of acoustic transmission through nonuniform ducts containing a high-speed subsonic flow is studied by means of the method of weighted residuals in the form of a modified Galerkin method and a Galerkin formulation of the finite element method. The method of weighted residuals is shown to employ the basis functions generated from eigenvalue calculations for the case of no flow, and is verified by comparison with exact eigenvalue calculations in the uniform duct case and numerical solutions of the one-dimensional form of the equations in the nonuniform duct case. The finite element scheme based on both the Galerkin method and the residual least squares method and employing eight-noded isoparametric elements is presented and used to investigate multimodal propagation by the coupling of the solution in the duct nonuniform section to modal expansions in uniform sections. Comparison of the results of the two methods reveals them to be in substantial agreement, and predicts the importance of multimodal interactions at high Mach numbers.

  3. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  4. 3D visualization and finite element mesh formation from wood anatomy samples, Part I – Theoretical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Koňas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The work summarizes created algorithms for formation of finite element (FE mesh which is derived from bitmap pattern. Process of registration, segmentation and meshing is described in detail. C++ library of STL from Insight Toolkit (ITK Project together with Visualization Toolkit (VTK were used for base processing of images. Several methods for appropriate mesh output are discussed. Multiplatform application WOOD3D for the task under GNU GPL license was assembled. Several methods of segmentation and mainly different ways of contouring were included. Tetrahedral and rectilinear types of mesh were programmed. Improving of mesh quality in some simple ways is mentioned. Testing and verification of final program on wood anatomy samples of spruce and walnut was realized. Methods of microscopic anatomy samples preparation are depicted. Final utilization of formed mesh in the simple structural analysis was performed.The article discusses main problems in image analysis due to incompatible colour spaces, samples preparation, thresholding and final conversion into finite element mesh. Assembling of mentioned tasks together and evaluation of the application are main original results of the presented work. In presented program two thresholding filters were used. By utilization of ITK two following filters were included. Otsu filter based and binary filter based were used. The most problematic task occurred in a production of wood anatomy samples in the unique light conditions with minimal or zero co­lour space shift and the following appropriate definition of thresholds (corresponding thresholding parameters and connected methods (prefiltering + registration which influence the continuity and mainly separation of wood anatomy structure. Solution in samples staining is suggested with the following quick image analysis realization. Next original result of the work is complex fully automated application which offers three types of finite element mesh

  5. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.W. de.

    1986-01-01

    The consequences of the incorporation of finite temperature effects in fields theories are investigated. Particularly, we consider the sypersymmetric non-linear sigma model, calculating the effective potencial in the large N limit. Initially, we present the 1/N expantion formalism and, for the O(N) model of scalar field, we show the impossibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking. Next, we study the same model at finite temperature and in the presence of conserved charges (the O(N) symmetry's generator). We conclude that these conserved charges explicitly break the symmetry. We introduce a calculation method for the thermodynamic potential of the theory in the presence of chemical potentials. We present an introduction to Supersymmetry in the aim of describing some important concepts for the treatment at T>0. We show that Suppersymmetry is broken for any T>0, in opposition to what one expects, by the solution of the Hierachy Problem. (author) [pt

  6. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  7. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement

  8. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  9. Optical Finite Element Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David; Taylor, Bradley K.

    1986-01-01

    A new high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) with many advantageous features is described. It achieves floating point accuracy, handles bipolar data by sign-magnitude representation, performs LU decomposition using only one channel, easily partitions and considers data flow. A new application (finite element (FE) structural analysis) for OLAPs is introduced and the results of a case study presented. Error sources in encoded OLAPs are addressed for the first time. Their modeling and simulation are discussed and quantitative data are presented. Dominant error sources and the effects of composite error sources are analyzed.

  10. Finiteness of corner vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Biswas, Sougata; Panda, Swapnendu

    2018-04-01

    Till date, the sequence of vortices present in the solid corners of steady internal viscous incompressible flows was thought to be infinite. However, the already existing and most recent geometric theories on incompressible viscous flows that express vortical structures in terms of critical points in bounded domains indicate a strong opposition to this notion of infiniteness. In this study, we endeavor to bridge the gap between the two opposing stream of thoughts by diagnosing the assumptions of the existing theorems on such vortices. We provide our own set of proofs for establishing the finiteness of the sequence of corner vortices by making use of the continuum hypothesis and Kolmogorov scale, which guarantee a nonzero scale for the smallest vortex structure possible in incompressible viscous flows. We point out that the notion of infiniteness resulting from discrete self-similarity of the vortex structures is not physically feasible. Making use of some elementary concepts of mathematical analysis and our own construction of diametric disks, we conclude that the sequence of corner vortices is finite.

  11. An open source software tool to assign the material properties of bone for ABAQUS finite element simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, Elise C; Gill, Harinderjit S

    2016-09-06

    A new software tool to assign the material properties of bone to an ABAQUS finite element mesh was created and compared with Bonemat, a similar tool originally designed to work with Ansys finite element models. Our software tool (py_bonemat_abaqus) was written in Python, which is the chosen scripting language for ABAQUS. The purpose of this study was to compare the software packages in terms of the material assignment calculation and processing speed. Three element types were compared (linear hexahedral (C3D8), linear tetrahedral (C3D4) and quadratic tetrahedral elements (C3D10)), both individually and as part of a mesh. Comparisons were made using a CT scan of a hemi-pelvis as a test case. A small difference, of -0.05kPa on average, was found between Bonemat version 3.1 (the current version) and our Python package. Errors were found in the previous release of Bonemat (version 3.0 downloaded from www.biomedtown.org) during calculation of the quadratic tetrahedron Jacobian, and conversion of the apparent density to modulus when integrating over the Young׳s modulus field. These issues caused up to 2GPa error in the modulus assignment. For these reasons, we recommend users upgrade to the most recent release of Bonemat. Processing speeds were assessed for the three different element types. Our Python package took significantly longer (110s on average) to perform the calculations compared with the Bonemat software (10s). Nevertheless, the workflow advantages of the package and added functionality makes 'py_bonemat_abaqus' a useful tool for ABAQUS users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  13. Statistical finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Iman; Rahemifar, Kaamran; Samani, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique is introduced for tissue deformation and stress analysis. Compared to the conventional Finite Element method, this technique is orders of magnitude faster and yet still very accurate. The proposed technique uses preprocessed data obtained from FE analyses of a number of similar objects in a Statistical Shape Model framework as described below. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the body organs have limited variability, especially in terms of their geometry. As such, it is well suited for calculating tissue displacements of body organs. The proposed technique can be applied in many biomedical applications such as image guided surgery, or virtual reality environment development where tissue behavior is simulated for training purposes.

  14. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  15. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...... features that justify the development of specialized solution algorithms....

  16. Finite strain discrete dislocation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    A framework for carrying out finite deformation discrete dislocation plasticity calculations is presented. The discrete dislocations are presumed to be adequately represented by the singular linear elastic fields so that the large deformations near dislocation cores are not modeled. The finite

  17. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  19. Finite discrete field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Manoelito M. de

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the physical meaning and the geometric interpretation of implementation in classical field theories. The origin of infinities and other inconsistencies in field theories is traced to fields defined with support on the light cone; a finite and consistent field theory requires a light-cone generator as the field support. Then, we introduce a classical field theory with support on the light cone generators. It results on a description of discrete (point-like) interactions in terms of localized particle-like fields. We find the propagators of these particle-like fields and discuss their physical meaning, properties and consequences. They are conformally invariant, singularity-free, and describing a manifestly covariant (1 + 1)-dimensional dynamics in a (3 = 1) spacetime. Remarkably this conformal symmetry remains even for the propagation of a massive field in four spacetime dimensions. We apply this formalism to Classical electrodynamics and to the General Relativity Theory. The standard formalism with its distributed fields is retrieved in terms of spacetime average of the discrete field. Singularities are the by-products of the averaging process. This new formalism enlighten the meaning and the problem of field theory, and may allow a softer transition to a quantum theory. (author)

  20. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  1. Finite Size Scaling of Perceptron

    OpenAIRE

    Korutcheva, Elka; Tonchev, N.

    2000-01-01

    We study the first-order transition in the model of a simple perceptron with continuous weights and large, bit finite value of the inputs. Making the analogy with the usual finite-size physical systems, we calculate the shift and the rounding exponents near the transition point. In the case of a general perceptron with larger variety of inputs, the analysis only gives bounds for the exponents.

  2. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  3. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  4. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/ journals /bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  5. PRONTO3D users` instructions: A transient dynamic code for nonlinear structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attaway, S.W.; Mello, F.J.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Ratner, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zadoks, R.I. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    1998-06-01

    This report provides an updated set of users` instructions for PRONTO3D. PRONTO3D is a three-dimensional, transient, solid dynamics code for analyzing large deformations of highly nonlinear materials subjected to extremely high strain rates. This Lagrangian finite element program uses an explicit time integration operator to integrate the equations of motion. Eight-node, uniform strain, hexahedral elements and four-node, quadrilateral, uniform strain shells are used in the finite element formulation. An adaptive time step control algorithm is used to improve stability and performance in plasticity problems. Hourglass distortions can be eliminated without disturbing the finite element solution using either the Flanagan-Belytschko hourglass control scheme or an assumed strain hourglass control scheme. All constitutive models in PRONTO3D are cast in an unrotated configuration defined using the rotation determined from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. A robust contact algorithm allows for the impact and interaction of deforming contact surfaces of quite general geometry. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method has been embedded into PRONTO3D using the contact algorithm to couple it with the finite element method.

  6. Solid finite elements through three decades

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, DN; Shrinivasa, U

    1994-01-01

    conventionally, solid finite elements have been looked upon as just generalizations of two-dimensional finite elements. In this article we trace their development starting from the days of their inception. Keeping in tune with our perceptions on developing finite elements, without taking recourse to any extra variational techniques, we discuss a few of the techniques which have been applied to solid finite elements. Finally we critically examine our own work on formulating solid finite elemen...

  7. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  8. Finite element methods for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    This book is intended as a textbook providing a deliberately simple introduction to finite element methods in a way that should be readily understandable to engineers, both students and practising professionals. Only the very simplest elements are considered, mainly two dimensional three-noded “constant strain triangles”, with simple linear variation of the relevant variables. Chapters of the book deal with structural problems (beams), classification of a broad range of engineering into harmonic and biharmonic types, finite element analysis of harmonic problems, and finite element analysis of biharmonic problems (plane stress and plane strain). Full Fortran programs are listed and explained in detail, and a range of practical problems solved in the text. Despite being somewhat unfashionable for general programming purposes, the Fortran language remains very widely used in engineering. The programs listed, which were originally developed for use on mainframe computers, have been thoroughly updated for use ...

  9. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  10. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...... in the radiation formula directly, and no pre-windowing is needed. Examples are given for the radiation efficiency, and the results are compared with results found in the literature....

  11. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmenhove, B; Coolen, A C C

    2003-01-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous

  12. Finite connectivity attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmenhove, B.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2003-09-01

    We study a family of diluted attractor neural networks with a finite average number of (symmetric) connections per neuron. As in finite connectivity spin glasses, their equilibrium properties are described by order parameter functions, for which we derive an integral equation in replica symmetric approximation. A bifurcation analysis of this equation reveals the locations of the paramagnetic to recall and paramagnetic to spin-glass transition lines in the phase diagram. The line separating the retrieval phase from the spin-glass phase is calculated at zero temperature. All phase transitions are found to be continuous.

  13. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Cervantes, Mayra; Fernandez, Francisco M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others

  14. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  15. Lattice QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeTar, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the numerical simulation of QCD at finite temperature is reviewed. Eight topics are treated briefly: (1) T c scaling, (2) Equation of state, (3) Baryon susceptibility, (4) The QCD Phase Diagram, (5) J/Ψ Binding in the Plasma, (6) The Screening Spectrum of the Plasma, (7) Gauge Symmetry Breaking at High T, (8) Progress in Computing Power. (author)

  16. Linguistics, Logic, and Finite Trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackburn, P.; Meyer-Viol, W.

    1993-01-01

    A modal logic is developed to deal with finite ordered binary trees as they are used in (computational) linguistics. A modal language is introduced with operators for the 'mother of', 'first daughter of' and 'second daughter of' relations together with their transitive reflexive closures.

  17. On symmetric pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K. B.; Yuan, K.; Křížek, Michal

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 11, 1-2 (2004), s. 213-227 ISSN 1492-8760 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : mesh generation * finite element method * composite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2004

  18. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. Finite-temperature confinement transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetitsky, B.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of lattice gauge theory at finite temperature is introduced. The framework of universality predictions for critical behavior is outlined, and recent analytic work in this direction is reviewed. New Monte Carlo information for the SU(4) theory are represented, and possible results of the inclusion of fermions in the SU(3) theory are listed

  20. Robust and scalable 3-D geo-electromagnetic modelling approach using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Bürg, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We present a robust and scalable solver for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations for problems with large conductivity contrasts, wide range of frequencies, stretched grids and locally refined meshes. The solver is part of the fully distributed adaptive 3-D electromagnetic modelling scheme which employs the finite element method and unstructured non-conforming hexahedral meshes for spatial discretization using the open-source software deal.II. We use the complex-valued electric field formulation and split it into two real-valued equations for which we utilize an optimal block-diagonal pre-conditioner. Application of this pre-conditioner requires the solution of two smaller real-valued symmetric problems. We solve them by using either a direct solver or the conjugate gradient method pre-conditioned with the recently introduced auxiliary space technique. The auxiliary space pre-conditioner reformulates the original problem in form of several simpler ones, which are then solved using highly efficient algebraic multigrid methods. In this paper, we consider the magnetotelluric case and verify our numerical scheme by using COMMEMI 3-D models. Afterwards, we run a series of numerical experiments and demonstrate that the solver converges in a small number of iterations for a wide frequency range and variable problem sizes. The number of iterations is independent of the problem size, but exhibits a mild dependency on frequency. To test the stability of the method on locally refined meshes, we have implemented a residual-based a posteriori error estimator and compared it with uniform mesh refinement for problems up to 200 million unknowns. We test the scalability of the most time consuming parts of our code and show that they fulfill the strong scaling assumption as long as each MPI process possesses enough degrees of freedom to alleviate communication overburden. Finally, we refer back to a direct solver-based pre-conditioner and analyse its complexity in time. The results show

  1. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  2. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  3. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  4. Factorization properties of finite spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simkhovich, B; Mann, A; Zak, J, E-mail: boriskas@tx.technion.ac.i, E-mail: ady@physics.technion.ac.i, E-mail: zak@physics.technion.ac.i [Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2010-01-29

    In 1960 Schwinger (J Schwinger 1960 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 46 570-9) proposed the algorithm for factorization of unitary operators in the finite M-dimensional Hilbert space according to a coprime decomposition of M. Using a special permutation operator A we generalize the Schwinger factorization to every decomposition of M. We obtain the factorized pairs of unitary operators and show that they obey the same commutation relations as Schwinger's. We apply the new factorization to two problems. First, we show how to generate two kq-like mutually unbiased bases for any composite dimension. Then, using a Harper-like Hamiltonian model in the finite dimension M = M{sub 1}M{sub 2}, we show how to design a physical system with M{sub 1} energy levels, each having degeneracy M{sub 2}.

  5. Representation theory of finite monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This first text on the subject provides a comprehensive introduction to the representation theory of finite monoids. Carefully worked examples and exercises provide the bells and whistles for graduate accessibility, bringing a broad range of advanced readers to the forefront of research in the area. Highlights of the text include applications to probability theory, symbolic dynamics, and automata theory. Comfort with module theory, a familiarity with ordinary group representation theory, and the basics of Wedderburn theory, are prerequisites for advanced graduate level study. Researchers in algebra, algebraic combinatorics, automata theory, and probability theory, will find this text enriching with its thorough presentation of applications of the theory to these fields. Prior knowledge of semigroup theory is not expected for the diverse readership that may benefit from this exposition. The approach taken in this book is highly module-theoretic and follows the modern flavor of the theory of finite dimensional ...

  6. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly Negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul; Lisonek, P.; Markvorsen, Steen

    1998-01-01

    We prove that, if a finite metric space is of strictly negative type, then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by the infinite extender (load vector). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all spaces on two, three, or four points, all trees, and all finite subspaces of Eu...

  7. The construction of finite solvable groups revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Eick, Bettina; Horn, Max

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new approach towards the systematic construction of finite groups up to isomorphism. This approach yields a practical algorithm for the construction of finite solvable groups up to isomorphism. We report on a GAP implementation of this method for finite solvable groups and exhibit some sample applications.

  8. Proving Finite Satisfiability of Deductive Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Bry, François; Manthey, Rainer

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how certain refutation methods can be extended into semi-decision procedures that are complete for both unsatisfiability and finite satisfiability. The proposed extension is justified by a new characterization of finite satisfiability. This research was motivated by a database design problem: Deduction rules and integrity constraints in definite databases have to be finitely satisfiable

  9. Characterization of finite spaces having dispersion points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bsoul, A. T

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we shall characterize the finite spaces having dispersion points. Also, we prove that the dispersion point of a finite space with a dispersion points fixed under all non constant continuous functions which answers the question raised by J. C obb and W. Voxman in 1980 affirmatively for finite space. Some open problems are given. (author). 16 refs

  10. Quantum Chromodynamic at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    A formal expression to the Gibbs free energy of topological defects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)by using the semiclassical approach in the context of field theory at finite temperature and in the high temperature limit is determined. This expression is used to calculate the free energy of magnetic monopoles. Applying the obtained results to a method in which the free energy of topological defects of a theory may indicate its different phases, its searched for informations about phases of QCD. (author) [pt

  11. Spinor pregeometry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Seiji.

    1985-10-01

    We derive the effective action for gravity at finite temperature in spinor pregeometry. The temperature-dependent effective potential for the vierbein which is parametrized as e sub(kμ) = b.diag(1, xi, xi, xi) has the minimum at b = 0 for fixed xi, and behaves as -xi 3 for fixed b. These results indicate that the system of fundamental matters in spinor pregeometry cannot be in equilibrium. (author)

  12. Strange matter at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, H.; Dang, B.V.

    1987-12-01

    The properties of strange quark matter at finite temperatures and in equilibrium with respect to weak interaction are explored on the basis of the MIT bag model picture of QCD. Furthermore, to determine the stability of strange quark matter analogous investigations are also performed for nuclear matter within Walecka's model field theory. It is found that strange quark matter can be stable at zero external pressure only for temperatures below 20 MeV. (orig.)

  13. Finite mathematics models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Carla C

    2015-01-01

    Features step-by-step examples based on actual data and connects fundamental mathematical modeling skills and decision making concepts to everyday applicability Featuring key linear programming, matrix, and probability concepts, Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications emphasizes cross-disciplinary applications that relate mathematics to everyday life. The book provides a unique combination of practical mathematical applications to illustrate the wide use of mathematics in fields ranging from business, economics, finance, management, operations research, and the life and social sciences.

  14. Propagator for finite range potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown

  15. Perturbative QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-03-01

    We discuss an application of finite temperature QCD to lepton-pair production in a quark-gluon plasma. The perturbative calculation is performed within the realtime formalism. After cancellation of infrared and mass singularities, the corrections at O (α s ) are found to be very small in the region where the mass of the Drell-Yan pair is much larger than the temperature of the plasma. Interesting effects, however, appear at the annihilation threshold of the thermalized quarks

  16. Extension of p-local finite groups

    OpenAIRE

    Broto, Carles; Castellana, Natalia; Grodal, Jesper; Levi, Ran; Oliver, Bob

    2005-01-01

    A p-local finite group consists of a finite p-group S, together with a pair of categories which encode ``conjugacy'' relations among subgroups of S, and which are modelled on the fusion in a Sylow p-subgroup of a finite group. It contains enough information to define a classifying space which has many of the same properties as p-completed classifying spaces of finite groups. In this paper, we study and classify extensions of p-local finite groups, and also compute the fundamental group of the...

  17. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...... matrix of a finite metric space is both hypermetric and regular, then it is of strictly negative type. We show that the strictly negative type finite subspaces of spheres are precisely those which do not contain two pairs of antipodal points....

  18. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  19. Flexoelectric effect in finite samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Yurkov, Alexander S.

    2012-08-01

    Static flexoelectric effect in a finite sample of a solid is addressed in terms of phenomenological theory for the case of a thin plate subjected to bending. It has been shown that despite an explicit asymmetry inherent to the bulk constitutive electromechanical equations which take into account the flexoelectric coupling, there exists a situation where electromechanical response for a finite sample is "symmetric." "Symmetric" means that if a sensor and an actuator are made of a flexoelectric element, performance of such devices can be characterized by the same effective piezoelectric coefficient. This behavior is consistent with the thermodynamic arguments offered earlier, being in conflict with the current point of view on the matter in literature. This result was obtained using standard mechanical boundary conditions valid for the case where the polarization vanishes at the surface. It was shown that, for the case where the polarization at the surface is not zero, the aforementioned symmetry of electromechanical response may be violated if standard mechanical boundary conditions are used, leading to a conflict with the thermodynamic arguments. It is suggested that this conflict may be resolved when using modified mechanical boundary conditions. It is also shown that the contribution of surface piezoelectricity to the flexoelectric response of a finite sample is expected to be comparable to that of the static bulk contribution (including materials with high values of the dielectric constant) and to scale as the bulk value of the dielectric constant (similar to the bulk contribution). This finding implies that if the experimentally measured flexoelectric coefficient scales as the dielectric constant of the material, this does not imply that the measured flexoelectric response is controlled by the static bulk contribution to the flexoelectric effect.

  20. Entropy conservative finite element schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, E.

    1986-01-01

    The question of entropy stability for discrete approximations to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws is studied. The amount of numerical viscosity present in such schemes is quantified and related to their entropy stability by means of comparison. To this end, two main ingredients are used: entropy variables and the construction of certain entropy conservative schemes in terms of piecewise-linear finite element approximations. It is then shown that conservative schemes are entropy stable, if and (for three-point schemes) only if, they contain more numerical viscosity than the abovementioned entropy conservation ones.

  1. Functionals of finite Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schiffer, Menahem

    1954-01-01

    This advanced monograph on finite Riemann surfaces, based on the authors' 1949-50 lectures at Princeton University, remains a fundamental book for graduate students. The Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society hailed the self-contained treatment as the source of ""a plethora of ideas, each interesting in its own right,"" noting that ""the patient reader will be richly rewarded."" Suitable for graduate-level courses, the text begins with three chapters that offer a development of the classical theory along historical lines, examining geometrical and physical considerations, existence theo

  2. Finite Higgs mass without Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Quirós, Mariano

    2001-01-01

    We identify a class of chiral models where the one-loop effective potential for Higgs scalar fields is finite without any requirement of supersymmetry. It corresponds to the case where the Higgs fields are identified with the components of a gauge field along compactified extra dimensions. We present a six dimensional model with gauge group U(3)xU(3) and quarks and leptons accomodated in fundamental and bi-fundamental representations. The model can be embedded in a D-brane configuration of type I string theory and, upon compactification on a T^2/Z_2 orbifold, it gives rise to the standard model with two Higgs doublets.

  3. Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzert, K.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanism of supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is still only partly understood. Though it has been proven that temperature always breaks supersymmetry, the spontaneous nature of this breaking remains unclear, in particular the role of the Goldstone fermion. The aim of this work is to unify two existing approaches to the subject. From a hydrodynamic point of view, it has been argued under very general assumptions that in any supersymmetric quantum field theory at finite temperature there should exist a massless fermionic collective excitation, named phonino because of the analogy to the phonon. In the framework of a self-consistent resummed perturbation theory, it is shown for the example of the Wess-Zumino model that this mode fits very well into the quantum field theoretical framework pursued by earlier works. Interpreted as a bound state of boson and fermion, it contributes to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identities in a way showing that supersymmetry is indeed broken spontaneously with the phonino playing the role of the Goldstone fermion. The second part of the work addresses the case of supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that also here the phonino exists and must be interpreted as the Goldstone mode. This knowledge allows a generalization to a wider class of models. (orig.)

  4. Finite Unification: Theory and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemeyer, S; Zoupanos, G

    2010-01-01

    All-loop Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are very interesting N=1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) which not only realise an old field theoretic dream but also have a remarkable predictive power due to the required reduction of couplings. The reduction of the dimensionless couplings in N=1 GUTs is achieved by searching for renormalization group invariant (RGI) relations among them holding beyond the unification scale. Finiteness results from the fact that there exist RGI relations among dimensionless couplings that guarantee the vanishing of all beta-functions in certain N=1 GUTs even to all orders. Furthermore developments in the soft supersymmetry breaking sector of N=1 GUTs and FUTs lead to exact RGI relations, i.e. reduction of couplings, in this dimensionful sector of the theory too. Based on the above theoretical framework phenomenologically consistent FUTS have been constructed. Here we present FUT models based on the SU(5) and SU(3)^3 gauge groups and their predictions. Of particular intere...

  5. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  6. Finite size scaling and lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Finite size (Fisher) scaling is investigated for four dimensional SU(2) and SU(3) lattice gauge theories without quarks. It allows to disentangle violations of (asymptotic) scaling and finite volume corrections. Mass spectrum, string tension, deconfinement temperature and lattice β-function are considered. For appropriate volumes, Monte Carlo investigations seem to be able to control the finite volume continuum limit. Contact is made with Luescher's small volume expansion and possibly also with the asymptotic large volume behavior. 41 refs., 19 figs

  7. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  8. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  9. A first course in finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Developed from the authors, combined total of 50 years undergraduate and graduate teaching experience, this book presents the finite element method formulated as a general-purpose numerical procedure for solving engineering problems governed by partial differential equations.  Focusing on the formulation and application of the finite element method through the integration of finite element theory, code development, and software application, the book is both introductory and self-contained, as well as being a hands-on experience for any student. This authoritative text on Finite Elements:Adopts

  10. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  11. Axisymmetric finite deformation membrane problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, W.W.

    1980-12-12

    Many biomechanic problems involve the analysis of finite deformation axisymmetric membranes. This paper presents the general formulation for solving a class of axisymmetric membrane problems. The material nonlinearity, as well as the geometric nonlinearity, is considered. Two methods are presented to solve these problems. The first method is solving a set of differential equilibrium equations. The governing equations are reduced to three first-order ordinary-differential equations with explicit derivatives. The second method is the Ritz method where a general potential energy functional valid for all axisymmetric deformed positions is presented. The geometric admissible functions that govern the deformed configuration are written in terms of a series with unknown coefficients. These unknown coefficients are determined by the minimum potential energy principle that of all geometric admissible deformed configurations, the equilibrium configuration minimizes the potential energy. Some examples are presented. A comparison between these two methods is mentioned.

  12. Finite volume schemes for Vlasov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crouseilles Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present finite volume schemes for the numerical approximation of the one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson equation (FOV CEMRACS 2011 project. Stability analysis is performed for the linear advection and links with semi-Lagrangian schemes are made. Finally, numerical results enable to compare the different methods using classical plasma test cases. Des schémas de type volumes finis sont étudiés ici pour l’approximation de l’équation de Vlasov-Poisson (projet FOV, CEMRACS 2011. Une analyse de stabilité est effectuée dans le cas de l’advection linéaire et plusieurs liens sont faits entre les méthodes volumes finis et semi-Lagrangiennes. Enfin, les méthodes sont comparées sur des cas tests académiques de la physique des plasmas.

  13. Phase transition in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Duflot, V.; Duflot, V.; Gulminelli, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of selected aspects of Phase transitions in finite systems applied in particular to the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. We show that the problem of the non existence of boundary conditions can be solved by introducing a statistical ensemble with an averaged constrained volume. In such an ensemble the microcanonical heat capacity becomes negative in the transition region. We show that the caloric curve explicitly depends on the considered transformation of the volume with the excitation energy and so does not bear direct informations on the characteristics of the phase transition. Conversely, partial energy fluctuations are demonstrated to be a direct measure of the equation of state. Since the heat capacity has a negative branch in the phase transition region, the presence of abnormally large kinetic energy fluctuations is a signal of the liquid gas phase transition. (author)

  14. Nuclear deformation at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y; Gilbreth, C N; Bertsch, G F

    2014-12-31

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  15. Nuclear Deformation at Finite Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y.; Gilbreth, C. N.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  16. Finite rotation shells basic equations and finite elements for Reissner kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, K

    2010-01-01

    This book covers theoretical and computational aspects of non-linear shells. Several advanced topics of shell equations and finite elements - not included in standard textbooks on finite elements - are addressed, and the book includes an extensive bibliography.

  17. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  18. The Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Solving the MEG and the Combined MEG/EEG Forward Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carla Piastra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In Electro- (EEG and Magnetoencephalography (MEG, one important requirement of source reconstruction is the forward model. The continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG-FEM has become one of the dominant approaches for solving the forward problem over the last decades. Recently, a discontinuous Galerkin FEM (DG-FEM EEG forward approach has been proposed as an alternative to CG-FEM (Engwer et al., 2017. It was shown that DG-FEM preserves the property of conservation of charge and that it can, in certain situations such as the so-called skull leakages, be superior to the standard CG-FEM approach. In this paper, we developed, implemented, and evaluated two DG-FEM approaches for the MEG forward problem, namely a conservative and a non-conservative one. The subtraction approach was used as source model. The validation and evaluation work was done in statistical investigations in multi-layer homogeneous sphere models, where an analytic solution exists, and in a six-compartment realistically shaped head volume conductor model. In agreement with the theory, the conservative DG-FEM approach was found to be superior to the non-conservative DG-FEM implementation. This approach also showed convergence with increasing resolution of the hexahedral meshes. While in the EEG case, in presence of skull leakages, DG-FEM outperformed CG-FEM, in MEG, DG-FEM achieved similar numerical errors as the CG-FEM approach, i.e., skull leakages do not play a role for the MEG modality. In particular, for the finest mesh resolution of 1 mm sources with a distance of 1.59 mm from the brain-CSF surface, DG-FEM yielded mean topographical errors (relative difference measure, RDM% of 1.5% and mean magnitude errors (MAG% of 0.1% for the magnetic field. However, if the goal is a combined source analysis of EEG and MEG data, then it is highly desirable to employ the same forward model for both EEG and MEG data. Based on these results, we conclude that the newly presented

  19. The Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Solving the MEG and the Combined MEG/EEG Forward Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Maria Carla; Nüßing, Andreas; Vorwerk, Johannes; Bornfleth, Harald; Oostenveld, Robert; Engwer, Christian; Wolters, Carsten H

    2018-01-01

    In Electro- (EEG) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG), one important requirement of source reconstruction is the forward model. The continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG-FEM) has become one of the dominant approaches for solving the forward problem over the last decades. Recently, a discontinuous Galerkin FEM (DG-FEM) EEG forward approach has been proposed as an alternative to CG-FEM (Engwer et al., 2017). It was shown that DG-FEM preserves the property of conservation of charge and that it can, in certain situations such as the so-called skull leakages , be superior to the standard CG-FEM approach. In this paper, we developed, implemented, and evaluated two DG-FEM approaches for the MEG forward problem, namely a conservative and a non-conservative one. The subtraction approach was used as source model. The validation and evaluation work was done in statistical investigations in multi-layer homogeneous sphere models, where an analytic solution exists, and in a six-compartment realistically shaped head volume conductor model. In agreement with the theory, the conservative DG-FEM approach was found to be superior to the non-conservative DG-FEM implementation. This approach also showed convergence with increasing resolution of the hexahedral meshes. While in the EEG case, in presence of skull leakages, DG-FEM outperformed CG-FEM, in MEG, DG-FEM achieved similar numerical errors as the CG-FEM approach, i.e., skull leakages do not play a role for the MEG modality. In particular, for the finest mesh resolution of 1 mm sources with a distance of 1.59 mm from the brain-CSF surface, DG-FEM yielded mean topographical errors (relative difference measure, RDM%) of 1.5% and mean magnitude errors (MAG%) of 0.1% for the magnetic field. However, if the goal is a combined source analysis of EEG and MEG data, then it is highly desirable to employ the same forward model for both EEG and MEG data. Based on these results, we conclude that the newly presented conservative DG

  20. A Finite Model Property for Intersection Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Statman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that the relational theory of intersection types known as BCD has the finite model property; that is, BCD is complete for its finite models. Our proof uses rewriting techniques which have as an immediate by-product the polynomial time decidability of the preorder <= (although this also follows from the so called beta soundness of BCD.

  1. Finite-Element Software for Conceptual Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, J.; Sandberg, G.; Damkilde, Lars

    2010-01-01

    and research. Forcepad is an effort to provide a conceptual design and teaching tool in a finite-element software package. Forcepad is a two-dimensional finite-element application based on the same conceptual model as image editing applications such as Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Paint. Instead of using...

  2. Non-linear finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The note is written for courses in "Non-linear finite element method". The note has been used by the author teaching non-linear finite element modeling at Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, Computational Mechanics at Aalborg University Esbjerg, Structural Engineering at the University...

  3. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  4. Finite Topological Spaces as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstutler, Randall D.; Higginbottom, Ryan S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of finite topological spaces as examples in a point-set topology class especially suited to help students transition into abstract mathematics. We describe how carefully chosen examples involving finite spaces may be used to reinforce concepts, highlight pathologies, and develop students' non-Euclidean intuition. We end with a…

  5. On p-supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [2] Ballester-Bolinches A, Ezquerro L M and Skiba A N, On second maximal subgroups of. Sylow subgroups of finite groups, J. Pure Appl. Algebra 215 (2011) 705–714. [3] Ballester-Bolinches A and Pedraza-Aguilera M C, On minimal subgroups of finite groups,. Acta Math. Hungar. 73 (1996) 335–342. [4] Chen X and Guo W ...

  6. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  7. On the orders of finite semisimple groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 115; Issue 4 ... The aim of this paper is to investigate the order coincidences among the finite semisimple groups and to give a reasoning of such order coincidences through the transitive ... We investigate the situation for finite semisimple groups of Lie type.

  8. Interpretability degrees of finitely axiomatized sequential theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    In this paper we show that the degrees of interpretability of finitely axiomatized extensions-in-the-same-language of a finitely axiomatized sequential theory-like Elementary Arithmetic EA, IΣ1, or the Gödel-Bernays theory of sets and classes GB-have suprema. This partially answers a question posed

  9. Interpretability Degrees of Finitely Axiomatized Sequential Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show that the degrees of interpretability of finitely axiomatized extensions-in-the-same-language of a finitely axiomatized sequential theory —like Elementary Arithmetic EA, IΣ1, or the Gödel-Bernays theory of sets and classes GB— have suprema. This partially answers a question

  10. On Finite $J$-Hermitian Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungwook

    2014-01-01

    In his recent paper arXiv:1312.7738, the author discussed $J$-Hermitian quantum mechanics and showed that $PT$-symmetric quantum mechanics is essentially $J$-Hermitian quantum mechanics. In this paper, the author discusses finite $J$-Hermitian quantum mechanics which is derived naturally from its continuum one and its relationship with finite $PT$-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  11. Least-squares finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Bochev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Since their emergence, finite element methods have taken a place as one of the most versatile and powerful methodologies for the approximate numerical solution of Partial Differential Equations. This book presents the theory and practice of least-square finite element methods, their strengths and weaknesses, successes, and open problems

  12. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Allan; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, s......: the Finite Volume Method. London: Longman Scientific Technical......Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see......, e.g. [2]) in order to develop methods for topology design for applications where conservation laws are critical such that element--wise conservation in the discretized models has a high priority. This encompasses problems involving for example mass and heat transport. The work described...

  13. Averaging theorems in finite deformation plasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Nemat-Nasser, S C

    1999-01-01

    The transition from micro- to macro-variables of a representative volume element (RVE) of a finitely deformed aggregate (e.g., a composite or a polycrystal) is explored. A number of exact fundamental results on averaging techniques, $9 valid at finite deformations and rotations of any arbitrary heterogeneous continuum, are obtained. These results depend on the choice of suitable kinematic and dynamic variables. For finite deformations, the deformation gradient and $9 its rate, and the nominal stress and its rate, are optimally suited for the averaging purposes. A set of exact identities is presented in terms of these variables. An exact method for homogenization of an ellipsoidal inclusion in an $9 unbounded finitely deformed homogeneous solid is presented, generalizing Eshelby's method for application to finite deformation problems. In terms of the nominal stress rate and the rate of change of the deformation gradient, $9 measured relative to any arbitrary state, a general phase-transformation problem is con...

  14. An introduction to finite tight frames

    CERN Document Server

    Waldron, Shayne F D

    2018-01-01

    This textbook is an introduction to the theory and applications of finite tight frames, an area that has developed rapidly in the last decade. Stimulating much of this growth are the applications of finite frames to diverse fields such as signal processing, quantum information theory, multivariate orthogonal polynomials, and remote sensing. Key features and topics: * First book entirely devoted to finite frames * Extensive exercises and MATLAB examples for classroom use * Important examples, such as harmonic and Heisenberg frames, are presented in preliminary chapters, encouraging readers to explore and develop an intuitive feeling for tight frames * Later chapters delve into general theory details and recent research results * Many illustrations showing the special aspects of the geometry of finite frames * Provides an overview of the field of finite tight frames * Discusses future research directions in the field Featuring exercises and MATLAB examples in each chapter, the book is well suited as a textbook ...

  15. Optimization of finite-size errors in finite-temperature calculations of unordered phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Deepak; Srednicki, Mark; Rigol, Marcos

    2015-06-01

    It is common knowledge that the microcanonical, canonical, and grand-canonical ensembles are equivalent in thermodynamically large systems. Here, we study finite-size effects in the latter two ensembles. We show that contrary to naive expectations, finite-size errors are exponentially small in grand canonical ensemble calculations of translationally invariant systems in unordered phases at finite temperature. Open boundary conditions and canonical ensemble calculations suffer from finite-size errors that are only polynomially small in the system size. We further show that finite-size effects are generally smallest in numerical linked cluster expansions. Our conclusions are supported by analytical and numerical analyses of classical and quantum systems.

  16. Stochastic delocalization of finite populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyrhofer, Lukas; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The localization of populations of replicating bacteria, viruses or autocatalytic chemicals arises in various contexts, such as ecology, evolution, medicine or chemistry. Several deterministic mathematical models have been used to characterize the conditions under which localized states can form, and how they break down due to convective driving forces. It has been repeatedly found that populations remain localized unless the bias exceeds a critical threshold value, and that close to the transition the population is characterized by a diverging length scale. These results, however, have been obtained upon ignoring number fluctuations (‘genetic drift’), which are inevitable given the discreteness of the replicating entities. Here, we study the localization/delocalization of a finite population in the presence of genetic drift. The population is modeled by a linear chain of subpopulations, or demes, which exchange migrants at a constant rate. Individuals in one particular deme, called ‘oasis’, receive a growth rate benefit, and the total population is regulated to have constant size N. In this ecological setting, we find that any finite population delocalizes on sufficiently long time scales. Depending on parameters, however, populations may remain localized for a very long time. The typical waiting time to delocalization increases exponentially with both population size and distance to the critical wind speed of the deterministic approximation. We augment these simulation results by a mathematical analysis that treats the reproduction and migration of individuals as branching random walks subject to global constraints. For a particular constraint, different from a fixed population size constraint, this model yields a solvable first moment equation. We find that this solvable model approximates very well the fixed population size model for large populations, but starts to deviate as population sizes are small. Nevertheless, the qualitative behavior of the

  17. What is finiteness? (Abhishek Banerjee) (Indian Institute of Science)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Do finites get enough respect? • Finiteness is easy, no? • Just count whether 1, 2, 3,... • But then we miss out on the true richness of the concept of finitness. • There's more finiteness around. In fact, finiteness is what helps us really understand things. 5 ...

  18. Social exclusion in finite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation.

  19. FEBio: finite elements for biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Ateshian, Gerard A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, investigators have primarily used commercial software that is neither geared toward biological applications nor sufficiently flexible to follow the latest developments in the field. This lack of a tailored software environment has hampered research progress, as well as dissemination of models and results. To address these issues, we developed the FEBio software suite (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software/febio), a nonlinear implicit finite element (FE) framework, designed specifically for analysis in computational solid biomechanics. This paper provides an overview of the theoretical basis of FEBio and its main features. FEBio offers modeling scenarios, constitutive models, and boundary conditions, which are relevant to numerous applications in biomechanics. The open-source FEBio software is written in C++, with particular attention to scalar and parallel performance on modern computer architectures. Software verification is a large part of the development and maintenance of FEBio, and to demonstrate the general approach, the description and results of several problems from the FEBio Verification Suite are presented and compared to analytical solutions or results from other established and verified FE codes. An additional simulation is described that illustrates the application of FEBio to a research problem in biomechanics. Together with the pre- and postprocessing software PREVIEW and POSTVIEW, FEBio provides a tailored solution for research and development in computational biomechanics.

  20. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  1. Stabilized Finite Elements in FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Newman, James C.; Karman, Steve L.

    2017-01-01

    A Streamlined Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilized finite-element discretization has been implemented as a library into the FUN3D unstructured-grid flow solver. Motivation for the selection of this methodology is given, details of the implementation are provided, and the discretization for the interior scheme is verified for linear and quadratic elements by using the method of manufactured solutions. A methodology is also described for capturing shocks, and simulation results are compared to the finite-volume formulation that is currently the primary method employed for routine engineering applications. The finite-element methodology is demonstrated to be more accurate than the finite-volume technology, particularly on tetrahedral meshes where the solutions obtained using the finite-volume scheme can suffer from adverse effects caused by bias in the grid. Although no effort has been made to date to optimize computational efficiency, the finite-element scheme is competitive with the finite-volume scheme in terms of computer time to reach convergence.

  2. Clifford algebra in finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-12-01

    We consider the most general power counting renormalizable and gauge invariant Lagrangean density L invariant with respect to some non-Abelian, compact, and semisimple gauge group G. The particle content of this quantum field theory consists of gauge vector bosons, real scalar bosons, fermions, and ghost fields. We assume that the ultimate grand unified theory needs no cutoff. This yields so-called finiteness conditions, resulting from the demand for finite physical quantities calculated by the bare Lagrangean. In lower loop order, necessary conditions for finiteness are thus vanishing beta functions for dimensionless couplings. The complexity of the finiteness conditions for a general quantum field theory makes the discussion of non-supersymmetric theories rather cumbersome. Recently, the F = 1 class of finite quantum field theories has been proposed embracing all supersymmetric theories. A special type of F = 1 theories proposed turns out to have Yukawa couplings which are equivalent to generators of a Clifford algebra representation. These algebraic structures are remarkable all the more than in the context of a well-known conjecture which states that finiteness is maybe related to global symmetries (such as supersymmetry) of the Lagrangean density. We can prove that supersymmetric theories can never be of this Clifford-type. It turns out that these Clifford algebra representations found recently are a consequence of certain invariances of the finiteness conditions resulting from a vanishing of the renormalization group β-function for the Yukawa couplings. We are able to exclude almost all such Clifford-like theories. (author)

  3. Finite Markov processes and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iosifescu, Marius

    2007-01-01

    A self-contained treatment of finite Markov chains and processes, this text covers both theory and applications. Author Marius Iosifescu, vice president of the Romanian Academy and director of its Center for Mathematical Statistics, begins with a review of relevant aspects of probability theory and linear algebra. Experienced readers may start with the second chapter, a treatment of fundamental concepts of homogeneous finite Markov chain theory that offers examples of applicable models.The text advances to studies of two basic types of homogeneous finite Markov chains: absorbing and ergodic ch

  4. Finite-dimensional division algebras over fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Finite-Dimensional Division Algebras over fields determine, by the Wedderburn Theorem, the semi-simple finite-dimensional algebras over a field. They lead to the definition of the Brauer group and to certain geometric objects, the Brauer-Severi varieties. The book concentrates on those algebras that have an involution. Algebras with involution appear in many contexts; they arose first in the study of the so-called 'multiplication algebras of Riemann matrices'. The largest part of the book is the fifth chapter, dealing with involutorial simple algebras of finite dimension over a field. Of parti

  5. Finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrie, F.; Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This guide is intended to help people wanting to do finite element analysis of piezoelectric materials by answering some of the questions that are peculiar to piezoelectric materials. The document is not intended as a complete beginners guide for finite element analysis in general as this is better dealt with by the individual software producers. The guide is based around the commercial package ANSYS as this is a popular package amongst piezoelectric material users, however much of the information will still be useful to users of other finite element codes. (author)

  6. A Note on Powers in Finite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2016-01-01

    , system theory, coding theory and cryptology. In this connection it is of interest to know criteria for the existence of squares and other powers in arbitrary finite fields. Making good use of polynomial division in polynomial rings over finite fields, we have examined a classical criterion of Euler...... for squares in odd prime fields, giving it a formulation which is apt for generalization to arbitrary finite fields and powers. Our proof uses algebra rather than classical number theory, which makes it convenient when presenting basic methods of applied algebra in the classroom....

  7. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, Bram van, E-mail: bramiozo@gmail.com [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands); Koren, Barry [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Blank, Hugo J. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, The Netherlands" 1 (Netherlands)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  8. An introduction to finite projective planes

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Abraham Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Geared toward both beginning and advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this self-contained treatment offers an elementary approach to finite projective planes. Following a review of the basics of projective geometry, the text examines finite planes, field planes, and coordinates in an arbitrary plane. Additional topics include central collineations and the little Desargues' property, the fundamental theorem, and examples of finite non-Desarguesian planes.Virtually no knowledge or sophistication on the part of the student is assumed, and every algebraic system that arises is defined and

  9. Electrical machine analysis using finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    OUTLINE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDSVector AnalysisElectromagnetic FieldsFundamental Equations SummaryReferencesBASIC PRINCIPLES OF FINITE ELEMENT METHODSIntroductionField Problems with Boundary ConditionsClassical Method for the Field Problem SolutionThe Classical Residual Method (Galerkin's Method)The Classical Variational Method (Rayleigh-Ritz's Method)The Finite Element MethodReferencesAPPLICATIONS OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO TWO-DIMENSIONAL FIELDSIntroductionLinear Interpolation of the Function fApplication of the Variational MethodSimple Descriptions of Electromagnetic FieldsAppendix: I

  10. The theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Rédei, L; Stark, M; Gravett, K A H

    1966-01-01

    The Theory of Finitely Generated Commutative Semigroups describes a theory of finitely generated commutative semigroups which is founded essentially on a single """"fundamental theorem"""" and exhibits resemblance in many respects to the algebraic theory of numbers. The theory primarily involves the investigation of the F-congruences (F is the the free semimodule of the rank n, where n is a given natural number). As applications, several important special cases are given. This volume is comprised of five chapters and begins with preliminaries on finitely generated commutative semigroups before

  11. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  12. Finite element methods a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whiteley, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical applications of the finite element method to general differential equations. The underlying strategy of deriving the finite element solution is introduced using linear ordinary differential equations, thus allowing the basic concepts of the finite element solution to be introduced without being obscured by the additional mathematical detail required when applying this technique to partial differential equations. The author generalizes the presented approach to partial differential equations which include nonlinearities. The book also includes variations of the finite element method such as different classes of meshes and basic functions. Practical application of the theory is emphasised, with development of all concepts leading ultimately to a description of their computational implementation illustrated using Matlab functions. The target audience primarily comprises applied researchers and practitioners in engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  13. A finite element solution of transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, K. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of finite elements is explored in a field in which its use has previously not been deemed very feasible, that of transonic flow. The specific problem chosen is that of steady small-disturbance transonic flow. The nonlinear equations are formulated with an artificial viscosity term added to yield the proper domain of dependence and directional bias in supersonic regions and across imbedded shock waves. Justification is given for the problem and means of solution chosen, and the potential advantages of the finite element procedure over standard finite difference procedures are discussed. Several possible improvements on the method as presently derived are stated. Computational mesh requirements and certain mesh variations are described. Some results equivalent to finite difference calculations are given as a sample solution.

  14. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  15. Multigrid methods for mortar finite elements

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlmuth, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Multigrid methods for mortar finite elements / R. Krause ; B. Wohlmuth. - In: Multigrid methods VI / Erik Dick ... (ed.). - Berlin u.a. : Springer, 2000. - S. 136-142 (Lecture notes in computational science and engineering ; 14)

  16. Jauch-Piron logics with finiteness conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalewicz, Vladimír

    1991-04-01

    We show that there are no non-Boolean block-finite orthomodular posets possessing a unital set of Jauch-Piron states. Thus, an orthomodular poset representing a quantum physical system must have infinitely many blocks.

  17. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...

  18. Deterministic equation solving over finite fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestijne, Christiaan Evert van de

    2006-01-01

    It is shown how to solve diagonal forms in many variables over finite fields by means of a deterministic efficient algorithm. Applications to norm equations, quadratic forms, and elliptic curves are given.

  19. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  20. Super-renormalizable and finite gravitational theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Modesto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We hereby introduce and extensively study a class of non-polynomial higher derivative theories of gravity that realize a ultraviolet (UV completion of Einstein general relativity. These theories are unitary (ghost free and at most only one-loop divergences survive. The outcome is a class of theories super-renormalizable in even dimension and finite in odd dimension. Moreover, we explicitly prove in D=4 that there exists an extension of the theory that is completely finite and all the beta functions vanish even at one-loop. These results can be easily extended in extra dimensions and it is likely that the higher dimensional theory can be made finite, too. Therefore we have the possibility for “finite quantum gravity” in any dimension.

  1. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa (tensile) and minimum value of ... These results shows that the residual stresses obtained by prediction from the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Chiral crossover transition in a finite volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Jia, Wenbao; Sun, An; Zhang, Liping; Zong, Hongshi

    2018-02-01

    Finite volume effects on the chiral crossover transition of strong interactions at finite temperature are studied by solving the quark gap equation within a cubic volume of finite size L. With the anti-periodic boundary condition, our calculation shows the chiral quark condensate, which characterizes the strength of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, decreases as L decreases below 2.5 fm. We further study the finite volume effects on the pseudo-transition temperature {T}{{c}} of the crossover, showing a significant decrease in {T}{{c}} as L decreases below 3 fm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475085, 11535005, 11690030, 51405027), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (020414380074), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M591808) and Open Research Foundation of State Key Lab. of Digital Manufacturing Equipment & Technology in Huazhong University of Science & Technology (DMETKF2015015)

  3. Discrete mechanics Based on Finite Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing-bo; Guo, Han-Ying; Wu, Ke

    2002-01-01

    Discrete Mechanics based on finite element methods is presented in this paper. We also explore the relationship between this discrete mechanics and Veselov discrete mechanics. High order discretizations are constructed in terms of high order interpolations.

  4. Critical-Point Structure in Finite Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Properties of quantum shape-phase transitions in finite nuclei are considered in the framework of the interacting boson model. Special emphasis is paid to the dynamics at the critical-point of a general first-order phase transition

  5. Quantiles for Finite Mixtures of Normal Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mezbahur; Rahman, Rumanur; Pearson, Larry M.

    2006-01-01

    Quantiles for finite mixtures of normal distributions are computed. The difference between a linear combination of independent normal random variables and a linear combination of independent normal densities is emphasized. (Contains 3 tables and 1 figure.)

  6. ANSYS mechanical APDL for finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    ANSYS Mechanical APDL for Finite Element Analysis provides a hands-on introduction to engineering analysis using one of the most powerful commercial general purposes finite element programs on the market. Students will find a practical and integrated approach that combines finite element theory with best practices for developing, verifying, validating and interpreting the results of finite element models, while engineering professionals will appreciate the deep insight presented on the program's structure and behavior. Additional topics covered include an introduction to commands, input files, batch processing, and other advanced features in ANSYS. The book is written in a lecture/lab style, and each topic is supported by examples, exercises and suggestions for additional readings in the program documentation. Exercises gradually increase in difficulty and complexity, helping readers quickly gain confidence to independently use the program. This provides a solid foundation on which to build, preparing readers...

  7. Mean field canonical treatments at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossignoli, R.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed to make mean field and higher order canonical treatments at finite temperature. Definite improvements are made over the usual Hartree-Fock thermal (great canonical) treatment. (Author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  8. Finite elements in CAD and ADINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathe, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of finite element methods in computer-aided-design - CAD - is discussed. Some current capabilities are presented and important future developments are outlined. The discussion focusses on the use of the ADINA program in CAD applications. (orig.)

  9. The finite-difference and finite-element modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moszo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.; Pazak, P.; Balazovijech, M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion is an irreplaceable tool in investigation of the Earth's structure, processes in the Earth, and particularly earthquake phenomena. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is the dominant method in the modeling of earthquake motion. Moreover, it is becoming more important in the seismic exploration and structural modeling. At the same time we are convinced that the best time of the finite-difference method in seismology is in the future. This monograph provides tutorial and detailed introduction to the application of the finite-difference, finite-element, and hybrid finite-difference-finite-element methods to the modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion. The text does not cover all topics and aspects of the methods. We focus on those to which we have contributed. (Author)

  10. Finite element approximation of the Isaacs equation

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, Abner J.; Zhang, Wujun

    2015-01-01

    We propose and analyze a two-scale finite element method for the Isaacs equation. The fine scale is given by the mesh size $h$ whereas the coarse scale $\\varepsilon$ is dictated by an integro-differential approximation of the partial differential equation. We show that the method satisfies the discrete maximum principle provided that the mesh is weakly acute. This, in conjunction with weak operator consistency of the finite element method, allows us to establish convergence of the numerical s...

  11. Finite Element Model of Gear Induction Hardening

    OpenAIRE

    Hodek, J; Zemko, M; Shykula, P

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a finite element model of a gear induction hardening process. The gear was surface-heated by an induction coil and quickly cooled by spraying water. The finite element model was developed as a three-dimensional model. The electromagnetic field, temperature field, stress distribution and microstructure distribution were examined. Temperature and microstructural characteristics were measured and used. The gear material data was obtained in part by mea...

  12. Generators for finite depth subfactor planar algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The main result of Kodiyalam and Tupurani [3] shows that a subfactor planar algebra of finite depth is singly generated with a finite presentation. If P is a subfactor planar algebra of depth k, it is shown there that a single 2k-box generates P. It is natural to ask what the smallest s is such that a single s-box generates P. While ...

  13. The finite element method in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    A new edition of the leading textbook on the finite element method, incorporating major advancements and further applications in the field of electromagnetics The finite element method (FEM) is a powerful simulation technique used to solve boundary-value problems in a variety of engineering circumstances. It has been widely used for analysis of electromagnetic fields in antennas, radar scattering, RF and microwave engineering, high-speed/high-frequency circuits, wireless communication, electromagnetic compatibility, photonics, remote sensing, biomedical engineering, and space exploration. The

  14. Finite Optimal Stopping Problems: The Seller's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mehdi; Smith, J. Cole

    2011-01-01

    We consider a version of an optimal stopping problem, in which a customer is presented with a finite set of items, one by one. The customer is aware of the number of items in the finite set and the minimum and maximum possible value of each item, and must purchase exactly one item. When an item is presented to the customer, she or he observes its…

  15. Surgery simulation using fast finite elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes our recent work on real-time surgery simulation using fast finite element models of linear elasticity. In addition, we discuss various improvements in terms of speed and realism......This paper describes our recent work on real-time surgery simulation using fast finite element models of linear elasticity. In addition, we discuss various improvements in terms of speed and realism...

  16. Thomas Fermi model of finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, J.; Rafelski, J.

    1977-01-01

    A relativistic Thomas-Fermi model of finite-nuclei is considered. The effective nuclear interaction is mediated by exchanges of isoscalar scalar and vector mesons. The authors include also a self-interaction of the scalar meson field and the Coulomb repulsion of the protons. The parameters of the model are constrained by the average nuclear properties. The Thomas-Fermi equations are solved numerically for finite, stable nuclei. The particular case of 208 82 Pb is considered in more detail. (Auth.)

  17. On finitely strained magnetoelastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankanala, Sundeep Venkat

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are a class of magnetoelastic solids whose mechanical properties can be altered by the application of magnetic fields. MREs, which are particle filled elastomers, have been developed and proposed as unique solutions for a number of engineering applications, such as tunable engine and chassis mounts in automobiles. In this dissertation we present a study of the magnetoelastic coupling in finitely deformable MREs. Two different continuum formulations for these solids are presented: an Eulerian based direct approach using the second law of thermodynamics plus the conservation laws of mechanics and a new, Lagrangian type formulation based on the unconstrained minimization of a potential energy functional. It is shown that both approaches yield the same governing equations and boundary conditions. Following a discussion of general properties of the free energy function of MREs, a particular such function is used to illustrate the magnetoelastic coupling phenomena in a cylinder subjected to traction or torsion under the presence of external magnetic fields. Motivated by the classical magnetoelastic buckling problem, the general theory is then applied to the solution of the stability of a rectangular block subjected to a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its longitudinal axis. The variational approach employed utilizes an unconstrained energy minimization. The analytical solution for the critical buckling fields for both the anti-symmetric and symmetric modes are obtained for three different constitutive laws. The corresponding result for beams is extracted asymptotically for a special material and the solution is compared to previously published results. The last part of this work delves into the constitutive modeling of MBEs. Uniaxial experiments are conducted to study the effect of particle chain orientation on the magnetostriction and magnetization responses of an MRE for different levels of compressive and tensile

  18. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  19. A Comparison of Continuous Mass-lumped Finite Elements and Finite Differences for 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.; Kononov, A.; Mulder, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    The finite-difference method is widely used for time-domain modelling of the wave equation because of its ease of implementation of high-order spatial discretization schemes, parallelization and computational efficiency. However, finite elements on tetrahedral meshes are more accurate in complex

  20. A matrix free, partitioned solution of fluid-structure interaction problems using finite volume and finite element methods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully-coupled partitioned finite volume–finite volume and hybrid finite volume–finite element fluid-structure interaction scheme is presented. The fluid domain is modelled as a viscous incompressible isothermal region governed by the Navier...

  1. Finite element analysis of tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian Nai En; Mikkelsen, Mikkel Peter W; Hansen, Leif Berner

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fractures of the tibial shaft are relatively common injuries. There are indications that tibial shaft fractures share characteristics in terms of site, type and local fracture mechanisms. In this study, we aimed to set up a mathematical, computer-based model using finite element...... of bony healing. The biomechanical results are the basis for fracture healing, biomechanical fall analysis and stability analysis of osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A finite element model of the bony part of the lower leg was generated on the basis of computed tomography data from the Visible Human...... Project. The data consisted of 21,219 3D elements with a cortical shell and a trabecular core. Three types of load of torsion, a direct lateral load and axial compression were applied. RESULTS: The finite element linear static analysis resulted in relevant fracture localizations and indicated relevant...

  2. Centralizers in simple locally finite groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Kuzucuoğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey article on centralizers of finitesubgroups in locally finite, simple groups or LFS-groups as wewill call them. We mention some of the open problems aboutcentralizers of subgroups in LFS-groups and applications of theknown information about the centralizers of subgroups to thestructure of the locally finite group. We also prove thefollowing: Let $G$ be a countably infinite non-linear LFS-groupwith a Kegel sequence $mathcal{K}={(G_i,N_i | iinmathbf{N} }$. If there exists an upper bound for ${ |N_i| |iin mathbf{N} }$, then for any finite semisimplesubgroup $F$ in $G$ the subgroup $C_G(F$ has elements oforder $p_i$ for infinitely many distinct prime $p_i$. Inparticular $C_G(F$ is an infinite group. This answers Hartley'squestion provided that there exists a bound on ${ |N_i| | iin mathbf{N}$.

  3. Geometrically unfitted finite element methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Burman, Erik; Larson, Mats; Olshanskii, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a snapshot of the state of the art of the rapidly evolving field of integration of geometric data in finite element computations. The contributions to this volume, based on research presented at the UCL workshop on the topic in January 2016, include three review papers on core topics such as fictitious domain methods for elasticity, trace finite element methods for partial differential equations defined on surfaces, and Nitsche’s method for contact problems. Five chapters present original research articles on related theoretical topics, including Lagrange multiplier methods, interface problems, bulk-surface coupling, and approximation of partial differential equations on moving domains. Finally, two chapters discuss advanced applications such as crack propagation or flow in fractured poroelastic media. This is the first volume that provides a comprehensive overview of the field of unfitted finite element methods, including recent techniques such as cutFEM, traceFEM, ghost penalty, and aug...

  4. Essentially finitely indecomposable QTAG-Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alveera Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A right module $M$ over an associative ring with unity is a $QTAG$-module if every finitely generated submodule of any homomorphic image of $M$ is a direct sum of uniserial modules. There are many fascinating results related to these modules and essentially indecomposable modules are extensively researched. Motivated by these modules we generalize them as essentially finitely indecomposable modules whose every direct decomposition $M=\\bigoplus\\limits_{k\\in I} M_k$ implies that there exists a positive integer $n$ such that $H_n(M_i=0$ for all $M_i$'s except for a finite number of $M_i$'s. Here we investigate these modules and their relationship with $HT$-modules. The cases when the modules are not $HT$-modules are especially highlighted.

  5. Shear sum rules at finite chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Justin R.; Jain, Sachin; Thakur, Somyadip

    2012-03-01

    We derive sum rules which constrain the spectral density corresponding to the retarded propagator of the T xy component of the stress tensor for three gravitational duals. The shear sum rule is obtained for the gravitational dual of the mathcal{N} = {4} Yang-Mills, theory of the M2-branes and M5-branes all at finite chemical potential. We show that at finite chemical potential there are additional terms in the sum rule which involve the chemical potential. These modifications are shown to be due to the presence of scalars in the operator product expansion of the stress tensor which have non-trivial vacuum expectation values at finite chemical potential.

  6. Visualizing higher order finite elements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David C; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elements into regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which the algorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomial approximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analytical solution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and momentum. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate. Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and these coefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of freedom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution. Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increasing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number of finite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some types of simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedom than increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation has determined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools do not exist for visual inspection of the solution. This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finite element simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicial regions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. The requirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the places where the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacing algorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.

  7. Electron–phonon coupling from finite differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2018-02-01

    The interaction between electrons and phonons underlies multiple phenomena in physics, chemistry, and materials science. Examples include superconductivity, electronic transport, and the temperature dependence of optical spectra. A first-principles description of electron–phonon coupling enables the study of the above phenomena with accuracy and material specificity, which can be used to understand experiments and to predict novel effects and functionality. In this topical review, we describe the first-principles calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences. The finite differences approach provides several advantages compared to alternative methods, in particular (i) any underlying electronic structure method can be used, and (ii) terms beyond the lowest order in the electron–phonon interaction can be readily incorporated. But these advantages are associated with a large computational cost that has until recently prevented the widespread adoption of this method. We describe some recent advances, including nondiagonal supercells and thermal lines, that resolve these difficulties, and make the calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences a powerful tool. We review multiple applications of the calculation of electron–phonon coupling from finite differences, including the temperature dependence of optical spectra, superconductivity, charge transport, and the role of defects in semiconductors. These examples illustrate the advantages of finite differences, with cases where semilocal density functional theory is not appropriate for the calculation of electron–phonon coupling and many-body methods such as the GW approximation are required, as well as examples in which higher-order terms in the electron–phonon interaction are essential for an accurate description of the relevant phenomena. We expect that the finite difference approach will play a central role in future studies of the electron–phonon interaction.

  8. Finite continuum quasi distributions from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2018-03-01

    We present a new approach to extracting continuum quasi distributions from lattice QCD. Quasi distributions are defined by matrix elements of a Wilson-line operator extended in a spatial direction, evaluated between nucleon states at finite momentum. We propose smearing this extended operator with the gradient flow to render the corresponding matrix elements finite in the continuum limit. This procedure provides a nonperturbative method to remove the power-divergence associated with the Wilson line and the resulting matrix elements can be directly matched to light-front distributions via perturbation theory.

  9. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  10. Finite elements for analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Akin, J E; Davenport, J H

    1994-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is an analysis tool for problem-solving used throughout applied mathematics, engineering, and scientific computing. Finite Elements for Analysis and Design provides a thoroughlyrevised and up-to-date account of this important tool and its numerous applications, with added emphasis on basic theory. Numerous worked examples are included to illustrate the material.Key Features* Akin clearly explains the FEM, a numerical analysis tool for problem-solving throughout applied mathematics, engineering and scientific computing* Basic theory has bee

  11. Finite W-algebras and intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarin, F.; Ragoucy, E.; Sorba, P.

    1994-09-01

    New realizations of finite W-algebras are constructed by relaxing the usual conditions. Then finite W-algebras are recognized in the Heisenberg quantization recently proposed by Leinaas and Myrheim, for a system of two identical particles in d dimensions. As the anyonic parameter is directly associated to the W-algebra involved in the d=1 case, it is natural to consider that the W-algebra framework is well adapted for a possible generalization of the anyon statistics. (author). 13 refs

  12. Quadrature representation of finite element variational forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Kristian Breum; Wells, Garth N.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter addresses the conventional run-time quadrature approach for the numerical integration of local element tensors associated with finite element variational forms, and in particular automated optimizations that can be performed to reduce the number of floating point operations. An alter......This chapter addresses the conventional run-time quadrature approach for the numerical integration of local element tensors associated with finite element variational forms, and in particular automated optimizations that can be performed to reduce the number of floating point operations...

  13. On p-supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supersolvability; p-nilpotency; weakly τ-embedded subgroups. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification. 20D10, 20D20. 1. Introduction. Throughout the paper, all groups are finite. Recall that a subgroup H of a group G is said to permute with a subgroup ...

  14. Finite difference order doubling in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Centre, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Jolicard, Georges [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut Utinam (UMR CNRS 6213), Observatoire de Besancon, 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP1615, 25010 Besancon cedex (France)

    2008-03-28

    An order doubling process previously used to obtain eighth-order eigenvalues from the fourth-order Numerov method is applied to the perturbed oscillator in two dimensions. A simple method of obtaining high order finite difference operators is reported and an odd parity boundary condition is found to be effective in facilitating the smooth operation of the order doubling process.

  15. Flexural vibrations of finite composite poroelastic cylinders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    infinite hollow poroelastic cylinders. Axially symmetric vibrations of finite composite poroe- lastic cylinders that are bonded end to end are investigated by Shah & Tajuddin (2009). The analysis of the flexural vibrations in cylindrical structures has wide applications in the field of acoustics structural design and Biomechanics, ...

  16. Finite Algorithms for Robust Linear Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Nielsen, Hans Bruun

    1990-01-01

    The Huber M-estimator for robust linear regression is analyzed. Newton type methods for solution of the problem are defined and analyzed, and finite convergence is proved. Numerical experiments with a large number of test problems demonstrate efficiency and indicate that this kind of approach may...

  17. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    complemented in G. In 1998, Ballester-Bolinches and Pedraza-Aguilera [2] introduced. S-quasinormally embedded ... concept of M-supplemented subgroups and characterized the structure of finite groups by ... A subgroup H of a group G is said to be M∗-supplemented in G if there exists a subgroup. K of G such that G = HK ...

  18. A Note on Powers in Finite Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2016-01-01

    The study of solutions to polynomial equations over finite fields has a long history in mathematics and is an interesting area of contemporary research. In recent years, the subject has found important applications in the modelling of problems from applied mathematical fields such as signal analysis, system theory, coding theory and cryptology. In…

  19. The Finite Lamplighter Groups: A Guided Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siehler, Jacob A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a family of finite groups, which provide excellent examples of the basic concepts of group theory. To work out the center, conjuagacy classes, and commutators of these groups, all that's required is a bit of linear algebra.

  20. Finite element analysis of photonic crystal fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Hoekstra, Hugo; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    2005-01-01

    A finite-element-based vectorial optical mode solver, furnished with Bayliss-Gunzburger-Turkel-like transparent boundary conditions, is used to rigorously analyze photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). Both the real and imaginary part of the modal indices can be computed in a relatively small computational

  1. Finite element simulation of asphalt fatigue testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per; Kieler, Thomas Lau; Kargo, Anders

    1997-01-01

    damage mechanics.The paper describes how continuum damage mechanics may be used with a finite element program to explain the progressive deterioration of asphalt mixes under laboratory fatigue testing. Both constant stress and constant strain testing are simulated, and compared to the actual results from...

  2. Legendre Elliptic Curves over Finite Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auer, Roland; Top, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    We show that every elliptic curve over a finite field of odd characteristic whose number of rational points is divisible by 4 is isogenous to an elliptic curve in Legendre form, with the sole exception of a minimal respectively maximal elliptic curve. We also collect some results concerning the

  3. On partially saturated formations of finite groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Calvo, Clara; Shemetkov, L A

    2007-01-01

    Various types of partially saturated formations and connections between them are considered. It is shown that partially saturated formations can be characterized as classes of finite groups with generalized central series. A theorem on the decomposition of an FG-module into a sum of two submodules with special properties is proved. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  4. Thermoelectric properties of finite graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the electronic and thermal transport properties of graphene antidot lattices with a finite length along the transport direction. The calculations are based on the π-tight-binding model and the Brenner potential. We show that both electronic and thermal transport...

  5. The geometry of finite equilibrium sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...

  6. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of solidification process is complex in nature and the simulation of such process is required in industry before it is actually undertaken. Finite element method is used to simulate the heat transfer process accompanying the solidification process. The metal and the mould along with the air gap formation is ...

  7. Finite-size effects from giant magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Gleb [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: g.arutyunov@phys.uu.nl; Frolov, Sergey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: frolovs@aei.mpg.de; Zamaklar, Marija [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marzam@aei.mpg.de

    2007-08-27

    In order to analyze finite-size effects for the gauge-fixed string sigma model on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}, we construct one-soliton solutions carrying finite angular momentum J. In the infinite J limit the solutions reduce to the recently constructed one-magnon configuration of Hofman and Maldacena. The solutions do not satisfy the level-matching condition and hence exhibit a dependence on the gauge choice, which however disappears as the size J is taken to infinity. Interestingly, the solutions do not conserve all the global charges of the psu(2,2-vertical bar4) algebra of the sigma model, implying that the symmetry algebra of the gauge-fixed string sigma model is different from psu(2,2-vertical bar4) for finite J, once one gives up the level-matching condition. The magnon dispersion relation exhibits exponential corrections with respect to the infinite J solution. We also find a generalisation of our one-magnon configuration to a solution carrying two charges on the sphere. We comment on the possible implications of our findings for the existence of the Bethe ansatz describing the spectrum of strings carrying finite charges.

  8. The Finite Embeddability Property for Residuated Groupoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haniková, Zuzana; Horčík, Rostislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-13 ISSN 0002-5240 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/11/1632 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : residuated groupoid * distributive lattice * finite embeddability property Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.442, year: 2014

  9. Adsorption of Lithium on Finite Graphitic Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Cabria, I.; Lopez, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The apparent discrepancies between density functional (DFT) and Moller-Plesset (MP2) calculations for the interaction of lithium with graphene recently pointed out by Ferre-Vilaplana (J. Phys. Chem. C 2008, 112, 3998) are discussed. In his calculations, this author used a finite coronene cluster, C...

  10. Fast finite elements for surgery simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses volumetric deformable models for modeling human body parts and organs in surgery simulation systems. These models are built using finite element models for linear elastic materials. To achieve real-time response condensation has been applied to the system stiffness matrix...

  11. Finite Feedback Cycling in Structural Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayduk, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    In models containing reciprocal effects, or longer causal loops, the usual effect estimates assume that any effect touching a loop initiates an infinite cycling of effects around that loop. The real world, in contrast, might permit only finite feedback cycles. I use a simple hypothetical model to demonstrate that if the world permits only a few…

  12. Galerkin finite element methods for wave problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    these methods. Keywords. hp-Finite element method; continuous Galerkin methods; wave solutions; Gibbs' phenomenon. 1. Introduction. Galerkin methods belong to the class of solution methods for PDEs where the solution residue is minimized giving rise to the well-known weak formulation of problems. In this approach,.

  13. Equivalent drawbead model in finite element simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carleer, Bart D.; Carleer, B.D.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han; Lee, J.K.; Kinzel, G.L.; Wagoner, R.

    1996-01-01

    In 3D simulations of the deep drawing process the drawbead geometries are seldom included. Therefore equivalent drawbeads are used. In order to investigate the drawbead behaviour a 2D plane strain finite element model was used. For verification of this model experiments were performed. The analyses

  14. Effective permittivity of finite inhomogeneous objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghunathan, S.B.; Budko, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    A generalization of the S-parameter retrieval method for finite three-dimensional inhomogeneous objects under arbitrary illumination and observation conditions is presented. The effective permittivity of such objects may be rigorously defined as a solution of a nonlinear inverse scattering problem.

  15. On higher order pyramidal finite elements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, L.; Davies, K.B.; Křížek, Michal; Guan, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2011), s. 131-140 ISSN 2070-0733 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : pyramidal polynomial basis functions * finite element method * composite elements * three-dimensional mortar elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.750, year: 2011

  16. The circle equation over finite fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2017-01-01

    Interesting patterns in the geometry of a plane algebraic curve C can be observed when the defining polynomial equation is solved over the family of finite fields. In this paper, we examine the case of C the classical unit circle defined by the circle equation x2 + y2 = 1. As a main result, we es...

  17. Restricted Schur polynomials and finite N counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Storm

    2009-01-01

    Restricted Schur polynomials have been posited as orthonormal operators for the change of basis from N=4 SYM to type IIB string theory. In this paper we briefly expound the relationship between the restricted Schur polynomials and the operators forwarded by Brown, Heslop, and Ramgoolam. We then briefly examine the finite N counting of the restricted Schur polynomials.

  18. A Ring Construction Using Finite Directed Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardzell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an interesting class of noncommutative rings which can be constructed using finite directed graphs. This construction also creates a vector space. These structures provide undergraduate students connections between ring theory and graph theory and, among other things, allow them to see a ring unity element that looks quite…

  19. Finite Cycle Gibbs Measures on Permutations of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz, Inés; Ferrari, Pablo A.; Groisman, Pablo; Leonardi, Florencia

    2015-03-01

    We consider Gibbs distributions on the set of permutations of associated to the Hamiltonian , where is a permutation and is a strictly convex potential. Call finite-cycle those permutations composed by finite cycles only. We give conditions on ensuring that for large enough temperature there exists a unique infinite volume ergodic Gibbs measure concentrating mass on finite-cycle permutations; this measure is equal to the thermodynamic limit of the specifications with identity boundary conditions. We construct as the unique invariant measure of a Markov process on the set of finite-cycle permutations that can be seen as a loss-network, a continuous-time birth and death process of cycles interacting by exclusion, an approach proposed by Fernández, Ferrari and Garcia. Define as the shift permutation . In the Gaussian case , we show that for each , given by is an ergodic Gibbs measure equal to the thermodynamic limit of the specifications with boundary conditions. For a general potential , we prove the existence of Gibbs measures when is bigger than some -dependent value.

  20. Finiteness of PST self-dual models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Cima, Oswaldo M.; Piguet, Olivier; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2000-12-01

    The Pasti-Sorokin-Tonin model for describing chiral forms is considered at the quantum level. We study the ultraviolet and infrared behaviour of the model in two, four and six dimensions in the framework of algebraic renormalization. The absence of anomalies, as well as the finiteness, up to non-physical renormalizations, are shown in all dimensions analyzed. (author)

  1. Simplicial Finite Elements in Higher Dimensions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brandts, J.; Korotov, S.; Křížek, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 251-265 ISSN 0862-7940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/04/1503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : n-simplex * finite element method * superconvergence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  2. Counting Subspaces of a Finite Vector Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 11. Counting Subspaces of a Finite Vector Space – 1. Amritanshu Prasad. General Article Volume 15 Issue 11 November 2010 pp 977-987. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Chiral symmetry breaking in finite quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, J.C.; Pleitez, V.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamical breakdown of chiral symmetry in a finite Abelian gauge theory using a variational approach for the effective potential for composite operators is discussed. It is shown that, at least in a variational approach, the fermion either remains massless or gets a dynamical mass for every non-zero coupling constant. (Author) [pt

  4. Regular Event Structures and Finite Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Thiagarajan, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    We present the notion of regular event structures and conjecture that they correspond exactly to finite 1-safe Petri nets. We show that the conjecture holds for the conflict-free case. Even in this restricted setting, the proof is non-trivial and involves a natural subclass of regular event...

  5. Finite element, discontinuous Galerkin, and finite difference evolution schemes in spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumbusch, G

    2009-01-01

    Numerical schemes for Einstein's vacuum equation are developed. Einstein's equation in harmonic gauge is second-order symmetric hyperbolic. It is discretized in four-dimensional spacetime by finite differences, finite elements and interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin methods, the latter being related to Regge calculus. The schemes are split into space and time and new time-stepping schemes for wave equations are derived. The methods are evaluated for linear and nonlinear test problems of the Apples-with-Apples collection.

  6. Robust mixed finite element methods to deal with incompressibility in finite strain in an industrial framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Akhrass, Dina

    2014-01-01

    Simulations in solid mechanics exhibit several difficulties, as dealing with incompressibility, with nonlinearities due to finite strains, contact laws, or constitutive laws. The basic motivation of our work is to propose efficient finite element methods capable of dealing with incompressibility in finite strain context, and using elements of low order. During the three last decades, many approaches have been proposed in the literature to overcome the incompressibility problem. Among them, mixed formulations offer an interesting theoretical framework. In this work, a three-field mixed formulation (displacement, pressure, volumetric strain) is investigated. In some cases, this formulation can be condensed in a two-field (displacement - pressure) mixed formulation. However, it is well-known that the discrete problem given by the Galerkin finite element technique, does not inherit the 'inf-sup' stability condition from the continuous problem. Hence, the interpolation orders in displacement and pressure have to be chosen in a way to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska stability conditions when using Galerkin approaches. Interpolation orders must be chosen so as to satisfy this condition. Two possibilities are considered: to use stable finite element satisfying this requirement, or to use finite element that does not satisfy this condition, and to add terms stabilizing the FE Galerkin formulation. The latter approach allows the use of equal order interpolation. In this work, stable finite element P2/P1 and P2/P1/P1 are used as reference, and compared to P1/P1 and P1/P1/P1 formulations stabilized with a bubble function or with a VMS method (Variational Multi-Scale) based on a sub-grid-space orthogonal to the FE space. A finite strain model based on logarithmic strain is selected. This approach is extended to three and two field mixed formulations with stable or stabilized elements. These approaches are validated on academic cases and used on industrial cases. (author)

  7. Comparison study of finite element and basis set methods for finite size scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antillon, Edwin; Moy, Winton; Wei Qi; Kais, Sabre

    2009-01-01

    We compare two methods of obtaining critical parameters for a quantum Hamiltonian using a finite size scaling approach. A finite element and basis set method were used in conjunction with the finite size scaling to obtain the critical parameters for the Hulthen potential. The critical parameters obtained analytically were the coupling constant λ c =(1/2), the critical exponents for the energy α=2 and for the 'correlation length 'ν=1. The extrapolated results for finite size scaling with the basis set method are λ c =0.499 99, α=1.9960, and ν=0.999 10. The results for the finite element solutions are λ c =0.501 84, α=1.999 93, and ν=1.000 79 for the linear interpolation and λ c =0.500 00, α=2.000 11, and ν=1.000 32 for the Hermite interpolation. The results for each method compare very well with the analytical results obtained for the Hulthen potential. However, the finite element method is easier to implement and may be combined with ab initio and density functional theory to obtain quantum critical parameters for more complex systems.

  8. Finite element modeling for materials engineers using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Oluwole, Oluleke

    2014-01-01

    Finite Element Modeling for Materials Engineers Using MATLAB® combines the finite element method with MATLAB to offer materials engineers a fast and code-free way of modeling for many materials processes.

  9. Finite Element Based Design and Optimization for Piezoelectric Accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bin; Kriegbaum, B.; Yao, Q.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic Finite Element design and optimisation procedure is implemented for the development of piezoelectric accelerometers. Most of the specifications of accelerometers can be obtained using the Finite Element simulations. The deviations between the simulated and calibrated sensitivities...

  10. Two inquiries about finite groups and well-behaved quotients

    OpenAIRE

    Blum-Smith, Ben

    2018-01-01

    This thesis addresses questions in representation and invariant theory of finite groups. The first concerns singularities of quotient spaces under actions of finite groups. We introduce a class of finite groups such that the quotients have at worst abelian quotient singularities. We prove that supersolvable groups belong to this class and show that nonabelian finite simple groups do not belong to it. The second question concerns the Cohen-Macaulayness of the invariant ring $\\mathbb{Z}[x_1,\\do...

  11. Finite Automata Based on Quantum Logic and Their Determinization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongming

    2007-01-01

    We give the quantum subset construction of orthomodular lattice-valued finite automata, then we show the equivalence between orthomodular lattice-valued finite automata, orthomodular lattice-valued deterministic finite automata and orthomodular lattice-valued finite automata with empty string-moves. Based on these equivalences, we study the algebraic operations on orthomodular lattice-valued regular languages, then we establish Kleene theorem in the frame of quantum logic.

  12. Error-controlled adaptive finite elements in solid mechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Erwin; Ramm, E

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error-controlled Adaptive Finite-element-methods . . . . . . . . . . . . Missing Features and Properties of Today's General Purpose FE Programs for Structural...

  13. Algebraic coding theory over finite commutative rings

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Steven T

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a self-contained introduction to algebraic coding theory over finite Frobenius rings. It is the first to offer a comprehensive account on the subject. Coding theory has its origins in the engineering problem of effective electronic communication where the alphabet is generally the binary field. Since its inception, it has grown as a branch of mathematics, and has since been expanded to consider any finite field, and later also Frobenius rings, as its alphabet. This book presents a broad view of the subject as a branch of pure mathematics and relates major results to other fields, including combinatorics, number theory and ring theory. Suitable for graduate students, the book will be of interest to anyone working in the field of coding theory, as well as algebraists and number theorists looking to apply coding theory to their own work.

  14. Topology optimization using the finite volume method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computational procedures for topology optimization of continuum problems using a material distribution method are typically based on the application of the finite element method (FEM) (see, e.g. [1]). In the present work we study a computational framework based on the finite volume method (FVM, see......, e.g. [2]) in order to develop methods for topology design for applications where conservation laws are critical such that element--wise conservation in the discretized models has a high priority. This encompasses problems involving for example mass and heat transport. The work described...... in this presentation is focused on a prototype model for topology optimization of steady heat diffusion. This allows for a study of the basic ingredients in working with FVM methods when dealing with topology optimization problems. The FVM and FEM based formulations differ both in how one computes the design...

  15. Blocks of finite groups and their invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Sambale, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Providing a nearly complete selection of up-to-date methods and results on block invariants with respect to their defect groups, this book covers the classical theory pioneered by Brauer, the modern theory of fusion systems introduced by Puig, the geometry of numbers developed by Minkowski, the classification of finite simple groups, and various computer assisted methods. In a powerful combination, these tools are applied to solve many special cases of famous open conjectures in the representation theory of finite groups. Most of the material is drawn from peer-reviewed journal articles, but there are also new previously unpublished results. In order to make the text self-contained, detailed proofs are given whenever possible. Several tables add to the text's usefulness as a reference. The book is aimed at experts in group theory or representation theory who may wish to make use of the presented ideas in their research.

  16. Effect of finite β on stellarator transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1984-04-01

    A theory of the modification of stellarator transport due to the presence of finite plasma pressure is developed, and applied to a range of stellarator configurations. For many configurations of interest, plasma transport can change by more than an order of magnitude in the progression from zero pressure to the equilibrium β limit of the device. Thus, a stellarator with transport-optimized vacuum fields can have poor confinement at the desired operating β. Without an external compensating field, increasing β tends to degrade confinement, unless the initial field structure is very carefully chosen. The theory permits one to correctly determine this vacuum structure, in terms of the desired structure of the field at a prescribed operating β. With a compensating external field, the deleterious effect of finite β on transport can be partially eliminated

  17. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  18. Multicomplementary operators via finite Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Andrei B; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L; Guise, Hubert de

    2005-01-01

    A complete set of d + 1 mutually unbiased bases exists in a Hilbert space of dimension d, whenever d is a power of a prime. We discuss a simple construction of d + 1 disjoint classes (each one having d - 1 commuting operators) such that the corresponding eigenstates form sets of unbiased bases. Such a construction works properly for prime dimension. We investigate an alternative construction in which the real numbers that label the classes are replaced by a finite field having d elements. One of these classes is diagonal, and can be mapped to cyclic operators by means of the finite Fourier transform, which allows one to understand complementarity in a similar way as for the position-momentum pair in standard quantum mechanics. The relevant examples of two and three qubits and two qutrits are discussed in detail

  19. On polynormality in finite solvable groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamadou Sadialiou Bah

    2003-05-01

    In the study of the arrangement of intermediate subgroups a wide use has been made of certain properties describing the way conjugacy classes of subgroups are embedded in the groups: abnormality, pronormality, paranormality, and their weak analogues. It was proved that pronormality and abnormality coincide with their weak analogues for solvable groups. This was a generalisation of known results of Peng and Taunt for finite solvable groups. In this paper we prove a conjecture of Borevich asserting a similar result for paranormality and polynormality (which is a sort of weak paranormality). Further we show that we get a stronger result when the given subgroup is nilpotent: In a finite solvable group any nilpotent polynormal subgroup is pronormal. (author)

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Cracks and Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Čížik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method to the analysis of discontinuous structural systems has received a considerable interest in recent years. Examples of problems in which discontinuities play a prominent role in the physical behaviour of a system are numerous and include various types of contact problems and layered or jointed systems. This paper gives a state-of-the-art report on the different methods developed to date for the finite element modelling of cracks and joints in discontinuous systems. Particular attention, however, has been given to the use of joint/interface elements, since their application is considered to be most appropriate for modelling of all kinds of discontinuities that may present in a structural system. A chronology of development of the main types of joint elements, including their pertinent characteristics, is also given. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual methods and types of joint elements presented are briefly discussed, together with various applications of interest.

  1. Solving hyperbolic equations with finite volume methods

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez-Cendón, M Elena

    2015-01-01

    Finite volume methods are used in numerous applications and by a broad multidisciplinary scientific community. The book communicates this important tool to students, researchers in training and academics involved in the training of students in different science and technology fields. The selection of content is based on the author’s experience giving PhD and master courses in different universities. In the book the introduction of new concepts and numerical methods go together with simple exercises, examples and applications that contribute to reinforce them. In addition, some of them involve the execution of MATLAB codes. The author promotes an understanding of common terminology with a balance between mathematical rigor and physical intuition that characterizes the origin of the methods. This book aims to be a first contact with finite volume methods. Once readers have studied it, they will be able to follow more specific bibliographical references and use commercial programs or open source software withi...

  2. Mathematics and computer science: coping with finiteness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, D E

    1976-12-11

    By presenting these examples, I have tried to illustrate four main points. 1) Finite numbers can be really enormous, and the known universe is very small. Therefore the distinction between finite and infinite is not as relevant as the distinction between realistic and unrealistic. 2) In many cases there are subtle ways to solve very large problems quickly, in spite of the fact that they appear at first to require examination of too many possibilities. 3) There are also cases where we can prove that a fairly natural problem is intrinsically hard, far beyond our conceivable capabilities. 4) It takes a good deal of skill to decide whether a given problem is in the easy or hard class; but even if a problem does turn out to be hard there are useful and interesting ways to change it into one that can be done satisfactorily.

  3. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature

  4. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  5. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S

    2002-03-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature.

  6. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  7. Finite element simulations with ANSYS workbench 16

    CERN Document Server

    Lee , Huei-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Finite Element Simulations with ANSYS Workbench 16 is a comprehensive and easy to understand workbook. It utilizes step-by-step instructions to help guide readers to learn finite element simulations. Twenty seven real world case studies are used throughout the book. Many of these cases are industrial or research projects the reader builds from scratch. All the files readers may need if they have trouble are available for download on the publishers website. Companion videos that demonstrate exactly how to preform each tutorial are available to readers by redeeming the access code that comes in the book. Relevant background knowledge is reviewed whenever necessary. To be efficient, the review is conceptual rather than mathematical. Key concepts are inserted whenever appropriate and summarized at the end of each chapter. Additional exercises or extension research problems are provided as homework at the end of each chapter. A learning approach emphasizing hands-on experiences spreads through this entire book. A...

  8. A finite element method for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    A completely boundary-free maximum principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation is derived from the completely boundary-free maximum principle for the mixed-parity Boltzmann equation. When continuity is imposed on the trial function for directions crossing interfaces the completely boundary-free principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation reduces to a maximum principle previously established directly from first principles and indirectly by the Euler-Lagrange method. Present finite element methods for the first-order Boltzmann equation are based on a weighted-residual method which permits the use of discontinuous trial functions. The new principle for the first-order equation can be used as a basis for finite-element methods with the same freedom from boundary conditions as those based on the weighted-residual method. The extremum principle as the parent of the variationally-derived weighted-residual equations ensures their good behaviour. (author)

  9. Finite element reliability analysis of fatigue life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, H.H.; Belytschko, T.; Liu, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue reliability is addressed by the first-order reliability method combined with a finite element method. Two-dimensional finite element models of components with cracks in mode I are considered with crack growth treated by the Paris law. Probability density functions of the variables affecting fatigue are proposed to reflect a setting where nondestructive evaluation is used, and the Rosenblatt transformation is employed to treat non-Gaussian random variables. Comparisons of the first-order reliability results and Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the accuracy of the first-order reliability method is quite good in this setting. Results show that the upper portion of the initial crack length probability density function is crucial to reliability, which suggests that if nondestructive evaluation is used, the probability of detection curve plays a key role in reliability. (orig.)

  10. Finite element analysis of tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian Nai En; Mikkelsen, Mikkel Peter W; Hansen, Leif Berner

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fractures of the tibial shaft are relatively common injuries. There are indications that tibial shaft fractures share characteristics in terms of site, type and local fracture mechanisms. In this study, we aimed to set up a mathematical, computer-based model using finite element...... analysis of the bones of the lower leg to examine if such a model is adequate for prediction of fracture locations and patterns. In future studies, we aim to use these biomechanical results to examine fracture prevention, among others, and to simulate different types of osteosynthesis and the process...... of bony healing. The biomechanical results are the basis for fracture healing, biomechanical fall analysis and stability analysis of osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A finite element model of the bony part of the lower leg was generated on the basis of computed tomography data from the Visible Human...

  11. Time-optimal control with finite bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, M.; Cappellaro, P.

    2018-04-01

    Time-optimal control theory provides recipes to achieve quantum operations with high fidelity and speed, as required in quantum technologies such as quantum sensing and computation. While technical advances have achieved the ultrastrong driving regime in many physical systems, these capabilities have yet to be fully exploited for the precise control of quantum systems, as other limitations, such as the generation of higher harmonics or the finite response time of the control apparatus, prevent the implementation of theoretical time-optimal control. Here we present a method to achieve time-optimal control of qubit systems that can take advantage of fast driving beyond the rotating wave approximation. We exploit results from time-optimal control theory to design driving protocols that can be implemented with realistic, finite-bandwidth control fields, and we find a relationship between bandwidth limitations and achievable control fidelity.

  12. On the reliability of finite element solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, K.S.R.K.

    1975-01-01

    The extent of reliability of the finite element method for analysis of nuclear reactor structures, and that of reactor vessels in particular and the need for the engineer to guard against the pitfalls that may arise out of both physical and mathematical models have been high-lighted. A systematic way of checking the model to obtain reasonably accurate solutions is presented. Quite often sophisticated elements are suggested for specific design and stress concentration problems. The desirability or otherwise of these elements, their scope and utility vis-a-vis the use of large stack of conventional elements are discussed from the view point of stress analysts. The methods of obtaining a check on the reliability of the finite element solutions either through modelling changes or an extrapolation technique are discussed. (author)

  13. The Finite-Bladed Betz Rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2016-01-01

    The finite-bladed optimum Betz rotor is treated. It is first very recently that a complete description of this rotor has been derived. In the chapter, a full analytical solution to the Betz rotor problem will be given, and the results will be compared to other optimum rotor models, both with resp......The finite-bladed optimum Betz rotor is treated. It is first very recently that a complete description of this rotor has been derived. In the chapter, a full analytical solution to the Betz rotor problem will be given, and the results will be compared to other optimum rotor models, both...... with respect to performance and resulting rotor geometry. It is here shown that for tip speed ratios greater than three, all models result in the same geometry at the outer part of the rotor, whereas the inner part always is different, both with respect to plan form and with respect to twist distribution....

  14. Finite element modelling of TRIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papatriantafillou, I.; Aravas, N.; Haidemenopoulos, G.N. [Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Univ. of Thessaly, Volos (Greece)

    2004-11-01

    A constitutive model that describes the mechanical behaviour of steels exhibiting ''Transformation Induced Plasticity'' (TRIP) during martensitic transformation is presented. Multiphase TRIP steels are considered as composite materials with a ferritic matrix containing bainite and retained austenite, which gradually transforms into martensite. The effective properties and overall behaviour of TRIP steels are determined by using homogenization techniques for non-linear composites. The developed constitutive model considers the different hardening behaviour of the individual phases and estimates the apportionment of plastic strain and stress between the individual phases of the composite. A methodology for the numerical integration of the resulting elastoplastic constitutive equations in the context of the finite element method is developed and the constitutive model is implemented in a general-purpose finite element program. The prediction of the model in uniaxial tension agrees well with the experimental data. The problem of necking of a bar in uniaxial tension is studied in detail. (orig.)

  15. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  16. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS FOR PERIFLEX COUPLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URDEA Mihaela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Periflex shaft couplings with rubber sleeve have a hig elasticity and link two shafts in diesel-engine and electric drives. They are simple from the point of view of construction, easily mounted and dismounted. The main goal of this paper is to present a finite element analysis for the Periflex coupling using the Generative Structural Analysis from CATIA software package. This paper presents important information about how to prepare an assembly for creating a static analysis case and also the important steps for developing a finite element analysis. It is very important that the analysis model should have the same behavior as the real, also the loading model. The results are images corresponding to Von Mises Stresses and Translational Displacement magnitude.

  17. Introduction to nonlinear finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Nam-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the key concepts of nonlinear finite element analysis procedures. The book explains the fundamental theories of the field and provides instructions on how to apply the concepts to solving practical engineering problems. Instead of covering many nonlinear problems, the book focuses on three representative problems: nonlinear elasticity, elastoplasticity, and contact problems. The book is written independent of any particular software, but tutorials and examples using four commercial programs are included as appendices: ANSYS, NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and MATLAB. In particular, the MATLAB program includes all source codes so that students can develop their own material models, or different algorithms. This book also: ·         Presents clear explanations of nonlinear finite element analysis for elasticity, elastoplasticity, and contact problems ·         Includes many informative examples of nonlinear analyses so that students can clearly understand the nonlinear theory ·    ...

  18. Quark bag coupling to finite size pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Kam, J.; Pirner, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    A standard approximation in theories of quark bags coupled to a pion field is to treat the pion as an elementary field ignoring its substructure and finite size. A difficulty associated with these treatments in the lack of stability of the quark bag due to the rapid increase of the pion pressure on the bad as the bag size diminishes. We investigate the effects of the finite size of the qanti q pion on the pion quark bag coupling by means of a simple nonlocal pion quark interaction. With this amendment the pion pressure on the bag vanishes if the bag size goes to zero. No stability problems are encountered in this description. Furthermore, for extended pions, no longer a maximum is set to the bag parameter B. Therefore 'little bag' solutions may be found provided that B is large enough. We also discuss the possibility of a second minimum in the bag energy function. (orig.)

  19. Thermal quench at finite 't Hooft coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ebrahim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using holography we have studied thermal electric field quench for infinite and finite 't Hooft coupling constant. The set-up we consider here is D7-brane embedded in (α′ corrected AdS-black hole background. It is well-known that due to a time-dependent electric field on the probe brane, a time-dependent current will be produced and it will finally relax to its equilibrium value. We have studied the effect of different parameters of the system on equilibration time. As the most important results, for massless fundamental matter, we have observed a universal behaviour in the rescaled equilibration time in the very fast quench regime for different values of the temperature and α′ correction parameter. It seems that in the slow quench regime the system behaves adiabatically. We have also observed that the equilibration time decreases in finite 't Hooft coupling limit.

  20. Introduction to finite and spectral element methods using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    The Finite Element Method in One Dimension. Further Applications in One Dimension. High-Order and Spectral Elements in One Dimension. The Finite Element Method in Two Dimensions. Quadratic and Spectral Elements in Two Dimensions. Applications in Mechanics. Viscous Flow. Finite and Spectral Element Methods in Three Dimensions. Appendices. References. Index.

  1. The Total Number of Parameters in the Finite Element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectangular finite elements are important in Finite Element Method. This paper establishes a general formula for obtaining the total number of parameters associated with any finite element rectangulation of a domain. This number is also the dimension of the trail space as well as the size of the associated linear system.

  2. Parallel direct solver for finite element modeling of manufacturing processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P.A.F.

    2017-01-01

    The central processing unit (CPU) time is of paramount importance in finite element modeling of manufacturing processes. Because the most significant part of the CPU time is consumed in solving the main system of equations resulting from finite element assemblies, different approaches have been...... developed to optimize solutions and reduce the overall computational costs of large finite element models....

  3. Finite element modelling of helmeted head impact under frontal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Finite element models of the head and helmet were used to study contact forces during frontal impact of the head with a rigid surface. The finite element model of the head consists of skin, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), brain, tentorium and falx. The finite element model of the helmet consists of shell and foam.

  4. Adaptive Smoothed Finite Elements (ASFEM) for history dependent material models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quak, W.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Menary, Gary

    2011-01-01

    A successful simulation of a bulk forming process with finite elements can be difficult due to distortion of the finite elements. Nodal smoothed Finite Elements (NSFEM) are an interesting option for such a process since they show good distortion insensitivity and moreover have locking-free behavior

  5. The finite element method in engineering, 2nd edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This work provides a systematic introduction to the various aspects of the finite element method as applied to engineering problems. Contents include: introduction to finite element method; solution of finite element equations; solid and structural mechanics; static analysis; dynamic analysis; heat transfer; fluid mechanics and additional applications

  6. Oscillations of the static meson fields at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Friman, B.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1996-04-01

    The spatial dependence of static meson correlation functions at finite baryon density is studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In contrast to the finite temperature case, we find that the correlation functions at finite density are not screened but exhibit long-range oscillations. The observed phenomenon is analogous to the Friedel oscillations in a degenerate electron gas. (orig.)

  7. Finite groups whose abelian subgroups of equal order are conjugate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sezer, S.; van der Waall, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    (Abstract of results (paraphrased): The paper classifies the finite groups mentioned in the title. It turns out that the class of all finite solvable groups satifying the condition in the title, coincides with the class of all finite solvable groups satisfying the condition in the title without the

  8. Finite Mathematics and Discrete Mathematics: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marvin L.

    Discrete mathematics and finite mathematics differ in a number of ways. First, finite mathematics has a longer history and is therefore more stable in terms of course content. Finite mathematics courses emphasize certain particular mathematical tools which are useful in solving the problems of business and the social sciences. Discrete mathematics…

  9. Finite element simulation and testing of ISW CFRP anchorage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Goltermann, Per; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2013-01-01

    is modelled in the 3D finite Element program ABAQUS, just as digital image correlation (DIC) testing was performed to verify the finite element simulation. Also a new optimized design was produced to ensure that the finite element simulation and anchorage behaviour correlated well. It is seen...

  10. Neutrix calculus and finite quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y Jack; Dam, H van

    2005-01-01

    In general, quantum field theories (QFT) require regularizations and infinite renormalizations due to ultraviolet divergences in their loop calculations. Furthermore, perturbation series in theories like quantum electrodynamics are not convergent series, but are asymptotic series. We apply neutrix calculus, developed in connection with asymptotic series and divergent integrals, to QFT, obtaining finite renormalizations. While none of the physically measurable results in renormalizable QFT is changed, quantum gravity is rendered more manageable in the neutrix framework. (letter to the editor)

  11. Using of Finite Automation at Programming PLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Rastocny

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerning with systematic advances at programming programmable logic controllers (PLC, which comes out from algebraic description of behaviour of sequential circuit, in the way of finite automaton. This kind of access is streamlining the work of a programmer and enabling to use formalisms in the of whole process of system development, that is from process of analysing demands to process of verification and validation created program. The paper considers about using of ladder diagram at programming PLC.

  12. Finite element analysis of nonlinear creeping flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loula, A.F.D.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.

    1988-12-01

    Steady-state creep problems with monotone constitutive laws are studied. Finite element approximations are constructed based on mixed Petrov-Galerkin formulations for constrained problems. Stability, convergence and a priori error estimates are proved for equal-order discontinuous stress and continuous velocity interpolations. Numerical results are presented confirming the rates of convergence predicted in the analysis and the good performance of this formulation. (author) [pt

  13. Finite element simulation of heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces the finite element method applied to the resolution of industrial heat transfer problems. Starting from steady conduction, the method is gradually extended to transient regimes, to traditional non-linearities, and to convective phenomena. Coupled problems involving heat transfer are then presented. Three types of couplings are discussed: coupling through boundary conditions (such as radiative heat transfer in cavities), addition of state variables (such as metallurgical phase change), and coupling through partial differential equations (such as electrical phenomena).? A re

  14. Elementary introduction to finite difference equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    An elementary description is given of the basic vocabulary and concepts associated with finite difference modeling. The material discussed is biased toward the types of large computer programs used at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Particular attention is focused on truncation error and how it can be affected by zoning patterns. The principle of convergence is discussed, and convergence as a tool for improving calculational accuracy and efficiency is emphasized

  15. Robust weak measurements on finite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A new weak measurement procedure is introduced for finite samples which yields accurate weak values that are outside the range of eigenvalues and which do not require an exponentially rare ensemble. This procedure provides a unique advantage in the amplification of small nonrandom signals by minimizing uncertainties in determining the weak value and by minimizing sample size. This procedure can also extend the strength of the coupling between the system and measuring device to a new regime

  16. Finite element methods for incompressible flow problems

    CERN Document Server

    John, Volker

    2016-01-01

    This book explores finite element methods for incompressible flow problems: Stokes equations, stationary Navier-Stokes equations, and time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. It focuses on numerical analysis, but also discusses the practical use of these methods and includes numerical illustrations. It also provides a comprehensive overview of analytical results for turbulence models. The proofs are presented step by step, allowing readers to more easily understand the analytical techniques.

  17. Finite Temperature Qcd With Domain Wall Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, G T

    2001-01-01

    Domain wall fermions are a new lattice fermion formulation which preserves the full chiral symmetry of the continuum at finite lattice spacing, up to terms exponentially small in an extra parameter. We discuss the main features of the formulation and its application to study of QCD with two light fermions of equal mass. We also present numerical studies of the two flavor QCD thermodynamics with aT = 1/4.

  18. On the orders of finite semisimple groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since the Galois group, Gal(Fq/Fq), is procyclic and A is a finite Galois-module, its Her- brand quotient is 1, i.e., |H0(Fq, A)|=|H1(Fq, A)|. ..... These pairs are quite special, in the sense that they admit a geometric reasoning for the coincidence of orders. We describe it in the last section. If we do not restrict ourselves to the ...

  19. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...

  20. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As we all know, the study of groups in which some primary subgroups satisfy a certain embedding property is one of the .... G ∈ F. The converse also holds, in the case where F = U. Lemma 2.10 Let G be a finite ..... Case I. F = U. If every Sylow 2-subgroup of G is cyclic, then G is 2-nilpotent by Burn- side theorem. Hence G is ...

  1. Quantum chromodynamics on networks and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, A.

    1990-01-01

    Lectures on quantum chromodynamics theory in the continuum and the associated non-disturbing phenomena are given. The discretization of the theory giving equations similar to those found in four dimensional statistical systems is studied. The physics of the expected non-disturbing phenomena is discussed. The lectures are also dedicated to finite temperature (chiral transitions and confinement) and addressed to non-experts [fr

  2. Limitations of Shallow Networks Representing Finite Mappings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůrková, Věra

    submitted 5.1. (2018) ISSN 0941-0643 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18108S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : shallow and deep networks * sparsity * variational norms * functions on large finite domains * concentration of measure * pseudo-noise sequences * perceptron networks Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 2.505, year: 2016

  3. The Geometry of Finite Equilibrium Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely non collinear....

  4. On the orders of finite semisimple groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    brand quotient is 1, i.e., |H0(Fq, A)|=|H1(Fq, A)|. It follows that | ˜H(Fq)|=|H(Fq)|. 2. 3. Determining the finite field. The first natural step in determining the ..... The equivalence class [(H,H)] acts as the identity and [(H1,H2)]. −1 = [(H2,H1)]. ThusG is an abelian, torsion-free group. Since the first two infinite families described in ...

  5. Finite Memory Model for Haptic Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    both help and hinder the memory process. If the spatial information must be remembered independently, and thus occupies slots in the memory register...psychologists. The memory experiment appears to have succeeded in eliminating the influence of spatial relations and feature identification error. The...7 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, Califormia AD-A245 342 THESIS Finite Memory Model for Haptic Recognition by Philip G. Beieri December 1991

  6. Topics on field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of a first order phase transition through the study of the decay rate of the false vacuum in the high temperature limit are analysed. An alternative approach to obtain the phase diagram of a field theory which is based on the study of the free energy of topological defects, is developed the behavior of coupling constants with the help of the Dyson-Schwinger equations at finite temperature, is evaluated. (author) [pt

  7. Supersymmetric field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicus, D.A.; Tata, X.R.

    1983-01-01

    We show by explicit calculations to second and third order in perturbation theory, that finite temperature effects do not break the supersymmetry Ward-Takahashi identities of the Wess-Zumino model. Moreover, it is argued that this result is true to all orders in perturbation theory, and further, true for a wide class of supersymmetric theories. We point out, however, that these identities can be broken in the course of a phase transition that restores an originally broken internal symmetry

  8. A Generalized Finite Source Calibration Factor: A Natural Improvement to the Finite Source Correction Factor for Uranium Holdup Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, C.A.; Oberer, R.B.; Chiang, L.G.; Ceo, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes refinements to the finite source correction factor used in holdup measurements. Specifically it focuses on a more general method to estimate the average detector response for a finite source. This proposed method for the average detector response is based directly on the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) assay method. First, the finite source correction factor as originally proposed is reviewed in this paper. Following this review the GGH assay method is described. Lastly, a new finite area calibration factor based on GGH is then proposed for finite point and line sources. As an alternative to the direct use of the finite arca calibration factor, finite source correction factors are also derived from this calibration factor. This new correction factor can be used in a manner similar to the finite source correction factor as currently implemented

  9. Coupled finite element modeling of piezothermoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senousy, M. S.; Rajapakse, R. K. N. D.; Gadala, M.

    2007-04-01

    The governing equations of piezo-thermoelastic materials show full coupling between mechanical, electric, and temperature fields. It is often assumed in the literature that in high-frequency oscillations, the coupling between the temperature and mechanical displacement and electric field is small and, therefore, can be neglected. A solution for the temperature field is then determined from an uncoupled equation. A finite element (FE) model that accounts for full coupling between the mechanical, electric, and thermal fields, nonlinear constitutive behavior and heat generation resulting from dielectric losses under alternating driving fields is under development. This paper presents a linear fully coupled model as an early development of the fully coupled nonlinear FE model. In the linear model, a solution for all field variables is obtained simultaneously and compared with the uncoupled solution. The finite element model is based on the weighted-residual principle and uses 2-D four-node isoparametric finite elements with four degrees of freedom per node. A thin piezoelectric square disk is modeled to obtain some preliminary understanding of the coupled fields in a piezoelectric stack actuator.

  10. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  11. Finite element modelling of contracting skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomens, C W J; Maenhout, M; van Oijen, C H; Drost, M R; Baaijens, F P

    2003-09-29

    To describe the mechanical behaviour of biological tissues and transport processes in biological tissues, conservation laws such as conservation of mass, momentum and energy play a central role. Mathematically these are cast into the form of partial differential equations. Because of nonlinear material behaviour, inhomogeneous properties and usually a complex geometry, it is impossible to find closed-form analytical solutions for these sets of equations. The objective of the finite element method is to find approximate solutions for these problems. The concepts of the finite element method are explained on a finite element continuum model of skeletal muscle. In this case, the momentum equations have to be solved with an extra constraint, because the material behaves as nearly incompressible. The material behaviour consists of a highly nonlinear passive part and an active part. The latter is described with a two-state Huxley model. This means that an extra nonlinear partial differential equation has to be solved. The problems and solutions involved with this procedure are explained. The model is used to describe the mechanical behaviour of a tibialis anterior of a rat. The results have been compared with experimentally determined strains at the surface of the muscle. Qualitatively there is good agreement between measured and calculated strains, but the measured strains were higher.

  12. Bottomonium dissociation in a finite density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson R.F. Braga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a holographic description of the thermal behavior of bb¯ heavy vector mesons inside a plasma at finite temperature and density. The meson dissociation in the medium is represented by the decrease in the height of the spectral function peaks. In order to find a description for the evolution of the quasi-states with temperature and chemical potential it is crucial to use a model that is consistent with the decay constant behavior. The reason is that the height of a spectral function peak is related to the value of the zero temperature decay constant of the corresponding particle. AdS/QCD holographic models are in general not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with radial excitation level. However, it was recently shown that using a soft wall background and calculating the correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, it is possible to describe the observed behavior. Here we extend this proposal to the case of finite temperature T and chemical potential μ. A clear picture of the dissociation of bottomonium states as a function of μ and T emerges from the spectral function. The energy scales where the change in chemical potential leads to changes in the thermal properties of the mesons is consistent with QCD expectations.

  13. BERSAFE: (BERkeley Structural Analysis by Finite Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    BERSAFE is a well-known finite element system which has been under continuous use and development for over 20 years. The BERSAFE system comprises an inter-compatible set of program modules covering static stress analysis, linear dynamics and thermal analysis. Data generation and results presentation modules are also available, along with special supporting functions including automatic crack growth through a model with adaptive meshing. The functionality of BERSAFE, is nowadays very advanced, both in engineering scope and finite element technology. It has seen many firsts, including the front solution and Virtual Crack Extension methods (VCE). More recent additions which have developed out of the Power Industry's requirements are a finite element computational fluid dynamics code, FEAT, and engineering design assessment procedures. These procedures include R6 and R5 for the assessment of the integrity of structures containing defects below and within the creep regime. To use all this software in a user-friendly manner, a new computational environment has been developed, called 'The Harness' which takes advantage of modern hardware and software philosophies. This provides the tool-kit to undertake complete problems, covering determination of fluid loads, structural analysis and failure assessment. In the following sections we describe briefly various components of the BERSAFE suite. (author)

  14. Finite element analysis of coupled electromechanical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melgoza-Vazquez, E.

    2001-01-01

    The modeling of electromechanical problems is discussed. The simultaneous consideration of two distinct phenomena is required, as the evolution of the electromagnetic and the mechanical parts are influenced by each other. In this work the equations of the coupled problem are described and possible methods of solution are considered. Three general approaches with varying degrees of detail are considered. In the first, a lumped parameter model of the device is constructed from the finite element solution of the electromagnetic problem. A second approach links the electromagnetic field directly with the lumped mechanical part. Lastly, both the electromagnetic and the mechanical systems are considered to be distributed, with the individual domains solved by using the finite element method. In the process of solution of transient problems the need to solve differential-algebraic systems of equations arises and some approaches are presented. It is shown that traditional finite difference formulas may be applied as long as the discretization is made at the element level. Higher order methods and step adaptation are discussed. (author)

  15. Determination of finite-difference weights using scaled binomial windows

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-05-01

    The finite-difference method evaluates a derivative through a weighted summation of function values from neighboring grid nodes. Conventional finite-difference weights can be calculated either from Taylor series expansions or by Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The finite-difference method can be interpreted as a truncated convolutional counterpart of the pseudospectral method in the space domain. For this reason, we also can derive finite-difference operators by truncating the convolution series of the pseudospectral method. Various truncation windows can be employed for this purpose and they result in finite-difference operators with different dispersion properties. We found that there exists two families of scaled binomial windows that can be used to derive conventional finite-difference operators analytically. With a minor change, these scaled binomial windows can also be used to derive optimized finite-difference operators with enhanced dispersion properties. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  16. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W. [Universitaet Augsburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  17. A study on the nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete structures: shell finite element formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2000-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to establish a methodology of finite element analysis of containment building predicting not only global behaviour but also local failure mode. In this report, we summerize some existing numerical analysis techniques to be improved for containment building. In other words, a complete description of the standard degenerated shell finite element formulation is provided for nonlinear stress analysis of nuclear containment structure. A shell finite element is derived using the degenerated solid concept which does not rely on a specific shell theory. Reissner-Mindlin assumptions are adopted to consider the transverse shear deformation effect. In order to minimize the sensitivity of the constitutive equation to structural types, microscopic material model is adopted. The four solution algorithms based on the standard Newton-Raphson method are discussed. Finally, two numerical examples are carried out to test the performance of the adopted shell medel.

  18. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louda, Petr; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2014-12-01

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  19. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír [Institute of Thermomechanics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel [Czech Technical University in Prague, Fac. of Mechanical Engineering (Czech Republic)

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  20. Flow Over Backward Facing Step with Inclined Wall Solved by Finite Volume and Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louda, Petr; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2010-09-01

    The work deals with numerical solution of 2D incompressible flow over backward facing step. The inclination angles of the upper wall of the channel were chosen as in measurements by Driver and Seegmiller [1]. Two numerical methods are considered. One is finite volume method, the other one is finite element method. Turbulence is modeled using two-equation turbulence models of k-ω type. The influence of outlet boundary condition is discussed and do-nothing-like condition found suitable also for finite volume method. The comparison of both methods is presented for laminar as well as turbulent cases, including experimental results. The differences of the results are studied using one turbulence model and both numerical methods or one method and more turbulence models. It is found that sensitivity of the computation to these circumstances increases for higher inclination angles (diffuser flow).

  1. Finite element simulation of piezoelectric transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, T; Kagawa, Y; Wakatsuki, N; Okamura, H

    2001-07-01

    Piezoelectric transformers are nothing but ultrasonic resonators with two pairs of electrodes provided on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate in which electrical energy is carried in the mechanical form. The input and output electrodes are arranged to provide the impedance transformation, which results in the voltage transformation. As they are operated at a resonance, the electrical equivalent circuit approach has traditionally been developed in a rather empirical way and has been used for analysis and design. The present paper deals with the analysis of the piezoelectric transformers based on the three-dimensional finite element modelling. The PIEZO3D code that we have developed is modified to include the external loading conditions. The finite element approach is now available for a wide variety of the electrical boundary conditions. The equivalent circuit of lumped parameters can also be derived from the finite element method (FEM) solution if required. The simulation of the present transformers is made for the low intensity operation and compared with the experimental results. Demonstration is made for basic Rosen-type transformers in which the longitudinal mode of a plate plays an important role; in which the equivalent circuit of lumped constants has been used. However, there are many modes of vibration associated with the plate, the effect of which cannot always be ignored. In the experiment, the double resonances are sometimes observed in the vicinity of the operating frequency. The simulation demonstrates that this is due to the coupling of the longitudinal mode with the flexural mode. Thus, the simulation provides an invaluable guideline to the transformer design.

  2. A finite element method for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    A variational treatment of the finite element method for neutron transport is given based on a version of the even-parity Boltzmann equation which does not assume that the differential scattering cross-section has a spherical harmonic expansion. The theory of minimum and maximum principles is based on the Cauchy-Schwartz equality and the properties of a leakage operator G and a removal operator C. For systems with extraneous sources, two maximum and one minimum principles are given in boundary free form, to ease finite element computations. The global error of an approximate variational solution is given, the relationship of one the maximum principles to the method of least squares is shown, and the way in which approximate solutions converge locally to the exact solution is established. A method for constructing local error bounds is given, based on the connection between the variational method and the method of the hypercircle. The source iteration technique and a maximum principle for a system with extraneous sources suggests a functional for a variational principle for a self-sustaining system. The principle gives, as a consequence of the properties of G and C, an upper bound to the lowest eigenvalue. A related functional can be used to determine both upper and lower bounds for the lowest eigenvalue from an inspection of any approximate solution for the lowest eigenfunction. The basis for the finite element is presented in a general form so that two modes of exploitation can be undertaken readily. The model can be in phase space, with positional and directional co-ordinates defining points of the model, or it can be restricted to the positional co-ordinates and an expansion in orthogonal functions used for the directional co-ordinates. Suitable sets of functions are spherical harmonics and Walsh functions. The latter set is appropriate if a discrete direction representation of the angular flux is required. (author)

  3. Gribov gap equation at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Pais, Pablo [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Salgado-Rebolledo, Patricio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Valdivia (Chile); Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile); Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Insitutes, Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper the Gribov gap equation at finite temperature is analyzed. The solutions of the gap equation (which depend explicitly on the temperature) determine the structure of the gluon propagator within the semi-classical Gribov approach. The present analysis is consistent with the standard confinement scenario for low temperatures, while for high enough temperatures, deconfinement takes place and a free gluon propagator is obtained. An intermediate regime in between the confined and free phases can be read off from the resulting gluon propagator, which appears to be closely related to partial deconfinement. (orig.)

  4. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  5. On fracture in finite strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    predictions. These differences increase significantly when large strains are taken into account, as a consequence of the contribution of strain gradients to the work hardening of the material. The magnitude of stress elevation at the crack tip and the distance ahead of the crack where GNDs significantly alter......In this work a general framework for damage and fracture assessment including the effect of strain gradients is provided. Both mechanism-based and phenomenological strain gradient plasticity (SGP) theories are implemented numerically using finite deformation theory and crack tip fields...

  6. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Wen-Cong, E-mail: ganwencong@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Shu, Fu-Wen, E-mail: shufuwen@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wu, Meng-He, E-mail: menghewu.physik@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-09-10

    We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  7. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cong Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  8. Measuring Communication in Parallel Communicating Finite Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Bordihn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Systems of deterministic finite automata communicating by sending their states upon request are investigated, when the amount of communication is restricted. The computational power and decidability properties are studied for the case of returning centralized systems, when the number of necessary communications during the computations of the system is bounded by a function depending on the length of the input. It is proved that an infinite hierarchy of language families exists, depending on the number of messages sent during their most economical recognitions. Moreover, several properties are shown to be not semi-decidable for the systems under consideration.

  9. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  10. Integral and finite difference inequalities and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pachpatte, B G

    2006-01-01

    The monograph is written with a view to provide basic tools for researchers working in Mathematical Analysis and Applications, concentrating on differential, integral and finite difference equations. It contains many inequalities which have only recently appeared in the literature and which can be used as powerful tools and will be a valuable source for a long time to come. It is self-contained and thus should be useful for those who are interested in learning or applying the inequalities with explicit estimates in their studies.- Contains a variety of inequalities discovered which find numero

  11. Finite Element analysis of jar connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, A.; Toor, Kashif; Solem, Sigurd

    2005-01-01

    A new tool joint system is considered. Traditionally these rotary connections have been designed with only one shoulder geometry. However, in order to increase the torque rating of the tool joint, a new design is introduced using two shoulders. This design allow reduced tool joint dimensions wher...... whereby down-hole equipment more easily can be fitted. In order to evaluate the validity of the design, finite element analysis have been performed in ANSYS. The results obtained indicate that the new design is valid and further tests can be performed....

  12. Trasforiiazioni Termoelastiche Finite di Solidi Incomprimibili

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, A.

    Queste lezlioni hanno come direttiva una sintesi di quanto si trova sistematicamente sviluppato in una mia Memoria sulle trasformazioni termoelastiche finite di solidi incomprimibili, in corso di stampa negli Annali di Matematica pura e applicata t. XXXIX ( 1955) pp. 147-201 , Verranno anche esposti, come necessaria premessa, alcuni d ei risultati di due precedenti Memorie degli stessi Annali. Invece, per motivo di brevità, non potrò dare neppure un cenno delle ulteriori ricerche svilup pate dal prof. T. Manacorda in tre recentissimi suoi lavori:

  13. Static phantom wormholes of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Orellana, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we derive new static phantom traversable wormholes by assuming a shape function with a quadratic dependence on the radial coordinate r . We mainly focus our study on wormholes sustained by exotic matter with positive energy density (as seen by any static observer) and a variable equation of state pr/ρ wormhole spacetimes extending to infinity, we show that a quadratic shape function allows us to construct static spacetimes of finite size, composed of a phantom wormhole connected to an anisotropic spherically symmetric distribution of dark energy. The wormhole part of the full spacetime does not fulfill the dominant energy condition, while the dark energy part does.

  14. Finite element modeling methods for photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, B M Azizur

    2013-01-01

    The term photonics can be used loosely to refer to a vast array of components, devices, and technologies that in some way involve manipulation of light. One of the most powerful numerical approaches available to engineers developing photonic components and devices is the Finite Element Method (FEM), which can be used to model and simulate such components/devices and analyze how they will behave in response to various outside influences. This resource provides a comprehensive description of the formulation and applications of FEM in photonics applications ranging from telecommunications, astron

  15. The Finite Deformation Dynamic Sphere Test Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versino, Daniele [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brock, Jerry Steven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    In this manuscript we describe test cases for the dynamic sphere problem in presence of finite deformations. The spherical shell in exam is made of a homogeneous, isotropic or transverse isotropic material and elastic and elastic-plastic material behaviors are considered. Twenty cases, (a) to (t), are thus defined combining material types and boundary conditions. The inner surface radius, the outer surface radius and the material's density are kept constant for all the considered test cases and their values are ri = 10mm, ro = 20mm and p = 1000Kg/m3 respectively.

  16. Mixed finite elements for global tide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Colin J; Kirby, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    We study mixed finite element methods for the linearized rotating shallow water equations with linear drag and forcing terms. By means of a strong energy estimate for an equivalent second-order formulation for the linearized momentum, we prove long-time stability of the system without energy accumulation-the geotryptic state. A priori error estimates for the linearized momentum and free surface elevation are given in [Formula: see text] as well as for the time derivative and divergence of the linearized momentum. Numerical results confirm the theoretical results regarding both energy damping and convergence rates.

  17. Generalized multiscale finite element methods: Oversampling strategies

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose oversampling strategies in the generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM) framework. The GMsFEM, which has been recently introduced in Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], allows solving multiscale parameter-dependent problems at a reduced computational cost by constructing a reduced-order representation of the solution on a coarse grid. The main idea of the method consists of (1) the construction of snapshot space, (2) the construction of the offline space, and (3) construction of the online space (the latter for parameter-dependent problems). In Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], it was shown that the GMsFEM provides a flexible tool to solve multiscale problems with a complex input space by generating appropriate snapshot, offline, and online spaces. In this paper, we develop oversampling techniques to be used in this context (see Hou and Wu (1997) where oversampling is introduced for multiscale finite element methods). It is known (see Hou and Wu (1997)) that the oversampling can improve the accuracy of multiscale methods. In particular, the oversampling technique uses larger regions (larger than the target coarse block) in constructing local basis functions. Our motivation stems from the analysis presented in this paper, which shows that when using oversampling techniques in the construction of the snapshot space and offline space, GMsFEM will converge independent of small scales and high contrast under certain assumptions. We consider the use of a multiple eigenvalue problems to improve the convergence and discuss their relation to single spectral problems that use oversampled regions. The oversampling procedures proposed in this paper differ from those in Hou and Wu (1997). In particular, the oversampling domains are partially used in constructing local

  18. Helix-Hopes on Finite Hyperfields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Vougiouklis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperstructure theory can overcome restrictions which ordinary algebraic structures have. A hyperproduct on non-square ordinary matrices can be defined by using the so called helix-hyperoperations. We study the helix-hyperstructures on the representations using ordinary fields. The related theory can be faced by defining the hyperproduct on the set of non square matrices. The main tools of the Hyperstructure Theory are the fundamental relations which connect the largest class of hyperstructures, the Hv-structures, with the corresponding classical ones. We focus on finite dimensional helix-hyperstructures and on small Hv-fields, as well.

  19. Graded associative conformal algebras of finite type

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnikov, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider graded associative conformal algebras. The class of these objects includes pseudo-algebras over non-cocommutative Hopf algebras of regular functions on some linear algebraic groups. In particular, an associative conformal algebra which is graded by a finite group $\\Gamma $ is a pseudo-algebra over the coordinate Hopf algebra of a linear algebraic group $G$ such that the identity component $G^0$ is the affine line and $G/G^0\\simeq \\Gamma $. A classification of simple...

  20. Solution of Fokker–Planck equation by finite element and finite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The response of a structural system to white noise excitation (delta- correlated) constitutes a Markov vector process whose transitional probability den- sity function (TPDF) is governed by both the forward Fokker–Planck and backward. Kolmogorov equations. Numerical solution of these equations by finite element ...

  1. A least squares principle unifying finite element, finite difference and nodal methods for diffusion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    A least squares principle is described which uses a penalty function treatment of boundary and interface conditions. Appropriate choices of the trial functions and vectors employed in a dual representation of an approximate solution established complementary principles for the diffusion equation. A geometrical interpretation of the principles provides weighted residual methods for diffusion theory, thus establishing a unification of least squares, variational and weighted residual methods. The complementary principles are used with either a trial function for the flux or a trial vector for the current to establish for regular meshes a connection between finite element, finite difference and nodal methods, which can be exact if the mesh pitches are chosen appropriately. Whereas the coefficients in the usual nodal equations have to be determined iteratively, those derived via the complementary principles are given explicitly in terms of the data. For the further development of the connection between finite element, finite difference and nodal methods, some hybrid variational methods are described which employ both a trial function and a trial vector. (author)

  2. Solution of Fokker–Planck equation by finite element and finite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hindered by the problem of dimensionality. In this paper numerical solution of the stationary and transient form of the Fokker–Planck (FP) equation corresponding to two state nonlinear systems is obtained by standard sequential finite element method. (FEM) using C0 shape function and Crank–Nicholson time integration ...

  3. Sparse adaptive finite elements for radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmer, G.; Hiptmair, R.; Schwab, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    The linear radiative transfer equation, a partial differential equation for the radiation intensity u(x,s), with independent variables x element of D is contained in R n in the physical domain D of dimension n=2,3, and angular variable s element of S 2 :={y element of R 3 :|y|=1}, is solved in the n+2-dimensional computational domain DxS 2 . We propose an adaptive multilevel Galerkin finite element method (FEM) for its numerical solution. Our approach is based on (a) a stabilized variational formulation of the transport operator, (b) on so-called sparse tensor products of two hierarchic families of finite element spaces in H 1 (D) and in L 2 (S 2 ), respectively, and (c) on wavelet thresholding techniques to adapt the discretization to the underlying problem. An a priori error analysis shows, under strong regularity assumptions on the solution, that the sparse tensor product method is clearly superior to a discrete ordinates method, as it converges with essentially optimal asymptotic rates while its complexity grows essentially only as that for a linear transport problem in R n . Numerical experiments for n=2 on a set of example problems agree with the convergence and complexity analysis of the method and show that introducing adaptivity can improve performance in terms of accuracy vs. number of degrees even further

  4. QCD at finite isospin chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Endrődi, Gergely; Schmalzbauer, Sebastian

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the properties of QCD at finite isospin chemical potential at zero and non-zero temperatures. This theory is not affected by the sign problem and can be simulated using Monte-Carlo techniques. With increasing isospin chemical potential and temperatures below the deconfinement transition the system changes into a phase where charged pions condense, accompanied by an accumulation of low modes of the Dirac operator. The simulations are enabled by the introduction of a pionic source into the action, acting as an infrared regulator for the theory, and physical results are obtained by removing the regulator via an extrapolation. We present an update of our study concerning the associated phase diagram using 2+1 flavours of staggered fermions with physical quark masses and the comparison to Taylor expansion. We also present first results for our determination of the equation of state at finite isospin chemical potential and give an example for a cosmological application. The results can also be used to gain information about QCD at small baryon chemical potentials using reweighting with respect to the pionic source parameter and the chemical potential and we present first steps in this direction.

  5. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc/sup 2//k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10/sup 11/ /sup 0/K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light.

  6. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc 2 /k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10 11 0 K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light

  7. Quantum statistical metastability for a finite spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study quantum-classical escape-rate transitions for uniaxial and biaxial models with finite spins S=10 (such as Mn12Ac and Fe8) and S=100 by a direct numerical approach. At second-order transitions the level making a dominant contribution into thermally assisted tunneling changes gradually with temperature whereas at first-order transitions a group of levels is skipped. For finite spins, the quasiclassical boundaries between first- and second-order transitions are shifted, favoring a second-order transition: For Fe8 in zero field the transition should be first order according to a theory with S-->∞, but we show that there are no skipped levels at the transition. Applying a field along the hard axis in Fe8 makes transition the strongest first order. For the same model with S=100 we confirmed the existence of a region where a second-order transition is followed by a first-order transition [X. Martínes Hidalgo and E. M. Chudnovsky, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 12, 4243 (2000)].

  8. Finite canonical measure for nonsingular cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, Don N.

    2011-01-01

    The total canonical (Liouville-Henneaux-Gibbons-Hawking-Stewart) measure is finite for completely nonsingular Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker classical universes with a minimally coupled massive scalar field and a positive cosmological constant. For a cosmological constant very small in units of the square of the scalar field mass, most of the measure is for nearly de Sitter solutions with no inflation at a much more rapid rate. However, if one restricts to solutions in which the scalar field energy density is ever more than twice the equivalent energy density of the cosmological constant, then the number of e-folds of rapid inflation must be large, and the fraction of the measure is low in which the spatial curvature is comparable to the cosmological constant at the time when it is comparable to the energy density of the scalar field. The measure for such classical FLRWΛ-φ models with both a big bang and a big crunch is also finite. Only the solutions with a big bang that expand forever, or the time-reversed ones that contract from infinity to a big crunch, have infinite measure

  9. The finite element response Matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.; Martin, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for global reactor core calculations is described. This method is based on a unique formulation of the response matrix method, implemented with a higher order finite element method. The unique aspects of this approach are twofold. First, there are two levels to the overall calculational scheme: the local or assembly level and the global or core level. Second, the response matrix scheme, which is formulated at both levels, consists of two separate response matrices rather than one response matrix as is generally the case. These separate response matrices are seen to be quite beneficial for the criticality eigenvalue calculation, because they are independent of k /SUB eff/. The response matrices are generated from a Galerkin finite element solution to the weak form of the diffusion equation, subject to an arbitrary incoming current and an arbitrary distributed source. Calculational results are reported for two test problems, the two-dimensional International Atomic Energy Agency benchmark problem and a two-dimensional pressurized water reactor test problem (Biblis reactor), and they compare well with standard coarse mesh methods with respect to accuracy and efficiency. Moreover, the accuracy (and capability) is comparable to fine mesh for a fraction of the computational cost. Extension of the method to treat heterogeneous assemblies and spatial depletion effects is discussed

  10. A summary of maintenance policies for a finite interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Mizutani, S.

    2009-01-01

    It would be an important problem to consider practically some maintenance policies for a finite time span, because the working times of most units are finite in actual fields. This paper converts the usual maintenance models to finite maintenance models. It is more difficult to study theoretically optimal policies for a finite time span than those for an infinite time span. Three usual models of periodic replacement with minimal repair, block replacement and simple replacement are transformed to finite replacement models. Further, optimal periodic and sequential policies for an imperfect preventive maintenance and an inspection model for a finite time span are considered. Optimal policies for each model are analytically derived and are numerically computed

  11. Finite element analysis theory and application with ANSYS

    CERN Document Server

    Moaveni, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    For courses in Finite Element Analysis, offered in departments of Mechanical or Civil and Environmental Engineering. While many good textbooks cover the theory of finite element modeling, Finite Element Analysis: Theory and Application with ANSYS is the only text available that incorporates ANSYS as an integral part of its content. Moaveni presents the theory of finite element analysis, explores its application as a design/modeling tool, and explains in detail how to use ANSYS intelligently and effectively. Teaching and Learning Experience This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience-for you and your students. It will help: *Present the Theory of Finite Element Analysis: The presentation of theoretical aspects of finite element analysis is carefully designed not to overwhelm students. *Explain How to Use ANSYS Effectively: ANSYS is incorporated as an integral part of the content throughout the book. *Explore How to Use FEA as a Design/Modeling Tool: Open-ended design problems help stude...

  12. Symplectic and multisymplectic schemes with the simple finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen Liu; Bai Yongqiang; Li Qisheng; Wu Ke

    2003-01-01

    We study the numerical scheme of elliptic equations by the finite element method. With the special finite element domain, we can find that the scheme can keep a preserved symplectic structure in one-dimensional case and a preserved multisymplectic structure in two-dimensional case. Then we consider the discrete variational principle with the finite element method in the corresponding Lagrangian formalism for classical mechanics and field theory and get the symplectic or multisymplectic scheme of the Euler-Lagrangian equation

  13. Finite-size scaling of survival probability in branching processes

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Branching processes pervade many models in statistical physics. We investigate the survival probability of a Galton-Watson branching process after a finite number of generations. We reveal the finite-size scaling law of the survival probability for a given branching process ruled by a probability distribution of the number of offspring per element whose standard deviation is finite, obtaining the exact scaling function as well as the critical exponents. Our findings prove the universal behavi...

  14. The finite element method its basis and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, Olek C; Zhu, JZ

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method: Its Basis and Fundamentals offers a complete introduction to the basis of the finite element method, covering fundamental theory and worked examples in the detail required for readers to apply the knowledge to their own engineering problems and understand more advanced applications. This edition sees a significant rearrangement of the book's content to enable clearer development of the finite element method, with major new chapters and sections added to cover: Weak forms Variational forms Multi-dimensional field prob

  15. Oscillations of the static meson fields at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, W.; Friman, B.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1996-04-01

    The spatial dependence of static meson correlation functions at finite baryon density is studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In contrast to the finite temperature case, we find that the correlation functions at finite density are not screened but exhibit long-range oscillations. The observed phenomenon is analogous to the Friedel oscillations in a degenerate electron gas. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  16. Finite Element Modeling of Burr Formation in Metal Cutting

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Sangkee; Dornfeld, David; Kim, J.; Shyu, B.

    2007-01-01

    In order to advance understanding of the burr formation process, a series of finite element models are introduced. First a finite element model of the burr formation of two-dimensional orthogonal cutting is introduced and validated with experimental observations. A detailed and thorough examination of the drilling burr forming process is undertaken. This information is then used in the construction of an analytical model and, leads to development of a three-dimensional finite element mode...

  17. Algebraic complexities and algebraic curves over finite fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, D V; Chudnovsky, G V

    1987-04-01

    We consider the problem of minimal (multiplicative) complexity of polynomial multiplication and multiplication in finite extensions of fields. For infinite fields minimal complexities are known [Winograd, S. (1977) Math. Syst. Theory 10, 169-180]. We prove lower and upper bounds on minimal complexities over finite fields, both linear in the number of inputs, using the relationship with linear coding theory and algebraic curves over finite fields.

  18. Finite-Larmor-radius stability theory of EBT plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1982-11-01

    An eikonal ballooning-mode formalism is developed to describe curvature-driven modes of hot electron plasmas in bumpy tori. The formalism treats frequencies comparable to the ion-cyclotron frequency, as well as arbitrary finite Larmor radius and field polarization, although the detailed analysis is restricted to E/sub parallel/ = 0. Moderate hot-electron finite-Larmor-radius effects are found to lower the background beta core limit, whereas strong finite-Lamor-radius effects produce stabilization

  19. Impact of new computing systems on finite element computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, A.K.; Fulton, R.E.; Storaasi, O.O.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact finite element computations are reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems (mini and microcomputers) are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario is presented for future hardware/software environment and finite element systems. A number of research areas which have high potential for improving the effectiveness of finite element analysis in the new environment are identified

  20. Twistor fibrations giving primitive harmonic maps of finite type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Pacheco

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Primitive harmonic maps of finite type from a Riemann surface M into a k-symmetric space G/H are obtained by integrating a pair of commuting Hamiltonian vector fields on certain finite-dimensional subspaces of loop algebras. We will clarify and generalize Ohnita and Udagawa's results concerning homogeneous projections p:G/H→G/K, with H⊂K, preserving finite-type property for primitive harmonic maps.

  1. Hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agadjanov, Andria

    2017-01-01

    In the present thesis, we study a number of hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume. Our work is motivated by the ongoing and future lattice simulations of the strong interaction theory called quantum chromodynamics. According to the available computational resources, the numerical calculations are necessarily performed on lattices with a finite spatial extension. The first part of the thesis is based on the finite volume formalism which is a standard method to investigate the processes with the final state interactions, and in particular, the elastic hadron resonances, on the lattice. Throughout the work, we systematically apply the non-relativistic effective field theory. The great merit of this approach is that it encodes the low-energy dynamics directly in terms of the effective range expansion parameters. After a brief introduction into the subject, we formulate a framework for the extraction of the ΔNγ * as well as the B→K * transition form factors from lattice data. Both processes are of substantial phenomenological interest, including the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Moreover, we provide a proper field-theoretical definition of the resonance matrix elements, and advocate it in comparison to the one based on the infinitely narrow width approximation. In the second part we consider certain aspects of the doubly virtual nucleon Compton scattering. The main objective of the work is to answer the question whether there is, in the Regge language, a so-called fixed pole in the process. To answer this question, the unknown subtraction function, which enters one of the dispersion relations for the invariant amplitudes, has to be determined. The external field method provides a feasible approach to tackle this problem on the lattice. Considering the nucleon in a periodic magnetic field, we derive a simple relation for the ground state energy shift up to a second order in the field strength. The obtained result encodes the value of the

  2. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  3. Characterizing chain-compact and chain-finite topological semilattices

    OpenAIRE

    Banakh, Taras; Bardyla, Serhii

    2017-01-01

    In the paper we present various characterizations of chain-compact and chain-finite topological semilattices. A topological semilattice $X$ is called chain-compact (resp. chain-finite) if each closed chain in $X$ is compact (finite). In particular, we prove that a (Hausdorff) $T_1$-topological semilattice $X$ is chain-finite (chain-compact) if and only if for any closed subsemilattice $Z\\subset X$ and any continuous homomorphism $h:X\\to Y$ to a (Hausdorff) $T_1$-topological semilattice $Y$ th...

  4. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  5. Adaptive Smoothed Finite Elements (ASFEM) for history dependent material models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quak, W.; Boogaard, A. H. van den

    2011-01-01

    A successful simulation of a bulk forming process with finite elements can be difficult due to distortion of the finite elements. Nodal smoothed Finite Elements (NSFEM) are an interesting option for such a process since they show good distortion insensitivity and moreover have locking-free behavior and good computational efficiency. In this paper a method is proposed which takes advantage of the nodally smoothed field. This method, named adaptive smoothed finite elements (ASFEM), revises the mesh for every step of a simulation without mapping the history dependent material parameters. In this paper an updated-Lagrangian implementation is presented. Several examples are given to illustrate the method and to show its properties.

  6. Modeling software with finite state machines a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Ferdinand; Wagner, Thomas; Wolstenholme, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Modeling Software with Finite State Machines: A Practical Approach explains how to apply finite state machines to software development. It provides a critical analysis of using finite state machines as a foundation for executable specifications to reduce software development effort and improve quality. This book discusses the design of a state machine and of a system of state machines. It also presents a detailed analysis of development issues relating to behavior modeling with design examples and design rules for using finite state machines. This volume describes a coherent and well-tested fr

  7. Finite element analysis in a minicomputer/mainframe environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Murphy, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Design considerations were evaluated for general purpose finite element systems to maximize performance when installed on distributed computer hardware/software systems. It is shown how the features of current minicomputers complement those of a modular implementation of the finite element method for increasing the control, speed, and visibility (interactive graphics) in solving structural problems at reduced cost. The approach used is to implement a finite element system in a distributed computer environment to solve structural problems and to explore alternatives in distributing finite element computations.

  8. Introduction to finite element analysis using MATLAB and Abaqus

    CERN Document Server

    Khennane, Amar

    2013-01-01

    There are some books that target the theory of the finite element, while others focus on the programming side of things. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis Using MATLAB(R) and Abaqus accomplishes both. This book teaches the first principles of the finite element method. It presents the theory of the finite element method while maintaining a balance between its mathematical formulation, programming implementation, and application using commercial software. The computer implementation is carried out using MATLAB, while the practical applications are carried out in both MATLAB and Abaqus. MA

  9. The finite-difference and finite-element modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.; Pazak, P.; Balazovjech, M.; Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.

    2007-01-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion is an irreplaceable tool in investigation of the Earth's structure, processes in the Earth, and particularly earthquake phenomena. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is the dominant method in the modeling of earthquake motion. Moreover, it is becoming more important in the seismic exploration and structural modeling. At the same time we are convinced that the best time of the finite-difference method in seismology is in the future. This monograph provides tutorial and detailed introduction to the application of the finite difference (FD), finite-element (FE), and hybrid FD-FE methods to the modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion. The text does not cover all topics and aspects of the methods. We focus on those to which we have contributed. We present alternative formulations of equation of motion for a smooth elastic continuum. We then develop alternative formulations for a canonical problem with a welded material interface and free surface. We continue with a model of an earthquake source. We complete the general theoretical introduction by a chapter on the constitutive laws for elastic and viscoelastic media, and brief review of strong formulations of the equation of motion. What follows is a block of chapters on the finite-difference and finite-element methods. We develop FD targets for the free surface and welded material interface. We then present various FD schemes for a smooth continuum, free surface, and welded interface. We focus on the staggered-grid and mainly optimally-accurate FD schemes. We also present alternative formulations of the FE method. We include the FD and FE implementations of the traction-at-split-nodes method for simulation of dynamic rupture propagation. The FD modeling is applied to the model of the deep sedimentary Grenoble basin, France. The FD and FE methods are combined in the hybrid FD-FE method. The hybrid

  10. On the total character of finite groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Prajapati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For a finite group $G$, we study the total character $tau_G$ afforded by the direct sum of all the non-isomorphic irreducible complex representations of $G$. We resolve for several classes of groups (the Camina $p$-groups, the generalized Camina $p$-groups, the groups which admit $(G,Z(G$ as a generalized Camina pair, the problem of existence of a polynomial $f(x in mathbb{Q}[x]$ such that $f(chi = tau_G$ for some irreducible character $chi$ of $G$. As a consequence, we completely determine the $p$-groups of order at most $p^5$ (with $p$ odd which admit such a polynomial. We deduce the characterization that these are the groups $G$ for which $Z(G$ is cyclic and $(G,Z(G$ is a generalized Camina pair and, we conjecture that this holds good for $p$-groups of any order.

  11. Finite element or Galerkin type semidiscrete schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgun, K.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element of Galerkin type semidiscrete method is proposed for numerical solution of a linear hyperbolic partial differential equation. The question of stability is reduced to the stability of a system of ordinary differential equations for which Dahlquist theory applied. Results of separating the part of numerical solution which causes the spurious oscillation near shock-like response of semidiscrete scheme to a step function initial condition are presented. In general all methods produce such oscillatory overshoots on either side of shocks. This overshoot pathology, which displays a behavior similar to Gibb's phenomena of Fourier series, is explained on the basis of dispersion of separated Fourier components which relies on linearized theory to be satisfactory. Expository results represented.

  12. Group-invariant finite Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenefelt, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The computation of the finite Fourier transform of functions is one of the most used computations in crystallography. Since the Fourier transform involved in 3-dimensional, the size of the computation becomes very large even for relatively few sample points along each edge. In this thesis, there is a family of algorithms that reduce the computation of Fourier transform of functions respecting the symmetries. Some properties of these algorithms are: (1) The algorithms make full use of the group of symmetries of a crystal. (2) The algorithms can be factored and combined according to the prime factorization of the number of points in the sample space. (3) The algorithms are organized into a family using the group structure of the crystallographic groups to make iterative procedures possible

  13. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravelli, F.; Sindoni, L.; Caccioli, F.; Ududec, C.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  14. A course in finite group representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This graduate-level text provides a thorough grounding in the representation theory of finite groups over fields and rings. The book provides a balanced and comprehensive account of the subject, detailing the methods needed to analyze representations that arise in many areas of mathematics. Key topics include the construction and use of character tables, the role of induction and restriction, projective and simple modules for group algebras, indecomposable representations, Brauer characters, and block theory. This classroom-tested text provides motivation through a large number of worked examples, with exercises at the end of each chapter that test the reader's knowledge, provide further examples and practice, and include results not proven in the text. Prerequisites include a graduate course in abstract algebra, and familiarity with the properties of groups, rings, field extensions, and linear algebra.

  15. Abstract Level Parallelization of Finite Difference Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Vollebregt

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A formalism is proposed for describing finite difference calculations in an abstract way. The formalism consists of index sets and stencils, for characterizing the structure of sets of data items and interactions between data items (“neighbouring relations”. The formalism provides a means for lifting programming to a more abstract level. This simplifies the tasks of performance analysis and verification of correctness, and opens the way for automaticcode generation. The notation is particularly useful in parallelization, for the systematic construction of parallel programs in a process/channel programming paradigm (e.g., message passing. This is important because message passing, unfortunately, still is the only approach that leads to acceptable performance for many more unstructured or irregular problems on parallel computers that have non-uniform memory access times. It will be shown that the use of index sets and stencils greatly simplifies the determination of which data must be exchanged between different computing processes.

  16. Computational structural analysis and finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kaveh, A

    2014-01-01

    Graph theory gained initial prominence in science and engineering through its strong links with matrix algebra and computer science. Moreover, the structure of the mathematics is well suited to that of engineering problems in analysis and design. The methods of analysis in this book employ matrix algebra, graph theory and meta-heuristic algorithms, which are ideally suited for modern computational mechanics. Efficient methods are presented that lead to highly sparse and banded structural matrices. The main features of the book include: application of graph theory for efficient analysis; extension of the force method to finite element analysis; application of meta-heuristic algorithms to ordering and decomposition (sparse matrix technology); efficient use of symmetry and regularity in the force method; and simultaneous analysis and design of structures.

  17. Quality management of finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, John

    1991-09-01

    A quality management system covering the use of finite element analysis is described. The main topics are as follows: acquisition, development and verification of software (including the software suppliers software quality control system), support, documentation, error control, internal software, software acceptance and release; development and qualification of analysis methods, including software evaluation, analysis procedure qualification and documentation, procedure quality checks, control of analysis procedure errors; product design and integrity analysis, including project quality assurance and analysis planning, task specification and allocation, analysis, execution, results checking and analysis records. Other issues include the commercial and business advantages of quality systems, project and technical management and the training and experience of personnel. The items are correlated with the requirements of International Standard Organization 9001.

  18. Finite quasiparticle lifetime in disordered superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemlicka, M.; Neilinger, P.; Trgala, M; Rehak, M; Manca, D.; Grajcar, M.; Szabo, P.; Samuely, P.; Gazi, S.; Hubner, U.; Vinokur, V. M.; Il' ichev, E.

    2015-12-08

    We investigate the complex conductivity of a highly disordered MoC superconducting film with k(F)l approximate to 1, where k(F) is the Fermi wave number and l is the mean free path, derived from experimental transmission characteristics of coplanar waveguide resonators in a wide temperature range below the superconducting transition temperature T-c. We find that the original Mattis-Bardeen model with a finite quasiparticle lifetime, tau, offers a perfect description of the experimentally observed complex conductivity. We show that iota is appreciably reduced by scattering effects. Characteristics of the scattering centers are independently found by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and agree with those determined from the complex conductivity.

  19. Finite conformal quantum gravity and spacetime singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Rachwał, Lesław

    2017-12-01

    We show that a class of finite quantum non-local gravitational theories is conformally invariant at classical as well as at quantum level. This is actually a range of conformal anomaly-free theories in the spontaneously broken phase of the Weyl symmetry. At classical level we show how the Weyl conformal invariance is able to tame all the spacetime singularities that plague not only Einstein gravity, but also local and weakly non-local higher derivative theories. The latter statement is proved by a singularity theorem that applies to a large class of weakly non-local theories. Therefore, we are entitled to look for a solution of the spacetime singularity puzzle in a missed symmetry of nature, namely the Weyl conformal symmetry. Following the seminal paper by Narlikar and Kembhavi, we provide an explicit construction of singularity-free black hole exact solutions in a class of conformally invariant theories.

  20. Resonance Extraction from the Finite Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Molina Peralta, Raquel [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The spectrum of excited hadrons becomes accessible in simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics on the lattice. Extensions of Lüscher's method allow to address multi-channel scattering problems using moving frames or modified boundary conditions to obtain more eigenvalues in finite volume. As these are at different energies, interpolations are needed to relate different eigenvalues and to help determine the amplitude. Expanding the T- or the K-matrix locally provides a controlled scheme by removing the known non-analyticities of thresholds. This can be stabilized by using Chiral Perturbation Theory. Different examples to determine resonance pole parameters and to disentangle resonances from thresholds are dis- cussed, like the scalar meson f0(980) and the excited baryons N(1535)1/2^- and Lambda(1405)1/2^-.

  1. Adaptive finite element method for shape optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Morin, Pedro

    2012-01-16

    We examine shape optimization problems in the context of inexact sequential quadratic programming. Inexactness is a consequence of using adaptive finite element methods (AFEM) to approximate the state and adjoint equations (via the dual weighted residual method), update the boundary, and compute the geometric functional. We present a novel algorithm that equidistributes the errors due to shape optimization and discretization, thereby leading to coarse resolution in the early stages and fine resolution upon convergence, and thus optimizing the computational effort. We discuss the ability of the algorithm to detect whether or not geometric singularities such as corners are genuine to the problem or simply due to lack of resolution - a new paradigm in adaptivity. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  2. Adaptive finite element methods for differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    These Lecture Notes discuss concepts of `self-adaptivity' in the numerical solution of differential equations, with emphasis on Galerkin finite element methods. The key issues are a posteriori error estimation and it automatic mesh adaptation. Besides the traditional approach of energy-norm error control, a new duality-based technique, the Dual Weighted Residual method for goal-oriented error estimation, is discussed in detail. This method aims at economical computation of arbitrary quantities of physical interest by properly adapting the computational mesh. This is typically required in the design cycles of technical applications. For example, the drag coefficient of a body immersed in a viscous flow is computed, then it is minimized by varying certain control parameters, and finally the stability of the resulting flow is investigated by solving an eigenvalue problem. `Goal-oriented' adaptivity is designed to achieve these tasks with minimal cost. At the end of each chapter some exercises are posed in order ...

  3. Finite-Element Modelling of Biotransistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaganapathy PR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current research efforts in biosensor design attempt to integrate biochemical assays with semiconductor substrates and microfluidic assemblies to realize fully integrated lab-on-chip devices. The DNA biotransistor (BioFET is an example of such a device. The process of chemical modification of the FET and attachment of linker and probe molecules is a statistical process that can result in variations in the sensed signal between different BioFET cells in an array. In order to quantify these and other variations and assess their importance in the design, complete physical simulation of the device is necessary. Here, we perform a mean-field finite-element modelling of a short channel, two-dimensional BioFET device. We compare the results of this model with one-dimensional calculation results to show important differences, illustrating the importance of the molecular structure, placement and conformation of DNA in determining the output signal.

  4. Large scale structure statistics: Finite volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, S.; Bouchet, F. R.; Schaeffer, R.

    1994-01-01

    We study finite volume effects on the count probability distribution function PN(l) and the averaged Q-body correlations Xi-barQ (2 less than or = Q less than or equal 5). These statistics are computed for cubic cells, of size l. We use as an example the case of the matter distribution of a cold dark matter (CDM) universe involving approximately 3 x 105 particles. The main effect of the finiteness of the sampled volume is to induce an abrupt cut-off on the function PN(l) at large N. This clear signature makes an analysis of the consequences easy, and one can envisage a correction procedure. As a matter of fact, we demonstrate how an unfair sample can strongly affect the estimates of the functions Xi-barQ for Q greater than or = 3 (and decrease the measured zero of the two-body correlation function). We propose a method to correct for this are fact, or at least to evaluate the corresponding errors. We show that the correlations are systematically underestimated by direct measurements. We find that, once corrected, the statistical properties of the CDM universe appear compatible with the scaling relation SQ identically equals Xi-bar2 exp Q-1 = constant with respect to scale, in the non-linear regime; it was not the case with direct measurments. However, we note a deviation from scaling at scales close to the correlation length. It is probably due to the transition between the highly non-linear regime and the weakly correlated regime, where the functions SQ also seem to present a plateau. We apply the same procedure to simulations with hot dark matter (HDM) and white noise initial conditions, with similar results. Our method thus provides the first accurate measurement of the normalized skewness, S3, and the normalized kurtosis, S4, for three typical models of large scale structure formation in an expanding universe.

  5. QCD and instantons at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.J.; Pisarski, R.D.; Yaffe, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    The current understanding of the behavior of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature is presented. Perturbative methods are used to explore the high-temperature dynamics. At sufficiently high temperatures the plasma of thermal excitations screens all color electric fields and quarks are unconfined. It is believed that the high-temperature theory develops a dynamical mass gap. However in perturbation theory the infrared behavior of magnetic fluctuations is so singular that beyond some order the perturbative expansion breaks down. The topological classification of finite-energy, periodic fields is presented and the classical solutions which minimize the action in each topological sector are examined. These include periodic instantons and magnetic monopoles. At sufficiently high temperature only fields with integral topological charge can contribute to the functional integral. Electric screening completely suppresses the contribution of fields with nonintegral topological charge. Consequently the theta dependence of the free energy at high temperature is dominated by the contribution of instantons. The complete temperature dependence of the instanton density is explicitly computed and large-scale instantons are found to be suppressed. Therefore the effects of instantons may be reliably calculated at sufficiently high temperature. The behavior of the theory in the vicinity of the transition from the high-temperature quark phase to the low-temperature hadronic phase cannot be accurately computed. However, at least in the absence of light quarks, semiclassical techniques and lattice methods may be combined to yield a simple picture of the dynamics valid for both high and low temperature, and to estimate the transition temperature

  6. Finite nucleus Dirac mean field theory and random phase approximation using finite B splines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, J.A.; Furnstahl, R.J.; Rost, E.; Shepard, J.R.; Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309)

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the finite nucleus Dirac mean field spectrum in a Galerkin approach using finite basis splines. We review the method and present results for the relativistic σ-ω model for the closed-shell nuclei 16 O and 40 Ca. We study the convergence of the method as a function of the size of the basis and the closure properties of the spectrum using an energy-weighted dipole sum rule. We apply the method to the Dirac random-phase-approximation response and present results for the isoscalar 1/sup -/ and 3/sup -/ longitudinal form factors of 16 O and 40 Ca. We also use a B-spline spectral representation of the positive-energy projector to evaluate partial energy-weighted sum rules and compare with nonrelativistic sum rule results

  7. Maximum Power Point Characteristics of Generalized Heat Engines with Finite Time and Finite Heat Capacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the problem of optimal power extraction in four-step cycles (two adiabatic and two heat-transfer branches when the finite-rate heat transfer obeys a linear law and the heat reservoirs have finite heat capacities. The heat-transfer branch follows a polytropic process in which the heat capacity of the working fluid stays constant. For the case of ideal gas as working fluid and a given switching time, it is shown that maximum work is obtained at Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency. Our expressions clearly show the dependence on the relative magnitudes of heat capacities of the fluid and the reservoirs. Many previous formulae, including infinite reservoirs, infinite-time cycles, and Carnot-like and non-Carnot-like cycles, are recovered as special cases of our model.

  8. Comparing finite elements and finite differences for developing diffusive models of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roniotis, Alexandros; Marias, Kostas; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Stamatakos, Georgios; Zervakis, Michalis

    2010-01-01

    Glioma is the most aggressive type of brain tumor. Several mathematical models have been developed during the last two decades, towards simulating the mechanisms that govern the development of glioma. The most common models use the diffusion-reaction equation (DRE) for simulating the spatiotemporal variation of tumor cell concentration. The proposed diffusive models have mainly used finite differences (FDs) or finite elements (FEs) for the approximation of the solution of the partial differential DRE. This paper presents experimental results on the comparison of the FEs and FDs, especially focused on the glioma model case. It is studied how the different meshes of brain can affect computational consistency, simulation time and efficiency of the model. The experiments have been studied on a test case, for which there is a known algebraic expression of the solution. Thus, it is possible to calculate the error that the different models yield.

  9. A stabilized finite element method for finite-strain three-field poroelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lorenz; Bordas, Rafel; Kay, David; Tavener, Simon

    2017-07-01

    We construct a stabilized finite-element method to compute flow and finite-strain deformations in an incompressible poroelastic medium. We employ a three-field mixed formulation to calculate displacement, fluid flux and pressure directly and introduce a Lagrange multiplier to enforce flux boundary conditions. We use a low order approximation, namely, continuous piecewise-linear approximation for the displacements and fluid flux, and piecewise-constant approximation for the pressure. This results in a simple matrix structure with low bandwidth. The method is stable in both the limiting cases of small and large permeability. Moreover, the discontinuous pressure space enables efficient approximation of steep gradients such as those occurring due to rapidly changing material coefficients or boundary conditions, both of which are commonly seen in physical and biological applications.

  10. Local dimension and finite time prediction in coupled map lattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tical applications bred vectors are different in two aspects. Firstly, for bred vectors there is no global orthonormalization and secondly, they are finite-amplitude, finite- time vectors. In the following, we discuss how one can formulate BV dimension for spatio-extended systems. Consider a 2D spatially distributed system whose ...

  11. Geotechnical Ultimate Limit State Design Using Finite Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkgreve, R.B.J.; Post, M.

    2015-01-01

    Displacement-based finite element calculations are primarily used for serviceability limit state (SLS) analysis, but the finite element method also offers possibilities for ultimate limit state (ULS) design in geotechnical engineering. The combined use of SLS and ULS calculations with partial safety

  12. Parallel direct solver for finite element modeling of manufacturing processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P.A.F.

    2017-01-01

    The central processing unit (CPU) time is of paramount importance in finite element modeling of manufacturing processes. Because the most significant part of the CPU time is consumed in solving the main system of equations resulting from finite element assemblies, different approaches have been d...

  13. The computation of linear triangular matrices in the finite element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An algorithm is developed for generating the system matrices for the Finite Element Method of solving some classes of second order partial differential equations problems using the linear triangular elements. This algorithm reduces the complexity normally associated with the finite element approximation and makes the ...

  14. A Note on TI-Subgroups of Finite Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A subgroup of a finite group is called a TI-subgroup if H ∩ H x = 1 or for any x ∈ G . In this short note, the finite groups all of whose nonabelian subgroups are TI-subgroups are classified. Author Affiliations. Jiakuan Lu1 Linna Pang1. Department of Mathematics, Guangxi Normal University, Guangxi, Guilin 541004, ...

  15. A geometric toolbox for tetrahedral finite element partitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.; Korotov, S.; Křížek, M.; Axelsson, O.; Karátson, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a survey of some geometric results on tetrahedral partitions and their refinements in a unified manner. They can be used for mesh generation and adaptivity in practical calculations by the finite element method (FEM), and also in theoretical finite element (FE) analysis.

  16. Reliable finite element methods for self-adjoint singular perturbation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that the standard finite element method based on the space Vh of continuous piecewise linear functions is not reliable in solving singular perturbation problems. It is also known that the solution of a two-point boundaryvalue singular perturbation problem admits a decomposition into a regular part and a finite ...

  17. An introduction to the UNCLE finite element scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enderby, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    UNCLE is a completely general finite element scheme which provides common input, output, equation-solving and other facilities for a family of finite element codes for linear and non-linear stress analysis, heat transfer etc. This report describes the concepts on which UNCLE is based and gives a general account of the facilities provided. (author)

  18. Finite approximate controllability for semilinear heat equations in noncylindrical domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Silvano B. de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate finite approximate controllability for semilinear heat equation in noncylindrical domains. First we study the linearized problem and then by an application of the fixed point result of Leray-Schauder we obtain the finite approximate controllability for the semilinear state equation.

  19. Analysis of Tube Drawing Process – A Finite Element Approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the effect of die semi angle on drawing load in cold tube drawing has been investigated numerically using the finite element method. The equation governing the stress distribution was derived and solved using Galerkin finite element method. An isoparametric formulation for the governing equation was utilized ...

  20. Exact Finite Differences. The Derivative on Non Uniformly Spaced Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Martínez-Pérez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We define a finite-differences derivative operation, on a non uniformly spaced partition, which has the exponential function as an exact eigenvector. We discuss some properties of this operator and we propose a definition for the components of a finite-differences momentum operator. This allows us to perform exact discrete calculations.

  1. Investigation of quasi-one-dimensional finite phononic crystal with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the results analysed by the finite element software, ANSYS. We hope that the results will be helpful in practical applications of phononic crystals. Keywords. Finite phononic crystal; band gap; frequency-response functions. PACS Nos 43.20.+g; 43.40.+s; 63.20.−e. 1. Introduction. In recent years, the propagation of classical ...

  2. Recurrent Artificial Neural Networks and Finite State Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisl, Hermann

    It is argued that pessimistic assessments of the adequacy of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for natural language processing (NLP) on the grounds that they have a finite state architecture are unjustified, and that their adequacy in this regard is an empirical issue. First, arguments that counter standard objections to finite state NLP on the…

  3. About the Finite Element Method Applied to Thick Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Ibănescu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches of plates subjected to transverse loads, when the shear force and the actual boundary conditions are considered, by using the Finite Element Method. The isoparametric finite elements create real facilities in formulating the problems and great possibilities in creating adequate computer programs.

  4. Proximinal subspaces of finite codimension in direct sum spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    d(x, A)}. Proximinal subspaces of finite codimension have been studied by various authors (see. [1–4, 7–10]). In this paper we obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for proximinality of subspaces of finite codimension inc0-direct sum of Banach spaces in terms of the proxim- inality of the corresponding subspaces of ...

  5. Olber's Paradox Revisited in a Static and Finite Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Building a Universe populated by stars identical to our Sun and taking into consideration the wave-particle duality of light, the biological limits of the human eye, the finite size of stars and the finiteness of our Universe, we conclude that the sky could very well be dark at night. Besides the human eye, the dominant parameter is the finite…

  6. The Finite and Moving Order Multinomial Universal Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Choon Peng; Pang, Sook Theng

    2013-01-01

    An upper bound for the ratio of wealths of the best constant -rebalanced portfolio to that of the multinomial universal portfolio is derived. The finite- order multinomial universal portfolios can reduce the implementation time and computer-memory requirements for computation. The improved performance of the finite-order portfolios on some selected local stock-price data sets is observed.

  7. Simulation of temperature distribution by finite element analysis on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on exposure to the synchrotron beam has been simulated by finite element analysis. Design of the cooling mechanism for each of these components has been carried out and estimation of the temperature rise has also been done incorporating the cooling mechanism. Keywords. Synchrotron; EXAFS; finite element analysis.

  8. Fourth order compact finite difference method for solving singularly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A numerical method based on finite difference scheme with uniform mesh is presented for solving singularly perturbed two-point boundary value problems of 1D reaction-diffusion equations. First, the derivatives of the given differential equation is replaced by the finite difference approximations and then, solved by using ...

  9. Review on finite element method | Erhunmwun | Journal of Applied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... finite elements, so that it is possible to systematically construct the approximation functions needed in a variational or weighted-residual approximation of the solution of a problem over each element. Keywords: Weak Formulation, Discretisation, Numerical methods, Finite element method, Global equations, Nodal solution ...

  10. THE PRACTICAL ANALYSIS OF FINITE ELEMENTS METHOD ERRORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Bakhova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The most important in the practical plan questions of reliable estimations of finite elementsmethod errors are considered. Definition rules of necessary calculations accuracy are developed. Methodsand ways of the calculations allowing receiving at economical expenditures of computing work the best finalresults are offered.Keywords: error, given the accuracy, finite element method, lagrangian and hermitian elements.

  11. A note on TI-subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A subgroup of a finite group is called a TI-subgroup if H ∩ H x = 1 or for any x ∈ G . In this short note, the finite groups all of whose nonabelian subgroups are TI-subgroups are classified. Author Affiliations. Jiakuan Lu1 Linna Pang1. Department of Mathematics, Guangxi Normal University, Guangxi, Guilin 541004, ...

  12. Removing the Restrictions Imposed on Finite State Machines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determines an effective method of removing the fixed and finite state amount of memory that restricts finite state machines from carrying out compilation jobs that require larger amount of memory. The study is ... The conclusion reviewed the various steps followed and made projections for further reading. Keyword: ...

  13. Finite Groups with Given Quantitative Non-Nilpotent Subgroups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2014-01-01

    As an extension of Shi and Zhang's 2011 article [4], we prove that any finite group having at most 23 non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is solvable except for G ≅ A 5 or SL(2, 5), and any finite group having at most three conjugacy classes of non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups...

  14. On Chudnovsky-Based Arithmetic Algorithms in Finite Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Atighehchi, Kevin; Ballet, Stéphane; Bonnecaze, Alexis; Rolland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to a new construction of the so-called Chudnovsky-Chudnovsky multiplication algorithm, we design efficient algorithms for both the exponentiation and the multiplication in finite fields. They are tailored to hardware implementation and they allow computations to be parallelized while maintaining a low number of bilinear multiplications. We give an example with the finite field ${\\mathbb F}_{16^{13}}$.

  15. Finite-state pre-processing for natural language analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Robbert Paul

    2005-01-01

    Wide-coverage natural language parsers are typically not very efficient. Finite-state techniques are less powerful, but offer the advantage of being very fast, and good at representing language locally. This dissertation constitutes empirical research into the construction and use of a finite-state

  16. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) corrections,. Hall current and radiative heat-loss function on the thermal instability of an infinite homogeneous, viscous plasma incorporating the effects of finite electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and permeability for star formation in interstellar medium have been ...

  17. Quantum Shape-Phase Transitions in Finite Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum shape-phase transitions in finite nuclei are considered in the framework of the interacting boson model. Critical-point Hamiltonians for first- and second-order transitions are identified by resolving them into intrinsic and collective parts. Suitable wave functions and finite-N estimates for observables at the critical-points are derived

  18. Quantum Shape-Phase Transitions in Finite Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2007-05-15

    Quantum shape-phase transitions in finite nuclei are considered in the framework of the interacting boson model. Critical-point Hamiltonians for first- and second-order transitions are identified by resolving them into intrinsic and collective parts. Suitable wave functions and finite-N estimates for observables at the critical-points are derived.

  19. Counting Subspaces of a Finite Vector Space – 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Counting Subspaces of a Finite Vector Space – 2. Amritanshu Prasad. Keywords. Gaussian binomial coefficients, finite vector spaces. Amritanshu Prasad has been at the Institute of. Mathematical Sciences,. Chennai since 2003. His mathematical interests include representation theory, harmonic analysis, and combinatorics ...

  20. On the finiteness properties of Matlis duals of local cohomology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    On the other hand, Brodmann and Lashgari [2] and Khashyarmanesh and Salarian [18] have shown that the first non-finitely generated local cohomology module has only finitely many associated primes. For some other work on this question, we refer the reader to [22],. [23], [28], [7], [10], [15] and [16]. However, examples ...

  1. A Novel Multiscale Design of Interfaces for Polymeric Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding...the edges in the x2−x3 plane and the interfaces between the layers. Eight noded linear hexahedral elements (C3D8 in ABAQUS notation) are used to mesh...script A pythonTM script is written that reads the ABAQUS input file and writes the multi-point con- straints. Working procedure of the pythonTM

  2. Cycles through all finite vertex sets in infinite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kundgen, Andre; Li, Binlong; Thomassen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    that every one-ended planar cubic 3-connected bipartite graph has a Hamiltonian curve. It is also equivalent to the statement that every planar cubic 3-connected bipartite graph with a nowhere-zero 3-flow (with no restriction on the number of ends) has a Hamiltonian curve. However, there are 7-ended planar......A closed curve in the Freudenthal compactification |G| of an infinite locally finite graph G is called a Hamiltonian curve if it meets every vertex of G exactly once (and hence it meets every end at least once). We prove that |G| has a Hamiltonian curve if and only if every finite vertex set of G...... is contained in a cycle of G. We apply this to extend a number of results and conjectures on finite graphs to Hamiltonian curves in infinite locally finite graphs. For example, Barnette’s conjecture (that every finite planar cubic 3-connected bipartite graph is Hamiltonian) is equivalent to the statement...

  3. Finite entanglement entropy and spectral dimension in quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzano, Michele; Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-12-01

    What are the conditions on a field theoretic model leading to a finite entanglement entropy density? We prove two very general results: (1) Ultraviolet finiteness of a theory does not guarantee finiteness of the entropy density; (2) If the spectral dimension of the spatial boundary across which the entropy is calculated is non-negative at all scales, then the entanglement entropy cannot be finite. These conclusions, which we verify in several examples, negatively affect all quantum-gravity models, since their spectral dimension is always positive. Possible ways out are considered, including abandoning the definition of the entanglement entropy in terms of the boundary return probability or admitting an analytic continuation (not a regularization) of the usual definition. In the second case, one can get a finite entanglement entropy density in multi-fractional theories and causal dynamical triangulations.

  4. An efficient finite element solution for gear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, C. G.; Parker, R. G.; Vijayakar, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    A finite element formulation for the dynamic response of gear pairs is proposed. Following an established approach in lumped parameter gear dynamic models, the static solution is used as the excitation in a frequency domain solution of the finite element vibration model. The nonlinear finite element/contact mechanics formulation provides accurate calculation of the static solution and average mesh stiffness that are used in the dynamic simulation. The frequency domain finite element calculation of dynamic response compares well with numerically integrated (time domain) finite element dynamic results and previously published experimental results. Simulation time with the proposed formulation is two orders of magnitude lower than numerically integrated dynamic results. This formulation admits system level dynamic gearbox response, which may include multiple gear meshes, flexible shafts, rolling element bearings, housing structures, and other deformable components.

  5. A modified finite element procedure for underwater shock analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Using the regular finite element method for analyzing wave propagation problems presents difficulties: (a) The finite element mesh gives spurious reflection of the traveling wave and (b) Since a finite element model has to have a finite boundary, the wave is reflected by the outside boundary. However, for underwater shock problems, only the response of the structure is of major interest, not the behavior of the wave itself, and the shock wave can be assumed to be spherical. By taking advantage of the limited scope of the underwater shock problem, a finite element procedure can be developed that eliminates the above difficulties. This procedure not only can give very accurate solutions but it may also include structural nonlinearities and effect of cavitation

  6. Finite entanglement entropy and spectral dimension in quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzano, Michele; Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    What are the conditions on a field theoretic model leading to a finite entanglement entropy density? We prove two very general results: (1) Ultraviolet finiteness of a theory does not guarantee finiteness of the entropy density; (2) If the spectral dimension of the spatial boundary across which the entropy is calculated is non-negative at all scales, then the entanglement entropy cannot be finite. These conclusions, which we verify in several examples, negatively affect all quantum-gravity models, since their spectral dimension is always positive. Possible ways out are considered, including abandoning the definition of the entanglement entropy in terms of the boundary return probability or admitting an analytic continuation (not a regularization) of the usual definition. In the second case, one can get a finite entanglement entropy density in multi-fractional theories and causal dynamical triangulations. (orig.)

  7. Finite entanglement entropy and spectral dimension in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzano, Michele [Rome Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Rome (Italy); Calcagni, Gianluca [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia

    2017-12-15

    What are the conditions on a field theoretic model leading to a finite entanglement entropy density? We prove two very general results: (1) Ultraviolet finiteness of a theory does not guarantee finiteness of the entropy density; (2) If the spectral dimension of the spatial boundary across which the entropy is calculated is non-negative at all scales, then the entanglement entropy cannot be finite. These conclusions, which we verify in several examples, negatively affect all quantum-gravity models, since their spectral dimension is always positive. Possible ways out are considered, including abandoning the definition of the entanglement entropy in terms of the boundary return probability or admitting an analytic continuation (not a regularization) of the usual definition. In the second case, one can get a finite entanglement entropy density in multi-fractional theories and causal dynamical triangulations. (orig.)

  8. Compton scattering at finite temperature: thermal field dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juraev, F.I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Compton scattering is a classical problem of quantum electrodynamics and has been studied in its early beginnings. Perturbation theory and Feynman diagram technique enables comprehensive analysis of this problem on the basis of which famous Klein-Nishina formula is obtained [1, 2]. In this work this problem is extended to the case of finite temperature. Finite-temperature effects in Compton scattering is of practical importance for various processes in relativistic thermal plasmas in astrophysics. Recently Compton effect have been explored using closed-time path formalism with temperature corrections estimated [3]. It was found that the thermal cross section can be larger than that for zero-temperature by several orders of magnitude for the high temperature realistic in astrophysics [3]. In our work we use a main tool to account finite-temperature effects, a real-time finite-temperature quantum field theory, so-called thermofield dynamics [4, 5]. Thermofield dynamics is a canonical formalism to explore field-theoretical processes at finite temperature. It consists of two steps, doubling of Fock space and Bogolyubov transformations. Doubling leads to appearing additional degrees of freedom, called tilded operators which together with usual field operators create so-called thermal doublet. Bogolyubov transformations make field operators temperature-dependent. Using this formalism we treat Compton scattering at finite temperature via replacing in transition amplitude zero-temperature propagators by finite-temperature ones. As a result finite-temperature extension of the Klein-Nishina formula is obtained in which differential cross section is represented as a sum of zero-temperature cross section and finite-temperature correction. The obtained result could be useful in quantum electrodynamics of lasers and for relativistic thermal plasma processes in astrophysics where correct account of finite-temperature effects is important. (author)

  9. Comparison of finite difference and finite element methods for simulating two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehner, Marcel; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Saenger, Erik H.; Steeb, Holger Karl

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional scattering of elastic waves in a medium containing a circular heterogeneity is investigated with an analytical solution and numerical wave propagation simulations. Different combinations of finite difference methods (FDM) and finite element methods (FEM) are used to numerically solve

  10. A finite element scheme to study the nonlinear optical response of a finite grating without and with defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suryanto, A.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.; Hammer, Manfred; Hoekstra, Hugo

    We present a simple numerical scheme based on the finite element method (FEM) using transparent-influx boundary conditions to study the nonlinear optical response of a finite one-dimensional grating with Kerr medium. Restricting first to the linear case, we improve the standard FEM to get a fourth

  11. Computations in finite-dimensional Lie algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Cohen

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes progress made in context with the construction of a general library of Lie algebra algorithms, called ELIAS (Eindhoven Lie Algebra System, within the computer algebra package GAP. A first sketch of the package can be found in Cohen and de Graaf[1]. Since then, in a collaborative effort with G. Ivanyos, the authors have continued to develop algorithms which were implemented in ELIAS by the second author. These activities are part of a bigger project, called ACELA and financed by STW, the Dutch Technology Foundation, which aims at an interactive book on Lie algebras (cf. Cohen and Meertens [2]. This paper gives a global description of the main ways in which to present Lie algebras on a computer. We focus on the transition from a Lie algebra abstractly given by an array of structure constants to a Lie algebra presented as a subalgebra of the Lie algebra of n×n matrices. We describe an algorithm typical of the structure analysis of a finite-dimensional Lie algebra: finding a Levi subalgebra of a Lie algebra.

  12. Exact Fit of Simple Finite Mixture Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Tasche

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available How to forecast next year’s portfolio-wide credit default rate based on last year’s default observations and the current score distribution? A classical approach to this problem consists of fitting a mixture of the conditional score distributions observed last year to the current score distribution. This is a special (simple case of a finite mixture model where the mixture components are fixed and only the weights of the components are estimated. The optimum weights provide a forecast of next year’s portfolio-wide default rate. We point out that the maximum-likelihood (ML approach to fitting the mixture distribution not only gives an optimum but even an exact fit if we allow the mixture components to vary but keep their density ratio fixed. From this observation we can conclude that the standard default rate forecast based on last year’s conditional default rates will always be located between last year’s portfolio-wide default rate and the ML forecast for next year. As an application example, cost quantification is then discussed. We also discuss how the mixture model based estimation methods can be used to forecast total loss. This involves the reinterpretation of an individual classification problem as a collective quantification problem.

  13. Control volume finite element method for radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, M.; Askri, F.; Rousse, D.; Ben Nasrallah, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a new methodology is presented by the authors for the numerical treatment of radiative heat transfer in emitting, absorbing and scattering media. This methodology is based on the utilisation of Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) and the use, for the first time, of matrix formulation of the discretized Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The advantages of the proposed methodology is to avoid problems that confronted when previous techniques are used to predict radiative heat transfer, essentially, in complex geometries and when there is scattering and/or non-black boundaries surfaces. Besides, the new formulation of the discretized RTE presented in this paper makes it possible to solve the algebraic system by direct or iterative numerical methods. The theoretical background of CVFEM and matrix formulation is presented in the text. The proposed technique is applied to different test problems, and the results compared favourably against other published works. Moreover this paper discusses in detail the effects of some radiative parameters, such as optical thickness and walls emissivities on the spatial evolution of the radiant heat flux. The numerical simulation of radiative heat transfer for different cases using the algorithm proposed in this work has shown that the developed computer procedure needs an accurate CPU time and is exempt of any numerical oscillations

  14. Liouville Cosmology at Zero and Finite Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Westmuckett, M

    2006-01-01

    We discuss cosmology in the context of Liouville strings, characterized by a central-charge deficit Q^2, in which target time is identified with (the world-sheet zero mode of the) Liouville field: Q-Cosmology. We use a specific example of colliding brane worlds to illustrate the phase diagram of this cosmological framework. The collision provides the necessary initial cosmological instability, expressed as a departure from conformal invariance in the underlying string model. The brane motion provides a way of breaking target-space supersymmetry, and leads to various phases of the brane and bulk Universes. Specifically, we find a hot metastable phase for the bulk string Universe soon after the brane collision in which supersymmetry is broken, which we describe by means of a subcritical world-sheet sigma model dressed by a space-like Liouville field, representing finite temperature (Euclidean time). This phase is followed by an inflationary phase for the brane Universe, in which the bulk string excitations are ...

  15. Exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Agata; Chmiel, Anna; Fronczak, Piotr

    2018-02-01

    This paper outlines an exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems. In this approach, cluster sizes and time are discrete and the binary aggregation alone governs the time evolution of the systems. By considering the growth histories of all possible clusters, an exact expression is derived for the probability of a coagulating system with an arbitrary kernel being found in a given cluster configuration when monodisperse initial conditions are applied. Then this probability is used to calculate the time-dependent distribution for the number of clusters of a given size, the average number of such clusters, and that average's standard deviation. The correctness of our general expressions is proved based on the (analytical and numerical) results obtained for systems with the constant kernel. In addition, the results obtained are compared with the results arising from the solutions to the mean-field Smoluchowski coagulation equation, indicating its weak points. The paper closes with a brief discussion on the extensibility to other systems of the approach presented herein, emphasizing the issue of arbitrary initial conditions.

  16. Nonequilibrum behaviour of finite gravitating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heggie, Douglas C

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of N equal point masses with an inverse square law of attraction is one of the fundamental problems of statistical physics, because of its numerous applications in astrophysics, and its simplicity. But the simplicity is deceptive. From a theoretical point of view this problem is one of the hardest because it is scale-free, the interaction is long-range, and the interaction exhibits a short-range divergence. Therefore theoretical information is best developed for systems with artificial cutoffs at large and small distances. From the point of view of simulations, the problem is hard because the computational effort grows roughly as N 3 , and because of fundamental problems in simulating a chaotic system. This talk reviews the relationship between these two approaches, with particular emphasis on simulations of isolated systems (i.e. with no boundary). We emphasise the range of time scales on which different non-equilibrium phenomena operate, and focus on those which are driven by relaxation. We discuss the characteristics of core collapse and gravothermal oscillations, where both basic results of statistical mechanics and phenomenological toy models are particularly instructive. We also review the long-term fate of finite isolated systems

  17. Finite element modelling of composite castellated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Richard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, castellated beam becomes popular in building structural as beam members. This is due to several advantages of castellated beam such as increased depth without any additional mass, passing the underfloor service ducts without changing of story elevation. However, the presence of holes can develop various local effects such as local buckling, lateral torsional buckling caused by compression force at the flange section of the steel beam. Many studies have investigated the failure mechanism of castellated beam and one technique which can prevent the beam fall into local failure is the use of reinforced concrete slab as lateral support on castellated beam, so called composite castellated beam. Besides of preventing the local failure of castellated beam, the concrete slab can increase the plasticity moment of the composite castellated beam section which can deliver into increasing the ultimate load of the beam. The aim of this numerical studies of composite castellated beam on certain loading condition (monotonic quasi-static loading. ABAQUS was used for finite element modelling purpose and compared with the experimental test for checking the reliability of the model. The result shows that the ultimate load of the composite castellated beam reached 6.24 times than the ultimate load of the solid I beam and 1.2 times compared the composite beam.

  18. Jauch-Piron logics with finiteness conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogalewicz, V.

    1991-01-01

    An event structure (so-called quantum logic) of a quantum mechanical system is commonly assumed to be an orthomodular poset L. A state of such a system is then interpreted as a probability measure on L. It turns out that the orthomodular posets which may potentially serve as logics must have reasonably rich spaces of states. Moreover, the following condition on the state space appears among the axioms of a quantum system: if Φ is a state on a logic L, and Φ(a) = Φ(b) = 1 for some a, b element-of L, then there is a c element-of L such that c ≤ a, c ≤ b, and Φ(c) = 1. Such a state is said to be a Jauch-Piron state. If all states on L fulfill this condition, then L is called a Jauch-Piron logic. The condition was originally introduced by Jauch (1968) and Piron (1976). The author investigates unital Jauch-Piron logics with finitely many blocks (maximal Boolean subalgebras). He shows that such a logic is always Boolean, i.e., it represents a purely classical system. In other words, and orthomodular poset must have infinitely many blocks in order to describe a (nonclassical) quantum system

  19. Iterative solutions of finite difference diffusion equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.; Khandekar, D.C.; Trasi, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The heterogeneous arrangement of materials and the three-dimensional character of the reactor physics problems encountered in the design and operation of nuclear reactors makes it necessary to use numerical methods for solution of the neutron diffusion equations which are based on the linear Boltzmann equation. The commonly used numerical method for this purpose is the finite difference method. It converts the diffusion equations to a system of algebraic equations. In practice, the size of this resulting algebraic system is so large that the iterative methods have to be used. Most frequently used iterative methods are discussed. They include : (1) basic iterative methods for one-group problems, (2) iterative methods for eigenvalue problems, and (3) iterative methods which use variable acceleration parameters. Application of Chebyshev theorem to iterative methods is discussed. The extension of the above iterative methods to multigroup neutron diffusion equations is also considered. These methods are applicable to elliptic boundary value problems in reactor design studies in particular, and to elliptic partial differential equations in general. Solution of sample problems is included to illustrate their applications. The subject matter is presented in as simple a manner as possible. However, a working knowledge of matrix theory is presupposed. (M.G.B.)

  20. Finite-time thermodynamics and simulated annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, B.

    1989-01-01

    When the general, global optimization technique simulated annealing was introduced by Kirkpatrick et al. (1983), this mathematical algorithm was based on an analogy to the statistical mechanical behavior of real physical systems like spin glasses, hence the name. In the intervening span of years the method has proven exceptionally useful for a great variety of extremely complicated problems, notably NP-problems like the travelling salesman, DNA sequencing, and graph partitioning. Only a few highly optimized heuristic algorithms (e.g. Lin, Kernighan 1973) have outperformed simulated annealing on their respective problems (Johnson et al. 1989). Simulated annealing in its current form relies only on the static quantity 'energy' to describe the system, whereas questions of rate, as in the temperature path (annealing schedule, see below), are left to intuition. We extent the connection to physical systems and take over further components from thermodynamics like ensemble, heat capacity, and relaxation time. Finally we refer to finite-time thermodynamics (Andresen, Salomon, Berry 1984) for a dynamical estimate of the optimal temperature path. (orig.)

  1. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  2. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N 2 , and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10 15 /cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 μsec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 μF, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption

  3. Finite quantum physics and noncommutative geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, A.P.; Ercolessi, E.; Landi, G.; Teotonio-Sobrinho, P.; Lizzi, F.; Sparano, G.

    1994-04-01

    Conventional discrete approximations of a manifold do not preserve its nontrivial topological features. In this article we describe an approximation scheme due to Sorkin which reproduces physically important aspects of manifold topology with striking fidelity. The approximating topological spaces in this scheme are partially ordered sets (posets). Now, in ordinary quantum physics on a manifold M, continuous probability densities generate the commutative C * -algebra C(M) of continuous functions on M. It has a fundamental physical significance, containing the information to reconstruct the topology of M, and serving to specify the domains of observables like the Hamiltonian. For a poset, the role of this algebra is assumed by a noncommutative C * -algebra A. As noncommutative geometries are based on noncommutative C * -algebra, we therefore have a remarkable connection between finite approximations to quantum physics and noncommutative geometries. Varies methods for doing quantum physics using A are explored. Particular attention is paid to developing numerically viable approximation schemes which at the same time preserve important topological features of continuum physics. (author). 21 refs, 13 figs

  4. Finite Cosmology and a CMB Cold Spot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, R.J.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Bjorken, J.D.; /SLAC; Overduin, J.M.; /Stanford U., HEPL

    2006-03-20

    The standard cosmological model posits a spatially flat universe of infinite extent. However, no observation, even in principle, could verify that the matter extends to infinity. In this work we model the universe as a finite spherical ball of dust and dark energy, and obtain a lower limit estimate of its mass and present size: the mass is at least 5 x 10{sup 23}M{sub {circle_dot}} and the present radius is at least 50 Gly. If we are not too far from the dust-ball edge we might expect to see a cold spot in the cosmic microwave background, and there might be suppression of the low multipoles in the angular power spectrum. Thus the model may be testable, at least in principle. We also obtain and discuss the geometry exterior to the dust ball; it is Schwarzschild-de Sitter with a naked singularity, and provides an interesting picture of cosmogenesis. Finally we briefly sketch how radiation and inflation eras may be incorporated into the model.

  5. Prediction with measurement errors in finite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Julio M; Stanek, Edward J; Lencina, Viviana B; González, Luz Mery; Li, Wenjun; Martino, Silvina San

    2012-02-01

    We address the problem of selecting the best linear unbiased predictor (BLUP) of the latent value (e.g., serum glucose fasting level) of sample subjects with heteroskedastic measurement errors. Using a simple example, we compare the usual mixed model BLUP to a similar predictor based on a mixed model framed in a finite population (FPMM) setup with two sources of variability, the first of which corresponds to simple random sampling and the second, to heteroskedastic measurement errors. Under this last approach, we show that when measurement errors are subject-specific, the BLUP shrinkage constants are based on a pooled measurement error variance as opposed to the individual ones generally considered for the usual mixed model BLUP. In contrast, when the heteroskedastic measurement errors are measurement condition-specific, the FPMM BLUP involves different shrinkage constants. We also show that in this setup, when measurement errors are subject-specific, the usual mixed model predictor is biased but has a smaller mean squared error than the FPMM BLUP which point to some difficulties in the interpretation of such predictors.

  6. Jauch-Piron logics with finiteness conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogalewicz, V. (Technical Univ. of Prague, (Czechoslovakia))

    1991-04-01

    An event structure (so-called quantum logic) of a quantum mechanical system is commonly assumed to be an orthomodular poset L. A state of such a system is then interpreted as a probability measure on L. It turns out that the orthomodular posets which may potentially serve as logics must have reasonably rich spaces of states. Moreover, the following condition on the state space appears among the axioms of a quantum system: if {Phi} is a state on a logic L, and {Phi}(a) = {Phi}(b) = 1 for some a, b {element of} L, then there is a c {element of} L such that c {le} a, c {le} b, and {Phi}(c) = 1. Such a state is said to be a Jauch-Piron state. If all states on L fulfill this condition, then L is called a Jauch-Piron logic. The condition was originally introduced by Jauch (1968) and Piron (1976). The author investigates unital Jauch-Piron logics with finitely many blocks (maximal Boolean subalgebras). He shows that such a logic is always Boolean, i.e., it represents a purely classical system. In other words, and orthomodular poset must have infinitely many blocks in order to describe a (nonclassical) quantum system.

  7. Discrete phase space based on finite fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, Kathleen S.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Wootters, William K.

    2004-01-01

    The original Wigner function provides a way of representing in phase space the quantum states of systems with continuous degrees of freedom. Wigner functions have also been developed for discrete quantum systems, one popular version being defined on a 2Nx2N discrete phase space for a system with N orthogonal states. Here we investigate an alternative class of discrete Wigner functions, in which the field of real numbers that labels the axes of continuous phase space is replaced by a finite field having N elements. There exists such a field if and only if N is a power of a prime; so our formulation can be applied directly only to systems for which the state-space dimension takes such a value. Though this condition may seem limiting, we note that any quantum computer based on qubits meets the condition and can thus be accommodated within our scheme. The geometry of our NxN phase space also leads naturally to a method of constructing a complete set of N+1 mutually unbiased bases for the state space

  8. Probabilistic finite element modeling of waste rollover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleel, M.A.; Cofer, W.F.; Al-fouqaha, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    Stratification of the wastes in many Hanford storage tanks has resulted in sludge layers which are capable of retaining gases formed by chemical and/or radiolytic reactions. As the gas is produced, the mechanisms of gas storage evolve until the resulting buoyancy in the sludge leads to instability, at which point the sludge ''rolls over'' and a significant volume of gas is suddenly released. Because the releases may contain flammable gases, these episodes of release are potentially hazardous. Mitigation techniques are desirable for more controlled releases at more frequent intervals. To aid the mitigation efforts, a methodology for predicting of sludge rollover at specific times is desired. This methodology would then provide a rational basis for the development of a schedule for the mitigation procedures. In addition, a knowledge of the sensitivity of the sludge rollovers to various physical and chemical properties within the tanks would provide direction for efforts to reduce the frequency and severity of these events. In this report, the use of probabilistic finite element analyses for computing the probability of rollover and the sensitivity of rollover probability to various parameters is described

  9. Effects of symmetry breaking in finite quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, J.L. [Department of Physics, City College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Nazmitdinov, R.G. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca 07122 (Spain); Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Yukalov, V.I., E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The review considers the peculiarities of symmetry breaking and symmetry transformations and the related physical effects in finite quantum systems. Some types of symmetry in finite systems can be broken only asymptotically. However, with a sufficiently large number of particles, crossover transitions become sharp, so that symmetry breaking happens similarly to that in macroscopic systems. This concerns, in particular, global gauge symmetry breaking, related to Bose–Einstein condensation and superconductivity, or isotropy breaking, related to the generation of quantum vortices, and the stratification in multicomponent mixtures. A special type of symmetry transformation, characteristic only for finite systems, is the change of shape symmetry. These phenomena are illustrated by the examples of several typical mesoscopic systems, such as trapped atoms, quantum dots, atomic nuclei, and metallic grains. The specific features of the review are: (i) the emphasis on the peculiarities of the symmetry breaking in finite mesoscopic systems; (ii) the analysis of common properties of physically different finite quantum systems; (iii) the manifestations of symmetry breaking in the spectra of collective excitations in finite quantum systems. The analysis of these features allows for the better understanding of the intimate relation between the type of symmetry and other physical properties of quantum systems. This also makes it possible to predict new effects by employing the analogies between finite quantum systems of different physical nature.

  10. Relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, which has been proposed recently in an astrophysical context. Assuming a constant distribution of protons inside the nucleus of finite size avoids severe divergence of the electron density with respect to a point-like nucleus. A formula for the nuclear radius is chosen to treat any element. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model matches the two asymptotic regimes, i.e., the non-relativistic and the ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models. The equation of state is considered in detail. For each version of the finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, the pressure, the kinetic energy, and the entropy are calculated. The internal energy and free energy are also considered. The thermodynamic consistency of the three models is considered by working from the free energy. The virial question is also studied in the three cases as well as the relationship with the density functional theory. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model is far more involved than the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models that are very close to each other from a mathematical point of view.

  11. Finite temperature LGT in a finite box with BPS monopole boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Molodtsov, S.V.; Mueller-Preussker, M.; Veselov, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Finite temperature SU(2) lattice gauge theory is investigated in a 3D cubic box with fixed boundary conditions (b.c.) provided by a discretized, static BPS monopole solution with varying core scale μ. For discrete μ-values we find stable classical solutions either of electro-magnetic ('dyon') or of purely magnetic type inside the box. Near the deconfinement transition we study the influence of the b.c. on the quantized fields inside the box. In contrast to the purely magnetic background field case, for the dyon case we observe confinement for temperatures above the usual critical one

  12. Fibonacci-Hubbard chain at zero and finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sanjay [Theoretical Condensed Matter (TCMP) Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)]. E-mail: sanjay@cmp.saha.ernet.in; Sil, Shreekantha [Department of Physics, Vishwabharati, Shantiniketan, Birbhum (India); Bhattacharyya, Bibhas [Department of Physics, Scottish Church College, 1 and 3, Urquhart Square, Kolkata 700006 (India)

    2005-01-31

    We have studied finite-sized single band Hubbard chains with Fibonacci modulation for half-filling within a mean field approximation. The ground state properties, together with the DC conductivity both at zero and non-zero temperatures, are calculated for such quasiperiodic Hubbard chains. While a reduction in the conductivity is found due to strong electronic interaction or strong Fibonacci modulation, a competition between these two is observed to enhance the conductivity. The results at finite temperatures also illustrate some interesting features of such finite-sized systems.

  13. Finite element solution algorithm for incompressible fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element solution algorithm is established for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations governing the transient motion of a viscous incompressible fluid, i.e., hydrodynamics. Dependent variable transformation renders the differential equation description uniformly elliptic. The finite element algorithm is established using the Galerkin criterion on a local basis within the Method of Weighted Residuals. It is unconstrained with respect to system linearity, computational mesh uniformity or solution domain closure regularity. The finite element matrices are established using a linear 'natural coordinate function' description. Computational solutions using the COMOC computer program illustrate the various features of the algorithm including recirculating flows.

  14. An adaptive discontinuous finite element method for the transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, J.; Walter, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a discontinuous finite element method. In our approach, it is possible to combine the advantages of finite element and finite difference methods. The main ingredients are numerical flux approximation and local orthogonal basis functions. The scheme is defined on arbitrary triangulations and two different error indicators are derived. Especially the second one is closely connected to our approach and able to handle arbitrary varying flow directions. Numerical results are given for boundary value problems in two dimensions. They demonstrate the performance of the scheme, combined with the two error indicators

  15. Finite Element Analysis of Fluid-Conveying Timoshenko Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Liang Chu

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A general finite element formulation using cubic Hermitian interpolation for dynamic analysis of pipes conveying fluid is presented. Both the effects of shearing deformations and rotary inertia are considered. The development retains the use of the classical four degrees-of-freedom for a two-node element. The effect of moving fluid is treated as external distributed forces on the support pipe and the fluid finite element matrices are derived from the virtual work done due to the fluid inertia forces. Finite element matrices for both the support pipe and moving fluid are derived and given explicitly. A numerical example is given to demonstrate the validity of the model.

  16. A wave finite element analysis of the passive cochlea

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Ni, Guangjian; Mace, Brian R.; Lineton, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Current models of the cochlea can be characterized as being either based on the assumed propagation of a single slow wave, which provides good insight, or involve the solution of a numerical model, such as in the finite element method, which allows the incorporation of more detailed anatomical features. In this paper it is shown how the wave finite element method can be used to decompose the results of a finite element calculation in terms of wave components, which allows the insight of the w...

  17. Defining Effectiveness Using Finite Sets A Study on Computability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macedo, Hugo Daniel dos Santos; Haeusler, Edward H.; Garcia, Alex

    2016-01-01

    finite sets and uses category theory as its mathematical foundations. The model relies on the fact that every function between finite sets is computable, and that the finite composition of such functions is also computable. Our approach is an alternative to the traditional model-theoretical based works...... which rely on (ZFC) set theory as a mathematical foundation, and our approach is also novel when compared to the already existing works using category theory to approach computability results. Moreover, we show how to encode Turing machine computations in the model, thus concluding the model expresses...

  18. Crossing fitness canyons by a finite population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B; Bratus, Alexander S; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2017-06-01

    We consider the Wright-Fisher model of the finite population evolution on a fitness landscape defined in the sequence space by a path of nearly neutral mutations. We study a specific structure of the fitness landscape: One of the intermediate mutations on the mutation path results in either a large fitness value (climbing up a fitness hill) or a low fitness value (crossing a fitness canyon), the rest of the mutations besides the last one are neutral, and the last sequence has much higher fitness than any intermediate sequence. We derive analytical formulas for the first arrival time of the mutant with two point mutations. For the first arrival problem for the further mutants in the case of canyon crossing, we analytically deduce how the mean first arrival time scales with the population size and fitness difference. The location of the canyon on the path of sequences has a crucial role. If the canyon is at the beginning of the path, then it significantly prolongs the first arrival time; otherwise it just slightly changes it. Furthermore, the fitness hill at the beginning of the path strongly prolongs the arrival time period; however, the hill located near the end of the path shortens it. We optimize the first arrival time by applying a nonzero selection to the intermediate sequences. We extend our results and provide a scaling for the valley crossing time via the depth of the canyon and population size in the case of a fitness canyon at the first position. Our approach is useful for understanding some complex evolution systems, e.g., the evolution of cancer.

  19. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 1. Formulation of the finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Ding, Lifeng; Kruft, Marc-Anton; Curcó, David

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to analyse materials at the atomic scale. However, MD has high computational demands, which may inhibit its use for simulations of structures involving large numbers of atoms such as amorphous polymer structures. An atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) is presented in this study with significantly lower computational demands than MD. Due to the reduced computational demands, AFEM is suitable for the analysis of Young's modulus of amorphous polymer structures. This is of particular interest when studying the degradation of bioresorbable polymers, which is the topic of an accompanying paper. AFEM is derived from the inter-atomic potential energy functions of an MD force field. The nonlinear MD functions were adapted to enable static linear analysis. Finite element formulations were derived to represent interatomic potential energy functions between two, three and four atoms. Validation of the AFEM was conducted through its application to atomic structures for crystalline and amorphous poly(lactide). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Finite size scaling study of Nf=4 finite density QCD on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kuramashi, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Yoshifumi; Takeda, Shinji; Ukawa, Akira

    2013-11-01

    We explore the phase space spanned by the temperature and the chemical potential for four-flavor lattice QCD using the Wilson-clover quark action. In order to determine the order of the phase transition, we apply finite-size scaling analyses to gluonic and quark observables, including plaquette, Polyakov loop, and quark number density, and examine their susceptibility, skewness, kurtosis, and Challa-Landau-Binder cumulant. Simulations were carried out on lattices of a temporal size fixed at Nt=4 and spatial sizes chosen from 63 up to 103. Configurations were generated using the phase-reweighting approach, while the value of the phase of the quark determinant was carefully monitored. The μ-parameter reweighting technique is employed to precisely locate the point of the phase transition. Among various approximation schemes for calculating the ratio of quark determinants needed for μ reweighting, we found the Taylor expansion of the logarithm of the quark determinant to be the most reliable. Our finite-size analyses show that the transition is first order at (β,κ,μ/T)=(1.58,0.1385,0.584±0.008), where (mπ/mρ,T/mρ)=(0.822,0.154). It weakens considerably at (β,κ,μ/T)=(1.60,0.1371,0.821±0.008), where (mπ/mρ,T/mρ)=(0.839,0.150), and a crossover rather than a first-order phase transition cannot be ruled out.

  1. Coupled Finite Volume and Finite Element Method Analysis of a Complex Large-Span Roof Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szafran J.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to present coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics and structural analysis for the precise determination of wind impact on internal forces and deformations of structural elements of a longspan roof structure. The Finite Volume Method (FVM serves for a solution of the fluid flow problem to model the air flow around the structure, whose results are applied in turn as the boundary tractions in the Finite Element Method problem structural solution for the linear elastostatics with small deformations. The first part is carried out with the use of ANSYS 15.0 computer system, whereas the FEM system Robot supports stress analysis in particular roof members. A comparison of the wind pressure distribution throughout the roof surface shows some differences with respect to that available in the engineering designing codes like Eurocode, which deserves separate further numerical studies. Coupling of these two separate numerical techniques appears to be promising in view of future computational models of stochastic nature in large scale structural systems due to the stochastic perturbation method.

  2. Coupled Finite Volume and Finite Element Method Analysis of a Complex Large-Span Roof Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafran, J.; Juszczyk, K.; Kamiński, M.

    2017-12-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics and structural analysis for the precise determination of wind impact on internal forces and deformations of structural elements of a longspan roof structure. The Finite Volume Method (FVM) serves for a solution of the fluid flow problem to model the air flow around the structure, whose results are applied in turn as the boundary tractions in the Finite Element Method problem structural solution for the linear elastostatics with small deformations. The first part is carried out with the use of ANSYS 15.0 computer system, whereas the FEM system Robot supports stress analysis in particular roof members. A comparison of the wind pressure distribution throughout the roof surface shows some differences with respect to that available in the engineering designing codes like Eurocode, which deserves separate further numerical studies. Coupling of these two separate numerical techniques appears to be promising in view of future computational models of stochastic nature in large scale structural systems due to the stochastic perturbation method.

  3. Moving mesh finite element method for finite time extinction of distributed parameter systems with positive exponential feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnadi, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    In the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback, non-global existence of solution is not always exist. For some positive initial values, there exist finite time T such that the solution goes to infinity, i.e. finite time extinction or blow-up. Here is present a numerical solution using Moving Mesh Finite Element to solve the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback close to blow-up time. The numerical behavior of the mesh close to the time of extinction is the prime interest in this study

  4. 8th conference on Finite Volumes for Complex Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Omnes, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    This first volume of the proceedings of the 8th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Lille, June 2017) covers various topics including convergence and stability analysis, as well as investigations of these methods from the point of view of compatibility with physical principles. It collects together the focused invited papers comparing advanced numerical methods for Stokes and Navier–Stokes equations on a benchmark, as well as reviewed contributions from internationally leading researchers in the field of analysis of finite volume and related methods, offering a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in the field. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation, and recent decades have brought significant advances in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including m...

  5. Finite element analyses for RF photoinjector gun cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper details electromagnetical, thermal and structural 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA) for normal conducting RF photoinjector gun cavities. The simulation methods are described extensively. Achieved results are presented. (orig.)

  6. Verification of Linear (In)Dependence in Finite Precision Arithmetic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohn, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3-4 (2014), s. 323-328 ISSN 1661-8289 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : linear dependence * linear independence * pseudoinverse matrix * finite precision arithmetic * verification * MATLAB file Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  7. Structural Topology Optimization Based on the Smoothed Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shobeiri

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the smoothed finite element method, incorporated with the level set method, is employed to carry out the topology optimization of continuum structures. The structural compliance is minimized subject to a constraint on the weight of material used. The cell-based smoothed finite element method is employed to improve the accuracy and stability of the standard finite element method. Several numerical examples are presented to prove the validity and utility of the proposed method. The obtained results are compared with those obtained by several standard finite element-based examples in order to access the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed method. The common numerical instabilities of the structural topology optimization problems such as checkerboard pattern and mesh dependency are studied in the examples.

  8. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  9. Finite-time nonautonomous bifurcation in impulsive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Akhmet

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to investigate nonautonomous bifurcation in impulsive differential equations. The impulsive finite-time analogues of transcritical and pitchfork bifurcation are provided.

  10. Finite element analysis of unnotched charpy impact tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the energy to : fracture unnotched Charpy specimens under pendulum impact loading. An oversized, : nonstandard pendulum impactor, called the Bulk Fracture Charpy Machine (BFCM), ...

  11. Finite element analyses of railroad tank car head impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-24

    This paper describes engineering analyses of a railroad : tank car impacted at its head by a rigid punch. This type of : collision, referred to as a head impact, is examined using : dynamic, nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). : Commercial softw...

  12. Finite difference techniques for nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study is concerned with numerical approximations to the initial value problem for nonlinear systems of conservative laws. Attention is given to the development of a class of conservation form finite difference schemes which are based on the finite volume method (i.e., the method of averages). These schemes do not fit into the classical framework of conservation form schemes discussed by Lax and Wendroff (1960). The finite volume schemes are specifically intended to approximate solutions of multidimensional problems in the absence of rectangular geometries. In addition, the development is reported of different schemes which utilize the finite volume approach for time discretization. Particular attention is given to local time discretization and moving spatial grids. 17 references

  13. Finite Element Method for Analysis of Material Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauhe, Jens Christian

    and the finite element method. The material microstructure of the heterogeneous material is non-destructively determined using X-ray microtomography. A software program has been generated which uses the X-ray tomographic data as an input for the mesh generation of the material microstructure. To obtain a proper...... description of the material microstructure the finite element models must contain a large number of elements and this problem is solved by using the preconditioned conjugated gradient solver with an Element-By-Element preconditioner. Finite element analysis provides the volume averaged stresses and strains...... which are used for the determination of the effective properties of the heterogeneous material. Generally, the properties determined using the finite element method coupled with X-ray microtomography are in good agreement with both experimentally determined properties and properties determined using...

  14. A Finite Segment Method for Skewed Box Girder Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Xue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite segment method is presented to analyze the mechanical behavior of skewed box girders. By modeling the top and bottom plates of the segments with skew plate beam element under an inclined coordinate system and the webs with normal plate beam element, a spatial elastic displacement model for skewed box girder is constructed, which can satisfy the compatibility condition at the corners of the cross section for box girders. The formulation of the finite segment is developed based on the variational principle. The major advantage of the proposed approach, in comparison with the finite element method, is that it can simplify a three-dimensional structure into a one-dimensional structure for structural analysis, which results in significant saving in computational times. At last, the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed finite segment method are verified by a model test.

  15. Finite element analysis of rotating beams physics based interpolation

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguli, Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the solution of rotating beam free-vibration problems using the finite element method. It provides an introduction to the governing equation of a rotating beam, before outlining the solution procedures using Rayleigh-Ritz, Galerkin and finite element methods. The possibility of improving the convergence of finite element methods through a judicious selection of interpolation functions, which are closer to the problem physics, is also addressed. The book offers a valuable guide for students and researchers working on rotating beam problems – important engineering structures used in helicopter rotors, wind turbines, gas turbines, steam turbines and propellers – and their applications. It can also be used as a textbook for specialized graduate and professional courses on advanced applications of finite element analysis.

  16. Wall deffects in field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazeia Filho, D.

    1985-01-01

    We discuss the effect of restauration of simmetry in field theories at finite temperature and its relation with wall deffects which appear as consequence of the instability of the constant field configuration. (M.W.O.) [pt

  17. Precise magnetostatic field using the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Francisco Rogerio Teixeira do

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to simulate electromagnetic fields using the Finite Element Method. Even in the easiest case of electrostatic and magnetostatic numerical simulation some problems appear when the nodal finite element is used. It is difficult to model vector fields with scalar functions mainly in non-homogeneous materials. With the aim to solve these problems two types of techniques are tried: the adaptive remeshing using nodal elements and the edge finite element that ensure the continuity of tangential components. Some numerical analysis of simple electromagnetic problems with homogeneous and non-homogeneous materials are performed using first, the adaptive remeshing based in various error indicators and second, the numerical solution of waveguides using edge finite element. (author)

  18. Finite Element Analysis of the Hierarchical Structure of Human Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dolloff, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    .... Finally, the effective stiffness of the bone was estimated. In order to determine the stiffness of the collagen fiber, a three-dimensional finite element model was developed and a simple analytical model was derived...

  19. Strict finitism and the logic of mathematical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the logic behind applied mathematics to the physical world, this volume illustrates how radical naturalism, nominalism and strict finitism can account for the applications of classical mathematics in current theories about natural phenomena.

  20. Finite-size scaling of survival probability in branching processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Millan, Rosalba; Font-Clos, Francesc; Corral, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Branching processes pervade many models in statistical physics. We investigate the survival probability of a Galton-Watson branching process after a finite number of generations. We derive analytically the existence of finite-size scaling for the survival probability as a function of the control parameter and the maximum number of generations, obtaining the critical exponents as well as the exact scaling function, which is G(y)=2ye(y)/(e(y)-1), with y the rescaled distance to the critical point. Our findings are valid for any branching process of the Galton-Watson type, independently of the distribution of the number of offspring, provided its variance is finite. This proves the universal behavior of the finite-size effects in branching processes, including the universality of the metric factors. The direct relation to mean-field percolation is also discussed.