WorldWideScience

Sample records for efficient transposon marker

  1. Efficient Generation of Marker-Free Transgenic Rice Plants Using an Improved Transposon-Mediated Transgene Reintegration Strategy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants. In this study, we improved the selection strategy and validated that the maize (Zea mays) Activator/Dissociation (Ds) transposable element can be routinely used to generate marker-free transgenic plants. A Ds-based gene of interest was linked to green fluorescent protein in transfer DNA (T-DNA), and a green fluorescent protein-aided counterselection against T-DNA was used together with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based positive selection for the gene of interest to screen marker-free progeny. To test the efficacy of this strategy, we cloned the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene into the Ds elements and transformed transposon vectors into rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR assays of the transposon empty donor site exhibited transposition in somatic cells in 60.5% to 100% of the rice transformants. Marker-free (T-DNA-free) transgenic rice plants derived from unlinked germinal transposition were obtained from the T1 generation of 26.1% of the primary transformants. Individual marker-free transgenic rice lines were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR to determine Ds(Bt) reintegration positions, reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Bt expression levels, and bioassays to confirm resistance against the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Overall, we efficiently generated marker-free transgenic plants with optimized transgene insertion and expression. The transposon-mediated marker-free platform established in this study can be used in rice and possibly in other important crops. PMID:25371551

  2. Efficient generation of marker-free transgenic rice plants using an improved transposon-mediated transgene reintegration strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong; Qu, Shaohong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants. In this study, we improved the selection strategy and validated that the maize (Zea mays) Activator/Dissociation (Ds) transposable element can be routinely used to generate marker-free transgenic plants. A Ds-based gene of interest was linked to green fluorescent protein in transfer DNA (T-DNA), and a green fluorescent protein-aided counterselection against T-DNA was used together with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based positive selection for the gene of interest to screen marker-free progeny. To test the efficacy of this strategy, we cloned the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene into the Ds elements and transformed transposon vectors into rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR assays of the transposon empty donor site exhibited transposition in somatic cells in 60.5% to 100% of the rice transformants. Marker-free (T-DNA-free) transgenic rice plants derived from unlinked germinal transposition were obtained from the T1 generation of 26.1% of the primary transformants. Individual marker-free transgenic rice lines were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR to determine Ds(Bt) reintegration positions, reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Bt expression levels, and bioassays to confirm resistance against the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Overall, we efficiently generated marker-free transgenic plants with optimized transgene insertion and expression. The transposon-mediated marker-free platform established in this study can be used in rice and possibly in other important crops. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Efficient generation of marker-free transgenic rice plants using an improved transposon-mediated transgene reintegration strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong; Qu, Shaohong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants...

  4. EXPRESSION OF PLURIPOTENCY MARKERS IN REPROGRAMMING WITH TRANSPOSON SYSTEM MURINE FIBROBLASTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Malysheva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for effective and safe methods to generate induced pluripotent stem cells is especially urgent. In the paper murine embryonic fibro blasts were reprogrammed towards actively proliferating colonies with typical induced pluripotent stem cells morphology by means of Sleeping beauty transposon-based vector system. The obtained clones were checked for the expression of various pluripotency markers: alkaline phosphatase, Oct4 and Sox2 genes, SSEA-1 expression in various clones was evaluated. Also the reactivation of endogenous pluripotency factors Nanog and Rex1 was indicated. The data obtained is analyzed and compared to the established pluripotent stem cell line. It is shown that somatic cells are reprogrammed towards pluripotency by means of Sleeping beauty transposon system. Therefore, the system is a new perspective biotechnological tool to generate pluripotent cells.

  5. In silico polymorphism analysis for the development of simple sequence repeat and transposon markers and construction of linkage map in cultivated peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Kenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea is an autogamous allotetraploid legume (2n = 4x = 40 that is widely cultivated as a food and oil crop. More than 6,000 DNA markers have been developed in Arachis spp., but high-density linkage maps useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding have not been constructed due to extremely low genetic diversity. Polymorphic marker loci are useful for the construction of such high-density linkage maps. The present study used in silico analysis to develop simple sequence repeat-based and transposon-based markers. Results The use of in silico analysis increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development by more than 3-fold. In total, 926 (34.2% of 2,702 markers showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the mapping population. Linkage analysis of the 926 markers along with 253 polymorphic markers selected from 4,449 published markers generated 21 linkage groups covering 2,166.4 cM with 1,114 loci. Based on the map thus produced, 23 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for 15 agronomical traits were detected. Another linkage map with 326 loci was also constructed and revealed a relationship between the genotypes of the FAD2 genes and the ratio of oleic/linoleic acid in peanut seed. Conclusions In silico analysis of polymorphisms increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development, and contributed to the construction of high-density linkage maps in cultivated peanut. The resultant maps were applicable to QTL analysis. Marker subsets and linkage maps developed in this study should be useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding in Arachis. The data are available at the Kazusa DNA Marker Database (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp.

  6. Systematic identification of genetic loci required for polymyxin resistance in Campylobacter jejuni using an efficient in vivo transposon mutagenesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Wang, Ying; Hoang, Ky Van

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genetic loci required for polymyxin (PM) resistance in Campylobacter jejuni using an efficient in vivo random mutagenesis system. PM has been widely used as a model peptide to examine mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), the major effectors of host innate immunity and also candidates for a new generation of antibiotics. In this study, a commercially available transposon mutagenesis approach (EZ-Tn5 Transposome; Epicentre, Madison, WI) was evaluated and used to systematically identify Campylobacter mutants with increased susceptibility to PM. This simple, yet efficient, transposon mutagenesis approach identified 12 mutants representing seven different genes of C. jejuni 81-176 involved in acquired PM resistance. Backcrossing of the transposon mutations into the parent strain confirmed that the PM-sensitive phenotype in each mutant was linked to the gene with a specific transposon insertion. The genes are identified as being involved in the synthesis of cell-surface carbohydrates, modification of intracellular targets, signal transduction, and modulation of transmembrane potential. The mutant with the highest susceptibility to PM contains a transposon insertion in a putative galU gene that is essential for production of uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP)-glucose, a precursor required for lipooligosaccharide (LOS) synthesis. LOS analysis by tricine SDSPAGE showed significant truncation of the LOS core structure in the galU mutant. Susceptibility assays also indicated that GalU contributed C. jejuni resistance to some natural AMPs. Complementation of the galU mutant in trans fully restored LOS synthesis and resistance to the levels of the parent strain. Together, these results define seven C. jejuni genetic loci that will be useful for characterizing the molecular basis of Campylobacter resistance to PM and natural AMPs, and also highlight the usefulness of the in vivo mutagenesis approach for

  7. Excision Efficiency Is Not Strongly Coupled to Transgenic Rate: Cell Type-Dependent Transposition Efficiency of Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac DNA Transposons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacsek, Orsolya; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Apáti, Ágota; Sándor, Sára; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB) DNA transposons represent an emerging new gene delivery technology, potentially suitable for human gene therapy applications. Previous studies pointed to important differences between these transposon systems, depending on the cell types examined and the methodologies applied. However, efficiencies cannot always be compared because of differences in applications. In addition, “overproduction inhibition,” a phenomenon believed to be a characteristic of DNA transposons, can remarkably reduce the overall transgenic rate, emphasizing the importance of transposase dose applied. Therefore, because of lack of comprehensive analysis, researchers are forced to optimize the technology for their own “in-house” platforms. In this study, we investigated the transposition of several SB (SB11, SB32, SB100X) and PB (mPB and hyPB) variants in various cell types at three levels: comparing the excision efficiency of the reaction by real-time PCR, testing the overall transgenic rate by detecting cells with stable integrations, and determining the average copy number when using different transposon systems and conditions. We concluded that high excision activity is not always followed by a higher transgenic rate, as exemplified by the hyperactive transposases, indicating that the excision and the integration steps of transposition are not strongly coupled as previously thought. In general, all levels of transposition show remarkable differences depending on the transposase used and cell lines examined, being the least efficient in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In spite of the comparably low activity in those special cell types, the hyperactive SB100X and hyPB systems could be used in hESCs with similar transgenic efficiency and with reasonably low (2–3) transgene copy numbers, indicating their potential applicability for gene therapy purposes in the future. PMID:25045962

  8. Creation of a Dense Transposon Insertion Library Using Bacterial Conjugation in Enterobacterial Strains Such As Escherichia Coli or Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Nikki E

    2017-09-23

    Transposon mutagenesis is a method that allows gene disruption via the random genomic insertion of a piece of DNA called a transposon. The protocol below outlines a method for high efficiency transfer between bacterial strains of a plasmid harboring a transposon containing a kanamycin resistance marker. The plasmid-borne transposase is encoded by a variant tnp gene that inserts the transposon into the genome of the recipient strain with very low insertional bias. This method thus allows the creation of large mutant libraries in which transposons have been inserted into unique genomic positions in a recipient strain of either Escherichia coli or Shigella flexneri bacteria. By using bacterial conjugation, as opposed to other methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation, large libraries with hundreds of thousands of unique clones can be created. This yields high-density insertion libraries, with insertions occurring as frequently as every 4-6 base pairs in non-essential genes. This method is superior to other methods as it allows for an inexpensive, easy to use, and high efficiency method for the creation of a dense transposon insertion library. The transposon library can be used in downstream applications such as transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq), to infer genetic interaction networks, or more simply, in mutational (forward genetic) screens.

  9. Comparison of genetic detection efficiency of different markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    combined genetic markers for the relations among populations. Key words: Genetic markers, genetic differentiation, genetic detection efficiency. ..... transporter gene moderate depression in maltreated children. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.

  10. Development of CACTA transposon derived SCAR markers and their use in population structure analysis in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Neha Samir; Park, Kyong-Cheul; Lee, Sung-Il; Im, Min-Ji; Ramekar, Rahul Vasudeo; Kim, Nam-Soo

    2018-02-01

    Molecular marker technologies have proven to be an important breakthrough for genetic studies, construction of linkage maps and population genetics analysis. Transposable elements (TEs) constitute major fractions of repetitive sequences in plants and offer a wide range of possible areas to be explored as molecular markers. Sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker development provides us with a simple and time saving alternative approach for marker development. We employed the CACTA-TD to develop SCARs and then integrated them into linkage map and used them for population structure and genetic diversity analysis of corn inbred population. A total of 108 dominant SCAR markers were designed out of which, 32 were successfully integrated in to the linkage map of maize RIL population and the remaining were added to a physical map for references to check the distribution throughout all chromosomes. Moreover, 76 polymorphic SCARs were used for diversity analysis of corn accessions being used in Korean corn breeding program. The overall average polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.34, expected heterozygosity was 0.324 and Shannon's information index was 0.491 with a percentage of polymorphism of 98.67%. Further analysis by associating with desirable traits may also provide some accurate trait specific tagged SCAR markers. TE linked SCARs can provide an added level of polymorphism as well as improved discriminating ability and therefore can be useful in further breeding programs to develop high yielding germplasm.

  11. Efficient marker data utilization in genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid

    of editing marker data, methods to handle missing genotypes and prediction using haplotypes constructed with an advanced method. The results of this study show that the accuracy of genomc prediction increases by: optimal criteria for marker data editing parameters, proper handling of missing genotypes using...

  12. A Traceless Selection: Counter-selection System That Allows Efficient Generation of Transposon and CRISPR-modified T-cell Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Mezzadra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen major breakthroughs in genome-engineering systems, such as transposon-mediated gene delivery systems and CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing tools. In these systems, transient expression of auxiliary genes is responsible for permanent genomic modification. For both systems, it would be valuable to select for cells that are likely to undergo stable genome modification. Importantly, in particular for clinical applications of genome-engineered cell products, it will also be of importance to remove those cells that, due to random vector integration, display an unwanted stable expression of the auxiliary gene. Here, we develop a traceless selection system that on the one hand allows efficient enrichment of modified cells, and on the other hand can be used to select against cells that retain expression of the auxiliary gene. The value of this system to produce highly enriched-auxiliary gene-free cell products is demonstrated.

  13. An Efficiency Analysis of Augmented Reality Marker Recognition Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurpytė Dovilė

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on the investigation of augmented reality system which is designed for identification and augmentation of 100 different square markers. Marker recognition efficiency was investigated by rotating markers along x and y axis directions in range from −90° to 90°. Virtual simulations of four environments were developed: a an intense source of light, b an intense source of light falling from the left side, c the non-intensive light source falling from the left side, d equally falling shadows. The graphics were created using the OpenGL graphics computer hardware interface; image processing was programmed in C++ language using OpenCV, while augmented reality was developed in Java programming language using NyARToolKit. The obtained results demonstrate that augmented reality marker recognition algorithm is accurate and reliable in the case of changing lighting conditions and rotational angles - only 4 % markers were unidentified. Assessment of marker recognition efficiency let to propose marker classification strategy in order to use it for grouping various markers into distinct markers’ groups possessing similar recognition properties.

  14. The Impact of cHS4 Insulators on DNA Transposon Vector Mobilization and Silencing in Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nynne; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Bak, Rasmus O.; Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Schrøder, Lisbeth Dahl; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2012-01-01

    DNA transposons have become important vectors for efficient non-viral integration of transgenes into genomic DNA. The Sleeping Beauty (SB), piggyBac (PB), and Tol2 transposable elements have distinct biological properties and currently represent the most promising transposon systems for animal transgenesis and gene therapy. A potential obstacle, however, for persistent function of integrating vectors is transcriptional repression of the element and its genetic cargo. In this study we analyze the insulating effect of the 1.2-kb 5′-HS4 chicken β-globin (cHS4) insulator element in the context of SB, PB, and Tol2 transposon vectors. By examining transgene expression from genomically inserted transposon vectors encoding a marker gene driven by a silencing-prone promoter, we detect variable levels of transcriptional silencing for the three transposon systems in retinal pigment epithelium cells. Notably, the PB system seems less vulnerable to silencing. Incorporation of cHS4 insulator sequences into the transposon vectors results in 2.2-fold and 1.5-fold increased transgene expression levels for insulated SB and PB vectors, respectively, but an improved persistency of expression was not obtained for insulated transgenes. Colony formation assays and quantitative excision assays unveil enhanced SB transposition efficiencies by the inclusion of the cHS4 element, resulting in a significant increase in the stable transfection rate for insulated SB transposon vectors in human cell lines. Our findings reveal a positive impact of cHS4 insulator inclusion for SB and PB vectors in terms of increased transgene expression levels and improved SB stable transfection rates, but also the lack of a long-term protective effect of the cHS4 insulator against progressive transgene silencing in retinal pigment epithelium cells. PMID:23110238

  15. The expanding universe of transposon technologies for gene and cell engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivics Zoltán

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposable elements can be viewed as natural DNA transfer vehicles that, similar to integrating viruses, are capable of efficient genomic insertion. The mobility of class II transposable elements (DNA transposons can be controlled by conditionally providing the transposase component of the transposition reaction. Thus, a DNA of interest (be it a fluorescent marker, a small hairpin (shRNA expression cassette, a mutagenic gene trap or a therapeutic gene construct cloned between the inverted repeat sequences of a transposon-based vector can be used for stable genomic insertion in a regulated and highly efficient manner. This methodological paradigm opened up a number of avenues for genome manipulations in vertebrates, including transgenesis for the generation of transgenic cells in tissue culture, the production of germline transgenic animals for basic and applied research, forward genetic screens for functional gene annotation in model species, and therapy of genetic disorders in humans. Sleeping Beauty (SB was the first transposon shown to be capable of gene transfer in vertebrate cells, and recent results confirm that SB supports a full spectrum of genetic engineering including transgenesis, insertional mutagenesis, and therapeutic somatic gene transfer both ex vivo and in vivo. The first clinical application of the SB system will help to validate both the safety and efficacy of this approach. In this review, we describe the major transposon systems currently available (with special emphasis on SB, discuss the various parameters and considerations pertinent to their experimental use, and highlight the state of the art in transposon technology in diverse genetic applications.

  16. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  17. Remobilization of Tol2 transposons in Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells Dan E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Class II DNA transposons are mobile genetic elements that move DNA sequence from one position in the genome to another. We have previously demonstrated that the naturally occurring Tol2 element from Oryzias latipes efficiently integrates its corresponding non-autonomous transposable element into the genome of the diploid frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Tol2 transposons are stable in the frog genome and are transmitted to the offspring at the expected Mendelian frequency. Results To test whether Tol2 transposons integrated in the Xenopus tropicalis genome are substrates for remobilization, we injected in vitro transcribed Tol2 mRNA into one-cell embryos harbouring a single copy of a Tol2 transposon. Integration site analysis of injected embryos from two founder lines showed at least one somatic remobilization event per embryo. We also demonstrate that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline and re-integration can result in the generation of novel GFP expression patterns in the developing tadpole. Although the parental line contained a single Tol2 transposon, the resulting remobilized tadpoles frequently inherit multiple copies of the transposon. This is likely to be due to the Tol2 transposase acting in discrete blastomeres of the developing injected embryo during the cell cycle after DNA synthesis but prior to mitosis. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that single copy Tol2 transposons integrated into the Xenopus tropicalis genome are effective substrates for excision and random re-integration and that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline. This is an important step in the development of 'transposon hopping' strategies for insertional mutagenesis, gene trap and enhancer trap screens in this highly tractable developmental model organism.

  18. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for cellular reprogramming and targeted gene insertion in induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabundzija, Ivana; Wang, Jichang; Sebe, Attila; Erdei, Zsuzsanna; Kajdi, Robert; Devaraj, Anantharam; Steinemann, Doris; Szuhai, Károly; Stein, Ulrike; Cantz, Tobias; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Sarkadi, Balázs; Ivics, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of direct cell reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology opened up new avenues for the application of non-viral, transposon-based gene delivery systems. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is highly advanced for versatile genetic manipulations in mammalian cells. We established iPS cell reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human foreskin fibroblasts by transposition of OSKM (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc) and OSKML (OSKM + Lin28) expression cassettes mobilized by the SB100X hyperactive transposase. The efficiency of iPS cell derivation with SB transposon system was in the range of that obtained with retroviral vectors. Co-expression of the miRNA302/367 cluster together with OSKM significantly improved reprogramming efficiency and accelerated the temporal kinetics of reprogramming. The iPS cells displayed a stable karyotype, and hallmarks of pluripotency including expression of stem cell markers and the ability to differentiate into embryoid bodies in vitro. We demonstrate Cre recombinase-mediated exchange allowing simultaneous removal of the reprogramming cassette and targeted knock-in of an expression cassette of interest into the transposon-tagged locus in mouse iPS cells. This strategy would allow correction of a genetic defect by site-specific insertion of a therapeutic gene construct into ‘safe harbor’ sites in the genomes of autologous, patient-derived iPS cells. PMID:23275558

  19. Transposon diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang Hien; Wright, Stephen; Yu, Zhihui; Bureau, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Recent availability of extensive genome sequence information offers new opportunities to analyze genome organization, including transposon diversity and accumulation, at a level of resolution that was previously unattainable. In this report, we used sequence similarity search and analysis protocols to perform a fine-scale analysis of a large sample (≈17.2 Mb) of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia) genome for transposons. Consistent with previous studies, we report that the A. thaliana genome harbors diverse representatives of most known superfamilies of transposons. However, our survey reveals a higher density of transposons of which over one-fourth could be classified into a single novel transposon family designated as Basho, which appears unrelated to any previously known superfamily. We have also identified putative transposase-coding ORFs for miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), providing clues into the mechanism of mobility and origins of the most abundant transposons associated with plant genes. In addition, we provide evidence that most mined transposons have a clear distribution preference for A + T-rich sequences and show that structural variation for many mined transposons is partly due to interelement recombination. Taken together, these findings further underscore the complexity of transposons within the compact genome of A. thaliana. PMID:10861007

  20. Examination of Exhaustive Cloning Attempts Reveals that C. elegans piRNAs, Transposons, and Repeat Sequences are Efficiently Cloned in Yeast, but not in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or eSagy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing requires insertion of random fragments of the sequenced organism’s DNA into a unicellular host, most often E. coli bacteria. This manipulation was found in the past to be analogous to naturally occurring horizontal gene transfer, and moreover has proved valuable to understanding toxicity of foreign genetic elements to E. coli. Sequencing of the C. elegans genome was similarly achieved via DNA transformation into E. coli. However, numerous attempts have proven a significant percentage of the genome unclonable using bacteria, although clonable via yeast. We examined the genomic segments that were not in bacteria but in yeast, and observed that, in line with previous hypotheses, such sequences are more repetitive on average compared with the entire C. elegans genome. In addition, we found that these gap-sequences encode significantly more for DNA transposons. Surprisingly, we discovered that although the vast majority of the C. elegans genome is in bacteria (77.5%, almost all the thousands of sequences that encode for PIWI-interacting small RNAs, or 21U-RNAs (91.6% were only in yeast. These results might help understanding why most piRNAs in C.elegans are physically clustered on particular loci on chromosome IV. In worms and in a large number of other organisms, piRNAs serve to distinguish Self from Non-Self sequences, and thus to protect the integrity of the genome against foreign genetic elements, such as transposons. We discuss the possible implications of these discoveries

  1. Transposon identification using profile HMMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Transposons are "jumping genes" that account for large quantities of repetitive content in genomes. They are known to affect transcriptional regulation in several different ways, and are implicated in many human diseases. Transposons are related to microRNAs and viruses, and many genes, pseudogenes, and gene promoters are derived from transposons or have origins in transposon-induced duplication. Modeling transposon-derived genomic content is difficult because they are poorly conserved. Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs), widely used for protein sequence family modeling, are rarely used for modeling DNA sequence families. The algorithm commonly used to estimate the parameters of profile HMMs, Baum-Welch, is prone to prematurely converge to local optima. The DNA domain is especially problematic for the Baum-Welch algorithm, since it has only four letters as opposed to the twenty residues of the amino acid alphabet. Results We demonstrate with a simulation study and with an application to modeling the MIR family of transposons that two recently introduced methods, Conditional Baum-Welch and Dynamic Model Surgery, achieve better estimates of the parameters of profile HMMs across a range of conditions. Conclusions We argue that these new algorithms expand the range of potential applications of profile HMMs to many important DNA sequence family modeling problems, including that of searching for and modeling the virus-like transposons that are found in all known genomes. PMID:20158867

  2. Exploration of Biological Markers of Feed Efficiency in Young Bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meale, Sarah J; Morgavi, Diego P; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Andueza, Donato; Ortigues-Marty, Isabelle; Robins, Richard J; Schiphorst, Anne-Marie; Laverroux, Sophie; Graulet, Benoit; Boudra, Hamid; Cantalapiedra-Hijar, Gonzalo

    2017-11-15

    The efficiency with which ruminants convert feed to desirable products is difficult to measure under normal commercial settings. We explored the use of potential biological markers from easily obtainable samples, that is, blood, hair, and feces, to characterize potential causes of divergent efficiency when considered as residual feed intake (RFI) or feed conversion efficiency (FCE). A total of 54 Charolais bulls, 20 in period 1 and 34 in period 2, were examined for individual dry matter intake (DMI) and growth. Bulls were offered a diet of 70:30 wrapped grass silage to concentrate for 99 d. At the conclusion of the test period, blood samples were collected for the determination of vitamins B2 and B6, and plasma used for the determination of metabolites, natural isotopic 15N abundance (15N NIA, expressed as δ15N ‰) and fractionation (Δ15Nplasma proteins-diet and Δ13Cplasma proteins-diet) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Feces were analyzed by NIRS. Bulls were slaughtered at 15-17 months of age and carcass characteristics determined. Bulls were ranked according to RFI with extremes (SD ± 0.5; n = 31) classified as either efficient (Neg-RFI) or inefficient (Pos-RFI). Extreme bulls were then classified for FCE (high vs low FCE), changing the groups. Pos-RFI bulls consumed 14% more feed than Neg-RFI bulls for the same level of weight gain. Low FCE bulls tended to eat more, but had lower weight gains than high FCE bulls. No differences were detected in carcass conformation, fat scores, hot carcass weight, or dressing percentage. Yet, heart and bladder weights were heavier in Pos-RFI, and rumen weight tended to be heavier in Pos-RFI bulls. RFI did not affect bulk 15N or 13C fractionation. A negative correlation was observed between FCE and Δ15Nplasma proteins-diet. Inefficient bulls (Pos-RFI) had higher δ15N in glycine compared to Neg-RFI bulls. Similarly, metabolomic analysis showed a tendency for concentrations of glycine and sarcosine to be elevated in

  3. Enzymatic engineering of the porcine genome with transposons and recombinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlson Daniel F

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swine is an important agricultural commodity and biomedical model. Manipulation of the pig genome provides opportunity to improve production efficiency, enhance disease resistance, and add value to swine products. Genetic engineering can also expand the utility of pigs for modeling human disease, developing clinical treatment methodologies, or donating tissues for xenotransplantation. Realizing the full potential of pig genetic engineering requires translation of the complete repertoire of genetic tools currently employed in smaller model organisms to practical use in pigs. Results Application of transposon and recombinase technologies for manipulation of the swine genome requires characterization of their activity in pig cells. We tested four transposon systems- Sleeping Beauty, Tol2, piggyBac, and Passport in cultured porcine cells. Transposons increased the efficiency of DNA integration up to 28-fold above background and provided for precise delivery of 1 to 15 transgenes per cell. Both Cre and Flp recombinase were functional in pig cells as measured by their ability to remove a positive-negative selection cassette from 16 independent clones and over 20 independent genomic locations. We also demonstrated a Cre-dependent genetic switch capable of eliminating an intervening positive-negative selection cassette and activating GFP expression from episomal and genome-resident transposons. Conclusion We have demonstrated for the first time that transposons and recombinases are capable of mobilizing DNA into and out of the porcine genome in a precise and efficient manner. This study provides the basis for developing transposon and recombinase based tools for genetic engineering of the swine genome.

  4. Forced evolution in silico by artificial transposons and their genetic operators: The ant navigation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamdborg, Leonid; Holloway, David M.; Merelo, Juan J.; Levchenko, Vladimir F.; Spirov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Modern evolutionary computation utilizes heuristic optimizations based upon concepts borrowed from the Darwinian theory of natural selection. Their demonstrated efficacy has reawakened an interest in other aspects of contemporary biology as an inspiration for new algorithms. However, amongst the many excellent candidates for study, contemporary models of biological macroevolution attract special attention. We believe that a vital direction in this field must be algorithms that model the activity of “genomic parasites”, such as transposons, in biological evolution. Many evolutionary biologists posit that it is the co-evolution of populations with their genomic parasites that permits the high efficiency of evolutionary searches found in the living world. This publication is our first step in the direction of developing a minimal assortment of algorithms that simulate the role of genomic parasites. Specifically, we started in the domain of genetic algorithms (GA) and selected the Artificial Ant Problem as a test case. This navigation problem is widely known as a classical benchmark test and possesses a large body of literature. We add new objects to the standard toolkit of GA - artificial transposons and a collection of operators that operate on them. We define these artificial transposons as a fragment of an ant's code with properties that cause it to stand apart from the rest. The minimal set of operators for transposons is a transposon mutation operator, and a transposon reproduction operator that causes a transposon to multiply within the population of hosts. An analysis of the population dynamics of transposons within the course of ant evolution showed that transposons are involved in the processes of propagation and selection of blocks of ant navigation programs. During this time, the speed of evolutionary search increases significantly. We concluded that artificial transposons, analogous to real transposons, are truly capable of acting as intelligent

  5. Transposon Tn5 mutagenesis of pseudomonas fluorescens to isolate mutants deficient in antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, N; Jahn, D; Jayaraman, K; Marahiel, M A

    1994-01-15

    Pseudomonas fluorescens was subjected to insertion mutagenesis studies using the transposon Tn5-GM to generate mutants deficient in antibacterial activity minus mutants. The transposon located on the temperature-sensitive plasmid pCHR84 was conjugally transferred into the non-pathogenic pseudomonad using the triparental mating procedure. Random integration of Tn5-GM into the chromosome of P. fluorescens was achieved by heat treatment of the transformed cells at 42 degrees C. Approximately 2% of transconjugants revealed an auxotrophic phenotype indicating efficient integration of the employed transposon into the chromosome of P. fluorescens. One transposon insertion mutant was obtained showing an antibacterial activity minus phenotype. This mutant (MM-7) was found to be defective in the production of an unidentified antibacterial compound against B. subtilis. These results introduce Tn5 transposon mutagenesis as a new useful tool for the molecular analysis of P. fluorescens.

  6. Efficiency of biparental crossing in sugarcane analyzed by SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Messias dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane has hermaphrodite flowers, however, selfing and cross pollination may occur, resulting in selfed or hybrid progeny. The aim of this study was to analyze the paternity of progenies from biparental crosses, in order to identify true hybrids or progenies originating from pollen of unknown origin. Seventy-six progenies from four crosses were analyzed using three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (SSR. Progenies showed moderate genetic similarity and were grouped into four distinct groups, according to the crosses. Transmission of alleles from parents to offspring was clearly observed, in which selfed individuals were not observed, and only true hybrids or progeny resulting from fertilization with pollen uncommon to both parents were. Results showed that there was contamination with pollen from unknown parents in sugarcane crosses, suggesting that errors in the pedigree may occur, and adjustment in the crossing procedure would decrease progenies from pollen of unknown origin.

  7. Methods comparison for microsatellite marker development: Different isolation methods, different yield efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Aibin; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Hu, Jingjie

    2009-06-01

    Microsatellite markers have become one kind of the most important molecular tools used in various researches. A large number of microsatellite markers are required for the whole genome survey in the fields of molecular ecology, quantitative genetics and genomics. Therefore, it is extremely necessary to select several versatile, low-cost, efficient and time- and labor-saving methods to develop a large panel of microsatellite markers. In this study, we used Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) as the target species to compare the efficiency of the five methods derived from three strategies for microsatellite marker development. The results showed that the strategy of constructing small insert genomic DNA library resulted in poor efficiency, while the microsatellite-enriched strategy highly improved the isolation efficiency. Although the mining public database strategy is time- and cost-saving, it is difficult to obtain a large number of microsatellite markers, mainly due to the limited sequence data of non-model species deposited in public databases. Based on the results in this study, we recommend two methods, microsatellite-enriched library construction method and FIASCO-colony hybridization method, for large-scale microsatellite marker development. Both methods were derived from the microsatellite-enriched strategy. The experimental results obtained from Zhikong scallop also provide the reference for microsatellite marker development in other species with large genomes.

  8. Efficiency of application of different DNA probes in identifying marker chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavokina L. V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of marker chromosomes in the human karyotype always requires a special diagnostic approach. Determination of the marker chromosome type and structure is of great diagnostic and prognostic importance. There are several methods of marker chromosomes identification, which differ in their informative value. The paper presents the results of cytogenetic and FISH diagnostics of supernumerical marker chromosomes (SMC cases in patients’ karyotype. Aim. To analyze the results of the cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic diagnostics for patients with marker chromosomes, and to evaluate and compare the efficiency of the methods used. Methods. Karyotyping was done according to the standard methods. GTG, CBG, QFQ and NOR-Ag methods of differential staining were used. FISH was performed according to the manufacturer’s instructions for CEP, LSI and WCP DNA-probes. Results. Marker chromosome was found in 15 of 7989 patients. Application of standard staining methods was effective in 66.6 % of cases. Combination of differential staining and FISH allowed identifying a marker chromosome in 83.3 %. 90 % of all marker chromosomes were identified as isochromosomes and 60 % of them were derivative from chromosome 15. Conclusions. The use of WCP probes is a main step in the marker chromosome identification with further application of CEP/LSI probes. If a marker chromosome has nonspecific DNA sequences more sensitive methods should be use..

  9. MAR elements and transposons for improved transgene integration and expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Ley

    Full Text Available Reliable and long-term expression of transgenes remain significant challenges for gene therapy and biotechnology applications, especially when antibiotic selection procedures are not applicable. In this context, transposons represent attractive gene transfer vectors because of their ability to promote efficient genomic integration in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, expression from genome-integrating vectors may be inhibited by variable gene transcription and/or silencing events. In this study, we assessed whether inclusion of two epigenetic control elements, the human Matrix Attachment Region (MAR 1-68 and X-29, in a piggyBac transposon vector, may lead to more reliable and efficient expression in CHO cells. We found that addition of the MAR 1-68 at the center of the transposon did not interfere with transposition frequency, and transgene expressing cells could be readily detected from the total cell population without antibiotic selection. Inclusion of the MAR led to higher transgene expression per integrated copy, and reliable expression could be obtained from as few as 2-4 genomic copies of the MAR-containing transposon vector. The MAR X-29-containing transposons was found to mediate elevated expression of therapeutic proteins in polyclonal or monoclonal CHO cell populations using a transposable vector devoid of selection gene. Overall, we conclude that MAR and transposable vectors can be used to improve transgene expression from few genomic transposition events, which may be useful when expression from a low number of integrated transgene copies must be obtained and/or when antibiotic selection cannot be applied.

  10. Chromosomal mobilization and reintegration of Sleeping Beauty and PiggyBac transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qi; Kong, Jun; Stalker, James; Bradley, Allan

    2009-06-01

    The Sleeping Beauty and PiggyBac DNA transposon systems have recently been developed as tools for insertional mutagenesis. We have compared the chromosomal mobilization efficiency and insertion site preference of the two transposons mobilized from the same donor site in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells under conditions in which there were no selective constraints on the transposons' insertion sites. Compared with Sleeping Beauty, PiggyBac exhibits higher transposition efficiencies, no evidence for local hopping and a significant bias toward reintegration in intragenic regions, which demonstrate its utility for insertional mutagenesis. Although Sleeping Beauty had no detectable genomic bias with respect to insertions in genes or intergenic regions, both Sleeping Beauty and PiggyBac transposons displayed preferential integration into actively transcribed loci. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. DNA transposon-based gene vehicles - scenes from an evolutionary drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Kristian Alsbjerg; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Sharma, Nynne; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-12-09

    DNA transposons are primitive genetic elements which have colonized living organisms from plants to bacteria and mammals. Through evolution such parasitic elements have shaped their host genomes by replicating and relocating between chromosomal loci in processes catalyzed by the transposase proteins encoded by the elements themselves. DNA transposable elements are constantly adapting to life in the genome, and self-suppressive regulation as well as defensive host mechanisms may assist in buffering 'cut-and-paste' DNA mobilization until accumulating mutations will eventually restrict events of transposition. With the reconstructed Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon as a powerful engine, a growing list of transposable elements with activity in human cells have moved into biomedical experimentation and preclinical therapy as versatile vehicles for delivery and genomic insertion of transgenes. In this review, we aim to link the mechanisms that drive transposon evolution with the realities and potential challenges we are facing when adapting DNA transposons for gene transfer. We argue that DNA transposon-derived vectors may carry inherent, and potentially limiting, traits of their mother elements. By understanding in detail the evolutionary journey of transposons, from host colonization to element multiplication and inactivation, we may better exploit the potential of distinct transposable elements. Hence, parallel efforts to investigate and develop distinct, but potent, transposon-based vector systems will benefit the broad applications of gene transfer. Insight and clever optimization have shaped new DNA transposon vectors, which recently debuted in the first DNA transposon-based clinical trial. Learning from an evolutionary drive may help us create gene vehicles that are safer, more efficient, and less prone for suppression and inactivation.

  12. DNA transposon-based gene vehicles - scenes from an evolutionary drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    DNA transposons are primitive genetic elements which have colonized living organisms from plants to bacteria and mammals. Through evolution such parasitic elements have shaped their host genomes by replicating and relocating between chromosomal loci in processes catalyzed by the transposase proteins encoded by the elements themselves. DNA transposable elements are constantly adapting to life in the genome, and self-suppressive regulation as well as defensive host mechanisms may assist in buffering ‘cut-and-paste’ DNA mobilization until accumulating mutations will eventually restrict events of transposition. With the reconstructed Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon as a powerful engine, a growing list of transposable elements with activity in human cells have moved into biomedical experimentation and preclinical therapy as versatile vehicles for delivery and genomic insertion of transgenes. In this review, we aim to link the mechanisms that drive transposon evolution with the realities and potential challenges we are facing when adapting DNA transposons for gene transfer. We argue that DNA transposon-derived vectors may carry inherent, and potentially limiting, traits of their mother elements. By understanding in detail the evolutionary journey of transposons, from host colonization to element multiplication and inactivation, we may better exploit the potential of distinct transposable elements. Hence, parallel efforts to investigate and develop distinct, but potent, transposon-based vector systems will benefit the broad applications of gene transfer. Insight and clever optimization have shaped new DNA transposon vectors, which recently debuted in the first DNA transposon-based clinical trial. Learning from an evolutionary drive may help us create gene vehicles that are safer, more efficient, and less prone for suppression and inactivation. PMID:24320156

  13. Mariner-based transposon mutagenesis for Bacteroides species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Minoru; Uchida, Keiko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tada, Tomoyo; Morita, Hidetoshi; Yasutomo, Koji; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2014-06-01

    Bacteroides is one of the most predominant groups of human gut microbiota. Recent metagenomic analyses and studies on gnotobiotic mice demonstrated the tight association of Bacteroides with epithelial function, the gut immune system and systemic metabolism in the host. The mariner family transposon shows relatively low target site specificity and has hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Thereby, random mutagenesis using the mariner family transposon is expected to identify key molecules for human-Bacteroides symbiosis. In this study, we constructed the plasmid pMI07 to deliver the gene cassette (ermF/ITR), which harbors the erythromycin resistant marker (ermF) and the inverted repeat sequences (ITRs) recognized by Himar1 transposase, to Bacteroides via electrotransformation. pMI07 successfully delivered ermF/ITR to the Bacteroides genomes and generated thousands of insertion mutants/μg of pMI07 in B. thetaiotaomicron, B. fragilis, B. ovatus, and also, although to a lesser extent, B. vulgatus. Analyses of the ermF/ITR insertion sites in B. thetaiotaomicron and B. vulgatus revealed that the cassette targeted the dinucleotide TA and integrated into the genomes in an unbiased manner. The data reported here will provide useful information for transposon mutagenesis in Bacteroides species, which will enable identification of the genes responsible for their unique phenotypes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Efficiency of RAPD versus SSR markers for determining genetic diversity among popcorn lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, A A; Mangolin, C A; do Amaral, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; Scapim, C A; Mott, A S; Eloi, I B O; Cordovés, V; da Silva, M F P

    2010-01-05

    Using only one type of marker to quantify genetic diversity generates results that have been questioned in terms of reliability, when compared to the combined use of different markers. To compare the efficiency of the use of single versus multiple markers, we quantified genetic diversity among 10 S(7) inbred popcorn lines using both RAPD and SSR markers, and we evaluated how well these two types of markers discriminated the popcorn genotypes. These popcorn genotypes: "Yellow Pearl Popcorn" (P1-1 and P1-5), "Zélia" (P1-2 and P1-4), "Curagua" (P1-3), "IAC 112" (P9-1 and P9-2), "Avati Pichinga" (P9-3 and P9-5), and "Pisankalla" (P9-4) have different soil and climate adaptations. Using RAPD marker analysis, each primer yielded bands of variable intensities that were easily detected, as well as non-specific bands, which were discarded from the analysis. The nine primers used yielded 126 bands, of which 104 were classified as polymorphic, giving an average of 11.6 polymorphisms per primer. Using SSR procedures, the number of alleles per locus ranged from two to five, giving a total of 47 alleles for the 14 SSR loci. When comparing the groups formed using SSR and RAPD markers, there were similarities in the combinations of genotypes from the same genealogy. Correlation between genetic distances obtained through RAPD and SSR markers was relatively high (0.5453), indicating that both techniques are efficient for evaluating genetic diversity in the genotypes of popcorn that we evaluated, though RAPDs yielded more polymorphisms.

  15. Introduction of transposon Tn901 into a plasmid of Anacystis nidulans: preparation for cloning in cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hondel, C. A.; Verbeek, S.; van der Ende, A.; Weisbeek, P. J.; Borrias, W. E.; van Arkel, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    We have used the TEM beta-lactamase transposon Tn901, located on Escherichia coli plasmid pRI46, to introduce in vivo a genetic marker into plasmid pUH24, present in the cyanobacterial strain Anacystis nidulans R-2. Restriction enzyme analysis and heteroduplex studies of the 8.3 x 10(6)-dalton

  16. Identification and isolation of the FEEBLY gene from tomato by transposon tagging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biezen, Erik A. van der; Brandwagt, Bas F.; Leeuwen, Wessel van; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The Ac/Ds transposon system from maize was used for insertional mutagenesis in tomato. Marker genes were employed for the selection of plants carrying a total of 471 unique Ds elements. Three mutants were obtained with Ds insertions closely linked to recessive mutations: feebly (fb), yellow jim (yj)

  17. An epigenetic switch ensures transposon repression upon dynamic loss of DNA methylation in embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marius; Teissandier, Aurélie; Pérez-Palacios, Raquel; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is extensively remodeled during mammalian gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Most transposons become hypomethylated, raising the question of their regulation in the absence of DNA methylation. To reproduce a rapid and extensive demethylation, we subjected mouse ES cells to chemically defined hypomethylating culture conditions. Surprisingly, we observed two phases of transposon regulation. After an initial burst of de-repression, various transposon families were efficiently re-silenced. This was accompanied by a reconfiguration of the repressive chromatin landscape: while H3K9me3 was stable, H3K9me2 globally disappeared and H3K27me3 accumulated at transposons. Interestingly, we observed that H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 occupy different transposon families or different territories within the same family, defining three functional categories of adaptive chromatin responses to DNA methylation loss. Our work highlights that H3K9me3 and, most importantly, polycomb-mediated H3K27me3 chromatin pathways can secure the control of a large spectrum of transposons in periods of intense DNA methylation change, ensuring longstanding genome stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11418.001 PMID:26814573

  18. A marker-free system for highly efficient construction of vaccinia virus vectors using CRISPR Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yuan

    Full Text Available The current method for creation of vaccinia virus (VACV vectors involves using a selection and purification marker, however inclusion of a gene without therapeutic value in the resulting vector is not desirable for clinical use. The Cre-LoxP system has been used to make marker-free Poxviruses, but the efficiency was very low. To obtain a marker-free VACV vector, we developed marker gene excision systems to modify the thymidine kinase (TK region and N1L regions using Cre-Loxp and Flp-FRET systems respectively. CRISPR-Cas9 system significantly resulted in a high efficiency (∼90% in generation of marker gene-positive TK-mutant VACV vector. The marker gene (RFP could be excised from the recombinant virus using Cre recombinase. To make a marker-free VV vector with double gene deletions targeting the TK and N1L gene, we constructed a donor repair vector targeting the N1L gene, which can carry a therapeutic gene and the marker (RFP that could be excised from the recombinant virus using Flp recombinase. The marker-free system developed here can be used to efficiently construct VACV vectors armed with any therapeutic genes in the TK region or N1L region without marker genes. Our marker-free system platform has significant potential for development of new marker-free VACV vectors for clinical application.

  19. Functional characterization of the human mariner transposon Hsmar2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estel Gil

    Full Text Available DNA transposons are mobile elements with the ability to mobilize and transport genetic information between different chromosomal loci. Unfortunately, most transposons copies are currently inactivated, little is known about mariner elements in humans despite their role in the evolution of the human genome, even though the Hsmar2 transposon is associated to hotspots for homologous recombination involved in human genetic disorders as Charcot-Marie-Tooth, Prader-Willi/Angelman, and Williams syndromes. This manuscript describes the functional characterization of the human HSMAR2 transposase generated from fossil sequences and shows that the native HSMAR2 is active in human cells, but also in bacteria, with an efficiency similar to other mariner elements. We observe that the sub-cellular localization of HSMAR2 is dependent on the host cell type, and is cytotoxic when overexpressed in HeLa cells. Finally, we also demonstrate that the binding of HSMAR2 to its own ITRs is specific, and that the excision reaction leaves non-canonical footprints both in bacteria and eukaryotic cells.

  20. Functional Characterization of the Human Mariner Transposon Hsmar2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Estel; Bosch, Assumpcio; Lampe, David; Lizcano, Jose M.; Perales, Jose C.; Danos, Olivier; Chillon, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    DNA transposons are mobile elements with the ability to mobilize and transport genetic information between different chromosomal loci. Unfortunately, most transposons copies are currently inactivated, little is known about mariner elements in humans despite their role in the evolution of the human genome, even though the Hsmar2 transposon is associated to hotspots for homologous recombination involved in human genetic disorders as Charcot–Marie–Tooth, Prader-Willi/Angelman, and Williams syndromes. This manuscript describes the functional characterization of the human HSMAR2 transposase generated from fossil sequences and shows that the native HSMAR2 is active in human cells, but also in bacteria, with an efficiency similar to other mariner elements. We observe that the sub-cellular localization of HSMAR2 is dependent on the host cell type, and is cytotoxic when overexpressed in HeLa cells. Finally, we also demonstrate that the binding of HSMAR2 to its own ITRs is specific, and that the excision reaction leaves non-canonical footprints both in bacteria and eukaryotic cells. PMID:24039890

  1. Transposon-mediated BAC transgenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suster, Maximiliano L; Abe, Gembu; Schouw, Anders; Kawakami, Koichi

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are widely used in studies of vertebrate gene regulation and function because they often closely recapitulate the expression patterns of endogenous genes. Here we report a step-by-step protocol for efficient BAC transgenesis in zebrafish using the medaka Tol2 transposon. Using recombineering in Escherichia coli, we introduce the iTol2 cassette in the BAC plasmid backbone, which contains the inverted minimal cis-sequences required for Tol2 transposition, and a reporter gene to replace a target locus in the BAC. Microinjection of the Tol2-BAC and a codon-optimized transposase mRNA into fertilized eggs results in clean integrations in the genome and transmission to the germline at a rate of ∼15%. A single person can prepare a dozen constructs within 3 weeks, and obtain transgenic fish within approximately 3-4 months. Our protocol drastically reduces the labor involved in BAC transgenesis and will greatly facilitate biological and biomedical studies in model vertebrates.

  2. Reliable transgene-independent method for determining Sleeping Beauty transposon copy numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolacsek Orsolya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transposon-based gene delivery technique is emerging as a method of choice for gene therapy. The Sleeping Beauty (SB system has become one of the most favored methods, because of its efficiency and its random integration profile. Copy-number determination of the delivered transgene is a crucial task, but a universal method for measuring this is lacking. In this paper, we show that a real-time quantitative PCR-based, transgene-independent (qPCR-TI method is able to determine SB transposon copy numbers regardless of the genetic cargo. Results We designed a specific PCR assay to amplify the left inverted repeat-direct repeat region of SB, and used it together with the single-copy control gene RPPH1 and a reference genomic DNA of known copy number. The qPCR-TI method allowed rapid and accurate determination of SB transposon copy numbers in various cell types, including human embryonic stem cells. We also found that this sensitive, rapid, highly reproducible and non-radioactive method is just as accurate and reliable as the widely used blotting techniques or the transposon display method. Because the assay is specific for the inverted repeat region of the transposon, it could be used in any system where the SB transposon is the genetic vehicle. Conclusions We have developed a transgene-independent method to determine copy numbers of transgenes delivered by the SB transposon system. The technique is based on a quantitative real-time PCR detection method, offering a sensitive, non-radioactive, rapid and accurate approach, which has a potential to be used for gene therapy.

  3. Reliable transgene-independent method for determining Sleeping Beauty transposon copy numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacsek, Orsolya; Krízsik, Virág; Schamberger, Anita; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Apáti, Agota; Várady, György; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Sarkadi, Balázs; Orbán, Tamás I

    2011-03-03

    The transposon-based gene delivery technique is emerging as a method of choice for gene therapy. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) system has become one of the most favored methods, because of its efficiency and its random integration profile. Copy-number determination of the delivered transgene is a crucial task, but a universal method for measuring this is lacking. In this paper, we show that a real-time quantitative PCR-based, transgene-independent (qPCR-TI) method is able to determine SB transposon copy numbers regardless of the genetic cargo. We designed a specific PCR assay to amplify the left inverted repeat-direct repeat region of SB, and used it together with the single-copy control gene RPPH1 and a reference genomic DNA of known copy number. The qPCR-TI method allowed rapid and accurate determination of SB transposon copy numbers in various cell types, including human embryonic stem cells. We also found that this sensitive, rapid, highly reproducible and non-radioactive method is just as accurate and reliable as the widely used blotting techniques or the transposon display method. Because the assay is specific for the inverted repeat region of the transposon, it could be used in any system where the SB transposon is the genetic vehicle. We have developed a transgene-independent method to determine copy numbers of transgenes delivered by the SB transposon system. The technique is based on a quantitative real-time PCR detection method, offering a sensitive, non-radioactive, rapid and accurate approach, which has a potential to be used for gene therapy.

  4. A plasmid-transposon hybrid mutagenesis system effective in a broad range of Enterobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita eMonson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways.

  5. Applying a "double-feature" promoter to identify cardiomyocytes differentiated from human embryonic stem cells following transposon-based gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbán, Tamás I; Apáti, Agota; Németh, Andrea; Varga, Nóra; Krizsik, Virág; Schamberger, Anita; Szebényi, Kornélia; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Várady, György; Karászi, Eva; Homolya, László; Német, Katalin; Gócza, Elen; Miskey, Csaba; Mátés, Lajos; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    Human embryonic stem (HuES) cells represent a new potential tool for cell-therapy and gene-therapy applications. However, these approaches require the development of efficient, stable gene delivery, and proper progenitor cell and tissue separation methods. In HuES cell lines, we have generated stable, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing clones using a transposon-based (Sleeping Beauty) system. This method yielded high percentage of transgene integration and expression. Similarly to a lentiviral expression system, both the undifferentiated state and the differentiation pattern of the HuES cells were preserved. By using the CAG promoter, in contrast to several other constitutive promoter sequences (such as CMV, elongation factor 1alpha, or phosphoglycerate kinase), an exceptionally high EGFP expression was observed in differentiated cardiomyocytes. This phenomenon was independent of the transgene sequence, methods of gene delivery, copy number, and the integration sites. This "double-feature" promoter behavior, that is providing a selectable marker for transgene expressing undifferentiated stem cells, and also specifically labeling differentiated cardiomyocytes, was assessed by transcriptional profiling. We found a positive correlation between CAG promoter-driven EGFP transcription and expression of cardiomyocyte-specific genes. Our experiments indicate an efficient applicability of transposon-based gene delivery into HuES cells and provide a novel approach to identify differentiated tissues by exploiting a nontypical behavior of a constitutively active promoter, thereby avoiding invasive drug selection methods.

  6. Transposon tools: worldwide landscape of intellectual property and technological developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzoli, Fabien; Testu, François-Xavier; Merly, Franck; Bigot, Yves

    2010-03-01

    DNA transposons are considered to be good candidates for developing tools for genome engineering, insertional mutagenesis and gene delivery for therapeutic purposes, as illustrated by the recent first clinical trial of a transposon. In this article we set out to highlight the interest of patent information, and to develop a strategy for the technological development of transposon tools, similar to what has been done in many other fields. We propose a patent landscape for transposon tools, including the changes in international patent applications, and review the leading inventors and applicants. We also provide an overview of the potential patent portfolio for the prokaryotic and eukaryotic transposons that are exploited by spin-off companies. Finally, we discuss the difficulties involved in tracing relevant state-of-the-art of articles and patent documents, based on the example of one of the most promising transposon systems, including all the impacts on the technological development of transposon tools.

  7. Mos1 transposon-based transformation of fish cell lines using baculoviral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoo, Masako [Laboratory of Applied Molecular Entomology, Division of Applied Bioscience, Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan); Fujita, Ryosuke [Laboratory of Applied Molecular Entomology, Division of Applied Bioscience, Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan); Innate Immunity Laboratory, Graduate School of Life Science and Creative Research Institution, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Nakajima, Yumiko [Functional Genomics Group, COMB, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Yoshimizu, Mamoru; Kasai, Hisae [Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate 041-8611 (Japan); Asano, Shin-ichiro [Laboratory of Applied Molecular Entomology, Division of Applied Bioscience, Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan); Bando, Hisanori, E-mail: hban@abs.agr.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Applied Molecular Entomology, Division of Applied Bioscience, Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The baculovirus vector infiltrates the cells of economic important fishes. •Drosophila Mos1 transposase expressed in fish cells maintains its ability to localize to the nucleus. •The baculoviral vector carrying Mos1 is a useful tool to stably transform fish cells. -- Abstract: Drosophila Mos1 belongs to the mariner family of transposons, which are one of the most ubiquitous transposons among eukaryotes. We first determined nuclear transportation of the Drosophila Mos1-EGFP fusion protein in fish cell lines because it is required for a function of transposons. We next constructed recombinant baculoviral vectors harboring the Drosophila Mos1 transposon or marker genes located between Mos1 inverted repeats. The infectivity of the recombinant virus to fish cells was assessed by monitoring the expression of a fluorescent protein encoded in the viral genome. We detected transgene expression in CHSE-214, HINAE, and EPC cells, but not in GF or RTG-2 cells. In the co-infection assay of the Mos1-expressing virus and reporter gene-expressing virus, we successfully transformed CHSE-214 and HINAE cells. These results suggest that the combination of a baculovirus and Mos1 transposable element may be a tool for transgenesis in fish cells.

  8. Mos1 transposon-based transformation of fish cell lines using baculoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoo, Masako; Fujita, Ryosuke; Nakajima, Yumiko; Yoshimizu, Mamoru; Kasai, Hisae; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Bando, Hisanori

    2013-09-13

    Drosophila Mos1 belongs to the mariner family of transposons, which are one of the most ubiquitous transposons among eukaryotes. We first determined nuclear transportation of the Drosophila Mos1-EGFP fusion protein in fish cell lines because it is required for a function of transposons. We next constructed recombinant baculoviral vectors harboring the Drosophila Mos1 transposon or marker genes located between Mos1 inverted repeats. The infectivity of the recombinant virus to fish cells was assessed by monitoring the expression of a fluorescent protein encoded in the viral genome. We detected transgene expression in CHSE-214, HINAE, and EPC cells, but not in GF or RTG-2 cells. In the co-infection assay of the Mos1-expressing virus and reporter gene-expressing virus, we successfully transformed CHSE-214 and HINAE cells. These results suggest that the combination of a baculovirus and Mos1 transposable element may be a tool for transgenesis in fish cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Utilization of a thermosensitive episome bearing transposon TN10 to isolate Hfr donor strains of Erwinia carotovora subsp. chrysanthemi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoujansky, A; Lemattre, M; Boistard, P

    1982-04-01

    A thermosensitive episome bearing the transposon Tn10, F(Ts)::Tn10 Lac+, has been successfully transferred from Escherichia coli to several wild strains of the enterobacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. chrysanthemi, which are pathogenic on Saintpaulia ionantha. In one of these strains, all of the characters controlled by this episome (Lac+, Tetr, Tra+) were expressed, and its replication was stopped at 40 degrees C and above. At 30 degrees C, the episome was easily transferred between strains derived from E. carotovora subsp. chrysanthemi 3937j and to E coli. Hfr donor strains were obtained from a F' strain of 3937j by selecting clones which grew at 40 degrees C on plates containing tetracycline. One of these strains, Hfrq, was examined in more detail: the characters Lac+ and Tetr were stabilized and did not segregate higher than its parental F' strain. The mating was most efficient at 37 degrees C on a membrane. Hfrq transferred its chromosome to recipient strains at high frequency and in a polarized fashion, as evidenced by the gradient of transfer frequencies, the kinetics of marker entry (in interrupted mating experiments), and the analysis of linkage between different markers. The chromosome of Hfrq was most probably transferred in the following sequence: origin...met...xyl...arg...ile...leu...thr...cys...pan...ura...gal...trp...his. ..pur... Moreover, this genetic transfer system proved to be efficient in strain construction.

  10. The Sleeping Beauty transposon system for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierczek, Marta; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán

    2012-02-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to establish efficient and safe gene delivery protocols that could meet demanding expectations of a successful gene therapy. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system combines simplicity and inexpensive manufacture offered by plasmid-based vector formulation with integrative features exhibited by some viral vectors. Activated after over ten million years of silent genomic existence, the SB transposable element entered the 21st century as a potent technology for a broad range of applications in genome engineering, including gene therapy. Beneficially for gene therapy purposes, the SB system has been demonstrated to enable persistent expression of therapeutic genes followed by restoration of homeostasis in a variety of disease models. Importantly, this non-viral gene delivery vehicle is postulated to constitute a relatively safe vector system, because it lacks a preference for inserting into transcription units and their upstream regulatory regions, thereby minimizing genotoxic risks that might be associated with vector integration. Further evolution and wide, comprehensive preclinical testing of the SB transposon system in the context of several disease models is expected to further refine this valuable technology matched by enhanced biosafety towards disease treatment.

  11. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-10-04

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elso et al.

  12. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  13. Gateway-compatible transposon vector to genetically modify human embryonic kidney and adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Spyros; Raskó, Tamas; Mátés, Lajos; Ivics, Zoltan; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Kouzi-Koliakou, Kokkona; Koliakos, George

    2012-07-01

    The Gateway technology cloning system and transposon technology represent state-of-the-art laboratory techniques. Combination of these molecular tools allows rapid cloning of target genes into expression vectors. Here, we describe a novel Gateway technology-compatible transposon plasmid that combines the advantages of Gateway recombination cloning with the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated transgene integrations. In our system the transposition is catalyzed by the novel hyperactive SB100x transposase, and provides highly efficient and precise transgene integrations into the host genome. A Gateway-compatible transposon plasmid was generated in which the potential target gene can be fused with a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tag at the N-terminal. The vector utilizes the CAGGS promoter to control fusion protein expression. The transposon expression vector encoding the YFP-interferon-β protein (IFNB1) fusion protein together with the hyperactive SB100x transposase was used to generate stable cell lines in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and rat adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC). ASCs and HEK293 cells stably expressed and secreted the human IFNB1 for up to 4 weeks after transfection. The generated Gateway-compatible transposon plasmid can be utilized for numerous experimental approaches, such as gene therapy or high-throughput screening methods in primary cells, representing a valuable molecular tool for laboratory applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Progress report, May 1, 1988--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-06-01

    Our goal is to clone genes in lettuce determining resistance to downy mildew. One approach involves the mobilization of transposons into resistance genes to mutate and tag the target gene. Because transposons have yet to be isolated and characterized from lettuce, the majority of our experiments have involved Ac from corn as this is increasingly the best characterized transposon. Over the past several years, various labs have contributed to a detailed understanding of the biology of Ac in corn and heterologous plant species. We have collaborated closely with several of these labs, exchanged materials and incorporated their advances into our analysis of transposition in lettuce. The original proposal described the development of a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and its subsequent use to tag disease resistance genes. The development phase involved characterization and manipulation of Ac transposition, identification of suitable whole plant selectable markers for the construction of chimeric non-autonomous elements, and investigation of the stability of resistance genes. Investigation of Ac transposition in lettuce has received the majority of our attention. Initially, we made a simple construct with wildtype Ac and introduced it into lettuce. No transposition was observed; although other labs demonstrated that the same construct was functional in tomato. We then focused on assaying for Ac transposition with constructs of increasing sophistication that had been demonstrated by others to be functional in other species. The latest constructs for transposon mutagenesis clearly demonstrated transposition in lettuce. This allowed us to generate seed stocks that we will start to screen for insertional inactivation of resistance genes this year.

  15. Efficient Software for Multi-marker, Region-Based Analysis of GWAS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleal S. Sanjak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have associated many single variants with complex disease, yet the better part of heritable complex disease risk remains unexplained. Analytical tools designed to work under specific population genetic models are needed. Rare variants are increasingly shown to be important in human complex disease, but most existing GWAS data do not cover rare variants. Explicit population genetic models predict that genes contributing to complex traits and experiencing recurrent, unconditionally deleterious, mutation will harbor multiple rare, causative mutations of subtle effect. It is difficult to identify genes harboring rare variants of large effect that contribute to complex disease risk via the single marker association tests typically used in GWAS. Gene/region-based association tests may have the power detect associations by combining information from multiple markers, but have yielded limited success in practice. This is partially because many methods have not been widely applied. Here, we empirically demonstrate the utility of a procedure based on the rank truncated product (RTP method, filtered to reduce the effects of linkage disequilibrium. We apply the procedure to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC data set, and uncover previously unidentified associations, some of which have been replicated in much larger studies. We show that, in the absence of significant rare variant coverage, RTP based methods still have the power to detect associated genes. We recommend that RTP-based methods be applied to all existing GWAS data to maximize the usefulness of those data. For this, we provide efficient software implementing our procedure.

  16. Non-viral reprogramming of fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells by Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talluri, Thirumala R; Kumar, Dharmendra; Glage, Silke; Garrels, Wiebke; Ivics, Zoltan; Debowski, Katharina; Behr, Rüdiger; Kues, Wilfried A

    2014-07-18

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represents a promising approach for innovative cell therapies. The original method requires viral transduction of several reprogramming factors, which may be associated with an increased risk of tumorigenicity. Transposition of reprogramming cassettes represents a recent alternative to viral approaches. Since binary transposons can be produced as common plasmids they provide a safe and cost-efficient alternative to viral delivery methods. Here, we compared the efficiency of two different transposon systems, Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB), for the generation of murine iPS. Murine fibroblasts derived from an inbred BL/6 mouse line carrying a pluripotency reporter, Oct4-EGFP, and fibroblasts derived from outbred NMRI mice were employed for reprogramming. Both transposon systems resulted in the successful isolation of murine iPS cell lines. The reduction of the core reprogramming factors to omit the proto-oncogene c-Myc was compatible with iPS cell line derivation, albeit with reduced reprogramming efficiencies. The transposon-derived iPS cells featured typical hallmarks of pluripotency, including teratoma growth in immunodeficient mice. Thus SB and PB transposons represent a promising non-viral approach for iPS cell derivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficiencies of Generating Selectable Marker-Free Transgenic Rice with Different Transformation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-xiu YU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the efficiency of generating selectable marker-free (SMF transgenic rice, two transformation methods were employed for four rice varieties (Wuxiangjing 9, Longtefu, Xieqingzao and Zhenshan 97. One method is by using a single twin T-DNA binary vector pYH592 in one Agrobacterium strain, which is composed of two separate T-DNA regions (one carrying an antisense Wx gene and the other carrying a HPT gene. The other one, named as two-strain/two-vector system, is by using two separate binary vectors in two separate Agrobacterium cultures. The results indicated that the average co-transformation frequencies of the antisense Wx gene and the HPT gene were 10.1% and 45.0%, respectively, for the four varieties. And the SMF transgenic plants selected from the offsprings of co-transformants were 55.6% and 60.0% in the two-strain/two-vector and twin T-DNA vector binary systems, respectively.

  18. A bifunctional aminoglycoside acetyltransferase/phosphotransferase conferring tobramycin resistance provides an efficient selectable marker for plastid transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Iman; Ruf, Stephanie; Bock, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    A new selectable marker gene for stable transformation of the plastid genome was developed that is similarly efficient as the aadA, and produces no background of spontaneous resistance mutants. More than 25 years after its development for Chlamydomonas and tobacco, the transformation of the chloroplast genome still represents a challenging technology that is available only in a handful of species. The vast majority of chloroplast transformation experiments conducted thus far have relied on a single selectable marker gene, the spectinomycin resistance gene aadA. Although a few alternative markers have been reported, the aadA has remained unrivalled in efficiency and is, therefore, nearly exclusively used. The development of new marker genes for plastid transformation is of crucial importance to all efforts towards extending the species range of the technology as well as to those applications in basic research, biotechnology and synthetic biology that involve the multistep engineering of plastid genomes. Here, we have tested a bifunctional resistance gene for its suitability as a selectable marker for chloroplast transformation. The bacterial enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6')-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia possesses an N-terminal acetyltransferase domain and a C-terminal phosphotransferase domain that can act synergistically and detoxify aminoglycoside antibiotics highly efficiently. We report that, in combination with selection for resistance to the aminoglycoside tobramycin, the aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-Ia gene represents an efficient marker for plastid transformation in that it produces similar numbers of transplastomic lines as the spectinomycin resistance gene aadA. Importantly, no spontaneous antibiotic resistance mutants appear under tobramycin selection.

  19. Efficient elimination of selectable marker genes from the plastid genome by the CRE-lox site-specific recombination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneille, S; Lutz, K; Svab, Z; Maliga, P

    2001-07-01

    Incorporation of a selectable marker gene during transformation is essential to obtain transformed plastids. However, once transformation is accomplished, having the marker gene becomes undesirable. Here we report on adapting the P1 bacteriophage CRE-lox site-specific recombination system for the elimination of marker genes from the plastid genome. The system was tested by the elimination of a negative selectable marker, codA, which is flanked by two directly oriented lox sites (>codA>). Highly efficient elimination of >codA> was triggered by introduction of a nuclear-encoded plastid-targeted CRE by Agrobacterium transformation or via pollen. Excision of >codA> in tissue culture cells was frequently accompanied by a large deletion of a plastid genome segment which includes the tRNA-ValUAC gene. However, the large deletions were absent when cre was introduced by pollination. Thus pollination is our preferred protocol for the introduction of cre. Removal of the >codA> coding region occurred at a dramatic speed, in striking contrast to the slow and gradual build-up of transgenic copies during plastid transformation. The nuclear cre gene could subsequently be removed by segregation in the seed progeny. The modified CRE-lox system described here will be a highly efficient tool to obtain marker-free transplastomic plants.

  20. "Knife to skin" time is a poor marker of operating room utilization and efficiency in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Suvitesh; Ramady, Omar; Monge, Mary; Fitzsimons, Michael G; Kaleta, Terry R; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-06-01

    Markers of operation room (OR) efficiency in cardiac surgery are focused on "knife to skin" and "start time tardiness." These do not evaluate the middle and later parts of the cardiac surgical pathway. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate knife to skin time as an efficiency marker in cardiac surgery. We looked at knife to skin time, procedure time, and transfer times in the cardiac operational pathway for their correlation with predefined indices of operational efficiency (Index of Operation Efficiency - InOE, Surgical Index of Operational Efficiency - sInOE). A regression analysis was performed to test the goodness of fit of the regression curves estimated for InOE relative to the times on the operational pathway. The mean knife to skin time was 90.6 ± 13 minutes (23% of total OR time). The mean procedure time was 282 ± 123 minutes (71% of total OR time). Utilization efficiencies were highest for aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting and least for complex aortic procedures. There were no significant procedure-specific or team-specific differences for standard procedures. Procedure times correlated the strongest with InOE (r = -0.98, p efficiency. A statistically significant linear dependence on InOE was observed with "procedure times" only. Procedure times are a better marker of OR efficiency than knife to skin in cardiac cases. Strategies to increase OR utilization and efficiency should address procedure times in addition to knife to skin times. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Functionality of Minimal PiggyBac Transposons in Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Troyanovsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimal piggyBac vectors are a modified single-plasmid version of the classical piggyBac delivery system that can be used for stable transgene integration. These vectors have a truncated terminal domain in the delivery cassette and thus, integrate significantly less flanking transposon DNA into host cell chromatin than classical piggyBac vectors. Herein, we test various characteristics of this modified transposon. The integration efficiency of minimal piggyBac vectors was inversely related to the size of both the transposon and the entire plasmid, but inserts as large as 15 kb were efficiently integrated. Open and super-coiled vectors demonstrated the same integration efficiency while DNA methylation decreased the integration efficiency and silenced the expression of previously integrated sequences in some cell types. Importantly, the incidence of plasmid backbone integration was not increased above that seen in nontransposon control vectors. In BALB/c mice, we demonstrated prolonged expression of two transgenes (intracellular mCherry and secretable Gaussia luciferase when delivered by the minimal piggyBac that resulted in a more sustained antibody production against the immunogenic luciferase than when delivered by a transient (nontransposon vector plasmid. We conclude that minimal piggyBac vectors are an effective alternative to other integrative systems for stable DNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  2. An efficient marker-free vector for clean gene transfer into plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-23

    Feb 23, 2012 ... A marker-free vector, pBINMF, for clean gene transfer was constructed based on the binary vector. pBINPLUS. Vector pBINMF, carrying only a multiple cloning site (MCS) between the left and the right. T-DNA border, was suitable to directly generate marker-free transgenic plants (MFTPs) without any.

  3. Hybrid Lentivirus-transposon Vectors With a Random Integration Profile in Human Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Nicklas H; Moldt, Brian; Mátés, Lajos

    2009-01-01

    Gene delivery by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) is efficient, but genomic integration of the viral DNA is strongly biased toward transcriptionally active loci resulting in an increased risk of insertional mutagenesis in gene therapy protocols. Nonviral...... Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors have a significantly safer insertion profile, but efficient delivery into relevant cell/tissue types is a limitation. In an attempt to combine the favorable features of the two vector systems we established a novel hybrid vector technology based on SB transposase......-mediated insertion of lentiviral DNA circles generated during transduction of target cells with integrase (IN)-defective LVs (IDLVs). By construction of a lentivirus-transposon hybrid vector allowing transposition exclusively from circular viral DNA substrates, we demonstrate that SB transposase added in trans...

  4. Horizontal transfer of a plant transposon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianmin Diao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of well-documented cases of horizontal transfer between higher eukaryotes involve the movement of transposable elements between animals. Surprisingly, although plant genomes often contain vast numbers of these mobile genetic elements, no evidence of horizontal transfer of a nuclear-encoded transposon between plant species has been detected to date. The most mutagenic known plant transposable element system is the Mutator system in maize. Mu-like elements (MULEs are widespread among plants, and previous analysis has suggested that the distribution of various subgroups of MULEs is patchy, consistent with horizontal transfer. We have sequenced portions of MULE transposons from a number of species of the genus Setaria and compared them to each other and to publicly available databases. A subset of these elements is remarkably similar to a small family of MULEs in rice. A comparison of noncoding and synonymous sequences revealed that the observed similarity is not due to selection at the amino acid level. Given the amount of time separating Setaria and rice, the degree of similarity between these elements excludes the possibility of simple vertical transmission of this class of MULEs. This is the first well-documented example of horizontal transfer of any nuclear-encoded genes between higher plants.

  5. Horizontal Transfer of a Plant Transposon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of well-documented cases of horizontal transfer between higher eukaryotes involve the movement of transposable elements between animals. Surprisingly, although plant genomes often contain vast numbers of these mobile genetic elements, no evidence of horizontal transfer of a nuclear-encoded transposon between plant species has been detected to date. The most mutagenic known plant transposable element system is the Mutator system in maize. Mu-like elements (MULEs are widespread among plants, and previous analysis has suggested that the distribution of various subgroups of MULEs is patchy, consistent with horizontal transfer. We have sequenced portions of MULE transposons from a number of species of the genus Setaria and compared them to each other and to publicly available databases. A subset of these elements is remarkably similar to a small family of MULEs in rice. A comparison of noncoding and synonymous sequences revealed that the observed similarity is not due to selection at the amino acid level. Given the amount of time separating Setaria and rice, the degree of similarity between these elements excludes the possibility of simple vertical transmission of this class of MULEs. This is the first well-documented example of horizontal transfer of any nuclear-encoded genes between higher plants.

  6. A bifunctional aminoglycoside acetyltransferase/phosphotransferase conferring tobramycin resistance provides an efficient selectable marker for plastid transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Tabatabaei, I.; Ruf, S; De Bock, R.

    2016-01-01

    Key message A new selectable marker gene for stable transformation of the plastid genome was developed that is similarly efficient as the aadA, and produces no background of spontaneous resistance mutants. Abstract More than 25?years after its development for Chlamydomonas and tobacco, the transformation of the chloroplast genome still represents a challenging technology that is available only in a handful of species. The vast majority of chloroplast transformation experiments conducted thus ...

  7. Association of genetic markers with the efficiency of tocilizumab treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Anatolyevna Guseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the association of polymorphic variants of the genes playing a pivotal role in the processes of inflammation with the efficiency of tocilizumab (TCZ therapy in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 43 patients with active RA resistant to standard therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs who had previously received no genetically engineered biological agents. The patients received 6 intravenous infusions of TCZ in a dose of 8 mg/kg at 4-week intervals. DAS28 was used to evaluate the efficiency of TCZ therapy. Polymorphisms in the genes of interleukin 6 (IL-6 (-174G/C, IL-6 receptor (IL-6R (+358A/C, tumor necrosis factor-а (TNF-а (-308A/G, IL-10(-592A/C, -1082A/G, TNF^-Induced protein 3 - TNF-αIP3 T/C (rs675520, TNF-αIP3A/G (rs6920220, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 - МСР1 (+2581A/G were detected by a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using fluorescently-labeled specific hybridization primers, followed by melting curve estimation by means of a DT-96 detecting amplifier (ZAO «Scientific Production Firm DNA-Technology», Russia. Results. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a therapeutic response to the first TCZ infusion was associated with the polymorphism of the TNF-а (-308A/G gene; the odds ratio (OR was 8.0 [95% confidence interval (CI 1.2-52.8] (p = 0.03. The carriers of the GG genotype demonstrated a less marked response than those of the AG genotype (the AA genotype was not found. After the sixth TCZ infusion, there was an obvious trend towards a statistically significant correlation of the clinical response with the polymorphism of the TNF- аIP3 A/G (rs6920220 gene (OR = 5.5; 95% CI 0.9-32.6; p = 0.06. A good response was more frequently observed in the carriers of the homozygous GG genotype than in those of the AA/AG genotypes (68.6 and 31.4%, respectively and, conversely, a moderate response was more common in the carriers

  8. Identification of transposon insertion polymorphisms by computational comparative analysis of next generation personal genome data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xuemei; Dehne, Frank; Liang, Ping

    2011-11-01

    Structural variations (SVs) in a genome are now known as a prominent and important type of genetic variation. Among all types of SVs, the identification of transposon insertion polymorphisms (TIPs) is more challenging due to the highly repetitive nature of transposon sequences. We developed a computational method, TIP-finder, to identify TIPs through analysis of next generation personal genome data and their extremely large copy numbers. We tested the efficiency of TIP-finder with simulated data and are able to detect about 88% of TIPs with precision of ≥91%. Using TIP-finder to analyze the Solexa pair-end sequence data at deep coverage for six genomes representing two trio families, we identified a total of 5569 TIPs, consisting of 4881, 456, 91, and 141 insertions from Alu, L1, SVA and HERV, respectively, representing the most comprehensive analysis of such type of genetic variation.

  9. Analyzing Maize Anther Development Using Transposons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S.

    2011-12-01

    Over the summer, we tackled two projects in studying more about transposons (moving/jumping genes) such as Mutator genes in corn for this project, and how the plants switch from the stages of mitosis to meiosis without a germ line. We use a transgenic corn line containing RescueMu (an artificial Mutator containing a plasmid in it), so we can keep track of the insertion events. This is a long term project so we haven't come to any final conclusions or results with tracking what happens in Mutator transposition during different stages of corn development but our process shows to work so we continue with what we've been doing.

  10. Upgrading of efficiency in the tracking of body markers with video techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Keemink (Lianne); G.A. Hoek van Dijke; C.J. Snijders (Chris)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Based on a VME system, a low-cost video system has been developed for recording human motion. The paper describes the algorithm which is used for the recordings. The video system makes it possible to track in real time up to six markers on the body, sampled at a 50 Hz

  11. An efficient method to find potentially universal population genetic markers, applied to metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenuil Anne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the impressive growth of sequence databases, the limited availability of nuclear markers that are sufficiently polymorphic for population genetics and phylogeography and applicable across various phyla restricts many potential studies, particularly in non-model organisms. Numerous introns have invariant positions among kingdoms, providing a potential source for such markers. Unfortunately, most of the few known EPIC (Exon Primed Intron Crossing loci are restricted to vertebrates or belong to multigenic families. Results In order to develop markers with broad applicability, we designed a bioinformatic approach aimed at avoiding multigenic families while identifying intron positions conserved across metazoan phyla. We developed a program facilitating the identification of EPIC loci which allowed slight variation in intron position. From the Homolens databases we selected 29 gene families which contained 52 promising introns for which we designed 93 primer pairs. PCR tests were performed on several ascidians, echinoderms, bivalves and cnidarians. On average, 24 different introns per genus were amplified in bilaterians. Remarkably, five of the introns successfully amplified in all of the metazoan genera tested (a dozen genera, including cnidarians. The influence of several factors on amplification success was investigated. Success rate was not related to the phylogenetic relatedness of a taxon to the groups that most influenced primer design, showing that these EPIC markers are extremely conserved in animals. Conclusions Our new method now makes it possible to (i rapidly isolate a set of EPIC markers for any phylum, even outside the animal kingdom, and thus, (ii compare genetic diversity at potentially homologous polymorphic loci between divergent taxa.

  12. Long-Term PEDF Release in Rat Iris and Retinal Epithelial Cells after Sleeping Beauty Transposon-Mediated Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Garcia-Garcia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF is a potent antiangiogenic, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective molecule that is the endogenous inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the retina. An ex vivo gene therapy approach based on transgenic overexpression of PEDF in the eye is assumed to rebalance the angiogenic-antiangiogenic milieu of the retina, resulting in growth regression of choroidal blood vessels, the hallmark of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Here, we show that rat pigment epithelial cells can be efficiently transfected with the PEDF-expressing non-viral hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system delivered in a form free of antibiotic resistance marker miniplasmids. The engineered retinal and iris pigment epithelium cells secrete high (141 ± 13 and 222 ± 14 ng PEDF levels in 72 hr in vitro. In vivo studies showed cell survival and insert expression during at least 4 months. Transplantation of the engineered cells to the subretinal space of a rat model of choroidal neovascularization reduces almost 50% of the development of new vessels.

  13. Identifying genetic marker sets associated with phenotypes via an efficient adaptive score test

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, T.

    2012-06-25

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and gene-expression profiling have generated a large number of valuable datasets for assessing how genetic variations are related to disease outcomes. With such datasets, it is often of interest to assess the overall effect of a set of genetic markers, assembled based on biological knowledge. Genetic marker-set analyses have been advocated as more reliable and powerful approaches compared with the traditional marginal approaches (Curtis and others, 2005. Pathways to the analysis of microarray data. TRENDS in Biotechnology 23, 429-435; Efroni and others, 2007. Identification of key processes underlying cancer phenotypes using biologic pathway analysis. PLoS One 2, 425). Procedures for testing the overall effect of a marker-set have been actively studied in recent years. For example, score tests derived under an Empirical Bayes (EB) framework (Liu and others, 2007. Semiparametric regression of multidimensional genetic pathway data: least-squares kernel machines and linear mixed models. Biometrics 63, 1079-1088; Liu and others, 2008. Estimation and testing for the effect of a genetic pathway on a disease outcome using logistic kernel machine regression via logistic mixed models. BMC bioinformatics 9, 292-2; Wu and others, 2010. Powerful SNP-set analysis for case-control genome-wide association studies. American Journal of Human Genetics 86, 929) have been proposed as powerful alternatives to the standard Rao score test (Rao, 1948. Large sample tests of statistical hypotheses concerning several parameters with applications to problems of estimation. Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 44, 50-57). The advantages of these EB-based tests are most apparent when the markers are correlated, due to the reduction in the degrees of freedom. In this paper, we propose an adaptive score test which up- or down-weights the contributions from each member of the marker-set based on the Z-scores of

  14. Synthetic strategies for efficient conjugation of organometallic complexes with pendant protein reactive markers

    KAUST Repository

    Jantke, Dominik

    2013-11-01

    Site-directed conjugation of metal centers to proteins is fundamental for biological and bioinorganic applications of transition metals. However, methods for the site-selective introduction of metal centers remain scarce. Herein, we present broadly applicable synthetic strategies for the conjugation of bioactive molecules with a range of organometallic complexes. Following three different synthetic strategies, we were able to synthesize a small library of metal conjugated protein markers featuring different types of protein reactive sites (epoxides, phenylphosphonates, fluorosulfonates and fluorophosphonate groups) as well as different late transition metals (iron, ruthenium, rhodium, palladium and platinum). The products were isolated in moderate to excellent yields and high purity. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction of the metalated protein markers corroborates structural integrity of the metal complex and the protein reactive site. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes and cellular processes driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Takahiro; Newberg, Justin Y.; Kodama, Michiko; Rangel, Roberto; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Tien, Jean C.; Parsons, Pamela H.; Wu, Hao; Finegold, Milton J.; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is thought to contribute to metastasis and chemoresistance in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), leading to their poor prognosis. The genes driving EMT in HCC are not yet fully understood, however. Here, we show that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposons in immortalized mouse hepatoblasts induces mesenchymal liver tumors on transplantation to nude mice. These tumors show significant down-regulation of epithelial markers, along with up-regulation of mesenchymal markers and EMT-related transcription factors (EMT-TFs). Sequencing of transposon insertion sites from tumors identified 233 candidate cancer genes (CCGs) that were enriched for genes and cellular processes driving EMT. Subsequent trunk driver analysis identified 23 CCGs that are predicted to function early in tumorigenesis and whose mutation or alteration in patients with HCC is correlated with poor patient survival. Validation of the top trunk drivers identified in the screen, including MET (MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase), GRB2-associated binding protein 1 (GAB1), HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1 (HUWE1), lysine-specific demethylase 6A (KDM6A), and protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor-type 12 (PTPN12), showed that deregulation of these genes activates an EMT program in human HCC cells that enhances tumor cell migration. Finally, deregulation of these genes in human HCC was found to confer sorafenib resistance through apoptotic tolerance and reduced proliferation, consistent with recent studies showing that EMT contributes to the chemoresistance of tumor cells. Our unique cell-based transposon mutagenesis screen appears to be an excellent resource for discovering genes involved in EMT in human HCC and potentially for identifying new drug targets. PMID:27247392

  16. An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi MR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad R Alavi1,2, Vlado Antonic2, Adrien Ravizee1, Peter J Weina3, Mina Izadjoo1,2, Alexander Stojadinovic21Division of Wound Biology and Translational Research, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and American Registry of Pathology, Washington DC, 2Combat Wound Initiative Program, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC, 3The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, USABackground: Genus Enterobacter includes important opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that could infect complex wounds. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in these microorganisms represents a challenging clinical problem in the treatment of these wounds. In the authors’ screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from complex wounds, an Enterobacter species was isolated that harbors antibiotic-resistant plasmids conferring resistance to Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to identify the resistance genes carried by one of these plasmids.Methods: The plasmids from the Enterobacter isolate were propagated in E. coli and one of the plasmids, designated as pR23, was sequenced by the Sanger method using fluorescent dye-terminator chemistry on a genetic analyzer. The assembled sequence was annotated by search of the GenBank database.Results: Plasmid pR23 is composed of the transposon Tn1331 and a backbone plasmid that is identical to the plasmid pPIGDM1 from Enterobacter agglomerans. The multidrug-resistance transposon Tn1331, which confers resistance to aminoglycoside and beta lactam antibiotics, has been previously isolated only from Klebsiella. The Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1, which carries a ColE1-like origin of replication and has no apparent selective marker, appears to provide a backbone for propagation of Tn1331 in Enterobacter. The recognition sequence of Tn1331 transposase for insertion into pPIGDM1 is the pentanucleotide TATTA, which occurs only once throughout the length of this plasmid.Conclusion: Transposition of Tn1331 into

  17. Epigenetics and Evolution: Transposons and the Stochastic Epigenetic Modification Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Branciamore; Andrei S. Rodin; Grigoriy Gogoshin; Arthur D. Riggs

    2015-01-01

    In addition to genetic variation, epigenetic variation and transposons can greatly affect the evolutionary fitnesses landscape and gene expression. Previously we proposed a mathematical treatment of a general epigenetic variation model that we called Stochastic Epigenetic Modification (SEM) model. In this study we follow up with a special case, the Transposon Silencing Model (TSM), with, once again, emphasis on quantitative treatment. We have investigated the evolutionary effects of epigeneti...

  18. A Transposon-Based Strategy for Sequencing Repetitive DNA in Eukaryotic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Scott E.; Chissoe, Stephanie L.; Eby, Yolanda; Wilson, Richard K.; Boeke, Jef D.

    1997-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is a significant component of eukaryotic genomes. We have developed a strategy to efficiently and accurately sequence repetitive DNA in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using integrated artificial transposons and automated fluorescent sequencing. Mapping and assembly tools represent important components of this strategy and facilitate sequence assembly in complex regions. We have applied the strategy to several cosmid assembly gaps resulting from repetitive DNA and have accurately recovered the sequences of these regions. Analysis of these regions revealed six novel transposon-like repetitive elements, IR-1, IR-2, IR-3, IR-4, IR-5, and TR-1. Each of these elements represents a middle-repetitive DNA family in C. elegans containing at least 3–140 copies per genome. Copies of IR-1, IR-2, IR-4, and IR-5 are located on all (or most) of the six nematode chromosomes, whereas IR-3 is predominantly located on chromosome X. These elements are almost exclusively interspersed between predicted genes or within the predicted introns of these genes, with the exception of a single IR-5 element, which is located within a predicted exon. IR-1, IR-2, and IR-3 are flanked by short sequence duplications resembling the target site duplications of transposons. We have established a website database (http://www.welch.jhu.edu/~devine/RepDNAdb.html) to track and cross-reference these transposon-like repetitive elements that contains detailed information on individual element copies and provides links to appropriate GenBank records. This set of tools may be used to sequence, track, and study repetitive DNA in model organisms and humans. [The sequences reported in this paper have been deposited in GenBank under accession nos. U53139 and U86946–U86951.] PMID:9149950

  19. Proposed uses of transposons in insect and medical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Peter W

    2008-01-01

    Transposons are small pieces of DNA that can transpose through either RNA or DNA intermediates. They have been found in almost all organisms and are important components of the evolutionary process at the chromosomal level. They have provided the raw genetic material that has produced domesticated genes that now provide important cellular functions and are now being explored as genetic tools in both humans and insects that vector human pathogens. Here I compare the requirements for both insect and human gene therapy and discuss the similarities between them in terms of transposon performance. Recent progress in understanding transposon function in terms of transposase structure is described as is the rapidly emerging role of RNAi in generic transposon regulation. These developments reinforce the view that, autonomous, transposon behavior in host organisms is, in part, determined by the nuclear and cellular environment of the cell and these factors need to be considered when developing transposons as therapeutic agents either in humans or in insects that vector human disease.

  20. A minimally invasive multiple marker approach allows highly efficient detection of meningioma tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meese Eckart

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of effective frameworks that permit an accurate diagnosis of tumors, especially in their early stages, remains a grand challenge in the field of bioinformatics. Our approach uses statistical learning techniques applied to multiple antigen tumor antigen markers utilizing the immune system as a very sensitive marker of molecular pathological processes. For validation purposes we choose the intracranial meningioma tumors as model system since they occur very frequently, are mostly benign, and are genetically stable. Results A total of 183 blood samples from 93 meningioma patients (WHO stages I-III and 90 healthy controls were screened for seroreactivity with a set of 57 meningioma-associated antigens. We tested several established statistical learning methods on the resulting reactivity patterns using 10-fold cross validation. The best performance was achieved by Naïve Bayes Classifiers. With this classification method, our framework, called Minimally Invasive Multiple Marker (MIMM approach, yielded a specificity of 96.2%, a sensitivity of 84.5%, and an accuracy of 90.3%, the respective area under the ROC curve was 0.957. Detailed analysis revealed that prediction performs particularly well on low-grade (WHO I tumors, consistent with our goal of early stage tumor detection. For these tumors the best classification result with a specificity of 97.5%, a sensitivity of 91.3%, an accuracy of 95.6%, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.971 was achieved using a set of 12 antigen markers only. This antigen set was detected by a subset selection method based on Mutual Information. Remarkably, our study proves that the inclusion of non-specific antigens, detected not only in tumor but also in normal sera, increases the performance significantly, since non-specific antigens contribute additional diagnostic information. Conclusion Our approach offers the possibility to screen members of risk groups as a matter of routine

  1. Improve space positioning recognition of laser marker to promote the operating efficiency of Ground LiDAR—A case of FARO Photon 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chiang

    2012-05-01

    Ground LiDAR scanning used in space operations, three or more conjugated laser markers between adjacent scanning stations are used to coordinate conversion and overlay of point cloud data, in order to get 3D point cloud model. The recognition of conjugated laser marker influences the precision of 3D point cloud model, and scanning distance is inversely proportional to the recognition. If scanning distance from LiDAR to laser marker is increased and the recognition of conjugated laser marker is maintained, it will promote the operating efficiency of Ground LiDAR. FARO Photon 120 and plane circular laser marker are studied in this research. Based on point cloud data features improved ISO11146 laser spot recognition formula, used to calculate laser marker center coordinate and diameter. The difference of calculated diameter minus actual diameter is the recognition of laser marker. The results show that laser marker 10-20 cm in diameter is recognizable for 1 cm or less than 30 m scanning distance. The scanning distance is 30-50 m, and laser marker 16-20 cm in diameter is recognizable for 1 cm or less. Therefore, increased diameter of laser marker helps in the recognition of laser marker of longer scanning distance. In Ground LiDAR operation, scanning distance from LiDAR to conjugated laser markers is increased by moderate increase in laser marker diameter. It will reduce scanning stations and shorten operation time and does not affect the accuracy of 3D point cloud model and promote the operating efficiency of Ground LiDAR.

  2. [Activity of the corn Spm transposon system in transgenic plants Orychophragmus violaceus (L.) O.E. Schulz obtained by both direct transfer of DNA to protoplasts and agrobacterial transformation of root explants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhno, L A; Sytnik, E S; Cherep, N N; Komarnitskiĭ, I K; Kuchuk, N V; Klimiuk, V I

    2002-01-01

    Transposon mediated insertional mutagenesis is one of the approaches for the unique gene cloning. A wild species of Cruciferae family Orychophragmus violaceus (L.) O.E. Schulz, which is of interest for practical breeding as a donor of improved plant oil, was an object of the investigation. Plasmid construction used in the experiments included selective NPT II gene, reported GUS gene serving as an excision marker, structural BAR gene located within the dSpm element and Spm transposase. The GUS gene of this plasmid had not his own promoter and became functional only after Spm-transposition. Transformed Orychophragmus violaceus (L.) O.E. Schulz. plants were obtained by direct mesophyll protoplast transformation as well as Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated root explant transformation. Gene transfer and the transposition event were confirmed by the GUS activity and the PCR analysis. Relative transformation efficiency using protoplasts was 5.8%.

  3. Mammary stem cells: Novel markers and novel approaches to increase lactation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue r...

  4. An efficient marker-free vector for clean gene transfer into plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results from three experiments show that 4.4% of regenerated shoots were transgenic by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, and the phenotype expression ... The results indicate that pBINMF was an efficient and reliable vector to directly generate complete MFTPs in plant species, and might be especially suitable for ...

  5. Reliable transgene-independent method for determining Sleeping Beauty transposon copy numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Kolacsek Orsolya; Krízsik Virág; Schamberger Anita; Erdei Zsuzsa; Apáti Ágota; Várady György; Mátés Lajos; Izsvák Zsuzsanna (1961-) (genetikus); Ivics Zoltán (1964-) (biológus); Sarkadi Balázs; Orbán Tamás I

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The transposon-based gene delivery technique is emerging as a method of choice for gene therapy. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) system has become one of the most favored methods, because of its efficiency and its random integration profile. Copy-number determination of the delivered transgene is a crucial task, but a universal method for measuring this is lacking. In this paper, we show that a real-time quantitative PCR-based, transgene-independent (qPCR-TI) method is able to de...

  6. Expanding the CRISPR/Cas9 toolkit for Pichia pastoris with efficient donor integration and alternative resistance markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Astrid; Fischer, Jasmin E; Raschmanová, Hana; Kniely, Claudia; Vogl, Thomas; Glieder, Anton

    2018-04-01

    Komagataella phaffii (syn. Pichia pastoris) is one of the most commonly used host systems for recombinant protein expression. Achieving targeted genetic modifications had been hindered by low frequencies of homologous recombination (HR). Recently, a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system has been implemented for P. pastoris enabling gene knockouts based on indels (insertion, deletions) via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) at near 100% efficiency. However, specifically integrating homologous donor cassettes via HR for replacement studies had proven difficult resulting at most in ∼20% correct integration using CRISPR/Cas9. Here, we demonstrate the CRISPR/Cas9 mediated integration of markerless donor cassettes at efficiencies approaching 100% using a ku70 deletion strain. The Ku70p is involved in NHEJ repair and lack of the protein appears to favor repair via HR near exclusively. While the absolute number of transformants in the Δku70 strain is reduced, virtually all surviving transformants showed correct integration. In the wildtype strain, markerless donor cassette integration was also improved up to 25-fold by placing an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) on the donor cassette. Alternative strategies for improving donor cassette integration using a Cas9 nickase variant or reducing off targeting associated toxicity using a high fidelity Cas9 variant were so far not successful in our hands in P. pastoris. Furthermore we provide Cas9/gRNA expression plasmids with a Geneticin resistance marker which proved to be versatile tools for marker recycling. The reported CRSIPR-Cas9 tools can be applied for modifying existing production strains and also pave the way for markerless whole genome modification studies in P. pastoris. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A vector system for efficient and economical switching of a ura4(+) module to three commonly used antibiotic marker cassettes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinghui; Chen, Lihua; An, Ke; Wang, Yamei; Jin, Quanwen

    2015-11-01

    We describe here the development of a set of plasmid vectors that allow simple, efficient and economical switching of a ura4(+) module in existing Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains to any of the three routinely used antibiotic marker cassettes, kanMX6, hphMX6 and natMX6. In principle, the applications of this system can also be extended to switching ura4(+) for additional MX6 module-based cassettes, such as bleMX6, as long as the antibiotic marker has been cloned into an ura4(+) module-switching vector. We illustrate the application of this set of vectors in exchange of the ura4(+) marker in existing strains with three antibiotic marker cassettes with high efficiency. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Transcribed Tc1-like transposons in salmonid fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afanasyev Sergey

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile genetic elements comprise a substantial fraction of vertebrate genomes. These genes are considered to be deleterious, and in vertebrates they are usually inactive. High throughput sequencing of salmonid fish cDNA libraries has revealed a large number of transposons, which remain transcribed despite inactivation of translation. This article reports on the structure and potential role of these genes. Results A search of EST showed the ratio of transcribed transposons in salmonid fish (i.e., 0.5% of all unique cDNA sequences to be 2.4–32 times greater than in other vertebrate species, and 68% of these genes belonged to the Tc1-family of DNA transposons. A phylogenetic analysis of reading frames indicate repeated transposition of distantly related genes into the fish genome over protracted intervals of evolutionary time. Several copies of two new DNA transposons were cloned. These copies showed relatively little divergence (11.4% and 1.9%. The latter gene was transcribed at a high level in rainbow trout tissues, and was present in genomes of many phylogenetically remote fish species. A comparison of synonymous and non-synonymous divergence revealed remnants of divergent evolution in the younger gene, while the older gene evolved in a neutral mode. From a 1.2 MB fragment of genomic DNA, the salmonid genome contains approximately 105 Tc1-like sequences, the major fraction of which is not transcribed. Our microarray studies showed that transcription of rainbow trout transposons is activated by external stimuli, such as toxicity, stress and bacterial antigens. The expression profiles of Tc1-like transposons gave a strong correlation (r2 = 0.63–0.88 with a group of genes implicated in defense response, signal transduction and regulation of transcription. Conclusion Salmonid genomes contain a large quantity of transcribed mobile genetic elements. Divergent or neutral evolution within genomes and lateral transmission can

  9. Rescue of mutant fitness defects using in vitro reconstituted designer transposons in Mycoplasma mycoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogumil Jacek Karas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With only hundreds of genes contained within their genomes, mycoplasmas have become model organisms for precise understanding of cellular processes, as well as platform organisms for predictable engineering of microbial functions for mission-critical applications. Despite the availability of whole genome writing in Mycoplasma mycoides, some traditional methods for genetic engineering are underdeveloped in mycoplasmas. Here we demonstrate two facile transposon-mediated approaches for introducing genes into the synthetic cell based on M. mycoides. The marker-less approach involves preparing a fragment containing only a small genomic region of interest with flanking transposase-binding sites, followed by in vitro transposase loading and introduction into the cells. The marker-driven approach involves cloning an open reading frame (ORF of interest into a vector containing a marker for mycoplasma transformation, as well as sites for transposase loading and random genomic integration. An innovative feature of this construct is to use a single promoter to express the transformation marker and the introduced ORF. The marker-driven approach can be conveniently applied to any exogenous or synthetic gene without any information on the effect of the gene on the strain, whereas the marker-less approach requires that the fragment has a recognizable effect. Using the marker-less method, we found that a region containing the nusG gene rescues a slow growth phenotype of a strain containing a larger deletion encompassing this gene. Using the marker-driven approach, we better defined this finding, thereby establishing that nusG is required for a normal growth rate in synthetic M. mycoides. These methods are suitable for complementation tests to identify genes responsible for assorted functions lacking in deletion mutants. These approaches are also expected to facilitate rapid testing of various natural and engineered genes or gene clusters from numerous sources in

  10. Germline transgenesis in rabbits by pronuclear microinjection of Sleeping Beauty transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivics, Zoltán; Hiripi, László; Hoffmann, Orsolya I; Mátés, Lajos; Yau, Tien Yin; Bashir, Sanum; Zidek, Vaclav; Landa, Vladimír; Geurts, Aron; Pravenec, Michal; Rülicke, Thomas; Bösze, Zsuzsanna; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2014-04-01

    The laboratory rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is widely used as a model for a variety of inherited and acquired human diseases. In addition, the rabbit is the smallest livestock animal that is used to transgenically produce pharmaceutical proteins in its milk. Here we describe a protocol for high-efficiency germline transgenesis and sustained transgene expression in rabbits by using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. The protocol is based on co-injection into the pronuclei of fertilized oocytes of synthetic mRNA encoding the SB100X hyperactive transposase together with plasmid DNA carrying a transgene construct flanked by binding sites for the transposase. The translation of the transposase mRNA is followed by enzyme-mediated excision of the transgene cassette from the plasmids and its permanent genomic insertion to produce stable transgenic animals. Generation of a germline-transgenic founder animal by using this protocol takes ∼2 months. Transposon-mediated transgenesis compares favorably in terms of both efficiency and reliable transgene expression with classic pronuclear microinjection, and it offers comparable efficacies (numbers of transgenic founders obtained per injected embryo) to lentiviral approaches, without limitations on vector design, issues of transgene silencing, and the toxicity and biosafety concerns of working with viral vectors.

  11. Germline transgenesis in rodents by pronuclear microinjection of Sleeping Beauty transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivics, Zoltán; Mátés, Lajos; Yau, Tien Yin; Landa, Vladimír; Zidek, Vaclav; Bashir, Sanum; Hoffmann, Orsolya I; Hiripi, László; Garrels, Wiebke; Kues, Wilfried A; Bösze, Zsuzsanna; Geurts, Aron; Pravenec, Michal; Rülicke, Thomas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2014-04-01

    We describe a protocol for high-efficiency germline transgenesis and sustained transgene expression in two important biomedical models, the mouse and the rat, by using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system. The procedure is based on co-injection of synthetic mRNA encoding the SB100X hyperactive transposase, together with circular plasmid DNA carrying a transgene construct flanked by binding sites for the transposase, into the pronuclei of fertilized oocytes. Upon translation of the transposase mRNA, enzyme-mediated excision of the transgene cassettes from the injected plasmids followed by permanent genomic insertion produces stable transgenic animals. Generation of a germline-transgenic founder animal by using this protocol takes ∼3 months. Transposon-mediated transgenesis compares favorably in terms of both efficiency and reliable transgene expression with classic pronuclear microinjection, and it offers comparable efficacies to lentiviral approaches without limitations on vector design, issues of transgene silencing, and the toxicity and biosafety concerns of working with viral vectors.

  12. Improved transposon-based library preparation for the Ion Torrent platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbacheva, Tatyana; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Popov, Vasily N; Vijg, Jan; Maslov, Alexander Y

    2015-04-01

    A transposon-based approach for the construction of sequencing libraries is an efficient way of preparing samples for processing on both Illumina and Ion Torrent platforms. However, PCR-mediated incorporation of adaptors in tagged DNA fragments leaves behind self-complementary regions flanking the DNA fragment. These regions are capable of forming hairpin structures and, together with adaptors, create conditions for the potential formation of template heteroduplexes. These negatively affect the sequencing process on the Ion Torrent platform and can lead to a more than 3-fold decline in output data compared with sequencing of conventional libraries. To address this problem, we have developed MuPlus, a transposon-based protocol for barcoded library preparation for Ion Torrent, in which one adaptor is integrated by PCR and the second is integrated by ligation as a single-stranded oligonucleotide after enzymatic cleavage of a complementary part on one strand of the tag. The resulting library does not contain self-complementary, hairpin-forming regions, is free of heteroduplexes, and can be analyzed on the Ion Torrent platform with the same efficiency as a library created with a ligation-based protocol.

  13. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Sara; Harms, Klaus; Fricke, W Florian; Johnsen, Pål J; da Silva, Gabriela J; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like). Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE), Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation provides a much

  14. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Domingues

    Full Text Available We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like. Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE, Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation

  15. Transposon display supports transpositional activity of P elements in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mobilization of two element subfamilies (canonical and O-type) from Drosophila sturtevanti and D. saltans was evaluated for copy number and transposition activity using the transposon display (TD) technique. Pairwise distances between strains regarding the insertion polymorphism profile were estimated. Amplification ...

  16. Transposon-tagging identifies novel pathogenicity genes in Fusarium graminearum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufresne, M.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; M'Barek, Ben S.; Xu, X.; Zhang, X.; Kema, G.H.J.; Daboussi, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase of sequenced fungal genomes, high-throughput methods for functional analyses of genes are needed. We assessed the potential of a new transposon mutagenesis tool deploying a Fusarium oxysporum miniature inverted-repeat transposable element mimp1, mobilized by the transposase of

  17. A mariner transposon vector adapted for mutagenesis in oral streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Christiansen, Natalia; Høiby, Niels

    2014-01-01

    ATs-pWV01, a selectable kanamycin resistance gene, a Himar1 transposase gene regulated by a xylose-inducible promoter, and an erythromycin resistance gene flanked by himar inverted repeats. The pMN100 plasmid was transformed into Streptococcus mutans UA159 and transposon mutagenesis was performed via...

  18. Random transposon vectors pUTTns for the markerless integration of exogenous genes into gram-negative eubacteria chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Wang, Guangli; Shen, Bin; Wang, Rong; Song, Yao; Li, Shunpeng; Jiang, Jiandong

    2009-11-01

    A set of random transposon vectors pUTTns that facilitates the markerless integration of new functions into the chromosome of gram-negative bacteria has been developed. The vectors, which are derived from mini-Tn5 transposons, are located on a R6K-based suicide delivery plasmid that provides the IS50(R) transposase tnp gene in cis, but they are external to the mobile element. The vectors' conjugal transfer to recipients is mediated by RP4 mobilization functions in the donor. Internal to the mini-Tn5 element is a cassette that contains a selectable antibiotic resistance marker (kanamycin, chloramphenicol, or tetracycline resistance gene), a counter-selectable marker (sacB), a 430-bp repeat of the sacB gene 3' end acted as the directly-repeated (DR) sequence, and modified multiple cloning sites (MCS). After two total rounds of transposon integration and recombination between the two DRs, only the exogenous DNA inserted into the MCS (passenger genes) and a single 430-bp scar sacBDR fragment remained in the chromosome after excision. The utility of these vectors was demonstrated by integrating the organophosphorus insecticide hydrolase gene (mpd) into the chromosome of Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Paracoccus species. Sequential integration of another organophosphorus insecticide hydrolase gene (oph) into the previously engineered bacteria, without bringing any selectable markers, was also successful. These engineered bacteria were relatively stable. Cell viability and original degrading characteristics were not affected compared with the original recipients. This shows that the developed system is very useful for the markerless integration of exogenous genes into the chromosome of gram-negative eubacteria.

  19. Genetic transformation of Drosophila willistoni using piggyBac transposon and GFP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Finokiet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on the use of piggyBac transposable element as vector and the green fluorescent protein (EGFP from the jellyfish, Aquorea victoria, as a genetic marker for the transformation of Drosophila willistoni. Preblastoderm embryos of D. willistoni white mutant were microinjected with a plasmid containing the EGFP marker and the piggyBac ITRs, together with a helper plasmid containing the piggyBac transposase placed under the control of the D. melanogaster hsp70 promoter. G0 adults transformants were recovered at a frequency of approximately 67%. Expression of EGFP in larvae, pupae and adults was observed up to the third generation, suggesting that this transposon was not stable in D. willistoni. Transformed individuals displayed high levels of EGFP expression during larvae and adult stages in the eye, abdomen, thorax and legs, suggesting a wide expression pattern in this species than reported to other species of Drosophilidae.Descrevemos neste trabalho a transformação genética de Drosophila willistoni empregando o elemento transponível piggyBac como vetor e o gene EGFP (green fluorescent protein retirado da água-viva Aquorea victoria, como marcador de transformação. Embriões de D. willistoni em estágio pré-blastoderme, mutantes para o gene white, foram microinjetados com plasmídio contendo o marcador EGFP e as regiões ITRs do transposon piggyBac concomitantemente com um plasmídio auxiliar possuindo o gene da transposase de piggyBac sobre o controle do promotor do gene hsp70 de Drosophila melanogaster. Adultos transformantes Go foram gerados em uma taxa de 67%. A expressão de GFP em larvas, pupas e adultos foi observada somente até a terceira geração, sugerindo que este transposon não é estável em D. willistoni. Os indivíduos transformados exigem um alto nível de expressão de EGFP durante os estágios de larva e, também em adultos o gene marcador é expresso nos olhos, abdome, tórax e patas, mostrando um

  20. Genome-wide transposon mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Bharucha, Nikë; Kumar, Anuj

    2011-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis is an effective method for generating large sets of random mutations in target DNA, with applicability toward numerous types of genetic screens in prokaryotes, single-celled eukaryotes, and metazoans alike. Relative to methods of random mutagenesis by chemical/UV treatment, transposon insertions can be easily identified in mutants with phenotypes of interest. The construction of transposon insertion mutants is also less labor-intensive on a genome-wide scale than methods for targeted gene replacement, although transposon insertions are not precisely targeted to a specific residue, and thus coverage of the target DNA can be problematic. The collective advantages of transposon mutagenesis have been well demonstrated in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, as transposon mutagenesis has been used extensively for phenotypic screens in both yeasts. Consequently, we present here protocols for the generation and utilization of transposon-insertion DNA libraries in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. Specifically, we present methods for the large-scale introduction of transposon insertion alleles in a desired strain of S. cerevisiae. Methods are also presented for transposon mutagenesis of C. albicans, encompassing both the construction of the plasmid-based transposon-mutagenized DNA library and its introduction into a desired strain of Candida. In total, these methods provide the necessary information to implement transposon mutagenesis in yeast, enabling the construction of large sets of identifiable gene disruption mutations, with particular utility for phenotypic screening in nonstandard genetic backgrounds.

  1. Simulation study on the efficiencies of MOET nucleus breeding schemes applying marker assisted selection in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, WeiZhen; Wang, YaChun; Zhang, Yuan

    2009-03-01

    Advantages of breeding schemes using genetic marker information and/or multiple ovulation and embryo transfer (MOET) technology over the traditional approach were extensively evaluated through simulation. Milk yield was the trait of interest and QTL was the genetic marker utilized. Eight dairy cattle breeding scenarios were considered, i.e., traditional progeny testing breeding scheme (denoted as STANPT), GASPT scheme including a pre-selection of young bulls entering progeny testing based on their own QTL information, MOETPT scheme using MOET technology to generate young bulls and a selection of young bulls limited within the full-sib family, GAMOPT scheme adopting both QTL pre-selection and MOET technology, COMBPT scheme using a mixed linear model which considered QTL genotype instead of the BLUP model in GAMOPT, and three non-progeny testing schemes, i.e. the MOET, GAMO and COMB schemes, corresponding to MOETPT, GAMOPT and COMBPT with progeny testing being part of the system. Animals were selected based on their breeding value which was estimated under an animal model framework. Sequential selection over 17 years was performed in the simulations and 30 replicates were designed for each scenario. The influences of using QTL information and MOET technology on favorable QTL allele frequency, true breeding values, polygenetic breeding values and the accumulated genetic superiority were extensively evaluated, for five different populations including active sires, lactating cows, bull dams, bull sires, and young bulls. The results showed that the combined schemes significantly outperformed other approaches wherein accumulated true breeding value progressed. The difference between schemes exclusively using QTL information or MOET technology was not significant. The STANPT scheme was the least efficient among the 8 schemes. The schemes using MOET technology had a higher polygenetic response than others in the 17th year. The increases of frequency of the favorable QTL

  2. Epigenetics and Evolution: Transposons and the Stochastic Epigenetic Modification Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Branciamore

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to genetic variation, epigenetic variation and transposons can greatly affect the evolutionary fitnesses landscape and gene expression. Previously we proposed a mathematical treatment of a general epigenetic variation model that we called Stochastic Epigenetic Modification (SEM model. In this study we follow up with a special case, the Transposon Silencing Model (TSM, with, once again, emphasis on quantitative treatment. We have investigated the evolutionary effects of epigenetic changes due to transposon (T insertions; in particular, we have considered a typical gene locus A and postulated that (i the expression level of gene A depends on the epigenetic state (active or inactive of a cis- located transposon element T, (ii stochastic variability in the epigenetic silencing of T occurs only in a short window of opportunity during development, (iii the epigenetic state is then stable during further development, and (iv the epigenetic memory is fully reset at each generation. We develop the model using two complementary approaches: a standard analytical population genetics framework (di usion equations and Monte-Carlo simulations. Both approaches led to similar estimates for the probability of fixation and time of fixation of locus TA with initial frequency P in a randomly mating diploid population of effective size Ne. We have ascertained the e ect that ρ, the probability of transposon Modification during the developmental window, has on the population (species. One of our principal conclusions is that as ρ increases, the pattern of fixation of the combined TA locus goes from "neutral" to "dominant" to "over-dominant". We observe that, under realistic values of ρ, epigenetic Modifications can provide an e cient mechanism for more rapid fixation of transposons and cis-located gene alleles. The results obtained suggest that epigenetic silencing, even if strictly transient (being reset at each generation, can still have signi cant

  3. Remobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in the germline of Xenopus tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yergeau Donald A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system has been used for germline transgenesis of the diploid frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Injecting one-cell embryos with plasmid DNA harboring an SB transposon substrate together with mRNA encoding the SB transposase enzyme resulted in non-canonical integration of small-order concatemers of the transposon. Here, we demonstrate that SB transposons stably integrated into the frog genome are effective substrates for remobilization. Results Transgenic frogs that express the SB10 transposase were bred with SB transposon-harboring animals to yield double-transgenic 'hopper' frogs. Remobilization events were observed in the progeny of the hopper frogs and were verified by Southern blot analysis and cloning of the novel integrations sites. Unlike the co-injection method used to generate founder lines, transgenic remobilization resulted in canonical transposition of the SB transposons. The remobilized SB transposons frequently integrated near the site of the donor locus; approximately 80% re-integrated with 3 Mb of the donor locus, a phenomenon known as 'local hopping'. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that SB transposons integrated into the X. tropicalis genome are effective substrates for excision and re-integration, and that the remobilized transposons are transmitted through the germline. This is an important step in the development of large-scale transposon-mediated gene- and enhancer-trap strategies in this highly tractable developmental model system.

  4. Transposon tagging and the study of root development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugeki, R.; Olson, M. L.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1998-01-01

    The maize Ac-Ds transposable element family has been used as the basis of transposon mutagenesis systems that function in a variety of plants, including Arabidopsis. We have developed modified transposons and methods which simplify the detection, cloning and analysis of insertion mutations. We have identified and are analyzing two plant lines in which genes expressed either in the root cap cells or in the quiescent cells, cortex/endodermal initial cells and columella cells of the root cap have been tagged with a transposon carrying a reporter gene. A gene expressed in root cap cells tagged with an enhancer-trap Ds was isolated and its corresponding EST cDNA was identified. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the gene show no significant similarity to other genes in the database. Genetic ablation experiments have been done by fusing a root cap-specific promoter to the diphtheria toxin A-chain gene and introducing the fusion construct into Arabidopsis plants. We find that in addition to eliminating gravitropism, root cap ablation inhibits elongation of roots by lowering root meristematic activities.

  5. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We

  6. Established cell surface markers efficiently isolate highly overlapping populations of skeletal muscle satellite cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesner, Claire C; Almada, Albert E; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) has enabled the direct isolation of highly enriched skeletal muscle stem cell, or satellite cell, populations from postnatal tissue. Several distinct surface marker panels containing different positively selecting surface antigens have been used to distinguish muscle satellite cells from other non-myogenic cell types. Because functional and transcriptional heterogeneity is known to exist within the satellite cell population, a direct comparison of results obtained in different laboratories has been complicated by a lack of clarity as to whether commonly utilized surface marker combinations select for distinct or overlapping subsets of the satellite cell pool. This study therefore sought to evaluate phenotypic and functional overlap among popular satellite cell sorting paradigms. Utilizing a transgenic Pax7-zsGreen reporter mouse, we compared the overlap between the fluorescent signal of canonical paired homeobox protein 7 (Pax7) expressing satellite cells to cells identified by combinations of surface markers previously published for satellite cells isolation. We designed two panels for mouse skeletal muscle analysis, each composed of markers that exclude hematopoietic and stromal cells (CD45, CD11b, Ter119, CD31, and Sca1), combined with previously published antibody clones recognizing surface markers present on satellite cells (β1-integrin/CXCR4, α7-integrin/CD34, and Vcam1). Cell populations were comparatively analyzed by flow cytometry and FACS sorted for functional assessment of myogenic activity. Consistent with prior reports, each of the commonly used surface marker schemes evaluated here identified a highly enriched satellite cell population, with 89-90 % positivity for Pax7 expression based on zsGreen fluorescence. Distinct surface marker panels were also equivalent in their ability to identify the majority of the satellite cell pool, with 90-93 % of all Pax7-zsGreen positive cells marked by each of the surface

  7. [Differential expression of DTSsa4 Tc1-like transposons in closely related populations of Baikal ciscoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychenko, O S; Sukhanova, L V; Azhikina, T L; Sverdlov, E D

    2009-01-01

    Two representatives of Baikal ciscoes - lake cisco and omul - diverged from a common ancestor as recently as 10-20 thousand years ago. We have found an increasing expression level of DTSsa4 Tc1-like DNA transposons in cisco and omul brains. The mapping of the sequences of these transposons from Salmo salar and Danio rerio genomes has shown that in some cases, these transposons are located in the 5' and 3' regions, as well as in the promoter regions of various genes. Probably, Tc1-like transposons affect the activity of neighboring genes, providing the adaptive divergence of the cisco population.

  8. Suicidal autointegration of sleeping beauty and piggyBac transposons in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wang, Jichang; Devaraj, Anatharam; Singh, Manvendra; Jimenez Orgaz, Ana; Chen, Jia-Xuan; Selbach, Matthias; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2014-03-01

    Transposons are discrete segments of DNA that have the distinctive ability to move and replicate within genomes across the tree of life. 'Cut and paste' DNA transposition involves excision from a donor locus and reintegration into a new locus in the genome. We studied molecular events following the excision steps of two eukaryotic DNA transposons, Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB) that are widely used for genome manipulation in vertebrate species. SB originates from fish and PB from insects; thus, by introducing these transposons to human cells we aimed to monitor the process of establishing a transposon-host relationship in a naïve cellular environment. Similarly to retroviruses, neither SB nor PB is capable of self-avoidance because a significant portion of the excised transposons integrated back into its own genome in a suicidal process called autointegration. Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BANF1), a cellular co-factor of certain retroviruses, inhibited transposon autointegration, and was detected in higher-order protein complexes containing the SB transposase. Increasing size sensitized transposition for autointegration, consistent with elevated vulnerability of larger transposons. Both SB and PB were affected similarly by the size of the transposon in three different assays: excision, autointegration and productive transposition. Prior to reintegration, SB is completely separated from the donor molecule and followed an unbiased autointegration pattern, not associated with local hopping. Self-disruptive autointegration occurred at similar frequency for both transposons, while aberrant, pseudo-transposition events were more frequently observed for PB.

  9. Unraveling the efficiency of RAPD and SSR markers in diversity analysis and population structure estimation in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Farhat, Sufia; Mahajan, Reetika; Bhakhri, Ayushi; Sharma, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Increase in food production viz-a-viz quality of food is important to feed the growing human population to attain food as well as nutritional security. The availability of diverse germplasm of any crop is an important genetic resource to mine the genes that may assist in attaining food as well as nutritional security. Here we used 15 RAPD and 23 SSR markers to elucidate diversity among 51 common bean genotypes mostly landraces collected from the Himalayan region of Jammu and Kashmir, India. We observed that both the markers are highly polymorphic. The discriminatory power of these markers was determined using various parameters like; percent polymorphism, PIC, resolving power and marker index. 15 RAPDs produced 171 polymorphic bands, while 23 SSRs produced 268 polymorphic bands. SSRs showed a higher PIC value (0.300) compared to RAPDs (0.243). Further the resolving power of SSRs was 5.241 compared to 3.86 for RAPDs. However, RAPDs showed a higher marker index (2.69) compared to SSRs (1.279) that may be attributed to their higher multiplex ratio. The dendrograms generated with hierarchical UPGMA cluster analysis grouped genotypes into two main clusters with various degrees of sub clustering within the cluster. Here we observed that both the marker systems showed comparable accuracy in grouping genotypes of common bean according to their area of cultivation. The model based STRUCTURE analysis using 15 RAPD and 23 SSR markers identified a population with 3 sub-populations which corresponds to distance based groupings. High level of genetic diversity was observed within the population. These findings have further implications in common bean breeding as well as conservation programs.

  10. Transposon leads to contamination of clinical pDNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, I; Gomez-Eerland, R; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G; Beijnen, J H; Nuijen, B

    2013-07-11

    We report an unexpected contamination during clinical manufacture of a Human Papilomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine, with a transposon originating from the Escherichia coli DH5 host cell genome. During processing, presence of this transposable element, insertion sequence 2 (IS2) in the plasmid vector was not noticed until quality control of the bulk pDNA vaccine when results of restriction digestion, sequencing, and CGE analysis were clearly indicative for the presence of a contaminant. Due to the very low level of contamination, only an insert-specific PCR method was capable of tracing back the presence of the transposon in the source pDNA and master cell bank (MCB). Based on the presence of an uncontrolled contamination with unknown clinical relevance, the product was rejected for clinical use. In order to prevent costly rejection of clinical material, both in-process controls and quality control methods must be sensitive enough to detect such a contamination as early as possible, i.e. preferably during plasmid DNA source generation, MCB production and ultimately during upstream processing. However, as we have shown that contamination early in the process development pipeline (source pDNA, MCB) can be present below limits of detection of generally applied analytical methods, the introduction of "engineered" or transposon-free host cells seems the only 100% effective solution to avoid contamination with movable elements and should be considered when searching for a suitable host cell-vector combination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transposon Tn7 preferentially inserts into GAA*TTC triplet repeats under conditions conducive to Y*R*Y triplex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Mancuso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansion of an unstable GAA*TTC repeat in the first intron of the FXN gene causes Friedreich ataxia by reducing frataxin expression. Structure formation by the repeat has been implicated in both frataxin repression and GAA*TTC instability. The GAA*TTC sequence is capable of adopting multiple non-B DNA structures including Y*R*Y and R*R*Y triplexes. Lower pH promotes the formation of Y*R*Y triplexes by GAA*TTC. Here we used the bacterial transposon Tn7 as an in vitro tool to probe whether GAA*TTC repeats can attract a well-characterized recombinase. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tn7 showed a pH-dependent preference for insertion into uninterrupted regions of a Friedreich ataxia patient-derived repeat, inserting 48, 39 and 14 percent of the time at pH 7, pH 8 and pH 9, respectively. Moreover, Tn7 also showed orientation and region specific insertion within the repeat at pH 7 and pH 8, but not at pH 9. In contrast, transposon Tn5 showed no strong preference for or against the repeat during in vitro transposition at any pH tested. Y*R*Y triplex formation was reduced in predictable ways by transposon interruption of the GAA*TTC repeat. However, transposon interruptions in the GAA*TTC repeats did not increase the in vitro transcription efficiency of the templates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that transposon Tn7 will recognize structures that form spontaneously in GAA*TTC repeats and insert in a specific orientation within the repeat. The conditions used for in vitro transposition span the physiologically relevant range suggesting that long GAA*TTC repeats can form triplex structures in vivo, attracting enzymes involved in DNA repair, recombination and chromatin modification.

  12. Transposon Tn7 preferentially inserts into GAA*TTC triplet repeats under conditions conducive to Y*R*Y triplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Miriam; Sammarco, Mimi C; Grabczyk, Ed

    2010-06-15

    Expansion of an unstable GAA*TTC repeat in the first intron of the FXN gene causes Friedreich ataxia by reducing frataxin expression. Structure formation by the repeat has been implicated in both frataxin repression and GAA*TTC instability. The GAA*TTC sequence is capable of adopting multiple non-B DNA structures including Y*R*Y and R*R*Y triplexes. Lower pH promotes the formation of Y*R*Y triplexes by GAA*TTC. Here we used the bacterial transposon Tn7 as an in vitro tool to probe whether GAA*TTC repeats can attract a well-characterized recombinase. Tn7 showed a pH-dependent preference for insertion into uninterrupted regions of a Friedreich ataxia patient-derived repeat, inserting 48, 39 and 14 percent of the time at pH 7, pH 8 and pH 9, respectively. Moreover, Tn7 also showed orientation and region specific insertion within the repeat at pH 7 and pH 8, but not at pH 9. In contrast, transposon Tn5 showed no strong preference for or against the repeat during in vitro transposition at any pH tested. Y*R*Y triplex formation was reduced in predictable ways by transposon interruption of the GAA*TTC repeat. However, transposon interruptions in the GAA*TTC repeats did not increase the in vitro transcription efficiency of the templates. We have demonstrated that transposon Tn7 will recognize structures that form spontaneously in GAA*TTC repeats and insert in a specific orientation within the repeat. The conditions used for in vitro transposition span the physiologically relevant range suggesting that long GAA*TTC repeats can form triplex structures in vivo, attracting enzymes involved in DNA repair, recombination and chromatin modification.

  13. Transposon Tn7 Preferentially Inserts into GAA•TTC Triplet Repeats under Conditions Conducive to Y•R•Y Triplex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Miriam; Sammarco, Mimi C.; Grabczyk, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Background Expansion of an unstable GAA•TTC repeat in the first intron of the FXN gene causes Friedreich ataxia by reducing frataxin expression. Structure formation by the repeat has been implicated in both frataxin repression and GAA•TTC instability. The GAA•TTC sequence is capable of adopting multiple non-B DNA structures including Y•R•Y and R•R•Y triplexes. Lower pH promotes the formation of Y•R•Y triplexes by GAA•TTC. Here we used the bacterial transposon Tn7 as an in vitro tool to probe whether GAA•TTC repeats can attract a well-characterized recombinase. Methodology/Principal Findings Tn7 showed a pH-dependent preference for insertion into uninterrupted regions of a Friedreich ataxia patient-derived repeat, inserting 48, 39 and 14 percent of the time at pH 7, pH 8 and pH 9, respectively. Moreover, Tn7 also showed orientation and region specific insertion within the repeat at pH 7 and pH 8, but not at pH 9. In contrast, transposon Tn5 showed no strong preference for or against the repeat during in vitro transposition at any pH tested. Y•R•Y triplex formation was reduced in predictable ways by transposon interruption of the GAA•TTC repeat. However, transposon interruptions in the GAA•TTC repeats did not increase the in vitro transcription efficiency of the templates. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that transposon Tn7 will recognize structures that form spontaneously in GAA•TTC repeats and insert in a specific orientation within the repeat. The conditions used for in vitro transposition span the physiologically relevant range suggesting that long GAA•TTC repeats can form triplex structures in vivo, attracting enzymes involved in DNA repair, recombination and chromatin modification. PMID:20559546

  14. Using PATIMDB to create bacterial transposon insertion mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Jonathan M; Wei, Tao; Liberati, Nicole; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Villanueva, Jacinto; Wu, Gang; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2009-04-01

    PATIMDB is a software package for facilitating the generation of transposon mutant insertion libraries. The software has two main functions: process tracking and automated sequence analysis. The process tracking function specifically includes recording the status and fates of multiwell plates and samples in various stages of library construction. Automated sequence analysis refers specifically to the pipeline of sequence analysis starting with ABI files from a sequencing facility and ending with insertion location identifications. The protocols in this unit describe installation and use of PATIMDB software.

  15. The Design and Analysis of Transposon-Insertion Sequencing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Michael C.; Abel, Sören; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Preface Transposon-insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful approach that can be widely applied to genome-wide definition of loci that are required for growth in diverse conditions. However, experimental design choices and stochastic biological processes can heavily influence the results of TIS experiments and affect downstream statistical analysis. Here, we discuss TIS experimental parameters and how these factors relate to the benefits and limitations of the various statistical frameworks that can be applied to computational analysis of TIS data. PMID:26775926

  16. ESSENTIALS: Software for Rapid Analysis of High Throughput Transposon Insertion Sequencing Data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A.L.; Burghout, P.J.; Bootsma, H.J.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput analysis of genome-wide random transposon mutant libraries is a powerful tool for (conditional) essential gene discovery. Recently, several next-generation sequencing approaches, e.g. Tn-seq/INseq, HITS and TraDIS, have been developed that accurately map the site of transposon

  17. The piggyBac transposon displays local and distant reintegration preferences and can cause mutations at noncanonical integration sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng Amy; Pettitt, Stephen J; Eckert, Sabine; Ning, Zemin; Rice, Stephen; Cadiñanos, Juan; Yusa, Kosuke; Conte, Nathalie; Bradley, Allan

    2013-04-01

    The DNA transposon piggyBac is widely used as a tool in mammalian experimental systems for transgenesis, mutagenesis, and genome engineering. We have characterized genome-wide insertion site preferences of piggyBac by sequencing a large set of integration sites arising from transposition from two separate genomic loci and a plasmid donor in mouse embryonic stem cells. We found that piggyBac preferentially integrates locally to the excision site when mobilized from a chromosomal location and identified other nonlocal regions of the genome with elevated insertion frequencies. piggyBac insertions were associated with expressed genes and markers of open chromatin structure and were excluded from heterochromatin. At the nucleotide level, piggyBac prefers to insert into TA-rich regions within a broader GC-rich context. We also found that piggyBac can insert into sites other than its known TTAA insertion site at a low frequency (2%). Such insertions introduce mismatches that are repaired with signatures of host cell repair pathways. Transposons could be mobilized from plasmids with the observed noncanonical flanking regions, indicating that piggyBac could generate point mutations in the genome.

  18. Pervasive horizontal transfer of rolling-circle transposons among animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jainy; Schaack, Sarah; Pritham, Ellen J

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of genes is known to be an important mechanism of genetic innovation, especially in prokaryotes. The impact of HT of transposable elements (TEs), however, has only recently begun to receive widespread attention and may be significant due to their mutagenic potential, inherent mobility, and abundance. Helitrons, also known as rolling-circle transposons, are a distinctive subclass of TE with a unique transposition mechanism. Here, we describe the first evidence for the repeated HT of four different families of Helitrons in an unprecedented array of organisms, including mammals, reptiles, fish, invertebrates, and insect viruses. The Helitrons present in these species have a patchy distribution and are closely related (80-98% sequence identity), despite the deep divergence times among hosts. Multiple lines of evidence indicate the extreme conservation of sequence identity is not due to selection, including the highly fragmented nature of the Helitrons identified and the lack of any signatures of selection at the nucleotide level. The presence of horizontally transferred Helitrons in insect viruses, in particular, suggests that this may represent a potential mechanism of transfer in some taxa. Unlike genes, Helitrons that have horizontally transferred into new host genomes can amplify, in some cases reaching up to several hundred copies and representing a substantial fraction of the genome. Because Helitrons are known to frequently capture and amplify gene fragments, HT of this unique group of DNA transposons could lead to horizontal gene transfer and incur dramatic shifts in the trajectory of genome evolution.

  19. In silico characterization of microsatellites in Eucalyptus spp.: abundance, length variation and transposon associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenilson Rabello

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the abundance of microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSR, in 19 Eucalyptus EST libraries from FORESTs, containing cDNA sequences from five species: E. grandis, E. globulus, E. saligna, E. urophylla and E. camaldulensis. Overall, a total of 11,534 SSRs and 8,447 SSR-containing sequences (25.5% of total ESTs were identified, with an average of 1 SSR/2.5 kb when considering all motifs and 1 SSR/3.1 kb when mononucleotides were not included. Dimeric repeats were the most abundant (41.03%, followed by trimerics (36.11% and monomerics (19.59%. The most frequent motifs were A/T (87.24% for monomerics, AG/CT (94.44% for dimerics, CCG/CGG (37.87% for trimerics, AAGG/CCTT (18.75% for tetramerics, AGAGG/CCTCT (14.04% for pentamerics and ACGGCG/CGCCGT (6.30% for hexamerics. According to sequence length, Class II or potentially variable markers were the most commonly found, followed by Class III. Two sequences presented high similarity to previously published Eucalyptus sequences from the NCBI database, EMBRA_72 and EMBRA_122. Local blastn search for transposons did not reveal the presence of any transposable elements with a cut-off value of 10-50. The large number of microsatellites identified will contribute to the refinement of marker-assisted mapping and to the discovery of novel markers for virtually all genes of economic interest.

  20. Chick derived induced pluripotent stem cells by the poly-cistronic transposon with enhanced transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Masafumi; Hirayama, Takashi; Tani, Tetsuya; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Onuma, Manabu; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2018-02-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology lead terminally differentiated cells into the pluripotent stem cells through the expression of defined reprogramming factors. Although, iPS cells have been established in a number of mammalian species, including mouse, human, and monkey, studies on iPS cells in avian species are still very limited. To establish chick iPS cells, six factors were used within the poly-cistronic reprogramming vector (PB-R6F), containing M3O (MyoD derived transactivation domain fused with Oct3/4), Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, Lin28, and Nanog. The PB-R6F derived iPS cells were alkaline-phosphatase and SSEA-1 positive, which are markers of pluripotency. Elevated levels of endogenous Oct3/4 and Nanog genes were detected in the established iPS cells, suggesting the activation of the FGF signaling pathway is critical for the pluripotent status. Histological analysis of teratoma revealed that the established chick iPS cells have differentiation ability into three-germ-layer derived tissues. This is the first report of establishment of avian derived iPS cells with a single poly-cistronic transposon based expression system. The establishment of avian derived iPS cells could contribute to the genetic conservation and modification of avian species. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Drosophila transposon insertions as unknowns for structured inquiry recombination mapping exercises in an undergraduate genetics course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey M; Hughes, Tia M

    2009-06-01

    Structured inquiry approaches, in which students receive a Drosophila strain of unknown genotype to analyze and map the constituent mutations, are a common feature of many genetics teaching laboratories. The required crosses frustrate many students because they are aware that they are participating in a fundamentally trivial exercise, as the map locations of the genes are already established and have been recalculated thousands of times by generations of students. We modified the traditional structured inquiry approach to include a novel research experience for the students in our undergraduate genetics laboratories. Students conducted crosses with Drosophila strains carrying P[lacW] transposon insertions in genes without documented recombination map positions, representing a large number of unique, but equivalent genetic unknowns. Using the eye color phenotypes associated with the inserts as visible markers, it is straightforward to calculate recombination map positions for the interrupted loci. Collectively, our students mapped 95 genetic loci on chromosomes 2 and 3. In most cases, the calculated 95% confidence interval for meiotic map location overlapped with the predicted map position based on cytology. The research experience evoked positive student responses and helped students better understand the nature of scientific research for little additional cost or instructor effort.

  2. MtDNA COI-COII marker and drone congregation area: an efficient method to establish and monitor honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) conservation centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Bénédicte; Alburaki, Mohamed; Legout, Hélène; Moulin, Sibyle; Mougel, Florence; Garnery, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    Honeybee subspecies have been affected by human activities in Europe over the past few decades. One such example is the importation of nonlocal subspecies of bees which has had an adverse impact on the geographical repartition and subsequently on the genetic diversity of the black honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera. To restore the original diversity of this local honeybee subspecies, different conservation centres were set up in Europe. In this study, we established a black honeybee conservation centre Conservatoire de l'Abeille Noire d'Ile de France (CANIF) in the region of Ile-de-France, France. CANIF's honeybee colonies were intensively studied over a 3-year period. This study included a drone congregation area (DCA) located in the conservation centre. MtDNA COI-COII marker was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of CANIF's honeybee populations and the drones found and collected from the DCA. The same marker (mtDNA) was used to estimate the interactions and the haplotype frequency between CANIF's honeybee populations and 10 surrounding honeybee apiaries located outside of the CANIF. Our results indicate that the colonies of the conservation centre and the drones of the DCA show similar stable profiles compared to the surrounding populations with lower level of introgression. The mtDNA marker used on both DCA and colonies of the conservation centre seems to be an efficient approach to monitor and maintain the genetic diversity of the protected honeybee populations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Construction of a large signature-tagged mini-Tn5 transposon library and its application to mutagenesis of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobigaylo, Nataliya; Wetter, Danijel; Szymczak, Silke; Schiller, Ulf; Kurtz, Stefan; Meyer, Folker; Nattkemper, Tim W; Becker, Anke

    2006-06-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti genome sequence determination has provided the basis for different approaches of functional genomics for this symbiotic nitrogen-fixing alpha-proteobacterium. One of these approaches is gene disruption with subsequent analysis of mutant phenotypes. This method is efficient for single genes; however, it is laborious and time-consuming if it is used on a large scale. Here, we used a signature-tagged transposon mutagenesis method that allowed analysis of the survival and competitiveness of many mutants in a single experiment. A novel set of signature tags characterized by similar melting temperatures and G+C contents of the tag sequences was developed. The efficiencies of amplification of all tags were expected to be similar. Thus, no preselection of the tags was necessary to create a library of 412 signature-tagged transposons. To achieve high specificity of tag detection, each transposon was bar coded by two signature tags. In order to generate defined, nonredundant sets of signature-tagged S. meliloti mutants for subsequent experiments, 12,000 mutants were constructed, and insertion sites for more than 5,000 mutants were determined. One set consisting of 378 mutants was used in a validation experiment to identify mutants showing altered growth patterns.

  4. Prediction of piRNAs using transposon interaction and a support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liang, Chun; Liu, Jinding; Xiao, Huamei; Huang, Shuiqing; Xu, Jianhua; Li, Fei

    2014-12-30

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNA primarily expressed in germ cells that can silence transposons at the post-transcriptional level. Accurate prediction of piRNAs remains a significant challenge. We developed a program for piRNA annotation (Piano) using piRNA-transposon interaction information. We downloaded 13,848 Drosophila piRNAs and 261,500 Drosophila transposons. The piRNAs were aligned to transposons with a maximum of three mismatches. Then, piRNA-transposon interactions were predicted by RNAplex. Triplet elements combining structure and sequence information were extracted from piRNA-transposon matching/pairing duplexes. A support vector machine (SVM) was used on these triplet elements to classify real and pseudo piRNAs, achieving 95.3 ± 0.33% accuracy and 96.0 ± 0.5% sensitivity. The SVM classifier can be used to correctly predict human, mouse and rat piRNAs, with overall accuracy of 90.6%. We used Piano to predict piRNAs for the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, an important rice insect pest that causes huge yield loss. As a result, 82,639 piRNAs were predicted in C. suppressalis. Piano demonstrates excellent piRNA prediction performance by using both structure and sequence features of transposon-piRNAs interactions. Piano is freely available to the academic community at http://ento.njau.edu.cn/Piano.html .

  5. Development of in vitro transposon assisted signal sequence trapping and its use in screening Bacillus halodurans C125 and Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 gene libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, F.; Schnorr, K.; Wilting, R.

    2004-01-01

    minitransposon enabling translational fusions between 'bla and target genes. Fusion of TnSig in the correct reading frame to a protein carrying transmembrane domains or signal peptides resulted in ampicillin resistance of the corresponding clone. Prokaryotic gene libraries from the alkaliphilic bacterium...... in the cell. Genes for secreted proteins, transmembrane proteins and lipoproteins were successfully identified by this method. In contrast to previous transposon based identification strategies, the method described here is fast and versatile and essentially enables any selectable marker compatible library...... to be tagged. It is suited for identifying genes encoding extracytosolic proteins in gene libraries of a wide range of prokaryotic organisms....

  6. Transposon-induced catalase-deficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetmalas, M B

    1997-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens MKR, a nonpathogenic strain, has three catalase isozymes and one superoxide dismutase but no detectable peroxidase activity. A large number (8400) of transconjugants were obtained with pSUP1011::Tn5 suicide vector. The transposition frequencies were found to be greater in biparental mating than in triparental mating with helper plasmid. Mutants MLA31, MLA32, MLA41, and MLA41(a), generated by transposon mutagenesis, all lacked one of the catalase isozymes. Mutants were more susceptible to cell death than the wild type upon direct exposure to 10.0 mmol L-1 H2O2. The specific activity of the enzyme catalase was found to be higher in nitrogen-rich growth medium than carbon-rich growth medium.

  7. GIN transposons: genetic elements linking retrotransposons and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Ignacio

    2010-08-01

    In a previous work, we characterized a gene, called Gypsy Integrase 1 (GIN1), which encodes a protein very similar to the integrase domains present in Gypsy/Ty3 retrotransposons. I describe here a paralog of GIN1 and GIN2 and show that both genes are present in multiple vertebrates and that a likely homolog is found in urochordates. Surprisingly, phylogenetic and structural analyses support the counterintuitive idea that the GIN genes did not directly derive from retrotransposons but from a novel type of animal-specific DNA transposons, the GIN elements. These elements, described for the first time in this study, are characterized by containing a gene that encodes a protein that is also very similar to Gypsy/Ty3 integrases. It turns out that the sequences of the integrases encoded by GIN1 and GIN2 are more similar to those found in GIN elements than to those detected in retrotransposons. Moreover, several introns are in the same positions in the integrase-encoding genes of some GIN elements, GIN1 and GIN2. The simplest explanation for these results is that GIN elements appeared early in animal evolution by co-option of the integrase of a retrotransposon, they later expanded in multiple animal lineages, and, eventually, gave rise to the GIN genes. In summary, GIN transposons may be the "missing link" that explain how GIN genes evolved from retrotransposons. GIN1 and GIN2 may have contributed to control the expansion of GIN elements and Gypsy/Ty3 retrotransposons in chordates.

  8. Germline transgenesis in pigs by cytoplasmic microinjection of Sleeping Beauty transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivics, Zoltán; Garrels, Wiebke; Mátés, Lajos; Yau, Tien Yin; Bashir, Sanum; Zidek, Vaclav; Landa, Vladimír; Geurts, Aron; Pravenec, Michal; Rülicke, Thomas; Kues, Wilfried A; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2014-04-01

    The pig has emerged as an important large animal model in biomedical and pharmaceutical research. We describe a protocol for high-efficiency germline transgenesis and sustained transgene expression in pigs by using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. The protocol is based on co-injection of a plasmid encoding the SB100X hyperactive transposase, together with a second plasmid carrying a transgene flanked by binding sites for the transposase, into the cytoplasm of porcine zygotes. The transposase mediates excision of the transgene cassette from the plasmid vector and its permanent insertion into the genome to produce stable transgenic animals. This method compares favorably in terms of both efficiency and reliable transgene expression to classic pronuclear microinjection or somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and it offers comparable efficacies to lentiviral approaches, without limitations on vector design, issues of transgene silencing and the toxicity and biosafety concerns of working with viral vectors. Microinjection of the vectors into zygotes and transfer of the embryos to recipient animals can be performed in 1 d; generation of germline-transgenic lines by using this protocol takes ∼1 year.

  9. WRKY6 Transcription Factor Restricts Arsenate Uptake and Transposon Activation in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrillo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; de Lorenzo, Laura; Crevillén, Pedro; Fraile-Escanciano, Ana; TC, Mohan; Mouriz, Alfonso; Catarecha, Pablo; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Olsson, Sanna; Leo del Puerto, Yolanda; Mateos, Isabel; Rojo, Enrique; Hernández, Luis E.; Jarillo, Jose A.; Piñeiro, Manuel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Leyva, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Stress constantly challenges plant adaptation to the environment. Of all stress types, arsenic was a major threat during the early evolution of plants. The most prevalent chemical form of arsenic is arsenate, whose similarity to phosphate renders it easily incorporated into cells via the phosphate transporters. Here, we found that arsenate stress provokes a notable transposon burst in plants, in coordination with arsenate/phosphate transporter repression, which immediately restricts arsenate uptake. This repression was accompanied by delocalization of the phosphate transporter from the plasma membrane. When arsenate was removed, the system rapidly restored transcriptional expression and membrane localization of the transporter. We identify WRKY6 as an arsenate-responsive transcription factor that mediates arsenate/phosphate transporter gene expression and restricts arsenate-induced transposon activation. Plants therefore have a dual WRKY-dependent signaling mechanism that modulates arsenate uptake and transposon expression, providing a coordinated strategy for arsenate tolerance and transposon gene silencing. PMID:23922208

  10. WRKY6 transcription factor restricts arsenate uptake and transposon activation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrillo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; de Lorenzo, Laura; Crevillén, Pedro; Fraile-Escanciano, Ana; Tc, Mohan; Mouriz, Alfonso; Catarecha, Pablo; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Olsson, Sanna; Leo Del Puerto, Yolanda; Mateos, Isabel; Rojo, Enrique; Hernández, Luis E; Jarillo, Jose A; Piñeiro, Manuel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Leyva, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Stress constantly challenges plant adaptation to the environment. Of all stress types, arsenic was a major threat during the early evolution of plants. The most prevalent chemical form of arsenic is arsenate, whose similarity to phosphate renders it easily incorporated into cells via the phosphate transporters. Here, we found that arsenate stress provokes a notable transposon burst in plants, in coordination with arsenate/phosphate transporter repression, which immediately restricts arsenate uptake. This repression was accompanied by delocalization of the phosphate transporter from the plasma membrane. When arsenate was removed, the system rapidly restored transcriptional expression and membrane localization of the transporter. We identify WRKY6 as an arsenate-responsive transcription factor that mediates arsenate/phosphate transporter gene expression and restricts arsenate-induced transposon activation. Plants therefore have a dual WRKY-dependent signaling mechanism that modulates arsenate uptake and transposon expression, providing a coordinated strategy for arsenate tolerance and transposon gene silencing.

  11. An Epigenetic Role for Maternally Inherited piRNAs in Transposon Silencing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julius Brennecke; Colin D. Malone; Alexei A. Aravin; Ravi Sachidanandam; Alexander Stark; Gregory J. Hannon

    2008-01-01

    .... We found that small RNAs themselves serve as vectors for epigenetic information. Crosses between Drosophila strains that differ in the presence of a particular transposon can produce sterile progeny, a phenomenon called hybrid dysgenesis...

  12. Stochastic Predator-Prey Dynamics of Transposons in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chi; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2016-11-01

    Transposable elements, or transposons, are DNA sequences that can jump from site to site in the genome during the life cycle of a cell, usually encoding the very enzymes which perform their excision. However, some transposons are parasitic, relying on the enzymes produced by the regular transposons. In this case, we show that a stochastic model, which takes into account the small copy numbers of the active transposons in a cell, predicts noise-induced predator-prey oscillations with a characteristic time scale that is much longer than the cell replication time, indicating that the state of the predator-prey oscillator is stored in the genome and transmitted to successive generations. Our work demonstrates the important role of the number fluctuations in the expression of mobile genetic elements, and shows explicitly how ecological concepts can be applied to the dynamics and fluctuations of living genomes.

  13. Generation of a Transposon Mutant Library in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis Using bursa aurealis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajjala, Vijaya Kumar; Widhelm, Todd J; Endres, Jennifer L; Fey, Paul D; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2016-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis is a genetic process that involves the random insertion of transposons into a genome resulting in the disruption of function of the genes in which they insert. Identification of the insertion sites through DNA sequencing allows for the identification of the genes disrupted and the creation of "libraries" containing a collection of mutants in which a large number of the nonessential genes have been disrupted. These mutant libraries have been a great resource for investigators to understand the various biological functions of individual genes, including those involved in metabolism, antibiotic susceptibility, and pathogenesis. Here, we describe the detailed methodologies for constructing a sequence defined transposon mutant library in both Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis using the mariner-based transposon, bursa aurealis.

  14. Efficient expression of nuclear transgenes in the green alga Chlamydomonas: synthesis of an HIV antigen and development of a new selectable marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahimipour, Rouhollah; Neupert, Juliane; Bock, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has become an invaluable model system in plant biology. There is also considerable interest in developing this microalga into an efficient production platform for biofuels, pharmaceuticals, green chemicals and industrial enzymes. However, the production of foreign proteins in the nucleocytosolic compartment of Chlamydomonas is greatly hampered by the inefficiency of transgene expression from the nuclear genome. We have recently addressed this limitation by isolating mutant algal strains that permit high-level transgene expression and by determining the contributions of GC content and codon usage to gene expression efficiency. Here we have applied these new tools and explored the potential of Chlamydomonas to produce a recombinant biopharmaceutical, the HIV antigen P24. We show that a codon-optimized P24 gene variant introduced into our algal expression strains give rise to recombinant protein accumulation levels of up to 0.25% of the total cellular protein. Moreover, in combination with an expression strain, a resynthesized nptII gene becomes a highly efficient selectable marker gene that facilitates the selection of transgenic algal clones at high frequency. By establishing simple principles of successful transgene expression, our data open up new possibilities for biotechnological research in Chlamydomonas.

  15. DNA transposons and the role of recombination in mutation accumulation in Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaack, Sarah; Choi, Eunjin; Lynch, Michael; Pritham, Ellen J

    2010-01-01

    We identify DNA transposons from the completed draft genome sequence of Daphnia pulex, a cyclically parthenogenetic, aquatic microcrustacean of the class Branchiopoda. In addition, we experimentally quantify the abundance of six DNA transposon families in mutation-accumulation lines in which sex is either promoted or prohibited in order to better understand the role of recombination in transposon proliferation. We identified 55 families belonging to 10 of the known superfamilies of DNA transposons in the genome of D. pulex. DNA transposons constitute approximately 0.7% of the genome. We characterized each family and, in many cases, identified elements capable of activity in the genome. Based on assays of six putatively active element families in mutation-accumulation lines, we compared DNA transposon abundance in lines where sex was either promoted or prohibited. We find the major difference in abundance in sexuals relative to asexuals in lab-reared lines is explained by independent assortment of heterozygotes in lineages where sex has occurred. Our examination of the duality of sex as a mechanism for both the spread and elimination of DNA transposons in the genome reveals that independent assortment of chromosomes leads to significant copy loss in lineages undergoing sex. Although this advantage may offset the so-called 'two fold cost of sex' in the short-term, if insertions become homozygous at specific loci due to recombination, the advantage of sex may be decreased over long time periods. Given these results, we discuss the potential effects of sex on the dynamics of DNA transposons in natural populations of D. pulex.

  16. Transition and Transversion Mutations Are Biased towards GC in Transposons of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Hua Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposons are often regulated by their hosts, and as a result, there are transposons with several mutations within their host organisms. To gain insight into the patterns of the variations, nucleotide substitutions and indels of transposons were analysed in Chilo suppressalis Walker. The CsuPLE1.1 is a member of the piggyBac-like element (PLE family, which belongs to the DNA transposons, and the Csu-Ty3 is a member of the Ty3/gypsy family, which belongs to the RNA transposons. Copies of CsuPLE1.1 and Csu-Ty3 were cloned separately from different C. suppressalis individuals, and then multiple sequence alignments were performed. There were numerous single-base substitutions in CsuPLE1.1 and Csu-Ty3, but only a few insertion and deletion mutations. Similarly, in both transposons, the occurring frequencies of transitions were significantly higher than transversions (p ≤ 0.01. In the single-base substitutions, the most frequently occurring base changes were A→G and T→C in both types of transposons. Additionally, single-base substitution frequencies occurring at positions 1, 2 or 3 (pos1, pos2 or pos3 of a given codon in the element transposase were not significantly different. Both in CsuPLE1.1 and Csu-Ty3, the patterns of nucleotide substitution had the same characteristics and nucleotide mutations were biased toward GC. This research provides a perspective on the understanding of transposon mutation patterns.

  17. An Enterobacter Plasmid as a New Genetic Background for the Transposon Tn1331

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    gene associated with different Tn402 variants, mercury transposons, and conjugative plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...soft tissue, urinary tract, and gastrointestinal tract infections.1–5 These microorganisms also infect various types of complex wounds and represent...Tn7;15 and Tn6005.16 Some of these transposons, like Tn402 derivatives, have also been identified in Pseudomonas , indicating exchange of

  18. Genetic variability and efficiency of DNA microsatellite markers for paternity testing in horse breeds from the Brazilian Marajó archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sávio P. Reis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 15 microsatellite DNA loci used in comparative tests by the International Society for Animal Genetics were applied to the evaluation of genetic diversity and management, and the efficiency of paternity testing in Marajoara horses and Puruca ponies from the Marajó Archipelago. Based on the genotyping of 93 animals, mean allelic diversity was estimated as 9.14 and 7.00 for the Marajoara and Puruca breeds, respectively. While these values are similar to those recorded in most European breeds, mean levels of heterozygosity were much lower (Marajoara 49%, Puruca 40%, probably as a result of high levels of inbreeding in the Marajó populations. The mean informative polymorphic content of this 15-marker system was over 50% in both breeds, and was slightly higher in the Marajoara horses. The discriminative power and exclusion probabilities derived from this system were over 99% for both populations, emphasizing the efficacy of these markers for paternity testing and genetic management in the two breeds.

  19. SmTRC1, a novel Schistosoma mansoni DNA transposon, discloses new families of animal and fungi transposons belonging to the CACTA superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verjovski-Almeida Sergio

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CACTA (also called En/Spm superfamily of DNA-only transposons contain the core sequence CACTA in their Terminal Inverted Repeats (TIRs and so far have only been described in plants. Large transcriptome and genome sequence data have recently become publicly available for Schistosoma mansoni, a digenetic blood fluke that is a major causative agent of schistosomiasis in humans, and have provided a comprehensive repository for the discovery of novel genes and repetitive elements. Despite the extensive description of retroelements in S. mansoni, just a single DNA-only transposon belonging to the Merlin family has so far been reported in this organism. Results We describe a novel S. mansoni transposon named SmTRC1, for S. mansoni Transposon Related to CACTA 1, an element that shares several characteristics with plant CACTA transposons. Southern blotting indicates approximately 30–300 copies of SmTRC1 in the S. mansoni genome. Using genomic PCR followed by cloning and sequencing, we amplified and characterized a full-length and a truncated copy of this element. RT-PCR using S. mansoni mRNA followed by cloning and sequencing revealed several alternatively spliced transcripts of this transposon, resulting in distinct ORFs coding for different proteins. Interestingly, a survey of complete genomes from animals and fungi revealed several other novel TRC elements, indicating new families of DNA transposons belonging to the CACTA superfamily that have not previously been reported in these kingdoms. The first three bases in the S. mansoni TIR are CCC and they are identical to those in the TIRs of the insects Aedes aegypti and Tribolium castaneum, suggesting that animal TRCs may display a CCC core sequence. Conclusion The DNA-only transposable element SmTRC1 from S. mansoni exhibits various characteristics, such as generation of multiple alternatively-spliced transcripts, the presence of terminal inverted repeats at the extremities of

  20. Insertional mutagenesis by a hybrid piggyBac and sleeping beauty transposon in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A; Behringer, Richard R

    2012-12-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat.

  1. A universal mariner transposon system for forward genetic studies in the genus Clostridium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available DNA transposons represent an essential tool in the armoury of the molecular microbiologist. We previously developed a catP-based mini transposon system for Clostridium difficile in which the expression of the transposase gene was dependent on a sigma factor unique to C. difficile, TcdR. Here we have shown that the host range of the transposon is easily extended through the rapid chromosomal insertion of the tcdR gene at the pyrE locus of the intended clostridial target using Allele-Coupled Exchange (ACE. To increase the effectiveness of the system, a novel replicon conditional for plasmid maintenance was developed, which no longer supports the effective retention of the transposon delivery vehicle in the presence of the inducer isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG. As a consequence, those thiamphenicol resistant colonies that arise in clostridial recipients, following plating on agar medium supplemented with IPTG, are almost exclusively due to insertion of the mini transposon into the genome. The system has been exemplified in both Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium sporogenes, where transposon insertion has been shown to be entirely random. Moreover, appropriate screening of both libraries resulted in the isolation of auxotrophic mutants as well as cells deficient in spore formation/germination. This strategy is capable of being implemented in any Clostridium species.

  2. Insertional Mutagenesis by a Hybrid PiggyBac and Sleeping Beauty Transposon in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W.; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A.; Behringer, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat. PMID:23023007

  3. Autonomous Replication of the Conjugative Transposon Tn916.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Laurel D; Grossman, Alan D

    2016-12-15

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), also known as conjugative transposons, are self-transferable elements that are widely distributed among bacterial phyla and are important drivers of horizontal gene transfer. Many ICEs carry genes that confer antibiotic resistances to their host cells and are involved in the dissemination of these resistance genes. ICEs reside in host chromosomes but under certain conditions can excise to form a plasmid that is typically the substrate for transfer. A few ICEs are known to undergo autonomous replication following activation. However, it is not clear if autonomous replication is a general property of many ICEs. We found that Tn916, the first conjugative transposon identified, replicates autonomously via a rolling-circle mechanism. Replication of Tn916 was dependent on the relaxase encoded by orf20 of Tn916 The origin of transfer of Tn916, oriT(916), also functioned as an origin of replication. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we found that the relaxase (Orf20) and the two putative helicase processivity factors (Orf22 and Orf23) encoded by Tn916 likely interact in a complex and that the Tn916 relaxase contains a previously unidentified conserved helix-turn-helix domain in its N-terminal region that is required for relaxase function and replication. Lastly, we identified a functional single-strand origin of replication (sso) in Tn916 that we predict primes second-strand synthesis during rolling-circle replication. Together these results add to the emerging data that show that several ICEs replicate via a conserved, rolling-circle mechanism. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) drive horizontal gene transfer and the spread of antibiotic resistances in bacteria. ICEs reside integrated in a host genome but can excise to create a plasmid that is the substrate for transfer to other cells. Here we show that Tn916, an ICE with broad host range, undergoes autonomous rolling-circle replication when in the

  4. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanhua; Billings, Gabriel; Hubbard, Troy P; Park, Joseph S; Yin Leung, Ka; Liu, Qin; Davis, Brigid M; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao; Waldor, Matthew K

    2017-10-03

    Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection). Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant's fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen) collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot). PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida's fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses.IMPORTANCE Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) enables genome-wide mapping of the genetic determinants of fitness, typically based on observations at a single sampling point. Here, we move beyond analysis of endpoint TIS data to create a framework for analysis of time series TIS data, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). We applied PACE to identify genes that contribute to colonization of a natural host by the fish pathogen

  5. Allele-specific marker development and selection efficiencies for both flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase genes in soybean subgenus soja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Color is one of the phenotypic markers mostly used to study soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) genetic, molecular and biochemical processes. Two P450-dependent mono-oxygenases, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H; EC1.14.3.21) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H, EC1.14.13.88), both catalyzing the hydroxylation of the B-ring in flavonoids, play an important role in coloration. Previous studies showed that the T locus was a gene encoding F3'H and the W1 locus co-segregated with a gene encoding F3'5'H in soybean. These two genetic loci have identified to control seed coat, flower and pubescence colors. However, the allelic distributions of both F3'H and F3'5'H genes in soybean were unknown. In this study, three novel alleles were identified (two of four alleles for GmF3'H and one of three alleles for GmF3'5'H). A set of gene-tagged markers was developed and verified based on the sequence diversity of all seven alleles. Furthermore, the markers were used to analyze soybean accessions including 170 cultivated soybeans (G. max) from a mini core collection and 102 wild soybeans (G. soja). For both F3'H and F3'5'H, the marker selection efficiencies for pubescence color and flower color were determined. The results showed that one GmF3'H allele explained 92.2 % of the variation in tawny and two gmf3'h alleles explained 63.8 % of the variation in gray pubescence colors. In addition, two GmF3'5'H alleles and one gmF3'5'h allele explained 94.0 % of the variation in purple and 75.3 % in white flowers, respectively. By the combination of the two loci, seed coat color was determined. In total, 90.9 % of accessions possessing both the gmf3'h-b and gmf3'5'h alleles had yellow seed coats. Therefore, seed coat colors are controlled by more than two loci.

  6. A Transposon Screen Identifies Genetic Determinants of Vibrio cholerae Resistance to High-Molecular-Weight Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Tobias; Delgado, Fernanda; Umans, Benjamin D; Gerding, Matthew A; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-08-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are notoriously resistant to a variety of high-molecular-weight antibiotics due to the limited permeability of their outer membrane (OM). The basis of OM barrier function and the genetic factors required for its maintenance remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed transposon insertion sequencing to identify genes required for Vibrio cholerae resistance to vancomycin and bacitracin, antibiotics that are thought to be too large to efficiently penetrate the OM. The screen yielded several genes whose protein products are predicted to participate in processes important for OM barrier functions and for biofilm formation. In addition, we identified a novel factor, designated vigA (for vancomycin inhibits growth), that has not previously been characterized or linked to outer membrane function. The vigA open reading frame (ORF) codes for an inner membrane protein, and in its absence, cells became highly sensitive to glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin and ramoplanin) and bacitracin but not to other large antibiotics or detergents. In contrast to wild-type (WT) cells, the vigA mutant was stained with fluorescent vancomycin. These observations suggest that VigA specifically prevents the periplasmic accumulation of certain large antibiotics without exerting a general role in the maintenance of OM integrity. We also observed marked interspecies variability in the susceptibilities of Gram-negative pathogens to glycopeptides and bacitracin. Collectively, our findings suggest that the OM barrier is not absolute but rather depends on specific OM-antibiotic interactions. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Random mutagenesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 using an IS6100-based transposon vector identified the last unknown gene in the histidine biosynthesis pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaigalat Lars

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive bacterium of the class Actinobacteria, is an industrially relevant producer of amino acids. Several methods for the targeted genetic manipulation of this organism and rational strain improvement have been developed. An efficient transposon mutagenesis system for the completely sequenced type strain ATCC 13032 would significantly advance functional genome analysis in this bacterium. Results A comprehensive transposon mutant library comprising 10,080 independent clones was constructed by electrotransformation of the restriction-deficient derivative of strain ATCC 13032, C. glutamicum RES167, with an IS6100-containing non-replicative plasmid. Transposon mutants had stable cointegrates between the transposon vector and the chromosome. Altogether 172 transposon integration sites have been determined by sequencing of the chromosomal inserts, revealing that each integration occurred at a different locus. Statistical target site analyses revealed an apparent absence of a target site preference. From the library, auxotrophic mutants were obtained with a frequency of 2.9%. By auxanography analyses nearly two thirds of the auxotrophs were further characterized, including mutants with single, double and alternative nutritional requirements. In most cases the nutritional requirement observed could be correlated to the annotation of the mutated gene involved in the biosynthesis of an amino acid, a nucleotide or a vitamin. One notable exception was a clone mutagenized by transposition into the gene cg0910, which exhibited an auxotrophy for histidine. The protein sequence deduced from cg0910 showed high sequence similarities to inositol-1(or 4-monophosphatases (EC 3.1.3.25. Subsequent genetic deletion of cg0910 delivered the same histidine-auxotrophic phenotype. Genetic complementation of the mutants as well as supplementation by histidinol suggests that cg0910 encodes the hitherto unknown

  8. Efficient somatic embryogenesis and molecular marker based analysis as effective tools for conservation of red-listed plant Commiphora wightii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASHOK KUMAR PARMAR

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A refined and high efficiency protocol for in vitro regeneration of Commiphora wightii, a red-listed medicinal plant of medicinal importance, has been developed through optimized somatic embryogenesis pathway. Cultures from immature fruits were induced and proliferated on B5 medium supplemented with 2.26 µM 2,4-D. Embryogenic calli were obtained and then maintained for extended periods by alternately subculturing on modified MS medium supplemented with 1.11 µM BAP, 0.57 µM IBA and with 0.5% activated charcoal or without PGR every 3-4 weeks. Cyclic embryogenesis was obtained. Late torpedo and early cotyledonary stages somatic embryos were regularly harvested from PGR-free modified MS medium. It was found that percent moisture available in culture containers play a critical role in maturation and subsequent germination of somatic embryos of C. wighti. Maximum germination of more than 80% was achieved through media recycling. Somatic embryo derived plants (emblings were acclimatized. After 5 months, acclimatized plants were out-planted in experimental field. These morphologically normal plants have been surviving for over 3 years. Molecular polymorphism was clearly evident when these plants were tested using RAPD primers, making the plants suitable for use in its species restoration program.

  9. Transposon-mediated BAC transgenesis in human ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovskaya, Maria; Fu, Jun; Obst, Mandy; Baer, Isabell; Weidlich, Stefanie; Wang, Hailong; Smith, Andrew J H; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2012-10-01

    Transgenesis is a cornerstone of molecular biology. The ability to integrate a specifically engineered piece of DNA into the genome of a living system is fundamental to our efforts to understand life and exploit its implications for medicine, nanotechnology and bioprospecting. However, transgenesis has been hampered by position effects and multi-copy integration problems, which are mainly due to the use of small, plasmid-based transgenes. Large transgenes based on native genomic regions cloned into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) circumvent these problems but are prone to fragmentation. Herein, we report that contrary to widely held notions, large BAC-sized constructs do not prohibit transposition. We also report the first reliable method for BAC transgenesis in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposon inverted repeats were integrated into BAC vectors by recombineering, followed by co-lipofection with the corresponding transposase in hESCs to generate robust fluorescent protein reporter lines for OCT4, NANOG, GATA4 and PAX6. BAC transposition delivers several advantages, including increased frequencies of single-copy, full-length integration, which will be useful in all transgenic systems but especially in difficult venues like hESCs.

  10. Search for genetic markers determining the efficiency of therapy with bisphosphonates in Russian women with postmenopausal osteoporosis: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Krylov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many clinical observations show that patient’s genetic background is of great importance in determining the efficiency of treatment.Subjects and methods. The instigation included 50 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (OP, who were followed up at the Laboratory of osteoporosis, V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology. Body mineral density (BMD in the lumbar spine (LI-IV, femoral neck (FN, and total hip was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and 12 months after treatment with bisphosphonates (BP. To estimate BMD changes, the investigators used ΔBMD in percent (Δ, %.Results and discussion. The whole group showed a positive effect of BP therapy during a year, which was most pronounced in the lumbar spine (mean ΔBMD, about 4%, and a small increment in the proximal hip BMD (mean ΔBMD, about 2%. An analysis indicated a statistically significant correlation of MCP1 -2518A>G polymorphism with changes in LI-IV BMD after 12-month BP therapy. Thus, the female patients who were A allele carriers had a twice lower increase in LI-IV BMD due to BP therapy than those without this allele. The genetic variants of the CCR5 gene, which were related to Δ32 deletion, and IL1β -511C/T polymorphism were also associated with changes in FN BMD following 12-month BP therapy. The BMD increase due to BP therapy in the carriers of the CCR5 Δ32 mutation (wt/Δ32 genotype was 3.5-fold than that in the carriers of the wild type gene (wt/wt genotype. Examination of IL1 -511C/T polymorphism demonstrated that the FN BMD increment in the carriers of the CC genotype was significantly higher than in those of the CT genotype (4.2±4.8 and 1.0±3.7%, respectively; р = 0.023. Our investigation revealed no significant relationship between VDR, LEPR, IL10, MHTFR, PPARG, SPP1, and CCR5(G/A gene polymorphisms and 12-month BP therapy-induced BMD changes in the three study skeletal regions. The findings may suggest that genetic testing may be used to

  11. Developing Universal Genetic Tools for Rapid and Efficient Deletion Mutation in Vibrio Species Based on Suicide T-Vectors Carrying a Novel Counterselectable Marker, vmi480.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Luo

    Full Text Available Despite that Vibrio spp. have a significant impact on the health of humans and aquatic animals, the molecular basis of their pathogenesis is little known, mainly due to the limited genetic tools for the functional research of genes in Vibrio. In some cases, deletion of target DNAs in Vibrio can be achieved through the use of suicide vectors. However, these strategies are time-consuming and lack universality, and the widely used counterselectable gene sacB does not work well in Vibrio cells. In this study, we developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient deletion mutations in Vibrio species based on suicide T-Vectors carrying a novel counterselectable marker, vmi480. We explored two uncharacterized genes, vmi480 and vmi470, in a genomic island from Vibrio mimicus VM573 and confirmed that vmi480 and vmi470 constitute a two-component toxin-antitoxin system through deletion and expression of vmi480 and vmi470. The product of vmi480 exhibited strong toxicity to Escherichia coli cells. Based on vmi480 and the PBAD or PTAC promoter system, we constructed two suicide T-vectors, pLP11 and pLP12, and each of these vectors contained a multiple cloning region with two AhdI sites. Both vectors linearized by AhdI digestion could be stored and directly ligated with purified PCR products without a digestion step. By using pLP11 and pLP12 coupled with a highly efficient conjugation system provided by E. coli β2163, six genes from four representative Vibrio species were easily deleted. By using the counterselective marker vmi480, we obtained 3-12 positive colonies (deletion mutants among no more than 20 colonies randomly selected on counterselection plates. The strategy does not require the digestion of PCR products and suicide vectors every time, and it avoids large-scale screening colonies on counterselective plates. These results demonstrate that we successfully developed universal genetic tools for rapid and efficient gene deletion in Vibrio

  12. The diversification and activity of hAT transposons in Musa genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Gerhard; Heitkam, Tony; Seibt, Kathrin M; Nouroz, Faisal; Müller-Stoermer, Manuela; Heslop-Harrison, John S; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Sequencing of plant genomes often identified the hAT superfamily as the largest group of DNA transposons. Nevertheless, detailed information on the diversity, abundance and chromosomal localization of plant hAT families are rare. By in silico analyses of the reference genome assembly and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences, respectively, we performed the classification and molecular characterization of hAT transposon families in Musa acuminata. Musa hAT transposons are organized in three families designated MuhAT I, MuhAT II and MuhAT III. In total, 70 complete autonomous elements of the MuhAT I and MuhAT II families were detected, while no autonomous MuhAT III transposons were found. Based on the terminal inverted repeat (TIR)-specific sequence information of the autonomous transposons, 1722 MuhAT I- and MuhAT II-specific miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MuhMITEs) were identified. Autonomous MuhAT I and MuhAT II elements are only moderately abundant in the sections of the genus Musa, while the corresponding MITEs exhibit an amplification in Musa genomes. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), autonomous MuhAT transposons as well as MuhMITEs were localized in subtelomeric, most likely gene-rich regions of M. acuminata chromosomes. A comparison of homoeologous regions of M. acuminata and Musa balbisiana BACs revealed the species-specific mobility of MuhMITEs. In particular, the activity of MuhMITEs II showing transduplications of genomic sequences might indicate the presence of active MuhAT transposons, thus suggesting a potential role of MuhMITEs as modulators of genome evolution of Musa.

  13. RAG1 core and V(DJ recombination signal sequences were derived from Transib transposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Kapitonov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The V(DJ recombination reaction in jawed vertebrates is catalyzed by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which are believed to have emerged approximately 500 million years ago from transposon-encoded proteins. Yet no transposase sequence similar to RAG1 or RAG2 has been found. Here we show that the approximately 600-amino acid "core" region of RAG1 required for its catalytic activity is significantly similar to the transposase encoded by DNA transposons that belong to the Transib superfamily. This superfamily was discovered recently based on computational analysis of the fruit fly and African malaria mosquito genomes. Transib transposons also are present in the genomes of sea urchin, yellow fever mosquito, silkworm, dog hookworm, hydra, and soybean rust. We demonstrate that recombination signal sequences (RSSs were derived from terminal inverted repeats of an ancient Transib transposon. Furthermore, the critical DDE catalytic triad of RAG1 is shared with the Transib transposase as part of conserved motifs. We also studied several divergent proteins encoded by the sea urchin and lancelet genomes that are 25%-30% identical to the RAG1 N-terminal domain and the RAG1 core. Our results provide the first direct evidence linking RAG1 and RSSs to a specific superfamily of DNA transposons and indicate that the V(DJ machinery evolved from transposons. We propose that only the RAG1 core was derived from the Transib transposase, whereas the N-terminal domain was assembled from separate proteins of unknown function that may still be active in sea urchin, lancelet, hydra, and starlet sea anemone. We also suggest that the RAG2 protein was not encoded by ancient Transib transposons but emerged in jawed vertebrates as a counterpart of RAG1 necessary for the V(DJ recombination reaction.

  14. Construction of a large-scale Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, a pathogenic member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), has emerged as a significant threat towards cystic fibrosis patients, where infection often leads to the fatal clinical manifestation known as cepacia syndrome. Many studies have investigated the pathogenicity of B. cenocepacia as well as its ability to become highly resistant towards many of the antibiotics currently in use. In addition, studies have also been undertaken to understand the pathogen's capacity to adapt and survive in a broad range of environments. Transposon based mutagenesis has been widely used in creating insertional knock-out mutants and coupled with recent advances in sequencing technology, robust tools to study gene function in a genome-wide manner have been developed based on the assembly of saturated transposon mutant libraries. In this study, we describe the construction of a large-scale library of B. cenocepacia transposon mutants. To create transposon mutants of B. cenocepacia strain J2315, electrocompetent bacteria were electrotransformed with the EZ-Tn5 transposome. Tetracyline resistant colonies were harvested off selective agar and pooled. Mutants were generated in multiple batches with each batch consisting of ˜20,000 to 40,000 mutants. Transposon insertion was validated by PCR amplification of the transposon region. In conclusion, a saturated B. cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library with an estimated total number of 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed. This mutant library can now be further exploited as a genetic tool to assess the function of every gene in the genome, facilitating the discovery of genes important for bacterial survival and adaptation, as well as virulence.

  15. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  16. Quantitative analysis of α-L-iduronidase expression in immunocompetent mice treated with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovich, Elena L; Hall, Bryan C; Bell, Jason B; McIvor, R Scott; Hackett, Perry B

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty transposon system, a non-viral, integrating vector that can deliver the alpha-L-iduronidase-encoding gene, is efficient in correcting mucopolysaccharidosis type I in NOD/SCID mice. However, in previous studies we failed to attain reliable long-term alpha-L-iduronidase expression in immunocompetent mice. Here, we focused on achieving sustained high-level expression in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. In our standard liver-directed treatment we hydrodynamically infuse mice with plasmids containing a SB transposon-encoding human alpha-L-iduronidase, along with a source of SB transposase. We sought to 1) minimize expression of the therapeutic enzyme in antigen-presenting cells, while avoiding promoter shutdown and gender bias, 2) increase transposition efficiency and 3) improve immunosuppression. By using a liver-specific promoter to drive IDUA expression, the SB100X hyperactive transposase and transient cyclophosphamide immunosuppression we achieved therapeutic-level (>100 wild-type) stabilized expression for 1 year in 50% of C57BL/6 mice. To gain insights into the causes of variability in transgene expression, we quantified the rates of alpha-L-iduronidase activity decay vis-a-vis transposition and transgene maintenance using the data obtained in this and previous studies. Our analyses showed that immune responses are the most important variable to control in order to prevent loss of transgene expression. Cumulatively, our results allow transition to pre-clinical studies of SB-mediated alpha-L-iduronidase expression and correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type I in animal models.

  17. Quantitative analysis of α-L-iduronidase expression in immunocompetent mice treated with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena L Aronovich

    Full Text Available The Sleeping Beauty transposon system, a non-viral, integrating vector that can deliver the alpha-L-iduronidase-encoding gene, is efficient in correcting mucopolysaccharidosis type I in NOD/SCID mice. However, in previous studies we failed to attain reliable long-term alpha-L-iduronidase expression in immunocompetent mice. Here, we focused on achieving sustained high-level expression in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. In our standard liver-directed treatment we hydrodynamically infuse mice with plasmids containing a SB transposon-encoding human alpha-L-iduronidase, along with a source of SB transposase. We sought to 1 minimize expression of the therapeutic enzyme in antigen-presenting cells, while avoiding promoter shutdown and gender bias, 2 increase transposition efficiency and 3 improve immunosuppression. By using a liver-specific promoter to drive IDUA expression, the SB100X hyperactive transposase and transient cyclophosphamide immunosuppression we achieved therapeutic-level (>100 wild-type stabilized expression for 1 year in 50% of C57BL/6 mice. To gain insights into the causes of variability in transgene expression, we quantified the rates of alpha-L-iduronidase activity decay vis-a-vis transposition and transgene maintenance using the data obtained in this and previous studies. Our analyses showed that immune responses are the most important variable to control in order to prevent loss of transgene expression. Cumulatively, our results allow transition to pre-clinical studies of SB-mediated alpha-L-iduronidase expression and correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type I in animal models.

  18. ESSENTIALS: Software for Rapid Analysis of High Throughput Transposon Insertion Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomer, Aldert; Burghout, Peter; Bootsma, Hester J.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput analysis of genome-wide random transposon mutant libraries is a powerful tool for (conditional) essential gene discovery. Recently, several next-generation sequencing approaches, e.g. Tn-seq/INseq, HITS and TraDIS, have been developed that accurately map the site of transposon insertions by mutant-specific amplification and sequence readout of DNA flanking the transposon insertions site, assigning a measure of essentiality based on the number of reads per insertion site flanking sequence or per gene. However, analysis of these large and complex datasets is hampered by the lack of an easy to use and automated tool for transposon insertion sequencing data. To fill this gap, we developed ESSENTIALS, an open source, web-based software tool for researchers in the genomics field utilizing transposon insertion sequencing analysis. It accurately predicts (conditionally) essential genes and offers the flexibility of using different sample normalization methods, genomic location bias correction, data preprocessing steps, appropriate statistical tests and various visualizations to examine the results, while requiring only a minimum of input and hands-on work from the researcher. We successfully applied ESSENTIALS to in-house and published Tn-seq, TraDIS and HITS datasets and we show that the various pre- and post-processing steps on the sequence reads and count data with ESSENTIALS considerably improve the sensitivity and specificity of predicted gene essentiality. PMID:22900082

  19. Rodent transgenesis mediated by a novel hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mátés, Lajos

    2011-01-01

    DNA-based transposons are natural gene delivery vehicles. Similarly to retroviruses, these elements -integrate into the chromosomes of host cells, but their life-cycle does not involve reverse transcription and they are not infectious. Transposon-based gene delivery has several advantageous features compared to viral methods; however, its efficacy has been the bottleneck of transposon utilization. Recently, using a novel strategy for in vitro evolution, we created a new hyperactive version (SB100X) of the vertebrate-specific Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase. SB100X, when coupled with enhanced inverted terminal repeat structure T2 type SB transposons, is over 100-fold more active in mammalian cells than the prototype. We established protocol for SB100X mediated rodent transgenesis resulting on the average 35% transgenic founders with a low average number (1-2) of transgene insertions per founder. Due to these characteristics the SB100X based protocol opens the possibility of designing SB based transgenes also for in vivo knockdown experiments. By the same token, single copy transgene units introduced by the SB transposon system, more than being less prone to transgene silencing, also allow better control of transgene expression levels and patterns.

  20. Genome-scale metabolic network validation of Shewanella oneidensis using transposon insertion frequency analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA. TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1 previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2 flux balance analysis (FBA predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions.

  1. Circular RNAs mediated by transposons are associated with transcriptomic and phenotypic variation in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Zhang, Pei; Fan, Yuan; Lu, Qiong; Li, Qing; Yan, Jianbing; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Schnable, Patrick S; Dai, Mingqiu; Li, Lin

    2017-11-20

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are covalently closed RNA molecules. Recent studies have shown that circRNAs can arise from the transcripts of transposons. Given the prevalence of transposons in the maize genome and dramatic genomic variation driven by transposons, we hypothesize that transposons in maize may be involved in the formation of circRNAs and further modulate phenotypic variation. We performed circRNA-Seq on B73 seedling leaves and uncovered 2804 high-confidence maize circRNAs, which show distinct genomic features. Comprehensive analyses demonstrated that sequences related to LINE1-like elements (LLEs) and their Reverse Complementary Pairs (LLERCPs) are significantly enriched in the flanking regions of circRNAs. Interestingly, as the number of LLERCPs increase, the accumulation of circRNAs varies, whereas that of linear transcripts decreases. Furthermore, genes with LLERCP-mediated circRNAs are enriched among loci that are associated with phenotypic variation. These results suggest that circRNAs are likely to be involved in the modulation of phenotypic variation by LLERCPs. Further, we showed that the presence/absence variation of LLERCPs was associated with expression variation of circRNA-circ1690 and was related to ear height, potentially through the interplay between circRNAs and functional linear transcripts. Our first study of maize circRNAs uncovers a potential new way for transposons to modulate transcriptomic and phenotypic variations. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Transposon mutagenesis of the plant-associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 revealed that the nfrA and RBAM17410 genes are involved in plant-microbe-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiharjo, Anto; Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Dolgova, Olga; Fan, Ben; Bleiss, Wilfrid; Ziegler, Jörg; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Borriss, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum FZB42 represents the prototype of Gram-positive plant growth promoting and biocontrol bacteria. In this study, we applied transposon mutagenesis to generate a transposon library, which was screened for genes involved in multicellular behavior and biofilm formation on roots as a prerequisite of plant growth promoting activity. Transposon insertion sites were determined by rescue-cloning followed by DNA sequencing. As in B. subtilis, the global transcriptional regulator DegU was identified as an activator of genes necessary for swarming and biofilm formation, and the DegU-mutant of FZB42 was found impaired in efficient root colonization. Direct screening of 3,000 transposon insertion mutants for plant-growth-promotion revealed the gene products of nfrA and RBAM_017140 to be essential for beneficial effects exerted by FZB42 on plants. We analyzed the performance of GFP-labeled wild-type and transposon mutants in the colonization of lettuce roots using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While the wild-type strain heavily colonized root surfaces, the nfrA mutant did not colonize lettuce roots, although it was not impaired in growth in laboratory cultures, biofilm formation and swarming motility on agar plates. The RBAM17410 gene, occurring in only a few members of the B. subtilis species complex, was directly involved in plant growth promotion. None of the mutant strains were affected in producing the plant growth hormone auxin. We hypothesize that the nfrA gene product is essential for overcoming the stress caused by plant response towards bacterial root colonization.

  3. Effects of high intensity interval versus moderate continuous training on markers of ventilatory and cardiac efficiency in coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Gustavo G; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Farinatti, Paulo T V

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that high intensity interval training (HIIT) would be more effective than moderate intensity continuous training (MIT) to improve newly emerged markers of cardiorespiratory fitness in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, as the relationship between ventilation and carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2 slope), oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), and oxygen pulse (O2P). Seventy-one patients with optimized treatment were randomly assigned into HIIT (n = 23, age = 56 ± 12 years), MIT (n = 24, age = 62 ± 12 years), or nonexercise control group (CG) (n = 24, age = 64 ± 12 years). MIT performed 30 min of continuous aerobic exercise at 70-75% of maximal heart rate (HRmax), and HIIT performed 30 min sessions split in 2 min alternate bouts at 60%/90% HRmax (3 times/week for 16 weeks). No differences among groups (before versus after) were found for VE/VCO2 slope or OUES (P > 0.05). After training the O2P slope increased in HIIT (22%, P 0.05), while decreased in CG (-20%, P < 0.05) becoming lower versus HIIT (P = 0.03). HIIT was more effective than MIT for improving O2P slope in CHD patients, while VE/VCO2 slope and OUES were similarly improved by aerobic training regimens versus controls.

  4. Sleeping Beauty transposon system for genetic etiological research and gene therapy of cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaomei; Du, Yan; Deng, Yang; Wu, Jianfeng; Cao, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is etiologically associated with somatic mutations of critical genes. Recently, a number of somatic mutations and key molecules have been found to be involved in functional networks affecting cancer progression. Suitable animal models are required to validate cancer-promoting or -inhibiting capacities of these mutants and molecules. Sleeping Beauty transposon system consists of a transposon that carries gene(s) of interest and a transposase that recognizes, excises, and reinserts genes in given location of the genome. It can create both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations, thus being frequently chosen to investigate the etiological mechanisms and gene therapy for cancers in animal models. In this review, we summarized current advances of Sleeping Beauty transposon system in revealing molecular mechanism of cancers and improving gene therapy. Understanding molecular mechanisms by which driver mutations contribute to carcinogenesis and metastasis may pave the way for the development of innovative prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against malignant diseases. PMID:25455252

  5. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  6. Tumor-directed gene therapy in mice using a composite nonviral gene delivery system consisting of the piggyBac transposon and polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chaoqun

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared with viral vectors, nonviral vectors are less immunogenic, more stable, safer and easier to replication for application in cancer gene therapy. However, nonviral gene delivery system has not been extensively used because of the low transfection efficiency and the short transgene expression, especially in vivo. It is desirable to develop a nonviral gene delivery system that can support stable genomic integration and persistent gene expression in vivo. Here, we used a composite nonviral gene delivery system consisting of the piggyBac (PB transposon and polyethylenimine (PEI for long-term transgene expression in mouse ovarian tumors. Methods A recombinant plasmid PB [Act-RFP, HSV-tk] encoding both the herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV-tk and the monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1 under PB transposon elements was constructed. This plasmid and the PBase plasmid were injected into ovarian cancer tumor xenografts in mice by in vivo PEI system. The antitumor effects of HSV-tk/ganciclovir (GCV system were observed after intraperitoneal injection of GCV. Histological analysis and TUNEL assay were performed on the cryostat sections of the tumor tissue. Results Plasmid construction was confirmed by PCR analysis combined with restrictive enzyme digestion. mRFP1 expression could be visualized three weeks after the last transfection of pPB/TK under fluorescence microscopy. After GCV admission, the tumor volume of PB/TK group was significantly reduced and the tumor inhibitory rate was 81.96% contrasted against the 43.07% in the TK group. Histological analysis showed that there were extensive necrosis and lymphocytes infiltration in the tumor tissue of the PB/TK group but limited in the tissue of control group. TUNEL assays suggested that the transfected cells were undergoing apoptosis after GCV admission in vivo. Conclusion Our results show that the nonviral gene delivery system coupling PB transposon with PEI can be used

  7. Replacing the wild type loxP site in BACs from the public domain with lox66 using a lox66 transposon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stennett Naima

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin adjoining the site of integration of a transgene affects expression and renders comparisons of closely related transgenes, such as those derived from a BAC deletion series retrofitted with enhancer-traps, unreliable. Gene targeting to a pre-determined site on the chromosome is likely to alleviate the problem. Findings A general procedure to replace the loxP site located at one end of genomic DNA inserts in BACs with lox66 is described. Truncating insert DNA from the loxP end with a Tn10 transposon carrying a lox66 site simultaneously substitutes the loxP with a lox66 sequence. The replacement occurs with high stringency, and the procedure should be applicable to all BACs in the public domain. Cre recombination of loxP with lox66 or lox71 was found to be as efficient as another loxP site during phage P1 transduction of small plasmids containing those sites. However the end-deletion of insert DNA in BACs using a lox66 transposon occurred at no more than 20% the efficiency observed with a loxP transposon. Differences in the ability of Cre protein available at different stages of the P1 life cycle to recombine identical versus non-identical lox-sites is likely responsible for this discrepancy. A possible mechanism to explain these findings is discussed. Conclusions The loxP/lox66 replacement procedure should allow targeting BACs to a pre-positioned lox71 site in zebrafish chromosomes; a system where homologous recombination-mediated "knock-in" technology is unavailable.

  8. A novel method for somatic transgenesis of the mouse prostate using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Kimberly D P; Alsop, James D; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita L; Roethe, Laura S; Powers, Ginny L; Marker, Paul C

    2014-05-01

    In vivo ectopic gene expression is a common approach for prostate research through the use of transgenes in germline transgenic mice. For some other organs, somatic transgenesis with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system has allowed in vivo ectopic gene expression with higher throughput and lower cost than germline transgenic approaches. Mouse e16 urogenital sinuses (UGSs) were co-injected with plasmids expressing the Sleeping Beauty transposase and plasmids with control or activated BRAF expressing transposons. Following electroporation, the transduced UGSs were grown as allografts in mouse hosts for 8 weeks, and the resulting allografts were evaluated for several endpoints. Transposon-transduced UGS allografts developed into prostatic tissue with normal tissue structure and cellular differentiation. Integration of transposon vectors into the genomes of transduced allografts was confirmed using linker-mediated PCR, sequencing, and in situ PCR. Transduction of UGS allografts with transposons expressing activated BRAF resulted in ectopic BRAF expression that was detectable at both the mRNA and protein levels. Prostatic ducts over-expressing activated BRAF also had ectopic activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen activated kinases and increased epithelial cell proliferation. The Sleeping Beauty transposon system can be used to achieve somatic transgenesis of prostatic allografts. This new method for achieving ectopic gene expression in the prostate will complement other existing approaches such as ectopic gene expression in cell lines and in germline transgenic mice. Advantages of this new approach include preservation of stromal-epithelial interactions not possible with cell lines, and higher throughput and lower cost than traditional germline transgenic approaches. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Efficiency of RAPD, ISSR, AFLP and ISTR markers for the detection of polymorphisms and genetic relationships in camote de cerro (Dioscorea spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paulina Velasco-Ramírez

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: This indicates an important level of genetic differences despite the fact that the plant is asexually propagated. Based on the diversity statistics, any marker tested in present work can be recommended for use in large-scale genetic studies of populations. However, the low correlations among different molecular marker systems show the importance of the complementarity of the information that is generated by different markers for genetic studies involving estimation of polymorphism and relationships.

  10. Physiologic responses and gene diversity indicate olive alternative oxidase as a potential source for markers involved in efficient adventitious root induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Macedo, Elisete; Cardoso, Hélia G; Hernández, Alejandro; Peixe, Augusto A; Polidoros, Alexios; Ferreira, Alexandre; Cordeiro, António; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2009-12-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) trees are mainly propagated by adventitious rooting of semi-hardwood cuttings. However, efficient commercial propagation of valuable olive tree cultivars or landraces by semi-hardwood cuttings can often be restricted by a low rooting capacity. We hypothesize that root induction is a plant cell reaction linked to oxidative stress and that activity of stress-induced alternative oxidase (AOX) is importantly involved in adventitious rooting. To identify AOX as a source for potential functional marker sequences that may assist tree breeding, genetic variability has to be demonstrated that can affect gene regulation. The paper presents an applied, multidisciplinary research approach demonstrating first indications of an important relationship between AOX activity and differential adventitious rooting in semi-hardwood cuttings. Root induction in the easy-to-root Portuguese cultivar 'Cobrançosa' could be significantly reduced by treatment with salicyl-hydroxamic acid, an inhibitor of AOX activity. On the contrary, treatment with H2O2 or pyruvate, both known to induce AOX activity, increased the degree of rooting. Recently, identification of several O. europaea (Oe) AOX gene sequences has been reported from our group. Here we present for the first time partial sequences of OeAOX2. To search for polymorphisms inside of OeAOX genes, partial OeAOX2 sequences from the cultivars 'Galega vulgar', 'Cobrançosa' and 'Picual' were cloned from genomic DNA and cDNA, including exon, intron and 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) sequences. The data revealed polymorphic sites in several regions of OeAOX2. The 3'-UTR was the most important source for polymorphisms showing 5.7% of variability. Variability in the exon region accounted 3.4 and 2% in the intron. Further, analysis performed at the cDNA from microshoots of 'Galega vulgar' revealed transcript length variation for the 3'-UTR of OeAOX2 ranging between 76 and 301 bp. The identified polymorphisms and 3'-UTR

  11. The dynamics of gene duplication and transposons in microbial genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2010-03-01

    Evidence indicates that new functional genes emerge from a process of gene duplication coupled with selection for a novel function. Recently, Bergthorsson et al. proposed a model of continuous selection in order to describe this process. Here, we examine their proposed evolutionary scheme, by modeling gene evolution using a stochastic simulation. Our results indicate that this model, and a related one that includes horizontal gene transfer, can account for the distribution of transposons in microbial genomes, and reproduce the observed environmentally-driven spatial dependence of transposon density in marine bacteria.

  12. β-Globin Matrix Attachment Region Improves Stable Genomic Expression of the Sleeping Beauty Transposon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Meghan C.; Steer, Clifford J.; Kren, Betsy T.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an attractive target for gene therapy due to its extensive capability for protein production and the numerous diseases resulting from a loss of gene function it normally provides. The Sleeping Beauty Transposon (SB-Tn)1 system is a non-viral vector capable of delivering and mediating therapeutic transgene(s) insertion into the host genome for long-term expression. A current challenge for this system is the low efficiency of integration of the transgene. In this study we use a human hepatoma cell line (HuH-7) and primary human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to test vectors containing DNA elements to enhance transposition without integrating themselves. We employed the human β-globin matrix attachment region (MAR) and the Simian virus 40 (SV40) nuclear translocation signal to increase the percent of HuH-7 cells persistently expressing a GFP::Zeo reporter construct by ~50% for each element; while combining both did not show an additive effect. Interestingly, both elements together displayed an additive effect on the number of insertion sites, and in BOECs the SV40 alone appeared to have an inhibitory effect on transposition. In long-term cultures the loss of plasmid DNA, transposase expression and mapping of insertion sites demonstrated bona fide transposition without episomal expression. These results show that addition of the β-globin MAR and potentially other elements to the backbone of SB-Tn system can enhance transposition and expression of therapeutic transgenes. These findings may have a significant influence on the use of SB transgene delivery to liver for the treatment of a wide variety of disorders. PMID:21520245

  13. Critical variations of conjugational DNA transfer into secondary metabolite multiproducing Sorangium cellulosum strains So ce12 and So ce56: development of a mariner-based transposon mutagenesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Maren; Irschik, Herbert; Gross, Frank; Perlova, Olena; Sandmann, Axel; Gerth, Klaus; Müller, Rolf

    2004-01-08

    Myxobacteria increasingly gain attention as a source of bioactive natural products. The genus Sorangium produces almost half of the secondary metabolites isolated from these microorganisms. Nevertheless, genetic systems for Sorangium strains are poorly developed, which makes the identification of the genes directing natural product biosynthesis difficult. Using biparental and triparental mating, we have developed methodologies for DNA transfer from Escherichia coli via conjugation for the genome sequencing model strain So ce56 and the secondary metabolite multiproducing strain So ce12. The conjugation protocol developed for strain So ce56 is not applicable to other Sorangium strains. Crucial points for the conjugation are the ratio of E. coli and Sorangium cellulosum cells, the choice of liquid or solid medium, the time used for the conjugation process and antibiotic selection in liquid medium prior to the plating of cells. A mariner-based transposon containing a hygromycin resistance gene was generated and used as the selectable marker for S. cellulosum. The transposon randomly integrates into the chromosome of both strains. As a proof of principle, S. cellulosum So ce12 transposon mutants were screened using an overlay assay to target the chivosazole biosynthetic gene cluster.

  14. BRAFV600E Efficient Transformation and Induction of Microsatellite Instability Versus KRASG12V Induction of Senescence Markers in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftychia Oikonomou

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In colorectal cancer, BRAF and KRAS oncogenes are mutated in about 15% and 35% respectively at approximately the same stage of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Since these two mutations rarely coexist, further analysis to dissect their function of transformation in colon cancer is required. Caco-2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were stably transfected with BRAFV600E (Caco-BR cells or KRASG12V (Caco-K cells oncogenes. BRAFV600E is more efficient in transforming Caco-2 cells and altering their morphology. The dominant nature of BRAFV600E is evident by its ability to render Caco-2 cells tumorigenic in vivo all be it through selective extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK 2 phosphorylation and high levels of cyclin D1. As a consequence, the cell cycle distribution of parental cells is altered and microsatellite instability is introduced. Attenuated ERK activation observed correlated with KSR downregulation by BRAFV600E without further implications to signaling. Highly activated ERK in case of KRASG12V (Caco-K cells leads to mild transformation causing Caco-K cells to express premature senescence-related markers and acquire growth factor-dependent viability. Interestingly, BRAFWTgets equally activated by upstream KRAS mutations present in colon adenocarcinoma cells such as DLD-1 and SW620. Taken together, these results suggest that the two oncogenes have different transforming capability in colon cancer, although they both use the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway to carry out their effect. In general, BRAFV600E presents greater potential in mediating tumorigenic effect as compared to KRASG12V both in vivo and in vitro. These findings may have implications in personalised diagnosis and targeted therapeutics.

  15. Delivery of full-length factor VIII using a piggyBac transposon vector to correct a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideto; Fujimoto, Naoko; Sasakawa, Noriko; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Shima, Midori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice. piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.

  16. Delivery of full-length factor VIII using a piggyBac transposon vector to correct a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto Matsui

    Full Text Available Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice. piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.

  17. An inducible tool for random mutagenesis in Aspergillus niger based on the transposon Vader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Linda; Nitsche, Benjamin; Homan, Tim; Ram, Arthur F; Kempken, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The ascomycete Aspergillus niger is widely used in the biotechnology, for instance in producing most of the world's citric acid. It is also known as a major food and feed contaminant. While generation of gene knockouts for functional genomics has become feasible in ku70 mutants, analyzing gene functions or metabolic pathways remains a laborious task. An unbiased transposon-based mutagenesis approach may aid this process of analyzing gene functions by providing mutant libraries in a short time. The Vader transposon is a non-autonomous DNA-transposon, which is activated by the homologous tan1-transposase. However, in the most commonly used lab strain of A. niger (N400 strain and derivatives), we found that the transposase, encoded by the tan1 gene, is mutated and inactive. To establish a Vader transposon-based mutagenesis system in the N400 background, we expressed the functional transposase of A. niger strain CBS 513.88 under the control of an inducible promoter based on the Tet-on system, which is activated in the presence of the antibiotic doxycycline (DOX). Increasing amounts of doxycycline lead to higher Vader excision frequencies, whereas little to none activity of Vader was observed without addition of doxycycline. Hence, this system appears to be suitable for producing stable mutants in the A. niger N400 background.

  18. Use of Multicopy Transposons Bearing Unfitness Genes in Weed Control: Four Example Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan; Levy, Avraham A.

    2014-01-01

    We speculate that multicopy transposons, carrying both fitness and unfitness genes, can provide new positive and negative selection options to intractable weed problems. Multicopy transposons rapidly disseminate through populations, appearing in approximately 100% of progeny, unlike nuclear transgenes, which appear in a proportion of segregating populations. Different unfitness transgenes and modes of propagation will be appropriate for different cases: (1) outcrossing Amaranthus spp. (that evolved resistances to major herbicides); (2) Lolium spp., important pasture grasses, yet herbicide-resistant weeds in crops; (3) rice (Oryza sativa), often infested with feral weedy rice, which interbreeds with the crop; and (4) self-compatible sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), which readily crosses with conspecific shattercane and with allotetraploid johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). The speculated outcome of these scenarios is to generate weed populations that contain the unfitness gene and thus are easily controllable. Unfitness genes can be under chemically or environmentally inducible promoters, activated after gene dissemination, or under constitutive promoters where the gene function is utilized only at special times (e.g. sensitivity to an herbicide). The transposons can be vectored to the weeds by introgression from the crop (in rice, sorghum, and Lolium spp.) or from planted engineered weed (Amaranthus spp.) using a gene conferring the degradation of a no longer widely used herbicide, especially in tandem with an herbicide-resistant gene that kills all nonhybrids, facilitating the rapid dissemination of the multicopy transposons in a weedy population. PMID:24820021

  19. EU-OSTID: A collection of transposon insertional mutants for functional genomics in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enckevort, van L.J.G.; Droc, G.; Piffanelli, P.; Greco, R.; Gagneur, C.; Weber, C.; Gonzalez, V.M.; Cabot, P.; Fornara, F.; Berri, S.; Miro, B.; Lan, P.; Rafel, M.; Capell, T.; Puigdomenech, P.; Ouwerkerk, P.B.F.; Meijer, A.H.; Pe', E.; Colombo, L.; Christou, P.; Guiderdoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    A collection of 1373 unique flanking sequence tags (FSTs), generated from Ac/Ds and Ac transposon lines for reverse genetics studies, were produced in japonica and indica rice, respectively. The Ds and Ac FSTs together with the original T-DNAs were assigned a position in the rice genome sequence

  20. Transcription and somatic transposition of the maize En/Spm transposon system in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greco, R.; Ouwerkerk, P.B.F.; Taal, A.J.C.; Sallaud, C.; Guiderdoni, E.; Meijer, A.H.; Hoge, J.H.C.; Pereira, A.B.

    2004-01-01

    Transposition of the maize En/Spm system in rice was investigated using a two-component construct consisting of an immobilised transposase source driven by the CaMV 35S-promoter, and a modified I/dSpm transposon. Mobilization of I/dSpm in somatic sectors was demonstrated by sequencing of excision

  1. Selection of independent Ds transposon insertions in somatic tissue of potato by protoplast regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enckevort, van L.J.G.; Bergervoet-van Deelen, J.E.M.; Stiekema, W.J.; Pereira, A.; Jacobsen, E.

    2000-01-01

    Potato is an autotetraploid crop plant that is not very amenable to the deployment of transposon tagging for gene cloning and gene identification. After diploidisation it is possible to get potato genotypes that grow well, but they are self-incompatible. This prevents the production of selfed

  2. Suppression of an atypically spliced rice CACTA transposon transcript in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greco, R.; Ouwerkerk, P.B.F.; Pereira, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    OsES1, a rice homolog of the maize En/Spm transposon, is transcribed to produce TnpA-like and TnpD-like transcripts. However, an alternatively spliced form of the TnpA-like transcript., which was found to be suppressed in transgenic plants, was revealed to be clue to atypical splicing of a Hipa-like

  3. Small RNAs and the control of transposons and viruses in Drosophila.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rij, R.P. van; Berezikov, E.

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) - post-transcriptional gene silencing guided by small interfering RNA (siRNA) - is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects and plants. Several recent studies in Drosophila identified endogenous siRNAs corresponding to transposons, to structured cellular

  4. Piwi-pathway alteration induces LINE-1 transposon derepression and infertility development in cryptorchidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk; Hadziselimovic, Nils O; Demougin, Philippe; Krey, Gunthild; Oakeley, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonia contain processing bodies that harbor P-element-induced wimpy testis (Piwi) proteins. Piwi proteins are associated specifically with Piwi-interacting RNAs to silence transposable DNA elements. Loss-of-function mutations in the Piwi pathway lead to derepression of transposable elements, resulting in defective spermatogenesis. Furthermore, deletion of gametocyte-specific factor 1 (GTSF1), a factor involved in Piwi-mediated transcriptional repression, causes male-specific sterility and derepression of LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. No previous studies have examined GTSF1, L1 and PIWIL4 expression in cryptorchidism. We examined transposon-silencing genes and L1 transposon expression in testicular biopsies with Affymetrix microarrays and immunohistology. Seven members of the Tudor gene family, 3 members of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family, and the GTSF1 gene were found to show significantly lower RNA signals in the high-infertility-risk group. In the immunohistochemical analysis, patients from the low-infertility-risk group showed coherently stronger staining for GTSF1 and PIWIL4 proteins and weaker staining for L1 transposon when compared to the high-infertility-risk samples. These new findings provide first evidence consistent with the idea that infertility in cryptorchidism is a consequence of alterations in the Piwi pathway and transposon derepression induced by the impaired function of mini-puberty.

  5. A putative autonomous 20.5 kb-CACTA transposon insertion in an F3'H allele identifies a new CACTA transposon subfamily in Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodkin Lila

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular organization of very few genetically defined CACTA transposon systems have been characterized thoroughly as those of Spm/En in maize, Tam1 of Antirrhinum majus Candystripe1 (Cs1 from Sorghum bicolor and CAC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana, for example. To date, only defective deletion derivatives of CACTA elements have been described for soybean, an economically important plant species whose genome sequence will be completed in 2008. Results We identified a 20.5 kb insertion in a soybean flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H gene representing the t* allele (stable gray trichome color whose origin traces to a single mutable chimeric plant displaying both tawny and gray trichomes. This 20.5 kb insertion has the molecular structure of a putative autonomous transposon of the CACTA family, designated Tgmt*. It encodes a large gene that was expressed in two sister isolines (T* and tm of the stable gray line (t* from which Tgmt* was isolated. RT-PCR derived cDNAs uncovered the structure of a large precursor mRNA as well as alternatively spliced transcripts reminiscent of the TNPA-mRNA generated by the En-1 element of maize but without sequence similarity to the maize TNPA. The larger mRNA encodes a transposase with a tnp2 and TNP1-transposase family domains. Because the two soybean lines expressing Tgmt* were derived from the same mutable chimeric plant that created the stable gray trichome t* allele line from which the element was isolated, Tgmt* has the potential to be an autonomous element that was rapidly inactivated in the stable gray trichome t* line. Comparison of Tgmt* to previously described Tgm elements demonstrated that two subtypes of CACTA transposon families exist in soybean based on divergence of their characteristic subterminal repeated motifs and their transposases. In addition, we report the sequence and annotation of a BAC clone containing the F3'H gene (T locus which was interrupted by the novel Tgmt* element

  6. The orotate transporter oroP from Lactococcus lactis can be used both as a very efficient, food-grade selection and counter-selection marker for strain construction in many different organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Defoor, Els Marie Celine; Martinussen, Jan

    A new lactococcal plasmid, pDBORO, was isolated from the Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis biovar diacetylactis strain DB0410 responsible for the sensitivity of DB0410 towards the pyrimidine-analog 5´-fluoroorotate. The plasmid pDBORO complete nucleotide sequence has been determined. The open reading...... the ability to utilize orotate. If the strains had a pyrimidine requirement, the oroP gene could function as a selectable marker when growing in the presence of orotate as sole pyrimidine source. In an otherwise resistant strain, oroP was shown to sensitize the strain towards the analog 5-Fluoroorotate....... It was shown that strains who have lost the oroP gene could easily be selected in the presence of 5-Fluoroorotate, thus being an efficient counter-selection marker. pyrimidine-requiring strain (pyr B, C or D) orotate negative Counter-selection marker: wild-type strain! Fluoro-orotate resistant Functional...

  7. Cytadherence-deficient mutants of Mycoplasma gallisepticum generated by transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudahi-Orenstein, Sigalit; Levisohn, Sharon; Geary, Steven J; Yogev, David

    2003-07-01

    Cytadherence-related molecules of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strain R-low were identified by Tn4001 transposon mutagenesis with the hemadsorption (HA) assay as an indicator for cytadherence. Three Gm(r) HA-negative (HA(-)) colonies displaying a stable HA(-) phenotype through several successive generations in which gentamicin selection was maintained were isolated from four independent transformation experiments and characterized. Southern blot analysis showed that the transposon was inserted as a single copy within the genome of each of the HA(-) mutants, suggesting that the transposon insertion was directly responsible for their inability to attach to erythrocytes. Sequence analysis of the transposon insertion sites revealed that in two mutants, the transposon was inserted at two distinct sites within the gapA structural gene. In the third mutant, the insertion was mapped within the crmA gene, which is located immediately downstream of the gapA gene as part of the same operon. In vitro attachment experiments with the MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cell line showed that the cytadherence capabilities of the HA(-) mutants were less than 25% those of original strain R. Experimental infection of chickens, the natural host of M. gallisepticum, with each of the three mutants demonstrated significantly impaired colonization and host responses. These data demonstrate conclusively the role of both GapA and CrmA proteins in the adherence of M. gallisepticum to host cells in model systems and in vivo colonization. Furthermore, these results underscore the relevance of in vitro cytadherence model systems for studying the pathogenesis of natural infections in chickens.

  8. Somatic mutagenesis with a Sleeping Beauty transposon system leads to solid tumor formation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura McGrail

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes and mouse transposon-induced tumors has identified a vast number of genes mutated in different cancers. One of the outstanding challenges in this field is to determine which genes, when mutated, contribute to cellular transformation and tumor progression. To identify new and conserved genes that drive tumorigenesis we have developed a novel cancer model in a distantly related vertebrate species, the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The Sleeping Beauty (SB T2/Onc transposon system was adapted for somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish. The carp ß-actin promoter was cloned into T2/Onc to create T2/OncZ. Two transgenic zebrafish lines that contain large concatemers of T2/OncZ were isolated by injection of linear DNA into the zebrafish embryo. The T2/OncZ transposons were mobilized throughout the zebrafish genome from the transgene array by injecting SB11 transposase RNA at the 1-cell stage. Alternatively, the T2/OncZ zebrafish were crossed to a transgenic line that constitutively expresses SB11 transposase. T2/OncZ transposon integration sites were cloned by ligation-mediated PCR and sequenced on a Genome Analyzer II. Between 700-6800 unique integration events in individual fish were mapped to the zebrafish genome. The data show that introduction of transposase by transgene expression or RNA injection results in an even distribution of transposon re-integration events across the zebrafish genome. SB11 mRNA injection resulted in neoplasms in 10% of adult fish at ∼10 months of age. T2/OncZ-induced zebrafish tumors contain many mutated genes in common with human and mouse cancer genes. These analyses validate our mutagenesis approach and provide additional support for the involvement of these genes in human cancers. The zebrafish T2/OncZ cancer model will be useful for identifying novel and conserved genetic drivers of human cancers.

  9. Bioinformatic evidence and characterization of novel putative large conjugative transposons residing in genomes of genera Bacteroides and Prevotella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenc, Katja; Accetto, Tomaž; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2012-07-01

    Bioinformatic evidence of the presence of a large conjugative transposon in ruminal bacterium Prevotella bryantii B(1)4(T) is presented. The described transposon appears to be related to another large conjugative transposon CTnBST, described in Bacteroides uniformis WH207 and to the conjugative transposon CTn3-Bf, which was observed in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis strain YCH46. All three transposons share tra gene regions with high amino acid identity and clearly conserved gene order. Additionally, a second conserved region consisting of hypothetical genes was discovered in all three transposons and named the GG region. This region served as a specific sequence signature and made possible the discovery of several other apparently related hypothetical conjugative transposons in bacteria from the genus Bacteroides. A cluster of genes involved in sugar utilization and metabolism was discovered within the hypothetical CTnB(1)4, to a certain extent resembling the polysaccharide utilization loci which were described recently in some Bacteroides strains. This is the first firm report on the presence of a large mobile genetic element in any strain from the genus Prevotella.

  10. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  11. Comprehensive Essentiality Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genome via Saturating Transposon Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Michael A; Gerrick, Elias R; Xu, Weizhen; Park, Sae Woong; Long, Jarukit E; Boutte, Cara C; Rubin, Eric J; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2017-01-17

    For decades, identifying the regions of a bacterial chromosome that are necessary for viability has relied on mapping integration sites in libraries of random transposon mutants to find loci that are unable to sustain insertion. To date, these studies have analyzed subsaturated libraries, necessitating the application of statistical methods to estimate the likelihood that a gap in transposon coverage is the result of biological selection and not the stochasticity of insertion. As a result, the essentiality of many genomic features, particularly small ones, could not be reliably assessed. We sought to overcome this limitation by creating a completely saturated transposon library in Mycobacterium tuberculosis In assessing the composition of this highly saturated library by deep sequencing, we discovered that a previously unknown sequence bias of the Himar1 element rendered approximately 9% of potential TA dinucleotide insertion sites less permissible for insertion. We used a hidden Markov model of essentiality that accounted for this unanticipated bias, allowing us to confidently evaluate the essentiality of features that contained as few as 2 TA sites, including open reading frames (ORF), experimentally identified noncoding RNAs, methylation sites, and promoters. In addition, several essential regions that did not correspond to known features were identified, suggesting uncharacterized functions that are necessary for growth. This work provides an authoritative catalog of essential regions of the M. tuberculosis genome and a statistical framework for applying saturating mutagenesis to other bacteria. Sequencing of transposon-insertion mutant libraries has become a widely used tool for probing the functions of genes under various conditions. The Himar1 transposon is generally believed to insert with equal probabilities at all TA dinucleotides, and therefore its absence in a mutant library is taken to indicate biological selection against the corresponding mutant

  12. Epigenome confrontation triggers immediate reprogramming of DNA methylation and transposon silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana F1 epihybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigal, Mélanie; Becker, Claude; Pélissier, Thierry; Pogorelcnik, Romain; Devos, Jane; Ikeda, Yoko; Weigel, Detlef; Mathieu, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Genes and transposons can exist in variable DNA methylation states, with potentially differential transcription. How these epialleles emerge is poorly understood. Here, we show that crossing an Arabidopsis thaliana plant with a hypomethylated genome and a normally methylated WT individual results, already in the F1 generation, in widespread changes in DNA methylation and transcription patterns. Novel nonparental and heritable epialleles arise at many genic loci, including a locus that itself controls DNA methylation patterns, but with most of the changes affecting pericentromeric transposons. Although a subset of transposons show immediate resilencing, a large number display decreased DNA methylation, which is associated with de novo or enhanced transcriptional activation and can translate into transposon mobilization in the progeny. Our findings reveal that the combination of distinct epigenomes can be viewed as an epigenomic shock, which is characterized by a round of epigenetic variation creating novel patterns of gene and TE regulation. PMID:27001853

  13. A novel piggyBac transposon inducible expression system identifies a role for AKT signalling in primordial germ cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Glover

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe a single piggyBac transposon system containing both a tet-activator and a doxycycline-inducible expression cassette. We demonstrate that a gene product can be conditionally expressed from the integrated transposon and a second gene can be simultaneously targeted by a short hairpin RNA contained within the transposon, both in vivo and in mammalian and avian cell lines. We applied this system to stably modify chicken primordial germ cell (PGC lines in vitro and induce a reporter gene at specific developmental stages after injection of the transposon-modified germ cells into chicken embryos. We used this vector to express a constitutively-active AKT molecule during PGC migration to the forming gonad. We found that PGC migration was retarded and cells could not colonise the forming gonad. Correct levels of AKT activation are thus essential for germ cell migration during early embryonic development.

  14. Epigenome confrontation triggers immediate reprogramming of DNA methylation and transposon silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana F1 epihybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigal, Mélanie; Becker, Claude; Pélissier, Thierry; Pogorelcnik, Romain; Devos, Jane; Ikeda, Yoko; Weigel, Detlef; Mathieu, Olivier

    2016-04-05

    Genes and transposons can exist in variable DNA methylation states, with potentially differential transcription. How these epialleles emerge is poorly understood. Here, we show that crossing an Arabidopsis thaliana plant with a hypomethylated genome and a normally methylated WT individual results, already in the F1 generation, in widespread changes in DNA methylation and transcription patterns. Novel nonparental and heritable epialleles arise at many genic loci, including a locus that itself controls DNA methylation patterns, but with most of the changes affecting pericentromeric transposons. Although a subset of transposons show immediate resilencing, a large number display decreased DNA methylation, which is associated with de novo or enhanced transcriptional activation and can translate into transposon mobilization in the progeny. Our findings reveal that the combination of distinct epigenomes can be viewed as an epigenomic shock, which is characterized by a round of epigenetic variation creating novel patterns of gene and TE regulation.

  15. Counterselection and co-delivery of transposon and transposase functions for Sleeping Beauty-mediated transposition in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Andrea D; Belur, Lalitha R; Gori, Jennifer L; Liu, Geyi; Amaya, Felipe; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Hackett, Perry B; McIvor, R Scott

    2004-12-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is a gene-insertion system reconstructed from transposon sequences found in teleost fish and is capable of mediating the transposition of DNA sequences from transfected plasmids into the chromosomes of vertebrate cell populations. The SB system consists of a transposon, made up of a gene of interest flanked by transposon inverted repeats, and a source of transposase. Here we carried out a series of studies to further characterize SB-mediated transposition as a tool for gene transfer to chromosomes and ultimately for human gene therapy. Transfection of mouse 3T3 cells, HeLa cells, and human A549 lung carcinoma cells with a transposon containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (NEO) gene resulted in a several-fold increase in drug-resistant colony formation when co-transfected with a plasmid expressing the SB transposase. A transposon containing a methotrexate-resistant dihydrofolate reductase gene was also found to confer an increased frequency of methotrexate-resistant colony formation when co-transfected with SB transposase-encoding plasmid. A plasmid containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene as well as a transposon containing a NEO gene was used for counterselection against random recombinants (NEO+TK+) in medium containing G418 plus ganciclovir. Effective counterselection required a recovery period of 5 days after transfection before shifting into medium containing ganciclovir to allow time for transiently expressed thymidine kinase activity to subside in cells not stably transfected. Southern analysis of clonal isolates indicated a shift from random recombination events toward transposition events when clones were isolated in medium containing ganciclovir as well as G418. We found that including both transposon and transposase functions on the same plasmid substantially increased the stable gene transfer frequency in Huh7 human hepatoma cells. The results from these experiments contribute technical and conceptual insight into

  16. Survey of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hAT transposons and MITE-like hATpin derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Menzel, G.; Krebs, C.; Diez, M.; Holtgrawe, D.; Weisshaar, B.; Minoche, A.; Dohm, J.; Himmelbauer, H.; Schmidt, T.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses of repetitive DNA suggest a significant impact particularly of transposable elements on genome size and evolution of virtually all eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of the hAT transposon superfamily of the sugar beet (B. vulgaris) genome, using molecular, bioinformatic and cytogenetic approaches. We identified 81 transposase-coding sequences, three of which are part of structurally intact but nonfunctional hAT transposons (BvhAT)...

  17. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    OpenAIRE

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of ather...

  18. Régulation des transposons lors de la perte rapide de la methylation de l'ADN

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Transposons are DNA sequences that can duplicate autonomously in the genome, posing a threat for genome stability and integrity. To prevent their potentially harmful mobilization, eukaryotes have developed numerous mechanisms that control transposon expression, among which DNA methylation plays a particularly important role. In mammals, DNA methylation patterns are stable for life, at the exception of two key moments during embryonic development, gametogenesis and early embryogenesis. After a...

  19. Random transposon mutagenesis of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome reveals additional genes influencing erythromycin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedashchin, Andrij; Cernota, William H; Gonzalez, Melissa C; Leach, Benjamin I; Kwan, Noelle; Wesley, Roy K; Weber, J Mark

    2015-11-01

    A single cycle of strain improvement was performed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea mutB and 15 genotypes influencing erythromycin production were found. Genotypes generated by transposon mutagenesis appeared in the screen at a frequency of ~3%. Mutations affecting central metabolism and regulatory genes were found, as well as hydrolases, peptidases, glycosyl transferases and unknown genes. Only one mutant retained high erythromycin production when scaled-up from micro-agar plug fermentations to shake flasks. This mutant had a knockout of the cwh1 gene (SACE_1598), encoding a cell-wall-associated hydrolase. The cwh1 knockout produced visible growth and morphological defects on solid medium. This study demonstrated that random transposon mutagenesis uncovers strain improvement-related genes potentially useful for strain engineering. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Pten in breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roberto; Lee, Song-Choon; Hon-Kim Ban, Kenneth; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Mann, Michael B.; Newberg, Justin Y.; McNoe, Leslie A.; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Ward, Jerrold M.; Rust, Alistair G.; Chin, Kuan-Yew; Black, Michael A.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. To better understand the genetic forces driving TNBC, we performed a transposon mutagenesis screen in a phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) mutant mice and identified 12 candidate trunk drivers and a much larger number of progression genes. Validation studies identified eight TNBC tumor suppressor genes, including the GATA-like transcriptional repressor TRPS1. Down-regulation of TRPS1 in TNBC cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by deregulating multiple EMT pathway genes, in addition to increasing the expression of SERPINE1 and SERPINB2 and the subsequent migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Transposon mutagenesis has thus provided a better understanding of the genetic forces driving TNBC and discovered genes with potential clinical importance in TNBC. PMID:27849608

  1. Bacterial transposons are co-transferred with T-DNA to rice chromosomes during Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Ryul; An, Gynheung

    2012-06-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is widely utilized for delivering a foreign gene into a plant's genome. We found the bacterial transposon Tn5393 in transgenic rice plants. Analysis of the flanking sequences of the transferred-DNA (T-DNA) identified that a portion of the Tn5393 sequence was present immediately next to the end of the T-DNA. Because this transposon was present in A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404, but not in EHA105 and GV3101, our findings indicated that Tn5393 was transferred from LBA4404 into the rice genome during the transformation process. We also noted that another bacterial transposon, Tn5563, is present in transgenic plants. Analyses of 331 transgenic lines revealed that 26.0% carried Tn5393 and 2.1% contained Tn5563. In most of the lines, an intact transposon was integrated into the T-DNA and transferred to the rice chromosome. More than one copy of T-DNA was introduced into the plants, often at a single locus. This resulted in T-DNA repeats of normal and transposon-carrying TDNA that generated deletions of a portion of the T-DNA, joining the T-DNA end to the bacterial transposon. Based on these data, we suggest that one should carefully select the appropriate Agrobacterium strain to avoid undesirable transformation of such sequences.

  2. Transposon-mediated mutagenesis of somatic cells in the mouse for cancer gene identification

    OpenAIRE

    Largaespada, David A

    2009-01-01

    To successfully treat cancer we will likely need a much more detailed understanding of the genes and pathways meaningfully altered in individual cancer cases. One method for achieving this goal is to derive cancers in model organisms using unbiased forward genetic screens that allow cancer gene candidate discovery. We have developed a method using a “cut-and-paste” DNA transposon system called Sleeping Beauty (SB) to perform forward genetic screens for cancer genes in mice. Although the appro...

  3. Transposon-based screens for cancer gene discovery in mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Dupuy, Adam J.

    2010-01-01

    Significant emphasis has recently been placed on the characterization of the human cancer genome. This effort has been assisted by the development of new DNA sequencing technologies that allow the genomes of individual tumors to be analyzed in much greater detail. However, the genetic complexity of human cancer has complicated the identification of driver mutations among the more abundant passenger mutations found in tumors. Recently, the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been engine...

  4. Sequence-indexed mutations in maize using the UniformMu transposon-tagging population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baier John

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts are a critical resource for functional genomics. In Arabidopsis, comprehensive knockout collections were generated by amplifying and sequencing genomic DNA flanking insertion mutants. These Flanking Sequence Tags (FSTs map each mutant to a specific locus within the genome. In maize, FSTs have been generated using DNA transposons. Transposable elements can generate unstable insertions that are difficult to analyze for simple knockout phenotypes. Transposons can also generate somatic insertions that fail to segregate in subsequent generations. Results Transposon insertion sites from 106 UniformMu FSTs were tested for inheritance by locus-specific PCR. We confirmed 89% of the FSTs to be germinal transposon insertions. We found no evidence for somatic insertions within the 11% of insertion sites that were not confirmed. Instead, this subset of insertion sites had errors in locus-specific primer design due to incomplete or low-quality genomic sequences. The locus-specific PCR assays identified a knockout of a 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase gene that co-segregates with a seed mutant phenotype. The mutant phenotype linked to this knockout generates novel hypotheses about the role for the plastid-localized oxidative pentose phosphate pathway during grain-fill. Conclusion We show that FSTs from the UniformMu population identify stable, germinal insertion sites in maize. Moreover, we show that these sequence-indexed mutations can be readily used for reverse genetic analysis. We conclude from these data that the current collection of 1,882 non-redundant insertion sites from UniformMu provide a genome-wide resource for reverse genetics.

  5. Next-generation sequencing reveals recent horizontal transfer of a DNA transposon between divergent mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yupu; Qi, Yumin; Ma, Yajun; Xia, Ai; Sharakhov, Igor; Chen, Xiaoguang; Biedler, Jim; Ling, Erjun; Tu, Zhijian Jake

    2011-02-10

    Horizontal transfer of genetic material between complex organisms often involves transposable elements (TEs). For example, a DNA transposon mariner has been shown to undergo horizontal transfer between different orders of insects and between different phyla of animals. Here we report the discovery and characterization of an ITmD37D transposon, MJ1, in Anopheles sinensis. We show that some MJ1 elements in Aedes aegypti and An. sinensis contain intact open reading frames and share nearly 99% nucleotide identity over the entire transposon, which is unexpectedly high given that these two genera had diverged 145-200 million years ago. Chromosomal hybridization and TE-display showed that MJ1 copy number is low in An. sinensis. Among 24 mosquito species surveyed, MJ1 is only found in Ae. aegypti and the hyrcanus group of anopheline mosquitoes to which An. sinensis belongs. Phylogenetic analysis is consistent with horizontal transfer and provides the basis for inference of its timing and direction. Although report of horizontal transfer of DNA transposons between higher eukaryotes is accumulating, our analysis is one of a small number of cases in which horizontal transfer of nearly identical TEs among highly divergent species has been thoroughly investigated and strongly supported. Horizontal transfer involving mosquitoes is of particular interest because there are ongoing investigations of the possibility of spreading pathogen-resistant genes into mosquito populations to control malaria and other infectious diseases. The initial indication of horizontal transfer of MJ1 came from comparisons between a 0.4x coverage An. sinensis 454 sequence database and available TEs in mosquito genomes. Therefore we have shown that it is feasible to use low coverage sequencing to systematically uncover horizontal transfer events. Expanding such efforts across a wide range of species will generate novel insights into the relative frequency of horizontal transfer of different TEs and

  6. Mini-Tn7 transposons for site-specific tagging of bacteria with fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, L.; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2004-01-01

    The mini-Tn7 transposon system is a convenient tool for site-specific tagging of bacteria in which the tagging DNA is inserted at a unique and neutral chromosomal site. We have expanded the panel of mini-Tn7 delivery plasmids expressing different fluorescent proteins (stable and unstable) from....... Furthermore, the effect of fluorescent protein expression on the cellular growth rate was tested by growth competition assays....

  7. A four-element based transposon system for allele specific tagging ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transposable element(s) Ac/Ds, Spm/dSpm, Mu in case of maize and Tam3 in case ... alleles feasible and much simpler than possible with the ..... using transposon tagging and T-DNA insertional muta- genesis; Annu. Rev. Plant Physiol. Plant Mol. Biol. 43. 49–. 82. Whittam S, Dinesh-Kumar S P, Choi D, Hehl R, Corr C and.

  8. TCUP: A novel hAT transposon active in maize tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eSmith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are capable of inducing heritable de novo genetic variation. The sequences capable of reactivation, and environmental factors that induce mobilization, remain poorly defined even in well-studied genomes such as maize. We treated maize tissue culture with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2-deoxcytidine and examined long-term tissue culture lines to discover silenced transposable elements that have the potential to induce heritable genetic variation. Through these screens we have identified a novel low copy number hAT transposon, Tissue Culture Up-Regulated (TCUP, which is transcribed at high levels in long-term maize Black Mexican Sweet (BMS tissue culture and up-regulated in response to treatment with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine. Analysis of the TIGR Maize Gene Index revealed that this element is the most frequently represented EST from the BMS cell culture library and is not represented in other tissue libraries, which is the basis for its name. A full-length sequence was assembled in inbred B73 that contains the putative functional motifs required for autonomous movement of a hAT transposon. Transposon display detected movement of TCUP in two long-term tissue cultured cell lines of the genotype Hi-II AxB and BMS. This research implicates TCUP as a transposon that is capable of reactivation and which may also be particularly sensitive to the stress of the tissue culture environment. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that epigenetic alterations potentiate genomic responses to stress during clonal propagation of plants.

  9. Next-generation sequencing reveals recent horizontal transfer of a DNA transposon between divergent mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupu Diao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal transfer of genetic material between complex organisms often involves transposable elements (TEs. For example, a DNA transposon mariner has been shown to undergo horizontal transfer between different orders of insects and between different phyla of animals. Here we report the discovery and characterization of an ITmD37D transposon, MJ1, in Anopheles sinensis. We show that some MJ1 elements in Aedes aegypti and An. sinensis contain intact open reading frames and share nearly 99% nucleotide identity over the entire transposon, which is unexpectedly high given that these two genera had diverged 145-200 million years ago. Chromosomal hybridization and TE-display showed that MJ1 copy number is low in An. sinensis. Among 24 mosquito species surveyed, MJ1 is only found in Ae. aegypti and the hyrcanus group of anopheline mosquitoes to which An. sinensis belongs. Phylogenetic analysis is consistent with horizontal transfer and provides the basis for inference of its timing and direction. Although report of horizontal transfer of DNA transposons between higher eukaryotes is accumulating, our analysis is one of a small number of cases in which horizontal transfer of nearly identical TEs among highly divergent species has been thoroughly investigated and strongly supported. Horizontal transfer involving mosquitoes is of particular interest because there are ongoing investigations of the possibility of spreading pathogen-resistant genes into mosquito populations to control malaria and other infectious diseases. The initial indication of horizontal transfer of MJ1 came from comparisons between a 0.4x coverage An. sinensis 454 sequence database and available TEs in mosquito genomes. Therefore we have shown that it is feasible to use low coverage sequencing to systematically uncover horizontal transfer events. Expanding such efforts across a wide range of species will generate novel insights into the relative frequency of horizontal transfer of

  10. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT: a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI. We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins.

  11. A composite transposon associated with erythromycin and clindamycin resistance in group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Karen M; Klinzing, David C; Lin, Michelle P; Yesucevitz, Derek L; Cieslewicz, Michael J

    2007-07-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin has been isolated with increasing frequency since the mid-1990s. This work studied GBS isolates from three US cities to determine the genetic basis of the macrolide resistance phenotype. ermB genes were amplified from five isolates collected in Boston, Pittsburgh and Seattle from infant and adult sources. Gene-walking methods were used to determine the chromosomal location of ermB and to identify associated genes. Southern mapping and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses were used to distinguish the isolates. The ermB gene was present on the chromosome within a composite Tn917/Tn916-like transposon similar to one identified in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Four strains from Boston and Pittsburgh were serotype V and identical by Southern hybridization and RAPD analysis. The Seattle isolate was serotype Ib, with different patterns on RAPD analysis and Southern mapping. The composite transposon was integrated at an identical chromosomal site in all five isolates. The presence of this composite transposon in both GBS and pneumococci suggests that ermB-mediated macrolide resistance in streptococci may be due to the horizontal transfer of a mobile transposable element, and raises concern for further dissemination of high-grade erythromycin and clindamycin resistance among streptococcal species.

  12. Gene expression in lung and liver after intravenous infusion of polyethylenimine complexes of Sleeping Beauty transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M; Bell, Jason B; Steele, Terry W J; Wilber, Andrew; Shier, W Thomas; Belur, Lalitha R; McIvor, R Scott; Hackett, Perry B

    2010-02-01

    Two methods of systemic gene delivery have been extensively explored, using the mouse as a model system: hydrodynamic delivery, wherein a DNA solution equivalent in volume to 10% of the mouse weight is injected intravenously in less than 10 sec, and condensation of DNA with polyethylenimine (PEI) for standard intravenous infusion. Our goal in this study was to evaluate quantitatively the kinetics of gene expression, using these two methods for delivery of Sleeping Beauty transposons. Transposons carrying a luciferase expression cassette were injected into mice either hydrodynamically or after condensation with PEI at a PEI nitrogen-to-DNA phosphate ratio of 7. Gene expression in the lungs and liver after hydrodynamic delivery resulted in exponential decay with a half-life of about 35-40 hr between days 1 and 14 postinjection. The decay kinetics of gene expression after PEI-mediated gene delivery were more complex; an initial decay rate of 6 hr was followed by a more gradual loss of activity. Consequently, the liver became the primary site of gene expression about 4 days after injection of PEI-DNA, and by 14 days expression in the liver was 10-fold higher than in the lung. Overall levels of gene expression 2 weeks postinjection were 100- to 1000-fold lower after PEI-mediated delivery compared with hydrodynamic injection. These results provide insight into the relative effectiveness and organ specificity of these two methods of nonviral gene delivery when coupled with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

  13. TE-array--a high throughput tool to study transposon transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanakkan, Veena P; Jaffe, Andrew E; Dai, Lixin; Fu, Jie; Wheelan, Sarah J; Levitsky, Hyam I; Boeke, Jef D; Burns, Kathleen H

    2013-12-10

    Although transposable element (TE) derived DNA accounts for more than half of mammalian genomes and initiates a significant proportion of RNA transcripts, high throughput methods are rarely leveraged specifically to detect expression from interspersed repeats. To characterize the contribution of transposons to mammalian transcriptomes, we developed a custom microarray platform with probes covering known human and mouse transposons in both sense and antisense orientations. We termed this platform the "TE-array" and profiled TE repeat expression in a panel of normal mouse tissues. Validation with nanoString® and RNAseq technologies demonstrated that TE-array is an effective method. Our data show that TE transcription occurs preferentially from the sense strand and is regulated in highly tissue-specific patterns. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that transposon RNAs frequently originate within genomic TE units and do not primarily accumulate as a consequence of random 'read-through' from gene promoters. Moreover, we find TE expression is highly dependent on the tissue context. This suggests that TE expression may be related to tissue-specific chromatin states or cellular phenotypes. We anticipate that TE-array will provide a scalable method to characterize transposable element RNAs.

  14. Tdd-4, a DNA transposon of Dictyostelium that encodes proteins similar to LTR retroelement integrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D J

    1999-06-01

    Tdd-4 is the first DNA transposon to be isolated from Dictyostelium discoideum. This element was isolated by insertion into a target plasmid. Two classes of elements were identified which include a 3.8 kb version and a 3.4 kb deleted version. Sequence analysis reveals that the 145 bp inverted terminal repeats contain the 5'-TGellipsisCA-3' conserved terminal dinucleotides found in prokaryotic transposons and integrated LTR retroelement DNA sequences. Tdd-4 open reading frames are assembled by removal of six introns. Introns 1-5 conform to the GT-AG rule, whereas intron 6 appears to be an AT-AA intron. Also, intron 6 undergoes an alternative 5' splicing reaction. The alternatively spliced region encodes 15 tandem SPXX repeats that are proposed to function as a DNA binding motif. By analogy to other transposons that encode two proteins from the same gene, the full-length Tdd-4 protein is the putative transposase and the truncated Tdd-4 protein is the putative transposition inhibitor. Protein database searches demonstrate Tdd-4 encoded proteins are unique for a DNA element by containing similarities to retroviral/retrotransposon integrases. The putative Tdd-4 transposase contains the same structural relationship as integrases by possessing an N-terminal HHCC motif, a central DDE motif and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain composed of the SPXX motif.

  15. Small RNA-based silencing strategies for transposons in the process of invading Drosophila species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, Nikolay V.; Aravin, Alexei A.; Zelentsova, Elena S.; Schostak, Natalia G.; Sachidanandam, Ravi; McCombie, W. Richard; Hannon, Gregory J.; Evgen'ev, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Colonization of a host by an active transposon can increase mutation rates or cause sterility, a phenotype termed hybrid dysgenesis. As an example, intercrosses of certain Drosophila virilis strains can produce dysgenic progeny. The Penelope element is present only in a subset of laboratory strains and has been implicated as a causative agent of the dysgenic phenotype. We have also introduced Penelope into Drosophila melanogaster, which are otherwise naive to the element. We have taken advantage of these natural and experimentally induced colonization processes to probe the evolution of small RNA pathways in response to transposon challenge. In both species, Penelope was predominantly targeted by endo-small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) rather than by piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Although we do observe correlations between Penelope transcription and dysgenesis, we could not correlate differences in maternally deposited Penelope piRNAs with the sterility of progeny. Instead, we found that strains that produced dysgenic progeny differed in their production of piRNAs from clusters in subtelomeric regions, possibly indicating that changes in the overall piRNA repertoire underlie dysgenesis. Considered together, our data reveal unexpected plasticity in small RNA pathways in germ cells, both in the character of their responses to invading transposons and in the piRNA clusters that define their ability to respond to mobile elements. PMID:20581131

  16. Comparison of inherently essential genes of Porphyromonas gingivalis identified in two transposon-sequencing libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcherson, J A; Gogeneni, H; Yoder-Himes, D; Hendrickson, E L; Hackett, M; Whiteley, M; Lamont, R J; Scott, D A

    2016-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe and keystone periodontal pathogen. A mariner transposon insertion mutant library has recently been used to define 463 genes as putatively essential for the in vitro growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in planktonic culture (Library 1). We have independently generated a transposon insertion mutant library (Library 2) for the same P. gingivalis strain and herein compare genes that are putatively essential for in vitro growth in complex media, as defined by both libraries. In all, 281 genes (61%) identified by Library 1 were common to Library 2. Many of these common genes are involved in fundamentally important metabolic pathways, notably pyrimidine cycling as well as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis, and nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. Also in common are genes encoding heat-shock protein homologues, sigma factors, enzymes with proteolytic activity, and the majority of sec-related protein export genes. In addition to facilitating a better understanding of critical physiological processes, transposon-sequencing technology has the potential to identify novel strategies for the control of P. gingivalis infections. Those genes defined as essential by two independently generated TnSeq mutant libraries are likely to represent particularly attractive therapeutic targets. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Capturing Uncertainty by Modeling Local Transposon Insertion Frequencies Improves Discrimination of Essential Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Michael A; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis experiments enable the identification of essential genes in bacteria. Deep-sequencing of mutant libraries provides a large amount of high-resolution data on essentiality. Statistical methods developed to analyze this data have traditionally assumed that the probability of observing a transposon insertion is the same across the genome. This assumption, however, is inconsistent with the observed insertion frequencies from transposon mutant libraries of M. tuberculosis. We propose a modified Binomial model of essentiality that can characterize the insertion probability of individual genes in which we allow local variation in the background insertion frequency in different non-essential regions of the genome. Using the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, samples of the posterior insertion probabilities were obtained for each gene, and the probability of each gene being essential is estimated. We compared our predictions to those of previous methods and show that, by taking into consideration local insertion frequencies, our method is capable of making more conservative predictions that better match what is experimentally known about essential and non-essential genes.

  18. A faster way to make GFP-based biosensors: Two new transposons for creating multicolored libraries of fluorescent fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Thomas E

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are now several ways to generate fluorescent fusion proteins by randomly inserting DNA encoding the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP into another protein's coding sequence. These approaches can be used to map regions in a protein that are permissive for GFP insertion or to create novel biosensors. While remarkably useful, the current insertional strategies have two major limitations: (1 they only produce one kind, or color, of fluorescent fusion protein and (2 one half of all GFP insertions within the target coding sequence are in the wrong orientation. Results We have overcome these limitations by incorporating two different fluorescent proteins coding sequences in a single transposon, either in tandem or antiparallel. Our initial tests targeted two mammalian integral membrane proteins: the voltage sensitive motor, Prestin, and an ER ligand gated Ca2+ channel (IP3R. Conclusions These new designs increase the efficiency of random fusion protein generation in one of two ways: (1 by creating two different fusion proteins from each insertion or (2 by being independent of orientation.

  19. Tβ4-overexpression based on the piggyBac transposon system in cashmere goats alters hair fiber characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bingbo; Ding, Qiang; He, Xiaolin; Zhu, Haijing; Niu, Yiyuan; Cai, Bei; Cai, Jiao; Lei, Anming; Kang, Danju; Yan, Hailong; Ma, Baohua; Wang, Xiaolong; Qu, Lei; Chen, Yulin

    2017-02-01

    Increasing cashmere yield is one of the vital aims of cashmere goats breeding. Compared to traditional breeding methods, transgenic technology is more efficient and the piggyBac (PB) transposon system has been widely applied to generate transgenic animals. For the present study, donor fibroblasts were stably transfected via a PB donor vector containing the coding sequence of cashmere goat thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) and driven by a hair follicle-specific promoter, the keratin-associated protein 6.1 (KAP6.1) promoter. To obtain genetically modified cells as nuclear donors, we co-transfected donor vectors into fetal fibroblasts of cashmere goats. Five transgenic cashmere goats were generated following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Via determination of the copy numbers and integration sites, the Tβ4 gene was successfully inserted into the goat genome. Histological examination of skin tissue revealed that Tβ4-overexpressing, transgenic goats had a higher secondary to primary hair follicle (S/P) ratio compared to wild type goats. This indicates that Tβ4-overexpressing goats possess increased numbers of secondary hair follicles (SHF). Our results indicate that Tβ4-overexpression in cashmere goats could be a feasible strategy to increase cashmere yield.

  20. Insertion of transposon in the vicinity of SSK2 confers enhanced tolerance to furfural in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Life Science; Kim, Na-Rae [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Kim, Wankee [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Life Science; Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Inst. for Medical Sciences; Choi, Wonja [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Life Science; Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Microbial Resources Research Center

    2012-07-15

    Furfural is one of the major inhibitors generated during sugar production from cellulosic materials and, as an aldehyde, inhibits various cellular activities of microorganisms used, leading to prolonged lag time during ethanologenic fermentation. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains tolerant to furfural are of great economic benefit in producing bioethanol, much effort to obtain more efficient strains continues to be made. In this study, we examined the furfural tolerance of transposon mutant strains (Tn 1-5) with enhanced ethanol tolerance and found that one of them (Tn 2), in which SSK2 is downregulated at the transcriptional level, displayed improved furfural tolerance. Such phenotype was abolished by complementation of the entire open reading frame of SSK2, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase kinase of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signaling pathway, suggesting an inhibitory effect of SSK2 in coping with furfural stress. Tn 2 showed a significant decrease in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and early and high activation of Hog1p, a MAP kinase integral to the HOG pathway in response to furfural. The transcriptional levels of CTT1 and GLR1, two of known Hog1p downstream target genes whose protein products are involved in reducing ROS, were increased by 43 % and 56 % respectively compared with a control strain, probably resulting in the ROS decrease. Tn 2 also showed a shortened lag time during fermentation in the presence of furfural, resulting from efficient conversion of furfural to non-toxic (or less toxic) furfuryl alcohol. Taken together, the enhanced furfural tolerance of Tn 2 is suggested to be conferred by the combined effect of an early event of less ROS accumulation and a late event of efficient detoxification of furfural. (orig.)

  1. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uwerhiavwe

    Variability was observed for six ... rapid increase in climate change, so there is need to develop high yielding ... the past decade including assessment of genetic diversity in maize ... The SSR gel images and marker data were processed using.

  2. Efficient Isolation and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cancer Cell Plasma Membrane Proteins for Identification of Metastasis-Associated Cell Surface Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface membrane proteins are involved in central processes such as cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, ion and solute transport, and they seem to play a pivotal role in several steps of the metastatic process of cancer cells. The low abundance and hydrophobic nature of cell surface memb...... peptides of which 622 (300 at SL80) were membrane proteins. The quantitative proteomic analysis identified 16 cell surface proteins as potential markers of the ability of breast cancer cells to form distant metastases....... membrane proteins complicate their purification and identification by MS. We used two isogenic cell lines with opposite metastatic capabilities in nude mice to optimize cell surface membrane protein purification and to identify potential novel markers of metastatic cancer. The cell surface membrane......Cell surface membrane proteins are involved in central processes such as cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, ion and solute transport, and they seem to play a pivotal role in several steps of the metastatic process of cancer cells. The low abundance and hydrophobic nature of cell surface...

  3. Survey of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hAT transposons and MITE-like hATpin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Gerhard; Krebs, Carmen; Diez, Mercedes; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Genome-wide analyses of repetitive DNA suggest a significant impact particularly of transposable elements on genome size and evolution of virtually all eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of the hAT transposon superfamily of the sugar beet (B. vulgaris) genome, using molecular, bioinformatic and cytogenetic approaches. We identified 81 transposase-coding sequences, three of which are part of structurally intact but nonfunctional hAT transposons (BvhAT), in a B. vulgaris BAC library as well as in whole genome sequencing-derived data sets. Additionally, 116 complete and 497 truncated non-autonomous BvhAT derivatives lacking the transposase gene were in silico-detected. The 116 complete derivatives were subdivided into four BvhATpin groups each characterized by a distinct terminal inverted repeat motif. Both BvhAT and BvhATpin transposons are specific for species of the genus Beta and closely related species, showing a localization on B. vulgaris chromosomes predominantely in euchromatic regions. The lack of any BvhAT transposase function together with the high degree of degeneration observed for the BvhAT and the BvhATpin genomic fraction contrasts with the abundance and activity of autonomous and non-autonomous hAT transposons revealed in other plant species. This indicates a possible genus-specific structural and functional repression of the hAT transposon superfamily during Beta diversification and evolution.

  4. Rapid Evolution of piRNA Pathway in the Teleost Fish: Implication for an Adaptation to Transposon Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Minhan; Chen, Feng; Luo, Majing; Cheng, Yibin; Zhao, Huabin; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-01-01

    The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is responsible for germline specification, gametogenesis, transposon silencing, and genome integrity. Transposable elements can disrupt genome and its functions. However, piRNA pathway evolution and its adaptation to transposon diversity in the teleost fish remain unknown. This article unveils evolutionary scene of piRNA pathway and its association with diverse transposons by systematically comparative analysis on diverse teleost fish genomes. Selective pressure analysis on piRNA pathway and miRNA/siRNA (microRNA/small interfering RNA) pathway genes between teleosts and mammals showed an accelerated evolution of piRNA pathway genes in the teleost lineages, and positive selection on functional PAZ (Piwi/Ago/Zwille) and Tudor domains involved in the Piwi–piRNA/Tudor interaction, suggesting that the amino acid substitutions are adaptive to their functions in piRNA pathway in the teleost fish species. Notably five piRNA pathway genes evolved faster in the swamp eel, a kind of protogynous hermaphrodite fish, than the other teleosts, indicating a differential evolution of piRNA pathway between the swamp eel and other gonochoristic fishes. In addition, genome-wide analysis showed higher diversity of transposons in the teleost fish species compared with mammals. Our results suggest that rapidly evolved piRNA pathway in the teleost fish is likely to be involved in the adaption to transposon diversity. PMID:24846630

  5. Stable gene transfer of CCR5 and CXCR4 siRNAs by sleeping beauty transposon system to confer HIV-1 resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkina Ramesh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thus far gene therapy strategies for HIV/AIDS have used either conventional retroviral vectors or lentiviral vectors for gene transfer. Although highly efficient, their use poses a certain degree of risk in terms of viral mediated oncogenesis. Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system offers a non-viral method of gene transfer to avoid this possible risk. With respect to conferring HIV resistance, stable knock down of HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 by the use of lentiviral vector delivered siRNAs has proved to be a promising strategy to protect cells from HIV-1 infection. In the current studies our aim is to evaluate the utility of SB system for stable gene transfer of CCR5 and CXCR4 siRNA genes to derive HIV resistant cells as a first step towards using this system for gene therapy. Results Two well characterized siRNAs against the HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 were chosen based on their previous efficacy for the SB transposon gene delivery. The siRNA transgenes were incorporated individually into a modified SB transfer plasmid containing a FACS sortable red fluorescence protein (RFP reporter and a drug selectable neomycin resistance gene. Gene transfer was achieved by co-delivery with a construct expressing a hyperactive transposase (HSB5 into the GHOST-R3/X4/R5 cell line, which expresses the major HIV receptor CD4 and and the co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4. SB constructs expressing CCR5 or CXCR4 siRNAs were also transfected into MAGI-CCR5 or MAGI-CXCR4 cell lines, respectively. Near complete downregulation of CCR5 and CXCR4 surface expression was observed in transfected cells. During viral challenge with X4-tropic (NL4.3 or R5-tropic (BaL HIV-1 strains, the respective transposed cells showed marked viral resistance. Conclusion SB transposon system can be used to deliver siRNA genes for stable gene transfer. The siRNA genes against HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are able to downregulate the respective cell surface proteins

  6. The transposon Galileo generates natural chromosomal inversions in Drosophila by ectopic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprat, Alejandra; Negre, Bàrbara; Puig, Marta; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2009-11-18

    Transposable elements (TEs) are responsible for the generation of chromosomal inversions in several groups of organisms. However, in Drosophila and other Dipterans, where inversions are abundant both as intraspecific polymorphisms and interspecific fixed differences, the evidence for a role of TEs is scarce. Previous work revealed that the transposon Galileo was involved in the generation of two polymorphic inversions of Drosophila buzzatii. To assess the impact of TEs in Drosophila chromosomal evolution and shed light on the mechanism involved, we isolated and sequenced the two breakpoints of another widespread polymorphic inversion from D. buzzatii, 2z(3). In the non inverted chromosome, the 2z(3) distal breakpoint was located between genes CG2046 and CG10326 whereas the proximal breakpoint lies between two novel genes that we have named Dlh and Mdp. In the inverted chromosome, the analysis of the breakpoint sequences revealed relatively large insertions (2,870-bp and 4,786-bp long) including two copies of the transposon Galileo (subfamily Newton), one at each breakpoint, plus several other TEs. The two Galileo copies: (i) are inserted in opposite orientation; (ii) present exchanged target site duplications; and (iii) are both chimeric. Our observations provide the best evidence gathered so far for the role of TEs in the generation of Drosophila inversions. In addition, they show unequivocally that ectopic recombination is the causative mechanism. The fact that the three polymorphic D. buzzatii inversions investigated so far were generated by the same transposon family is remarkable and is conceivably due to Galileo's unusual structure and current (or recent) transpositional activity.

  7. Quantitative insertion-site sequencing (QIseq) for high throughput phenotyping of transposon mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Iraad F; Otto, Thomas D; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth; Wang, Chengqi; Quail, Michael A; Jiang, Rays H Y; Adams, John H; Rayner, Julian C

    2016-07-01

    Genetic screening using random transposon insertions has been a powerful tool for uncovering biology in prokaryotes, where whole-genome saturating screens have been performed in multiple organisms. In eukaryotes, such screens have proven more problematic, in part because of the lack of a sensitive and robust system for identifying transposon insertion sites. We here describe quantitative insertion-site sequencing, or QIseq, which uses custom library preparation and Illumina sequencing technology and is able to identify insertion sites from both the 5' and 3' ends of the transposon, providing an inbuilt level of validation. The approach was developed using piggyBac mutants in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but should be applicable to many other eukaryotic genomes. QIseq proved accurate, confirming known sites in >100 mutants, and sensitive, identifying and monitoring sites over a >10,000-fold dynamic range of sequence counts. Applying QIseq to uncloned parasites shortly after transfections revealed multiple insertions in mixed populations and suggests that >4000 independent mutants could be generated from relatively modest scales of transfection, providing a clear pathway to genome-scale screens in P. falciparum QIseq was also used to monitor the growth of pools of previously cloned mutants and reproducibly differentiated between deleterious and neutral mutations in competitive growth. Among the mutants with fitness defects was a mutant with a piggyBac insertion immediately upstream of the kelch protein K13 gene associated with artemisinin resistance, implying mutants in this gene may have competitive fitness costs. QIseq has the potential to enable the scale-up of piggyBac-mediated genetics across multiple eukaryotic systems. © 2016 Bronner et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Efficient isolation and quantitative proteomic analysis of cancer cell plasma membrane proteins for identification of metastasis-associated cell surface markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2009-06-01

    Cell surface membrane proteins are involved in central processes such as cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, ion and solute transport, and they seem to play a pivotal role in several steps of the metastatic process of cancer cells. The low abundance and hydrophobic nature of cell surface membrane proteins complicate their purification and identification by MS. We used two isogenic cell lines with opposite metastatic capabilities in nude mice to optimize cell surface membrane protein purification and to identify potential novel markers of metastatic cancer. The cell surface membrane proteins were isolated by centrifugation/ultracentrifugation steps, followed by membrane separation using a Percoll/sucrose density gradient. The gradient fractions containing the cell surface membrane proteins were identified by enzymatic assays. Stable isotope labeling of the proteome of the metastatic cell line by SILAC followed by mass spectrometry analysis enabled identification and quantification of proteins that were differentially expressed in the two cell lines. Dual stable isotopic labels ((13)C-arginine and (13)C-lysine) instead of a single label ((13)C-arginine) increased the percentage of proteins that could be quantified from 40 to 93%. Repeated LC-MS/MS analyses (3-4 times) of each sample increased the number of identified proteins by 60%. The use of Percoll/sucrose density separation allowed subfractionation of membranes leading to enrichment of membrane proteins (66%) and reduction from 33% to only 16% of protein from other membranous organelles such as endoplasmatic reticulum, Golgi, and mitochondria. In total, our optimized methods resulted in 1919 protein identifications (corresponding to 826 at similarity level 80% (SL80); 1145 (509 at SL80) were identified by two or more peptides of which 622 (300 at SL80) were membrane proteins. The quantitative proteomic analysis identified 16 cell surface proteins as potential markers of the ability of breast cancer cells to

  9. Conditional gene expression in the mouse using a Sleeping Beauty gene-trap transposon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackett Perry B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insertional mutagenesis techniques with transposable elements have been popular among geneticists studying model organisms from E. coli to Drosophila and, more recently, the mouse. One such element is the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon that has been shown in several studies to be an effective insertional mutagen in the mouse germline. SB transposon vector studies have employed different functional elements and reporter molecules to disrupt and report the expression of endogenous mouse genes. We sought to generate a transposon system that would be capable of reporting the expression pattern of a mouse gene while allowing for conditional expression of a gene of interest in a tissue- or temporal-specific pattern. Results Here we report the systematic development and testing of a transposon-based gene-trap system incorporating the doxycycline-repressible Tet-Off (tTA system that is capable of activating the expression of genes under control of a Tet response element (TRE promoter. We demonstrate that the gene trap system is fully functional in vitro by introducing the "gene-trap tTA" vector into human cells by transposition and identifying clones that activate expression of a TRE-luciferase transgene in a doxycycline-dependent manner. In transgenic mice, we mobilize gene-trap tTA vectors, discover parameters that can affect germline mobilization rates, and identify candidate gene insertions to demonstrate the in vivo functionality of the vector system. We further demonstrate that the gene-trap can act as a reporter of endogenous gene expression and it can be coupled with bioluminescent imaging to identify genes with tissue-specific expression patterns. Conclusion Akin to the GAL4/UAS system used in the fly, we have made progress developing a tool for mutating and revealing the expression of mouse genes by generating the tTA transactivator in the presence of a secondary TRE-regulated reporter molecule. A vector like the gene

  10. [Markers of brain tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, R; Pezzotta, S; Bernini, F; Racagni, G

    1984-05-19

    Biological markers of tumors are compounds or enzymatic activities measurable in body fluids. Their presence or concentration must be linked to tumoral growth. The markers of the central nervous system tumors are detected in CSF. Alpha-feto-protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, human chorionic gonadotropin, adenohypophyseal peptide hormones, enzymes, etc., have found some application in the early diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. Other applications involve the early detection and recurrency of primary brain tumors, as well as the evaluation of efficacy of their therapy. The tests based on the CSF content of desmosterol and polyamines have been studied extensively. Their rationale is discussed and specificity, sensitivity, efficiency and predictive value are considered. Experimental results concerning a new possible biochemical marker, based on CSF concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, are reported.

  11. Microarray-based genetic footprinting strategy to identify strain improvement genes after competitive selection of transposon libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottes, Alison K; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Successful strain engineering involves perturbing key nodes within the cellular network. How the -network's connectivity affects the phenotype of interest and the ideal nodes to modulate, however, are frequently not readily apparent. To guide the generation of a list of candidate nodes for detailed investigation, designers often examine the behavior of a representative set of strains, such as a library of transposon insertion mutants, in the environment of interest. Here, we first present design principles for creating a maximally informative competitive selection. Then, we describe how to globally quantify the change in distribution of strains within a transposon library in response to a competitive selection by amplifying the DNA adjacent to the transposons and hybridizing it to a microarray. Finally, we detail strategies for analyzing the resulting hybridization data to identify genes and pathways that contribute both negatively and positively to fitness in the desired environment.

  12. Transposon mutations in the flagella biosynthetic pathway of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 result in a decreased expression of solvent efflux genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J; Bruinenberg, R; Keizer-Gunnink, [No Value; de Bont, JAM

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen solvent-sensitive transposon mutants were generated from the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida strain S12 by applying the TnMOD-KmO mutagenesis system. These mutants were unable to grow in the presence of octanol and toluene. By cloning the region flanking the transposon insertion point a

  13. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP-PROBOOK

    2016-10-05

    Oct 5, 2016 ... Cluster analysis was constructed using DARwin program version 6.0. Forty eight (48) coconut individuals were clustered into three groups. Key words: Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera ... markers, cluster analysis, diversity. INTRODUCTION ... industry in Kenya (Muhammed et al., 2013). Furthermore, the slow ...

  14. (SRAP) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... are a very powerful tool for characterization and genetic diversity estimation. Many molecular marker techniques have been successfully used in identification and genetic diversity analysis in mulberry, such as RAPD (Xiang et al., 1995; Feng et al., 1996; Zhao and Pan, 2004),. AFLP (Sharma and Sharma, ...

  15. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-30

    Jul 30, 2014 ... and attempt crosses for genetic improvement of the crop. Key words: Capsicum, genetic diversity, molecular characterization, simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers. INTRODUCTION. Chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) (Solanaceae) has a chromosome number 2n=2x=24. It is indigenous to South.

  16. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is an important oilseed crop worldwide. The objective of this research was to study the genetic diversity and relationships of B. napus accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR). A set of 217 genotypes was characterized using 37 SSR markers of mapping on the B.

  17. (RAPD) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... Biotechnol. Biotechnol. Equip.14: 16-18. Belaj A, Satovic Z, Cipriani G, Baldoni L, Testolin R, Rallo L, Trujillo I. (2003). Comparative study of the discriminating capacity of RAPD,. AFLP and SSR markers and of their effectiveness in establishing genetic relationships in olive. Theor. Appl. Genet. 107: 736-744 ...

  18. Development of an efficient transformation method by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and high throughput spray assay to identify transgenic plants for woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) using NPTII selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Christopher J; Fisk, Sarah; Mills, Kerri; Flinn, Barry S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Veilleux, Richard E; Dan, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We developed an efficient Agrobacterium -mediated transformation method using an Ac/Ds transposon tagging construct for F. vesca and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to identify its transformants for strawberry functional genomics. Genomic resources for Rosaceae species are now readily available, including the Fragaria vesca genome, EST sequences, markers, linkage maps, and physical maps. The Rosaceae Genomic Executive Committee has promoted strawberry as a translational genomics model due to its unique biological features and transformability for fruit trait improvement. Our overall research goal is to use functional genomic and metabolic approaches to pursue high throughput gene discovery in the diploid woodland strawberry. F. vesca offers several advantages of a fleshy fruit typical of most fruit crops, short life cycle (seed to seed in 12-16 weeks), small genome size (206 Mbb/C), small plant size, self-compatibility, and many seeds per plant. We have developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated strawberry transformation method using kanamycin selection, and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to efficiently identify transgenic strawberry plants. Using our kanamycin transformation method, we were able to produce up to 98 independent kanamycin resistant insertional mutant lines using a T-DNA construct carrying an Ac/Ds transposon Launchpad system from a single transformation experiment involving inoculation of 22 leaf explants of F. vesca accession 551572 within approx. 11 weeks (from inoculation to soil). Transgenic plants with 1-2 copies of a transgene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Using our paromomycin spray assay, transgenic F. vesca plants were rapidly identified within 10 days after spraying.

  19. Avoiding the ends: internal epitope tagging of proteins using transposon Tn7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Rebecca E; Beliveau, Brian J; Trow, Jonathan A; Craig, Nancy L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2015-05-01

    Peptide tags fused to proteins are used in a variety of applications, including as affinity tags for purification, epitope tags for immunodetection, or fluorescent protein tags for visualization. However, the peptide tags can disrupt the target protein function. When function is disrupted by fusing a peptide to either the N or C terminus of the protein of interest, identifying alternative ways to create functional tagged fusion proteins can be difficult. Here, we describe a method to introduce protein tags internal to the coding sequence of a target protein. The method employs in vitro Tn7-transposon mutagenesis of plasmids for random introduction of the tag, followed by subsequent Gateway cloning steps to isolate alleles with mutations in the coding sequence of the target gene. The Tn7-epitope cassette is designed such that essentially all of the transposon is removed through restriction enzyme digestion, leaving only the protein tag at diverse sites internal to the ORF. We describe the use of this system to generate a panel of internally epitope-tagged versions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPI-linked membrane protein Dcw1 and the Candida glabrata transcriptional regulator Sir3. This internal protein tagging system is, in principle, adaptable to tag proteins in any organism for which Gateway-adapted expression vectors exist. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Transposon Mutagenesis Screen Identifies Potential Lung Cancer Drivers and CUL3 as a Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Casey; Janik, Callie; Weg, Madison; Been, Raha A.; Bader, Justin; Kang, Ryan; Ng, Brandon; Foran, Lindsey; Landman, Sean R.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Steinbach, Michael; Sarver, Aaron L.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Largaespada, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harbor thousands of passenger events that hide genetic drivers. Even highly recurrent events in NSCLC, such as mutations in PTEN, EGFR, KRAS, and ALK, are only detected in, at most, 30% of patients. Thus, many unidentified low-penetrant events are causing a significant portion of lung cancers. To detect low-penetrance drivers of NSCLC a forward genetic screen was performed in mice using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon as a random mutagen to generate lung tumors in a Pten deficient background. SB mutations coupled with Pten deficiency were sufficient to produce lung tumors in 29% of mice. Pten deficiency alone, without SB mutations, resulted in lung tumors in 11% of mice, while the rate in control mice was ~3%. In addition, thyroid cancer and other carcinomas as well as the presence of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelialization in mice deficient for Pten were also identified. Analysis of common transposon insertion sites identified 76 candidate cancer driver genes. These genes are frequently dysregulated in human lung cancers and implicate several signaling pathways. Cullin3 (Cul3), a member of an ubiquitin ligase complex that plays a role in the oxidative stress response pathway, was identified in the screen and evidence demonstrates that Cul3 functions as a tumor suppressor. PMID:25995385

  1. The BDGP gene disruption project: Single transposon insertions associated with 40 percent of Drosophila genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Levis, Robert W.; Liao, Guochun; He, Yuchun; Carlson, Joseph W.; Tsang, Garson; Evans-Holm, Martha; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Schulze, Karen L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Spradling, Allan C.

    2004-01-13

    The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) strives to disrupt each Drosophila gene by the insertion of a single transposable element. As part of this effort, transposons in more than 30,000 fly strains were localized and analyzed relative to predicted Drosophila gene structures. Approximately 6,300 lines that maximize genomic coverage were selected to be sent to the Bloomington Stock Center for public distribution, bringing the size of the BDGP gene disruption collection to 7,140 lines. It now includes individual lines predicted to disrupt 5,362 of the 13,666 currently annotated Drosophila genes (39 percent). Other lines contain an insertion at least 2 kb from others in the collection and likely mutate additional incompletely annotated or uncharacterized genes and chromosomal regulatory elements. The remaining strains contain insertions likely to disrupt alternative gene promoters or to allow gene mis-expression. The expanded BDGP gene disruption collection provides a public resource that will facilitate the application of Drosophila genetics to diverse biological problems. Finally, the project reveals new insight into how transposons interact with a eukaryotic genome and helps define optimal strategies for using insertional mutagenesis as a genomic tool.

  2. Dynamics of gene duplication and transposons in microbial genomes following a sudden environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2011-02-01

    A variety of genome transformations can occur as a microbial population adapts to a large environmental change. In particular, genomic surveys indicate that, following the transition to an obligate, host-dependent symbiont, the density of transposons first rises, then subsequently declines over evolutionary time. Here we show that these observations can be accounted for by a class of generic stochastic models for the evolution of genomes in the presence of continuous selection and gene duplication. The models use a fitness function that allows for partial contributions from multiple gene copies, is an increasing but bounded function of copy number, and is optimal for one fully adapted gene copy. We use Monte Carlo simulation to show that the dynamics result in an initial rise in gene copy number followed by a subsequent falloff due to adaptation to the new environmental parameters. These results are robust for reasonable gene duplication and mutation parameters when adapting to a novel target sequence. Our model provides a generic explanation for the dynamics of microbial transposon density following a large environmental change such as host restriction.

  3. Insertion of Transposon Tn917 Derivatives into the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsen, Hans; Hansen, Egon Bech

    1993-01-01

    Two transposition vectors, pTV32 and pLTV1, containing transposon Tn917 derivatives TV32 and LTV1, respectively, were introduced into Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1614. It was found that pTV32 and pLTV1 replicate and that TV32 and LTV1 transpose in this strain. A protocol for production of a collection of Tn917 insertions in L. lactis subsp. lactis was developed. The physical locations of TV32 on the chromosomal SmaI fragments of 62 independent transpositions were established by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These transpositions could be divided into at least 38 different groups that exhibited no Tn917-dominating hot spots on the L. lactis subsp. lactis chromosome. A total of 10 of the 62 transpositions resulted in strains that express β-galactosidase. This indicates that there was fusion of the promoterless lacZ of the Tn917 derivatives to a chromosomal promoter. Thus, the Tn917-derived transposons should be powerful genetic tools for studying L. lactis subsp. lactis. Images PMID:16348845

  4. [Transposon expression and potential effects on gene regulation of Brassica rapa and B. oleracea genomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhang, Biao; Liu, Sheng-Yi; Ma, Jian-Xin

    2013-08-01

    Transposons or transposable elements (TEs) are ubiquitous and most abundant DNA components in higher eukaryotes. Recent sequencing of the Brassica rapa and B. oleracea genomes revealed that the amplification of TEs is one of the main factors inducing the difference in genome size. However, the expressions of TEs and the TE effects on gene regulation and functions of these two Brassica diploid species were unclear. Here, we analyzed the RNA sequencing data of leaves, roots, and stems from B. rapa and B. oleracea. Our data showed that overall TEs in either genome expressed at very low levels, and the expression levels of different TE categories and families varied among different organs. Moreover, even for the same TE category or family, the expression activities were distinct between the two Brassica diploids. Forty-one and nine LTR retrotransposons with the transcripts that read into their adjacent sequences have the distances shorter than 2 kb and 100 bp compared to the downstream genes. These LTR retrotransposon readout transcriptions may produce sense or antisense transcripts of nearby genes, with the effects on activating or silencing corresponding genes. Meanwhile, intact LTRs were detected at stronger readout activities than solo LTRs. Of the TEs inserted into genes, the frequencies were ob-served at a higher level in B. rapa than in B. oleracea. In addition, DNA transposons were prone to insert or retain in the intronic regions of genes in either Brassica genomes. These results revealed that the TEs may have potential effects on regulating protein coding genes.

  5. Copy number variation of ribosomal DNA and Pokey transposons in natural populations of Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eagle Shannon HC

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite their ubiquity and high diversity in eukaryotic genomes, DNA transposons are rarely encountered in ribosomal DNA (rDNA. In contrast, R-elements, a diverse group of non-LTR retrotransposons, specifically target rDNA. Pokey is a DNA transposon that targets a specific rDNA site, but also occurs in many other genomic locations, unlike R-elements. However, unlike most DNA transposons, Pokey has been a stable component of Daphnia genomes for over 100 million years. Here we use qPCR to estimate the number of 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes and Pokey elements in rDNA (rPokey, as well as other genomic locations (gPokey in two species of Daphnia. Our goals are to estimate the correlation between (1 the number of 18S and 28S rRNA genes, (2 the number of 28S genes and rPokey, and (3 the number of rPokey and gPokey. In addition, we ask whether Pokey number and distribution in both genomic compartments are affected by differences in life history between D. pulex and D. pulicaria. Results We found differences in 18S and 28S gene number within isolates that are too large to be explained by experimental variation. In general, Pokey number within isolates is modest (Pokey. There is no correlation between the number of rRNA genes and rPokey, or between rPokey and gPokey. However, we identified three isolates with unusually high numbers of both rPokey and gPokey, which we infer is a consequence of recent transposition. We also detected other rDNA insertions (rInserts that could be degraded Pokey elements, R- elements or the divergent PokeyB lineage recently detected in the Daphnia genome sequence. Unlike rPokey, rInserts are positively correlated with rRNA genes, suggesting that they are amplified by the same mechanisms that amplify rDNA units even though rPokey is not. Overall, Pokey frequency and distribution are similar in D. pulex and D. pulicaria suggesting that differences in life history have no impact on Pokey. Conclusions The

  6. Resistance determinant erm(X) is borne by transposon Tn5432 in Bifidobacterium thermophilum and Bifidobacterium animals subsp. lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Mayrhofer, S.; Domig, K.J.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The erm(X) gene from erythromycin- and clindamycin-resistant Bifidobacterium strains was characterised by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, including flanking regions. Results suggest that the resistance determinant was part of transposon Tn5432 that has been described in several

  7. ZBED6, a novel transcription factor derived from a domesticated DNA transposon regulates IGF2 expression and muscle growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markljung, Ellen; Jiang, Lin; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2009-01-01

    and find that the protein, named ZBED6, is previously unknown, specific for placental mammals, and derived from an exapted DNA transposon. Silencing of Zbed6 in mouse C2C12 myoblasts affected Igf2 expression, cell proliferation, wound healing, and myotube formation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (Ch...... is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation, and growth....

  8. ß-Glucuronidase (GUS) transposons for ecological and genetic studies of rhizobia and other Gram-negative bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, K.J.; Sessitsch, A.; Corbo, J.C.; Giller, K.E.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Jefferson, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A series of transposons are described which contain the gusA gene, encoding β-glucuronidase (GUS), expressed from a variety of promoters, both regulated and constitutive. The regulated promoters include the tac promoter which can be induced by IPTG, and nifH promoters which are symbiotically

  9. The Evolution of Mobile DNAs: When Will Transposons Create Phylogenies That Look As If There Is a Master Gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, John F. Y.; Johnson, Louise J.

    2006-01-01

    Some families of mammalian interspersed repetitive DNA, such as the Alu SINE sequence, appear to have evolved by the serial replacement of one active sequence with another, consistent with there being a single source of transposition: the “master gene.” Alternative models, in which multiple source sequences are simultaneously active, have been called “transposon models.” Transposon models differ in the proportion of elements that are active and in whether inactivation occurs at the moment of transposition or later. Here we examine the predictions of various types of transposon model regarding the patterns of sequence variation expected at an equilibrium between transposition, inactivation, and deletion. Under the master gene model, all bifurcations in the true tree of elements occur in a single lineage. We show that this property will also hold approximately for transposon models in which most elements are inactive and where at least some of the inactivation events occur after transposition. Such tree shapes are therefore not conclusive evidence for a single source of transposition. PMID:16790583

  10. Transposon tagging : towards the isolation of the resistance R-genes in potato against Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kharbotly, El A.

    1995-01-01

    The thesis describes the first step of the research leading to transposon tagging of the resistance genes against late blight of potato (Phytophthora infestans). Different diploid potato populations have been developed in which four R -genes have

  11. Identification of novel genes responsible for ethanol and/or thermotolerance by transposon mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Life Sciences; Kim, Na-Rae [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Yang, Jungwoo [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Microbial Resources Research Center; Choi, Wonja [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Life Sciences; Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Microbial Resources Research Center

    2011-08-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains tolerant to ethanol and heat stresses are important for industrial ethanol production. In this study, five strains (Tn 1-5) tolerant to up to 15% ethanol were isolated by screening a transposon-mediated mutant library. Two of them displayed tolerance to heat (42 C). The determination of transposon insertion sites and Northern blot analysis identified seven putative genes (CMP2, IMD4, SSK2, PPG1, DLD3, PAM1, and MSN2) and revealed simultaneous down-regulations of CMP2 and IMD4, and SSK2 and PPG1, down-regulation of DLD3, and disruptions of the open reading frame of PAM1 and MSN2, indicating that ethanol and/or heat tolerance can be conferred. Knockout mutants of these seven individual genes were ethanol tolerant and three of them (SSK2, PPG1, and PAM1) were tolerant to heat. Such tolerant phenotypes reverted to sensitive phenotypes by the autologous or overexpression of each gene. Five transposon mutants showed higher ethanol production and grew faster than the control strain when cultured in rich media containing 30% glucose and initial 6% ethanol at 30 C. Of those, two thermotolerant transposon mutants (Tn 2 and Tn 3) exhibited significantly enhanced growth and ethanol production compared to the control at 42 C. The genes identified in this study may provide a basis for the application in developing industrial yeast strains. (orig.)

  12. Dual functions of Macpiwi1 in transposon silencing and stem cell maintenance in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Battistoni, Giorgia; El Demerdash, Osama; Gurtowski, James; Wunderer, Julia; Falciatori, Ilaria; Ladurner, Peter; Schatz, Michael C; Hannon, Gregory J; Wasik, Kaja A

    2015-11-01

    PIWI proteins and piRNA pathways are essential for transposon silencing and some aspects of gene regulation during animal germline development. In contrast to most animal species, some flatworms also express PIWIs and piRNAs in somatic stem cells, where they are required for tissue renewal and regeneration. Here, we have identified and characterized piRNAs and PIWI proteins in the emerging model flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We found that M. lignano encodes at least three PIWI proteins. One of these, Macpiwi1, acts as a key component of the canonical piRNA pathway in the germline and in somatic stem cells. Knockdown of Macpiwi1 dramatically reduces piRNA levels, derepresses transposons, and severely impacts stem cell maintenance. Knockdown of the piRNA biogenesis factor Macvasa caused an even greater reduction in piRNA levels with a corresponding increase in transposons. Yet, in Macvasa knockdown animals, we detected no major impact on stem cell self-renewal. These results may suggest stem cell maintenance functions of PIWI proteins in flatworms that are distinguishable from their impact on transposons and that might function independently of what are considered canonical piRNA populations. © 2015 Zhou et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. The bandit, a New DNA Transposon from a Hookworm—Possible Horizontal Genetic Transfer between Host and Parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Thewarach; Loukas, Alex; Wattanasatitarpa, Supatra; Somprakhon, Jenjira; Kewgrai, Nonglack; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mitreva, Makedonka; Brindley, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Background An enhanced understanding of the hookworm genome and its resident mobile genetic elements should facilitate understanding of the genome evolution, genome organization, possibly host-parasite co-evolution and horizontal gene transfer, and from a practical perspective, development of transposon-based transgenesis for hookworms and other parasitic nematodes. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel mariner-like element (MLE) was characterized from the genome of the dog hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum, and termed bandit. The consensus sequence of the bandit transposon was 1,285 base pairs (bp) in length. The new transposon was flanked by perfect terminal inverted repeats of 32 nucleotides in length with a common target site duplication TA, and it encoded an open reading frame (ORF) of 342 deduced amino acid residues. Phylogenetic comparisons confirmed that the ORF encoded a mariner-like transposase, which included conserved catalytic domains, and that the bandit transposon belonged to the cecropia subfamily of MLEs. The phylogenetic analysis also indicated that the Hsmar1 transposon from humans was the closest known relative of bandit, and that bandit and Hsmar1 constituted a clade discrete from the Tc1 subfamily of MLEs from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Moreover, homology models based on the crystal structure of Mos1 from Drosophila mauritiana revealed closer identity in active site residues of the catalytic domain including Ser281, Lys289 and Asp293 between bandit and Hsmar1 than between Mos1 and either bandit or Hsmar1. The entire bandit ORF was amplified from genomic DNA and a fragment of the bandit ORF was amplified from RNA, indicating that this transposon is actively transcribed in hookworms. Conclusions/Significance A mariner-like transposon termed bandit has colonized the genome of the hookworm A. caninum. Although MLEs exhibit a broad host range, and are identified in other nematodes, the closest phylogenetic relative of bandit is the Hsmar1

  14. Network Efficiency and Posterior Alpha Patterns Are Markers of Recovery from General Anesthesia: A High-Density Electroencephalography Study in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Blain-Moraes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have investigated local oscillations, long-range connectivity, and global network patterns to identify neural changes associated with anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. These studies typically employ anesthetic protocols that either just cross the threshold of unconsciousness, or induce deep unconsciousness for a brief period of time—neither of which models general anesthesia for major surgery. To study neural patterns of unconsciousness and recovery in a clinically-relevant context, we used a realistic anesthetic regimen to induce and maintain unconsciousness in eight healthy participants for 3 h. High-density electroencephalogram (EEG was acquired throughout and for another 3 h after emergence. Seven epochs of 5-min eyes-closed resting states were extracted from the data at baseline as well as 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180-min post-emergence. Additionally, 5-min epochs were extracted during induction, unconsciousness, and immediately prior to recovery of consciousness, for a total of 10 analysis epochs. The EEG data in each epoch were analyzed using source-localized spectral analysis, phase-lag index, and graph theoretical techniques. Posterior alpha power was significantly depressed during unconsciousness, and gradually approached baseline levels over the 3 h recovery period. Phase-lag index did not distinguish between states of consciousness or stages of recovery. Network efficiency was significantly depressed and network clustering coefficient was significantly increased during unconsciousness; these graph theoretical measures returned to baseline during the 3 h recovery period. Posterior alpha power may be a potential biomarker for normal recovery of functional brain networks after general anesthesia.

  15. Rapid evolution of piRNA pathway in the teleost fish: implication for an adaptation to transposon diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Minhan; Chen, Feng; Luo, Majing; Cheng, Yibin; Zhao, Huabin; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-05-19

    The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is responsible for germline specification, gametogenesis, transposon silencing, and genome integrity. Transposable elements can disrupt genome and its functions. However, piRNA pathway evolution and its adaptation to transposon diversity in the teleost fish remain unknown. This article unveils evolutionary scene of piRNA pathway and its association with diverse transposons by systematically comparative analysis on diverse teleost fish genomes. Selective pressure analysis on piRNA pathway and miRNA/siRNA (microRNA/small interfering RNA) pathway genes between teleosts and mammals showed an accelerated evolution of piRNA pathway genes in the teleost lineages, and positive selection on functional PAZ (Piwi/Ago/Zwille) and Tudor domains involved in the Piwi-piRNA/Tudor interaction, suggesting that the amino acid substitutions are adaptive to their functions in piRNA pathway in the teleost fish species. Notably five piRNA pathway genes evolved faster in the swamp eel, a kind of protogynous hermaphrodite fish, than the other teleosts, indicating a differential evolution of piRNA pathway between the swamp eel and other gonochoristic fishes. In addition, genome-wide analysis showed higher diversity of transposons in the teleost fish species compared with mammals. Our results suggest that rapidly evolved piRNA pathway in the teleost fish is likely to be involved in the adaption to transposon diversity. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. A new mini-transposon for in vivo protein epitope tagging: application to Burkholderia multivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholti, Abdelaziz; Plesa, Maria; Cornelis, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    A short amino acid sequence coding for the mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprI lipoprotein was fused to a mini-Tn5 plasposon (mini-transposon with an origin of replication) with tetracycline resistance in order to generate in-frame fusion proteins after transposition. After conjugative transfer to Burkholderia multivorans, clones reacting with an anti-OprI mab were selected. In-frame OprI-tagged proteins were detected and identified for six clones. The six C-tagged proteins were detected by immunoblot. The different mutants had insertions into a histone H1-like coding gene, cspD, encoding a cold-shock protein, dsbC, encoding a putative outer membrane lipoprotein involved in thiol-disulfide exchange, paaE, a ferredoxin-NADPH reductase gene, a gene for the catabolism of propionate, and one encoding an unknown protein.

  17. Construction of a mariner-based transposon for epitope-tagging and genomic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Su L; Rubin, Eric J

    2002-08-21

    Mobile genetic elements are often employed for constructing gene fusions or to perform mutagenesis. mariner transposons are well-suited to such applications because of their low site specificity, in vitro activity, and exceptionally broad host range. This report describes a mariner-based method for rapidly creating a large number of insertion mutants that can be converted to in-frame epitope fusions in a single step. First, a mariner-based vector is used to deliver a FLP recombinase substrate randomly into a target molecule. Expression of the FLP recombinase is then induced to catalyse the excision of sequences flanked by FLP recombinase target recognition sites, leaving behind a triple-FLAG epitope. The reversibility of the excision event provides opportunities for using genomic targeting methods easily to create transcriptional or translational fusions to genes of interest.

  18. Necessity Is the Mother of Invention: Ciliates, Transposons, and Transgenerational Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sarah E; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2017-03-01

    Ciliates are a fascinating model system for the study of the interaction between eukaryotic germlines and somatic lines, especially with regard to the invasion and defence against transposable elements. They separate their germline and somatic line into two nuclei within the same cell, and they silence transposons and repetitive elements by way of deleting them from their somatic genome. This large-scale deletion event uses a series of intricate sequence targeting pathways involving small RNAs and transposases, part of which consists of a transnuclear comparison between maternal soma and daughter germline. We present recent progress in this dynamic field, and argue that these DNA targeting pathways provide an optimal system for the transgenerational inheritance of acquired traits. Ciliates thus also demonstrate the evolutionary value of transposable elements, both as sources of sequence diversity and also as drivers of adaptive evolution by necessitating defensive systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Human transposon insertion profiling: Analysis, visualization and identification of somatic LINE-1 insertions in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zuojian; Steranka, Jared P.; Ma, Sisi; Grivainis, Mark; Rodić, Nemanja; Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li; Fenyö, David

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are replete with interspersed repeats reflecting the activity of transposable elements. These mobile DNAs are self-propagating, and their continued transposition is a source of both heritable structural variation as well as somatic mutation in human genomes. Tailored approaches to map these sequences are useful to identify insertion alleles. Here, we describe in detail a strategy to amplify and sequence long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1, L1) retrotransposon insertions selectively in the human genome, transposon insertion profiling by next-generation sequencing (TIPseq). We also report the development of a machine-learning–based computational pipeline, TIPseqHunter, to identify insertion sites with high precision and reliability. We demonstrate the utility of this approach to detect somatic retrotransposition events in high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma. PMID:28096347

  20. The mosquito Aedes aegypti has a large genome size and high transposable element load but contains a low proportion of transposon-specific piRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arensburger Peter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The piRNA pathway has been shown in model organisms to be involved in silencing of transposons thereby providing genome stability. In D. melanogaster the majority of piRNAs map to these sequences. The medically important mosquito species Aedes aegypti has a large genome size, a high transposon load which includes Miniature Inverted repeat Transposable Elements (MITES and an expansion of the piRNA biogenesis genes. Studies of transgenic lines of Ae. aegypti have indicated that introduced transposons are poorly remobilized and we sought to explore the basis of this. We wished to analyze the piRNA profile of Ae. aegypti and thereby determine if it is responsible for transposon silencing in this mosquito. Results Estimated piRNA sequence diversity was comparable between Ae. aegypti and D. melanogaster, but surprisingly only 19% of mosquito piRNAs mapped to transposons compared to 51% for D. melanogaster. Ae. aegypti piRNA clusters made up a larger percentage of the total genome than those of D. melanogaster but did not contain significantly higher percentages of transposon derived sequences than other regions of the genome. Ae. aegypti contains a number of protein coding genes that may be sources of piRNA biogenesis with two, traffic jam and maelstrom, implicated in this process in model organisms. Several genes of viral origin were also targeted by piRNAs. Examination of six mosquito libraries that had previously been transformed with transposon derived sequence revealed that new piRNA sequences had been generated to the transformed sequences, suggesting that they may have stimulated a transposon inactivation mechanism. Conclusions Ae. aegypti has a large piRNA complement that maps to transposons but primarily gene sequences, including many viral-derived sequences. This, together the more uniform distribution of piRNA clusters throughout its genome, suggest that some aspects of the piRNA system differ between Ae. aegypti and D

  1. Transcriptome-wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Brachypodium distachyon Transposons in Response to Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Gürkök

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are the most abundant group of genomic elements in plants that can be found in genic or intergenic regions of their host genomes. Several stimuli such as biotic or abiotic stress have roles in either activating their transcription or transposition. Here the effect of the Panicum mosaic virus (PMV and its satellite virus (SPMV infection on the transposon transcription of the Brachypodium distachyon model plant was investigated. To evaluate the transcription activity of TEs, transcriptomic data of mock and virus inoculated plants were compared. Our results indicate that major components of TEs are retroelements in all RNA-seq libraries. The number of transcribed TEs detected in mock inoculated plants is higher than virus inoculated plants. In comparison with mock inoculated plants 13% of the TEs showed at least two folds alteration upon PMV infection and 21% upon PMV+SPMV infection. Rather than inoculation with PMV alone inoculation with PMV+SPMV together also increased various TE encoding transcripts expressions. MuDR-N78C_OS encoding transcript was strongly up-regulated against both PMV and PMV+SPMV infection. The synergism generated by PMV and SPMV together enhanced TE transcripts expressions than PMV alone. It was observed that viral infection induced the transcriptional activity of several transposons. The results suggest that increased expressions of TEs might have a role in response to biotic stress in B. distachyon. Identification of TEs which are taking part in stress can serve useful information for functional genomics and designing novel breeding strategies in developing stress resistance crops.

  2. Structural and sequence diversity of the transposon Galileo in the Drosophila willistoni genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliana W; Valiati, Victor Hugo; Delprat, Alejandra; Valente, Vera L S; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2014-09-13

    Galileo is one of three members of the P superfamily of DNA transposons. It was originally discovered in Drosophila buzzatii, in which three segregating chromosomal inversions were shown to have been generated by ectopic recombination between Galileo copies. Subsequently, Galileo was identified in six of 12 sequenced Drosophila genomes, indicating its widespread distribution within this genus. Galileo is strikingly abundant in Drosophila willistoni, a neotropical species that is highly polymorphic for chromosomal inversions, suggesting a role for this transposon in the evolution of its genome. We carried out a detailed characterization of all Galileo copies present in the D. willistoni genome. A total of 191 copies, including 133 with two terminal inverted repeats (TIRs), were classified according to structure in six groups. The TIRs exhibited remarkable variation in their length and structure compared to the most complete copy. Three copies showed extended TIRs due to internal tandem repeats, the insertion of other transposable elements (TEs), or the incorporation of non-TIR sequences into the TIRs. Phylogenetic analyses of the transposase (TPase)-encoding and TIR segments yielded two divergent clades, which we termed Galileo subfamilies V and W. Target-site duplications (TSDs) in D. willistoni Galileo copies were 7- or 8-bp in length, with the consensus sequence GTATTAC. Analysis of the region around the TSDs revealed a target site motif (TSM) with a 15-bp palindrome that may give rise to a stem-loop secondary structure. There is a remarkable abundance and diversity of Galileo copies in the D. willistoni genome, although no functional copies were found. The TIRs in particular have a dynamic structure and extend in different ways, but their ends (required for transposition) are more conserved than the rest of the element. The D. willistoni genome harbors two Galileo subfamilies (V and W) that diverged ~9 million years ago and may have descended from an ancestral

  3. Revolver and Superior: Novel Transposon-Like Gene Families of the Plant Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Motonori

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of eukaryotic genomes has revived interest in the structure and function of repetitive genomic sequences, previously referred to as junk DNA. Repetitive sequences, including transposable elements, are now believed to play a significant role in genomic differentiation and evolution. Some are also expressed as regulatory noncoding RNAs. Vast DNA databases exist for higher eukaryotes; however, with the exception of homologues of known repetitive-sequence-families and transposable elements, most repetitive elements still need to be annotated. Revolver and Superior, both discovered in the Triticeae, are novel classes of transposon-like genes and major components of large cereal genomes. Revolver was isolated from rye via genome subtraction of sequences common to rye and wheat. Superior was isolated from rye by cleavage with EcoO109I, the recognition sites of which consist of a 5′- PuGGNCCPy-3′ multi-sequence. Revolver is 2929–3041 bp long with an inverted repeat sequence on each end. The Superior family elements are 1292–1432 bp in length, with divergent 5′ regions, indicating the presence of considerable structural diversity. Revolver and Superior are transcriptionally active elements; Revolver harbors a single gene consisting of three exons and two introns, encoding a protein of 139 amino acid residues. Revolver variants range in size from 2665 bp to 4269 bp, with some variants lacking the 5′ region, indicating structural diversity around the first exon. Revolver and Superior are dispersed across all seven chromosomes of rye. Revolver has existed since the diploid progenitor of wheat, and has been amplified or lost in several species during the evolution of the Triticeae. This article reviews the recently discovered Revolver and Superior families of plant transposons, which do not share identity with any known autonomous transposable elements or repetitive elements from any living species. PMID:20808526

  4. Development of transgenic cloned pig models of skin inflammation by DNA transposon-directed ectopic expression of human β1 and α2 integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicklas Heine Staunstrup

    Full Text Available Integrins constitute a superfamily of transmembrane signaling receptors that play pivotal roles in cutaneous homeostasis by modulating cell growth and differentiation as well as inflammatory responses in the skin. Subrabasal expression of integrins α2 and/or β1 entails hyperproliferation and aberrant differentiation of keratinocytes and leads to dermal and epidermal influx of activated T-cells. The anatomical and physiological similarities between porcine and human skin make the pig a suitable model for human skin diseases. In efforts to generate a porcine model of cutaneous inflammation, we employed the Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon system for production of transgenic cloned Göttingen minipigs expressing human β1 or α2 integrin under the control of a promoter specific for subrabasal keratinocytes. Using pools of transgenic donor fibroblasts, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer was utilized to produce reconstructed embryos that were subsequently transferred to surrogate sows. The resulting pigs were all transgenic and harbored from one to six transgene integrants. Molecular analyses on skin biopsies and cultured keratinocytes showed ectopic expression of the human integrins and localization within the keratinocyte plasma membrane. Markers of perturbed skin homeostasis, including activation of the MAPK pathway, increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1α, and enhanced expression of the transcription factor c-Fos, were identified in keratinocytes from β1 and α2 integrin-transgenic minipigs, suggesting the induction of a chronic inflammatory phenotype in the skin. Notably, cellular dysregulation obtained by overexpression of either β1 or α2 integrin occurred through different cellular signaling pathways. Our findings mark the creation of the first cloned pig models with molecular markers of skin inflammation. Despite the absence of an overt psoriatic phenotype, these animals may possess increased susceptibility to

  5. Development of Transgenic Cloned Pig Models of Skin Inflammation by DNA Transposon-Directed Ectopic Expression of Human β1 and α2 Integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Madsen, Johannes; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Li, Juan; Liu, Ying; Kragh, Peter M.; Li, Rong; Schmidt, Mette; Purup, Stig; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Svensson, Lars; Petersen, Thomas K.; Callesen, Henrik; Bolund, Lars; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2012-01-01

    Integrins constitute a superfamily of transmembrane signaling receptors that play pivotal roles in cutaneous homeostasis by modulating cell growth and differentiation as well as inflammatory responses in the skin. Subrabasal expression of integrins α2 and/or β1 entails hyperproliferation and aberrant differentiation of keratinocytes and leads to dermal and epidermal influx of activated T-cells. The anatomical and physiological similarities between porcine and human skin make the pig a suitable model for human skin diseases. In efforts to generate a porcine model of cutaneous inflammation, we employed the Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon system for production of transgenic cloned Göttingen minipigs expressing human β1 or α2 integrin under the control of a promoter specific for subrabasal keratinocytes. Using pools of transgenic donor fibroblasts, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer was utilized to produce reconstructed embryos that were subsequently transferred to surrogate sows. The resulting pigs were all transgenic and harbored from one to six transgene integrants. Molecular analyses on skin biopsies and cultured keratinocytes showed ectopic expression of the human integrins and localization within the keratinocyte plasma membrane. Markers of perturbed skin homeostasis, including activation of the MAPK pathway, increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1α, and enhanced expression of the transcription factor c-Fos, were identified in keratinocytes from β1 and α2 integrin-transgenic minipigs, suggesting the induction of a chronic inflammatory phenotype in the skin. Notably, cellular dysregulation obtained by overexpression of either β1 or α2 integrin occurred through different cellular signaling pathways. Our findings mark the creation of the first cloned pig models with molecular markers of skin inflammation. Despite the absence of an overt psoriatic phenotype, these animals may possess increased susceptibility to severe skin damage

  6. Mobility and generation of mosaic non-autonomous transposons by Tn3-derived inverted-repeat miniature elements (TIMEs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Szuplewska

    Full Text Available Functional transposable elements (TEs of several Pseudomonas spp. strains isolated from black shale ore of Lubin mine and from post-flotation tailings of Zelazny Most in Poland, were identified using a positive selection trap plasmid strategy. This approach led to the capture and characterization of (i 13 insertion sequences from 5 IS families (IS3, IS5, ISL3, IS30 and IS1380, (ii isoforms of two Tn3-family transposons--Tn5563a and Tn4662a (the latter contains a toxin-antitoxin system, as well as (iii non-autonomous TEs of diverse structure, ranging in size from 262 to 3892 bp. The non-autonomous elements transposed into AT-rich DNA regions and generated 5- or 6-bp sequence duplications at the target site of transposition. Although these TEs lack a transposase gene, they contain homologous 38-bp-long terminal inverted repeat sequences (IRs, highly conserved in Tn5563a and many other Tn3-family transposons. The simplest elements of this type, designated TIMEs (Tn3 family-derived Inverted-repeat Miniature Elements (262 bp, were identified within two natural plasmids (pZM1P1 and pLM8P2 of Pseudomonas spp. It was demonstrated that TIMEs are able to mobilize segments of plasmid DNA for transposition, which results in the generation of more complex non-autonomous elements, resembling IS-driven composite transposons in structure. Such transposon-like elements may contain different functional genetic modules in their core regions, including plasmid replication systems. Another non-autonomous element "captured" with a trap plasmid was a TIME derivative containing a predicted resolvase gene and a res site typical for many Tn3-family transposons. The identification of a portable site-specific recombination system is another intriguing example confirming the important role of non-autonomous TEs of the TIME family in shuffling genetic information in bacterial genomes. Transposition of such mosaic elements may have a significant impact on diversity and

  7. Mobility and Generation of Mosaic Non-Autonomous Transposons by Tn3-Derived Inverted-Repeat Miniature Elements (TIMEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuplewska, Magdalena; Ludwiczak, Marta; Lyzwa, Katarzyna; Czarnecki, Jakub; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Functional transposable elements (TEs) of several Pseudomonas spp. strains isolated from black shale ore of Lubin mine and from post-flotation tailings of Zelazny Most in Poland, were identified using a positive selection trap plasmid strategy. This approach led to the capture and characterization of (i) 13 insertion sequences from 5 IS families (IS3, IS5, ISL3, IS30 and IS1380), (ii) isoforms of two Tn3-family transposons – Tn5563a and Tn4662a (the latter contains a toxin-antitoxin system), as well as (iii) non-autonomous TEs of diverse structure, ranging in size from 262 to 3892 bp. The non-autonomous elements transposed into AT-rich DNA regions and generated 5- or 6-bp sequence duplications at the target site of transposition. Although these TEs lack a transposase gene, they contain homologous 38-bp-long terminal inverted repeat sequences (IRs), highly conserved in Tn5563a and many other Tn3-family transposons. The simplest elements of this type, designated TIMEs (Tn3 family-derived Inverted-repeat Miniature Elements) (262 bp), were identified within two natural plasmids (pZM1P1 and pLM8P2) of Pseudomonas spp. It was demonstrated that TIMEs are able to mobilize segments of plasmid DNA for transposition, which results in the generation of more complex non-autonomous elements, resembling IS-driven composite transposons in structure. Such transposon-like elements may contain different functional genetic modules in their core regions, including plasmid replication systems. Another non-autonomous element “captured” with a trap plasmid was a TIME derivative containing a predicted resolvase gene and a res site typical for many Tn3-family transposons. The identification of a portable site-specific recombination system is another intriguing example confirming the important role of non-autonomous TEs of the TIME family in shuffling genetic information in bacterial genomes. Transposition of such mosaic elements may have a significant impact on diversity and evolution

  8. A large inversion in the linear chromosome of Streptomyces griseus caused by replicative transposition of a new Tn3 family transposon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, M; Uchida, T; Yang, Y; Lezhava, A; Kinashi, H

    2011-04-01

    We have comprehensively analyzed the linear chromosomes of Streptomyces griseus mutants constructed and kept in our laboratory. During this study, macrorestriction analysis of AseI and DraI fragments of mutant 402-2 suggested a large chromosomal inversion. The junctions of chromosomal inversion were cloned and sequenced and compared with the corresponding target sequences in the parent strain 2247. Consequently, a transposon-involved mechanism was revealed. Namely, a transposon originally located at the left target site was replicatively transposed to the right target site in an inverted direction, which generated a second copy and at the same time caused a 2.5-Mb chromosomal inversion. The involved transposon named TnSGR was grouped into a new subfamily of the resolvase-encoding Tn3 family transposons based on its gene organization. At the end, terminal diversity of S. griseus chromosomes is discussed by comparing the sequences of strains 2247 and IFO13350.

  9. New genes of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri involved in pathogenesis and adaptation revealed by a transposon-based mutant library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Ana CR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus canker is a disease caused by the phytopathogens Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. aurantifolli and Xanthomonas alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis. The first of the three species, which causes citrus bacterial canker type A, is the most widely spread and severe, attacking all citrus species. In Brazil, this species is the most important, being found in practically all areas where citrus canker has been detected. Like most phytobacterioses, there is no efficient way to control citrus canker. Considering the importance of the disease worldwide, investigation is needed to accurately detect which genes are related to the pathogen-host adaptation process and which are associated with pathogenesis. Results Through transposon insertion mutagenesis, 10,000 mutants of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 (Xcc were obtained, and 3,300 were inoculated in Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia leaves. Their ability to cause citrus canker was analyzed every 3 days until 21 days after inoculation; a set of 44 mutants showed altered virulence, with 8 presenting a complete loss of causing citrus canker symptoms. Sequencing of the insertion site in all 44 mutants revealed that 35 different ORFs were hit, since some ORFs were hit in more than one mutant, with mutants for the same ORF presenting the same phenotype. An analysis of these ORFs showed that some encoded genes were previously known as related to pathogenicity in phytobacteria and, more interestingly, revealed new genes never implicated with Xanthomonas pathogenicity before, including hypothetical ORFs. Among the 8 mutants with no canker symptoms are the hrpB4 and hrpX genes, two genes that belong to type III secretion system (TTSS, two hypothetical ORFS and, surprisingly, the htrA gene, a gene reported as involved with the virulence process in animal-pathogenic bacteria but not described as involved in phytobacteria virulence. Nucleic acid hybridization using

  10. A novel composite retrotransposon derived from or generated independently of the SVA (SINE/VNTR/Alu) transposon has undergone proliferation in gibbon genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toru; Hirai, Yuriko; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily Hominoidea (hominoids) comprises two families: Hominidae (hominids) and Hylobatidae (gibbons, also called small apes). The SVA transposon is a composite retrotransposon that occurs widely in hominoids and is considered to have been generated by stepwise fusions of three genetic elements: SINE-R, a variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) sequence, and Alu. We identified a novel transposon whose basic structure is the same as that of SVA, with one prominent difference being the presence of part of prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) in place of SINE-R. We designate this composite transposon as PVA and propose two possible mechanisms regarding its generation. One is the derivation of PVA from SVA: the SINE-R region of SVA was replaced with a PTGR2 fragment by template switching. The other is the formation of PVA independently of SVA: a PTGR2 fragment was fused to an evolutionary intermediate comprising the VNTR and Alu regions. The nucleotide sequence of the junction between the VNTR and PTGR2 regions supports the second hypothesis. We identified PVA in the white-cheeked gibbon Nomascus leucogenys by analysis of genome sequence databases, and subsequent experimental analysis revealed its presence in all four gibbon genera. The white-cheeked gibbon harbors at least 93 PVA copies in its haploid genome. Another SVA-like composite transposon carrying parts of the LINE1 and Alu transposons in place of SINE-R, designated as LAVA, has recently been reported. The significance of the discovery of PVA is that its substituted fragment originates not from a transposon but from a single-copy gene. PVA should provide additional insights into the transposition mechanism of this type of composite transposon; the transposition activity is conferred even if the substituted fragment is not related to a transposon.

  11. Functionally relevant novel microsatellite markers for efficient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-13

    30 and SR-31) to 76.1% (between SR-19 and SR-26) with an overall diversity of 61.3%. Cluster analysis based on 247 alleles derived from 52 polymorphic primers were successfully tested for diversity characterization of 40.

  12. An algorithm for the reconstruction of consensus sequences of ancient segmental duplications and transposon copies in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abanish; Keswani, Umeshkumar; Levine, David; Feschotte, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    Interspersed repeats, mostly resulting from the activity and accumulation of transposable elements, occupy a significant fraction of many eukaryotic genomes. More than half of human genomic sequence consists of known repeats, however a very large part has not yet been associated with neither repetitive structures nor functional units. We have postulated that most of the seemingly unique content of mammalian genomes is also a result of transposon activity, written software to look for weak signals which would help us reconstruct the ancient elements with substantially mutated copies, and integrated it into a system for de novo identification and classification of interspersed repeats. In this manuscript we describe our approach, and report on our methods for building the consensus sequences of these transposons.

  13. High-resolution definition of the Vibrio cholerae essential gene set with hidden Markov model-based analyses of transposon-insertion sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Michael C; Pritchard, Justin R; Zhang, Yanjia J; Rubin, Eric J; Livny, Jonathan; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2013-10-01

    The coupling of high-density transposon mutagenesis to high-throughput DNA sequencing (transposon-insertion sequencing) enables simultaneous and genome-wide assessment of the contributions of individual loci to bacterial growth and survival. We have refined analysis of transposon-insertion sequencing data by normalizing for the effect of DNA replication on sequencing output and using a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based filter to exploit heretofore unappreciated information inherent in all transposon-insertion sequencing data sets. The HMM can smooth variations in read abundance and thereby reduce the effects of read noise, as well as permit fine scale mapping that is independent of genomic annotation and enable classification of loci into several functional categories (e.g. essential, domain essential or 'sick'). We generated a high-resolution map of genomic loci (encompassing both intra- and intergenic sequences) that are required or beneficial for in vitro growth of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. This work uncovered new metabolic and physiologic requirements for V. cholerae survival, and by combining transposon-insertion sequencing and transcriptomic data sets, we also identified several novel noncoding RNA species that contribute to V. cholerae growth. Our findings suggest that HMM-based approaches will enhance extraction of biological meaning from transposon-insertion sequencing genomic data.

  14. Salmonella Persistence in Tomatoes Requires a Distinct Set of Metabolic Functions Identified by Transposon Insertion Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Marcos H; Desai, Prerak; Porwollik, Steffen; Canals, Rocio; Perez, Daniel R; Chu, Weiping; McClelland, Michael; Teplitski, Max

    2017-03-01

    Human enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli , are increasingly recognized as causes of gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Persistence in plants represents an important part of the life cycle of these pathogens. The identification of the full complement of Salmonella genes involved in the colonization of the model plant (tomato) was carried out using transposon insertion sequencing analysis. With this approach, 230,000 transposon insertions were screened in tomato pericarps to identify loci with reduction in fitness, followed by validation of the screen results using competition assays of the isogenic mutants against the wild type. A comparison with studies in animals revealed a distinct plant-associated set of genes, which only partially overlaps with the genes required to elicit disease in animals. De novo biosynthesis of amino acids was critical to persistence within tomatoes, while amino acid scavenging was prevalent in animal infections. Fitness reduction of the Salmonella amino acid synthesis mutants was generally more severe in the tomato rin mutant, which hyperaccumulates certain amino acids, suggesting that these nutrients remain unavailable to Salmonella spp. within plants. Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was required for persistence in both animals and plants, exemplifying some shared pathogenesis-related mechanisms in animal and plant hosts. Similarly to phytopathogens, Salmonella spp. required biosynthesis of amino acids, LPS, and nucleotides to colonize tomatoes. Overall, however, it appears that while Salmonella shares some strategies with phytopathogens and taps into its animal virulence-related functions, colonization of tomatoes represents a distinct strategy, highlighting this pathogen's flexible metabolism. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of gastroenteritis caused by human pathogens have been increasingly associated with foods of plant origin, with tomatoes being

  15. Transposon insertion libraries for the characterization of mutants from the kiwifruit pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Rees-George, Jonathan; Gardner, Paul P.; Ghomi, Fatemeh Ashari; Gerth, Monica L.; Andersen, Mark T.; Rikkerink, Erik H. A.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), the causal agent of kiwifruit canker, is one of the most devastating plant diseases of recent times. We have generated two mini-Tn5-based random insertion libraries of Psa ICMP 18884. The first, a ‘phenotype of interest’ (POI) library, consists of 10,368 independent mutants gridded into 96-well plates. By replica plating onto selective media, the POI library was successfully screened for auxotrophic and motility mutants. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis mutants with ‘Fuzzy-Spreader’-like morphologies were also identified through a visual screen. The second, a ‘mutant of interest’ (MOI) library, comprises around 96,000 independent mutants, also stored in 96-well plates, with approximately 200 individuals per well. The MOI library was sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform using Transposon-Directed Insertion site Sequencing (TraDIS) to map insertion sites onto the Psa genome. A grid-based PCR method was developed to recover individual mutants, and using this strategy, the MOI library was successfully screened for a putative LPS mutant not identified in the visual screen. The Psa chromosome and plasmid had 24,031 and 1,236 independent insertion events respectively, giving insertion frequencies of 3.65 and 16.6 per kb respectively. These data suggest that the MOI library is near saturation, with the theoretical probability of finding an insert in any one chromosomal gene estimated to be 97.5%. However, only 47% of chromosomal genes had insertions. This surprisingly low rate cannot be solely explained by the lack of insertions in essential genes, which would be expected to be around 5%. Strikingly, many accessory genes, including most of those encoding type III effectors, lacked insertions. In contrast, 94% of genes on the Psa plasmid had insertions, including for example, the type III effector HopAU1. These results suggest that some chromosomal sites are rendered inaccessible to transposon insertion, either

  16. Tudor-SN Interacts with Piwi Antagonistically in Regulating Spermatogenesis but Synergistically in Silencing Transposons in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Yen Ku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piwi proteins associate with piRNAs and functions in epigenetic programming, post-transcriptional regulation, transposon silencing, and germline development. However, it is not known whether the diverse functions of these proteins are molecularly separable. Here we report that Piwi interacts with Tudor-SN (Tudor staphylococcal nuclease, TSN antagonistically in regulating spermatogenesis but synergistically in silencing transposons. However, it is not required for piRNA biogenesis. TSN is known to participate in diverse molecular functions such as RNAi, degradation of hyper-edited miRNAs, and spliceosome assembly. We show that TSN colocalizes with Piwi in primordial germ cells (PGCs and embryonic somatic cells. In adult ovaries and testes, TSN is ubiquitously expressed and enriched in the cytoplasm of both germline and somatic cells. The tsn mutants display a higher mitotic index of spermatogonia, accumulation of spermatocytes, defects in meiotic cytokinesis, a decreased number of spermatids, and eventually reduced male fertility. Germline-specific TSN-expression analysis demonstrates that this function is germline-dependent. Different from other known Piwi interters, TSN represses Piwi expression at both protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, reducing piwi expression in the germline rescues tsn mutant phenotype in a dosage-dependent manner, demonstrating that Piwi and TSN interact antagonistically in germ cells to regulate spermatogenesis. However, the tsn deficiency has little, if any, impact on piRNA biogenesis but displays a synergistic effect with piwi mutants in transposon de-silencing. Our results reveal the biological function of TSN and its contrasting modes of interaction with Piwi in spermatogenesis, transposon silencing, and piRNA biogenesis.

  17. Physical mapping of transposon Tn5 insertions defines a gene cluster functional in nitrous oxide respiration by Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    OpenAIRE

    Viebrock, A; Zumft, W G

    1987-01-01

    By transposon Tn5 mutagenesis, 19 strains of Pseudomonas stutzeri were acquired that had defects in nitrous oxide respiration (Nos- phenotype). A physical map of the mutants showed nearly random Tn5 insertions into genomic DNA within a single region ca. 8 kilobases long. Mutants were characterized immunochemically, enzymatically, and chemically. Several functions related to the synthesis and regulation of nitrous oxide reductase were associated with this DNA region, indicating that in P. stut...

  18. Restorer-of-Fertility Mutations Recovered in Transposon-Active Lines of S Male-Sterile Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay-Laughnan, Susan; Settles, A Mark; Hannah, L Curtis; Porch, Timothy G; Becraft, Philip W; McCarty, Donald R; Koch, Karen E; Zhao, Liming; Kamps, Terry L; Chamusco, Karen C; Chase, Christine D

    2018-01-04

    Mitochondria execute key pathways of central metabolism and serve as cellular sensing and signaling entities, functions that depend upon interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic systems. This is exemplified in cytoplasmic male sterility type S (CMS-S) of Zea mays, where novel mitochondrial open reading frames are associated with a pollen collapse phenotype, but nuclear restorer-of-fertility (restorer) mutations rescue pollen function. To better understand these genetic interactions, we screened Activator-Dissociation (Ac-Ds), Enhancer/Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm), and Mutator (Mu) transposon-active CMS-S stocks to recover new restorer mutants. The frequency of restorer mutations increased in transposon-active stocks compared to transposon-inactive stocks, but most mutants recovered from Ac-Ds and En/Spm stocks were unstable, reverting upon backcrossing to CMS-S inbred lines. However, 10 independent restorer mutations recovered from CMS-S Mu transposon stocks were stable upon backcrossing. Many restorer mutations condition seed-lethal phenotypes that provide a convenient test for allelism. Eight such mutants recovered in this study included one pair of allelic mutations that were also allelic to the previously described rfl2-1 mutant. Targeted analysis of mitochondrial proteins by immunoblot identified two features that consistently distinguished restored CMS-S pollen from comparably staged, normal-cytoplasm, nonmutant pollen: increased abundance of nuclear-encoded alternative oxidase relative to mitochondria-encoded cytochrome oxidase and decreased abundance of mitochondria-encoded ATP synthase subunit 1 compared to nuclear-encoded ATP synthase subunit 2. CMS-S restorer mutants thus revealed a metabolic plasticity in maize pollen, and further study of these mutants will provide new insights into mitochondrial functions that are critical to pollen and seed development. Copyright © 2018 Gabay-Laughnan et al.

  19. High-level gentamicin resistance mediated by a Tn4001-like transposon in seven nonclonal hospital isolates of Streptococcus pasteurianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Viola C Y; Hawkey, Peter M; Chan, Edward W C; Chin, Miu L; Au, T K; Fung, Danny K C; Chan, Raphael C Y

    2007-07-01

    We report on the first occurrence of high-level gentamicin resistance (MICs > or = 512 microg/ml) in seven clinical isolates of Streptococcus pasteurianus from Hong Kong. These seven isolates were confirmed to be the species S. pasteurianus on the basis of nucleotide sequencing of the superoxide dismutase (sodA) gene. Epidemiological data as well as the results of pulse-field gel electrophoresis analysis suggested that the seven S. pasteurianus isolates did not belong to the same clone. Molecular characterization showed that they carried a chromosomal, transposon-borne resistance gene [aac(6')Ie-aph(2'')Ia] which was known to encode a bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme. The genetic arrangement of this transposon was similar to that of Tn4001, a transposon previously recovered from Staphylococcus aureus and other gram-positive isolates. Genetic linkage with other resistance elements, such as the ermB gene for erythromycin resistance, was not evident. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that routine screening for high-level gentamicin resistance should be recommended for all clinically significant blood culture isolates. This is to avoid the inadvertent use of short-course combination therapy with penicillin and gentamicin, which may lead to the failure of treatment for endocarditis, the selection of drug-resistant Streptococcus pasteurianus and other gram-positive organisms, as well as the unnecessary usage of gentamicin, a drug with potential toxicity.

  20. Identification of genes potentially involved in solute stress response in Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 by transposon mutant recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith eCoronado

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The term water stress refers to the effects of low water availability on microbial growth and physiology. Water availability has been proposed as a major constraint for the use of microorganisms in contaminated sites with the purpose of bioremediation. Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 is a bacterium capable of degrading the xenobiotic compounds dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin, and has potential to be used for targeted bioremediation. The aim of the current work was to identify genes implicated in water stress in RW1 by means of transposon mutagenesis and mutant growth experiments. Conditions of low water potential were mimicked by adding NaCl to the growth media. Three different mutant selection or separation method were tested, which, however recovered different mutants. Recovered transposon mutants with poorer growth under salt-induced water stress carried insertions in genes involved in proline and glutamate biosynthesis, and further in a gene putatively involved in aromatic compound catabolism. Transposon mutants growing poorer on medium with lowered water potential also included ones that had insertions in genes involved in more general functions such as transcriptional regulation, elongation factor, cell division protein, RNA polymerase β or an aconitase.

  1. Gene mutations and genomic rearrangements in the mouse as a result of transposon mobilization from chromosomal concatemers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron M Geurts

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system, as an insertional mutagen in the germline of mice, have used reverse genetic approaches. These studies have led to its proposed use for regional saturation mutagenesis by taking a forward-genetic approach. Thus, we used the SB system to mutate a region of mouse Chromosome 11 in a forward-genetic screen for recessive lethal and viable phenotypes. This work represents the first reported use of an insertional mutagen in a phenotype-driven approach. The phenotype-driven approach was successful in both recovering visible and behavioral mutants, including dominant limb and recessive behavioral phenotypes, and allowing for the rapid identification of candidate gene disruptions. In addition, a high frequency of recessive lethal mutations arose as a result of genomic rearrangements near the site of transposition, resulting from transposon mobilization. The results suggest that the SB system could be used in a forward-genetic approach to recover interesting phenotypes, but that local chromosomal rearrangements should be anticipated in conjunction with single-copy, local transposon insertions in chromosomes. Additionally, these mice may serve as a model for chromosome rearrangements caused by transposable elements during the evolution of vertebrate genomes.

  2. Transposon mutagenesis identifies chromatin modifiers cooperating with Ras in thyroid tumorigenesis and detects ATXN7 as a cancer gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Conde, Cristina; Leandro-Garcia, Luis J; Chen, Xu; Oler, Gisele; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Ryder, Mabel; Landa, Iñigo; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; La, Konnor; Ghossein, Ronald A; Bajorin, Dean F; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Riordan, Jesse D; Dupuy, Adam J; Fagin, James A

    2017-06-20

    Oncogenic RAS mutations are present in 15-30% of thyroid carcinomas. Endogenous expression of mutant Ras is insufficient to initiate thyroid tumorigenesis in murine models, indicating that additional genetic alterations are required. We used Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to identify events that cooperate with Hras(G12V) in thyroid tumor development. Random genomic integration of SB transposons primarily generated loss-of-function events that significantly increased thyroid tumor penetrance in Tpo-Cre/homozygous FR-Hras(G12V) mice. The thyroid tumors closely phenocopied the histological features of human RAS-driven, poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. Characterization of transposon insertion sites in the SB-induced tumors identified 45 recurrently mutated candidate cancer genes. These mutation profiles were remarkably concordant with mutated cancer genes identified in a large series of human poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers screened by next-generation sequencing using the MSK-IMPACT panel of cancer genes, which we modified to include all SB candidates. The disrupted genes primarily clustered in chromatin remodeling functional nodes and in the PI3K pathway. ATXN7, a component of a multiprotein complex with histone acetylase activity, scored as a significant SB hit. It was recurrently mutated in advanced human cancers and significantly co-occurred with RAS or NF1 mutations. Expression of ATXN7 mutants cooperated with oncogenic RAS to induce thyroid cell proliferation, pointing to ATXN7 as a previously unrecognized cancer gene.

  3. Combination of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated 9 technique with the piggybac transposon system for mouse in utero electroporation to study cortical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Man; Jin, Xubin; Mu, Lili; Wang, Fangyu; Li, Wei; Zhong, Xiaoling; Liu, Xuan; Shen, Wenchen; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In utero electroporation (IUE) is commonly used to study cortical development of cerebrum by downregulating or overexpressing genes of interest in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) of small mammals. However, exogenous plasmids are lost or diluted over time. Furthermore, gene knockdown based on short-hairpin RNAs may exert nonspecific effects that lead to aberrant neuronal migration. Genomic engineering by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) system has great research and therapeutic potentials. Here we integrate the CRISPR/Cas9 components into the piggyBac (PB) transposon system (the CRISPR/Cas9-PB toolkit) for cortical IUEs. The mouse Sry-related HMG box-2 (Sox2) gene was selected as the target for its application. Most transduced cortical NPCs were depleted of SOX2 protein as early as 3 days post-IUE, whereas expressions of SOX1 and PAX6 remained intact. Furthermore, both the WT Cas9 and the D10A nickase mutant Cas9n showed comparable knockout efficiency. Transduced cortical cells were purified with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and effective gene editing at the Sox2 loci was confirmed. Thus, application of the CRISPR/Cas9-PB toolkit in IUE is a promising strategy to study gene functions in cortical NPCs and their progeny. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Adaptive Evolution Leads to Cross-Species Incompatibility in the piRNA Transposon Silencing Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhad, Swapnil S; Tu, Shikui; Weng, Zhiping; Theurkauf, William E

    2017-10-09

    Reproductive isolation defines species divergence and is linked to adaptive evolution of hybrid incompatibility genes. Hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans are sterile, and phenocopy mutations in the PIWI interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway, which silences transposons and shows pervasive adaptive evolution, and Drosophila rhino and deadlock encode rapidly evolving components of a complex that binds to piRNA clusters. We show that Rhino and Deadlock interact and co-localize in simulans and melanogaster, but simulans Rhino does not bind melanogaster Deadlock, due to substitutions in the rapidly evolving Shadow domain. Significantly, a chimera expressing the simulans Shadow domain in a melanogaster Rhino backbone fails to support piRNA production, disrupts binding to piRNA clusters, and leads to ectopic localization to bulk heterochromatin. Fusing melanogaster Deadlock to simulans Rhino, by contrast, restores localization to clusters. Deadlock binding thus directs Rhino to piRNA clusters, and Rhino-Deadlock co-evolution has produced cross-species incompatibilities, which may contribute to reproductive isolation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Transposon-mediated epigenetic regulation contributes to phenotypic diversity and environmental adaptation in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xianwei; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have long been regarded as 'selfish DNA', and are generally silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. However, work in the past decade has identified positive roles for TEs in generating genomic novelty and diversity in plants. In particular, recent studies suggested that TE-induced epigenetic alterations and modification of gene expression contribute to phenotypic variation and adaptation to geography or stress. These findings have led many to regard TEs, not as junk DNA, but as sources of control elements and genomic diversity. As a staple food crop and model system for genomic research on monocot plants, rice (Oryza sativa) has a modest-sized genome that harbors massive numbers of DNA transposons (class II transposable elements) scattered across the genome, which may make TE regulation of genes more prevalent. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on the functions of rice TEs in modulating gene expression and creating new genes. We also examine the contributions of TEs to phenotypic diversity and adaptation to environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of the efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance transposon in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadegan, Azadeh; Ahmadi, Ali; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar; Talebi, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    The present analysis focuses on phenotypic and genotypic characterizations of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae due to an increase in macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae worldwide. We investigated the prevalence of efflux-mediated erythromycin resistance and its relevant genetic elements from 186 specimens of S. pneumonia isolated from clinical and normal flora from Tehran, Iran. The presence of erythromycin resistance genes was tested by PCR with two sets of primers, specific for erm(B) and mef(A/E), and their genetic elements with tetM, xis, and int genes. Isolates were typed with the BOX PCR method and tested for resistance to six antibiotics. Antibiotic susceptibility tests revealed that 100% and 47% isolates were resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin, respectively. The erythromycin and clindamycin double-disc diffusion test for macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB (MLSB) resistance phenotype showed 74 (84%) isolates with the constitutive MLSB phenotype and the remaining with the M phenotype. BOX PCR demonstrated the presence of 7 types in pneumococci with the M phenotype. Fourteen (16%) isolates with the M phenotype harbored mef(A/E), tetM, xis, and int genes. The present results suggest dissemination of polyclonal groups of S. pneumoniae with the M phenotype carrying resistance genes attributed to transposon 2009.

  7. Rapid construction of a whole-genome transposon insertion collection for Shewanella oneidensis by Knockout Sudoku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baym, Michael; Shaket, Lev; Anzai, Isao A.; Adesina, Oluwakemi; Barstow, Buz

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome knockout collections are invaluable for connecting gene sequence to function, yet traditionally, their construction has required an extraordinary technical effort. Here we report a method for the construction and purification of a curated whole-genome collection of single-gene transposon disruption mutants termed Knockout Sudoku. Using simple combinatorial pooling, a highly oversampled collection of mutants is condensed into a next-generation sequencing library in a single day, a 30- to 100-fold improvement over prior methods. The identities of the mutants in the collection are then solved by a probabilistic algorithm that uses internal self-consistency within the sequencing data set, followed by rapid algorithmically guided condensation to a minimal representative set of mutants, validation, and curation. Starting from a progenitor collection of 39,918 mutants, we compile a quality-controlled knockout collection of the electroactive microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 containing representatives for 3,667 genes that is functionally validated by high-throughput kinetic measurements of quinone reduction. PMID:27830751

  8. Generation and screening of a comprehensive Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transposon mutant bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Lamont, Elise A; Harris, N Beth; Fenton, Robert J; Zinniel, Denise K; Liu, Xiaofei; Sotos, Josh; Feng, Zhengyu; Livneh-Kol, Ayala; Shpigel, Nahum Y; Czuprynski, Charles J; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Barletta, Raúl G

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne's Disease in ruminants. This enteritis has significant economic impact and worldwide distribution. Vaccination is one of the most cost effective infectious disease control measures. Unfortunately, current vaccines reduce clinical disease and shedding, but are of limited efficacy and do not provide long-term protective immunity. Several strategies have been followed to mine the MAP genome for virulence determinants that could be applied to vaccine and diagnostic assay development. In this study, a comprehensive mutant bank of 13,536 MAP K-10 Tn5367 mutants (P > 95%) was constructed and screened in vitro for phenotypes related to virulence. This strategy was designated to maximize identification of genes important to MAP pathogenesis without relying on studies of other mycobacterial species that may not translate into similar effects in MAP. This bank was screened for mutants with colony morphology alterations, susceptibility to D-cycloserine, impairment in siderophore production or secretion, reduced cell association, and decreased biofilm and clump formation. Mutants with interesting phenotypes were analyzed by PCR, Southern blotting and DNA sequencing to determine transposon insertion sites. These insertion sites mapped upstream from the MAP1152-MAP1156 cluster, internal to either the Mod operon gene MAP1566 or within the coding sequence of lsr2, and several intergenic regions. Growth curves in broth cultures, invasion assays and kinetics of survival and replication in primary bovine macrophages were also determined. The ability of vectors carrying Tn5370 to generate stable MAP mutants was also investigated.

  9. Transposon Dysregulation Modulates dWnt4 Signaling to Control Germline Stem Cell Differentiation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitreyi Upadhyay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Germline stem cell (GSC self-renewal and differentiation are required for the sustained production of gametes. GSC differentiation in Drosophila oogenesis requires expression of the histone methyltransferase dSETDB1 by the somatic niche, however its function in this process is unknown. Here, we show that dSETDB1 is required for the expression of a Wnt ligand, Drosophila Wingless type mouse mammary virus integration site number 4 (dWnt4 in the somatic niche. dWnt4 signaling acts on the somatic niche cells to facilitate their encapsulation of the GSC daughter, which serves as a differentiation cue. dSETDB1 is known to repress transposable elements (TEs to maintain genome integrity. Unexpectedly, we found that independent upregulation of TEs also downregulated dWnt4, leading to GSC differentiation defects. This suggests that dWnt4 expression is sensitive to the presence of TEs. Together our results reveal a chromatin-transposon-Wnt signaling axis that regulates stem cell fate.

  10. GC-rich coding sequences reduce transposon-like, small RNA-mediated transgene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Lyudmila V; Lee, Tzuu-Fen; Woosley, Aaron; Moskal, William A; Bevan, Scott A; Merlo, P Ann Owens; Walsh, Terence A; Wang, Xiujuan; Weaver, Staci; Glancy, Todd P; Wang, PoHao; Yang, Xiaozeng; Sriram, Shreedharan; Meyers, Blake C

    2017-10-30

    The molecular basis of transgene susceptibility to silencing is poorly characterized in plants; thus, we evaluated several transgene design parameters as means to reduce heritable transgene silencing. Analyses of Arabidopsis plants with transgenes encoding a microalgal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthase revealed that small RNA (sRNA)-mediated silencing, combined with the use of repetitive regulatory elements, led to aggressive transposon-like silencing of canola-biased PUFA synthase transgenes. Diversifying regulatory sequences and using native microalgal coding sequences (CDSs) with higher GC content improved transgene expression and resulted in a remarkable trans-generational stability via reduced accumulation of sRNAs and DNA methylation. Further experiments in maize with transgenes individually expressing three crystal (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) tested the impact of CDS recoding using different codon bias tables. Transgenes with higher GC content exhibited increased transcript and protein accumulation. These results demonstrate that the sequence composition of transgene CDSs can directly impact silencing, providing design strategies for increasing transgene expression levels and reducing risks of heritable loss of transgene expression.

  11. Revolver is a New Class of Transposon-like Gene Composing the Triticeae Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Motonori; Shinohara, Kasumi; Morimoto, Mayu

    2008-01-01

    Revolver discovered in the Triticeae plant is a novel class of transposon-like gene and a major component of the large cereal genome. An 89 bp segment of Revolver that is enriched in the genome of rye was isolated by deleting the DNA sequences common to rye and wheat. The entire structure of Revolver was determined by using rye genomic clones, which were screened by the 89 bp probe. Revolver consists of 2929—3041 bp with an inverted repeated sequence on each end and is dispersed through all seven chromosomes of the rye genome. Revolver is transcriptionally active, and the isolated full-length cDNA (726 bp) reveals that Revolver harbors a single gene consisting of three exons (342, 88, and 296 bp) and two introns (750 and 1237 bp), and encodes 139 amino acid residues of protein, which shows similarity to some transcriptional regulators. Revolver variants ranging from 2665 to 4269 bp, in which 5′ regions were destructed, indicate structural diversities around the first exon. Revolver does not share identity with any known class I or class II autonomous transposable elements of any living species. DNA blot analysis of Triticeae plants shows that Revolver has existed since the diploid progenitor of wheat, and has been amplified or lost in several species during the evolution of the Triticeae. PMID:18303044

  12. A transposon insertion in FLOWERING LOCUS T is associated with delayed flowering in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueming; Meng, Lin; Liu, Bo; Hu, Yunyan; Cheng, Feng; Liang, Jianli; Aarts, Mark G M; Wang, Xiaowu; Wu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Long days and vernalization accelerate the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth in Brassica rapa. Bolting before plants reach the harvesting stage is a serious problem in B. rapa vegetable crop cultivation. The genetic dissection of flowering time is important for breeding of premature bolting-resistant B. rapa crops. Using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, we twice detected two major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for flowering time in two different growing seasons that were located on chromosomes A02 and A07, respectively. We hypothesized that an orthologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene, named as BrFT2, was the candidate gene underlying the QTL localized to A07. A transposon insertion in the second intron of BrFT2 was detected in one of the parental lines, which was predicted to generate a loss-of-function allele. Transcription analysis revealed that the BrFT2 transcript was not present in the parental line that harbored the mutated allele. RILs carrying only the mutated BrFT2 allele showed delayed flowering regardless of growing seasons when compared to RILs carrying the wild-type BrFT2 allele. These data suggest that BrFT2 is involved in flowering time regulation in controlling flowering time in B. rapa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient, footprint-free human iPSC genome editing by consolidation of Cas9/CRISPR and piggyBac technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Luhan; Grishin, Dennis; Rios, Xavier; Ye, Lillian Y; Hu, Yong; Li, Kai; Zhang, Donghui; Church, George M; Pu, William T

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offers unprecedented opportunities for in vitro disease modeling and personalized cell replacement therapy. The introduction of Cas9-directed genome editing has expanded adoption of this approach. However, marker-free genome editing using standard protocols remains inefficient, yielding desired targeted alleles at a rate of ∼1-5%. We developed a protocol based on a doxycycline-inducible Cas9 transgene carried on a piggyBac transposon to enable robust and highly efficient Cas9-directed genome editing, so that a parental line can be expeditiously engineered to harbor many separate mutations. Treatment with doxycycline and transfection with guide RNA (gRNA), donor DNA and piggyBac transposase resulted in efficient, targeted genome editing and concurrent scarless transgene excision. Using this approach, in 7 weeks it is possible to efficiently obtain genome-edited clones with minimal off-target mutagenesis and with indel mutation frequencies of 40-50% and homology-directed repair (HDR) frequencies of 10-20%.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaiyong; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhan, Gangming; Wei, Guorong; Zhou, Xinli; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus.

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyong Luo

    Full Text Available The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus.

  16. Generation and screening of a comprehensive Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transposon mutant bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govardhan eRathnaiah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is the etiologic agent of Johne’s Disease in ruminants. This enteritis has significant economic impact and worldwide distribution. Vaccination is one of the most cost effective infectious disease control measures. Unfortunately, current vaccines reduce clinical disease and shedding, but are of limited efficacy and do not provide long-term protective immunity. Several strategies have been followed to mine the MAP genome for virulence determinants that could be applied to vaccine and diagnostic assay development. In this study, a comprehensive mutant bank of 13,536 MAP K-10 Tn5367 mutants (P > 95% was constructed and screened in vitro for phenotypes related to virulence. This strategy was designated to maximize identification of genes important to MAP pathogenesis without relying on studies of other mycobacterial species that may not translate into similar effects in MAP. This bank was screened for mutants with colony morphology alterations, susceptibility to D-cycloserine, impairment in siderophore production or secretion, reduced cell association, and decreased biofilm and clump formation. Mutants with interesting phenotypes were analyzed by PCR, Southern blotting and DNA sequencing to determine transposon insertion sites. These insertion sites mapped upstream from the MAP1152-MAP1156 cluster, internal to either the Mod operon gene MAP1566 or within the coding sequence of lsr2, and several intergenic regions. Growth curves in broth cultures, invasion assays and kinetics of survival and replication in primary bovine macrophages were also determined. The ability of vectors carrying Tn5370 to generate stable MAP mutants was also investigated.

  17. Transposon variation by order during allopolyploidisation between Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Z; Tang, Z; Ma, B; Mason, A S; Guo, Y; Yin, J; Gao, C; Wei, L; Li, J; Fu, D

    2014-07-01

    Although many studies have shown that transposable element (TE) activation is induced by hybridisation and polyploidisation in plants, much less is known on how different types of TE respond to hybridisation, and the impact of TE-associated sequences on gene function. We investigated the frequency and regularity of putative transposon activation for different types of TE, and determined the impact of TE-associated sequence variation on the genome during allopolyploidisation. We designed different types of TE primers and adopted the Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) method to detect variation in TE-associated sequences during the process of allopolyploidisation between Brassica rapa (AA) and Brassica oleracea (CC), and in successive generations of self-pollinated progeny. In addition, fragments with TE insertions were used to perform Blast2GO analysis to characterise the putative functions of the fragments with TE insertions. Ninety-two primers amplifying 548 loci were used to detect variation in sequences associated with four different orders of TE sequences. TEs could be classed in ascending frequency into LTR-REs, TIRs, LINEs, SINEs and unknown TEs. The frequency of novel variation (putative activation) detected for the four orders of TEs was highest from the F1 to F2 generations, and lowest from the F2 to F3 generations. Functional annotation of sequences with TE insertions showed that genes with TE insertions were mainly involved in metabolic processes and binding, and preferentially functioned in organelles. TE variation in our study severely disturbed the genetic compositions of the different generations, resulting in inconsistencies in genetic clustering. Different types of TE showed different patterns of variation during the process of allopolyploidisation. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  18. Analysis of transposons and repeat composition of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia; Zuccolo, Andrea; Giordani, Tommaso; Jurman, Irena; Ferrillo, Veronica; Vitacolonna, Nicola; Sarri, Vania; Cattonaro, Federica; Ceccarelli, Marilena; Cionini, Pier Giorgio; Morgante, Michele

    2010-02-01

    A sample-sequencing strategy combined with slot-blot hybridization and FISH was used to study the composition of the repetitive component of the sunflower genome. One thousand six hundred thirty-eight sequences for a total of 954,517 bp were analyzed. The fraction of sequences that can be classified as repetitive using computational and hybridization approaches amounts to 62% in total. Almost two thirds remain as yet uncharacterized in nature. Of those characterized, most belong to the gypsy superfamily of LTR-retrotransposons. Unlike in other species, where single families can account for large fractions of the genome, it appears that no transposon family has been amplified to very high levels in sunflower. All other known classes of transposable elements were also found. One family of unknown nature (contig 61) was the most repeated in the sunflower genome. The evolution of the repetitive component in the Helianthus genus and in other Asteraceae was studied by comparative analysis of the hybridization of total genomic DNAs from these species to the sunflower small-insert library and compared to gene-based phylogeny. Very little similarity is observed between Helianthus species and two related Asteraceae species outside of the genus. Most repetitive elements are similar in annual and perennial Helianthus species indicating that sequence amplification largely predates such divergence. Gypsy-like elements are more represented in the annuals than in the perennials, while copia-like elements are similarly represented, attesting a different amplification history of the two superfamilies of LTR-retrotransposons in the Helianthus genus.

  19. Transposon mutagenesis identifies novel genes associated with Staphylococcus aureus persister formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ewenjie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacterial persisters are responsible for the recalcitrance of chronic and persistent infections to antimicrobial therapy. Although the mechanisms of persister formation and survival have been widely studied in Escherichia coli, persistence mechanisms in S. aureus remain largely unknown. Here, we screened a transposon mutant library of a clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)strain, USA500 (ST8, under antibiotic pressure and identified 13 genes whose insertion mutations resulted in a defect in persistence. These candidate genes were further confirmed by evaluating the survival of the mutants upon exposure to levofloxacin and several other stress conditions. We found 13 insertion mutants with significantly lower persister numbers under several stress conditions, including sdhA, sdhB, ureG, mnhG1, fbaA, ctaB, clpX, parE, HOU_0223, HOU_0587, HOU_2091, HOU_2315 and HOU_2346, which mapped into pathways of oxidative phosphorylation, TCA cycle, glycolysis, cell cycle and ABC transporters, suggesting that these genes and pathways may play an important role in persister formation and survival. The newly constructed knockout strains of ureG, sdhA and sdhB and their complemented strains were also tested for defect in persisters following exposure to levofloxacin and several other stress conditions. The results from these experiments were consistent with the screening results, which indicated that deletion of these genes in MRSA USA500 leads to persister defect. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of persister formation and survival in S. aureus and offer new targets for the development of persister-directed antibiotics for the improved treatment of chronic and persistent infections.

  20. Moving through the stressed genome: Emerging regulatory roles for transposons in plant stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negi Pooja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of a positive correlation between organism genome size with its transposable element (TE content, represents a key discovery of the field of genome biology. Considerable evidence accumulated since then suggests the involvement of TEs in genome structure, evolution and function. The global genome reorganization brought about by transposon activity might play an adaptive/regulatory role in the host response to environmental challenges, reminiscent of McClintock’s original ’Controlling Element’ hypothesis. This regulatory aspect of TEs is also garnering support in light of the recent evidences which project TEs as distributed genomic control modules. According to this view, TEs are capable of actively reprogramming host genes circuits and ultimately fine-tuning the host response to specific environmental stimuli. Moreover, the stress-induced changes in epigenetic status of TE activity may allow TEs to propagate their stress responsive elements to host genes; the resulting genome fluidity can permit phenotypic plasticity and adaptation to stress. Given their predominating presence in the plant genomes, nested organization in the genic regions and potential regulatory role in stress response, TEs hold unexplored potential for crop improvement programs. This review intends to present the current information about the roles played by TEs in plant genome organization, evolution and function, and highlight the regulatory mechanisms in plant stress responses. We will also briefly discuss the connection between TE activity, host epigenetic response and phenotypic plasticity as a critical link for traversing the translational bridge from a purely basic study of TEs, to the applied field of stress adaptation and crop improvement.

  1. Evidence for the role of transposons in the recruitment of cis-regulatory motifs during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chensi; Xu, Jiajia; Zheng, Guangyong; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-03-08

    C4 photosynthesis evolved from C3 photosynthesis and has higher light, water, and nitrogen use efficiencies. Several C4 photosynthesis genes show cell-specific expression patterns, which are required for these high resource-use efficiencies. However, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of cis-regulatory elements that control these cell-specific expression patterns remain elusive. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the cis-regulatory motifs related to C4 photosynthesis genes were recruited from non-photosynthetic genes and further examined potential mechanisms facilitating this recruitment. We examined 65 predicted bundle sheath cell-specific motifs, 17 experimentally validated cell-specific cis-regulatory elements, and 1,034 motifs derived from gene regulatory networks. Approximately 7, 5, and 1,000 of these three categories of motifs, respectively, were apparently recruited during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. In addition, we checked 1) the distance between the acceptors and the donors of potentially recruited motifs in a chromosome, and 2) whether the potentially recruited motifs reside within the overlapping region of transposable elements and the promoter of donor genes. The results showed that 7, 4, and 658 of the potentially recruited motifs might have moved via the transposable elements. Furthermore, the potentially recruited motifs showed higher binding affinity to transcription factors compared to randomly generated sequences of the same length as the motifs. This study provides molecular evidence supporting the hypothesis that transposon-driven recruitment of pre-existing cis-regulatory elements from non-photosynthetic genes into photosynthetic genes plays an important role during C4 evolution. The findings of the present study coincide with the observed repetitive emergence of C4 during evolution.

  2. An efficient strategy for producing a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dingpei; Lu, Weijian; Zhang, Yuli; Bi, Lihui; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Zhao, Aichun

    2015-03-05

    We developed an efficient strategy that combines a method for the post-integration elimination of all transposon sequences, a site-specific recombination system, and an optimized fibroin H-chain expression system to produce a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) that overcomes the disadvantages of random insertion and post-integration instability of transposons. Here, we generated four different transgenic silkworm strains, and of one the transgenic strains, designated TS1-RgG2, with up to 16% (w/w) of the target protein in the cocoons, was selected. The subsequent elimination of all the transposon sequences from TS1-RgG2 was completed by the heat-shock-induced expression of the transposase in vivo. The resulting transgenic silkworm strain was designated TS3-g2 and contained only the attP-flanked optimized fibroin H-chain expression cassette in its genome. A phiC31/att-system-based recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) method could be used to integrate other genes of interest into the same genome locus between the attP sites in TS3-g2. Controlling for position effects with phiC31-mediated RMCE will also allow the optimization of exogenous protein expression and fine gene function analyses in the silkworm. The strategy developed here is also applicable to other lepidopteran insects, to improve the ecological safety of transgenic strains in biocontrol programs.

  3. The Tol2 transposon system mediates the genetic engineering of T-cells with CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, T; Iwase, N; Kawakami, K; Iwasaki, M; Yamamoto, C; Ohmine, K; Uchibori, R; Teruya, T; Ido, H; Saga, Y; Urabe, M; Mizukami, H; Kume, A; Nakamura, M; Brentjens, R; Ozawa, K

    2015-02-01

    Engineered T-cell therapy using a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CD19-CAR) is a promising strategy for the treatment of advanced B-cell malignancies. Gene transfer of CARs to T-cells has widely relied on retroviral vectors, but transposon-based gene transfer has recently emerged as a suitable nonviral method to mediate stable transgene expression. The advantages of transposon vectors compared with viral vectors include their simplicity and cost-effectiveness. We used the Tol2 transposon system to stably transfer CD19-CAR into human T-cells. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were co-nucleofected with the Tol2 transposon donor plasmid carrying CD19-CAR and the transposase expression plasmid and were selectively propagated on NIH3T3 cells expressing human CD19. Expanded CD3(+) T-cells with stable and high-level transgene expression (~95%) produced interferon-γ upon stimulation with CD19 and specifically lysed Raji cells, a CD19(+) human B-cell lymphoma cell line. Adoptive transfer of these T-cells suppressed tumor progression in Raji tumor-bearing Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) immunodeficient mice compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that the Tol2 transposon system could be used to express CD19-CAR in genetically engineered T-cells for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies.

  4. piggyBac transposon somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker (PB-SMART for genetic screens in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean F Landrette

    Full Text Available Somatic forward genetic screens have the power to interrogate thousands of genes in a single animal. Retroviral and transposon mutagenesis systems in mice have been designed and deployed in somatic tissues for surveying hematopoietic and solid tumor formation. In the context of cancer, the ability to visually mark mutant cells would present tremendous advantages for identifying tumor formation, monitoring tumor growth over time, and tracking tumor infiltrations and metastases into wild-type tissues. Furthermore, locating mutant clones is a prerequisite for screening and analyzing most other somatic phenotypes. For this purpose, we developed a system using the piggyBac (PB transposon for somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker, called PB-SMART. The PB-SMART mouse genetic screening system can simultaneously induce somatic mutations and mark mutated cells using bioluminescence or fluorescence. The marking of mutant cells enable analyses that are not possible with current somatic mutagenesis systems, such as tracking cell proliferation and tumor growth, detecting tumor cell infiltrations, and reporting tissue mutagenesis levels by a simple ex vivo visual readout. We demonstrate that PB-SMART is highly mutagenic, capable of tumor induction with low copy transposons, which facilitates the mapping and identification of causative insertions. We further integrated a conditional transposase with the PB-SMART system, permitting tissue-specific mutagenesis with a single cross to any available Cre line. Targeting the germline, the system could also be used to conduct F1 screens. With these features, PB-SMART provides an integrated platform for individual investigators to harness the power of somatic mutagenesis and phenotypic screens to decipher the genetic basis of mammalian biology and disease.

  5. PLE-wu, a new member of piggyBac transposon family from insect, is active in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2014-10-01

    piggyBac, a highly active transposon in insect and mammalian cells, is a very useful tool in genome manipulation. A new piggyBac-like element (PLE), named PLE-wu, was identified from a mutant baculovirus cultured in sf9 insect cells. This new transposon is 2931 bp in length and encodes two active forms of transposase, a 708-amino acid-long transposase and a short 576-residue-long transposase translated from a downstream in-frame initiation codon. PLE-wu has asymmetric terminal structures, containing 6-bp inverted terminal repeats, 32-bp imperfect inverted and direct sub-terminal repeats. Similar to piggyBac, PLE-wu exhibits traceless excision activity in both insect and mammalian cells, restoring the original TTAA target sequence upon excision. It also retains the insertion activity in mammalian cells with a plasmid to chromosome transposition rate about 10-fold higher than random integration. Plasmid rescue assays revealed that the TTAA target sequence was duplicated at the junctions of the insertion site. Deletion of the terminal sequences including the sub-terminal repeats decreased the transposition activity of the 708-residue-long transposase, while the transposition activity of the short form of transposase was not affected. With its low sequence similarity to piggyBac, PLE-wu will contribute to the understanding the mechanism of PLE transposition, as well as design of new transposon systems with higher activity. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transposon Mutagenesis of the Zika Virus Genome Highlights Regions Essential for RNA Replication and Restricted for Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Benjamin O; Sachs, David; Schwarz, Megan C; Palese, Peter; Evans, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    The molecular constraints affecting Zika virus (ZIKV) evolution are not well understood. To investigate ZIKV genetic flexibility, we used transposon mutagenesis to add 15-nucleotide insertions throughout the ZIKV MR766 genome and subsequently deep sequenced the viable mutants. Few ZIKV insertion mutants replicated, which likely reflects a high degree of functional constraints on the genome. The NS1 gene exhibited distinct mutational tolerances at different stages of the screen. This result may define regions of the NS1 protein that are required for the different stages of the viral life cycle. The ZIKV structural genes showed the highest degree of insertional tolerance. Although the envelope (E) protein exhibited particular flexibility, the highly conserved envelope domain II (EDII) fusion loop of the E protein was intolerant of transposon insertions. The fusion loop is also a target of pan-flavivirus antibodies that are generated against other flaviviruses and neutralize a broad range of dengue virus and ZIKV isolates. The genetic restrictions identified within the epitopes in the EDII fusion loop likely explain the sequence and antigenic conservation of these regions in ZIKV and among multiple flaviviruses. Thus, our results provide insights into the genetic restrictions on ZIKV that may affect the evolution of this virus.IMPORTANCE Zika virus recently emerged as a significant human pathogen. Determining the genetic constraints on Zika virus is important for understanding the factors affecting viral evolution. We used a genome-wide transposon mutagenesis screen to identify where mutations were tolerated in replicating viruses. We found that the genetic regions involved in RNA replication were mostly intolerant of mutations. The genes coding for structural proteins were more permissive to mutations. Despite the flexibility observed in these regions, we found that epitopes bound by broadly reactive antibodies were genetically constrained. This finding may explain

  7. Mechanism for transfer of transposon Tn2010 carrying macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae and its effects on genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqing; Yao, Kaihu; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Yonghong; Li, Yun; Lv, Yuan; Feng, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the mechanism responsible for the horizontal transfer of transposon Tn2010 in Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the genomic alterations introduced by the transfer process. Tn2010 was identified using PCR in 15 clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with erythromycin resistance. S. pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis isolates were used as recipient cells in mating and transformation experiments to test the conjugative transferability and transformability of Tn2010. Whole-genome sequencing was used to assess the effects of the Tn2010 transfer on recipient genomes. The biological cost of the horizontal acquisition of Tn2010 and additional genomic changes was investigated by growth competition experiments. Tn2010 was transformed at a frequency of 3 × 10(-7) transformants per cfu, whereas no transconjugants were detected using S. pneumoniae or E. faecalis as recipient cells. Genome analysis showed that many other recombinations were scattered throughout the genome of the transformants in addition to transposon Tn2010. The transformants demonstrated a negligible fitness cost compared with the wild-type strain. Tn2010 tended to be transferred by transformation rather than conjugation in S. pneumoniae, and the spread of Tn2010 could have a profound effect on the evolution of the genome. The acquisition of Tn2010 with negligible fitness cost may facilitate spread of the transposon. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The widely used Nicotiana benthamiana 16c line has an unusual T-DNA integration pattern including a transposon sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua G Philips

    Full Text Available Nicotiana benthamiana is employed around the world for many types of research and one transgenic line has been used more extensively than any other. This line, 16c, expresses the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP, highly and constitutively, and has been a major resource for visualising the mobility and actions of small RNAs. Insights into the mechanisms studied at a molecular level in N. benthamiana 16c are likely to be deeper and more accurate with a greater knowledge of the GFP gene integration site. Therefore, using next generation sequencing, genome mapping and local alignment, we identified the location and characteristics of the integrated T-DNA. As suggested from previous molecular hybridisation and inheritance data, the transgenic line contains a single GFP-expressing locus. However, the GFP coding sequence differs from that originally reported. Furthermore, a 3.2 kb portion of a transposon, appears to have co-integrated with the T-DNA. The location of the integration mapped to a region of the genome represented by Nbv0.5scaffold4905 in the www.benthgenome.com assembly, and with less integrity to Niben101Scf03641 in the www.solgenomics.net assembly. The transposon is not endogenous to laboratory strains of N. benthamiana or Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101 (MP90, which was reportedly used in the generation of line 16c. However, it is present in the popular LBA4404 strain. The integrated transposon sequence includes its 5' terminal repeat and a transposase gene, and is immediately adjacent to the GFP gene. This unexpected genetic arrangement may contribute to the characteristics that have made the 16c line such a popular research tool and alerts researchers, taking transgenic plants to commercial release, to be aware of this genomic hitchhiker.

  9. Isolation of cyanobacterial mutants exhibiting growth defects under microoxic conditions by transposon tagging mutagenesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Kazuki; Sobue, Riho; Furutani, Yuho; Aoki, Rina; Fujita, Yuichi

    2017-05-12

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis by extracting electrons from water, with the generation of oxygen as a byproduct. Cyanobacteria use oxygen not only for respiration to produce energy in the dark but also for biosynthesis of various metabolites, such as heme and chlorophyll. Oxygen levels dynamically fluctuate in the field environments, from hyperoxic at daytime to almost anaerobic at night. Thus, adaptation to anaerobiosis should be important for cyanobacteria to survive in low-oxygen and anaerobic environments. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial anaerobiosis because cyanobacteria have been regarded as aerobic organisms. As a first step to elucidate cyanobacterial adaptation mechanisms to low-oxygen environments, we isolated five mutants, T-1-T-5, exhibiting growth defects under microoxic conditions. The mutants were obtained from a transposon-tagged mutant library of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which was produced by in vitro transposon tagging of cyanobacterial genomic DNA. Southern blot analysis indicated that a kanamycin resistance gene was inserted in the genome as a single copy. We identified the chromosomal transposon-tagged locus in T-5. Two open reading frames (sll0577 and sll0578) were partially deleted by the insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene in T-5. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction suggested that these co-transcribed genes are constitutively expressed under both aerobic and microoxic conditions. Then, we isolated two mutants in which one of the two genes was individually disrupted. Only the mutants partially lacking an intact sll0578 gene showed growth defects under microoxic conditions, whereas it grew normally under aerobic conditions. sll0578 is annotated as purK encoding N5-carboxy-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase involved in purine metabolism. This result implies the unexpected physiological importance of Pur

  10. A Tn5051-like mer-containing transposon identified in a heavy metal tolerant strain Achromobacter sp. AO22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhave Mrinal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achromobacter sp. AO22 (formerly Alcaligenes sp. AO22, a bacterial strain isolated from a lead-contaminated industrial site in Australia, was previously found to be resistant to moderate to high levels of mercury, copper and other heavy metals. However, the nature and location of the genetic basis for mercuric ion resistance in this strain, had not been previously identified. Findings Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a functional mer operon with all four essential genes (merRTPA and shows >99% DNA sequence identity to that of Tn501. The mer operon was present on a transposon, designated TnAO22, captured by introducing a broad-host-range IncP plasmid into Achromobacter sp. AO22 and subsequently transferring it to E. coli recipients. The transposition frequency of TnAO22 was 10-2 to 10-3 per target plasmid transferred. Analysis of TnAO22 sequence revealed it belonged to the Tn21 subgroup of the Tn3 superfamily of transposons, with the transposition module having >99% identity with Tn5051 of a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a water sample in New York. Conclusion TnAO22 is thus a new variant of Tn5051 of the Tn3 superfamily and the transposon and its associated mercury resistance system are among the few such systems reported in a soil bacterium. Achromobacter sp. AO22 can thus be exploited for applications such as in situ mercury bioremediation of contaminated sites, or the mobile unit and mer operon could be mobilized to other bacteria for similar purposes.

  11. A Tn5051-like mer-containing transposon identified in a heavy metal tolerant strain Achromobacter sp. AO22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shee Ping; Davis, Belinda; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2009-03-07

    Achromobacter sp. AO22 (formerly Alcaligenes sp. AO22), a bacterial strain isolated from a lead-contaminated industrial site in Australia, was previously found to be resistant to moderate to high levels of mercury, copper and other heavy metals. However, the nature and location of the genetic basis for mercuric ion resistance in this strain, had not been previously identified. Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a functional mer operon with all four essential genes (merRTPA) and shows >99% DNA sequence identity to that of Tn501. The mer operon was present on a transposon, designated TnAO22, captured by introducing a broad-host-range IncP plasmid into Achromobacter sp. AO22 and subsequently transferring it to E. coli recipients. The transposition frequency of TnAO22 was 10-2 to 10-3 per target plasmid transferred. Analysis of TnAO22 sequence revealed it belonged to the Tn21 subgroup of the Tn3 superfamily of transposons, with the transposition module having >99% identity with Tn5051 of a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a water sample in New York. TnAO22 is thus a new variant of Tn5051 of the Tn3 superfamily and the transposon and its associated mercury resistance system are among the few such systems reported in a soil bacterium. Achromobacter sp. AO22 can thus be exploited for applications such as in situ mercury bioremediation of contaminated sites, or the mobile unit and mer operon could be mobilized to other bacteria for similar purposes.

  12. The 987P gene cluster in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli contains an STpa transposon that activates 987P expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, P; Woodward, M J; van Zijderveld, F G; de Graaf, F K

    1990-03-01

    The genetic determinant for the production of 987P fimbriae has been cloned into pBR322. Analysis of frequently occurring deletions in the resultant recombinant plasmid, pPK180, revealed that the 987P gene cluster contains a transposon that encodes the synthesis of heat-stable enterotoxin STpa and is flanked by inverted repeats of IS1. Hybridization experiments with STpa- and 987P-specific probes demonstrated that a variety of STpa+ 987P+ wild-type Escherichia coli strains contained contiguous STpa-987P DNA, most likely on their chromosome. Transcription of the 987P gene cluster appeared to be activated by the adjacent IS1 element.

  13. TAPDANCE: An automated tool to identify and annotate transposon insertion CISs and associations between CISs from next generation sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarver Aaron L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing approaches applied to the analyses of transposon insertion junction fragments generated in high throughput forward genetic screens has created the need for clear informatics and statistical approaches to deal with the massive amount of data currently being generated. Previous approaches utilized to 1 map junction fragments within the genome and 2 identify Common Insertion Sites (CISs within the genome are not practical due to the volume of data generated by current sequencing technologies. Previous approaches applied to this problem also required significant manual annotation. Results We describe Transposon Annotation Poisson Distribution Association Network Connectivity Environment (TAPDANCE software, which automates the identification of CISs within transposon junction fragment insertion data. Starting with barcoded sequence data, the software identifies and trims sequences and maps putative genomic sequence to a reference genome using the bowtie short read mapper. Poisson distribution statistics are then applied to assess and rank genomic regions showing significant enrichment for transposon insertion. Novel methods of counting insertions are used to ensure that the results presented have the expected characteristics of informative CISs. A persistent mySQL database is generated and utilized to keep track of sequences, mappings and common insertion sites. Additionally, associations between phenotypes and CISs are also identified using Fisher’s exact test with multiple testing correction. In a case study using previously published data we show that the TAPDANCE software identifies CISs as previously described, prioritizes them based on p-value, allows holistic visualization of the data within genome browser software and identifies relationships present in the structure of the data. Conclusions The TAPDANCE process is fully automated, performs similarly to previous labor intensive approaches

  14. Multiple homoplasious insertions and deletions of a Triticeae (Poaceae DNA transposon: a phylogenetic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason-Gamer Roberta J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stowaway elements are short, non-autonomous DNA transposons categorized as miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs. The high MITE copy number in grass genomes suggests an active history of amplification and insertion, but ongoing MITE activity has only rarely been seen, and ongoing Stowaway activity has never been observed. Thus, a phylogenetic perspective on presence vs. absence of elements in an aligned data set can provide valuable historical insights into the dynamics of MITE acquisition and loss. Results A Stowaway-like element resides within the fourth intron of a β-amylase gene in representatives of five genera in the wheat tribe, Triticeae. Its presence vs. absence was examined with reference to the β-amylase gene tree topology, and in light of sequence comparisons of the β-amylase elements to Triticeae Stowaway elements in the Entrez nucleotide database. Among the sequences lacking the element, there are five distinct putative excision footprints (one widespread and four restricted to unrelated lineages and two flanking deletions. The sequences that do contain elements are polyphyletic on the β-amylase tree, and their elements are divergent at the sequence level. The β-amylase elements do not form a monophyletic group relative to other Stowaway elements in Entrez; most are more similar to elements from other loci in other Triticeae genomes than they are to one another. Conclusion Combined, the phylogenetic distribution, sequence variation, and Entrez database comparisons indicate that a Stowaway-like element has undergone multiple deletions from and insertions into the same site in β-amylase intron 4 during the history of the tribe. The elements currently at the site represent multiple, distinct lineages that transcend generic boundaries. While patterns of Stowaway polymorphism across a phylogenetic data set do not allow evolutionary mechanisms to be inferred with certainty, they do provide

  15. TcA, the putative transposase of the C. elegans Tc1 transposon, has an N-terminal DNA binding domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Schukkink, R F; Plasterk, R H

    1990-01-01

    Tc1 is a transposon present in several copies in the genome of all natural isolates of the nematode C.elegans; it is actively transposing in many strains. In those strains Tc1 insertion is the main cause of spontaneous mutations. The transposon contains one large ORF that we call TcA; we assume that the TcA protein is the transposase of Tc1. We expressed TcA in E.coli, purified the protein and showed that it has a strong affinity for DNA (both single stranded and double stranded). A fusion pr...

  16. Transgenerational changes in plant physiology and in transposon expression in response to UV-C stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migicovsky, Zoe; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Stress has a negative impact on crop yield by altering a gain in biomass and affecting seed set. Recent reports suggest that exposure to stress also influences the response of the progeny. In this paper, we analyzed seed size, leaf size, bolting time and transposon expression in 2 consecutive generations of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to moderate UV-C stress. Since previous reports suggested a potential role of Dicer-like (DCL) proteins in the establishment of transgenerational response, we used dcl2, dcl3 and dcl4 mutants in parallel with wild-type plants. These studies revealed that leaf number decreased in the progeny of UV-C stressed plants, and bolting occurred later. Transposons were also re-activated in the progeny of stressed plants. Changes in the dcl mutants were less prominent than in wild-type plants. DCL2 and DCL3 appeared to be more important in the transgenerational stress memory than DCL4 because transgenerational changes were less profound in the dcl2 and dcl3 mutants.

  17. Transposon Invasion of the Paramecium Germline Genome Countered by a Domesticated PiggyBac Transposase and the NHEJ Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline Dubois

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequences related to transposons constitute a large fraction of extant genomes, but insertions within coding sequences have generally not been tolerated during evolution. Thanks to their unique nuclear dimorphism and to their original mechanism of programmed DNA elimination from their somatic nucleus (macronucleus, ciliates are emerging model organisms for the study of the impact of transposable elements on genomes. The germline genome of the ciliate Paramecium, located in its micronucleus, contains thousands of short intervening sequences, the IESs, which interrupt 47% of genes. Recent data provided support to the hypothesis that an evolutionary link exists between Paramecium IESs and Tc1/mariner transposons. During development of the macronucleus, IESs are excised precisely thanks to the coordinated action of PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase, and of the NHEJ double-strand break repair pathway. A PiggyMac homolog is also required for developmentally programmed DNA elimination in another ciliate, Tetrahymena. Here, we present an overview of the life cycle of these unicellular eukaryotes and of the developmentally programmed genome rearrangements that take place at each sexual cycle. We discuss how ancient domestication of a piggyBac transposase might have allowed Tc1/mariner elements to spread throughout the germline genome of Paramecium, without strong counterselection against insertion within genes.

  18. A four-element based transposon system for allele specific tagging ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the second step selected line would be crossed to a line containing Ac transposase to induce transpositions of Ds element to linked sites thereby exploiting the natural tendency of Ds element to jump to linked sites. Unlinked jumps of dSpm(Ds) and linked jumps of Ds could be monitored by appropriate marker genes.

  19. Heritable epigenetic mutation of a transposon-flanked Arabidopsis gene due to lack of the chromatin-remodeling factor DDM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saze, Hidetoshi; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2007-08-08

    Epigenetically silent transposons and repeats constitute a substantial proportion of eukaryotic genomes, but their impact on cellular gene function remains largely unexplored. In Arabidopsis, transposons are silenced by DNA methylation, and this methylation is often abolished by mutations in a chromatin-remodeling gene DDM1 (DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION 1). The ddm1 mutation induces various types of developmental abnormalities through de-repression of transposons and repeats. Here, we report a novel mechanism for a ddm1-induced syndrome, called bonsai (bns). We identified the gene responsible for the bns phenotypes by genetic linkage analysis and subsequent transcriptional analysis. The bns phenotypes are due to silencing of a putative Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) 13 gene. The BNS gene silencing was associated with DNA hypermethylation, which is in contrast to the ddm1-induced hypomethylation in the other genomic regions. This paradoxical BNS hypermethylation was reproducibly induced during self-pollination of the ddm1 mutant, and it was mediated by a long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) retrotransposon flanking the BNS gene. We discuss possible molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary implications of transposon-mediated epigenetic changes in the BNS locus.

  20. Registration of the barley transposon-tagged population I:seventy lines each with a single, unique site of Ds insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA-ARS), has developed and released a new genetic stock resource, a transposon-tagging barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) population comprised of 70 lines, TNP 200-TNP 207, TNP 210—TNP 229, TNP 232, TNP 233, TNP 235, TNP 237—TNP 262, TNP 264—T...

  1. A mariner transposon-based signature-tagged mutagenesis system for the analysis of oral infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Joanne; Casey, Pat G; Joyce, Susan A; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive foodborne pathogen and the causative agent of listerosis a disease that manifests predominately as meningitis in the non-pregnant individual or infection of the fetus and spontaneous abortion in pregnant women. Common-source outbreaks of foodborne listeriosis are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, relatively little is known concerning the mechanisms that govern infection via the oral route. In order to aid functional genetic analysis of the gastrointestinal phase of infection we designed a novel signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) system based upon the invasive L. monocytogenes 4b serotype H7858 strain. To overcome the limitations of gastrointestinal infection by L. monocytogenes in the mouse model we created a H7858 strain that is genetically optimised for oral infection in mice. Furthermore our STM system was based upon a mariner transposon to favour numerous and random transposition events throughout the L. monocytogenes genome. Use of the STM bank to investigate oral infection by L. monocytogenes identified 21 insertion mutants that demonstrated significantly reduced potential for infection in our model. The sites of transposon insertion included lmOh7858_0671 (encoding an internalin homologous to Lmo0610), lmOh7858_0898 (encoding a putative surface-expressed LPXTG protein homologous to Lmo0842), lmOh7858_2579 (encoding the HupDGC hemin transport system) and lmOh7858_0399 (encoding a putative fructose specific phosphotransferase system). We propose that this represents an optimised STM system for functional genetic analysis of foodborne/oral infection by L. monocytogenes.

  2. Characterization of constitutive promoters for piggyBac transposon-mediated stable transgene expression in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wen

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can undergo self-renewal and give rise to multi-lineages under given differentiation cues. It is frequently desirable to achieve a stable and high level of transgene expression in MSCs in order to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms through which MSC self-renewal and lineage commitment are regulated. Retroviral or lentiviral vector-mediated gene expression in MSCs usually decreases over time. Here, we choose to use the piggyBac transposon system and conduct a systematic comparison of six commonly-used constitutive promoters for their abilities to drive RFP or firefly luciferase expression in somatic HEK-293 cells and MSC iMEF cells. The analyzed promoters include three viral promoters (CMV, CMV-IVS, and SV40, one housekeeping gene promoter (UbC, and two composite promoters of viral and housekeeping gene promoters (hEFH and CAG-hEFH. CMV-derived promoters are shown to drive the highest transgene expression in HEK-293 cells, which is however significantly reduced in MSCs. Conversely, the composite promoter hEFH exhibits the highest transgene expression in MSCs whereas its promoter activity is modest in HEK-293 cells. The reduced transgene expression driven by CMV promoters in MSCs may be at least in part caused by DNA methylation, or to a lesser extent histone deacetlyation. However, the hEFH promoter is not significantly affected by these epigenetic modifications. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the hEFH composite promoter may be an ideal promoter to drive long-term and high level transgene expression using the piggyBac transposon vector in progenitor cells such as MSCs.

  3. Exogenous gene can be integrated into Nosema bombycis genome by mediating with a non-transposon vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Cao, Guangli; Lu, Yahong; Xue, Renyu; Kumar, Dhiraj; Hu, Xiaolong; Gong, Chengliang

    2016-08-01

    Nosema bombycis, a microsporidium, is a pathogen of pebrine disease of silkworms, and its genomic DNA sequences had been determined. Thus far, the research of gene functions of microsporidium including N. bombycis cannot be performed with gain/loss of function. In the present study, we targeted to construct transgenic N. bombycis. Therefore, hemocytes of the infected silkworm were transfected with a non-transposon vector pIZT/V5-His vector in vivo, and the blood, in which the hemocyte with green fluorescence could be observed, was added to the cultured BmN cells. Furthermore, normal BmN cells were infected with germinated N. bombycis, and the infected cells were transfected with pIZT/V5-His. Continuous fluorescence observations exposed that there were N. bombycis with green fluorescence in some N. bombycis-infected cells, and the extracted genome from the purified N. bombycis spore was used as templates. PCR amplification was carried out with a pair of primers for specifically amplifying the green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene; a specific product representing the gfp gene could be amplified. Expression of the GFP protein through Western blotting also demonstrated that the gfp gene was perfectly inserted into the genome of N. bombysis. These results illustrated that exogenous gene can be integrated into N. bombycis genome by mediating with a non-transposon vector. Our research not only offers a strategy for research on gene function of N. bombycis but also provides an important reference for constructing genetically modified microsporidium utilized for biocontrol of pests.

  4. A mariner transposon-based signature-tagged mutagenesis system for the analysis of oral infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Cummins

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive foodborne pathogen and the causative agent of listerosis a disease that manifests predominately as meningitis in the non-pregnant individual or infection of the fetus and spontaneous abortion in pregnant women. Common-source outbreaks of foodborne listeriosis are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, relatively little is known concerning the mechanisms that govern infection via the oral route. In order to aid functional genetic analysis of the gastrointestinal phase of infection we designed a novel signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM system based upon the invasive L. monocytogenes 4b serotype H7858 strain. To overcome the limitations of gastrointestinal infection by L. monocytogenes in the mouse model we created a H7858 strain that is genetically optimised for oral infection in mice. Furthermore our STM system was based upon a mariner transposon to favour numerous and random transposition events throughout the L. monocytogenes genome. Use of the STM bank to investigate oral infection by L. monocytogenes identified 21 insertion mutants that demonstrated significantly reduced potential for infection in our model. The sites of transposon insertion included lmOh7858_0671 (encoding an internalin homologous to Lmo0610, lmOh7858_0898 (encoding a putative surface-expressed LPXTG protein homologous to Lmo0842, lmOh7858_2579 (encoding the HupDGC hemin transport system and lmOh7858_0399 (encoding a putative fructose specific phosphotransferase system. We propose that this represents an optimised STM system for functional genetic analysis of foodborne/oral infection by L. monocytogenes.

  5. An active ac/ds transposon system for activation tagging in tomato cultivar m82 using clonal propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jared D; Pereira, Andy; Dickerman, Allan W; Veilleux, Richard E

    2013-05-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model organism for Solanaceae in both molecular and agronomic research. This project utilized Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and the transposon-tagging construct Activator (Ac)/Dissociator (Ds)-ATag-Bar_gosGFP to produce activation-tagged and knockout mutants in the processing tomato cultivar M82. The construct carried hygromycin resistance (hyg), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the transposase (TPase) of maize (Zea mays) Activator major transcript X054214.1 on the stable Ac element, along with a 35S enhancer tetramer and glufosinate herbicide resistance (BAR) on the mobile Ds-ATag element. An in vitro propagation strategy was used to produce a population of 25 T0 plants from a single transformed plant regenerated in tissue culture. A T1 population of 11,000 selfed and cv M82 backcrossed progeny was produced from the functional T0 line. This population was screened using glufosinate herbicide, hygromycin leaf painting, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Insertion sites of transposed Ds-ATag elements were identified through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and resulting product sequences were aligned to the recently published tomato genome. A population of 509 independent, Ds-only transposant lines spanning all 12 tomato chromosomes has been developed. Insertion site analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of these lines harbored Ds insertions conducive to activation tagging. The capacity of the Ds-ATag element to alter transcription was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR in two mutant lines. The transposon-tagged lines have been immortalized in seed stocks and can be accessed through an online database, providing a unique resource for tomato breeding and analysis of gene function in the background of a commercial tomato cultivar.

  6. The role of molecular markers and marker assisted selection in breeding for organic agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammerts van Bueren, E.T.; Backes, G.; de Vriend, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plant geneticists consider molecular marker assisted selection a useful additional tool in plant breeding programs to make selection more efficient. Standards for organic agriculture do not exclude the use of molecular markers as such, however for the organic sector the appropriateness of molecular...... markers is not self-evident and is often debated. Organic and low-input farming conditions require breeding for robust and flexible varieties, which may be hampered by too much focus on the molecular level. Pros and contras for application of molecular markers in breeding for organic agriculture...... was the topic of a recent European plant breeding workshop. The participants evaluated strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the use of molecular markers and we formalized their inputs into breeder’s perspectives and perspectives seen from the organic sector’s standpoint. Clear strengths were...

  7. Identification of Prostate Cancer Prognostic Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    role in cellular energetics and growth. So far, our results suggest that genomic alterations may serve as prognostic markers that would improve the...shRNA vectors with better knockdown efficiency . Stable ECI1- knockdown cells would be ultimately used to perform rescue experiments for the phenotypes

  8. The Role of Apoptosis Associated Markers in Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    To Compare the Serum Apoptosis-associated Markers Between Patients With Active TB and Patients With LTBI; To Evaluate the Efficiency of Apoptosis-associated Markers to Differentiate Potential of Active TB From LTBI

  9. Efficient mammalian germline transgenesis by cis-enhanced Sleeping Beauty transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Daniel F; Geurts, Aron M; Garbe, John R; Park, Chang-Won; Rangel-Filho, Artur; O'Grady, Scott M; Jacob, Howard J; Steer, Clifford J; Largaespada, David A; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2011-02-01

    Heightened interest in relevant models for human disease increases the need for improved methods for germline transgenesis. We describe a significant improvement in the creation of transgenic laboratory mice and rats by chemical modification of Sleeping Beauty transposons. Germline transgenesis in mice and rats was significantly enhanced by in vitro cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine methylation of transposons prior to injection. Heritability of transgene alleles was also greater from founder mice generated with methylated versus non-methylated transposon. The artificial methylation was reprogrammed in the early embryo, leading to founders that express the transgenes. We also noted differences in transgene insertion number and structure (single-insert versus concatemer) based on the influence of methylation and plasmid conformation (linear versus supercoiled), with supercoiled substrate resulting in efficient transpositional transgenesis (TnT) with near elimination of concatemer insertion. Combined, these substrate modifications resulted in increases in both the frequency of transgenic founders and the number of transgenes per founder, significantly elevating the number of potential transgenic lines. Given its simplicity, versatility and high efficiency, TnT with enhanced Sleeping Beauty components represents a compelling non-viral approach to modifying the mammalian germline.

  10. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  11. Identification of a novel transposon-associated phosphoethanolamine transferase gene, mcr-5, conferring colistin resistance in d-tartrate fermenting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiak, Maria; Fischer, Jennie; Hammerl, Jens A

    2017-01-01

    phosphoethanolamine transferase genes involved in colistin resistance. Subsequently PCR screening, S1-PFGE and DNA-DNA hybridization were performed to analyse the prevalence and location of the identified mcr-5 gene. Cloning and transformation experiments in Escherichia coli DH5α and Salmonella Paratyphi B d Ta...... during 2011-13. The respective gene, further termed as mcr-5 (1644 bp), is part of a 7337 bp transposon of the Tn 3 family and usually located on related multi-copy ColE-type plasmids. Interestingly, in one isolate an additional subclone with a chromosomal location of the mcr-5 transposon was observed....... Our findings suggest that the transfer of colistin-resistance-mediating phosphoethanolamine transferase genes from bacterial chromosomes to mobile genetic elements has occurred in multiple independent events raising concern regarding their variety, prevalence and impact on public health....

  12. Plasmid-Encoded AmpC (pAmpC) in Enterobacteriaceae: epidemiology of microorganisms and resistance markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, Daniela; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Quinteros, Mirta; Giovanakis, Marta; Vay, Carlos; Lascialandare, Silvana; Mutti, Daniel; Pagniez, Gastón; Almuzara, Marisa; Gutkind, Gabriel; Radice, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    CMY-2 Β-lactamase is an important cause of Β-lactam resistance in Enterobacteriaceae and constitutes the most widespread pAmpC. Although CMY-2 has been previously recognized in our region, the real prevalence and epidemiology of this resistance marker was uncertain. During August-October 2009, we conducted a multicenter, prospective study to determine pAmpC prevalence and to characterize CMY-2 producing Escherichia coli associated plasmids. Plasmid-encoded AmpC prevalence was 0.9 % in enterobacteria in this period, being CMY-2 prevalent and to a lesser extent DHA. Molecular typing of CMY-2- producing Escherichia coli isolates showed several lineages. Moreover, replicon typing of cmy-2- containing plasmids displayed a broad diversity in Inc/cmy-2 links. Therefore, association of cmy-2 with specific transposon elements may be responsible for the spread of this resistance marker in Enterobacteriaceae.

  13. Transposon-mediated Chromosomal Integration of Transgenes in the Parasitic Nematode Strongyloides ratti and Establishment of Stable Transgenic Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Thomas J.; Massey, Holman C.; Pearce, Edward J.; Lok, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic transformation is a potential tool for analyzing gene function and thereby identifying new drug and vaccine targets in parasitic nematodes, which adversely affect more than one billion people. We have previously developed a robust system for transgenesis in Strongyloides spp. using gonadal microinjection for gene transfer. In this system, transgenes are expressed in promoter-regulated fashion in the F1 but are silenced in subsequent generations, presumably because of their location in repetitive episomal arrays. To counteract this silencing, we explored transposon-mediated chromosomal integration of transgenes in S. ratti. To this end, we constructed a donor vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Ss-act-2 promoter with flanking inverted tandem repeats specific for the piggyBac transposon. In three experiments, free-living Strongyloides ratti females were transformed with this donor vector and a helper plasmid encoding the piggyBac transposase. A mean of 7.9% of F1 larvae were GFP-positive. We inoculated rats with GFP-positive F1 infective larvae, and 0.5% of 6014 F2 individuals resulting from this host passage were GFP-positive. We cultured GFP-positive F2 individuals to produce GFP-positive F3 L3i for additional rounds of host and culture passage. Mean GFP expression frequencies in subsequent generations were 15.6% in the F3, 99.0% in the F4, 82.4% in the F5 and 98.7% in the F6. The resulting transgenic lines now have virtually uniform GFP expression among all progeny after at least 10 generations of passage. Chromosomal integration of the reporter transgenes was confirmed by Southern blotting and splinkerette PCR, which revealed the transgene flanked by S. ratti genomic sequences corresponding to five discrete integration sites. BLAST searches of flanking sequences against the S. ratti genome revealed integrations in five contigs. This result provides the basis for two powerful functional genomic tools in S. ratti

  14. A novel transposon construct expressing PhoA with potential for studying protein expression and translocation in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panicker Indu S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a major poultry pathogen and causes severe economic loss to the poultry industry. In mycoplasmas lipoproteins are abundant on the membrane surface and play a critical role in interactions with the host, but tools for exploring their molecular biology are limited. Results In this study we examined whether the alkaline phosphatase gene (phoA from Escherichia coli could be used as a reporter in mycoplasmas. The promoter region from the gene for elongation factor Tu (ltuf and the signal and acylation sequences from the vlhA 1.1 gene, both from Mycoplasma gallisepticum , together with the coding region of phoA , were assembled in the transposon-containing plasmid pISM2062.2 (pTAP to enable expression of alkaline phosphatase (AP as a recombinant lipoprotein. The transposon was used to transform M. gallisepticum strain S6. As a control, a plasmid containing a similar construct, but lacking the signal and acylation sequences, was also produced (pTP and also introduced into M. gallisepticum . Using a colorimetric substrate for detection of alkaline phosphatase activity, it was possible to detect transformed M. gallisepticum . The level of transcription of phoA in organisms transformed with pTP was lower than in those transformed with pTAP, and alkaline phosphatase was not detected by immunoblotting or enzymatic assays in pTP transformants, eventhough alkaline phosphatase expression could be readily detected by both assays in pTAP transformants. Alkaline phosphatase was shown to be located in the hydrophobic fraction of transformed mycoplasmas following Triton X-114 partitioning and in the membrane fraction after differential fractionation. Trypsin proteolysis confirmed its surface exposure. The inclusion of the VlhA lipoprotein signal sequence in pTAP enabled translocation of PhoA and acylation of the amino terminal cysteine moiety, as confirmed by the effect of treatment with globomycin and radiolabelling

  15. Transposon-Derived and Satellite-Derived Repetitive Sequences Play Distinct Functional Roles in Mammalian Intron Size Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Su, Yao; Wang, Xumin; Lei, Hongxing; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Repetitive sequences (RSs) are redundant, complex at times, and often lineage-specific, representing significant “building” materials for genes and genomes. According to their origins, sequence characteristics, and ways of propagation, repetitive sequences are divided into transposable elements (TEs) and satellite sequences (SSs) as well as related subfamilies and subgroups hierarchically. The combined changes attributable to the repetitive sequences alter gene and genome architectures, such as the expansion of exonic, intronic, and intergenic sequences, and most of them propagate in a seemingly random fashion and contribute very significantly to the entire mutation spectrum of mammalian genomes. Principal findings Our analysis is focused on evolutional features of TEs and SSs in the intronic sequence of twelve selected mammalian genomes. We divided them into four groups—primates, large mammals, rodents, and primary mammals—and used four non-mammalian vertebrate species as the out-group. After classifying intron size variation in an intron-centric way based on RS-dominance (TE-dominant or SS-dominant intron expansions), we observed several distinct profiles in intron length and positioning in different vertebrate lineages, such as retrotransposon-dominance in mammals and DNA transposon-dominance in the lower vertebrates, amphibians and fishes. The RS patterns of mouse and rat genes are most striking, which are not only distinct from those of other mammals but also different from that of the third rodent species analyzed in this study—guinea pig. Looking into the biological functions of relevant genes, we observed a two-dimensional divergence; in particular, genes that possess SS-dominant and/or RS-free introns are enriched in tissue-specific development and transcription regulation in all mammalian lineages. In addition, we found that the tendency of transposons in increasing intron size is much stronger than that of satellites, and the

  16. Role of transposon-derived small RNAs in the interplay between genomes and parasitic DNA in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, Misuzu; Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Nagato, Yasuo; Ono, Akemi; Ishiwata, Aiko; Sato, Yutaka

    2012-09-01

    RNA silencing is a defense system against "genomic parasites" such as transposable elements (TE), which are potentially harmful to host genomes. In plants, transcripts from TEs induce production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and are processed into small RNAs (small interfering RNAs, siRNAs) that suppress TEs by RNA-directed DNA methylation. Thus, the majority of TEs are epigenetically silenced. On the other hand, most of the eukaryotic genome is composed of TEs and their remnants, suggesting that TEs have evolved countermeasures against host-mediated silencing. Under some circumstances, TEs can become active and increase in copy number. Knowledge is accumulating on the mechanisms of TE silencing by the host; however, the mechanisms by which TEs counteract silencing are poorly understood. Here, we show that a class of TEs in rice produces a microRNA (miRNA) to suppress host silencing. Members of the microRNA820 (miR820) gene family are located within CACTA DNA transposons in rice and target a de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, OsDRM2, one of the components of epigenetic silencing. We confirmed that miR820 negatively regulates the expression of OsDRM2. In addition, we found that expression levels of various TEs are increased quite sensitively in response to decreased OsDRM2 expression and DNA methylation at TE loci. Furthermore, we found that the nucleotide sequence of miR820 and its recognition site within the target gene in some Oryza species have co-evolved to maintain their base-pairing ability. The co-evolution of these sequences provides evidence for the functionality of this regulation. Our results demonstrate how parasitic elements in the genome escape the host's defense machinery. Furthermore, our analysis of the regulation of OsDRM2 by miR820 sheds light on the action of transposon-derived small RNAs, not only as a defense mechanism for host genomes but also as a regulator of interactions between hosts and their parasitic elements.

  17. Role of transposon-derived small RNAs in the interplay between genomes and parasitic DNA in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misuzu Nosaka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is a defense system against "genomic parasites" such as transposable elements (TE, which are potentially harmful to host genomes. In plants, transcripts from TEs induce production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs and are processed into small RNAs (small interfering RNAs, siRNAs that suppress TEs by RNA-directed DNA methylation. Thus, the majority of TEs are epigenetically silenced. On the other hand, most of the eukaryotic genome is composed of TEs and their remnants, suggesting that TEs have evolved countermeasures against host-mediated silencing. Under some circumstances, TEs can become active and increase in copy number. Knowledge is accumulating on the mechanisms of TE silencing by the host; however, the mechanisms by which TEs counteract silencing are poorly understood. Here, we show that a class of TEs in rice produces a microRNA (miRNA to suppress host silencing. Members of the microRNA820 (miR820 gene family are located within CACTA DNA transposons in rice and target a de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, OsDRM2, one of the components of epigenetic silencing. We confirmed that miR820 negatively regulates the expression of OsDRM2. In addition, we found that expression levels of various TEs are increased quite sensitively in response to decreased OsDRM2 expression and DNA methylation at TE loci. Furthermore, we found that the nucleotide sequence of miR820 and its recognition site within the target gene in some Oryza species have co-evolved to maintain their base-pairing ability. The co-evolution of these sequences provides evidence for the functionality of this regulation. Our results demonstrate how parasitic elements in the genome escape the host's defense machinery. Furthermore, our analysis of the regulation of OsDRM2 by miR820 sheds light on the action of transposon-derived small RNAs, not only as a defense mechanism for host genomes but also as a regulator of interactions between hosts and their parasitic elements.

  18. Advance of molecular marker application in the tobacco research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 7 (25) ... The application and development of molecular marker in tobacco genetic research was presented ..... N. debneyi origin. The finding of linked marker of disease resistant gene on the DNA level can be applied to assist selection, increase breeding efficiency and ...

  19. Molecular markers linked to apomixis in Panicum maximum Jacq ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bulked segregant analysis was performed using 184 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers in an F1 population of P. maximum segregating for reproductive mode. Four RAPD markers linked to apomixis were identified and mapped in this population. These markers showed good selection efficiency, ranging ...

  20. Identification of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the most effective method for disease control. The application of molecular markers is an efficient way to identify host resistance for breeding programs. In this study, bulked segregant analysis (BSA) was used to search for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers linked to the late blight resistance gene Ph-3, ...

  1. Tn5-Mob transposon mediated transfer of salt tolerance and symbiotic characteristics between Rhizobia genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Wu, Z; Gao, W; Li, J

    1993-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti 042B is a fast-growing, salt-tolerant and high efficiency nitrogen-fixing symbiont with alfalfa. Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 grows slowly, and cannot grow in YMA medium containing 0.1M NaCl, but nodulates and fixed nitrogen efficiently with soybean. Eighty-six transconjugants, called SR, were obtained by inserting Tn5-Mob randomly into genomes of 042B using pSUP5011 and helper plasmid RP4. Selecting 4 SR strains randomly and introducing DNA fragment of SR into USDA110 with helper plasmid R68.45 by triparental mating, 106 transconjugants, called BSR, were constructed. Most of BSR strains had the fast-growing phenotype and could tolerate 0.3-0.5M NaCl generally. Some of them produced melanine. When soybean and alfalfa were inoculated with these transconjugants BSR, 47 out of 90 BSR were found to nodulate in both of these plants, but no nitrogenase activity was observed with alfalfa; 26 strains could only nodulate and fix nitrogen in soybean; 13 strains could nodulate in alfalfa but did not fix nitrogen; 4 strains failed to nodulate in either soybean or alfalfa. Among them, 4 transconjugants which tolerated and fixed nitrogen efficiently in soybean were constructed.

  2. The urine marker test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Stine Nylandsted; Elsborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    of this new method via two questionnaires (n = 253). Furthermore, a third study (n = 91) investigated whether ingestion of the marker can identify the urine as coming from a specific person and whether the marker interferes with the detection of prohibited substances. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The results...... indicate that this new method finds wide acceptance both from athletes who have only heard about the procedure and those who have actually tested the new method. Furthermore, the marker, which can identify urine as coming from a specific person, does not interfere with the detection of prohibited...... that athletes are actually delivering their own urine. A method that can be used to alleviate the negative impact of a supervised urination procedure and which can also identify urine as coming from a specific athlete is the urine marker test. Monodisperse low molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEGs...

  3. VT Roadside Historic Markers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Roadside Historic Site Marker program has proven an effective way to commemorate Vermont’s many people, events, and places of regional, statewide, or national...

  4. Genome-Wide Transposon Mutagenesis Indicates that Mycobacterium marinum Customizes Its Virulence Mechanisms for Survival and Replication in Different Hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Weerdenburg, Eveline M.

    2015-02-17

    The interaction of environmental bacteria with unicellular eukaryotes is generally considered a major driving force for the evolution of intracellular pathogens, allowing them to survive and replicate in phagocytic cells of vertebrate hosts. To test this hypothesis on a genome-wide level, we determined for the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum whether it uses conserved strategies to exploit host cells from both protozoan and vertebrate origin. Using transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), we determined differences in genetic requirements for survival and replication in phagocytic cells of organisms from different kingdoms. In line with the general hypothesis, we identified a number of general virulence mechanisms, including the type VII protein secretion system ESX-1, biosynthesis of polyketide lipids, and utilization of sterols. However, we were also able to show that M. marinum contains an even larger set of host-specific virulence determinants, including proteins involved in the modification of surface glycolipids and, surprisingly, the auxiliary proteins of the ESX-1 system. Several of these factors were in fact counterproductive in other hosts. Therefore, M. marinum contains different sets of virulence factors that are tailored for specific hosts. Our data imply that although amoebae could function as a training ground for intracellular pathogens, they do not fully prepare pathogens for crossing species barriers.

  5. Development of stable reporter system cloning luxCDABE genes into chromosome of Salmonella enterica serotypes using Tn7 transposon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Mark L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis may be a food safety problem when raw food products are mishandled and not fully cooked. In previous work, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella enterica serotypes using a plasmid-based reporting system that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products in short term studies. In this study, we report the use of a Tn7-based transposon system for subcloning of luxCDABE genes into the chromosome of eleven Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from the broiler production continuum. Results We found that the lux operon is constitutively expressed from the chromosome post-transposition and the lux cassette is stable without external pressure, i.e. antibiotic selection, for all Salmonella enterica serotypes used. Bioluminescence expression is based on an active electron transport chain and is directly related with metabolic activity. This relationship was quantified by measuring bioluminescence against a temperature gradient in aqueous solution using a luminometer. In addition, bioluminescent monitoring of two serotypes confirmed that our chicken skin model has the potential to be used to evaluate pathogen mitigation strategies. Conclusions This study demonstrated that our new stable reporting system eliminates bioluminescence variation due to plasmid instability and provides a reliable real-time experimental system to study application of preventive measures for Salmonella on food products in real-time for both short and long term studies.

  6. Identification of genes required by Bacillus thuringiensis for survival in soil by transposon-directed insertion site sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Alistair H; Rachwal, Phillip A; Vaid, Alka

    2014-04-01

    Transposon-directed insertion site sequencing was used to identify genes required by Bacillus thuringiensis to survive in non-axenic plant/soil microcosms. A total of 516 genetic loci fulfilled the criteria as conferring survival characteristics. Of these, 127 (24.6 %) were associated with uptake and transport systems; 227 loci (44.0 %) coded for enzymatic properties; 49 (9.5 %) were gene regulation or sensory loci; 40 (7.8 %) were structural proteins found in the cell envelope or had enzymatic activities related to it and 24 (4.7 %) were involved in the production of antibiotics or resistance to them. Eighty-three (16.1 %) encoded hypothetical proteins or those of unknown function. The ability to form spores was a key survival characteristic in the microcosms: bacteria, inoculated in either spore or vegetative form, were able to multiply and colonise the soil, whereas a sporulation-deficient mutant was not. The presence of grass seedlings was critical to colonisation. Bacteria labelled with green fluorescent protein were observed to adhere to plant roots. The sporulation-specific promoter of spo0A, the key regulator of sporulation, was strongly activated in the rhizosphere. In contrast, the vegetative-specific promoters of spo0A and PlcR, a pleiotropic regulator of genes with diverse activities, were only very weakly activated.

  7. Vast potential for using the piggyBac transposon to engineer transgenic plants at specific genomic locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric T.; Owens, Jesse B.; Moisyadi, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acceptance of bioengineered plants by some nations is hampered by a number of factors, including the random insertion of a transgene into the host genome. Emerging technologies, such as site-specific nucleases, are enabling plant scientists to promote recombination or mutations at specific plant loci. Off target activity of these nucleases may limit widespread use. Insertion of transgenes by transposases engineered with a specific DNA binding domain has been accomplished in a number of organisms, but not in plants. The piggyBac transposon system, originally isolated from an insect, has been utilized to transform a variety of organisms. The piggyBac transposase is amendable to structural modifications, and was able to insert a transgene at a specific human locus through fusion of a DNA binding domain to its N-terminus. Recent developments demonstrating the activity of piggyBac transposase in plants is an important first step toward the potential use of engineered versions of piggyBac transposase for site-specific transgene insertion in plants. PMID:26930269

  8. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of the tet (M)-carrying conjugative transposon Tn5251 of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Francesco; Oggioni, Marco R; Pozzi, Gianni; Iannelli, Francesco

    2010-07-01

    The Tn916-like genetic element Tn5251 is part of the composite conjugative transposon (CTn) Tn5253 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a 64.5-kb chromosomal element originally called Omega(cat-tet) BM6001. DNA sequence analysis showed that Tn5251 is 18 033-bp long and contains 22 ORFs, 20 of which have the same direction of transcription. Annotation was possible for 11 out of 22 ORFs, including the tet(M) tetracycline resistance gene and int and xis involved in the integration/excision process. Autonomous copies of Tn5251 were generated during matings of Tn5253-containing donors with S. pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis. Tn5251 was shown to integrate at different sites in the bacterial chromosome. It behaves as a fully functional CTn capable of independent conjugal transfer to a variety of bacterial species including S. pneumoniae, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, E. faecalis and Bacillus subtilis. The excision of Tn5251 produces a circular intermediate and a deletion in Tn5253 at a level of 1.2 copies per 10(5) chromosomes.

  9. The Identification of Genes Important in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola Plant Colonisation Using In Vitro Screening of Transposon Libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharani Manoharan

    Full Text Available The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph colonises the surface of common bean plants before moving into the interior of plant tissue, via wounds and stomata. In the intercellular spaces the pathogen proliferates in the apoplastic fluid and forms microcolonies (biofilms around plant cells. If the pathogen can suppress the plant's natural resistance response, it will cause halo blight disease. The process of resistance suppression is fairly well understood, but the mechanisms used by the pathogen in colonisation are less clear. We hypothesised that we could apply in vitro genetic screens to look for changes in motility, colony formation, and adhesion, which are proxies for infection, microcolony formation and cell adhesion. We made transposon (Tn mutant libraries of Pph strains 1448A and 1302A and found 106/1920 mutants exhibited alterations in colony morphology, motility and biofilm formation. Identification of the insertion point of the Tn identified within the genome highlighted, as expected, a number of altered motility mutants bearing mutations in genes encoding various parts of the flagellum. Genes involved in nutrient biosynthesis, membrane associated proteins, and a number of conserved hypothetical protein (CHP genes were also identified. A mutation of one CHP gene caused a positive increase in in planta bacterial growth. This rapid and inexpensive screening method allows the discovery of genes important for in vitro traits that can be correlated to roles in the plant interaction.

  10. A TALE of transposition: Tn3-like transposons play a major role in the spread of pathogenicity determinants of Xanthomonas citri and other xanthomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rafael Marini; de Oliveira, Amanda Carolina P; Moreira, Leandro M; Belasque, José; Gourbeyre, Edith; Siguier, Patricia; Ferro, Maria Inês T; Ferro, Jesus A; Chandler, Michael; Varani, Alessandro M

    2015-02-17

    Members of the genus Xanthomonas are among the most important phytopathogens. A key feature of Xanthomonas pathogenesis is the translocation of type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins (T3SEs) into the plant target cells via a T3SS. Several T3SEs and a murein lytic transglycosylase gene (mlt, required for citrus canker symptoms) are found associated with three transposition-related genes in Xanthomonas citri plasmid pXAC64. These are flanked by short inverted repeats (IRs). The region was identified as a transposon, TnXax1, with typical Tn3 family features, including a transposase and two recombination genes. Two 14-bp palindromic sequences within a 193-bp potential resolution site occur between the recombination genes. Additional derivatives carrying different T3SEs and other passenger genes occur in different Xanthomonas species. The T3SEs include transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs). Certain TALEs are flanked by the same IRs as found in TnXax1 to form mobile insertion cassettes (MICs), suggesting that they may be transmitted horizontally. A significant number of MICs carrying other passenger genes (including a number of TALE genes) were also identified, flanked by the same TnXax1 IRs and delimited by 5-bp target site duplications. We conclude that a large fraction of T3SEs, including individual TALEs and potential pathogenicity determinants, have spread by transposition and that TnXax1, which exhibits all of the essential characteristics of a functional transposon, may be involved in driving MIC transposition. We also propose that TALE genes may diversify by fork slippage during the replicative Tn3 family transposition. These mechanisms may play a crucial role in the emergence of Xanthomonas pathogenicity. Xanthomonas genomes carry many insertion sequences (IS) and transposons, which play an important role in their evolution and architecture. This study reveals a key relationship between transposons and pathogenicity determinants in

  11. Medline search engine for finding genetic markers with biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weijian; Wang, Pinglang; Watson, Stanley J; Meng, Fan

    2007-09-15

    Genome-wide high density SNP association studies are expected to identify various SNP alleles associated with different complex disorders. Understanding the biological significance of these SNP alleles in the context of existing literature is a major challenge since existing search engines are not designed to search literature for SNPs or other genetic markers. The literature mining of gene and protein functions has received significant attention and effort while similar work on genetic markers and their related diseases is still in its infancy. Our goal is to develop a web-based tool that facilitates the mining of Medline literature related to genetic studies and gene/protein function studies. Our solution consists of four main function modules for (1) identification of different types of genetic markers or genetic variations in Medline records (2) distinguishing positive versus negative linkage or association between genetic markers and diseases (3) integrating marker genomic location data from different databases to enable the retrieval of Medline records related to markers in the same linkage disequilibrium region (4) and a web interface called MarkerInfoFinder to search, display, sort and download Medline citation results. Tests using published data suggest MarkerInfoFinder can significantly increase the efficiency of finding genetic disorders and their underlying molecular mechanisms. The functions we developed will also be used to build a knowledge base for genetic markers and diseases. The MarkerInfoFinder is publicly available at: http://brainarray.mbni.med.umich.edu/brainarray/datamining/MarkerInfoFinder.

  12. Tumor Markers: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay G Nayak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is a potentially fatal disease that has been the bane of clinicians throughout the world. Though various modalities of management exist, early detection still provides the best hope for any cancer patient Advances in molecular diagnosis have led to a plethora of choices being available in the fight against cancer. Abnormal cellular products elucidated from malignant cells can be detected and measured in various body tissues and fluids and constitute tumor markers. The various clinical applications and their limitations are covered in the brief overview to help the oral medicine specialist understand the relevant advances made in the field of tumor markers.

  13. Transposable Element Junctions in Marker Development and Genomic Characterization of Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Mazaheri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Barley is a model plant in genomic studies of Triticeae species. However, barley’s large genome size and high repetitive sequence content complicate the whole-genome sequencing. The majority of the barley genome is composed of transposable elements (TEs. In this study, TE repeat junctions (RJs were used to develop a large-scale molecular marker platform, as a prerequisite to genome assembly. A total of 10.22 Gb of barley nonassembled 454 sequencing data were screened with RJPrimers pipeline. In total, 9,881,561 TE junctions were identified. From detected RJs, 400,538 polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based RJ markers (RJMs were designed across the genome, with an average of 39 markers/Mb. The utility of designed markers was tested using a random subset of RJMs. Over 94% of the markers successfully amplified amplicons, among which ∼90% were genome specific. In addition to marker design, identified RJs were utilized to detect 1190,885 TEs across the genome. In gene-poor regions of the genome elements comprised the majority of TEs (∼65%, while in gene-rich regions , , and were the main transposons, each representing an average ∼23% of total TEs. The numerous RJ primer pairs developed in this study will be a valuable resource for barley genomic studies including genomic selection, fine mapping, and genome assembly. In addition, the results of this study show that characterizing RJs provides insight into TE composition of species without a sequenced genome but for which short-read sequence data is available.

  14. Putative adaptive inter-slope divergence of transposon frequency in fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) at "Evolution Canyon", Mount Carmel, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiles, Avigdor; Raz, Shmuel; Ben-Abu, Yuval; Nevo, Eviatar

    2015-10-14

    The current analysis of transposon elements (TE) in Drosophila melanogaster at Evolution Canyon, (EC), Israel, is based on data and analysis done by our collaborators (Drs. J. Gonzalez, J. Martinez and W. Makalowski, this issue). They estimated the frequencies of 28 TEs (transposon elements) in fruit flies (D. melanogaster) from the ecologically tropic, hot, and dry south-facing slope (SFS) or "African" slope (AS) of EC and compared it with the TE frequencies on the temperate-cool and humid north-facing slope (NFS) or "European" slope (ES), separated, on average, by 250 m. The flies were sampled from two stations on each slope. We received their results, including the frequencies of each TE on each slope, and the probabilities of the statistical analyses (G-tests) of each TE separately. We continued the analysis of the inter-slope differences of the frequencies of the TEs, and based our different conclusions on that analysis and on the difference between micro (=EC) and macro (2000 km.) comparisons [Gonzalez et al. 2015 doi: 10.1186/s13062-015-0075-4 ]. Our collaborators based all their conclusions on the non-significant results of each of the individual tests of the 28 TEs. We analysed also the distribution of the TE differences between the slopes, based on their results. Thirteen TEs were more frequent on the SFS, 11 were more frequent on the NFS, and four had equal frequencies. Because of the equalizing effect of the ongoing migration, only small and temporary differences between the slopes (0 - 0.06) were regarded by us as random fluctuations (drift). Three TEs were intermediate (0.08-0.09) and await additional research. The 11 TEs with large frequency differences (0.12 - 0.22) were regarded by us as putative adaptive TEs, because the equalizing power of ongoing migration will eliminate random large differences. Five of them were higher on the SFS and six were higher on the NFS. Gaps in the distribution of the differences distinguished between the large and

  15. The use of transposon insertion sequencing to interrogate the core functional genome of the legume symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Perry

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The free-living legume symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum is of significant economic value because of its ability to provide fixed nitrogen to globally important leguminous food crops, such as peas and lentils. Discovery based research into the genetics and physiology of R. leguminosarum provides the foundational knowledge necessary for understanding the bacterium’s complex lifestyle, and to subsequently improve its application as a crop biological. Transposon insertion sequencing (INSeq facilitates high-throughput forward genetic screening at a genomic scale to identify individual genes required for growth in a specific environment. In this study we applied INSeq to screen the genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae strain 3841 (RLV3841 for genes required for growth on minimal mannitol containing medium. Results from this study were contrasted with a prior INSeq experiment screened on peptide rich media to identify a common set of functional genes necessary for basic physiology. Contrasting the two growth conditions indicated that approximately 10% of the chromosome was required for growth, under both growth conditions. Specific genes that were essential to singular growth conditions were also identified. Data from INSeq screening on mannitol as a sole carbon source were used to reconstruct a metabolic map summarizing growth impaired phenotypes observed in the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, Entner-Doudoroff pathway, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle. This revealed the presence of mannitol dependent and independent metabolic pathways required for growth, along with identifying metabolic steps with isozymes or possible carbon flux by-passes. Additionally, genes were identified on plasmids pRL11 and pRL12 that are likely to encode for functional activities important to the central physiology of RLV3841.

  16. Striking structural dynamism and nucleotide sequence variation of the transposon Galileo in the genome of Drosophila mojavensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Mar; Bello, Xabier; Puig, Marta; Maside, Xulio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2013-02-04

    Galileo is a transposable element responsible for the generation of three chromosomal inversions in natural populations of Drosophila buzzatii. Although the most characteristic feature of Galileo is the long internally-repetitive terminal inverted repeats (TIRs), which resemble the Drosophila Foldback element, its transposase-coding sequence has led to its classification as a member of the P-element superfamily (Class II, subclass 1, TIR order). Furthermore, Galileo has a wide distribution in the genus Drosophila, since it has been found in 6 of the 12 Drosophila sequenced genomes. Among these species, D. mojavensis, the one closest to D. buzzatii, presented the highest diversity in sequence and structure of Galileo elements. In the present work, we carried out a thorough search and annotation of all the Galileo copies present in the D. mojavensis sequenced genome. In our set of 170 Galileo copies we have detected 5 Galileo subfamilies (C, D, E, F, and X) with different structures ranging from nearly complete, to only 2 TIR or solo TIR copies. Finally, we have explored the structural and length variation of the Galileo copies that point out the relatively frequent rearrangements within and between Galileo elements. Different mechanisms responsible for these rearrangements are discussed. Although Galileo is a transposable element with an ancient history in the D. mojavensis genome, our data indicate a recent transpositional activity. Furthermore, the dynamism in sequence and structure, mainly affecting the TIRs, suggests an active exchange of sequences among the copies. This exchange could lead to new subfamilies of the transposon, which could be crucial for the long-term survival of the element in the genome.

  17. Possible Origins of CTnBST, a Conjugative Transposon Found Recently in a Human Colonic Bacteroides Strain▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David J.; Shoemaker, Nadja B.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2007-01-01

    A previous survey of Bacteroides isolates suggested that the ermB gene entered Bacteroides spp. recently. Previously, ermB had been found almost exclusively in gram-positive bacteria. In one Bacteroides strain, ermB was located on 100-kb conjugative transposon (CTn) CTnBST. To assess the possible origin of this CTn, we obtained the full DNA sequence of CTnBST and used this information to investigate its possible origins. Over one-half of CTnBST had high sequence identity to a putative CTn found in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis YCH46. This included the ends of the CTn and genes involved in integration, transfer, and excision. However, the region around the ermB gene contained genes that appeared to originate from gram-positive organisms. In particular, a 7-kb segment containing the ermB gene was 100% identical to an ermB region found in the genome of the gram-positive bacterium Arcanobacterium pyogenes. A screen of Bacteroides isolates whose DNA cross-hybridized with a CTnBST probe revealed that several isolates did not carry the 7-kb region, implying that the acquisition of this region may be more recent than the acquisition of the entire CTnBST element by Bacteroides spp. We have also identified other Bacteroides isolates that carry a slightly modified 7-kb region but have no other traces of CTnBST. Thus, it is possible that this 7-kb region could itself be part of a mobile element that has inserted in a Bacteroides CTn. Our results show that CTnBST is a hybrid element which has acquired a portion of its coding region from gram-positive bacteria but which may originally have come from Bacteroides spp. or some related species. PMID:17483268

  18. Possible origins of CTnBST, a conjugative transposon found recently in a human colonic Bacteroides strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, David J; Shoemaker, Nadja B; Salyers, Abigail A

    2007-07-01

    A previous survey of Bacteroides isolates suggested that the ermB gene entered Bacteroides spp. recently. Previously, ermB had been found almost exclusively in gram-positive bacteria. In one Bacteroides strain, ermB was located on 100-kb conjugative transposon (CTn) CTnBST. To assess the possible origin of this CTn, we obtained the full DNA sequence of CTnBST and used this information to investigate its possible origins. Over one-half of CTnBST had high sequence identity to a putative CTn found in the genome of Bacteroides fragilis YCH46. This included the ends of the CTn and genes involved in integration, transfer, and excision. However, the region around the ermB gene contained genes that appeared to originate from gram-positive organisms. In particular, a 7-kb segment containing the ermB gene was 100% identical to an ermB region found in the genome of the gram-positive bacterium Arcanobacterium pyogenes. A screen of Bacteroides isolates whose DNA cross-hybridized with a CTnBST probe revealed that several isolates did not carry the 7-kb region, implying that the acquisition of this region may be more recent than the acquisition of the entire CTnBST element by Bacteroides spp. We have also identified other Bacteroides isolates that carry a slightly modified 7-kb region but have no other traces of CTnBST. Thus, it is possible that this 7-kb region could itself be part of a mobile element that has inserted in a Bacteroides CTn. Our results show that CTnBST is a hybrid element which has acquired a portion of its coding region from gram-positive bacteria but which may originally have come from Bacteroides spp. or some related species.

  19. Early embryogenesis-specific expression of the rice transposon Ping enhances amplification of the MITE mPing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Teramoto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs are numerically predominant transposable elements in the rice genome, and their activities have influenced the evolution of genes. Very little is known about how MITEs can rapidly amplify to thousands in the genome. The rice MITE mPing is quiescent in most cultivars under natural growth conditions, although it is activated by various stresses, such as tissue culture, gamma-ray irradiation, and high hydrostatic pressure. Exceptionally in the temperate japonica rice strain EG4 (cultivar Gimbozu, mPing has reached over 1000 copies in the genome, and is amplifying owing to its active transposition even under natural growth conditions. Being the only active MITE, mPing in EG4 is an appropriate material to study how MITEs amplify in the genome. Here, we provide important findings regarding the transposition and amplification of mPing in EG4. Transposon display of mPing using various tissues of a single EG4 plant revealed that most de novo mPing insertions arise in embryogenesis during the period from 3 to 5 days after pollination (DAP, and a large majority of these insertions are transmissible to the next generation. Locus-specific PCR showed that mPing excisions and insertions arose at the same time (3 to 5 DAP. Moreover, expression analysis and in situ hybridization analysis revealed that Ping, an autonomous partner for mPing, was markedly up-regulated in the 3 DAP embryo of EG4, whereas such up-regulation of Ping was not observed in the mPing-inactive cultivar Nipponbare. These results demonstrate that the early embryogenesis-specific expression of Ping is responsible for the successful amplification of mPing in EG4. This study helps not only to elucidate the whole mechanism of mPing amplification but also to further understand the contribution of MITEs to genome evolution.

  20. Magik Markers Trehvis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Müra-rock'i viljelevast USA duost Magik Markers (ansambel osaleb režissöör Veiko Õunapuu uue mängufilmi "Püha Tõnu kiusamine" võtetel, kontsert 15. nov. Tartus klubis Trehv, vt. www.magikmarkers.audiosport.org.)

  1. (DArT) markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Industry and Investment and Charles Sturt. University), P. O. Box 588 Wagga Wagga, .... between-cluster variance in relative hybridization intensity as a percentage of the total .... markers tend to cluster on one or two linkage groups. The data of both sets of ...

  2. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  3. A time marker instrument for kinematics movement studies: a development of previous versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Laburú

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a time marker to study movements in kinematics. It contributes to elaborate a version of time marker which low cost and more efficient in comparison with the marker presented in another work as well as the earlier commercial version.

  4. Development and Characterisation of Irap Markers From Expressed Retrotransposon-like sequences in Pinus sylvestris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronova Angelika

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conifer genomes are large and stably diploid, in contrast to angiosperms, which are more variable both in genome size and ploidy. Conifer genomes are characterised by multiple gene families and pseudogenes, contain large inter-gene regions and a considerable proportion of repetitive sequences. All members of plant retrotransposon orders have been identified in gymnosperm genomes, however active elements have not been described. Investigation of transposable elements in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. could offer insights into transposon-mediated reorganisation under stress conditions in complex and ancient plant genomes. Nine Pinus sylvestris specific markers were developed to hypothetical long terminal repeats (LTRs from differentially expressed retrotransposon-like fragments after heat stress and insect damage. Genetic diversity of 150 trees from a naturally regenerated pine stand was investigated using the IRAP method. The developed markers revealed high levels of genetic diversity and were able to distinguish subpopulations growing in long-term differential environmental conditions. Somaclonal variation was also investigated using these markers and polymorphic fragments were identified between ramets of Scots pine clones growing in two different plantations, possibly indicating evidence of recent transposition events. Sequencing of the polymorphic fragments identified two groups of sequences containing LTR sequences of an unknown retrotransposon with homology to the LTRs of the Copia-17-PAb-I element.

  5. Host co-factors of the retrovirus-like transposon Ty1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risler Jenni K

    2012-08-01

    DNA include characterized RNA metabolism and modification genes, consistent with their having roles in early steps in retrotransposition such as expression, nuclear export, translation, localization, or packaging of Ty1 RNA. Our results suggest that Bud21, Hcr1, Loc1, and Puf6 promote efficient synthesis or stability of Ty1 Gag.

  6. Host co-factors of the retrovirus-like transposon Ty1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    steps in retrotransposition such as expression, nuclear export, translation, localization, or packaging of Ty1 RNA. Our results suggest that Bud21, Hcr1, Loc1, and Puf6 promote efficient synthesis or stability of Ty1 Gag. PMID:22856544

  7. Drawing organic photovoltaics using paint marker pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kaori; Izawa, Seiichiro; Chen, Yujiao; Nakano, Kyohei; Tajima, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    Active layers for organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) were prepared by hand drawing with paint marker pens containing solutions of the materials. Although the pen-coated organic films were visually non-uniform with quite high surface roughness, OPV devices using these films exhibited similar or slightly better performances than those using spin-coated films. As such, the pen-coating technique represents an easily accessible, inexpensive, and highly material-efficient method for fabricating OPVs.

  8. Genome-wide transposon mutagenesis of Proteus mirabilis: Essential genes, fitness factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and the impact of polymicrobial infection on fitness requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sara N.; Zhao, Lili; Wu, Weisheng

    2017-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a leading cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), which are often polymicrobial. Numerous prior studies have uncovered virulence factors for P. mirabilis pathogenicity in a murine model of ascending UTI, but little is known concerning pathogenesis during CAUTI or polymicrobial infection. In this study, we utilized five pools of 10,000 transposon mutants each and transposon insertion-site sequencing (Tn-Seq) to identify the full arsenal of P. mirabilis HI4320 fitness factors for single-species versus polymicrobial CAUTI with Providencia stuartii BE2467. 436 genes in the input pools lacked transposon insertions and were therefore concluded to be essential for P. mirabilis growth in rich medium. 629 genes were identified as P. mirabilis fitness factors during single-species CAUTI. Tn-Seq from coinfection with P. stuartii revealed 217/629 (35%) of the same genes as identified by single-species Tn-Seq, and 1353 additional factors that specifically contribute to colonization during coinfection. Mutants were constructed in eight genes of interest to validate the initial screen: 7/8 (88%) mutants exhibited the expected phenotypes for single-species CAUTI, and 3/3 (100%) validated the expected phenotypes for polymicrobial CAUTI. This approach provided validation of numerous previously described P. mirabilis fitness determinants from an ascending model of UTI, the discovery of novel fitness determinants specifically for CAUTI, and a stringent assessment of how polymicrobial infection influences fitness requirements. For instance, we describe a requirement for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis by P. mirabilis during coinfection due to high-affinity import of leucine by P. stuartii. Further investigation of genes and pathways that provide a competitive advantage during both single-species and polymicrobial CAUTI will likely provide robust targets for therapeutic intervention to reduce P. mirabilis

  9. The Drosophila Su(var)3–7 Gene Is Required for Oogenesis and Female Fertility, Genetically Interacts with piwi and aubergine, but Impacts Only Weakly Transposon Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeot, Flora; Koryakov, Dmitry E.; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Ronsseray, Stéphane; Vieira, Cristina; Spierer, Pierre; Delattre, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is made of repetitive sequences, mainly transposable elements (TEs), the regulation of which is critical for genome stability. We have analyzed the role of the heterochromatin-associated Su(var)3–7 protein in Drosophila ovaries. We present evidences that Su(var)3–7 is required for correct oogenesis and female fertility. It accumulates in heterochromatic domains of ovarian germline and somatic cells nuclei, where it co-localizes with HP1. Homozygous mutant females display ovaries with frequent degenerating egg-chambers. Absence of Su(var)3–7 in embryos leads to defects in meiosis and first mitotic divisions due to chromatin fragmentation or chromosome loss, showing that Su(var)3–7 is required for genome integrity. Females homozygous for Su(var)3–7 mutations strongly impair repression of P-transposable element induced gonadal dysgenesis but have minor effects on other TEs. Su(var)3–7 mutations reduce piRNA cluster transcription and slightly impact ovarian piRNA production. However, this modest piRNA reduction does not correlate with transposon de-silencing, suggesting that the moderate effect of Su(var)3–7 on some TE repression is not linked to piRNA production. Strikingly, Su(var)3–7 genetically interacts with the piwi and aubergine genes, key components of the piRNA pathway, by strongly impacting female fertility without impairing transposon silencing. These results lead us to propose that the interaction between Su(var)3–7 and piwi or aubergine controls important developmental processes independently of transposon silencing. PMID:24820312

  10. Loss of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2 function causes widespread and unexpected changes in the expression of transposons, genes, and 24-nt small RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs comprise a substantial portion of many eukaryotic genomes and are typically transcriptionally silenced. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2 is a component of the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM silencing pathway. In maize, loss of mediator of paramutation1 (mop1 encoded RDR2 function results in reactivation of transcriptionally silenced Mu transposons and a substantial reduction in the accumulation of 24 nt short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs that recruit RNA silencing components. An RNA-seq experiment conducted on shoot apical meristems (SAMs revealed that, as expected based on a model in which RDR2 generates 24 nt siRNAs that suppress expression, most differentially expressed DNA TEs (78% were up-regulated in the mop1 mutant. In contrast, most differentially expressed retrotransposons (68% were down-regulated. This striking difference suggests that distinct silencing mechanisms are applied to different silencing templates. In addition, >6,000 genes (24% of analyzed genes, including nearly 80% (286/361 of genes in chromatin modification pathways, were differentially expressed. Overall, two-thirds of differentially regulated genes were down-regulated in the mop1 mutant. This finding suggests that RDR2 plays a significant role in regulating the expression of not only transposons, but also of genes. A re-analysis of existing small RNA data identified both RDR2-sensitive and RDR2-resistant species of 24 nt siRNAs that we hypothesize may at least partially explain the complex changes in the expression of genes and transposons observed in the mop1 mutant.

  11. Stable, Nonviral Expression of Mutated Tumor Neoantigen-specific T-cell Receptors Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon/Transposase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniger, Drew C; Pasetto, Anna; Tran, Eric; Parkhurst, Maria R; Cohen, Cyrille J; Robbins, Paul F; Cooper, Laurence Jn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Neoantigens unique to each patient's tumor can be recognized by autologous T cells through their T-cell receptor (TCR) but the low frequency and/or terminal differentiation of mutation-specific T cells in tumors can limit their utility as adoptive T-cell therapies. Transfer of TCR genes into younger T cells from peripheral blood with a high proliferative potential could obviate this problem. We generated a rapid, cost-effective strategy to genetically engineer cancer patient T cells with TCRs using the clinical Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system. Patient-specific TCRs reactive against HLA-A*0201-restriced neoantigens AHNAK(S2580F) or ERBB2(H473Y) or the HLA-DQB*0601-restricted neoantigen ERBB2IP(E805G) were assembled with murine constant chains and cloned into Sleeping Beauty transposons. Patient peripheral blood lymphocytes were coelectroporated with SB11 transposase and Sleeping Beauty transposon, and transposed T cells were enriched by sorting on murine TCRβ (mTCRβ) expression. Rapid expansion of mTCRβ(+) T cells with irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes feeders, OKT3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 resulted in a preponderance of effector (CD27(-)CD45RA(-)) and less-differentiated (CD27(+)CD45RA(+)) T cells. Transposed T cells specifically mounted a polyfunctional response against cognate mutated neoantigens and tumor cell lines. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposition of mutation-specific TCRs can facilitate the use of personalized T-cell therapy targeting unique neoantigens.

  12. The SUVR4 histone lysine methyltransferase binds ubiquitin and converts H3K9me1 to H3K9me3 on transposon chromatin in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje V Veiseth

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure and gene expression are regulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs on the N-terminal tails of histones. Mono-, di-, or trimethylation of lysine residues by histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTases can have activating or repressive functions depending on the position and context of the modified lysine. In Arabidopsis, trimethylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3 is mainly associated with euchromatin and transcribed genes, although low levels of this mark are also detected at transposons and repeat sequences. Besides the evolutionarily conserved SET domain which is responsible for enzyme activity, most HKMTases also contain additional domains which enable them to respond to other PTMs or cellular signals. Here we show that the N-terminal WIYLD domain of the Arabidopsis SUVR4 HKMTase binds ubiquitin and that the SUVR4 product specificity shifts from di- to trimethylation in the presence of free ubiquitin, enabling conversion of H3K9me1 to H3K9me3 in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and immunocytological analysis showed that SUVR4 in vivo specifically converts H3K9me1 to H3K9me3 at transposons and pseudogenes and has a locus-specific repressive effect on the expression of such elements. Bisulfite sequencing indicates that this repression involves both DNA methylation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Transcribed genes with high endogenous levels of H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H2Bub1, but low H3K9me1, are generally unaffected by SUVR4 activity. Our results imply that SUVR4 is involved in the epigenetic defense mechanism by trimethylating H3K9 to suppress potentially harmful transposon activity.

  13. Transposon defense by endo-siRNAs, piRNAs and somatic pilRNAs in Drosophila: contributions of Loqs-PD and R2D2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijana Mirkovic-Hösle

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are a serious threat for genome integrity and their control via small RNA mediated silencing pathways is an ancient strategy. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has two silencing activities that target transposons: endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs or endo-siRNAs and Piwi-interacting small RNAs (piRNAs. The biogenesis of endo-siRNAs involves the Dicer-2 co-factors Loqs-PD, which acts predominantly during processing of dsRNA by Dcr-2, and R2D2, which primarily helps to direct siRNAs into the RNA interference effector Ago2. Nonetheless, loss of either protein is not sufficient to produce a phenotype comparable with a dcr-2 mutation. We provide further deep sequencing evidence supporting the notion that R2D2 and Loqs-PD have partially overlapping function. Certain transposons display a preference for either dsRBD-protein during production or loading; this appeared to correlate neither with overall abundance, classification of the transposon or a specific site of genomic origin. The endo-siRNA biogenesis pathway in germline operates according to the same principles as the existing model for the soma, and its impairment does not significantly affect piRNAs. Expanding the analysis, we confirmed the occurrence of somatic piRNA-like RNAs (pilRNAs that show a ping-pong signature. We detected expression of the Piwi-family protein mRNAs only barely above background, indicating that the somatic pilRNAs may arise from a small sub-population of somatic cells that express a functional piRNA pathway.

  14. Genome-wide transposon mutagenesis of Proteus mirabilis: Essential genes, fitness factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and the impact of polymicrobial infection on fitness requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsie E Armbruster

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a leading cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs, which are often polymicrobial. Numerous prior studies have uncovered virulence factors for P. mirabilis pathogenicity in a murine model of ascending UTI, but little is known concerning pathogenesis during CAUTI or polymicrobial infection. In this study, we utilized five pools of 10,000 transposon mutants each and transposon insertion-site sequencing (Tn-Seq to identify the full arsenal of P. mirabilis HI4320 fitness factors for single-species versus polymicrobial CAUTI with Providencia stuartii BE2467. 436 genes in the input pools lacked transposon insertions and were therefore concluded to be essential for P. mirabilis growth in rich medium. 629 genes were identified as P. mirabilis fitness factors during single-species CAUTI. Tn-Seq from coinfection with P. stuartii revealed 217/629 (35% of the same genes as identified by single-species Tn-Seq, and 1353 additional factors that specifically contribute to colonization during coinfection. Mutants were constructed in eight genes of interest to validate the initial screen: 7/8 (88% mutants exhibited the expected phenotypes for single-species CAUTI, and 3/3 (100% validated the expected phenotypes for polymicrobial CAUTI. This approach provided validation of numerous previously described P. mirabilis fitness determinants from an ascending model of UTI, the discovery of novel fitness determinants specifically for CAUTI, and a stringent assessment of how polymicrobial infection influences fitness requirements. For instance, we describe a requirement for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis by P. mirabilis during coinfection due to high-affinity import of leucine by P. stuartii. Further investigation of genes and pathways that provide a competitive advantage during both single-species and polymicrobial CAUTI will likely provide robust targets for therapeutic intervention to reduce

  15. Validating simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for introgression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low hybridization efficiency (22.5%) was achieved using the anther dehiscence method. Such low hybridization efficiency requires use of molecular markers to easily identify plants harbouring the required genotypes. Key words: Stay-green, drought tolerance, quantitative trait loci (QTL), simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  16. Tn6350, a Novel Transposon Carrying Pyocin S8 Genes Encoding a Bacteriocin with Activity against Carbapenemase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turano, Helena; Gomes, Fernando; Barros-Carvalho, Gesiele A; Lopes, Ralf; Cerdeira, Louise; Netto, Luis E S; Gales, Ana C; Lincopan, Nilton

    2017-05-01

    A novel transposon belonging to the Tn3-like family was identified on the chromosome of a commensal strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequence type 2343 (ET02). Tn6350 is 7,367 bp long and harbors eight open reading frames (ORFs), an ATPase (IS481 family), a transposase (DDE catalytic type), a Tn3 resolvase, three hypothetical proteins, and genes encoding the new pyocin S8 with its immunity protein. We show that pyocin S8 displays activity against carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa, including IMP-1, SPM-1, VIM-1, GES-5, and KPC-2 producers. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Identification of a high frequency transposon induced by tissue culture, nDaiZ, a member of the hAT family in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Kewei; Shen, Yi; Huang, Zejun; Li, Ming; Tang, Ding; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2009-03-01

    Recent completion of rice genome sequencing has revealed that more than 40% of its genome consists of repetitive sequences, and most of them are related to inactive transposable elements. In the present study, a transposable element, nDaiZ0, which is induced by tissue culture with high frequency, was identified by sequence analysis of an allelic line of the golden hull and internode 2 (gh2) mutant, which was integrated into the forth exon of GH2. The 528-bp nDaiZ0 has 14-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs), and generates an 8-bp duplication of its target sites (TSD) during its mobilization. nDaiZs are non-autonomous transposons and have no coding capacity. Bioinformatics analysis and southern blot hybridization showed that at least 16 copies of nDaiZ elements exist in the japonica cultivar Nipponbare genome and 11 copies in the indica cultivar 93-11 genome. During tissue culture, only one copy, nDaiZ9, located on chromosome 5 in the genome of Nipponbare can be activated with its transposable frequency reaching 30%. However, nDaiZ9 was not present in the 93-11 genome. The larger elements, DaiZs, were further identified by database searching using nDaiZ0 as a query because they share similar TIRs and subterminal sequences. DaiZ can also generate an 8-bp TSD. DaiZ elements contain a conserved region with a high similarity to the hAT dimerization motif, suggesting that the nDaiZ-DaiZ transposon system probably belongs to the hAT superfamily of class II transposons. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that it is a new type of plant hAT-like transposon. Although nDaiZ is activated by tissue culture, the high transposable frequency indicates that it could become a useful gene tagging system for rice functional genomic studies. In addition, the mechanism of the high transposable ability of nDaiZ9 is discussed.

  18. Alcoholism: Current Marker Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    mongolism are high-risk candidates for certain types of leukemia. Similarly, hemophiliacs have a correspondingly high incidence of color blindness . (4...genetically determined characteristics such as color blindness and blood type. GENETIC MARKER STUDIES In 1966 Dr. Cruz-Coke and Dr. Varela reported that...their study had linked color blindness , cirrhosis of the liver and alcoholism. They further hypothesized the existence of a sex-linked carrier gene

  19. ecoPrimers: inference of new DNA barcode markers from whole genome sequence analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Riaz, Tiayyba; Shehzad, Wasim; Viari, Alain; Pompanon, Fran?ois; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Using non-conventional markers, DNA metabarcoding allows biodiversity assessment from complex substrates. In this article, we present ecoPrimers, a software for identifying new barcode markers and their associated PCR primers. ecoPrimers scans whole genomes to find such markers without a priori knowledge. ecoPrimers optimizes two quality indices measuring taxonomical range and discrimination to select the most efficient markers from a set of reference sequences, according to specific experime...

  20. Hepatocellualar carcinoma serum markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertino, Gaetano; Ardiri, Annalisa; Malaguarnera, Michele; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Bertino, Nicoletta; Calvagno, Giuseppe Stefano

    2012-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in some areas of the world. In most cases, HCC is diagnosed at a late stage. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with HCC is generally poor. The recommended screening strategy for patients with cirrhosis includes the determination of serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels and an abdominal ultrasound every 6 months to detect HCC at an earlier stage. AFP, however, is a marker characterized by poor sensitivity and specificity, and abdominal ultrasound is highly dependent on the operator's experience. In addition to AFP, Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive AFP (AFP-L3), des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP), glypican-3 (GPC-3), osteopontin (OPN), and several other biomarkers (such as squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin M complexes [SCCA-IgM], alpha-1-fucosidase [AFU], chromogranin A [CgA], human hepatocyte growth factor, insulin-like growth factor) have been proposed as markers for the early detection of HCC. For these markers, we describe the mechanisms of production, and their diagnostic and prognosis roles. None of them is optimal; however, when used together, their sensitivity in detecting HCC is increased. Recent research has shown that some biomarkers have mitogenic and migratory activities in the angiogenesis of HCC and are a factor of tumor growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances of selectable marker genes in plastid genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Luo, An; Mu, Lian-Sheng; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Yan; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Tian, Zhi-Hong

    2017-09-20

    Plastid genetic engineering is a safer, more precise, and more efficient transgene expression system than the nuclear genetic transformation system. It has been widely used in basic research and biotechnology applications as the next-generation transgenic technology in plants. Similar to nuclear genetic transformation, selection markers are needed in plastid genetic engineering to identify 'true' transformants and acquire homoplasmy. Because of the high copy number of plastids, maternal inheritance of the plastid genome, and the long process of homogenization of transplastomic plants, the selection markers for plastid genetic engineering are different from those used in the nuclear transformation system. At present, antibiotic resistance genes are the most commonly used selectable markers in the transplastomic selections. However for biosafety reasons, they needed to be replaced with either alternative markers or marker-free systems for the plastid genetic engineering. In this review, we have evaluated and summarized the positive and negative features of the selectable markers and marker elimination strategies commonly used in the plastid engineering research in the literature on plastid genetic engineering research. In addition, we have reviewed the features of the reporter genes used in plastid genetic engineering. We hope this review can help improving the current and developing new selectable markers and marker removal systems, and further promote the development of plastid genetic engineering, especially on the monocotyledonous plants.

  2. Characterization of three active transposable elements recently inserted in three independent DFR-A alleles and one high-copy DNA transposon isolated from the Pink allele of the ANS gene in onion (Allium cepa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunggil; Park, Jee Young; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Intact retrotransposon and DNA transposons inserted in a single gene were characterized in onions (Allium cepa) and their transcription and copy numbers were estimated in this study. While analyzing diverse onion germplasm, large insertions in the DFR-A gene encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were found in two accessions. A 5,070-bp long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon inserted in the active DFR-A (R4) allele was identified from one of the large insertions and designated AcCOPIA1. An intact ORF encoded typical domains of copia-like LTR retrotransposons. However, AcCOPIA1 contained atypical 'TG' and 'TA' dinucleotides at the ends of the LTRs. A 4,615-bp DNA transposon was identified in the other large insertion. This DNA transposon, designated AcCACTA1, contained an ORF coding for a transposase showing homology with the CACTA superfamily transposable elements (TEs). Another 5,073-bp DNA transposon was identified from the DFR-A (TRN) allele. This DNA transposon, designated AchAT1, belonged to the hAT superfamily with short 4-bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Finally, a 6,258-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, designated AcPINK, was identified in the ANS-p allele encoding anthocyanidin synthase, the next downstream enzyme to DFR in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. AcPINK also possessed very short 3-bp TIRs. Active transcription of AcCOPIA1, AcCACTA1, and AchAT1 was observed through RNA-Seq analysis and RT-PCR. The copy numbers of AcPINK estimated by mapping the genomic DNA reads produced by NextSeq 500 were predominantly high compared with the other TEs. A series of evidence indicated that these TEs might have transposed in these onion genes very recently, providing a stepping stone for elucidation of enormously large-sized onion genome structure.

  3. Transposon fingerprinting using low coverage whole genome shotgun sequencing in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Saemundur; Gill, Navdeep; Kane, Nolan C; Cronk, Quentin

    2013-07-24

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive elements are a large and dynamically evolving part of eukaryotic genomes, especially in plants where they can account for a significant proportion of genome size. Their dynamic nature gives them the potential for use in identifying and characterizing crop germplasm. However, their repetitive nature makes them challenging to study using conventional methods of molecular biology. Next generation sequencing and new computational tools have greatly facilitated the investigation of TE variation within species and among closely related species. (i) We generated low-coverage Illumina whole genome shotgun sequencing reads for multiple individuals of cacao (Theobroma cacao) and related species. These reads were analysed using both an alignment/mapping approach and a de novo (graph based clustering) approach. (ii) A standard set of ultra-conserved orthologous sequences (UCOS) standardized TE data between samples and provided phylogenetic information on the relatedness of samples. (iii) The mapping approach proved highly effective within the reference species but underestimated TE abundance in interspecific comparisons relative to the de novo methods. (iv) Individual T. cacao accessions have unique patterns of TE abundance indicating that the TE composition of the genome is evolving actively within this species. (v) LTR/Gypsy elements are the most abundant, comprising c.10% of the genome. (vi) Within T. cacao the retroelement families show an order of magnitude greater sequence variability than the DNA transposon families. (vii) Theobroma grandiflorum has a similar TE composition to T. cacao, but the related genus Herrania is rather different, with LTRs making up a lower proportion of the genome, perhaps because of a massive presence (c. 20%) of distinctive low complexity satellite-like repeats in this genome. (i) Short read alignment/mapping to reference TE contigs provides a simple and effective method of investigating

  4. An Expanded Transposon Mutant Library Reveals that Vibrio fischeri δ-Aminolevulinate Auxotrophs Can Colonize Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Noreen L; Septer, Alecia N; Dunn, Anne K; Duckett, Drew; Stoudenmire, Julie L; Stabb, Eric V

    2017-03-01

    Libraries of defined mutants are valuable research tools but necessarily lack gene knockouts that are lethal under the conditions used in library construction. In this study, we augmented a Vibrio fischeri mutant library generated on a rich medium (LBS, which contains [per liter] 10 g of tryptone, 5 g of yeast extract, 20 g of NaCl, and 50 mM Tris [pH 7.5]) by selecting transposon insertion mutants on supplemented LBS and screening for those unable to grow on LBS. We isolated strains with insertions in alr, glr (murI), glmS, several heme biosynthesis genes, and ftsA, as well as a mutant disrupted 14 bp upstream of ftsQ Mutants with insertions in ftsA or upstream of ftsQ were recovered by addition of Mg2+ to LBS, but their cell morphology and motility were affected. The ftsA mutant was more strongly affected and formed cells or chains of cells that appeared to wind back on themselves helically. Growth of mutants with insertions in glmS, alr, or glr was recovered with N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), d-alanine, or d-glutamate, respectively. We hypothesized that NAG, d-alanine, or d-glutamate might be available to V. fischeri in the Euprymna scolopes light organ; however, none of these mutants colonized the host effectively. In contrast, hemA and hemL mutants, which are auxotrophic for δ-aminolevulinate (ALA), colonized at wild-type levels, although mutants later in the heme biosynthetic pathway were severely impaired or unable to colonize. Our findings parallel observations that legume hosts provide Bradyrhizobium symbionts with ALA, but they contrast with virulence phenotypes of hemA mutants in some pathogens. The results further inform our understanding of the symbiotic light organ environment.IMPORTANCE By supplementing a rich yeast-based medium, we were able to recover V. fischeri mutants with insertions in conditionally essential genes, and further characterization of these mutants provided new insights into this bacterium's symbiotic environment. Most notably, we

  5. Plant breeding with marker-assisted selection in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ney Sussumu Sakiyama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, molecular marker studies reached extraordinary advances, especially for sequencing and bioinformatics techniques. Marker-assisted selection became part of the breeding program routines of important seed companies, in order to accelerate and optimize the cultivar developing processes. Private seed companies increasingly use marker-assisted selection, especially for the species of great importance to the seed market, e.g. corn, soybean, cotton, and sunflower. In the Brazilian public institutions few breeding programs use it efficiently. The possible reasons are: lack of know-how, lack of appropriate laboratories, few validated markers, high cost, and lack of urgency in obtaining cultivars. In this article we analyze the use and the constraints of marker-assisted selection in plant breeding programs of Brazilian public institutes

  6. Transposon mutagenesis of probiotic Lactobacillus casei identifies asnH, an asparagine synthetase gene involved in its immune-activating capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masahiro; Kim, Yun-Gi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kiwaki, Mayumi; Nomoto, Koji; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 enhances host innate immunity, and the J1 phage-resistant mutants of this strain lose the activity. A transposon insertion mutant library of L. casei ATCC 27139 was constructed, and nine J1 phage-resistant mutants out of them were obtained. Cloning and sequencing analyses identified three independent genes that were disrupted by insertion of the transposon element: asnH, encoding asparagine synthetase, and dnaJ and dnaK, encoding the molecular chaperones DnaJ and DnaK, respectively. Using an in vivo mouse model of Listeria infection, only asnH mutant showed deficiency in their ability to enhance host innate immunity, and complementation of the mutation by introduction of the wild-type asnH in the mutant strain recovered the immuno-augmenting activity. AsnH protein exhibited asparagine synthetase activity when the lysozyme-treated cell wall extracts of L. casei ATCC 27139 was added as substrate. The asnH mutants lost the thick and rigid peptidoglycan features that are characteristic to the wild-type cells, indicating that AsnH of L. casei is involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. These results indicate that asnH is required for the construction of the peptidoglycan composition involved in the immune-activating capacity of L. casei ATCC 27139.

  7. The Foldback-like element Galileo belongs to the P superfamily of DNA transposons and is widespread within the Drosophila genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Mar; Puig, Marta; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2008-02-26

    Galileo is the only transposable element (TE) known to have generated natural chromosomal inversions in the genus Drosophila. It was discovered in Drosophila buzzatii and classified as a Foldback-like element because of its long, internally repetitive, terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) and lack of coding capacity. Here, we characterized a seemingly complete copy of Galileo from the D. buzzatii genome. It is 5,406 bp long, possesses 1,229-bp TIRs, and encodes a 912-aa transposase similar to those of the Drosophila melanogaster 1360 (Hoppel) and P elements. We also searched the recently available genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species for elements similar to Dbuz\\Galileo by using bioinformatic tools. Galileo was found in six species (ananassae, willistoni, peudoobscura, persimilis, virilis, and mojavensis) from the two main lineages within the Drosophila genus. Our observations place Galileo within the P superfamily of cut-and-paste transposons and extend considerably its phylogenetic distribution. The interspecific distribution of Galileo indicates an ancient presence in the genus, but the phylogenetic tree built with the transposase amino acid sequences contrasts significantly with that of the species, indicating lineage sorting and/or horizontal transfer events. Our results also suggest that Foldback-like elements such as Galileo may evolve from DNA-based transposon ancestors by loss of the transposase gene and disproportionate elongation of TIRs.

  8. The telomeric sync model of speciation: species-wide telomere erosion triggers cycles of transposon-mediated genomic rearrangements, which underlie the saltatory appearance of nonadaptive characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stindl, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Charles Darwin knew that the fossil record is not overwhelmingly supportive of genetic and phenotypic gradualism; therefore, he developed the core of his theory on the basis of breeding experiments. Here, I present evidence for the existence of a cell biological mechanism that strongly points to the almost forgotten European concept of saltatory evolution of nonadaptive characters, which is in perfect agreement with the gaps in the fossil record. The standard model of chromosomal evolution has always been handicapped by a paradox, namely, how speciation can occur by spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements that are known to decrease the fertility of heterozygotes in a population. However, the hallmark of almost all closely related species is a differing chromosome complement and therefore chromosomal rearrangements seem to be crucial for speciation. Telomeres, the caps of eukaryotic chromosomes, erode in somatic tissues during life, but have been thought to remain stable in the germline of a species. Recently, a large human study spanning three healthy generations clearly found a cumulative telomere effect, which is indicative of transgenerational telomere erosion in the human species. The telomeric sync model of speciation presented here is based on telomere erosion between generations, which leads to identical fusions of chromosomes and triggers a transposon-mediated genomic repatterning in the germline of many individuals of a species. The phenotypic outcome of the telomere-triggered transposon activity is the saltatory appearance of nonadaptive characters simultaneously in many individuals. Transgenerational telomere erosion is therefore the material basis of aging at the species level.

  9. Genome Sequencing and Transposon Mutagenesis of Burkholderia seminalis TC3.4.2R3 Identify Genes Contributing to Suppression of Orchid Necrosis Caused by B. gladioli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Welington L; Creason, Allison L; Mano, Emy T; Camargo-Neves, Aline A; Minami, Sonia N; Chang, Jeff H; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-06-01

    From a screen of 36 plant-associated strains of Burkholderia spp., we identified 24 strains that suppressed leaf and pseudobulb necrosis of orchid caused by B. gladioli. To gain insights into the mechanisms of disease suppression, we generated a draft genome sequence from one suppressive strain, TC3.4.2R3. The genome is an estimated 7.67 megabases in size, with three replicons, two chromosomes, and the plasmid pC3. Using a combination of multilocus sequence analysis and phylogenomics, we identified TC3.4.2R3 as B. seminalis, a species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex that includes opportunistic human pathogens and environmental strains. We generated and screened a library of 3,840 transposon mutants of strain TC3.4.2R3 on orchid leaves to identify genes contributing to plant disease suppression. Twelve mutants deficient in suppression of leaf necrosis were selected and the transposon insertions were mapped to eight loci. One gene is in a wcb cluster that is related to synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide, a key determinant in bacterial-host interactions in other systems, and the other seven are highly conserved among Burkholderia spp. The fundamental information developed in this study will serve as a resource for future research aiming to identify mechanisms contributing to biological control.

  10. Generation of mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of Bacillus sphaericus 2297 and investigation of genes involved in sporulation and mosquito-larvicidal crystal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiming; Hu, Xiaomin; Ge, Yong; Zheng, Dasheng; Yuan, Zhiming

    2012-05-01

    Bacillus sphaericus has been used with great success in mosquito control programs worldwide. Under conditions of nutrient limitation, it undergoes sporulation via a series of well defined morphological stages. However, only a small number of genes involved in sporulation have been identified. To identify genes associated with sporulation, and to understand the relationship between sporulation and crystal protein synthesis, a random mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of B. sphaericus strain 2297 was constructed and seven sporulation-defective mutants were selected. Sequencing of the DNA flanking of the transposon insertion identified several genes involved in sporulation. The morphologies of mutants were determined by electron microscopy and synthesis of crystal proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Four mutants blocked at early stages of sporulation failed to produce crystal proteins and had lower larvicidal activity. However, the other three mutants were blocked at later stages and were able to form crystal proteins, and the larvicidal activity was similar to wild type. These results indicated that crystal protein synthesis in B. sphaericus is dependent on sporulation initiation. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular markers in maize breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treskić Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the marker assisted selection (MAS is being routinely applied in breeding programs of large private companies. However, the implementation of molecular markers for commercial use in small companies and public sec- tor is on a considerably smaller scale. Numerous researches on QTL mapping, theoretical analysis and simulation models for MAS give impetus to new research on the validation of quantitative trait loci and the application of molecular markers in maize breeding. This paper presents basic concepts related to MAS, the principles of QTL mapping, marker-trait association analysis and examples of successful application of markers in breeding for qualitative and quantitative traits.

  12. Recombinogenic engineering of conjugative plasmids with fluorescent marker cassettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Molin, Søren; Zechner, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    An efficient approach for the insertion of fluorescent marker genes with sequence specificity into conjugative plasmids in Escherichia coli is described. For this purpose, homologous recombination of linear double-stranded targeting DNA was mediated by the bacteriophage lambda recombination...... resistance genes and fluorescent markers. The choice of 5' non-homologous extensions in primer pairs used for amplifying the marker cassettes determines the site specificity of the targeting DNA. This methodology is applicable to the modification of all plasmids that replicate in E coli and is not restricted...

  13. Human Transposon Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kathleen H.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile DNAs have had a central role in shaping our genome. More than half of our DNA is comprised of interspersed repeats resulting from replicative copy and paste events of retrotransposons. Although most are fixed, incapable of templating new copies, there are important exceptions to retrotransposon quiescence. De novo insertions cause genetic diseases and cancers, though reliably detecting these occurrences has been difficult. New technologies aimed at uncovering polymorphic insertions reveal that mobile DNAs provide a substantial and dynamic source of structural variation. Key questions going forward include the how and how much new transposition events affect human health and disease. PMID:22579280

  14. The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA markers in constructing genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-30

    May 30, 2011 ... present study, various combinations of these data sets and different sampling sizes of the closely related tribes of the family Bovidae were manipulated using bioinformatics. These data were used to provide the genetic kinship among different Oryx species. The complete cytochrome b gene sequence.

  15. The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA markers in constructing genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To date, only parts of mitochondrial DNA from cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA and non-coding Dloop had been sequenced for different species of Oryx. Discrepancy in the genetic relationship among Oryx species was previously revealed when combinations of these sequences were analyzed. In the present study, ...

  16. Molecular markers in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani-Sabet, M

    2014-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed the dawn of the molecular era in melanoma treatment. With the advent of successful therapy targeting mutant BRAF, melanoma is leading the field of cancer research in the molecular approach to therapy of advanced disease. Attempting to keep pace with advances in therapy are advances in the molecular assessment of melanoma progression, facilitated by the availability of genome-wide approaches to interrogate the malignant phenotype. At the DNA level, this has included approaches such as comparative genomic hybridization. At the RNA level, this has consisted of gene expression profiling using various assay methodologies. In certain instances, markers identified using these platforms have been further examined and developed using fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis. In this article, we will review recent progress in the development of novel molecular markers for melanoma that are nearing clinical application. We will review developments in the molecular classification of melanoma, in the molecular diagnosis of melanoma, and in the molecular assessment of melanoma prognosis. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Serologic Markers of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramova, T V; Kaysheva, Anna L; Ivanov, Y D; Pleshakova, T O; Iourov, I Y; Vorsanova, S G; Yurov, Y B; Schetkin, A A; Archakov, A I

    2017-08-01

    According to WHO data, about 67 million people worldwide are affected by autism, and this number grows by 14% annually. Among the possible causes of autism are genetic modifications, organic lesions of the central nervous system, metabolic disorders, influence of viral and bacterial infections, chemical influence to the mother's body during pregnancy, etc. The conducted research shows that research papers published until today do not name any potential protein markers that meet the requirements of the basic parameters for evaluating the efficiency of disease diagnostics, in particular high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Conducting proteomic research on a big scale in order to detect serologic markers of protein nature associated with development of autism spectrum disorders seems to be highly relevant.

  18. DNA markers for Portuguese olive oil fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Lopes, Paula; Gomes, Sónia; Santos, Elisabete; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2008-12-24

    The certification of olive oil has led to the definition of Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO) producing regions in European countries. PDO products should be protected, and a solution could be by using DNA fingerprinting. In this work we evaluate the efficiency of RAPD, ISSR, and SSR molecular markers for olive oil varietal identification and their possible use in certification purposes. Twenty-three Portuguese olive oil samples (11 obtained monovarietal and 12 purchased commercial oils) were screened by means of two RAPD, four ISSR, and four SSR markers. The quality of amplified products was used to evaluate the reproducibility and the level of polymorphism. Principal component analysis was performed with DCENTER using unweighted pair group mathematical average (UPGMA) that allowed group formation according to olive oil varietal geographic origin.

  19. Toward the analysis of the Petunia MADS box gene family by reverse and forward transposon insertion mutagenesis approaches: B, C, and D Floral organ identity functions require SEPALLATA-Like MADS box genes in Petunia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbussche, M.; Zethof, J.; Souer, E.; Koes, R.; Tornielli, G.B.; Pezzotti, M.; Ferrario, S.I.T.; Angenent, G.C.; Gerats, T.

    2003-01-01

    We have initiated a systematic functional analysis of the MADS box, intervening region, K domain, C domain-type MADS box gene family in petunia. The starting point for this has been a reverse-genetics approach, aiming to select for transposon insertions into any MADS box gene. We have developed and

  20. Markers of hepatic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballería, Llorenç; Torán, Pere; Caballería, Joan

    2017-10-18

    Chronic liver diseases constitute a major health problem. Chronic liver inflammation, defined by the degree of hepatic fibrosis, is asymptomatic in a significant percentage of patients; hence, the disease often remains undiagnosed until it has reached very advanced phases and, frequently, when the damage is irreversible. Ideally, patients should be screened during the initial phases of chronic inflammation, thus allowing for the effective management of the natural evolution of the disease by stopping or delaying its course. Standard diagnostic methods (transaminase determination or abdominal ultrasonography) do not allow for the early diagnosis of the degree of fibrosis. A liver biopsy is the invasive method of choice to screen for fibrosis, however, due to its limitations, non-invasive diagnostic methods such as elastography or serological markers are increasingly used as a good alternative for the early diagnosis of the degree of fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. A Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based genetic sensor for functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Nicklas H; Sharma, Nynne; Bak, Rasmus O

    2011-01-01

    methods that allow a comparative evaluation of drug properties. As a new tool in functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues, we describe a genomically integratable sensor for sensitive drug detection. This system facilitates assessment of the pharmacokinetic and pharmadynamic properties of vitamin D3...... analogues. The tri-cistronic genetic sensor encodes a drug-sensoring protein, a reporter protein expressed from an activated sensor-responsive promoter, and a resistance marker....

  2. Molecular marker applications in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Alice C; Tollenaere, Reece; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Batley, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Individuals within a population of a sexually reproducing species will have some degree of heritable genomic variation caused by mutations, insertion/deletions (INDELS), inversions, duplications, and translocations. Such variation can be detected and screened using molecular, or genetic, markers. By definition, molecular markers are genetic loci that can be easily tracked and quantified in a population and may be associated with a particular gene or trait of interest. This chapter will review the current major applications of molecular markers in plants.

  3. Efficient Sleeping Beauty DNA Transposition From DNA Minicircles

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Nynne; Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O.; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Schrøder, Lisbeth Dahl; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    DNA transposon-based vectors have emerged as new potential delivery tools in therapeutic gene transfer. Such vectors are now showing promise in hematopoietic stem cells and primary human T cells, and clinical trials with transposon-engineered cells are on the way. However, the use of plasmid DNA as a carrier of the vector raises safety concerns due to the undesirable administration of bacterial sequences. To optimize vectors based on the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon for clinical use, w...

  4. The identification of a tetracycline resistance gene tet(M), on a Tn916-like transposon, in the Bacillus cereus group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate whether resistance genes present in bacteria in manure could transfer to indigenous soil bacteria, resistant isolates belonging to the Bacillus cereus group (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis) were isolated from farm soil (72 isolates) and manure...... (12 isolates) samples. These isolates were screened for tetracycline resistance genes (tet(K), tet(L), tet(M), tet(O), tet(S) and tet(T)). Of 88 isolates examined, three (3.4%) isolates carried both tet(M) and tet(L) genes, while four (4.5%) isolates carried the tet(L) gene. Eighty-one (92.......1%) isolates did not contain any of the tested genes. All tet(M) positive isolates carried transposon Tn916 and could transfer this mobile DNA element to other Gram-positive bacteria....

  5. Diversity of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) and identification of Tn916- and Tn5801-like (Tn6014) transposons in Staphylococcus aureus from humans and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Lisbeth Elvira; Christensen, H.; Skov, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    to S. aureus recipients. S. aureus of human origin contained diverse tet(M) located on Tn916- and Tn5801-like (Tn6014) transposons, and S. aureus of animal origin contained Tn916-like tet(M) genes. This suggests that conjugative transposition plays an important role in the evolution and horizontal...... spread of tet(M) in S. aureus. This is the first study showing horizontal transfer of Tn5801 (Tn6014).......To analyse the sequence diversity of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) in Staphylococcus aureus from humans and animals and to determine mobile elements associated with tet(M) in S. aureus. In total, 205 tetracycline-resistant isolates were screened for tet(M) by PCR. tet(M) genes were...

  6. Oral cancer risk and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Font-Costa, Imma; López-López, José

    2004-01-01

    The clinical appearance and, especially, the degree of dysplasia that may be shown by pre-cancerous lesions in the oral cavity suggest a potential for malignisation. An increasing number of studies are seeking new, more specific markers that would help to determine the degree of cell alteration and enable a better understanding of the degree of malignant degeneration of these cells. The present review considers the most recent findings for these markers, grouping them into families: tumour growth markers; markers of tumour suppression and anti-tumour response; angiogenesis markers; markers of tumour invasion and metastatic potential; cell surface markers; intracellular markers; markers derived from arachidonic acid; and enzymatic markers.

  7. Marker Detection in Aerial Images

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Yazeed

    2017-04-09

    The problem that the thesis is trying to solve is the detection of small markers in high-resolution aerial images. Given a high-resolution image, the goal is to return the pixel coordinates corresponding to the center of the marker in the image. The marker has the shape of two triangles sharing a vertex in the middle, and it occupies no more than 0.01% of the image size. An improvement on the Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) is proposed, eliminating the majority of baseline HOG false positives for marker detection. The improvement is guided by the observation that standard HOG description struggles to separate markers from negatives patches containing an X shape. The proposed method alters intensities with the aim of altering gradients. The intensity-dependent gradient alteration leads to more separation between filled and unfilled shapes. The improvement is used in a two-stage algorithm to achieve high recall and high precision in detection of markers in aerial images. In the first stage, two classifiers are used: one to quickly eliminate most of the uninteresting parts of the image, and one to carefully select the marker among the remaining interesting regions. Interesting regions are selected by scanning the image with a fast classifier trained on the HOG features of markers in all rotations and scales. The next classifier is more precise and uses our method to eliminate the majority of the false positives of standard HOG. In the second stage, detected markers are tracked forward and backward in time. Tracking is needed to detect extremely blurred or distorted markers that are missed by the previous stage. The algorithm achieves 94% recall with minimal user guidance. An average of 30 guesses are given per image; the user verifies for each whether it is a marker or not. The brute force approach would return 100,000 guesses per image.

  8. Genomic sequencing and microsatellite marker development for Boswellia papyrifera, an economically important but threatened tree native to dry tropical forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addisalem, A.B.; Esselink, G.; Bongers, F.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite (or simple sequence repeat, SSR) markers are highly informative DNA markers often used in conservation genetic research. Next-generation sequencing enables efficient development of large numbers of SSR markers at lower costs. Boswellia papyrifera is an economically important tree

  9. Whole genome sequencing in Drosophila virilis identifies Polyphemus, a recently activated Tc1-like transposon with a possible role in hybrid dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstiel, Justin P

    2014-02-20

    Hybrid dysgenic syndromes in Drosophila have been critical for characterizing host mechanisms of transposable element (TE) regulation. This is because a common feature of hybrid dysgenesis is germline TE mobilization that occurs when paternally inherited TEs are not matched with a maternal pool of silencing RNAs that maintain transgenerational TE control. In the face of this imbalance TEs become activated in the germline and can cause F1 sterility. The syndrome of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila virilis was the first to show that the mobilization of one dominant TE, the Penelope retrotransposon, may lead to the mobilization of other unrelated elements. However, it is not known how many different elements contribute and no exhaustive search has been performed to identify additional ones. To identify additional TEs that may contribute to hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila virilis, I analyzed repeat content in genome sequences of inducer and non-inducer lines. Here I describe Polyphemus, a novel Tc1-like DNA transposon, which is abundant in the inducer strain of D. virilis but highly degraded in the non-inducer strain. Polyphemus expression is also increased in the germline of progeny of the dysgenic cross relative to reciprocal progeny. Interestingly, like the Penelope element, it has experienced recent re-activation within the D. virilis lineage. Here I present the results of a comprehensive search to identify additional factors that may cause hybrid dysgenesis in D. virilis. Polyphemus, a novel Tc1-like DNA transposon, has recently become re-activated in Drosophila virilis and likely contributes to the hybrid dysgenesis syndrome. It has been previously shown that the Penelope element has also been re-activated in the inducer strain. This suggests that TE co-reactivation within species may synergistically contribute to syndromes of hybrid dysgenesis.

  10. A transposon mutant library of Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 reveals novel genes required for biofilm formation and implicates motility as an important factor for pellicle-biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okshevsky, Mira; Louw, Matilde Greve; Lamela, Elena Otero; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2017-11-22

    Bacillus cereus is one of the most common opportunistic pathogens causing foodborne illness, as well as a common source of contamination in the dairy industry. B. cereus can form robust biofilms on food processing surfaces, resulting in food contamination due to shedding of cells and spores. Despite the medical and industrial relevance of this species, the genetic basis of biofilm formation in B. cereus is not well studied. In order to identify genes required for biofilm formation in this bacterium, we created a library of 5000 +  transposon mutants of the biofilm-forming strain B. cereusATCC 10987, using an unbiased mariner transposon approach. The mutant library was screened for the ability to form a pellicle biofilm at the air-media interface, as well as a submerged biofilm at the solid-media interface. A total of 91 genes were identified as essential for biofilm formation. These genes encode functions such as chemotaxis, amino acid metabolism and cellular repair mechanisms, and include numerous genes not previously known to be required for biofilm formation. Although the majority of disrupted genes are not directly responsible for motility, further investigations revealed that the vast majority of the biofilm-deficient mutants were also motility impaired. This observation implicates motility as a pivotal factor in the formation of a biofilm by B. cereus. These results expand our knowledge of the fundamental molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation by B. cereus. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Whole genome sequencing in Drosophila virilis identifies Polyphemus, a recently activated Tc1-like transposon with a possible role in hybrid dysgenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Hybrid dysgenic syndromes in Drosophila have been critical for characterizing host mechanisms of transposable element (TE) regulation. This is because a common feature of hybrid dysgenesis is germline TE mobilization that occurs when paternally inherited TEs are not matched with a maternal pool of silencing RNAs that maintain transgenerational TE control. In the face of this imbalance TEs become activated in the germline and can cause F1 sterility. The syndrome of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila virilis was the first to show that the mobilization of one dominant TE, the Penelope retrotransposon, may lead to the mobilization of other unrelated elements. However, it is not known how many different elements contribute and no exhaustive search has been performed to identify additional ones. To identify additional TEs that may contribute to hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila virilis, I analyzed repeat content in genome sequences of inducer and non-inducer lines. Results Here I describe Polyphemus, a novel Tc1-like DNA transposon, which is abundant in the inducer strain of D. virilis but highly degraded in the non-inducer strain. Polyphemus expression is also increased in the germline of progeny of the dysgenic cross relative to reciprocal progeny. Interestingly, like the Penelope element, it has experienced recent re-activation within the D. virilis lineage. Conclusions Here I present the results of a comprehensive search to identify additional factors that may cause hybrid dysgenesis in D. virilis. Polyphemus, a novel Tc1-like DNA transposon, has recently become re-activated in Drosophila virilis and likely contributes to the hybrid dysgenesis syndrome. It has been previously shown that the Penelope element has also been re-activated in the inducer strain. This suggests that TE co-reactivation within species may synergistically contribute to syndromes of hybrid dysgenesis. PMID:24555450

  12. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Galvan

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12, a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans.

  13. A genetic mechanism for emergence of races in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici: inactivation of avirulence gene AVR1 by transposon insertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keigo Inami

    Full Text Available Compatible/incompatible interactions between the tomato wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL and tomato Solanum lycopersicum are controlled by three avirulence genes (AVR1-3 in FOL and the corresponding resistance genes (I-I3 in tomato. The three known races (1, 2 and 3 of FOL carry AVR genes in different combinations. The current model to explain the proposed order of mutations in AVR genes is: i FOL race 2 emerged from race 1 by losing the AVR1 and thus avoiding host resistance mediated by I (the resistance gene corresponding to AVR1, and ii race 3 emerged when race 2 sustained a point mutation in AVR2, allowing it to evade I2-mediated resistance of the host. Here, an alternative mechanism of mutation of AVR genes was determined by analyses of a race 3 isolate, KoChi-1, that we recovered from a Japanese tomato field in 2008. Although KoChi-1 is race 3, it has an AVR1 gene that is truncated by the transposon Hormin, which belongs to the hAT family. This provides evidence that mobile genetic elements may be one of the driving forces underlying race evolution. KoChi-1 transformants carrying a wild type AVR1 gene from race 1 lost pathogenicity to cultivars carrying I, showing that the truncated KoChi-1 avr1 is not functional. These results imply that KoChi-1 is a new race 3 biotype and propose an additional path for emergence of FOL races: Race 2 emerged from race 1 by transposon-insertion into AVR1, not by deletion of the AVR1 locus; then a point mutation in race 2 AVR2 resulted in emergence of race 3.

  14. The Infinitive Marker across Scandinavian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ken Ramshøj

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the base-position of the infinitive marker in the Scandinavian languages and English share a common origin site. It is inserted as the top-most head in the VP-domain. The cross-linguistic variation in the syntactic distribution of the infinitive marker can be accounted...

  15. (SSR) marker development for tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -

    2012-09-18

    Sep 18, 2012 ... semi automated and fully automated robotics for liquid handling and genotyping steps. As several of our developed SSR markers were mapped to informative sequences, they are called EST-. SSR putatives. The set of EST-SSR markers would be informative for phylogenetics analysis and genetic mapping.

  16. Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/diagnosis-staging/diagnosis/tumor-markers-fact-sheet. Accessed on 4/10/17. (January ... http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/tumor-markers. Accessed June ... Mosby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 10th Edition: Mosby, Inc., ...

  17. Development and use of microsatellite markers in Marama bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellites are becoming the molecular marker system of choice because they are multiallelic and generally more informative. Recently, the development of SSR enrichment techniques has increased the efficiency of SSR characterisation in new species. The aim of the study was to develop SSR's for detection of ...

  18. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... During the efficient genetic transformation of plants with the gene of interest, some selectable marker genes are also used in order to identify the transgenic plant cells or tissues. Usually, antibiotic- or herbicide-selective agents and their corresponding resistance genes are used to introduce economically ...

  19. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the efficient genetic transformation of plants with the gene of interest, some selectable marker genes are also used in order to identify the transgenic plant cells or tissues. Usually, antibiotic- or herbicide-selective agents and their corresponding resistance genes are used to introduce economically valuable genes into ...

  20. A Stable Simple Sequence Repeat Marker for Resistance to White ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    White mould, caused by Golovinomyces cichoracearum, is a major fungal disease of tobacco. Breeding for resistance to white mould is slow due to the intensive labour needed in artificial screening and the huge effect of the environment. In order to improve selection efficiency, molecular markers need to be identified to ...

  1. Odontogenic Tumor Markers - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premalatha, B R; Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Reddy, Narendranatha P; Indu, M

    2013-01-01

    The practice of pathology is currently undergoing significant change, due to advances in the field of molecular pathology. Tumor markers are molecules that help the pathologists for confirmatory diagnosis of histopathologically confounding lesions. Odontogenic tumors are relatively rare with estimated incidence of less than 0.5 cases/ 100,000 population per year. Odontogenic tumors can pose diagnostic challenges because of overlapping histology. But, appropriate diagnosis is crucial as their treatment modality and prognosis differ; in these situations tumor markers can be helpful. But lack of comprehensive literature on specific markers for odontogenic tumors imposes pathologists to think aimlessly about various markers to arrive at an appropriate diagnosis. With this background, it is our attempt at compiling diagnostically important odontogenic tumor markers. Also, a note is added on tumor behaviour studies in common clinically important odontogenic tumors: Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic odontogenic tumor. How to cite this article: Premalatha B R, Patil S, Rao R S, Reddy N P, Indu M. Odontogenic Tumor Markers - An Overview. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):65-75. How to cite this article: Premalatha B R, Patil S, Rao R S, Reddy N P, Indu M. Odontogenic Tumor Markers - An Overview. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):65-75 PMID:24155593

  2. A Vision-Based Automated Guided Vehicle System with Marker Recognition for Indoor Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeisung; Hyun, Chang-Ho; Park, Mignon

    2013-01-01

    We propose an intelligent vision-based Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV) system using fiduciary markers. In this paper, we explore a low-cost, efficient vehicle guiding method using a consumer grade web camera and fiduciary markers. In the proposed method, the system uses fiduciary markers with a capital letter or triangle indicating direction in it. The markers are very easy to produce, manipulate, and maintain. The marker information is used to guide a vehicle. We use hue and saturation values in the image to extract marker candidates. When the known size fiduciary marker is detected by using a bird's eye view and Hough transform, the positional relation between the marker and the vehicle can be calculated. To recognize the character in the marker, a distance transform is used. The probability of feature matching was calculated by using a distance transform, and a feature having high probability is selected as a captured marker. Four directional signals and 10 alphabet features are defined and used as markers. A 98.87% recognition rate was achieved in the testing phase. The experimental results with the fiduciary marker show that the proposed method is a solution for an indoor AGV system. PMID:23966180

  3. A vision-based automated guided vehicle system with marker recognition for indoor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeisung; Hyun, Chang-Ho; Park, Mignon

    2013-08-07

    We propose an intelligent vision-based Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV) system using fiduciary markers. In this paper, we explore a low-cost, efficient vehicle guiding method using a consumer grade web camera and fiduciary markers. In the proposed method, the system uses fiduciary markers with a capital letter or triangle indicating direction in it. The markers are very easy to produce, manipulate, and maintain. The marker information is used to guide a vehicle. We use hue and saturation values in the image to extract marker candidates. When the known size fiduciary marker is detected by using a bird's eye view and Hough transform, the positional relation between the marker and the vehicle can be calculated. To recognize the character in the marker, a distance transform is used. The probability of feature matching was calculated by using a distance transform, and a feature having high probability is selected as a captured marker. Four directional signals and 10 alphabet features are defined and used as markers. A 98.87% recognition rate was achieved in the testing phase. The experimental results with the fiduciary marker show that the proposed method is a solution for an indoor AGV system.

  4. A Vision-Based Automated Guided Vehicle System with Marker Recognition for Indoor Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeisung Lee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose an intelligent vision-based Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV system using fiduciary markers. In this paper, we explore a low-cost, efficient vehicle guiding method using a consumer grade web camera and fiduciary markers. In the proposed method, the system uses fiduciary markers with a capital letter or triangle indicating direction in it. The markers are very easy to produce, manipulate, and maintain. The marker information is used to guide a vehicle. We use hue and saturation values in the image to extract marker candidates. When the known size fiduciary marker is detected by using a bird’s eye view and Hough transform, the positional relation between the marker and the vehicle can be calculated. To recognize the character in the marker, a distance transform is used. The probability of feature matching was calculated by using a distance transform, and a feature having high probability is selected as a captured marker. Four directional signals and 10 alphabet features are defined and used as markers. A 98.87% recognition rate was achieved in the testing phase. The experimental results with the fiduciary marker show that the proposed method is a solution for an indoor AGV system.

  5. Marker-assisted-selection (MAS): A fast track to increase genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mapping and tagging of agriculturally important genes have been greatly facilitated by an array of molecular markers in crop plants. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is gaining considerable importance as it would improve the efficiency of plant breeding through precise transfer of genomic regions of interest (foreground ...

  6. Juggling Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sand; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-01-01

    on institutional logics, we illustrate how a logic of efficiency organise and give shape to healthcare seeking practices as they manifest in local clinical settings. Overall, patient concerns are reconfigured to fit the local clinical setting and healthcare professionals and patients are required to juggle...... efficiency in order to deal with uncertainties and meet more complex or unpredictable needs. Lastly, building on the empirical case of cancer diagnostics, we discuss the implications of the pervasiveness of the logic of efficiency in the clinical setting and argue that provision of medical care in today......'s primary care settings requires careful balancing of increasing demands of efficiency, greater complexity of biomedical knowledge and consideration for individual patient needs....

  7. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuckle, Howard

    2014-05-09

    Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs), chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application in public health settings, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker marker tests. The established screening methods can be readily applied in the first trimester to identify pregnancies at high risk of pre-eclampsia and offer prevention though aspirin treatment. Prenatal screening for fragile X syndrome might be adopted more widely if the test was to be framed as a form of maternal marker screening.

  8. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Cuckle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs, chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application in public health settings, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker marker tests. The established screening methods can be readily applied in the first trimester to identify pregnancies at high risk of pre-eclampsia and offer prevention though aspirin treatment. Prenatal screening for fragile X syndrome might be adopted more widely if the test was to be framed as a form of maternal marker screening.

  9. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Howard Cuckle

    2014-01-01

    Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs), chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application ...

  10. SSR markers associated to early leaf spot disease resistance through selective genotyping and single marker analysis in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adama Zongo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. is an important oilseed and food crop of the world. Breeding for disease resistance is one of major objectives in groundnut breeding. Early leaf spot (ELS is one of the major destructive diseases worldwide and in West Africa, particularly in Burkina Faso causing significant yield losses. Conventional breeding approaches have been employed to develop improved varieties resistant to ELS. Molecular dissection of resistance traits using QTL analysis can improve the efficiency of resistance breeding. In the present study, an ELS susceptible genotype QH243C and an ELS resistant genotype NAMA were crossed and the F2 population genotypic and F3 progenies phenotypic data were used for marker-trait association analysis. Parents were surveyed with 179 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers out of which 103 SSR markers were found to be polymorphic between the parents. These polymorphic markers were utilized to genotype the F2 population followed by marker-trait analysis through single marker analysis (SMA and selective genotyping of the population using 23 resistant and 23 susceptible genotypes. The SMA revealed 13 markers while the selective genotyping method identified 8 markers associated with ELS resistance. Four markers (GM1911, GM1883, GM1000 and Seq13E09 were found common between the two trait mapping methods. These four markers could be employed in genomics-assisted breeding for selection of ELS resistant genotypes in groundnut breeding.

  11. Efficient Electrotransformation of Bacteroides fragilis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ichimura, Minoru; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Wakimoto, Shin; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2010-01-01

    This study describes refined electroporation parameters for efficient transformation of Bacteroides fragilis by plasmids prepared from laboratory strains of Escherichia coli. Development of the method used included determination of the optimal growth conditions for competent cell preparation, selectable antimicrobial resistance markers, electric field strength, and postpulse incubation time. Of the four E. coli-Bacteroides shuttle plasmids tested (pVAL-1, pVAL-2, pNLY1, and pLYL05), pLYL05 co...

  12. Breast cancer statistics and markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Siva Donepudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D, genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc., and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  13. First Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Containing a mecB-Carrying Gene Complex Independent of Transposon Tn6045 in a Macrococcus caseolyticus Isolate from a Canine Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Schwendener, Sybille; Thomann, Andreas; Gobeli Brawand, Stefanie; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    A methicillin-resistant mecB-positive Macrococcus caseolyticus (strain KM45013) was isolated from the nares of a dog with rhinitis. It contained a novel 39-kb transposon-defective complete mecB-carrying staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmecKM45013). SCCmecKM45013 contained 49 coding sequences (CDSs), was integrated at the 3' end of the chromosomal orfX gene, and was delimited at both ends by imperfect direct repeats functioning as integration site sequences (ISSs). SCCmecKM45013 presented two discontinuous regions of homology (SCCmec coverage of 35%) to the chromosomal and transposon Tn6045-associated SCCmec-like element of M. caseolyticus JCSC7096: (i) the mec gene complex (98.8% identity) and (ii) the ccr-carrying segment (91.8% identity). The mec gene complex, located at the right junction of the cassette, also carried the β-lactamase gene blaZm (mecRm-mecIm-mecB-blaZm). SCCmecKM45013 contained two cassette chromosome recombinase genes, ccrAm2 and ccrBm2, which shared 94.3% and 96.6% DNA identity with those of the SCCmec-like element of JCSC7096 but shared less than 52% DNA identity with the staphylococcal ccrAB and ccrC genes. Three distinct extrachromosomal circularized elements (the entire SCCmecKM45013, ΨSCCmecKM45013 lacking the ccr genes, and SCCKM45013 lacking mecB) flanked by one ISS copy, as well as the chromosomal regions remaining after excision, were detected. An unconventional circularized structure carrying the mecB gene complex was associated with two extensive direct repeat regions, which enclosed two open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF46 and ORF51) flanking the chromosomal mecB-carrying gene complex. This study revealed M. caseolyticus as a potential disease-associated bacterium in dogs and also unveiled an SCCmec element carrying mecB not associated with Tn6045 in the genus Macrococcus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Characterizing the roles of Cryphonectria parasitica RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-like genes in antiviral defense, viral recombination and transposon transcript accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Xiu Zhang

    Full Text Available An inducible RNA-silencing pathway, involving a single Dicer protein, DCL2, and a single Argonaute protein, AGL2, was recently shown to serve as an effective antiviral defense response in the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica. Eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs are frequently involved in transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene silencing and antiviral defense. We report here the identification and characterization of four RdRP genes (rdr1-4 in the C. parasitica genome. Sequence relationships with other eukaryotic RdRPs indicated that RDR1 and RDR2 were closely related to QDE-1, an RdRP involved in RNA silencing ("quelling" in Neurospora crassa, whereas RDR3 was more closely related to the meiotic silencing gene SAD-1 in N. crassa. The RdRP domain of RDR4, related to N. crassa RRP-3 of unknown function, was truncated and showed evidence of alternative splicing. Similar to reports for dcl2 and agl2, the expression levels for rdr3 and rdr4 increased after hypovirus CHV-1/EP713 infection, while expression levels of rdr1 and rdr2 were unchanged. The virus-responsive induction patterns for rdr3 and rdr4 were altered in the Δdcl2 and Δagl2 strains, suggesting some level of interaction between rdr3 and rdr4 and the dcl2/agl2 silencing pathway. Single rdr gene knockouts Δrdr1-4, double knockouts Δrdr1/2, Δrdr2/3, Δrdr1/3, and a triple knockout, Δrdr1/2/3, were generated and evaluated for effects on fungal phenotype, the antiviral defense response, viral RNA recombination activity and transposon expression. None of the single or multiple rdr knockout strains displayed any phenotypic differences from the parental strains with or without viral infection or any significant changes in viral RNA accumulation or recombination activity or transposon RNA accumulation, indicating no detectable contribution by the C. parasitica rdr genes to these processes.

  15. Tissue culture-induced flower-color changes in Saintpaulia caused by excision of the transposon inserted in the flavonoid 3', 5' hydroxylase (F3'5'H) promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mitsuru; Kawabe, Takashi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Doi, Motoaki

    2011-05-01

    The variegated Saintpaulia cultivar Thamires (Saintpaulia sp.), which has pink petals with blue splotches, is generally maintained by leaf cuttings. In contrast, tissue culture-derived progeny of the cultivar showed not only a high percentage of mutants with solid-blue petals but also other solid-color variants, which have not been observed from leaf cuttings. Solid-color phenotypes were inherited stably by their progeny from tissue culture. Petals from each solid-color variant were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and shown to contain different proportions of three main anthocyanin derivatives: malvidin, peonidin, and pelargonidin. Analysis of flavonoid 3', 5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) sequences showed no differences in the coding region among the variants and variegated individuals. However, a transposon belonging to the hAT superfamily was found in the promoter region of variegated individuals, and the presence of transposon-related insertions or deletions correlated with the observed flower-color phenotypes. Solid-blue flower mutants contained 8-base pair (bp) insertions (transposon excision footprints), while solid-pink mutants had 58- to 70-bp insertions, and purple- and deep-purple mutants had 21- and 24-bp deletions, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that F3'5'H expression levels correlated with insertions and deletions (indels) caused by hAT excision, resulting in flower-color differences. Our results showed that tissue culture of Saintpaulia 'Thamires' elicits transposon excision, which in turn alters F3'5'H expression levels and flower colors.

  16. Batch efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Schwickerath, U; Uria, C; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2010-01-01

    A frequent source of concern for resource providers is the efficient use of computing resources in their centers. This has a direct impact on requests for new resources. There are two different but strongly correlated aspects to be considered: while users are mostly interested in a good turn-around time for their jobs, resource providers are mostly interested in a high and efficient usage of their available resources. Both things, the box usage and the efficiency of individual user jobs, need to be closely monitored so that the sources of the inefficiencies can be identified. At CERN, the Lemon monitoring system is used for both purposes. Examples of such sources are poorly written user code, inefficient access to mass storage systems, and dedication of resources to specific user groups. As a first step for improvements CERN has launched a project to develop a scheduler add-on that allows careful overloading of worker nodes that run idle jobs.

  17. Imaging markers for Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchetta, Martina; Chételat, Gael; Rabinovici, Gil D.; de Leon, Mony J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Reiman, Eric M.; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Black, Sandra E.; Brooks, David J.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Fox, Nick C.; Herholz, Karl; Nordberg, Agneta; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Thies, William; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Weiner, Michael W.; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; DeCarli, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Revised diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) acknowledge a key role of imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy depends on which marker (i.e., amyloid imaging, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG]-PET, SPECT, MRI) as well as how it is measured (“metric”: visual, manual, semiautomated, or automated segmentation/computation). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of marker vs metric in separating AD from healthy and prognostic accuracy to predict progression in mild cognitive impairment. The outcome measure was positive (negative) likelihood ratio, LR+ (LR−), defined as the ratio between the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in patients and the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in healthy controls. Diagnostic LR+ of markers was between 4.4 and 9.4 and LR− between 0.25 and 0.08, whereas prognostic LR+ and LR− were between 1.7 and 7.5, and 0.50 and 0.11, respectively. Within metrics, LRs varied up to 100-fold: LR+ from approximately 1 to 100; LR− from approximately 1.00 to 0.01. Markers accounted for 11% and 18% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+ and 16% and 24% of LR−. Across all markers, metrics accounted for an equal or larger amount of variance than markers: 13% and 62% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+, and 29% and 18% of LR−. Within markers, the largest proportion of diagnostic LR+ and LR− variability was within 18F-FDG-PET and MRI metrics, respectively. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of imaging AD biomarkers is at least as dependent on how the biomarker is measured as on the biomarker itself. Standard operating procedures are key to biomarker use in the clinical routine and drug trials. PMID:23897875

  18. Development of a RAD-Seq Based DNA Polymorphism Identification Software, AgroMarker Finder, and Its Application in Rice Marker-Assisted Breeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate genome-wide marker detection is essential to the marker-assisted breeding and functional genomics studies. In this work, we developed an integrated software, AgroMarker Finder (AMF: http://erp.novelbio.com/AMF, for providing graphical user interface (GUI to facilitate the recently developed restriction-site associated DNA (RAD sequencing data analysis in rice. By application of AMF, a total of 90,743 high-quality markers (82,878 SNPs and 7,865 InDels were detected between rice varieties JP69 and Jiaoyuan5A. The density of the identified markers is 0.2 per Kb for SNP markers, and 0.02 per Kb for InDel markers. Sequencing validation revealed that the accuracy of genome-wide marker detection by AMF is 93%. In addition, a validated subset of 82 SNPs and 31 InDels were found to be closely linked to 117 important agronomic trait genes, providing a basis for subsequent marker-assisted selection (MAS and variety identification. Furthermore, we selected 12 markers from 31 validated InDel markers to identify seed authenticity of variety Jiaoyuanyou69, and we also identified 10 markers closely linked to the fragrant gene BADH2 to minimize linkage drag for Wuxiang075 (BADH2 donor/Jiachang1 recombinants selection. Therefore, this software provides an efficient approach for marker identification from RAD-seq data, and it would be a valuable tool for plant MAS and variety protection.

  19. Translating epithelial mesenchymal transition markers into the clinic: Novel insights from proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergara Daniele

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT may represent a potential source of clinical markers. Despite EMT drivers have not yet emerged as candidate markers in the clinical setting, their association with established clinical markers may improve their specificity and sensitivity. Mass spectrometry-based platforms allow analyzing multiple samples for the expression of EMT candidate markers, and may help to diagnose diseases or monitor treatment efficiently. This review highlights proteomic approaches applied to elucidate the differences between epithelial and mesenchymal tumors and describes how these can be used for target discovery and validation.

  20. Nodulation of Soybean by a Transposon-Mutant of Rhizobium fredii USDA257 Is Subject to Competitive Nodulation Blocking by Other Rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balatti, P A; Pueppke, S G

    1990-11-01

    Rhizobium fredii USDA257 fails to nodulate the improved soybean [Glycine max (L.)Merr.] cultivar McCall in plastic growth pouches. Mutant 257DH4, which was derived from USDA257 by transposon mutagenesis, forms nitrogen fixing nodules under these conditions. If USDA257 is present in inocula containing the mutant, most infections are arrested prior to organization of the nodule meristem, and nodule number is reduced by 95%. The improved cultivars Essex, Harosoy, Hodgson 78, and Viçoja, as well as a supernodulating mutant of Williams, respond like McCall to inoculation with such mixtures of bacteria. Nodulation blocking on McCall can be elicited by rhizobia other than USDA257, provided that they meet two criteria: Blocking strains must themselves be able to induce cortical cells of McCall to divide, and such divisions must proceed to the stage of nodule meristem formation. Nodulation by the mutant remains sensitive to a challenge inoculation with USDA257 for only the first 6 to 12 hours after inoculation. Nodulation blocking involving mutant 257DH4 thus appears to be a rapid, generalized process.

  1. A new biotype of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 2 emerged by a transposon-driven mutation of avirulence gene AVR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Sato, Akira; Akai, Kotaro; Teraoka, Tohru; Komatsu, Ken; Arie, Tsutomu

    2016-07-01

    Emergence of races in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) is caused by loss or mutation of at least one avirulence (AVR) gene. The product of AVR1 is a small protein (Avr1) secreted by Fol in tomato xylem sap during infection. This protein triggers Fol race 1 specific resistance (I) in tomato, indicating that AVR1 is an AVR gene. Deletion of AVR1 in race 1 resulted in the emergence of race 2, and an additional mutation in AVR2 generated race 3. Previously, we reported a new biotype of race 3, KoChi-1, in which AVR1 was truncated by a transposon Hormin, which suggested a new route to evolution of races in Fol However, to date no race 2 isolate carrying Hormin-truncated AVR1 has been reported. In this report, we describe such isolates, represented by Chiba-5, in which Hormin insertion occurred in AVR1 at a position different from that in KoChi-1. AVR1 truncation in both isolates resulted in production of defective Avr1 proteins. Chiba-5 and KoChi-1 belong to different phylogenetic clades, A1 and A2, respectively, suggesting that insertion of Hormin in AVR1 in Chiba-5 and KoChi-1 occurred as independent evolutionary events. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. P instability factor: an active maize transposon system associated with the amplification of Tourist-like MITEs and a new superfamily of transposases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Feschotte, C; Zhang, Q; Jiang, N; Eggleston, W B; Wessler, S R

    2001-10-23

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are widespread and abundant in both plant and animal genomes. Despite the discovery and characterization of many MITE families, their origin and transposition mechanism are still poorly understood, largely because MITEs are nonautonomous elements with no coding capacity. The starting point for this study was P instability factor (PIF), an active DNA transposable element family from maize that was first identified following multiple mutagenic insertions into exactly the same site in intron 2 of the maize anthocyanin regulatory gene R. In this study we report the isolation of a maize Tourist-like MITE family called miniature PIF (mPIF) that shares several features with PIF elements, including identical terminal inverted repeats, similar subterminal sequences, and an unusual but striking preference for an extended 9-bp target site. These shared features indicate that mPIF and PIF elements were amplified by the same or a closely related transposase. This transposase was identified through the isolation of several PIF elements and the identification of one element (called PIFa) that cosegregated with PIF activity. PIFa encodes a putative protein with homologs in Arabidopsis, rice, sorghum, nematodes, and a fungus. Our data suggest that PIFa and these PIF-like elements belong to a new eukaryotic DNA transposon superfamily that is distantly related to the bacterial IS5 group and are responsible for the origin and spread of Tourist-like MITEs.

  3. Repetitive DNA in the Catfish Genome: rDNA, Microsatellites, and Tc1-Mariner Transposon Sequences in Imparfinis Species (Siluriformes, Heptapteridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Juceli Gonzalez; Wolf, Ivan Rodrigo; Vilas-Boas, Laurival Antonio; Heslop-Harrison, John Seymour; Schwarzacher, Trude; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2017-09-01

    Physical mapping of repetitive DNA families in the karyotypes of fish is important to understand the organization and evolution of different orders, families, genera, or species. Fish in the genus Imparfinis show diverse karyotypes with various diploid numbers and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locations. Here we isolated and characterized Tc1-mariner nucleotide sequences from Imparfinis schubarti, and mapped their locations together with 18S rDNA, 5S rDNA, and microsatellite probes in Imparfinis borodini and I. schubarti chromosomes. The physical mapping of Tc1/Mariner on chromosomes revealed dispersed signals in heterochromatin blocks with small accumulations in the terminal and interstitial regions of I. borodini and I. schubarti. Tc1/Mariner was coincident with rDNA chromosomes sites in both species, suggesting that this transposable element may have participated in the dispersion and evolution of these sequences in the fish genome. Our analysis suggests that different transposons and microsatellites have accumulated in the I. borodini and I. schubarti genomes and that the distribution patterns of these elements may be related to karyotype evolution within Imparfinis. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Transposon Tagging of a Male-Sterility, Female-Sterility Gene, St8, Revealed that the Meiotic MER3 DNA Helicase Activity Is Essential for Fertility in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Baumbach

    Full Text Available The W4 locus in soybean encodes a dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR2 that regulates pigmentation patterns in flowers and hypocotyl. The mutable w4-m allele that governs variegated flowers has arisen through insertion of a CACTA-type transposable element, Tgm9, in DFR2. In the w4-m line, reversion from variegated to purple flower indicates excision of Tgm9, and its insertion at a new locus. Previously, we have identified a male-sterile, female-sterile mutant among the selfed progenies of a revertant plant carrying only purple flowers. Co-segregation between Tgm9 and the sterility phenotype suggested that the mutant was generated by insertion of Tgm9 at the St8 locus. The transposon was localized to exon 10 of Glyma.16G072300 that shows high identity to the MER3 DNA helicase involved in crossing over. Molecular analysis of fertile branches from two independent revertant plants confirmed precise excision of Tgm9 from the st8 allele, which restored fertility. In soybean, the gene is expressed in flower-buds, trifoliate leaves and stem. Phylogenetic analysis placed St8 in a clade with the Arabidopsis and rice MER3 suggesting that St8 is most likely the orthologous MER3 soybean gene. This study established the utility of Tgm9 in gene identification as well as in forward and reverse genetics studies.

  5. Ct shift: A novel and accurate real-time PCR quantification model for direct comparison of different nucleic acid sequences and its application for transposon quantifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacsek, Orsolya; Pergel, Enikő; Varga, Nóra; Apáti, Ágota; Orbán, Tamás I

    2017-01-20

    There are numerous applications of quantitative PCR for both diagnostic and basic research. As in many other techniques the basis of quantification is that comparisons are made between different (unknown and known or reference) specimens of the same entity. When the aim is to compare real quantities of different species in samples, one cannot escape their separate precise absolute quantification. We have established a simple and reliable method for this purpose (Ct shift method) which combines the absolute and the relative approach. It requires a plasmid standard containing both sequences of amplicons to be compared (e.g. the target of interest and the endogenous control). It can serve as a reference sample with equal copies of templates for both targets. Using the ΔΔCt formula we can quantify the exact ratio of the two templates in each unknown sample. The Ct shift method has been successfully applied for transposon gene copy measurements, as well as for comparison of different mRNAs in cDNA samples. This study provides the proof of concept and introduces some potential applications of the method; the absolute nature of results even without the need for real reference samples can contribute to the universality of the method and comparability of different studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transposon Tagging of a Male-Sterility, Female-Sterility Gene, St8, Revealed that the Meiotic MER3 DNA Helicase Activity Is Essential for Fertility in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Jordan; Pudake, Ramesh N; Johnson, Callie; Kleinhans, Kaylin; Ollhoff, Alexandrea; Palmer, Reid G; Bhattacharyya, Madan K; Sandhu, Devinder

    2016-01-01

    The W4 locus in soybean encodes a dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR2) that regulates pigmentation patterns in flowers and hypocotyl. The mutable w4-m allele that governs variegated flowers has arisen through insertion of a CACTA-type transposable element, Tgm9, in DFR2. In the w4-m line, reversion from variegated to purple flower indicates excision of Tgm9, and its insertion at a new locus. Previously, we have identified a male-sterile, female-sterile mutant among the selfed progenies of a revertant plant carrying only purple flowers. Co-segregation between Tgm9 and the sterility phenotype suggested that the mutant was generated by insertion of Tgm9 at the St8 locus. The transposon was localized to exon 10 of Glyma.16G072300 that shows high identity to the MER3 DNA helicase involved in crossing over. Molecular analysis of fertile branches from two independent revertant plants confirmed precise excision of Tgm9 from the st8 allele, which restored fertility. In soybean, the gene is expressed in flower-buds, trifoliate leaves and stem. Phylogenetic analysis placed St8 in a clade with the Arabidopsis and rice MER3 suggesting that St8 is most likely the orthologous MER3 soybean gene. This study established the utility of Tgm9 in gene identification as well as in forward and reverse genetics studies.

  7. Transposon-mediated Generation of Cellular and Mouse Models of Splicing Mutations to Assess the Efficacy of snRNA-based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Barbon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease-causing splicing mutations can be rescued by variants of the U1 small nuclear RNA (U1snRNAs. However, the evaluation of the efficacy and safety of modified U1snRNAs as therapeutic tools is limited by the availability of cellular and animal models specific for a given mutation. Hence, we exploited the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system (SB100X to integrate human factor IX (hFIX minigenes into genomic DNA in vitro and in vivo. We generated stable HEK293 cell lines and C57BL/6 mice harboring splicing-competent hFIX minigenes either wild type (SChFIX-wt or mutated (SChFIXex5-2C. In both models the SChFIXex5-2C variant, found in patients affected by Hemophilia B, displayed an aberrant splicing pattern characterized by exon 5 skipping. This allowed us to test, for the first time in a genomic DNA context, the efficacy of the snRNA U1-fix9, delivered with an adeno-associated virus (AAV vector. With this approach, we showed rescue of the correct splicing pattern of hFIX mRNA, leading to hFIX protein expression. These data validate the SB100X as a versatile tool to quickly generate models of human genetic mutations, to study their effect in a stable DNA context and to assess mutation-targeted therapeutic strategies.

  8. MarkerMiner 1.0: A new application for phylogenetic marker development using angiosperm transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamala, Srikar; García, Nicolás; Godden, Grant T; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid E; De Smet, Riet; Barbazuk, W Brad; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S

    2015-04-01

    Targeted sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms offers enormous potential for plant systematics by enabling economical acquisition of multilocus data sets that can resolve difficult phylogenetic problems. However, because discovery of single-copy nuclear (SCN) loci from NGS data requires both bioinformatics skills and access to high-performance computing resources, the application of NGS data has been limited. We developed MarkerMiner 1.0, a fully automated, open-access bioinformatic workflow and application for discovery of SCN loci in angiosperms. Our new tool identified as many as 1993 SCN loci from transcriptomic data sampled as part of four independent test cases representing marker development projects at different phylogenetic scales. MarkerMiner is an easy-to-use and effective tool for discovery of putative SCN loci. It can be run locally or via the Web, and its tabular and alignment outputs facilitate efficient downstream assessments of phylogenetic utility, locus selection, intron-exon boundary prediction, and primer or probe development.

  9. Writing on water with permanent markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Sepideh; Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-11-01

    Permanent markers create a continuous thin stain on a surface, which, after drying, can only be removed by high pressure cleaning or organic solvents. The stains of the markers are hydrophobic and thus effectively resist rinsing by water. We introduce a peeling technique based on surface tension, which benefits from this hydrophobicity, to transfer complex two-dimensional marks onto the air-water interface. As an air-water meniscus reaches the stain edge, the surface tension applies a detachment force to the thin layer. If larger than the adhesion of the stain on the substrate, the surface tension can peel off the entire layer. We examine the efficiency of this peeling method for elastic thin films in an experimental model made of thin polystyrene films of well-controlled geometrical properties adhering on clean glass substrates. We investigate the effect of film thickness and interface velocity. At low interface velocities U cleaning the water proof stains without solvent and fabrication of flexible wearable electronics. This research is supported by Grant from Swiss National Science Foundation (P2ELP2-158896).

  10. Biological Markers and Salivary Cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Gunnarsson, Lars-Gunnar; Harris, Anette

    2011-01-01

    This chapter focuses on salivary cortisol in relation to biological markers. Specifically, associations with conventional cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic abnormalities (body mass index, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, lipid status, glucose, blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate...... variability), markers related to inflammation (C-reactive protein, cytokines and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and other stress hormones (adrenaline and noradrenaline) were studied. The focus was on healthy adult populations; studies on patient populations and pregnant women were excluded. Studies on genome...... variations and pharmacological interventions were also excluded. After meeting all exclusion criteria, 42 papers remained. In total, 273 associations between salivary cortisol and any of the markers mentioned were studied, comprising 241 associations on metabolic abnormalities, 30 on inflammation, and 2...

  11. Serum markers of liver fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tougas, Gervais

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibrosis is a central histological feature of chronic liver diseases and is characterized by the accumulation and reorganization of the extracellular matrix. The gold standard for assessment of fibrosis is histological evaluation of a percutaneous liver biopsy. Albeit a considerable......-epitopes, may be targeted for novel biochemical marker development in fibrosis. We used the recently proposed BIPED system (Burden of disease, Investigative, Prognostic, Efficacy and Diagnostic) to characterise present serological markers. METHODS: Pubmed was search for keywords; Liver fibrosis, neo......, a systematic use of the neo-epitope approach, i.e. the quantification of peptide epitopes generated from enzymatic cleavage of proteins during extracellular remodeling, may prove productive in the quest to find new markers of liver fibrosis....

  12. Detecting DNA polymorphism and genetic diversity in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) germplasm: comparison of ISSR and DAMD marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedimoradi, Hiva; Talebi, Reza

    2014-10-01

    Genetic diversity and interrelationships among 31 lentil genotypes were evaluated using 10 Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and 10 directed amplification of minisatellite DNA region (DAMD) primers. A total of 43 and 48 polymorphic bands were amplified by ISSR and DAMD markers, respectively. Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for ISSR and DAMD markers were 0.37 and 0.41, respectively. All 31 lentil genotypes could be distinguished by ISSR markers into three groups and by DAMD markers into two groups. Various molecular markers show a different efficiency for evaluating DNA polymorphism in lentil and indicate that the patterns of variation are clearly influenced by the genetic marker used. Comparatively, the genetic diversity of examined lentil genotypes by two different marker techniques (ISSR and DAMD) was high and indicated that ISSR and DAMD are effective and promising marker systems for fingerprinting in lentil and give useful information on its genetic relationships.

  13. Development of Sex-Specific PCR-Based Markers in Date Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atia, Mohamed A M; Sakr, Mahmoud M; Mokhtar, Morad M; Adawy, Sami S

    2017-01-01

    Molecular markers are used efficiently in the development and identification of gender-specific PCR-based markers in date palm. There is mounting evidence that different marker systems vary in their mechanisms of detecting polymorphism and genome coverage. Therefore, they could complement each other to generate accurate sex-specific markers in date palm. This chapter describes the uses of PCR-based molecular markers to develop and identify the gender in different date palm genotypes; these are amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT), conserved DNA-derived polymorphism (CDDP), intron-targeted amplified polymorphism (ITAP), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Also described is how to characterize the identified markers by Sanger sequencing and to explore their functions through alignment of their sequences with the Genbank databases.

  14. Efficient ICT for efficient smart grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2012-01-01

    In this extended abstract the need for efficient and reliable ICT is discussed. Efficiency of ICT not only deals with energy-efficient ICT hardware, but also deals with efficient algorithms, efficient design methods, efficient networking infrastructures, etc. Efficient and reliable ICT is a

  15. Genomic, RNA, and ecological divergences of the Revolver transposon-like multi-gene family in Triticeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Motonori; Okutani, Asuka; Beiles, Avigdor; Nevo, Eviatar

    2011-09-25

    Revolver is a newly discovered multi-gene family of transposable elements in the Triticeae genome. Revolver encompasses 2929 to 3041 bp, has 20 bp of terminal inverted repeated sequences at both ends, and contains a transcriptionally active gene encoding a DNA-binding-like protein. A putative TATA box is located at base 221, with a cap site at base 261 and a possible polyadenylation signal AATAAA at base 2918. Revolver shows considerable quantitative variation in wheat and its relatives. Revolver cDNAs varied between 395 and 2,182 bp in length. The first exon exhibited length variation, but the second and third exons were almost identical. These variants in the Revolver family shared the downstream region of the second intron, but varied structurally at the 5' first exon. There were 58 clones, which showed partial homology to Revolver, among 440,000 expressed sequence tagged (EST) clones sourced from Triticeae. In these Revolver homologues with lengths of 360-744 bp, the portion after the 2nd exon was conserved (65-79% homology), but the 1st exon sequences had mutually low homology, with mutations classified into 12 types, and did not have EST sequences with open reading frames (ORFs). By PCR with the 3'-flanking region of a typical genomic clone of Revolver-2 used as a single primer, rye chromosomes 1R and 5R could be simultaneously identified. Extensive eco-geographic diversity and divergence was observed among 161 genotypes of the single species Triticum dicoccoides collected from 18 populations in Israel with varying exposures to abiotic and biotic stresses (soil, temperature, altitude, water availability, and pathogens). On the base of existing differences between Revolver variants, the molecular markers that can distinguish different rye chromosomes were developed. Eco-geographic diversification of wild emmer T. dicoccoides in Israel and high Revolver copy numbers are associated with higher rainfall and biotic stresses. The remarkable quantitative differences

  16. Genomic, RNA, and ecological divergences of the Revolver transposon-like multi-gene family in Triticeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiles Avigdor

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Revolver is a newly discovered multi-gene family of transposable elements in the Triticeae genome. Revolver encompasses 2929 to 3041 bp, has 20 bp of terminal inverted repeated sequences at both ends, and contains a transcriptionally active gene encoding a DNA-binding-like protein. A putative TATA box is located at base 221, with a cap site at base 261 and a possible polyadenylation signal AATAAA at base 2918. Revolver shows considerable quantitative variation in wheat and its relatives. Results Revolver cDNAs varied between 395 and 2,182 bp in length. The first exon exhibited length variation, but the second and third exons were almost identical. These variants in the Revolver family shared the downstream region of the second intron, but varied structurally at the 5' first exon. There were 58 clones, which showed partial homology to Revolver, among 440,000 expressed sequence tagged (EST clones sourced from Triticeae. In these Revolver homologues with lengths of 360-744 bp, the portion after the 2nd exon was conserved (65-79% homology, but the 1st exon sequences had mutually low homology, with mutations classified into 12 types, and did not have EST sequences with open reading frames (ORFs. By PCR with the 3'-flanking region of a typical genomic clone of Revolver-2 used as a single primer, rye chromosomes 1R and 5R could be simultaneously identified. Extensive eco-geographic diversity and divergence was observed among 161 genotypes of the single species Triticum dicoccoides collected from 18 populations in Israel with varying exposures to abiotic and biotic stresses (soil, temperature, altitude, water availability, and pathogens. Conclusions On the base of existing differences between Revolver variants, the molecular markers that can distinguish different rye chromosomes were developed. Eco-geographic diversification of wild emmer T. dicoccoides in Israel and high Revolver copy numbers are associated with higher rainfall and

  17. Using Next Generation Sequencing for Multiplexed Trait-Linked Markers in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Amy; Wang, Shan; St Amand, Paul; Bai, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the major type of marker for genotyping in many crops. However, the availability of SNP markers for important traits of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) that can be effectively used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) is still limited and SNP assays for MAS are usually uniplex. A shift from uniplex to multiplex assays will allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple markers and increase MAS efficiency. We designed 33 locus-specific markers from SNP or indel-based marker sequences that linked to 20 different quantitative trait loci (QTL) or genes of agronomic importance in wheat and analyzed the amplicon sequences using an Ion Torrent Proton Sequencer and a custom allele detection pipeline to determine the genotypes of 24 selected germplasm accessions. Among the 33 markers, 27 were successfully multiplexed and 23 had 100% SNP call rates. Results from analysis of "kompetitive allele-specific PCR" (KASP) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers developed from the same loci fully verified the genotype calls of 23 markers. The NGS-based multiplexed assay developed in this study is suitable for rapid and high-throughput screening of SNPs and some indel-based markers in wheat.

  18. Using Next Generation Sequencing for Multiplexed Trait-Linked Markers in Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Bernardo

    Full Text Available With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS technologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have become the major type of marker for genotyping in many crops. However, the availability of SNP markers for important traits of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. that can be effectively used in marker-assisted selection (MAS is still limited and SNP assays for MAS are usually uniplex. A shift from uniplex to multiplex assays will allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple markers and increase MAS efficiency. We designed 33 locus-specific markers from SNP or indel-based marker sequences that linked to 20 different quantitative trait loci (QTL or genes of agronomic importance in wheat and analyzed the amplicon sequences using an Ion Torrent Proton Sequencer and a custom allele detection pipeline to determine the genotypes of 24 selected germplasm accessions. Among the 33 markers, 27 were successfully multiplexed and 23 had 100% SNP call rates. Results from analysis of "kompetitive allele-specific PCR" (KASP and sequence tagged site (STS markers developed from the same loci fully verified the genotype calls of 23 markers. The NGS-based multiplexed assay developed in this study is suitable for rapid and high-throughput screening of SNPs and some indel-based markers in wheat.

  19. Protein species as diagnostic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffen, Pascal; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Robertson, Wesley D.; Zarrine-Afsar, Mash; Deterra, Diana; Richter, Verena; Schlueter, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Many diseases are associated with protein species perturbations. A prominent example of an established diagnostic marker is the glycated protein species of hemoglobin, termed HbA1c. HbA1c concentration is increased in the blood of diabetes mellitus patients due to their poor control of blood glucose

  20. Split marker transformation increases homologous integration frequency in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J; Hettler, E; Wickes, B L

    2006-03-01

    Gene disruption in Cryptococcus neoformans can be problematic due to high frequencies of ectopic integration and telomerization. To improve the frequency of homologous integration, a transformation strategy was employed called split marker, which utilizes a mixture of DNAs comprised of overlapping truncations of the selectable marker. Five genes were compared for homologous integration frequencies using various constructs. Homologous integration was highest when the split marker approach was used, with rates as high as 60% depending on target gene. A second factor that contributed to an increased homologous integration frequency was strain background, which was highest when a double auxotroph was used as a host. The split marker strategy was combined with an ura-blaster construct, which has been used in other fungi to recycle ura5 or ura3 mutations. When a hisG-URA5-hisG cassette was successfully integrated at the target locus, the URA5 gene could be easily evicted by plating onto 5-FOA agar. The cassette was then successfully used for a second cycle of transformation-eviction. The effectiveness of the split marker disruption strategy suggests that continued investigation and modification of traditional molecular techniques could increase the efficiency of C. neoformans molecular manipulation.

  1. Biochemical Markers in Neurocritical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidvar Rezae

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, a variety of serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical markers in daily clinical practice have been recommended to diagnose and monitor diverse diseases or pathologic situations. It will be essential to develop a panel of biomarkers, to be suitable for evaluation of treatment efficacy, representing distinct phases of injury and recovery and consider the temporal profile of those. Among the possible and different biochemical markers, S100b appeared to fulfill many of optimized criteria of an ideal marker. S100b, a cytosolic low molecular weight dimeric calciumbinding protein from chromosome 21, synthesized in glial cells throughout the CNS, an homodimeric diffusible, belongs to a family of closely related protein, predominantly expressed by astrocytes and Schwann cells and a classic immunohistochemical marker for these cells, is implicated in brain development and neurophysiology. Of the 3 isoforms of S-100, the BB subunit (S100B is present in high concentrations in central and peripheral glial and Schwann cells, Langerhans and anterior pituitary cells, fat, muscle, and bone marrow tissues. The biomarker has shown to be a sensitive marker of clinical and subclinical cerebral damage, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. Increasing evidence suggests that the biomarker plays a double function as an intracellular regulator and an extracellular signal of the CNS. S100b is found in the cytoplasm in a soluble form and also is associated with intracellular membranes, centrosomes, microtubules, and type III intermediate filaments. Their genomic organization now is known, and many of their target proteins have been identified, although the mechanisms of regulating S100b secretion are not completely understood and appear to be related to many factors, such as the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a, interleukin (IL-1b, and metabolic stress. 

  2. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Telfer

    Full Text Available Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K. The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi

  3. Identification of new candidate pathogenicity factors in the xylem-invading pathogen Xanthomonas albilineans by transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rott, Philippe; Fleites, Laura; Marlow, Gary; Royer, Monique; Gabriel, Dean W

    2011-05-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans is a xylem-invading pathogen that produces the toxin albicidin that blocks chloroplast differentiation, resulting in disease symptoms of sugarcane leaf scald. In contrast to other xanthomonads, X. albilineans does not possess a hypersensitive response and pathogenicity type III secretion system and does not produce xanthan gum. Albicidin is the only previously known pathogenicity factor in X. albilineans, yet albicidin-deficient mutant strains are still able to efficiently colonize sugarcane. To identify additional host adaptation or pathogenicity factors, sugarcane 'CP80-1743' was inoculated with 1,216 independently derived Tn5 insertions in X. albilineans XaFL07-1 from Florida. Sixty-one Tn5 mutants were affected in development of leaf symptoms or in stalk colonization. The Tn5 insertion sites of these mutants were determined and the interrupted genes were identified using the recently available genomic DNA sequence of X. albilineans GPE PC73 from Guadeloupe. Several pathogenicity-related loci that were not previously reported in Xanthomonas spp. were identified, including loci encoding hypothetical proteins, a membrane fusion protein conferring resistance to novobiocin, transport proteins, TonB-dependent outer-membrane transporters, and an OmpA family outer-membrane protein.

  4. Identification of new genes contributing to the extreme radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans using a Tn5-based transposon mutant library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulermo, Rémi; Onodera, Takefumi; Coste, Geneviève; Passot, Fanny; Dutertre, Murielle; Porteron, Martine; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Sommer, Suzanne; Pasternak, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have developed an extremely efficient in vivo Tn5-based mutagenesis procedure to construct a Deinococcus radiodurans insertion mutant library subsequently screened for sensitivity to genotoxic agents such as γ and UV radiations or mitomycin C. The genes inactivated in radiosensitive mutants belong to various functional categories, including DNA repair functions, stress responses, signal transduction, membrane transport, several metabolic pathways, and genes of unknown function. Interestingly, preliminary characterization of previously undescribed radiosensitive mutants suggests the contribution of cyclic di-AMP signaling in the recovery of D. radiodurans cells from genotoxic stresses, probably by modulating several pathways involved in the overall cell response. Our analyses also point out a new transcriptional regulator belonging to the GntR family, encoded by DR0265, and a predicted RNase belonging to the newly described Y family, both contributing to the extreme radioresistance of D. radiodurans. Altogether, this work has revealed new cell responses involved either directly or indirectly in repair of various cell damage and confirmed that D. radiodurans extreme radiation resistance is determined by a multiplicity of pathways acting as a complex network.

  5. Identification of new genes contributing to the extreme radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans using a Tn5-based transposon mutant library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Dulermo

    Full Text Available Here, we have developed an extremely efficient in vivo Tn5-based mutagenesis procedure to construct a Deinococcus radiodurans insertion mutant library subsequently screened for sensitivity to genotoxic agents such as γ and UV radiations or mitomycin C. The genes inactivated in radiosensitive mutants belong to various functional categories, including DNA repair functions, stress responses, signal transduction, membrane transport, several metabolic pathways, and genes of unknown function. Interestingly, preliminary characterization of previously undescribed radiosensitive mutants suggests the contribution of cyclic di-AMP signaling in the recovery of D. radiodurans cells from genotoxic stresses, probably by modulating several pathways involved in the overall cell response. Our analyses also point out a new transcriptional regulator belonging to the GntR family, encoded by DR0265, and a predicted RNase belonging to the newly described Y family, both contributing to the extreme radioresistance of D. radiodurans. Altogether, this work has revealed new cell responses involved either directly or indirectly in repair of various cell damage and confirmed that D. radiodurans extreme radiation resistance is determined by a multiplicity of pathways acting as a complex network.

  6. Informativeness of Diagnostic Marker Values and the Impact of Data Grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hua; Bandos, Andriy I; Gur, David

    2018-01-01

    Assessing performance of diagnostic markers is a necessary step for their use in decision making regarding various conditions of interest in diagnostic medicine and other fields. Globally useful markers could, however, have ranges of values that are " diagnostically non-informative" . This paper demonstrates that the presence of marker values from diagnostically non-informative ranges could lead to a loss in statistical efficiency during nonparametric evaluation and shows that grouping non-informative values provides a natural resolution to this problem. These points are theoretically proven and an extensive simulation study is conducted to illustrate the possible benefits of using grouped marker values in a number of practically reasonable scenarios. The results contradict the common conjecture regarding the detrimental effect of grouped marker values during performance assessments. Specifically, contrary to the common assumption that grouped marker values lead to bias, grouping non-informative values does not introduce bias and could substantially reduce sampling variability. The proven concept that grouped marker values could be statistically beneficial without detrimental consequences implies that in practice, tied values do not always require resolution whereas the use of continuous diagnostic results without addressing diagnostically non-informative ranges could be statistically detrimental. Based on these findings, more efficient methods for evaluating diagnostic markers could be developed.

  7. Transposon insertion sequencing reveals T4SS as the major genetic trait for conjugation transfer of multi-drug resistance pEIB202 from Edwardsiella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Yanan; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan

    2017-05-12

    Conjugation is a major type of horizontal transmission of genes that involves transfer of a plasmid into a recipient using specific conjugation machinery, which results in an extended spectrum of bacterial antibiotics resistance. However, there is inadequate knowledge about the regulator and mechanisms that control the conjugation processes, especially in an aquaculture environment where a cocktail of antibiotics may be present. Here, we investigated these with pEIB202, a typical multi-drug resistant IncP plasmid encoding tetracycline, streptomycin, sulfonamide and chloramphenicol resistance in fish pathogen Edwardsiella piscicida strain EIB202. We used transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) to identify genes that are responsible for conjugation transfer of pEIB202. All ten of the plasmid-borne type IV secretion system (T4SS) genes and a putative lipoprotein p007 were identified to play an important role in pEIB202 horizontal transfer. Antibiotics appear to modulate conjugation frequencies by repressing T4SS gene expression. In addition, we identified topA gene, which encodes topoisomerase I, as an inhibitor of pEIB202 transfer. Furthermore, the RNA-seq analysis of the response regulator EsrB encoded on the chromosome also revealed its essential role in facilitating the conjugation by upregulating the T4SS genes. Collectively, our screens unraveled the genetic basis of the conjugation transfer of pEIB202 and the influence of horizontally acquired EsrB on this process. Our results will improve the understanding of the mechanism of plasmid conjugation processes that facilitate dissemination of antibiotic resistance especially in aquaculture industries.

  8. Copy number of the transposon, Pokey, in rDNA is positively correlated with rDNA copy number in Daphnia obtuse [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlynn LeRiche

    Full Text Available Pokey is a class II DNA transposon that inserts into 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes and other genomic regions of species in the subgenus, Daphnia. Two divergent lineages, PokeyA and PokeyB have been identified. Recombination between misaligned rRNA genes changes their number and the number of Pokey elements. We used quantitative PCR (qPCR to estimate rRNA gene and Pokey number in isolates from natural populations of Daphnia obtusa, and in clonally-propagated mutation accumulation lines (MAL initiated from a single D. obtusa female. The change in direction and magnitude of Pokey and rRNA gene number did not show a consistent pattern across ∼ 87 generations in the MAL; however, Pokey and rRNA gene number changed in concert. PokeyA and 28S gene number were positively correlated in the isolates from both natural populations and the MAL. PokeyB number was much lower than PokeyA in both MAL and natural population isolates, and showed no correlation with 28S gene number. Preliminary analysis did not detect PokeyB outside rDNA in any isolates and detected only 0 to 4 copies of PokeyA outside rDNA indicating that Pokey may be primarily an rDNA element in D. obtusa. The recombination rate in this species is high and the average size of the rDNA locus is about twice as large as that in other Daphnia species such as D. pulicaria and D. pulex, which may have facilitated expansion of PokeyA to much higher numbers in D. obtusa rDNA than these other species.

  9. A comprehensive analysis of in vitro and in vivo genetic fitness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using high-throughput sequencing of transposon libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Skurnik

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing of transposon (Tn libraries created within entire genomes identifies and quantifies the contribution of individual genes and operons to the fitness of organisms in different environments. We used insertion-sequencing (INSeq to analyze the contribution to fitness of all non-essential genes in the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 based on a library of ∼300,000 individual Tn insertions. In vitro growth in LB provided a baseline for comparison with the survival of the Tn insertion strains following 6 days of colonization of the murine gastrointestinal tract as well as a comparison with Tn-inserts subsequently able to systemically disseminate to the spleen following induction of neutropenia. Sequencing was performed following DNA extraction from the recovered bacteria, digestion with the MmeI restriction enzyme that hydrolyzes DNA 16 bp away from the end of the Tn insert, and fractionation into oligonucleotides of 1,200-1,500 bp that were prepared for high-throughput sequencing. Changes in frequency of Tn inserts into the P. aeruginosa genome were used to quantify in vivo fitness resulting from loss of a gene. 636 genes had <10 sequencing reads in LB, thus defined as unable to grow in this medium. During in vivo infection there were major losses of strains with Tn inserts in almost all known virulence factors, as well as respiration, energy utilization, ion pumps, nutritional genes and prophages. Many new candidates for virulence factors were also identified. There were consistent changes in the recovery of Tn inserts in genes within most operons and Tn insertions into some genes enhanced in vivo fitness. Strikingly, 90% of the non-essential genes were required for in vivo survival following systemic dissemination during neutropenia. These experiments resulted in the identification of the P. aeruginosa strain PA14 genes necessary for optimal survival in the mucosal and systemic environments of a mammalian

  10. Two Different Tetracycline Resistance Mechanisms, Plasmid-Carried tet(L) and Chromosomally Located Transposon-Associated tet(M), Coexist in Lactobacillus sakei Rits 9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammor, Mohammed Salim; Gueimonde, Miguel; Danielsen, Morten; Zagorec, Monique; van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Mayo, Baltasar; Margolles, Abelardo

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is extensively used as functional starter culture in fermented meat products. One of the safety criteria of a starter culture is the absence of potentially transferable antibiotic resistance determinants. However, tetracycline-resistant L. sakei strains have already been observed. In this paper, we show that tetracycline resistance in L. sakei Rits 9, a strain isolated from Italian Sola cheese made from raw milk, is mediated by a transposon-associated tet(M) gene coding for a ribosomal protection protein and a plasmid-carried tet(L) gene coding for a tetracycline efflux pump. pLS55, the 5-kb plasmid carrying the tet(L) gene, is highly similar to the pMA67 plasmid recently described for Paenibacillus larvae, a species pathogenic to honeybees. pLS55 could be transferred by electroporation into the laboratory strain L. sakei 23K. While the L. sakei 23K transformant containing pLS55 displayed an intermediate tetracycline resistance level (MIC, <32 μg/ml), L. sakei Rits 9, containing both tetracycline-resistant determinants, had a MIC of <256 μg/ml, suggesting that Tet L and Tet M confer different levels of resistance in L. sakei. Remarkably, in the absence of tetracycline, a basal expression of both genes was detected for L. sakei Rits 9. In addition, subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline affected the expression patterns of tet(M) and tet(L) in different ways: the expression of tet(M) was induced only at high tetracycline concentrations, whereas the expression of tet(L) was up-regulated at lower concentrations. This is the first time that two different mechanisms conferring resistance to tetracycline are characterized for the same strain of a lactic acid bacterium. PMID:18192429

  11. Two different tetracycline resistance mechanisms, plasmid-carried tet(L) and chromosomally located transposon-associated tet(M), coexist in Lactobacillus sakei Rits 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammor, Mohammed Salim; Gueimonde, Miguel; Danielsen, Morten; Zagorec, Monique; van Hoek, Angela H A M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Mayo, Baltasar; Margolles, Abelardo

    2008-03-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is extensively used as functional starter culture in fermented meat products. One of the safety criteria of a starter culture is the absence of potentially transferable antibiotic resistance determinants. However, tetracycline-resistant L. sakei strains have already been observed. In this paper, we show that tetracycline resistance in L. sakei Rits 9, a strain isolated from Italian Sola cheese made from raw milk, is mediated by a transposon-associated tet(M) gene coding for a ribosomal protection protein and a plasmid-carried tet(L) gene coding for a tetracycline efflux pump. pLS55, the 5-kb plasmid carrying the tet(L) gene, is highly similar to the pMA67 plasmid recently described for Paenibacillus larvae, a species pathogenic to honeybees. pLS55 could be transferred by electroporation into the laboratory strain L. sakei 23K. While the L. sakei 23K transformant containing pLS55 displayed an intermediate tetracycline resistance level (MIC, <32 microg/ml), L. sakei Rits 9, containing both tetracycline-resistant determinants, had a MIC of <256 microg/ml, suggesting that Tet L and Tet M confer different levels of resistance in L. sakei. Remarkably, in the absence of tetracycline, a basal expression of both genes was detected for L. sakei Rits 9. In addition, subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline affected the expression patterns of tet(M) and tet(L) in different ways: the expression of tet(M) was induced only at high tetracycline concentrations, whereas the expression of tet(L) was up-regulated at lower concentrations. This is the first time that two different mechanisms conferring resistance to tetracycline are characterized for the same strain of a lactic acid bacterium.

  12. A new approach to CAR T-cell gene engineering and cultivation using piggyBac transposon in the presence of IL-4, IL-7 and IL-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptáčková, Pavlína; Musil, Jan; Štach, Martin; Lesný, Petr; Němečková, Šárka; Král, Vlastimil; Fábry, Milan; Otáhal, Pavel

    2018-02-20

    Clinical-grade chimeric antigenic receptor (CAR)19 T cells are routinely manufactured by lentiviral/retroviral (LV/RV) transduction of an anti-CD3/CD28 activated T cells, which are then propagated in a culture medium supplemented with interleukin (IL)-2. The use of LV/RVs for T-cell modification represents a manufacturing challenge due to the complexity of the transduction approach and the necessity of thorough quality control. We present here a significantly improved protocol for CAR19 T-cell manufacture that is based on the electroporation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with plasmid DNA encoding the piggyBac transposon/transposase vectors and their cultivation in the presence of cytokines IL-4, IL-7 and IL-21. We found that activation of the CAR receptor by either its cognate ligand (i.e., CD19 expressed on the surface of B cells) or anti-CAR antibody, followed by cultivation in the presence of cytokines IL-4 and IL-7, enables strong and highly selective expansion of functional CAR19 T cells, resulting in >90% CAR + T cells. Addition of cytokine IL-21 to the mixture of IL-4 and IL-7 supported development of immature CAR19 T cells with central memory and stem cell memory phenotypes and expressing very low amounts of inhibitory receptors PD-1, LAG-3 and TIM-3. Our protocol provides a simple and cost-effective method for engineering high-quality T cells for adoptive therapies. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Pathogenicity-Related Genes in Biofilm-Defective Acidovorax citrulli by Transposon Tn5 Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Luo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation is important for virulence of a large number of plant pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, some virulence genes have been found to be involved in the formation of biofilm in bacterial fruit blotch pathogen Acidovorax citrulli. However, some virulent strains of A. citrulli were unable to format biofilm, indicating the complexity between biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, virulence-related genes were identified in the biofilm-defective strain A1 of A. citrulli by using Tn5 insertion, pathogenicity test, and high-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (hiTAIL-PCR. Results from this study indicated that 22 out of the obtained 301 mutants significantly decreased the virulence of strain A1 compared to the wild-type. Furthermore, sequence analysis indicated that the obtained 22 mutants were due to the insertion of Tn5 into eight genes, including Aave 4244 (cation diffusion facilitator family transporter, Aave 4286 (hypothetical protein, Aave 4189 (alpha/beta hydrolase fold, Aave 1911 (IMP dehydrogenase/GMP reductase domain, Aave 4383 (bacterial export proteins, family 1, Aave 4256 (Hsp70 protein, Aave 0003 (histidine kinase, DNA gyrase B, and HSP90-like ATPase, and Aave 2428 (pyridoxal-phosphate dependent enzyme. Furthermore, the growth of mutant Aave 2428 was unaffected and even increased by the change in incubation temperature, NaCl concentration and the pH of the LB broth, indicating that this gene may be directly involved in the bacterial virulence. Overall, the determination of the eight pathogenicity-related genes in strain A1 will be helpful to elucidate the pathogenesis of biofilm-defective A. citrulli.

  14. Early bichemical markers of effects: Enzyme induction, oncogene activation and markers of oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E.; Loft, Steffen

    1995-01-01

    Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein......Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein...

  15. Efficiency stud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brundaban Patro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of combination tube boilers, as applicable to commercial use, along with the significant features, limitations, and applicability. A heat balance sheet is prepared to know the various heat losses in two different two-pass combination tube boilers, using low grade coal and rice husk as a fuel. Also, the efficiency of the combination tube boilers is studied by the direct and heat loss methods. It is observed that the dry flue gas loss is a major loss in the combination tube boilers. The loss due to the unburnt in the fly ash is very less in the combination tube boilers, due to the surrounded membrane wall. It is also observed that the loss due to the unburnt in the bottom ash has a considerable amount for the heat loss, and cannot be ignored.

  16. ecoPrimers: inference of new DNA barcode markers from whole genome sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Tiayyba; Shehzad, Wasim; Viari, Alain; Pompanon, François; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric

    2011-11-01

    Using non-conventional markers, DNA metabarcoding allows biodiversity assessment from complex substrates. In this article, we present ecoPrimers, a software for identifying new barcode markers and their associated PCR primers. ecoPrimers scans whole genomes to find such markers without a priori knowledge. ecoPrimers optimizes two quality indices measuring taxonomical range and discrimination to select the most efficient markers from a set of reference sequences, according to specific experimental constraints such as marker length or specifically targeted taxa. The key step of the algorithm is the identification of conserved regions among reference sequences for anchoring primers. We propose an efficient algorithm based on data mining, that allows the analysis of huge sets of sequences. We evaluate the efficiency of ecoPrimers by running it on three different sequence sets: mitochondrial, chloroplast and bacterial genomes. Identified barcode markers correspond either to barcode regions already in use for plants or animals, or to new potential barcodes. Results from empirical experiments carried out on a promising new barcode for analyzing vertebrate diversity fully agree with expectations based on bioinformatics analysis. These tests demonstrate the efficiency of ecoPrimers for inferring new barcodes fitting with diverse experimental contexts. ecoPrimers is available as an open source project at: http://www.grenoble.prabi.fr/trac/ecoPrimers.

  17. Inflammation markers in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsounis, Dimitrios; Bouras, Georgios; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Charalampos; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension is a common health disorder with uncertain etiology and unclear pathophysiology. There is evidence that various systems interact in uncertain ways and mechanisms to cause hypertension. It is also well known that inflammation is a key feature in the initiation, progression and clinical implication of several cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has become evident that the immune system and inflammatory response are also essential in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Many inflammation markers such as CRP, cytokines, and adhesion molecules have been found elevated in hypertensive patients supporting the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Also, in normotensive individuals, these markers have been associated with the risk of developing hypertension, whereas in hypertensive patients they have been associated with target organ damage as well as with the risk for future cardiovascular events. Thus, understanding the role of inflammation in hypertension provides new insights for novel therapeutic approaches, targeting inflammation for the treatment of hypertension and its complications.

  18. The Infinitive Marker across Scandinavian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ramshøj Christensen

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I argue that the base-position of the infinitive marker in the Scandinavian languages and English share a common origin site. It is inserted as the top-most head in the VP-domain. The cross-linguistic variation in the syntactic distribution of the infinitive marker can be accounted for by assuming that it undergoes head movement. This movement is optional in Danish, English, Norwegian, and Early Modern Danish and is not feature-driven. In Faroese, Icelandic, and Swedish, on the other hand, it is triggered by φ-feature checking on Finº. In Icelandic and Swedish these φ-features are strong and induce obligatory vº→Finº movement, whereas they are weak in Faroese and do not induce vº→Finº movement.

  19. Serotonin, neural markers and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo eMeneses

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals’ species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence

  20. Elevated Markers of Death Receptor-Activated Apoptosis are Associated with Increased Risk for Development of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Yao Mattisson

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The present study demonstrates an association between several cardiovascular risk factors and elevated levels of circulating markers of apoptotic cell death. It also shows that subjects with high levels of these biomarkers have increased risk of diabetes and CVD. This implies that soluble death receptors are markers of β-cell and vascular injury and potentially could be used as surrogate markers of therapeutic efficiency in risk factor interventions.

  1. Prognostic molecular markers in cancer - quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søland, Tine M; Brusevold, Ingvild J

    2013-09-01

    Despite the tremendous number of studies of prognostic molecular markers in cancer, only a few such markers have entered clinical practise. The lack of clinical prognostic markers clearly reflects limitations in or an inappropriate approach to prognostic studies. This situation should be of great concern for the research community, clinicians and patients. In the present review, we evaluate immunohistochemical prognostic marker studies in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) from 2006 to 2012. We comment upon general issues such as study design, assay methods and statistical methods, applicable to prognostic marker studies irrespective of cancer type. The three most frequently studied markers in OSCC are reviewed. Our analysis revealed that most new molecular markers are reported only once. To draw conclusions of clinical relevance based on the few markers that appeared in more than one study was problematic due to between-study heterogeneity. Currently, much valuable tissue material, time and money are wasted on irrelevant studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Vocatives and discourse markers in textualinteractive grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Penhavel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the class of Vocatives and the class of Discourse Markers as proposed within Textualinteractive Grammar, and we try to demonstrate that Vocatives can work as Discourse Markers.

  3. Evaluation of a multi-marker immunomagnetic enrichment assay for the quantification of circulating melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman James B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating melanoma cells (CMCs are thought to be valuable in improving measures of prognosis in melanoma patients and may be a useful marker of residual disease to identify non-metastatic patients requiring adjuvant therapy. We investigated whether immunomagnetic enrichment targeting multiple markers allows more efficient enrichment of CMCs from patient peripheral blood than targeting a single marker. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether the number of CMCs in patient blood was associated with disease stage. Methods We captured CMCs by targeting the melanoma associated markers MCSP and MCAM as well as the melanoma stem cell markers ABCB5 and CD271, both individually and in combination, by immunomagnetic enrichment. CMCs were enriched and quantified from the peripheral blood of 10 non-metastatic and 13 metastatic melanoma patients. Results Targeting all markers in combination resulted in the enrichment of more CMCs than when any individual marker