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  1. Cataractogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofija Andjelić

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cataractogenesis is the process of cataract formation. Cataract, which can be defined as any opacity of the crystalline lens, is the leading cause of avoidable blindness worldwide. The mechanisms involved in cataractogenesis are not yet understood. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of contemporary research in cataractogenesis. have been identified, including increasing age, genetic predisposition, oxidative stress and exposure to UV light. Cataract can be congenital, age-related or secondary. Secondary cataract can be associated with ocular conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa or uveitis, or systemic conditions as in the case of diabetes or homocistinuria, or can be also drug-induced, mainly by steroids.

  2. Effect of curcumin on galactose-induced cataractogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, Palla; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2003-06-09

    Curcumin, the active principle of turmeric, has been shown to have both antioxidant and hypoglycemic activity in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of curcumin on the onset and maturation of galactose induced cataract. Sprague-Dawley rats (21 days old) were divided into 5 groups. The control group (A) received an AIN-93 diet, the galactose group (B) received 30% galactose in the diet, the test groups (C and D) received the B group diet plus 0.002% and 0.01% curcumin respectively, and group (E) received the control diet plus 0.01% curcumin, all for a period of 4 weeks. Cataract progression due to galactose feeding was monitored by slit lamp microscope and classified into 4 stages. At the end of the experiment biochemical parameters such as lipid peroxidation, aldose reductase (AR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), reduced glutathione, protein content, and protein carbonyls were measured in the lens. Advanced glycated end products (AGE) and protein oxidation were measured by AGE and tryptophon fluorescence respectively. Crystallin profile was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (HPLC). Slit lamp microscope observations indicated that curcumin at 0.002% (group C) delayed the onset and maturation of cataract. In contrast even though there was a slight delay in the onset of cataract at the 0.01% level (group D), maturation of cataract was faster when compared to group B. Biochemical analysis showed that curcumin at the 0.002% level appeared to exert antioxidant and antiglycating effects, as it inhibited lipid peroxidation, AGE-fluorescence, and protein aggregation. Though the reasons for faster onset and maturation of cataract in group D rats was not clear, the data suggested that under hyperglycemic conditions higher levels of curcumin (0.01%) in the diet may increase oxidative stress, AGE formation, and protein aggregation. However, feeding of curcumin to normal rats up to a 0.01% level did not result in any changes in lens

  3. Effects of estrogen and gender on cataractogenesis induced by high-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M.A.; Rusek, A.; Valluri, S.; Garrett, J.; Lopez, J.; Caperell-Grant, A.; Mendonca, M.; Bigsby, R.; Dynlacht, J.

    2010-01-01

    Planning for long-duration manned lunar and interplanetary missions requires an understanding of radiation-induced cataractogenesis. Previously, it was demonstrated that low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation with 10 Gy of 60 Co γ rays resulted in an increased incidence of cataracts in male rats compared to female rats. This gender difference was not due to differences in estrogen, since male rats treated with the major secreted estrogen 17-β-estradiol (E2) showed an identical increase compared to untreated males. We now compare the incidence and rate of progression of cataracts induced by high-LET radiation in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received a single dose of 1 Gy of 600 MeV 56 Fe ions. Lens opacification was measured at 2-4 week intervals with a slit lamp. The incidence and rate of progression of radiation-induced cataracts was significantly increased in the animals in which estrogen was available from endogenous or exogenous sources. Male rats with E2 capsules implanted had significantly higher rates of progression compared to male rats with empty capsules implanted (P = 0.025) but not compared to the intact female rats. These results contrast with data obtained after low-LET irradiation and suggest the possibility that the different types of damage caused by high- and low-LET radiation may be influenced differentially by steroid sex hormones.

  4. Biochemical studies on the ocular lens in relation to cataractogenesis. Final report, July 1, 1968--December 31, 1978J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, V.E.; Reddy, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    As indicated in the scope and purpose of this program, the broad aim of these investigations was to provide an understanding of the mechanisms by which various inorganic ions and a number of organic substances, particularly amino acids, enter and leave the ocular lens and to assay the role of these mechanisms in the physiological and pathological conditions of the eye. The studies also dealt with the mechanisms of glutathione in the lens and its relationship to amino acid transport, the effect of x-ray on the protein aggregation mechanism as well as the studies of the biochemical changes associated with the development of the experimentally induced galactose cataract

  5. Role of pirenoxine in the effects of catalin on in vitro ultraviolet-induced lens protein turbidity and selenite-induced cataractogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao-Chien; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Hsu, Kuang-Yang; Lin, I-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Wen-Hsin; Wei, Tzu-Tang; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wu, Tzu-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the biochemical pharmacology of pirenoxine (PRX) and catalin under in vitro selenite/calcium- and ultraviolet (UV)-induced lens protein turbidity challenges. The systemic effects of catalin were determined using a selenite-induced cataractogenesis rat model. In vitro cataractogenesis assay systems (including UVB/C photo-oxidation of lens crystallins, calpain-induced proteolysis, and selenite/calcium-induced turbidity of lens crystallin solutions) were used to screen the activity of PRX and catalin eye drop solutions. Turbidity was identified as the optical density measured using spectroscopy at 405 nm. We also determined the in vivo effects of catalin on cataract severity in a selenite-induced cataract rat model. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied to analyze the integrity of crystallin samples. PRX at 1,000 μM significantly delayed UVC-induced turbidity formation compared to controls after 4 h of UVC exposure (pturbidity induced by 4 h of UVC exposure was ameliorated in the presence of catalin equivalent to 1~100 μM PRX in a concentration-dependent manner. Samples with catalin-formulated vehicle only (CataV) and those containing PRX equivalent to 100 μM had a similar protective effect after 4 h of UVC exposure compared to the controls (pturbidity formation compared to controls on days 0~4 (pturbidity on day 1 (pturbidity but required millimolar levels to protect against UVC irradiation. The observed inhibition of UVC-induced turbidity of lens crystallins by catalin at micromolar concentrations may have been a result of the catalin-formulated vehicle. Transient protection by catalin against selenite-induced turbidity of crystallin solutions in vitro was supported by the ameliorated cataract scores in the early stage of cataractogenesis in vivo by subcutaneously administered catalin. PRX could not inhibit calpain-induced proteolysis activated by calcium or catalin itself, and may be

  6. Oxidative Stress in Cataractogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Cekić

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to compeer levels of antioxidative agent -total SH groups and the finale product of lipid peroxidationmalondialdehyde (MDA in serum, and glutathione (GSH and MDA in nucleocortical parts of lens after extracapsular extraction of cataract. Patient were (38 with cataract and 38 controls matched by sex and years of life. Diagnosis of cataract was established by complete ocular examination. All results are expressed as mean ± S.D. A Student’s t-test was used to estimate differences between the groups. The level of significance was p<0,05. Total sulfhydryl groups were determined in serum by the method of Ellman as well as GSH content in nucleocortical parts of lenses using the method of Sedlak and Lindsay. Lipid peroxidation, evidenced by formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, was determined in nucleocortical parts of the lens and in serum. Our results show a statistical significance in concentration of total SH groups (225,37±82,19μmol/L, controls 311,03±60,37μm0l/L p<0,05 and MDA (20,24±8,12, and controls 8,73±2,53μmol/L, p<0,001 in serum among patients with age related cataract and controls. There was no statistical significance in concentration of total SH groups and MDA in serum among patients with different type of age related cataract and in nucleocortical parts of lens. The present study concludes that there is a statistical significance in concentration of total SH groups and MDA in serum among patients with age related cataract and controls, but there were no statistical significance in concentration of GSH and MDA in serum and nucleocortical parts of lens in patient with different type of cataract.

  7. Biochemical studies on the ocular lens in relation to cataractogenesis. Final report, July 1, 1968--December 31, 1978J. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsey, V.E.; Reddy, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    As indicated in the scope and purpose of this program, the broad aim of these investigations was to provide an understanding of the mechanisms by which various inorganic ions and a number of organic substances, particularly amino acids, enter and leave the ocular lens and to assay the role of these mechanisms in the physiological and pathological conditions of the eye. The studies also dealt with the mechanisms of glutathione in the lens and its relationship to amino acid transport, the effect of x-ray on the protein aggregation mechanism as well as the studies of the biochemical changes associated with the development of the experimentally induced galactose cataract.

  8. Physical factors in cataractogenesis: ambient ultraviolet radiation and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliney, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    A number of environmental cofactors have been implicated in cataracto-genesis. Two have received the greatest attention: ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and ambient temperature. Unfortunately, both temperature and UVR levels vary similarly with geographical latitude. Careful attention to several more refined physical variables and the geometry of exposure may permit investigators to separate the contributory effects of these two physical agents. This paper briefly reviews the available data, estimates the variation of lenticular temperature with ambient temperature, and provides measurements of short-wavelength (UV-B) UVR exposure to the human eye with different meterological conditions. The study attempts to provide epidemiological investigators with more detailed information necessary to perform more accurate studies of cataract and other ocular pathologies that appear to be related to environmental factors. Ocular UV-B radiation exposure levels were measured at nine locations in the USA near 40 degrees latitude at elevations from sea level to 8000 ft. Terrain reflectance is shown to be much more important than terrain elevation; cloud cover and haze may actually increase ocular exposure; and the value of wearing brimmed hats and spectacles varies with the environment. Several avenues for future research are suggested

  9. Delayed progression of diabetic cataractogenesis and retinopathy by Litchi chinensis in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilari, Eswar Kumar; Putta, Swathi

    2017-03-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effect of the aqueous fruit pericarp extract of Litchi chinensis (APLC) on parameters which leads to diabetic cataractogenesis and retinopathy in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The objective of the study is to evaluate the APLC for in vivo antioxidant activity and its role in inhibiting the polyol pathway and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The diabetic animals were treated with L. chinensis for a period of 12 weeks. At the end of 12 weeks, the animals were killed and the biochemical pathways involved in the pathogenesis of cataract such as oxidative stress by protein content, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and polyolpathway by aldose reductase (AR) in lens homogenates, alterations in protein carbonyl content (PCO) and AGEs in both serum and lens the APLC-treated diabetic rats were compared against diabetic control rats. Cataract progression due to hyperglycemia was monitored by slit lamp bio microscope and classified into four stages. Fundoscope test and retinal histopathology were done for assessing retinopathy. Statistically significant reduction in glucose, and elevation of protein content, SOD, CAT, and GSH levels and decreased levels of AR and PCO in lens homogenate and significant reduction in AGEs serum and lens homogenate were observed. Slit lamp examination, fundoscope, and histopathology showed improvement in retinal changes in APLC-treated rats compared to diabetic control animals. The treatment with APLC found to delay the progression of diabetic cataractogenesis and retinopathy, which might be due to its antioxidant activity, because of the presence of active phytochemicals in APLC.

  10. Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis: A Critical Literature Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seals, Kevin F., E-mail: KSeals@mednet.ucla.edu; Lee, Edward W., E-mail: EdwardLee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States); Cagnon, Christopher H., E-mail: CCagnon@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Hakim, Ramsey A., E-mail: RAlhakim@mednet.ucla.edu; Kee, Stephen T., E-mail: SKee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Extensive research supports an association between radiation exposure and cataractogenesis. New data suggests that radiation-induced cataracts may form stochastically, without a threshold and at low radiation doses. We first review data linking cataractogenesis with interventional work. We then analyze the lens dose typical of various procedures, factors modulating dose, and predicted annual dosages. We conclude by critically evaluating the literature describing techniques for lens protection, finding that leaded eyeglasses may offer inadequate protection and exploring the available data on alternative strategies for cataract prevention.

  11. Cinnamaldehyde Attenuates Cataractogenesis via Restoration of Hypertension and Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Fed Hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several studies have revealed that systemic hypertension is strongly associated with cataractogenesis. However, the pathophysiology and treatment is often unclear. In this study, we evaluated the anti-cataractogenic effect of cinnamaldehyde (CA, a natural organic compound, in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. Methods: The rats were divided into six groups. For six weeks, the normal group received a suspension of 0.5% carboxy methyl cellulose (10 mL/kg/day, p.o. while five other groups received a 10% (w/v fructose solution in their drinking water to induce hypertension. By the end of the third week hypertension had been induced in all the animals receiving fructose. From the beginning of the fourth week to the end of the sixth week, one of those five groups (control continued to receive only 10% (w/v fructose solution, one group (standard received ramipril (1 mg/kg/day, p.o. plus 10% (w/v fructose solution, and three groups (experimental received CA at doses of 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg/day p.o., plus 10% (w/v fructose solution. Blood pressure was measured weekly using a non-invasive blood pressure apparatus. After six weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and the anti-cataractogenic effects on the eye lenses were evaluated. Results: Administration of fructose elevated both the systolic and the diastolic blood pressures, which were significantly reduced by CA at all dose levels. In the control group, a significant increase in the malonaldehyde (MDA level and decreases in the total protein, Ca2+adenosine triphosphate (ATPase activity, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels, as compared to the normal group, were observed. Administration of CA at all doses significantly restored the enzymatic, non-enzymatic, antioxidants, total protein, and Ca2+ATPase levels, but decreased the MDA level, as compared to the control group. Conclusion: The present study revealed that CA modulated the antioxidant

  12. Late cataractogenesis in rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons and radiogenic cataract in other species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lett, J.T.; Lee, A.C.; Cox, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) which were irradiated at ca. 2 years of age with acute doses (less than or equal to 5 Gy) of protons (32-2300 MeV) are exhibiting the late progressive phase of radiation cataractogenesis 20-24 years after exposure, the period during which we have been monitoring the sequelae of irradiation of the lens. The median life span of the primate is approximately 24 years. Analogous late ocular changes also occur in a similar period of the lifetimes of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) exposed at 8-10 weeks of age to 460-MeV 56 Fe ions. In this experiment, which has been in progress for ca. 6 years, we are following the development of radiation-induced lenticular opacification (cataractogenic profiles) throughout the life span. The median life span of the lagomorph is 5-7 years. Cataractogenic profiles for NZW rabbits irradiated with 20 Ne and 40 Ar ions and 60 Co gamma photons were obtained previously. Reference is also made to measurements of the cataractogenic profiles of a short-lived rodent, the Fischer 344 rat (Rattus norvegicus) during the first year after exposure at 8-10 weeks of age to spread-Bragg-peak protons of 55 MeV nominal energy. The median life span of the rodent is reported to be 2-3 years

  13. Pathogenesis of Congenital Rubella Virus Infection in Human Fetuses: Viral Infection in the Ciliary Body Could Play an Important Role in Cataractogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thong Van Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation: Our study based on the pathological examination demonstrated that the rubella virus infection occurred via systemic organs of human fetuses. This fact was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and direct detection of viral RNA in multiple organs. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report demonstrating that the rubella virus infection occurred via systemic organs of the human body. Importantly, virus infection of the ciliary body could play an important role in cataractogenesis.

  14. Cumulative antioxidant defense against oxidative challenge in galactose-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, T N; Kumar, C Sanat; Kanth, V Rajani; Ramana, B Venkata; Reddy, P Uma Maheswara; Suryanarayana, P; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2006-09-01

    Natural dietary ingredients are known for their antioxidant activity. Of such, curcumin, the active principle of turmeric, at 0.01% in the diet proved as pro-oxidative in galactose-induced cataract in vivo. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of vitamin E (VE), a well-known antioxidant, in combination with curcumin on the onset and maturation of galactose induced cataract. Periodic slit-lamp microscope examination indicated that in combination with vitamin-E, 0.01% curcumin (G-IV) delayed the onset and maturation of galactose-induced cataract. Biochemical analyses revealed that combined treatment of 0.01% curcumin and vitamin-E diet exhibited an efficient antioxidant effect, as it inhibited lipid peroxidation and contributed to a distinct rise in reduced glutathione content. The results indicate that natural dietary ingredients are effective in combination rather than the individual administration as they are complementing each other in reducing the risk of galactose induced cataract.

  15. Dose Response for Radiation Cataractogenesis: A Meta-Regression of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Matthew D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E., E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Smith, David D. [Division of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Nguyen, Khanh H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Bayhealth Cancer Center, Dover, Delaware (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a meta-regression on published data and to model the 5-year probability of cataract development after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with and without total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies reporting cataract incidence after HSCT with TBI were identified by a PubMed search. Seventeen publications provided complete information on radiation dose schedule, fractionation, dose rate, and actuarial cataract incidence. Chemotherapy-only regimens were included as zero radiation dose regimens. Multivariate meta-regression with a weighted generalized linear model was used to model the 5-year cataract incidence and contributory factors. Results: Data from 1386 patients in 21 series were included for analysis. TBI was administered to a total dose of 0 to 15.75 Gy with single or fractionated schedules with a dose rate of 0.04 to 0.16 Gy/min. Factors significantly associated with 5-year cataract incidence were dose, dose times dose per fraction (D•dpf), pediatric versus adult status, and the absence of an ophthalmologist as an author. Dose rate, graft versus host disease, steroid use, hyperfractionation, and number of fractions were not significant. Five-fold internal cross-validation showed a model validity of 83% ± 8%. Regression diagnostics showed no evidence of lack-of-fit and no patterns in the studentized residuals. The α/β ratio from the linear quadratic model, estimated as the ratio of the coefficients for dose and D•dpf, was 0.76 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-1.55). The odds ratio for pediatric patients was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.7-4.6) relative to adults. Conclusions: Dose, D•dpf, pediatric status, and regimented follow-up care by an ophthalmologist were predictive of 5-year cataract incidence after HSCT. The low α/β ratio indicates the importance of fractionation in reducing cataracts. Dose rate effects have been observed in single institution studies but not in the

  16. Dose Response for Radiation Cataractogenesis: A Meta-Regression of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Smith, David D.; Nguyen, Khanh H.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a meta-regression on published data and to model the 5-year probability of cataract development after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with and without total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies reporting cataract incidence after HSCT with TBI were identified by a PubMed search. Seventeen publications provided complete information on radiation dose schedule, fractionation, dose rate, and actuarial cataract incidence. Chemotherapy-only regimens were included as zero radiation dose regimens. Multivariate meta-regression with a weighted generalized linear model was used to model the 5-year cataract incidence and contributory factors. Results: Data from 1386 patients in 21 series were included for analysis. TBI was administered to a total dose of 0 to 15.75 Gy with single or fractionated schedules with a dose rate of 0.04 to 0.16 Gy/min. Factors significantly associated with 5-year cataract incidence were dose, dose times dose per fraction (D•dpf), pediatric versus adult status, and the absence of an ophthalmologist as an author. Dose rate, graft versus host disease, steroid use, hyperfractionation, and number of fractions were not significant. Five-fold internal cross-validation showed a model validity of 83% ± 8%. Regression diagnostics showed no evidence of lack-of-fit and no patterns in the studentized residuals. The α/β ratio from the linear quadratic model, estimated as the ratio of the coefficients for dose and D•dpf, was 0.76 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-1.55). The odds ratio for pediatric patients was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.7-4.6) relative to adults. Conclusions: Dose, D•dpf, pediatric status, and regimented follow-up care by an ophthalmologist were predictive of 5-year cataract incidence after HSCT. The low α/β ratio indicates the importance of fractionation in reducing cataracts. Dose rate effects have been observed in single institution studies but not in the

  17. Final state effects in photoemission studies of Fermi surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, Richard L; Browne, Dana A; Mankey, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is one of the most important methods for extracting information about the Fermi surface (FS) of materials. An electron photoexcited from the FS is emitted from the crystal conserving the parallel momentum, k parallel , while the perpendicular momentum k perpendicular is reduced due to the surface potential barrier. A simple interpretation of the process assumes the final state is free-electron-like allowing one to 'map' the detected photoelectron back to its initial k momentum. There are multiple final state effects that can complicate the interpretation of photoelectron data and these effects are reviewed here. These can involve both energy and k broadening, which can give rise to shadow or ghost FS contours, scattering and final state diffraction effects that modify intensities, and matrix element effects which reflect the symmetries of the states involved and can be highly dependent on photon polarization. These matrix elements result in contours of photoelectron intensity that follow the dispersion in k-space of the initial state, the FS, and the final state. Locations where intensities go to zero due to matrix element and symmetry effects can result in gaps where FS contours 'disappear'. Recognition that these effects can play a significant role in determining the measured angular distributions is crucial in developing an informed model of where the FS contours actually lie in relation to measured intensity contours

  18. Final state interaction effect on correlations in narrow particles pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of the two-particle correlation function on the space-time dimensions of the particle production region is discussed. The basic formulae, taking into account he effects of quantum statistics and final state interaction, and the conditions of their applicability are given

  19. Final report: Compiled MPI. Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gropp, William Douglas [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This is the final report on Compiled MPI: Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development, and summarizes the results under this project. The project investigated runtime enviroments that improve the performance of MPI (Message-Passing Interface) programs; work at Illinois in the last period of this project looked at optimizing data access optimizations expressed with MPI datatypes.

  20. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  1. Research on the climatic effects of nuclear winter: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has undertaken a series of research efforts to develop and implement improvements to the Community Climate Model (CCM) needed to make the model more applicable to studies of the climatic effects of nuclear war. The development of the model improvements has reached a stage where implementation may proceed, and several of the developed routines are being incorporated into the next approved version of the CCM (CCM1). Formal documentation is being completed describing the specific model improvements that have been successfully implemented. This final report includes the series of annual proposals and progress reports that have guided the project

  2. Research on the climatic effects of nuclear winter: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, R.E.

    1986-12-03

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has undertaken a series of research efforts to develop and implement improvements to the Community Climate Model (CCM) needed to make the model more applicable to studies of the climatic effects of nuclear war. The development of the model improvements has reached a stage where implementation may proceed, and several of the developed routines are being incorporated into the next approved version of the CCM (CCM1). Formal documentation is being completed describing the specific model improvements that have been successfully implemented. This final report includes the series of annual proposals and progress reports that have guided the project.

  3. Final state effects in neutron Compton scattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, A.L.

    1997-10-01

    The single atom momentum distributions of condensed matter systems can be derived using the technique of neutron Compton scattering (NCS). The electron Volt spectrometer (eVS) which is situated at the world's most intense pulsed neutron spallation source, ISIS, has been configured to perform NCS measurements. Interpretation of NCS data requires the use of the impulse approximation, however even at the high energy and momentum transfers obtainable on the eVS deviations from the impulse approximation occur. These deviations are generally known as final state effects (FSE) which manifest themselves as an asymmetry in the measured momentum distribution. The aim of the work reported in this thesis is to demonstrate how final state effects can be accounted for in a simple way using the expansion method described by Sears. An advantage of the Sears method is that the first asymmetric term in the expansion is proportional to the mean Laplacian of the potential, 2 V>, thus giving access to further information on the single atom potential. The Sears expansion has been incorporated into data analysis routines and applied to measured data on three systems that were chosen to represent the systems that are regularly investigated using the eVS. Measurements have been carried out on the deuteron in ZrD 2 , a light atom in a heavy lattice, beryllium, a polycrystalline solid and pyrolytic graphite, an aligned crystalline sample with an anisotropic momentum distribution. The study shows how the new analysis method gives more reliable values for the mean kinetic energy k >, which can be derived from the measured momentum distribution. A comparison of measured data with simulated data calculated within the harmonic approximation reveals how 2 V> can be a sensitive probe of anharmonicity of the interatomic potential. An anisotropy in the derived k > and 2 V> of pyrolytic graphite has been measured indicating the dependence of final state effects on bonding strength. The derived 2 V

  4. Final state effects in liquid 4He: An experimental test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokol, P.E.; Silver, R.N.; Sosnick, T.R.; Snow, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering at high momentum transfers can provide direct information on the atomic momentum distribution n(p) when the Impulse Approximation (IA) is valid. In isotropic systems, the scattering in the IA is directly proportional to the longitudinal momentum distribution which is a function of a single scaling variable Y /triple bond/ (M/Q)(ω /minus/ ω/sub r/), where M is the mass of the scatterer, Q is the momentum transfer, and ω/sub r/ = Q 2 /2M is the recoiled energy. However, the experimentally attainable Q's are not large enough to reach the IA limit. Deviations from the IA due to final state scattering by neighboring atoms, known as final state effects, will distort the observed scattering from the IA prediction. Thus, an understanding of deviations from the IA is essential to accurate determination of n(p). Liquid helium provides an excellent testing ground for studying FSE in a dense, strongly interacting system for two reasons. First, theoretical calculations of the momentum distributions are available in both the normal liquid, and superfluid phases. These calculations are believed to be quite accurate, since they agree well with several other measured properties of the liquid. In addition, n(p) in the superfluid exhibits a very sharp feature, the Bose condensate peak, which should be very sensitive to FSE. Comparison of the predicted scattering obtained from the theoretical n(p) using the IA to the experimentally observed scattering can be used to study deviations due to FSE. 14 refs., 7 figs

  5. The testing effect for mediator final test cues and related final test cues in online and laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Coppens; P.P.J.L. Verkoeijen; S. Bouwmeester; R.M.J.P. Rikers

    2016-01-01

    Background The testing effect is the finding that information that is retrieved during learning is more often correctly retrieved on a final test than information that is restudied. According to the semantic mediator hypothesis the testing effect arises because retrieval practice of cue-target

  6. The testing effect for mediator final test cues and related final test cues in online and laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, Leonora C.; Verkoeijen, Peter P. J. L.; Bouwmeester, Samantha; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The testing effect is the finding that information that is retrieved during learning is more often correctly retrieved on a final test than information that is restudied. According to the semantic mediator hypothesis the testing effect arises because retrieval practice of cue-target pairs

  7. Effect of water in salt repositories. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Gilpatrick, L.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Bronstein, H.R.; Shor, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Additional results confirm that during most of the consolidation of polycrystalline salt in brine, the previously proposed rate expression applies. The final consolidation, however, proceeds at a lower rate than predicted. The presence of clay hastens the consolidation process but does not greatly affect the previously observed relationship between permeability and void fraction. Studies of the migration of brine within polycrystalline salt specimens under stress indicate that the principal effect is the exclusion of brine as a result of consolidation, a process that evidently can proceed to completion. No clear effect of a temperature gradient could be identified. A previously reported linear increase with time of the reciprocal permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine was confirmed, though the rate of increase appears more nearly proportional to the product of sigma ΔP rather than sigma ΔP 2 (sigma is the uniaxial stress normal to the interface and ΔP is the hydraulic pressure drop). The new results suggest that a limiting permeability may be reached. A model for the permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine is developed that is reasonably consistent with the present results and may be used to predict the permeability of bedded salt. More measurements are needed, however, to choose between two limiting forms of the model

  8. Effect of water in salt repositories. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Gilpatrick, L.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Bronstein, H.R.; Shor, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Additional results confirm that during most of the consolidation of polycrystalline salt in brine, the previously proposed rate expression applies. The final consolidation, however, proceeds at a lower rate than predicted. The presence of clay hastens the consolidation process but does not greatly affect the previously observed relationship between permeability and void fraction. Studies of the migration of brine within polycrystalline salt specimens under stress indicate that the principal effect is the exclusion of brine as a result of consolidation, a process that evidently can proceed to completion. No clear effect of a temperature gradient could be identified. A previously reported linear increase with time of the reciprocal permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine was confirmed, though the rate of increase appears more nearly proportional to the product of sigma ..delta..P rather than sigma ..delta..P/sup 2/ (sigma is the uniaxial stress normal to the interface and ..delta..P is the hydraulic pressure drop). The new results suggest that a limiting permeability may be reached. A model for the permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine is developed that is reasonably consistent with the present results and may be used to predict the permeability of bedded salt. More measurements are needed, however, to choose between two limiting forms of the model.

  9. Evaluation of the effects of turbulence on the behavior of migratory fish, final report 2002.; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated

  10. The testing effect for mediator final test cues and related final test cues in online and laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Leonora C; Verkoeijen, Peter P J L; Bouwmeester, Samantha; Rikers, Remy M J P

    2016-05-31

    The testing effect is the finding that information that is retrieved during learning is more often correctly retrieved on a final test than information that is restudied. According to the semantic mediator hypothesis the testing effect arises because retrieval practice of cue-target pairs (mother-child) activates semantically related mediators (father) more than restudying. Hence, the mediator-target (father-child) association should be stronger for retrieved than restudied pairs. Indeed, Carpenter (2011) found a larger testing effect when participants received mediators (father) than when they received target-related words (birth) as final test cues. The present study started as an attempt to test an alternative account of Carpenter's results. However, it turned into a series of conceptual (Experiment 1) and direct (Experiment 2 and 3) replications conducted with online samples. The results of these online replications were compared with those of similar existing laboratory experiments through small-scale meta-analyses. The results showed that (1) the magnitude of the raw mediator testing effect advantage is comparable for online and laboratory experiments, (2) in both online and laboratory experiments the magnitude of the raw mediator testing effect advantage is smaller than in Carpenter's original experiment, and (3) the testing effect for related cues varies considerably between online experiments. The variability in the testing effect for related cues in online experiments could point toward moderators of the related cue short-term testing effect. The raw mediator testing effect advantage is smaller than in Carpenter's original experiment.

  11. Course Syllabi and Their Effects on Students' Final Grade Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study examined the relationship between the changes introduced in a course syllabus for a course titled "Instructional Strategies" and the final grades obtained by freshman and sophomore students in three successive academic periods. A sample of 150 subjects was randomly selected from students enrolled in the course at the…

  12. Effectiveness of Oregon's teen licensing program : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Significant changes in Oregons teen licensing laws went into effect on March 1, 2000. The new laws expanded the provisional driving license program which had been in effect since October 1989 and established a graduated driver licensing (GDL) prog...

  13. Effective Classroom Management and Instruction: An Exploration of Models. Executive Summary of Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertson, Carolyn M.; And Others

    A summary is presented of the final report, "Effective Classroom Management and Instruction: An Exploration of Models." The final report presents a set of linked investigations of the effects of training teachers in effective classroom management practices in a series of school-based workshops. Four purposes were addressed by the study: (1) to…

  14. Guidelines - A Primer for Communicating Effectively with NABIR Stakeholders; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyard, G.R.; Word, C.J.; Weber, J.R.; Harding, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    This primer is a tool to help prepare scientists for meetings with stakeholders. It was prepared for staff involved with the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. It discusses why some efforts in science communication may succeed while others fail, provides methods of approaching group interactions about science that may better orient expert participants, and summarizes experience drawn from observations of groups interacting about topics in bioremediation or the NABIR program. The primer also provides brief, useful models for interacting with either expert or non-expert groups. Finally, it identifies topical areas that may help scientists prepare for public meetings, based on the developers' ongoing research in science communication in public forums

  15. Effects of climate changes on forest ecosystems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasch, P.; Lindner, M.; Bellmann, K.

    1995-08-01

    The report evalutates the current state of knowledge on the effects of site-related climate factors (temperature sum in the vegetation period, frost, water supply and arid phases) on the growth and distribution of different tree species. The effects of increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere are discussed as well. ( orig./MG) [de

  16. Unusual initial and final state effects in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.A.

    1990-12-01

    We have constructed fundamental test which can be used to probe discrete symmetries, and their possible violations, in the required ''new physics'' beyond the standard model. In a recent paper for applications at an e + e - collider, we have proposed a simple test for ''maximal P -- maximal C'' violation in the Z degree → τ 1 - τ 1 + coupling. For τ minus-plus → π minus-plus ν, for example, this test is based on an azimuthal correlation function I(φ e , φ) where the azimuthal angles are defined relative to the final π 1 - . For e - e + collisions in the Γ or J/Ψ regions, I(φ e , φ) can be used to test for a complex phase in the γ* → τ - τ + coupling. In other research programs, we are continuing to investigate our proposal that partons be identified with nearly degenerate, coherent quark-gluon ''jet'' states, and have proven a completeness relation for the q-analogue of the unusual coherent states

  17. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, M.B.; Davis, M.V.

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10 4 rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10 5 rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects

  18. The effects of napping on night shift performance : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    This study represents a collaborative effort between the Federal Aviation Administrations Civil Aeromedical Institute and the US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory to investigate the effects of napping on the midnight shift as a potential counte...

  19. Long-term aging effects in RPV steel. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, Frank; Ulbricht, Andreas; Wagner, Arne

    2014-01-01

    The BMWi project 1501393 aimed at contributing to the clarification of flux effects and late blooming effects in irradiated RPV steels by means of experimental techniques of sensitivity at the nm scale. The investigation of these effects was focussed on RPV steels, both base metal and weld of German reactors selected according to the objectives of the present project from two previous projects performed at AREVA GmbH. The complementary techniques of small-angle neutron scattering, atom probe tomography and positron annihilation spectroscopy were applied to detect and characterize the irradiation-induced nm-scale defect-solute clusters. A flux effect on the size of the irradiation-induced clusters but no flux effect on both cluster volume fraction and mechanical properties was found. For a low-Cu RPV weld, a late blooming effect was observed, which results in a steep slope of both cluster volume fraction and transition temperature shift after an initial stage of small or no change.

  20. User effects on the transient system code calculations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksan, S.N.; D'Auria, F.

    1995-01-01

    Large thermal-hydraulic system codes are widely used to perform safety and licensing analyses of nuclear power plants to optimize operational procedures and the plant design itself. Evaluation of the capabilities of these codes are accomplished by comparing the code predictions with the measured experimental data obtained from various types of separate effects and integral test facilities. In recent years, some attempts have been made to establish methodologies to evaluate the accuracy and the uncertainty of the code predictions and consequently judgement on the acceptability of the codes. In none of the methodologies has the influence of the code user on the calculated results been directly addressed. In this paper, the results of the investigations on the user effects for the thermal-hydraulic transient system codes is presented and discussed on the basis of some case studies. The general findings of the investigations show that in addition to user effects, there are other reasons that affect the results of the calculations and which are hidden under user effects. Both the hidden factors and the direct user effects are discussed in detail and general recommendations and conclusions are presented to control and limit them

  1. Study of Effective Alternative Education Programs: Final Grant Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Mary Magee; Poirier, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents findings of a study conducted to identify the components of systems that effectively meet the diverse, ever changing needs of children with disabilities for whom traditional school settings do not work. A secondary goal of this study was to develop a conceptually clear and empirically grounded definition of alternative…

  2. Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species and Implications for Management and Research (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species and Implications for Management and Research . This report reviews available literature on climate-change effects on aquatic invasive species (AIS) and examines sta...

  3. Communicating radon risk effectively: Radon testing in Maryland. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desvousges, W.H.; Smith, V.K.; Rink, H.H.

    1988-10-01

    Two sets of materials and corresponding delivery strategies for communicating radon risk were evaluated, compared with a 'no-special-treatment' strategy in a comparison community. One community received radio public-service announcements and utility bill inserts. The second received these plus posters, local government sponsorship of a radon awareness week, and local slide presentations. The most-intensive efforts (multiple channels, multiple hits) were more effective than the less intensive effort, which had little impact compared with no special treatment. From a marketing perspective, the effort was very successful, increasing the share of homeowners who tested for radon from 5% to 15%. This may not be viewed as sufficiently effective from a public-health perspective, however

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on salamander orientation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoop, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Pens were stocked with larvae of Am, bystoma opacum, A. maculatum, and Rana sylvatica and observations were made on survivorship, metamorphosis, size of juveniles, length of larval period, and migration. Migrating adults were irradiated with a 137 Cs source; the control and experimental animals were then returned to their points of capture and released. Radiation effects were not evident. Studies were conducted on the uptake and turnover of sodium, praseodymium, and europium by larval and hatchling amphibians and reptiles

  5. Radiation-induced effects in organic systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    This project, which is of twenty-seven years duration, has been devoted to furthering our basic understanding of the processes involved in the absorption and distribution of high-energy radiation in organic molecules. The early phases of the work were concerned with the gross chemical effects of radiation and included studies in a number of important classes of organic compounds including alcohols, aliphatic acids, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Basic information was acquired through these studies that has led to a better understanding of the effects of high-energy radiation on condensed media. During this period the so-called protective effect of low concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons was also studied. A contribution of lasting significance at this time was the development of a technique for the post-radiolysis analysis of trapped free radicals by photochemical means. A comprehensive series of papers on the reactions of thermal hydrogen atoms with frozen organic substrates represented the beginning of a new phase in the approach to the problems of radiation chemistry in this laboratory. Since that time the general philosophy guided the research has been to single out events or processes suspected of contributing to the gross-radiation effect and study them in isolation. Thus from 1970 on efforts were devoted to charge-exchange processes, ionization efficiencies (w-values), radical decay process in solids and ion-dissociation reactions. The first by means of a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the second utilizing an ionization chamber constructed in the FSU shops, the third using electron spin resonance detection, and the last involving the use of a dual mass spectrometer, solid target system invented in our laboratory. The most productive of these efforts has been the radical decay work

  6. Air quality effects of alternative fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, P.; Ligocki, M.; Looker, R.; Cohen, J.

    1997-11-01

    To support the Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, a comparison of potential air quality effects of alternative transportation fuels is being performed. This report presents the results of Phase 1 of this program, focusing on reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol blended with 15 percent gasoline (M85), and compressed natural gas (CNG). The fuels are compared in terms of effects on simulated future concentrations of ozone and mobile source air toxics in a photochemical grid model. The fuel comparisons were carried out for the future year 2020 and assumed complete replacement of gasoline in the projected light-duty gasoline fleet by each of the candidate fuels. The model simulations were carried out for the areas surrounding Los Angeles and Baltimore/DC, and other (non-mobile) sources of atmospheric emissions were projected according to published estimates of economic and population growth, and planned emission control measures specific to each modeling domain. The future-year results are compared to a future-year run with all gasoline vehicle emissions removed. The results of the comparison indicate that the use of M85 is likely to produce similar ozone and air toxics levels as those projected from the use of RFG. Substitution of CNG is projected to produce significantly lower levels of ozone and the mobile source air toxics than those projected for RFG or M85. The relative benefits of CNG substitution are consistent in both modeling domains. The projection methodologies used for the comparison are subject to a large uncertainty, and modeled concentration distributions depend on meteorological conditions. The quantitative comparison of fuel effects is thus likely to be sensitive to alternative assumptions. The consistency of the results for two very different modeling domains, using very different base assumptions, lends credibility to the qualitative differentiation among these fuels. 32 refs., 42 figs., 47 tabs.

  7. Research on the climatic effects of nuclear war: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittock, A.B.; Galbally, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    The major thrust of this work has been to investigate the surface climatic effects of a thin layer of smoke thought likely to move over Australia following a major nuclear war in the Northern Hemisphere. It was found that daily average surface coolings would be in the range of 2-4 deg C, but that daily maximum temperature could cool by 5 deg C or more over large areas of Australia, especially in the dry season. The most important effect over Australia would be a large reduction in summer monsoonal and convective rainfall. A computer model of the rising fireball was constructed. Simulations with this model suggested that some past estimates of nitrogen oxide injections into the upper atmosphere from near-surface nuclear explosions may be overestimated. Recommendations are made that a wider study be undertaken, which would take into account increases in ultraviolet radiation due to ozone depletion, and various socio-economic factors such as loss of vital imports, loss of economic incentives for farmers, and a possible controlled or uncontrolled influx of refugees. 24 refs., 3 figs

  8. Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1996-11-01

    Task 1 of this research was the development of a high-resolution, fully implicit, finite-difference, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional simulator for chemical flooding. The major physical phenomena modeled in this simulator are dispersion, heterogeneous permeability and porosity, adsorption, interfacial tension, relative permeability and capillary desaturation, compositional phase viscosity, compositional phase density and gravity effects, capillary pressure, and aqueous-oleic-microemulsion phase behavior. Polymer and its non-Newtonian rheology properties include shear-thinning viscosity, permeability reduction, inaccessible pore volume, and adsorption. Options of constant or variable space grids and time steps, constant-pressure or constant-rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and multiple slug injections are also available in the simulator. The solution scheme used in this simulator is fully implicit. The pressure equation and the mass-conservation equations are solved simultaneously for the aqueous-phase pressure and the total concentrations of each component. A third-order-in-space, second-order-in-time finite-difference method and a new total-variation-diminishing (TVD) third-order flux limiter are used that greatly reduce numerical dispersion effects. Task 2 was the optimization of surfactant flooding. The code UTCHEM was used to simulate surfactant polymer flooding.

  9. What causes the density effect in young forest plantations?; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara J. Bond; Gary A. Ritchie

    2002-01-01

    In young forest plantations, trees planted at high densities frequently show more rapid height and diameter growth than those plants at lower densities. This positive growth response to density (the ''density effect'') often manifests long before seedlings are tall enough to shade one another, so it is not a simple response to shade. The mechanism(s) which trigger and sustain this growth enhancement are unknown. Our objectives were to document the temporal dynamics of positive growth response to increasing density in Douglas-fir plantations and to test two hypotheses as potential mechanisms for this response. The hypotheses are (1) a canopy boundary layer effect, and (2) alterations in the quality of light reflected from neighboring trees. The ''boundary layer'' hypotheses proposes that changes in atmospheric mixing occur in high-density plantations, promoting increased concentrations of CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O vapor during early morning hours, which in turn would enhance carbon assimilation. The ''light quality'' hypothesis proposes that the presence of neighbors alters the ratio of red to far red light in the canopy environment. Plant sensors detect this change in light quality, and growth and development is altered in response. We found that boundary layer conductance was higher, as we predicted, in low-density Douglas-fir stands than in high-density stands five years after planting. The changes in boundary conductance were accompanied by higher CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O vapor during early morning hours. However, we also found that the primary manifestation of the density effect in Douglas-fir occurs two to four years after planting, and we were not able to measure differences in boundary conductance in different densities at that time. Also, we found no difference in carbon isotope composition of wood cellulose formed in high- vs. low-density stands two to three years after planting. We conclude that although stand density may have a significant impact on

  10. Heavy ion induced genetic effects in mammalian cells. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.; Brend'amour, M.; Casares, A.; Egenolf, R.; Gutermuth, F.; Ikpeme, S.E.; Koch, S.; Kost, M.; Loebrich, M.; Pross, H.D.; Russmann, C.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Stoll, U.; Weber, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generally assumed to be the most relevant initial event producing radiation-induced cellular lethality, as well as mutations and transformations. The dependence of their formation on radiation quality has been recently reviewed. Contrary to earlier observations there seems to be now agreement that the RBE does not increase above unity with increasing LET in mammalian cells when conventional techniques are applied which are not able to resolve smaller fragments. If they are, however, included in the analysis maximum RBE values around 2 are obtained. The situation is different with yeast: An increased effectiveness for DSB induction has been reported with alpha particles, as well as for heavy ions. This may be due to differences in methods or to chromosomal structure, as discussed in more detail in this paper. DSB induction was measured for a LET range of 100 to 11500 keV/? m in yeast cells using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Under the conditions applied the chromosomes of the yeast cells could be separated according to size allowing the direct quantification of the DSB yield by measuring the intensity of the largest chromosomes. The results demonstrate clearly that DSB induction in yeast depends on radiation quality. The derived cross-sections for DSB induction were also compared to those for cell inactivation determined in parallel experiments under identical irradiation conditions. (orig.)

  11. Updating OSHA standards based on national consensus standards. final rule; confirmation of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-14

    OSHA is confirming the effective date of its direct final rule that revises a number of standards for general industry that refer to national consensus standards. The direct final rule states that it would become effective on March 13, 2008 unless OSHA receives significant adverse comment on these revisions by January 14, 2008. OSHA received no adverse comments by that date and, therefore, is confirming that the rule will become effective on March 13, 2008.

  12. Effective Field Theories and Strong Interactions. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The framework of Effective Field Theories (EFTs) allows us to describe strong interactions in terms of degrees of freedom relevant to the energy regimes of interest, in the most general way consistent with the symmetries of QCD. Observables are expanded systematically in powers of M lo /M hi , where M lo (M hi ) denotes a low-(high-)energy scale. This organizational principle is referred to as 'power counting'. Terms of increasing powers in the expansion parameter are referred to as leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO), etc. Details of the QCD dynamics not included explicitly are encoded in interaction parameters, or 'low-energy constants' (LECs), which can in principle be calculated from an explicit solution of QCD - for example via lattice simulations- but can also be determined directly from experimental data. QCD has an intrinsic scale M QCD ≅ 1 GeV, at which the QCD coupling constant α s (M QCD ) becomes large and the dynamics becomes non-perturbative. As a consequence M QCD sets the scale for the masses of most hadrons, such as the nucleon mass m N ≅ 940 MeV. EFTs can roughly be divided into two categories: those that can be matched onto QCD in perturbation theory, which we call high-energy EFTs, and those that cannot be matched perturbatively, which we call low-energy EFTs. In high-energy EFTs, M QCD typically sets the low-energy scale, and all the dynamics associated with this scale reside in matrix elements of EFT operators. These non-perturbative matrix elements are the LECs and are also referred to as long-distance contributions. Each matrix element is multiplied by a short-distance coefficient, which contains the dynamics from the high scale M hi . Since M hi >> M QCD , α s (M hi ) hi ∼ M Q , the heavy-quark mass, and in addition to M QCD there are low scales associated with the typical relative momentum ∼ M Q v and energy ∼ M Q v 2 of the heavy quarks. Depending on the sizes of M Q and the heavy-quark velocity v these scales can

  13. Medical devices: reports of corrections and removals; delay of effective data--FDA. Direct final rule; delay of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-18

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published in the Federal Register of August 7, 1998 (63 FR 42229), a direct final rule. The direct final rule notified the public of FDA's intention to amend the regulations that govern reports of corrections and removals of medical devices to eliminate the requirement for distributors to make such reports. This document delays the effective date of the direct final rule.

  14. The effects of solar Reimers η on the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianpo; Lin, Ling; Bai, Chunyan; Liu, Jinzhong

    2016-04-01

    Our Sun will lose sizable mass and expand enormously when it evolves to the red giant branch phase and the asymptotic giant branch phase. The loss of solar mass will push a planet outward. On the contrary, solar expansion will enhance tidal effects, and tidal force will drive a planet inward. Will our Sun finally engulf Venus, the Earth, and Mars? In the literature, one can find a large number of studies with different points of view. A key factor is that we do not know how much mass the Sun will lose at the late stages. The Reimers η can describe the efficiency of stellar mass-loss and greatly affect solar mass and solar radius at the late stages. In this work, we study how the final destinies of Venus, the Earth, and Mars can be depending on Reimers η chosen. In our calculation, the Reimers η varies from 0.00 to 0.75, with the minimum interval 0.0025. Our results show that Venus will be engulfed by the Sun and Mars will most probably survive finally. The fate of the Earth is uncertain. The Earth will finally be engulfed by the Sun while η <0.4600, and it will finally survive while η ≥ 0.4600. New observations indicate that the average Reimers η for solar-like stars is 0.477. This implies that Earth may survive finally.

  15. EFFECT OF ULTRASOUND ACTIVATION OF SHS-CHARGE ON THE FINAL PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klubovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the effect of ultrasound activation of dolomite, which is used for producing refractory material by the SHS method, on the final product. X-ray investigation has demonstrated that ultrasound activation of the initial charge brings about changes in the phase composition of the synthesized product.

  16. Improving regulatory effectiveness in Federal/State siting actions. Success factor evaluation panel. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggard, J.

    1977-06-01

    An independent appraisal of the factors that determine efficiency in reaching environmental decisions with respect to nuclear facilities was addressed. The Panel recommended to substitute 'effectiveness' for 'efficiency.' Thus, an effective decision is: 'A timely final decision, that provides for necessary change, consistent with societal objectives and law, and which is equitable and practical, and is based upon fully and candidly expressed premises utilizing a commonly available data base.' The measurement criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of the environmental decision making process are: timely decision, final decision, provision for change, consistency with societal goals and law, equitable, practical, fully and candidly expressed premises, commonly available data base, and public confidence. The Panel evaluated the 8 policies proposed by NRC staff as essential to licensing reform: national fuels policy, regional review, early disclosure, State role, technical assistance to State, role of utilities, radiation health and safety, and modification of the Atomic Energy Act. The five NRC scenarios were evaluated in terms of regulatory effectiveness

  17. Peak and ceiling effects in final-product analysis of mastoidectomy performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, N; Konge, L; Cayé-Thomasen, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality surgical simulation of mastoidectomy is a promising training tool for novices. Final-product analysis for assessing novice mastoidectomy performance could be limited by a peak or ceiling effect. These may be countered by simulator-integrated tutoring. METHODS: Twenty......-two participants completed a single session of self-directed practice of the mastoidectomy procedure in a virtual reality simulator. Participants were randomised for additional simulator-integrated tutoring. Performances were assessed at 10-minute intervals using final-product analysis. RESULTS: In all, 45.5 per...

  18. Final-state interactions and relativistic effects in the quasielastic (e,e') reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, C.R.; Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545); Picklesimer, A.; Van Orden, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse response functions for the inclusive quasielastic (e,e') reaction are analyzed in detail. A microscopic theoretical framework for the many-body reaction provides a clear conceptual (nonrelativistic) basis for treating final-state interactions and goes far beyond simple plane-wave or Hermitean potential models. The many-body physics of inelastic final-state channels as described by optical and multiple scattering theories is properly included by incorporating a full complex optical potential. Explicit nonrelativistic and relativistic momentum-space calculations quantitatively demonstrate the importance of such a treatment of final-state interactions for both the transverse and longitudinal response. Nonrelativistic calculations are performed using final-state interactions based on phenomenology, local density models, and microscopic multiple scattering theory. Relativistic calculations span a similar range of models and employ Dirac bound-state wave functions. The theoretical extension to relativistic dynamics is of course not clear, but is done in obvious parallel to elastic proton scattering. Extensive calculations are performed for 40 Ca at momentum transfers of 410, 550, and 700 MeV/c. A number of interesting physical effects are observed, including significant relativistic suppressions (especially for R L ), large off-shell and virtual pair effects, enhancement of the tails of the response by the final-state interactions, and large qualitative and even shape distinctions between the predictions of the various models of the final-state interactions. None of the models is found to be able to simultaneously predict the data for both response functions. This strongly suggests that additional physical mechanisms are of qualitative importance in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering

  19. VA Dental Insurance Program--federalism. Direct final rule; confirmation of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) published a direct final rule in the Federal Register on October 22, 2013, amending its regulations related to the VA Dental Insurance Program (VADIP), a pilot program to offer premium-based dental insurance to enrolled veterans and certain survivors and dependents of veterans. Specifically, this rule adds language to clarify the limited preemptive effect of certain criteria in the VADIP regulations. VA received no comments concerning this rule or its companion substantially identical proposed rule published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2013. This document confirms that the direct final rule became effective on December 23, 2013. In a companion document in this issue of the Federal Register, we are withdrawing as unnecessary the proposed rule.

  20. Quantum vacuum effects on the final fate of a collapsing ball of dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arfaei, Hessamaddin [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology,P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences(IPM),P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noorikuhani, Milad [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology,P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-24

    We consider the quantum vacuum effects of the massless scalar fields that are non-minimally coupled to the background geometry of a collapsing homogeneous ball of dust. It is shown that for a definite range of coupling constants, there are repulsive quantum vacuum effects, capable of stopping the collapse process inside the black hole and precluding the formation of singularity. The final fate of the collapse will be a black hole with no singularity, inside which the matter stays balanced. The density of the final static matter will be close to the Planck density. We show that the largest possible radius of the stable static ball inside a black hole with Schwarzschild mass M is given by ((1/(90π))(M/(m{sub p}))){sup (1/3)}ℓ{sub p}. If the black hole undergoes Hawking radiation, the final state will be an extremal quantum-corrected black hole, with zero temperature, with a remnant of matter inside. We show that the resolution of singularity is not disrupted under Hawking radiation.

  1. Final-state effects on superfluid 4He in the deep inelastic regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzanti, F.; Boronat, J.; Polls, A.

    1996-01-01

    A study of final-state effects (FSE) on the dynamic structure function of superfluid 4 He in the Gersch-Rodriguez formalism is presented. The main ingredients needed in the calculation are the momentum distribution and the semidiagonal two-body density matrix. The influence of these ground-state quantities on the FSE is analyzed. A variational form of ρ 2 is used, even though simpler forms turn out to give accurate results if properly chosen. Comparison to the experimental response at high momentum transfer is performed. The predicted response is quite sensitive to slight variations on the value of the condensate fraction, the best agreement with experiment being obtained with n 0 =0.082. Sum rules of the FSE broadening function are also derived and commented. Finally, it is shown that Gersch-Rodriguez theory produces results as accurate as those coming from other more recent FSE theories. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. 76 FR 72928 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a class of employees from Vitro Manufacturing in...

  3. 77 FR 15759 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  4. 78 FR 21955 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  5. 76 FR 7852 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a class of employees from Texas City Chemicals...

  6. 76 FR 59701 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a class of employees from the Sandia National...

  7. 78 FR 70949 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  8. 77 FR 60438 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  9. 75 FR 67364 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a class of employees from the Blockson Chemical...

  10. 75 FR 51816 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a... Special Exposure Cohort (SEC) under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of...

  11. 75 FR 27784 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... concerning the final effect of the decision to designate a class of employees from Lawrence Livermore...

  12. 75 FR 27785 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... concerning the final effect of the decision to designate a class of employees from Area IV of the Santa...

  13. 75 FR 37812 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... and Human Services (HHS) gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  14. 77 FR 60437 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  15. 77 FR 69845 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  16. 78 FR 21954 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice concerning the final effect of the HHS decision to designate a...

  17. Environmental effects of exploratory drilling offshore Canada : environmental effects monitoring data and literature review : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, G.; Ellis, J.

    2004-10-01

    This study examined pertinent environmental effects monitoring (EEM) information and data associated with offshore exploratory and development drilling in Canada. Two approaches were used: (1) a review of scientific literature was conducted to provide a synthesis of knowledge concerning interactions between exploratory drilling and the environment; and (2) a review of pertinent Canadian EEM data was conducted to evaluate interactions between exploratory drilling and the environment. Virtually all the east coast Canadian data reviewed in the study related to the effects of multiple wells. Although the effects of drilling waste were a primary focus, the effects of accidental discharges, lights and flaring, atmospheric emissions and noise emissions were also considered. Changes in the diversity and abundance of benthic organisms were detected within 1000 metres of many drill sites. The fine particles in drilling wastes contributed to the environmental effects observed around drilling platforms, and elevated body burden concentrations of drill waste indicators were detected over larger scales in a wide range of taxonomic groups. The results of laboratory and field studies suggested a lower potential for toxicity on commercial finfish and shellfish species. However, it was observed that measuring the effects of elevated concentrations of contaminants remained a challenge due to high levels variability in literature studies. A precautionary approach to the management of seismic surveys was recommended. It was concluded that the potential cumulative impacts of exploration drilling should be considered in the context of other anthropogenic activities. 138 refs., 6 tabs.

  18. Effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emi Razera BALDASSO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin. Sixty root canals from mandibular incisors were instrumented and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10 according to the irrigant used: QMiX, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid (CA, 1% peracetic acid (PA, 2.5% NaOCl (solution control, and distilled water (negative control. The chelating solutions were used to irrigate the canal followed by 2.5% NaOCl as a final flush. After the irrigation protocols, all specimens were rinsed with 10 mL of distilled water to remove any residue of the chemical solutions. Before and after the final irrigation protocols, dentin microhardness was measured with a Knoop indenter. Three indentations were made at 100 µm and 500 µm from the root canal lumen. Afterwards, the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopic analysis and the amount of dentin erosion was examined. Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the results with a significance level set at 5%. At 100 µm, all protocols significantly reduced dentin microhardness (p < .05, while at 500 µm, this effect was detected only in the EDTA and QMiX groups (p < .05. CA was the irrigant that caused more extensive erosion in dentinal tubules, followed by PA and EDTA. QMiX opened dentinal tubules, but did not cause dentin erosion. Results suggest that QMiX and 17% EDTA reduced dentin microhardness at a greater depth. Additionally, QMiX did not cause dentin erosion.

  19. Final cutting of shelterwood. Harvesting techniques and effects on the Picea abies regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloede, Dan

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade, environmental and biological aspects have grown increasingly important in forestry. At the same time conventional planting after clear-cutting has failed on many sites with a high ground water table, abundant competitive vegetation and frequent frosts. Therefore, on these sites the use of the shelterwood system for regeneration of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) has increased in Sweden. The main objective of the thesis is to study if it is possible to final-cut shelterwoods at acceptable harvesting costs, logging damage and release effects in the regeneration. Final cutting of three shelterwoods (180-200 m 3 /ha) in Sweden were carried out with single- and double-grip harvester systems in 1-1.5 m high regeneration (6 400-26 700 seedlings/ha). In a fourth shelterwood (140-165 m 3 /ha), also situated in Sweden, conventional felling with a single-grip harvester was compared with a more concentrated felling according to a method named 'tossing the caber', where the trees were felled top-end first over the 1.2-1.3 m high regeneration (9 530-11 780 seedlings/ha) and into the striproad. No differences in productivity and cost between single- and double-grip harvesters in final cutting of shelterwood were found. Despite few stems/ha and extensive regeneration the harvesting cost was considered low (33.5 SEK/m 3 ). Approximately one third of the seedlings suffered mortal logging damage, which was considered acceptable. No differences between conventional felling and the tossing the caber method were found regarding productivity, cost and damage to the regeneration. However, tossing the caber may be a more productive alternative in final cutting of pine-dominated shelterwood or seed tree stands. Seedling growth and survival after shelterwood removal was not influenced by the choice of harvester system. Seedling height and vitality were found to be good estimators of post-release survival and growth which, in total, was found to be acceptable

  20. Long term fuel price elasticity: effects on mobility tool ownership and residential location choice - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erath, A.; Axhausen, K. W.

    2010-04-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the long-term effects of fuel price elasticity. The study analyses how mobility tool usage and ownership as well as residence location choice are affected by rising fuel costs. Based on econometric models, long-term fuel price elasticity is derived. The authors quote that the demand reactions to higher fuel prices mainly observed are the reduction of mileage and the consideration of smaller-engined and diesel-driven cars. As cars with natural gas powered engines and electric drives were hardly considered in the survey, the results of the natural gas model can, according to the authors, only serve as a trend. No stable model could be estimated for the demand and usage of electric cars. A literature overview is presented and the design of the survey is discussed, whereby socio-demographical variables and the effects of price and residence changes are discussed. Modelling of mobility tool factors and results obtained are looked at. Finally, residence choice factors are modelled and discussed. Several appendices complete the report.

  1. Effects of final-state interaction and screening on strange and heavy quark production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chatterjee, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India)

    1996-10-01

    Final-state interaction and screening have a great influence on {ital q{anti q}} production cross sections, which are important quantities in many problems in quark-gluon plasma physics. They lead to an enhancement of the cross section for a {ital q{anti q}} color-singlet state and a suppression for a color-octet state. The effects are large near the production threshold. The presence of screening gives rise to resonances for {ital q{anti q}} production just above the threshold at specific plasma temperatures. These resonances, especially {ital c{anti c}} and {ital b{anti b}} resonances, may be utilized to search for the quark-gluon plasma by studying the temperature dependence of heavy-quark pair production just above the threshold.

  2. Interagency task force on the health effects of ionizing radiation. final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This is the final report of the task force and incorporates the findings and recommendations of six smaller work groups, each with a more specific focus; i.e., science, privacy, care and benefits, exposure reduction, public information, and institutional arrangements. A research agenda that could provide some answers to questions about the effects of low-level radiation is proposed, along with recommendations to facilitate research. A public information program is outlined. Recommendations are advanced to improve systems that deliver care and benefits to those who may have been injured by exposure to radiation, and proposals for steps that might reduce unnecessary radiation exposure in the future are identified. The task force also recommends measures to institutionalize the interagency cooperation that characterized the task force. Three tables and one figure show the collective estimates of the U.S. general population, Federal research financing, cancer linked to radiation in particular populations, and a general dose-response model

  3. Initial and Final State Interaction Effects in Small-x Quark Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2010-08-30

    We study the initial and final state interaction effects in the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in the small-x saturation region. In particular, we discuss the quark distributions in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan lepton pair production and dijet-correlation processes in pA collisions. We calculate the quark distributions in the scalar-QED model and then extend to the color glass condensate formalism in QCD. The quark distributions are found universal between the DIS and Drell-Yan processes. On the other hand, the quark distribution from the qq'-->qq' channel contribution to the dijet-correlation process is not universal. However, we find that it can be related to the quark distribution in DIS process by a convolution with the normalized unintegrated gluon distribution in the CGC formalism in the large Nc limit.

  4. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, Cameron [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Capps, Scott [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  5. The effect of increasing levels of embedded generation on the distribution network. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collinson, A; Earp, G K; Howson, D; Owen, R D; Wright, A J

    1999-10-01

    This report was commissioned as part of the EA Technology Strategic Technology Programme under guidance of the Module 5 (Embedded Generation) Steering Group. This report aims to provide information related to the distribution and supply of electricity in the context of increasing levels of embedded generation. There is a brief description of the operating environment within which electricity companies in the UK must operate. Technical issues related to the connection of generation to the existing distribution infrastructure are highlighted and the design philosophy adopted by network designers in accommodating applications for the connection of embedded generation to the network is discussed. The effects embedded generation has on the network and the issues raised are presented as many of them present barriers to the connection of embedded generators. The final chapters cover the forecast of required connection to 2010 and solutions to restrictions preventing the connection of more embedded generation to the network. (author)

  6. Effect of esthetic core shades on the final color of IPS Empress all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Shereen S; Ayash, Ghada M; Johnston, William M; Khalil, Moustafa F; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2006-12-01

    Clinically relevant assessment of all-ceramic crowns supported by esthetic composite resin foundations has not been evaluated with regard to color reproducibility. This in vitro study quantitatively evaluated the influence of different shades of composite resin foundations and resin cement on the final color of a leucite-reinforced all-ceramic material. A total of 128 disks were fabricated; 64 (20 x 1 mm) were made of all-ceramic material (IPS Empress) and 64 (20 x 4 mm) of 4 different shades composite resin (Tetric Ceram). The ceramic and composite resin disks were luted using 2 shades (A3 and Transparent) of resin cement (Variolink II). Color was measured using a colorimeter configured with a diffuse illumination/0-degree viewing geometry, and Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L( *)a( *)b( *) values were directly calculated. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed, and color differences (DeltaE) for the average L( *), a( *) and b( *) color parameters were calculated. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare mean values and SDs between the different color combinations (alpha=.05). The CIE L( *)a( *)b( *) color coordinate values showed no significant differences for variation in color parameters due to the effect of the different composite resin shades (P=.24) or cement shades (P=.12). The mean color difference (DeltaE) value between the groups was 0.8. Within the limitations of this study, the use of different shades for composite resin cores and resin cements presented no statistically significant effect on the final color of IPS Empress all-ceramic material.

  7. Medicaid program; premiums and cost sharing. Final rule; delay of effective date and reopening of comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-27

    This action temporarily delays the effective date of the November 25, 2008 final rule entitled, Medicaid Program; Premiums and Cost Sharing" (73 FR 71828) until December 31, 2009. In addition, this action reopens the comment period on the policies set out in the November 25, 2008 final rule, and specifically solicits comments on the effect of certain provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

  8. Theoretical Model for Volume Fraction of UC, 235U Enrichment, and Effective Density of Final U 10Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); McGarrah, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)

    2016-04-12

    The purpose of this document is to provide a theoretical framework for (1) estimating uranium carbide (UC) volume fraction in a final alloy of uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) as a function of final alloy carbon concentration, and (2) estimating effective 235U enrichment in the U-10Mo matrix after accounting for loss of 235U in forming UC. This report will also serve as a theoretical baseline for effective density of as-cast low-enriched U-10Mo alloy. Therefore, this report will serve as the baseline for quality control of final alloy carbon content

  9. Final State Interaction Effects on the B + → J / ψ ρ + Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Mohammadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The exclusive decay of B + → J / ψ ρ + is studied in the framework of the QCD factorization (QCDF method and final state interaction (FSI. A direct B + → J / ψ ρ + decay is only occurred via a tree and a penguin based on the quark diagram analysis. The result that is found by using the QCDF method is less than the experimental result, so, the role of FSI is considered. The intermediate states D + D ̅ 0 , D + * D ̅ 0 * , D + * D ̅ 0 , and D + D ̅ 0 * via the exchange of D - and D - * are contributed to the B + → J / ψ ρ + decay. The above intermediate states is calculated by using the QCDF method. In the FSI effects the results of our calculations depend on “η” as the phenomenological parameter. The range of this parameter are selected from 1 to 2. For the exchanged particles D - and D - * , it is found that if η = 1.58 ~ 1.83 is selected the numbers of the branching ratio are placed in the experimental range. The experimental branching ratio of B + → J / ψ ρ + decay is ( 5 ± 0.8 × 1 0 - 5 , and our prediction number is ( 1.42 ± 0.36 × 1 0 - 5 in the absence of FSI effects, and it becomes ( 4.2 ~ 5.8 × 1 0 - 5 when FSI contributions are taken into account.

  10. Wealth Effects on Household Final Consumption: Stock and Housing Market Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yener Coskun

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The study primarily explores the linkage between wealth effects, arising from stock and housing market channels, and household final consumption for 11 advanced countries over the period from 1970 Q1 to 2015 Q4. As a modelling strategy, we employ regression analysis through the common correlated effects mean group (CCEMG estimator, as well as Durbin–Hausman cointegration and Dumitrescu and Hurlin (2012 causality tests. The study provides various pieces of evidence through whole-panel and country-level analyses. In this respect, we find that consumption is mostly explained by income and housing wealth is positively and significantly correlated with consumption. As counter-intuitive evidence, we detect a negative linkage between consumption and stock wealth. The evidence also suggests a long-run cointegration relationship among consumption, income, interest rates, housing wealth, and stock wealth. Moreover, we find bidirectional causality between consumption and income, stock wealth, housing wealth, and interest rates. Overall, the evidence implies that housing wealth, rather than stock wealth, is the primary source of consumption growth in advanced countries.

  11. New Perspectives for Hadron Phenomenology:The Effects of Final-State Interactions and Near-Conformal Effective QCD Couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2003-10-24

    The effective QCD charge extracted from {tau} decay is remarkably constant at small momenta, implying the near-conformal behavior of hadronic interactions at small momentum transfer. The correspondence of large-N{sub c} supergravity theory in higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter spaces with gauge theory in physical space-time also has interesting implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, such as constituent counting rules for hard exclusive processes. The utility of light-front quantization and lightfront Fock wavefunctions for analyzing such phenomena and representing the dynamics of QCD bound states is reviewed. I also discuss the novel effects of initial- and final-state interactions in hard QCD inclusive processes, including Bjorken-scaling single-spin asymmetries and the leading-twist diffractive and shadowing contributions to deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering.

  12. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions

  13. Drug Pricing Program Ceiling Price and Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties Regulation. Final rule; further delay of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) administers section 340B of the Public Health Service Act (PHSA), known as the "340B Drug Pricing Program" or the "340B Program." HRSA published a final rule on January 5, 2017, that set forth the calculation of the ceiling price and application of civil monetary penalties. The final rule applied to all drug manufacturers that are required to make their drugs available to covered entities under the 340B Program. On August 21, 2017, HHS solicited comments on further delaying the effective date of the January 5, 2017, final rule to July 1, 2018 (82 FR 39553). HHS proposed this action to allow a more deliberate process of considering alternative and supplemental regulatory provisions and to allow for sufficient time for additional rulemaking. After consideration of the comments received on the proposed rule, HHS is delaying the effective date of the January 5, 2017, final rule, to July 1, 2018.

  14. Final Test Report: Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    The test results for Salt Spray Resistance, Static Heat and Humidity and Marine Environment can be found in Sections 3.1.3.3, 3.1.4.3 and 3.1.5.3 respectively. In summary, both the Metalast TCP and SurTec 650 Type 2 conversion coatings perform very similar to the incumbent Type 1 conversion coating against both 6061 and 5052 aluminum under all three test conditions. Significant prior work was performed to select the aluminum and conversion coating included within this test cycle; Reference - NASA GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Final Pretreatments Test Report Task Order: NNH12AA45D September 01, 2013. As illustrated in the data, the 6061 aluminum panels SLIGHTLY out-performed the 5052 aluminum panels. Individual shielding effectiveness graphs for each panel are included within Appendix C and D. One other notable effect found during review of the data is that the Test Panels exposed to B117 Salt Fog reduced in shielding effectiveness significantly more than the Marine Environment Test Panels. The shielding effectiveness of the Marine Test Panels was approximately 20dB higher than the Test Panels that underwent B117 Salt Fog Exposure. The intent of this evaluation was not to maximize shielding effectiveness values. The same Parker Chomerics Cho-Seal 6503 gasket material was used for all panels with aluminum and conversion coating variants. A typical EMI gasket design for corrosive environments would be done quite differently. The intent was to execute a test that would provide the best possible evaluation of different aluminum materials and conversion coatings in corrosive environments. The test program achieved this intent. The fact that the two aluminums and two Type II conversion coatings performed similar to the incumbent Type 1 conversion coating is a positive outcome. It was desired to have an outcome that further differentiation the performance of two aluminum types and two conversion coating types but this could not be extracted by the test

  15. 340B Drug Pricing Program Ceiling Price and Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties Regulation. Final rule; further delay of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-19

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) administers section 340B of the Public Health Service Act (PHSA), referred to as the "340B Drug Pricing Program" or the "340B Program." HRSA published a final rule on January 5, 2017, that set forth the calculation of the ceiling price and application of civil monetary penalties. The final rule applied to all drug manufacturers that are required to make their drugs available to covered entities under the 340B Program. In accordance with a January 20, 2017, memorandum from the Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff, entitled "Regulatory Freeze Pending Review," HRSA issued an interim final rule that delayed the effective date of the final rule published in the Federal Register (82 FR 1210, (January 5, 2017)) to May 22, 2017. HHS invited commenters to provide their views on whether a longer delay of the effective date to October 1, 2017, would be more appropriate. After consideration of the comments received on the interim final rule, HHS is delaying the effective date of the January 5, 2017 final rule, to October 1, 2017.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These

  17. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and

  18. Effectiveness of Pavement Management System and its Effects to the Closing of Final Account in Construction Project in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Zarabizan; Ismail, Syuhaida; Yusof, Aminah Md

    2013-04-01

    Federal roads maintenance needs a systematic and effective mechanism to ensure that the roads are in good condition and provide comfort to the road user. In implementing effective maintenance, budget is main the factor limiting this endeavor. Thus Public Works Department (PWD) Malaysia used Highway Development and Management (HDM-4) System to help the management of PWD Malaysia in determining the location and length of the road to be repaired according to the priority based on its analysis. For that purpose, PWD Malaysia has applied Pavement Management System (PMS) which utilizes HDM-4 as the analysis engine to conduct technical and economic analysis in generating annual work programs for pavement maintenance. As a result, a lot of feedback and comment have been received from Supervisory and Roads Maintenance Unit (UPPJ) Zonal on the accuracy of the system output and problems that arise in the closing of final account. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to evaluate current system accuracy in terms of generating the annual work program for periodic pavement maintenance, to identify factors contributing to the system inaccuracy in selecting the location and length of roads that require for treatment and to propose improvement measures for the system accuracy. The factors affecting the closing of final account caused by result received from the pavement management system are also defined. The scope of this paper is on the existing HDM-4 System which cover four states specifically Perlis, Selangor, Kelantan and Johor which is analysed via the work program output data for the purpose of evaluating the system accuracy. The method used in this paper includes case study, interview, discussion and analysis of the HDM-4 System output data. This paper has identified work history not updated and the analysis is not using the current data as factors contributing to the system accuracy. From the result of this paper, it is found that HDM-4's system accuracy used by PWD

  19. Final Report on the Fuel Saving Effectiveness of Various Driver Feedback Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2011-03-01

    This final report quantifies the fuel-savings opportunities from specific driving behavior changes, identifies factors that influence drivers' receptiveness to adopting fuel-saving behaviors, and assesses various driver feedback approaches.

  20. Effect of Repeated/Spaced Formative Assessments on Medical School Final Exam Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward K. Chang

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: Performance on weekly formative assessments was predictive of final exam scores. Struggling medical students will benefit from extra cumulative practice exams while students who are excelling do not need extra practice.

  1. Final state effects in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering from nuclei: Clues from quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, R.N.; Clark, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The impulse approximation (IA) predicts that momentum distributions, n/sub k/, in many-body systems should be measurable by inclusive quasielastic scattering at high energy and momentum (w,Q) transfer. The observations that the cross section appears to satisfy ''Y-scaling'' (i.e., is a function not of both w and Q of a single variable, Y) is usually taken as a signature of the IA. In nuclear physics, inelastic electron scattering at GeV energies should reveal the high momentum components of the nuclear wave function. In quantum fluids, neutron scattering at hundreds of MeV energies should measure the Bose condensate in superfluid /sup 4/He and the Fermi surface discontinuity and depletion of the Fermi sea in /sup 3/He. In molecular and condensed matter systems, X-ray Compton scattering at keV energies reveals electronic n/sub k/. Such experiments test many-body wave functions calculated by methods such as Green Function and Path Integral Monte Carlo, and Fermi Hypernetted Chain. However, an outstanding issue has been the corrections to the IA due to the scattering of the recoiling particle from neighboring particles, which are termed ''final state effects'' (FSE). The FSE should be especially important in nuclei and quantum fluids where the potentials have steeply repulsive cores. While there have been a variety of theories proposed for FSE, until now none has been adequately tested by experiment. Recently, the ''hard core perturbation theory'' (HCPT) for FSE in quantum fluids by Silver has been successfully compared to new neutron scattering measurements on /sup 4/He by P. E. Sokol and colleagues. In this paper, we shall discuss the lessons of this success for the extraction of n/sub k/ in nuclei by inclusive ''quasielastic electron-nucleus scattering'' (QENS). 19 refs., 12 figs

  2. Effects of hard mask etch on final topography of advanced phase shift masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortenbach, Olga; Rolff, Haiko; Lajn, Alexander; Baessler, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Continuous shrinking of the semiconductor device dimensions demands steady improvements of the lithographic resolution on wafer level. These requirements challenge the photomask industry to further improve the mask quality in all relevant printing characteristics. In this paper topography of the Phase Shift Masks (PSM) was investigated. Effects of hard mask etch on phase shift uniformity and mask absorber profile were studied. Design of experiments method (DoE) was used for the process optimization, whereas gas composition, bias power of the hard mask main etch and bias power of the over-etch were varied. In addition, influence of the over-etch time was examined at the end of the experiment. Absorber depth uniformity, sidewall angle (SWA), reactive ion etch lag (RIE lag) and through pitch (TP) dependence were analyzed. Measurements were performed by means of Atomic-force microscopy (AFM) using critical dimension (CD) mode with a boot-shaped tip. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) cross-section images were prepared to verify the profile quality. Finally CD analysis was performed to confirm the optimal etch conditions. Significant dependence of the absorber SWA on hard mask (HM) etch conditions was observed revealing an improvement potential for the mask absorber profile. It was found that hard mask etch can leave a depth footprint in the absorber layer. Thus, the etch depth uniformity of hard mask etch is crucial for achieving a uniform phase shift over the active mask area. The optimized hard mask etch process results in significantly improved mask topography without deterioration of tight CD specifications.

  3. Competition between Final-State and Pairing-Gap Effects in the Radio-Frequency Spectra of Ultracold Fermi Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perali, A.; Pieri, P.; Strinati, G. C.

    2008-01-01

    The radio-frequency spectra of ultracold Fermi atoms are calculated by including final-state interactions affecting the excited level of the transition and compared with the experimental data. A competition is revealed between pairing-gap effects which tend to push the oscillator strength toward high frequencies away from threshold and final-state effects which tend instead to pull the oscillator strength toward threshold. As a result of this competition, the position of the peak of the spectra cannot be simply related to the value of the pairing gap, whose extraction thus requires support from theoretical calculations

  4. Medicaid program; premiums and cost sharing. Final rule; delay of effective data and reopening of comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-27

    In accordance with the memorandum of January 20, 2009, from the Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff, entitled "Regulatory Review Plan," this action temporarily delays for 60 days the effective date of the final rule entitled "Medicaid Program; Premiums and Cost Sharing" (73 FR 71828). The temporary 60-day delay in effective date is necessary to give Department officials the opportunity for further review and consideration of new regulations. In addition, this action reopens the comment period on the policies set out in the November 25, 2008 final rule.

  5. Preventive Effect of Zea mays L. (Purple Waxy Corn) on Experimental Diabetic Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Thiraphatthanavong, Paphaphat; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-mee, Wipawee; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Tong-un, Terdthai; Suriharn, Bhalang; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-01-01

    Recently, substances possessing antioxidant can prevent cataractogenesis of diabetic cataract. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the anticataract effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn), a flavonoids rich plant, in experimental diabetic cataract. Enucleated rat lenses were incubated in artificial aqueous humor containing 55 mM glucose with various concentrations of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) ranging between 2, 10, and 50 mg/mL at room temperature for 72 h. At the end of ...

  6. Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

    2012-02-28

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when

  7. An Investigation of the Compensatory Effectiveness of Assistive Technology on Postsecondary Students with Learning Disabilities. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Harry; Higgins, Eleanor

    This final report describes the activities and accomplishments of a 3-year study on the compensatory effectiveness of three assistive technologies, optical character recognition, speech synthesis, and speech recognition, on postsecondary students (N=140) with learning disabilities. These technologies were investigated relative to: (1) immediate…

  8. Effects of Guided Inquiry versus Lecture Instruction on Final Grade Distribution in a One-Semester Organic and Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Colleen J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive guided-inquiry approach was used in a combined organic and biochemistry course for prenursing and predietetics students rather than lecture. To assess its effectiveness, exam grades and final course grades of students in three instructional techniques were compared. The three groups were the following: (i) lecture only, (ii)…

  9. Climate and Land Use Change Effects on Ecological Resources in Three Watersheds: A Synthesis Report (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Climate and Land-Use Change Effects on Ecological Resources in Three Watersheds: A Synthesis Report. This report provides a summary of climate change impacts to selected watersheds and recommendations for how to improv...

  10. 78 FR 3897 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this employment or...

  11. 78 FR 3898 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health... number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this employment or...

  12. Systematic Process Synthesis and Design Methods for Cost Effective Waste Minimization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegler, L.T.; Grossmann, I.E.; Westerberg, A.W.

    1998-02-14

    This report focuses on research done over the past four years under the grant with the above title. In addition, the report also includes a brief summary of work done before 1994 under grant DOE-DE-FG02-85ER13396. Finally, a complete list of publications that acknowledge support from this grant is listed at the end.

  13. Systematic Process Synthesis and Design Methods for Cost Effective Waste Minimization. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biegler, L.T.; Grossmann, I.E.; Westerberg, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    This report focuses on research done over the past four years under the grant with the above title. In addition, the report also includes a brief summary of work done before 1994 under grant DOE-DE-FG02-85ER13396. Finally, a complete list of publications that acknowledge support from this grant is listed at the end

  14. Investigations on THM effects in buffer, EDZ and argillaceous host rock. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Breustedt, M.; Li, S.; Polster, M.; Schirmer, S.

    2013-11-15

    In the Federal Republic of Germany the final disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in clay formations is investigated as an alternative to the reference concept in a salt formation. The main concern when switching to a clay host rock is the high amount of heat released from the canisters into the clay rock over a long period of time. It is still an open question to what extent the host rock formation is affected by the released heat and if this is a threat to safety. The released heat from the canisters is a load on the whole barrier system, which consists of the geotechnical barriers (buffer and plugs) and the geological barrier. The temperature has a direct impact on the buffer, the excavative damaged zone (EDZ) and the surrounding host rock. The buffer has specific thermo-physical properties that significantly influence the temperature evolution in the near field so that a temperature load on the buffer is of special concern. Thus, with regard to thermal criteria, the buffer plays a significant role for the design of the emplacement fields. An open question is whether the use of admixtures could enhance the thermo-physical properties so that the heat release into the host rock would be more efficient. Due to the permanent heat release and the continuous emplacement of additional canisters, the in-situ stress state in the vicinity of the emplacement boreholes continuously varies during the operational period and beyond. It is an open question how the EDZ of emplacement boreholes evolves in the long term with regard to its fissure system and mainly its permeability. A closure of the EDZ and a corresponding decrease in its permeability are necessary to enhance the tightness of the barrier system, especially to avoid a preferential pathway through the EDZ around the openings. The host rock has specific properties that are necessary to ensure a safe enclosure of the waste. A change in the host rock temperature may change these properties irreversibly. This is

  15. Effect of Peracetic Acid as A Final Rinse on Push Out Bond Strength of Root Canal Sealers to Root Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddala, Naresh; Veeramachineni, Chandrasekhar; Tummala, Muralidhar

    2015-05-01

    Smear layer which was formed during the instrumentation of root canals hinders the penetration of root canal sealers to root dentin and affect the bond strength of root canal sealers to root dentin. Final irrigant such as demineralizing agents are used to remove the inorganic portion of the smear layer. In the present study, peracetic acid used as a final rinse, to effect the bond strength of root canal sealers to root dentin. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of peracetic acid as a final irrigant on bond strength of root canal sealers to root dentin. Sixty six freshly extracted human single rooted mandibular premolars were used for this study. After decoronation the samples were instrumented with Protaper upto F3 and irrigated with 5.25% NaOcl. The teeth were then divided into three groups based on final irrigant used: Group-1(control group) Canals were irrigated with distilled water. Group-2: Canals were irrigated with peracetic acid. Group-3: Canals were irrigated with smear clear. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=30) based on the sealer used to obturate the canals. Subgroup-1: kerr, Subgroup-2: Apexit plus, Subgroup-3: AH PLUS. Each sealer was mixed and coated to master cone and placed in the canal. The bonding between sealer and dentin surface was evaluated using push out bond strength by universal testing machine. The mean bond strength values of each group were statistically evaluated using Two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey post-hoc test. Significant difference was found among the bond strength of the sealers. But, there is no statistically significant difference between the groups irrigated with peracetic acid and smear clear compared to control group. AH Plus showed highest bond strength irrespective of the final irrigant used. Peracetic acid when employed as final irrigant improved the bond strength of root canal sealers compared to control group but not statistically significant than smear clear.

  16. Non-auditory effects of noise in industry. VI. A final field study in industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, F. J.; Souman, A. M.; de Vries, F. F.

    1987-01-01

    Non-auditory effects of noise were studied among 539 male workers from seven industries. The LAeq, assessed by personal noise dosimetry, has been used to study acute effects. Various indices of total noise exposure, involving level and duration, were developed for long-term effect studies. In the

  17. State child health; revisions to the regulations implementing the State Children's Health Insurance Program. Interim final rule with comment period; revisions, delay of effective date, and technical amendments to final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-25

    Title XXI authorizes the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) to assist State efforts to initiate and expand the provision of child health assistance to uninsured, low-income children. On January 11, 2001 we published a final rule in the Federal Register to implement SCHIP that has not gone into effect. This interim final rule further delays the effective date, revises certain provisions and solicits public comment, and makes technical corrections and clarifications to the January 2001 final rule based on further review of the comments received and applicable law. Only the provisions set forth in this document have changed. All other provisions set forth in the January 2001 final rule will be implemented without change.

  18. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TI-based electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  19. Final report on 'biological effects of tritium as a basis of research and development in nuclear fusion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, has undertaken a special study of ''biological effects of tritium as a basis of research and development in nuclear fusion'' over a 5-year period from April 1981 through March 1986. This is a final report, covering incorporation and metabolism of tritium, physical, chemical, and cellular effects of tritium, tritium damage to the mammalian tissue, and human exposure to tritium. The report is organized into five chapters, including ''Study of incorporation of tritium into the living body and its in vivo behavior''; ''Physical and chemical studies for the determination of relative biological effectiveness''; ''Analytical study on biological effects of tritium in cultured mammalian cells''; ''Study of tritium effects on the mammalian tissue, germ cells, and cell transformation''; and ''Changes in the hemopoietic stem cells and lymphocyte subsets in humans after exposure to some internal emitters''. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. From intermediate to final behavioral endpoints : Modeling cognitions in (cost-)effectiveness analyses in health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prenger, Hendrikje Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) are considered an increasingly important tool in health promotion and psychology. In health promotion adequate effectiveness data of innovative interventions are often lacking. In case of many promising interventions the available data are inadequate for CEAs due

  1. How clarinettists articulate: The effect of blowing pressure and tonguing on initial and final transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weicong; Almeida, André; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2016-02-01

    Articulation, including initial and final note transients, is important to tasteful music performance. Clarinettists' tongue-reed contact, the time variation of the blowing pressure P¯mouth, the mouthpiece pressure, the pressure in the instrument bore, and the radiated sound were measured for normal articulation, accents, sforzando, staccato, and for minimal attack, i.e., notes started very softly. All attacks include a phase when the amplitude of the fundamental increases exponentially, with rates r ∼1000 dB s(-1) controlled by varying both the rate of increase in P¯mouth and the timing of tongue release during this increase. Accented and sforzando notes have shorter attacks (r∼1300 dB s(-1)) than normal notes. P¯mouth reaches a higher peak value for accented and sforzando notes, followed by a steady decrease for accented notes or a rapid fall to a lower, nearly steady value for sforzando notes. Staccato notes are usually terminated by tongue contact, producing an exponential decrease in sound pressure with rates similar to those calculated from the bandwidths of the bore resonances: ∼400 dB s(-1). In all other cases, notes are stopped by decreasing P¯mouth. Notes played with different dynamics are qualitatively similar, but louder notes have larger P¯mouth and larger r.

  2. The Effect on Final Bond Strength of Bracket Manipulation Subsequent To Initial Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David A.

    The shear bond strength of light activated orthodontic adhesives varies according to the composition of the material, placement protocol, and time prior to light curing. Manipulating brackets after their initial placement on a tooth can disrupt the adhesive's polymerization and compromise final bond strength. No previous research has investigated how a specific degree of manipulation, and the amount of time elapsed prior to curing, under specific lighting conditions, affects the orthodontic adhesives shear bond strength. Victory SeriesRTM, MBT prescription, premolar (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA) orthodontic brackets were bonded using three different adhesives to sixty (60) bicuspids and varying the time after bracket manipulation before curing. The shear bond strength was calculated for each specimen. The brackets were debonded and the same teeth were rebonded with new, identical brackets, using the same protocol and under the same conditions. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the shear bond strength of Transbond XT and Grengloo, with Transbond XT having the highest strength. There was also a statistically significance difference in bond strength between the group cured 30 seconds after manipulation and the groups manipulated at different intervals prior to curing, with the 30 second group having the highest bond strength. This study confirms that various orthodontic adhesives have different bond strengths depending on manipulation and varying times prior to curing each adhesive.

  3. Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

    1983-03-01

    This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS

  4. Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

    1983-03-01

    This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation upon natural populations and ecosystems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Accomplishments throughout a 10-year period summarized include: a study of the effects of radiation from a γ source on the ecology of the El Verde rain forest in Puerto Rico, with emphasis on the role of secondary succession in the recovery of forest ecosystems following irradiation; the effects of light and temperature on gaseous exchange in trees using 14 CO 2 as a tracer in Palcourea; the nature of the sensitivity of pine trees to ionizing radiation and the possible synergistic effects of elevated ozone levels on radiosensitivity; the combined effects of radioactive and thermal effluents on plant communities of a swamp hardwood forest; and the development of a new conceptual approach to the evaluation of environmental quality, with emphasis on ecological perspectives in land use planning

  6. final register SOLID FERMENTED MATERIAL (BOKASHI) AS A BIOFERTILIZER FOR POTTING MEDIA USING EFFECTIVE MICROORGANISMS (EM)

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Tim A.; Daly, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Adding a solid fermentation product (bokashi) to potting media enhanced the growth of vegetable seedlings when the microbial inoculant Effective Micororganisms (EM) was used. There was a negative response to the inclusion of bokashi made without EM. The benefit to seedling growth from EM bokashi also improved crop performance post-transplanting. Effect on seedlings was further enhanced by the inclusion of fishmeal and, to a lesser extent, by adding trace elements in the bokashi fermentation. ...

  7. Radiation effects control: eyes, skin. Final report, 1 October 1969--31 December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J.B.

    1974-12-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited. (auth)

  8. Final Report - Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent Molter

    2012-08-18

    This program is focused on the experimental determination of the effects of key hydrogen side impurities on the performance of PEM fuel cells. Experimental data has been leveraged to create mathematical models that predict the performance of PEM fuel cells that are exposed to specific impurity streams. These models are validated through laboratory experimentation and utilized to develop novel technologies for mitigating the effects of contamination on fuel cell performance. Results are publicly disseminated through papers, conference presentations, and other means.

  9. Ecological effects of nuclear steam electric station operations on estuarine systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihursky, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of studies of the impact of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant on the aquatic biota of Chesapeake Bay. Physical findings show that the typical radial extent of influence of the discharge on the physical and chemical environment of the Bay is rather limited (< 2 km). This suggestion is bolstered by findings of phytoplankton and zooplankton studies: when effects were noted at all, they only appeared at sampling stations nearest (within 2 km of) the discharge. Also, direct entrainment effects on these groups were either small (in the case of phytoplankton) or species-specific (in the case of zooplankton). Benthos showed mixed responses to plant operations - the populations of some species were enhanced, one species was adversely affected, and others were unaffected. The major plant effect on the benthos was due to habitat resource enrichment, and the consequence was higher standing stocks (e.g., more food for fish) in the affected area. Direct plant effects on finfish are dominated by impingement. Mortality as a result of impingement, for many species, tends to be moderate to slight. Effects as a result of entrainment of eggs and larvae are limited because the Calvert Cliffs area is not a major spawning location for any species. In sum, the Calvert Cliffs plant appears to have a limited effect on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. 180 references, 6 figures, 18 tables

  10. Effects of CO(sub 2) and nitrogen fertilization on soils planted with ponderosa pine; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO(sub 2) (ambient, 525, and 700(micro)l l(sup -1))and N fertilization (0, 10, and 20 g N m(sup 2) yr(sup -1)) on soil pCO(sub 2), CO(sub 2) efflux, soil solution chemistry, and soil C and nutrients in an open-top chamber study with Pinus ponderosa are described. Soil pCO(sub 2) and CO(sub 2) efflux were significantly greater with elevated CO(sub 2), at first (second growing season) in the 525(micro)l l(sup -1) and later (fourth and fifth growing seasons) in the 700(micro)l l(sup -1) CO(sub 2) treatments. Soil solution HCO(sub 3)(sup -) concentrations were temporarily elevated in the 525(micro)l l(sup -1) CO(sub 2) treatment during the second growing season, consistent with the elevated pCO(sub 2). Nitrogen fertilization had no consistent effect on soil pCO(sub 2) or CO(sub 2) efflux, but did have the expected negative effect on exchangeable Ca(sup 2+), K(sup+), and Mg(sup 2+), presumed to be caused by increased nitrate leaching. Elevated CO(sub 2) had no consistent effects on exchangeable Ca(sup 2+), K(sup+), and Mg(sup 2+), but did cause temporary reductions in soil NO(sup 3(sup -)) (second growing season). Statistically significant negative effects of elevated CO(sub 2) on soil extractable P were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons. However, these patterns in extractable P reflected pre-treatment differences, which, while not statistically significant, followed the same pattern. Statistically significant effects of elevated CO(sub 2) on total C and N in soils were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons, but these effects were inconsistent among N treatments and years. The clearest effect of elevated CO(sub 2) was in the case of C/N ratio in year 6, where there was a consistent, positive effect. The increases in C/N ratio with elevated CO(sub 2) in year six were largely a result of reductions in soil N rather than increases in soil C. Future papers will assess whether this apparent reduction in soil N could have been

  11. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  12. Coupling and corona effects research plan for transmission lines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridges, J E; Formanek, V C

    1976-06-01

    Concern has arisen over the possible effects of electric and magnetic fields produced by EHV-UHV transmission lines. Past and ongoing research concerning the electric and magnetic field effects from EHV-UHV transmission lines was reviewed as it pertains to the following areas: (1) electromagnetic interference, (2) acoustic noise, (3) generation of gaseous effluents, and (4) safety considerations of induced voltages and currents. The intent of this review was to identify the short and long range research projects required to address these areas. The research plan identifies and gives priority to twenty programs in corona and coupling effects. In the case of the corona effects, a number of programs were recommended for acoustic noise and electromagnetic interference to delineate improved power line design criteria in terms of social, meteorological, geographical and cost constraints. Only one project is recommended in the case of ozone generation, because the results of comprehensive analyses, laboratory studies and field measurements have demonstrated that power lines do not contribute significant quantities of ozone. In the case of the coupling effects, a number of programs are recommended for HVAC transmission lines to improve the theoretically developed design guidelines by considering practical constraints. For HVDC transmission lines, programs are suggested to engender a better theoretical understanding and practical measurements capability for the coupling mechanisms of the dc electric and magnetic field with nearby objects. The interrelationship of the programs and their role in a long-term research plan is also discussed.

  13. Evaluation of strategies for promoting effective radon mitigation. Risk communication and economic research series. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.K.; McClelland, G.H.; Schulze, W.D.; Locke, P.A.; Elliott, S.R.

    1990-03-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that as many as 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year in the United States can be attributed to exposure to radon gas. The report evaluates alternative strategies for motivating people to test for radon gas in their homes and to mitigate if necessary. Specifically, two separate radon information and awareness programs were evaluated, one targeted to the general population in the Washington, D.C. area and the other to home buyers in the Boulder, Colorado area. The results suggest that a home buyer program is likely to be far more effective in terms of effective remediation to reduce home radon levels than a program aimed at the general population. The report discusses the empirical findings and develops a recommendation for increasing the effectiveness of radon awareness and mitigation programs

  14. Estimation of Potential Population Level Effects of Contaminants on Wildlife; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loar, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide DOE with improved methods to assess risks from contaminants to wildlife populations. The current approach for wildlife risk assessment consists of comparison of contaminant exposure estimates for individual animals to literature-derived toxicity test endpoints. These test endpoints are assumed to estimate thresholds for population-level effects. Moreover, species sensitivities to contaminants is one of several criteria to be considered when selecting assessment endpoints (EPA 1997 and 1998), yet data on the sensitivities of many birds and mammals are lacking. The uncertainties associated with this approach are considerable. First, because toxicity data are not available for most potential wildlife endpoint species, extrapolation of toxicity data from test species to the species of interest is required. There is no consensus on the most appropriate extrapolation method. Second, toxicity data are represented as statistical measures (e.g., NOAEL s or LOAELs) that provide no information on the nature or magnitude of effects. The level of effect is an artifact of the replication and dosing regime employed, and does not indicate how effects might increase with increasing exposure. Consequently, slight exceedance of a LOAEL is not distinguished from greatly exceeding it. Third, the relationship of toxic effects on individuals to effects on populations is poorly estimated by existing methods. It is assumed that if the exposure of individuals exceeds levels associated with impaired reproduction, then population level effects are likely. Uncertainty associated with this assumption is large because depending on the reproductive strategy of a given species, comparable levels of reproductive impairment may result in dramatically different population-level responses. This project included several tasks to address these problems: (1) investigation of the validity of the current allometric scaling approach for interspecies extrapolation

  15. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1987-03-01

    The career of Dr. E.L. Powers, a pioneer in the development of radiobiology, is reviewed. His initial research involved the effects of radiation and certain chemicals on Paramecium, associated ultrastructural studies on protozoan cells, responses of Rickettsia and bacteriophage to irradiation, and the development of techniques for studying bacterial spores. These efforts established the basic radiation biology of the spore and its importance in understanding the effects of free radicals, oxygen, and water. His recent research extended work on the dry spore to the very wet spore and to other selected chemical systems in aqueous suspension. 126 refs., 2 figs

  16. Study of the Effectiveness of OCR for Decentralized Data Capture and Conversion. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, David M.; And Others

    The ERIC network conversion to an OCR (Optical Character Recognition) mode of data entry was studied to analyze the potential effectiveness of OCR data entry for future EPC/s (Editorial Processing Centers). Study results are also applicable to any other system involving decentralized bibliographic data capture and conversion functions. The report…

  17. Effects of hazardous environments on animal performance. Final report, Mar 88-Mar 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.R.

    1992-03-01

    Using a variety of experimental methods and procedures, animal models are used to measure the effects on performance of combat threats and countermeasures for such threats. The ultimate usefulness of such measurements in animal models will depend on extrapolations from performance changes in animals to performance changes in humans performing tasks of military relevance. This report describes several tasks in use for performance assessments in animals, and the results of experiments using these tasks to estimate performance threats from chemical warfare agents and from chemical countermeasures to these agents, as well as the efficacy of such countermeasures in reducing deleterious effects of threat agents. The use of rodents to characterize changes in neural structure and function concomitant with near-lethal exposures to chemical threat agents is also illustrated. Efforts to make rodents more closely resemble primates in their sensitivity to anticholinesterases through the use of carboxylesterase inhibitors are reported. Development of a primate model for thermal stress effects in chemical warfare defense is also described. The application of primate performance assessment techniques to the medical question of hyperbaric oxygen treatment effects on carbon monoxide toxicity is also presented.

  18. Effective Transition (Project E.T.) Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Patricia

    This report presents an evaluation of the Effective Transition (ET) project, an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its second year of operation at Lafayette High School and Pershing Intermediate School in Brooklyn, New York. The project served a total of 300 students of limited English proficiency who were native…

  19. A Post Licensing Study of Community Effects at Two Operating Nuclear Power Plants. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Bruce J.; And Others

    In an effort to identify and assess the social, economic, and political effects of nuclear power plant construction and operation upon two host communities (Plymouth, Massachusetts and Waterford, Connecticut), a post-licensing review revealed that the primary impact of the nuclear power plants in both communities was an increase in the property…

  20. CEAMF study, volume 2 : cumulative effects indicators, thresholds, and case studies : final

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The four types of cumulative effects on the environment are: alteration, loss, and fragmentation of habitat; disturbance; barriers to movement; and direct and indirect mortality. Defining where and how human activities can be continued without irreversible net harm to the environment is part of cumulative effects management. Various land-use and habitat indicators were tested in the Blueberry and Sukunka study areas of British Columbia, to address the environmental effects associated with oil and gas development. As recommended, a tiered threshold approach was used to allow for flexibility in different land management regimes and ecological settings. Success will depend on defining acceptable change, threshold values, standard public database, standard processes to calculate indicator values using the database, and project-specific and cooperative management actions. A pilot study was suggested to test the candidate thresholds and implementation process. The two areas proposed for consideration were the Jedney Enhanced Resource Development Resource Management Zone in the Fort St. John Forest District, and the Etsho Enhanced Resource Development Resource Management Zone in the Fort Nelson Forest District. Both are of interest to the petroleum and forest sectors, and support the woodland caribou, a species which is extremely sensitive to cumulative effects of habitat fragmentation and disturbance. 117 refs., 11 tabs., 39 figs.

  1. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whiting, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grear, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Blake, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Massaua, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brown-Saracino, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Battey, H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  2. Implementation and effectiveness of sound mitigation measures on Texas highways (HB 790) : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The 84th Texas Legislature passed House Bill (HB) 790 directing the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) to perform a study on the implementation and effectiveness of sound mitigation measures on the state highway system and certain toll roads an...

  3. Understanding and predicting metallic whisker growth and its effects on reliability : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Grant, Richard P.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Pillars, Jamin; Susan, Donald Francis; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Yelton, William Graham

    2012-01-01

    review of previous literature on Sn whisker crystallography. The overall texture of the Sn films was also analyzed by EBSD. Finally, a short Appendix is included at the end of this report, in which the X-Ray diffraction (XRD) results are discussed and compared to the EBSD analyses of the overall textures of the Sn films. Sections 2, 3, and 4 have been or will be submitted as stand-alone papers in peer-reviewed technical journals. A bibliography of recent Sandia Sn whisker publications and presentations is included at the end of the report.

  4. Effects of slash removal in an experimental nitrogen gradient. Final report for the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohrstedt, H.Oe.; Ring, Eva; Sikstroem, Ulf; Hoegbom, Lars; Nordlund, Sten

    2000-04-01

    During four years after clear-felling, the effects of slash removal, including needles, were studied on a productive spruce site (site index G30) in the province of Vaermland, western Sweden. The study was made in an old fertilization experiment, in which at the most 2400 kg N/ha had been added during a twenty-year period. Despite the fact that the site is rich in nitrogen and that much slash was removed (100 ton d. m./ha), there were only very minor effects of the slash removal on the variables under study. These were the composition of soil water, the content of inorganic nitrogen in soil, the biomass of the field layer and the development of the planted spruce seedlings. The only statistically significant effect was that the content of nitrate was reduced in the humus layer. No data supported the idea that the previous fertilization influenced the effect of the slash removal, even though the fertilization had increased the content of total nitrogen in soil and the nitrogen leaching. Thus, we have not been able to repeat the observation from another Swedish study that slash removal reduces leaching of nitrogen and accompanying base cations, e. g. potassium. The effect of slash removal seems to depend on site conditions. Research is needed to reveal the variation in response and decisive factors. Our results, that the survival of spruce seedlings tends to be favoured by slash removal and that the early height growth is unaffected, are in accordance with results from previous studies. Our result, that the biomass of the total field layer is unaffected by slash removal, is not possible to compare with results from other studies, since these were mainly of a qualitative nature

  5. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated

  6. Study of the health effects of bicycling in an urban atmosphere. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, M.; Weiss, S.; Articola, W.

    1977-10-14

    This report analyzes data on the health effects of bicycling in an urban environment through intensive study of ten healthy male subjects bicycling or driving in systematically varied conditions in the streets of Washington, D.C. Evaluation criteria for available technology and instrumentation are included and a methodology is developed for route selection. Specific air pollutants (carbon monoxide, ozone, sulfates, nitrates, and particulates) are measured concurrently with exposure and subsequent changes in health status identified through pulmonary function testing, cardiovascular testing, and blood and symptoms analysis. The report concludes that no major adverse short-term health effects were noted for ten healthy male subjects while bicycling or driving in levels of pollution and thermal stress encountered during the study period. Recommendations for further research are also presented.

  7. Effect of final evaluation on job motivation from the perspective of nurses in Ahvaz Hospitals in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji Khiavi, F; Amiri, E; Ghobadian, S; Roshankar, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increasing nurses' motivation is among the most important and complex nursing duties. Performance evaluation system could be used as a means to improve the quantity and quality of the human resources. Therefore, current research objected to evaluate the effect of final evaluation on job motivation from the perspective of nurses in Ahvaz hospitals according to Herzberg scheme. Methods: This investigation conducted in 2012. Research population included nurses in Ahvaz educational hospitals. The sample size was calculated 120 and sampling was performed based on classification and random sampling. Research instrument was a self-made questionnaire with confirmed validity through content analysis and Cronbach's alpha calculated at 0.94. Data examined utilizing ANOVA, T-Test, and descriptive statistics. Results: The nurses considered the final evaluation on management policy (3.2 ± 1.11) and monitoring (3.15 ± 1.15) among health items and responsibility (3.15 ± 1.15) and progress (3.06 ± 1.24) among motivational factors relatively effective. There was a significant association between scores of nurses' views in different age and sex groups (P = 0.01), but there was no significant association among respondents in educational level and marital status. Conclusion: Experienced nurses believed that evaluation has little effect on job motivation. If annual assessment of the various job aspects are considered, managers could use it as an efficient tool to motivate nurses.

  8. Siting a municipal solid waste disposal facility, part II: the effects of external criteria on the final decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korucu, M Kemal; Karademir, Aykan

    2014-02-01

    The procedure of a multi-criteria decision analysis supported by the geographic information systems was applied to the site selection process of a planning municipal solid waste management practice based on twelve different scenarios. The scenarios included two different decision tree modes and two different weighting models for three different area requirements. The suitability rankings of the suitable sites obtained from the application of the decision procedure for the scenarios were assessed by a factorial experimental design concerning the effect of some external criteria on the final decision of the site selection process. The external criteria used in the factorial experimental design were defined as "Risk perception and approval of stakeholders" and "Visibility". The effects of the presence of these criteria in the decision trees were evaluated in detail. For a quantitative expression of the differentiations observed in the suitability rankings, the ranking data were subjected to ANOVA test after a normalization process. Then the results of these tests were evaluated by Tukey test to measure the effects of external criteria on the final decision. The results of Tukey tests indicated that the involvement of the external criteria into the decision trees produced statistically meaningful differentiations in the suitability rankings. Since the external criteria could cause considerable external costs during the operation of the disposal facilities, the presence of these criteria in the decision tree in addition to the other criteria related to environmental and legislative requisites could prevent subsequent external costs in the first place.

  9. Chemistry and preliminary environmental effects of mixtures of triisopropyl phosphite, Bis-(2-ethylexyl)-phosphonate, and sulfur. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Harvey, S.D.; McVeety, B.D.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Noris, P.

    1991-12-01

    The present studies were performed to evaluate the reaction chemistry and preliminary biotic impacts of BIS, TIP, and TIPS. Reaction chemistry studies were designed to simulate in-flight mixing characteristics. The binary mixture undergoes rapid and nearly complete reaction. The final products released to the environment are TIPS and excess elemental sulfur. There is an apparent species sensitivity difference in algae for the simulants BIS, TIP, and TIPS, with Chlorella being more sensitive than Selenastrum based on cell number studies. However, the extent of adverse effects was not excessive for either algal species. There was no apparent effect of TIP or TIPS on the electron transport systems of isolated chloroplasts at the concentration tested (10 ppm). In general, it is unlikely that environmental release of these products would have significant or lasting effects, based on the preliminary algal tests and electron transport studies.

  10. Final report on the project research 'stochastic effects of irradiation and risk estimation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The title project research was carried out through 1983-1987, by three groups for the studies of radiation carcinogenesis, human genetic effects, and radiotoxicology. 8 reports by the first group, 3 by the second, and 6 by the third group are collected in this issue. The contents are as follows. Serial sacrifice study on tumorigenesis in male C57BL/6J mice exposed to gamma-ray or fast neutron radiation; Influence of biological variables on radiation carcinogenesis; Studies on radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis; Modifying factors of radiation induced myeloid leukemia of C3H/He mouse; Cell kinetic studies on radiation induced leukemogenesis; Cytogenetical studies on the mechanism of radiation induced neoplasmas; Molecular biological study on genetic stability of the genome; Protein factors regulating proliferation and differentiation of normal and neoplastic cells; Studies on dose-radiation relationships for induction of chromosome abberations in stem-spermatogonia of three crab-eating monkey after low and high dose rate γ-irradiation; Risk estimation of radiation mutagenesis in man by using cultured mammalian cells; Effects of ionizing radiation on male germ cells of crabeating monkey; Movement and metabolism of radioactive particles in the respiratory tract; Studies on dosimetry for internally deposited alpha-emitters; Comparative toxicological studies on the effects of internal exposures; Studies on treatment of alpha-radioactive wastes; Methodological studies on the inhalation of radioactive aerosols; Removal of transuranic elements by DTPA. (A. Y.)

  11. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  12. Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

  13. The effect of thickness in the through-diffusion experiment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkiainen, M.; Aalto, H.; Lehikoinen, J.; Uusheimo, K.

    1996-01-01

    The report contains an experimental study of diffusion in the water-filled pores of rock samples. The samples studied are rapakivi granite from Loviisa, southern Finland. The drill-core sample was sectioned perpendicularly with a diamond saw and three cylindrical samples were obtained. The nominal thicknesses (heights of the cylinders) are 2, 4 and 6 cm. For the diffusion measurement the sample holders were pressed between two chambers. One of the chambers was filled with 0.0044 molar sodium chloride solution spiked with tracers. Another chamber was filled with inactive solution. Tritium (HTO) considered to be a water equivalent tracer and anionic 36 Cl - were used as tracers. The through diffusion was monitored about 1000 days after which time the diffusion cells were emptied and the sample holders dismantled. The samples were sectioned into 1 cm slices and the tracers were leached from the slices. The porosities of the slices were determined by the weighing method. The rock-capacity factors could be determined from the leaching results obtained. It was seen that the porosity values were in accordance with the rock capacity factors obtained with HTO. An anion exclusion can be seen comparing the results obtained with HTO and 36 Cl - . The concentration profile through even the thickest sample had reached a constant slope and the rate of diffusion was practically at a steady state. An anion exclusion effect was also seen in the effective diffusion coefficients. The effect of thickness on diffusion shows that the connectivity of the pores decreases in the thickness range 2-4 cm studied. The decrease as reflected in the diffusion coefficient was not dramatic and it can be said that especially for studying chemical interactions during diffusion, the thickness of 2 cm is adequate. (orig.) (12 refs.)

  14. Cost-effective control systems for solar heating and cooling applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejsa, J. H.; Bassett, W. W.; Wenzler, S. A.; Nguyen, K. H.; Olson, T. J.

    1978-09-01

    A methodology has been defined to arrive at control recommendations for a variety of climate control system designs, applications and regions, and the results are presented in two parts. Part I consists of a literature and market-place survey, involving control strategies, functions, sensors, actuators, and the controllers themselves. Part II represents the bulk of the study effort - an attempt to simulate and evaluate system performance for several representative residential and commercial heating and cooling designs and thus to derive improved performance techniques within cost-effective control systems. (MHR)

  15. Simulation of space radiation effects on polyimide film materials for high temperature applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogdall, L.B.; Cannaday, S.S.

    1977-11-01

    Space environment effects on candidate materials for the solar sail film are determined. Polymers, including metallized polyimides that might be suitable solar radiation receivers, were exposed to combined proton and solar electromagnetic radiation. Each test sample was weighted, to simulate the tension on the polymer when it is stretched into near-planar shape while receiving solar radiation. Exposure rates up to 16 times that expected in Earth orbit were employed, to simulate near-sun solar sailing conditions. Sample appearance, elongation, and shrinkage were monitored, noted, and documented in situ. Thermosetting polyimides showed less degradation or visual change in appearance than thermoplastics

  16. Site Specific Microbeam Irradiation: Defining a Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    2003-01-01

    There is evidence that low-energy x-rays as used in mammography have an increased biological effectiveness relative to higher-energy photons. However, the RBE values are not large, probably less than 2. Thus it is unlikely that the radiation risk alone could prove to be a ''show stopper'' regarding screening mammography because, for older women, the benefit is likely to considerably outweigh the radiation risk. Nevertheless, the RBE for low-energy x-rays might reasonably be taken into account when assessing the recommended age to commence such annual screening

  17. Quantification of the greenhouse effect gases at the territorial scale. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, G.; Lacassagne, S.

    2003-07-01

    An efficient action against the greenhouse effect needs the implication of the local collectivities. To implement appropriate energy policies, deciders need information and tools to quantify the greenhouse gases and evaluate the obtained results of their greenhouse gases reduction policies. This study is a feasibility study of the tools realization, adapted to the french context. It was done in three steps: analysis of the existing tools, application to the french context and elaboration of the requirements of appropriate tools. This report presents the study methodology, the information analysis and the conclusions. (A.L.B.)

  18. Forecasting power plant effects on the coastal zone. EG and G final report number B-4441

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    Field methods, data analyses, and calculation are presented exemplifying procedures for oceanic dispersion prediction as a tool for forecasting power plant effects on the coastal zone. Measurements were made of dye, drogues and temperatures near Pilgrim Station's discharge (Plymouth, Massachusetts), and of currents and other variables across Massachusetts Bay. Analysis of current data illustrates separation of tidal, wind-driven and inertial constituents and their significance for dispersion. Dye and temperature dispersion are compared with the currents study, and diffusion coefficients estimated. Current data from coastal sites (New Jersey and Massachusetts) are analyzed to determine field requirements for dispersion estimates. Methods to calculate expected precision of estimates based on brief current records are developed. Model calculations predicting dispersion based on observed ocean currents are described. Formulae are derived to estimate the spatial distribution of impact from a discharge. A numerical model to calculate discharge dispersion in more detail is discussed and used to study time variations of discharge effects. Model predictions are compared with field observations

  19. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  20. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. [Integral Technologies, Inc., Westmont, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  1. Neurologic effects of solvents in older adults. (UW retired worker study). Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniell, W.E.

    1993-11-12

    The possibility that previous occupational exposure to solvents might be associated with clinically significant neurological dysfunction in older adults was investigated in a cross-sectional study. Subjects included 67 painters, 22 aerospace painters and fuel cell sealers, and a comparison group of 126 carpenters. All subjects had retired from regular employment at least 1 year prior to the study. As measured by semiquantitative exposure index, the cumulative histories of lifetime occupational solvent exposure were on the average comparable in the two exposed study groups, painters and aerospace workers. The carpenters differed from the other groups in solvent exposure by several orders of magnitude. The painters had a significantly higher history of consuming alcoholic beverages than did the other two study groups. The painters had a significantly higher score on the Beck Depression Inventory, a measure of current depressive symptoms. The painters reported significantly more general neurologic symptoms than did the other two groups. The aerospace workers showed much greater evidence of possible adverse effects from former solvent exposure on current neuropsychological function than did the painters when determined by reasoning and memory tests, memory visual motor speed and motor tests. No evidence of persistent effects on liver or renal excretory function was seen in solvent exposed subjects.

  2. Economic effects of oil and gas development on marine aquaculture leases. Study 17. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caswell, M.F.

    1991-03-01

    There are three primary mariculture products grown in California waters: oysters, mussels, and abalone. In total, the California mariculture industry earns revenues of about $6.5 million. Water quality degradation was the primary concern of most growers. Coliform bacteria and pesticide residues are currently threatening several shallow-water sites. Lease holders (and potential lease holders) for deep-water sites state that coliform bacteria from municipal sewer outfalls and offshore oil and gas drilling effluents are the greatest dangers to their profitability. The Southern California Educational Initiative is an attempt to determine whether such concerns are warranted. A simple model of economic externalities was described to highlight the scientific data one must gather so as to choose the optimal production levels for both energy and mariculture resources. That information is necessary to assess the economic consequences to the California mariculture industry of chronic exposure to oil and gas development. The co-development model shows that the marginal (incremental) effects of oil production on mariculture costs needs to be assessed. The model also shows that if the effects are moderated by distance from the point of discharge, such changes must be estimated in order to determine optimal lease boundaries. The report concludes that interdisciplinary cooperation is essential for designing a co-development plan that maximizes the social welfare to be gained from developing multiple coastal resources

  3. Final report: mathematical method for quantifying the effectiveness of management strategies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covan, John Morgan; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Roginski, Robert J.; Cooper, James Arlin

    2005-10-01

    Large complex teams (e.g., DOE labs) must achieve sustained productivity in critical operations (e.g., weapons and reactor development) while maintaining safety for involved personnel, the public, and physical assets, as well as security for property and information. This requires informed management decisions that depend on tradeoffs of factors such as the mode and extent of personnel protection, potential accident consequences, the extent of information and physical asset protection, and communication with and motivation of involved personnel. All of these interact (and potentially interfere) with each other and must be weighed against financial resources and implementation time. Existing risk analysis tools can successfully treat physical response, component failure, and routine human actions. However, many ''soft'' factors involving human motivation and interaction among weakly related factors have proved analytically problematic. There has been a need for an effective software tool capable of quantifying these tradeoffs and helping make rational choices. This type of tool, developed during this project, facilitates improvements in safety, security, and productivity, and enables measurement of improvements as a function of resources expended. Operational safety, security, and motivation are significantly influenced by ''latent effects'', which are pre-occurring influences. One example of these is that an atmosphere of excessive fear can suppress open and frank disclosures, which can in turn hide problems, impede correction, and prevent lessons learned. Another is that a cultural mind-set of commitment, self-responsibility, and passion for an activity is a significant contributor to the activity's success. This project pursued an innovative approach for quantitatively analyzing latent effects in order to link the above types of factors, aggregating available information into quantitative metrics that can contribute to

  4. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most

  5. Transport effects with hot electrons in laser fusion. Final report, October 1, 1981-February 28, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkarofsky, I.P.

    1983-02-01

    Two explanations are offered which can account for heat inhibition found in laser-fusion experiments. The first explanation requires an anisotorpic electron velocity distribution with a higher temperature parallel to the surface than into the surface. This provides axial heat inhibition. Lateral heat inhibition is associated with azimuthal magnetic fields. The second explanation requires the presence of both hot suprathermal and thermal electrons. The hot electrons can cause the flux limiter to decrease substantially below the free-streaming limit in an intermediate range of collisionality. Conditions for this situation occur in the coronal region. We compare a Maxwellian distribution to an exp(-v 5 /v 5 /sub c/) variation for the cold electrons and find that the flux limiter decreases more for the latter case. The effects of collisions between cold and hot electrons is also looked into. The Cartesian tensor approach is used in the above investigations with various forms for the zeroth order electron velocity distribution function

  6. Assessment of effects of Fort St. Vrain HTGR primary coolant on Alloy 800. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trester, P.W.; Johnson, W.R.; Simnad, M.T.; Burnette, R.D.; Roberts, D.I.

    1982-08-01

    A comprehensive review was conducted of primary helium coolant chemistry data, based on current and past operating histories of helium-cooled, high-temperature reactors (HTGRs), including the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) HTGR. A reference observed FSV reactor coolant environment was identified. Further, a slightly drier expected FSV coolant chemistry was predicted for reactor operation at 100% of full power. The expected environment was compared with helium test environments used in the US, United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Japan. Based on a comprehensive review and analysis of mechanical property data reported for Alloy 800 tested in controlled-impurity helium environments (and in air when appropriate for comparison), an assessment was made of the effect of FSV expected helium chemistry on material properties of alloy 800, with emphasis on design properties of the Alloy 800 material utilized in the FSV steam generators

  7. Effect of water fogs on the deliberate ignition of hydrogen. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalosh, R.G.; Bajpai, S.N.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents an experimental evaluation of the effects of water fog density, droplet diameter, and temperature on the lower flammable limit (LFL) of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. The results show that the LFL for hydrogen in air at 20 0 C is only marginally higher with fog than without. Most of the nozzles tested at 20 0 C raised the hydrogen LFL from 4.0 vol % to about 4.8%, for the case of dense fogs with volume-average drop size in the range 45 to 90 microns. The lower flammable limit at 50 0 C was typically 7.2% for dense fogs with drop size in the range 25 to 50 microns. The lower flammable limit at 70 0 C was typically 7.6%. Typical fog concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 vol % at 20 0 C and decreased with increasing fog temperature. 7 figures, 4 tables

  8. Health effects of water-borne radon: review of a proposed study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Science Advisory Board's Radiation Advisory Committee was requested to review the scientific merit of a proposal to conduct an epidemiological study of radon in indoor air. The Board accepted the request and formed a Radioepidemiology Subcommittee which responded to two overriding scientific issues: Can further epidemiological study contribute to an understanding of the risks of lung cancer associated with household exposures. The Subcommittee concludes that scientific uncertainties in current epidemiological studies (chiefly studies of uranium miners) could be further reduced through direct investigations of the domestic population. Is the proposed study under review by the Office of Research and Development, entitled Health Effects of Waterborne Radon, appropriately designed to address the risk. For reasons cited in the attached report, the Subcommittee concludes that it is not appropriately designed

  9. Effects of radiation and chemicals on SV40 oncogenesis. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    This project is directed toward developing rapid, quantitative methods and immunologic markers which will permit the early detection of newly forming tumors induced or enhanced by x-irradiation, chemical carcinogens, viruses or combinations of the three. The projects under study in our ongoing collaborative program seek to develop the detailed understanding and precise methodology required for the early detection of embryonic antigens in transformed cells induced by the co-carcinogenic effects of viruses and low-level radiation. A new technique for assaying the earliest transformed cells appearing in a carcinogen treated population affords a unique tool for this study. Present plans involve efforts to purify embryonic determinants from fetal and transformed cells of hamsters and mice in order to define their role in the transformation process and in tumor development

  10. Environmental and economic effects of subsidence: Category 4, Project 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viets, V.F.; Vaughan, C.K.; Harding, R.C.

    1979-05-01

    A list of more than 70 subsidence areas was screened to select those areas which seemed to have the best potential for providing reliable data. The screening process is described in an appendix. Nine areas were selected for detailed case studies to collect all available data on the environmental and economic effects of the subsidence. Available information from the subsidence areas not selected as case studies was tabulated for each area and is included in an appendix. The nine case study areas are: Arizona; San Joaquin Valley, California; Baldwin Hills, California; Santa Clara Valley, California; Wilmington, California; Las Vegas Valley, Nevada; Houston-Galveston area, Texas; Mexico City, Mexico; and Wairakei, New Zealand. (MHR)

  11. The effects of radiation on intermediate-level wasteforms: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, C.R.; Phillips, D.C.; Lyon, C.E.; Burnay, S.G.; Winter, J.A.; Spindler, W.E.

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a programme carried out on the evaluation of the effects of radiation on organic ion exchangers in cement, mixed ion exchangers in modified vinyl ester polymer, immobilised fuel hull residues in cement, incinerator ash in cement and combustible PCM in cement. Both β/γ and α irradiation experiments were carried out over a range of dose rates. Cracking and spallation can occur over a wide range of water/cement ratios at a high dose rate of 3.0 Gy s -1 for grouts based on blast furnace slag compositions. Gas pressurisation is the most likely mechanism for the damage. Cement pore water extracted from irradiated samples of combustible PCM had a pH of 9.8 after 9.0 MGy compared to 13.0 for unirradiated controls. (author)

  12. The final effect of extraction system in the uranyl nitrate-water-diethyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Luina, A.; Gutierrez Jodra, L.; Miro, A. R.

    1957-01-01

    The solute transfer of uranyl nitrate from diallylether to water has been studied in a spray column using water as dispersed phase and a direction of extraction from ether to water. The column is 102 cm. long has a diameter of 4. 7 cm. The entrances of the phases are 7 7 cm. apart. The rates of flow of both phases have been used as variables and the concentration of the continuous phase has been determined; at different heights. The curves of logarithm of concentration of the continuous phase vs , distance to interphase show the presence of a drop of concentration in the entrance of the continuous phase. This depends on the rates of flow of the phases. No effect in the entrance of the dispersed phase has been found. (Author)

  13. Cost effectiveness of DH-network construction. Final report; Kaukolaempoeverkon rakentamisen kehittaeminen; Loppuraportti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivistoe, V.M. [Ekono Energy Ltd, Espoo (Finland)

    1993-12-31

    Construction cost of DH networks were analyzed in the study. Basing on the analysis, those areas of construction activities were selected, where cost effectiveness could be improved. According to the study, the civil works` cost form about half of the total construction cost on small diameter networks and 30..40 % of the cost of larger sizes. The impact of the design on the construction cost should be emphasized. According to the study it is possible to find significant reduction in the construction cost by increased use of twin pipe where the both carrier pipes are included in the same insulation casing. In small network sizes the reduction of cost achievable by the above is about 30..35 % and in larger sizes about 10 % (DN 125..DN 200) when comparing with a design by individual pipes. The use of twin pipe also causes savings in thermal loss. In sizes DN 65 and up, the saving in heat loss is about 90..95 FIM/m which represents about half of the total savings when compared with design by individual pipes. The possibility of prestressing the twin pipe element at factory in order to shorten the installation time at site was also studied and test pipes was also done. By factory prestressing it would be possible to avoid preheating of pipes at construction site. The trench could be backfilled immediately after pipe laying, welding and inspections. Theoretically and based on test pipes done the prestressing of twin pipe element looks very promising. When factory prestressing would be used, the open time of the trench is reduced significantly and for instance the disturbance to traffic is smaller. As well the use of labour and machinery at site could be more effective

  14. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-01-01

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A vy ) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure ( vy locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in animals and humans needs to be defined

  15. Patient safety competence for final-year health professional students: Perceptions of effectiveness of an interprofessional education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jee-In; Yoon, Tai-Young; Jin, Hyeon-Jeong; Park, Yikyun; Park, Ju-Young; Lee, Beom-Joon

    2016-11-01

    As final-year medical and nursing students will soon play key roles in frontline patient care, their preparedness for safe, reliable care provision is of special importance. We assessed patient safety competencies of final-year health profession students, and the effect of a 1-day patient safety education programme on these competencies. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 233 students in three colleges of medicine, nursing, and traditional medicine in Seoul. A before-and-after study followed to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. Patient safety competency was measured using the Health-Professional Education for Patients Safety Survey (H-PEPSS) and an objective patient safety knowledge test. The mean scores were 3.4 and 1.7 out of 5.0, respectively. The communication domain was rated the highest and the teamwork domain was rated the lowest. H-PEPSS scores significantly differed between the students from three colleges. The 1-day patient safety education curriculum significantly improved H-PEPSS and knowledge test scores. These results indicated that strengthening patient safety competencies, especially teamwork, of students is required in undergraduate healthcare curricula. A 1-day interprofessional patient safety education programme may be a promising strategy. The findings suggest that interprofessional patient safety education needs to be implemented as a core undergraduate course to improve students' safety competence.

  16. WPDD workshop on: 'safe, efficient, and cost-effective decommissioning'. Workshop Conclusions/Final Stocktaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    On September 6-10, 2004 a workshop on 'Safe, Efficient, and Cost-Effective Decommissioning' was held in Rome (Italy) to enable international experts on decommissioning to compare and evaluate respective approaches and experiences in decommissioning nuclear power and fuel cycle facilities and to formulate proposals for future international cooperation in the decommissioning arena. The main messages emerging from the workshop are: - Decommissioning is a mature industrial process and many projects have been safely completed with support of local communities. Technical and scientific issues are well-understood and practical experience and associated lessons are being documented to guide future activities. Emphasis is being placed on effective planning with active programmes of community involvement. - Individual countries need to further develop integrated decommissioning and waste management strategies to ensure that long-term solutions will be available for all wastes generated from decommissioning. National systems are evolving to meet national needs, against a framework provided by the international organisations, and these seem increasingly to favour early dismantling regardless of the availability of waste disposal routes. - Realistic and streamlined regulatory programmes are being developed with feed back from industry experience and are placing more responsibility and accountability on licensees. - Accurate decommissioning waste cost calculation methods is needed. Waste volumes may vary from project to project even for similar installations. There though appears to be a strong case for accumulating data and benchmarking costs for similar plants and processes. Further work and experience exchange on cost comparisons between different strategies (for example clearance and recycling/reuse of materials versus direct surface disposal) would be valuable. - International clearance criteria have been established, with individual countries free to adopt them

  17. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-10-11

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (<10 cGy) during early gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the increased use of CT scans in disease diagnosis, increased number of people predicted to live and work in space, and the present concern about radiological terrorism. We showed for the first time that LDIR significantly increased DNA methylation at the A{sup vy} locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in

  18. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  19. Laboratory studies on the effects of shear on fish: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dauble, D. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moursund, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abernethy, C. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The overall objective of these studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish-friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish’s tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system; in other words, determining or assuming conditions known to injure fish will assist engineers in the design of a fish-friendly turbine system. To address the development of biological specifications, this experiment designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response. The test data reported here provide quantified strain rates and the relationship of these forces to direct and indirect biological effects on fish. The study concludes that juvenile salmonids and American shad should survive shear environments where strain rates do not exceed 500 cm/s/cm at a Dy of 1.8 cm. Additional studies are planned with a sensor fish to better link hydraulic conditions found within the laboratory and field environments.

  20. Final report on effects of environmental radiation of Kori nuclear power plant on human population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Kim, J.B.; Chung, K.H.; Lee, K.S.; Kim, S.R.; Yang, S.Y.

    1980-01-01

    In order to clarify and protect the effects of environmental radiation according to the operation of Kori nuclear power plant on the human population, the base line survey for the human monitoring, human life habits, expected individual exposure dose, frequencies of chromosomal aberration, gene frequencies and karyotypes in amphibia, fauna, and radiation sensitivities in microorganisms which have been living around the power plant site were carried out. Kilchonri population which took for the human monitoring lie within a 2 km distance from the power plant site. Human monitoring, house and food characteristics, individual experience of x-ray exposures, human chromosome analysis and fauna were surveyed and expressed in numerical tables. Chromosome number obtained from the amphibia which were collected around the power plant area was as follows: Kaloula borealis 2N=30, Rana amurensis 2N=26, Rana dybouskii 2N=24, Rana rugosa 2N=26, Rana nigromaculata 2N=26, Rana plancyi 2N=26, Bombina orientalis 2N=24, Hyla arborea 2N=24, Bufo stejnegeri 2N=22, Bufo bufo 2N=22. (author)

  1. Effect of 18F-FDG dosage alternation on final PET image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayi; Yao Shulin; Chen Yingmao; Shao Mingzhe; Tian Jiahe

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess PET reconstructed image effected by different 18 F-FDG dosages with quantitative and qualitative analysis. Methods: To perform PET phantom acquisition by routine clinical parameters after filled with different doses of 18 F-FDG solution. An identical slice was extracted from reconstructed image for doing following analysis: the hot area standard uptake value (SUV), the ratio of hot area to cold area, the standard deviation on background area, the ratio of true coincidence to random. Results: 296 MBq: The image uniformity was terribly worse, T/R=0.83, other indexes were irregular. 148 MBq: The image presentation looked like the image without attenuation correction, T/R=1.64, other indexes were moderate. 74, 37 and 18.5 MBq: The images were with excellent uniformity, resolution and contrast, the background noise was suitable, all of the quantitative indexes were good. 9.25 and 4.625 MBq: The uniformity and resolution was degraded terribly because of the higher noise and lower information. Conclusion: Combining above results with other considerations, such as radiation exposure, information amount and acquisition time, the authors think the optimal dosage should be 4.625-11.1 MBq/kg

  2. Final report on Production Test No. 105-245-P -- Effectiveness of cadmium coated splines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, A.B.

    1949-05-19

    This report discussed cadmium coated splines which have been developed to supplement the regular control rod systems under emergency shutdown conditions from higher power levels. The objective of this test was to determine the effectiveness of one such spline placed in a tube in the central zone of a pile, and of two splines in the same tube. In addition, the process control group of the P Division asked that probable spline requirements for safe operation at various power levels be estimated, and the details included in this report. The results of the test indicated a reactivity value of 10.5 {plus_minus} 1.0 ih for a single spline, and 19.0 ih {plus_minus} 1.0 ihfor two splines in tube 1674-B under the loading conditions of 4-27-49, the date of the test. The temperature rise of the cooling water for this tube under these conditions was found to be 37.2{degrees}C for 275 MW operation.

  3. Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

  4. Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Ceramics for Plutonium Immobilization: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2004-01-01

    In this document, we summarize our study of the effects of radiation induced damage to the titanate ceramics that were to be the immobilization form for surplus weapons-grade Pu. In this study, we made five ceramic materials: pure-phase pyrochlore, pure-phase zirconolite, pyrochlore-rich baseline, zirconolite-rich baseline, and impurity baseline. Two-hundred specimens were made of which 130 contained approximately 10 mass% 238Pu and 70 contained 10 mass% 239Pu. The specimens containing 239Pu served as materials against which the behavior of the 238Pu-bearing specimens could be compared. In our studies, we measured the true density (density exclusive of surface connected porosity), bulk density, crystalline-phase composition with X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dissolution rates as radiation induced damage accumulated in the 238Pu-bearing specimens. We routinely took photographs of the specimens during each characterization period. From our studies, we determined that these materials swell less than 10% and generally less than 5%. As the material swells, some open porosity can be converted to closed porosity, often causing the true density to decrease more rapidly than the bulk density. In general, 3?1018 a/g of damage accumulation were required for the materials to become amorphous as determined with the XRD method. The order in which the phases became amorphous was brannerite, pyrochlore, and zirconolite with brannerite being the most susceptible to radiation induced damage. However, we also show that Pu is not evenly distributed amongst the phases when multiple phases are present. We were unsuccessful in making a pure brannerite to study. Therefore, the brannerite was always present with other phases. For a material containing about 10 mass% 239Pu, 3?1018 a/g represent about 500 years in the geologic repository. At no time in our studies was there evidence for microcracking in these materials, even upon close examination in a scanning-electron microscope . Upon

  5. Effects of pipelines and gathering lines on snow crab and lobster : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, J.L.; Covill, J.D. [Martec Ltd., Halifax, NS (Canada); Gilroy, L.; Wheaton, D.; Holtham, P.; Richards, T.; Lucas, C.; Schattschneider, G.; Religa, R.; Brannan, C. [Defence Research and Development Canada Atlantic, Dartmouth, NS (Canada); DeMont, E.; Schuegraf, M; King, K. [Saint Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    2004-12-01

    A study investigating potential behavioural changes in lobster after the completion of the ExxonMobil natural gas pipeline in the vicinity of Goldboro, Nova Scotia was presented. The study was divided into 4 components: (1) field studies to measure underwater noise in the region associated with the operational gas pipeline; (2) a determination of the electromagnetic (EM) fields generated by the presence of a pipeline in the region through the creation of a numerical model; (3) a lobster catch-and-release field program to measure lobster catches, with concentrated sampling around the Goldboro pipeline landfall using 2 reference sites; and (4) a separate laboratory based study to determine the scaling and climbing ability of lobsters over 32 and 48 inch simulated gas pipelines with smooth and rough texture protective coatings. Offshore sections of the pipeline are partially or fully exposed above the sea-floor, and the laboratory experiments were conducted to asses the effects of unburied pipelines creating a barrier to lobster movement. Results of the acoustic surveys showed peaks of low frequency sound within the hearing range of lobster in the vicinity of the pipeline. The EM survey and resulting numerical model indicated that the pipeline created a narrow magnetic field affecting an area only 2 to 3 metres wide on either side of the pipeline which produced a field strength up to one third as strong as that of the earth's background magnetic field. The lobster catch and release program showed no statistically significant variation of catches between the pipeline locale and the 2 reference sites. In the laboratory testing, the rough surface coating was found to more scaleable for the lobsters than a smooth coating. 7 tabs., 7 figs.

  6. Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costeux, Stephane [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States); Bunker, Shanon [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    2013-12-20

    The objective of this project was to explore and potentially develop high performing insulation with increased R/inch and low impact on climate change that would help design highly insulating building envelope systems with more durable performance and lower overall system cost than envelopes with equivalent performance made with materials available today. The proposed technical approach relied on insulation foams with nanoscale pores (about 100 nm in size) in which heat transfer will be decreased. Through the development of new foaming methods, of new polymer formulations and new analytical techniques, and by advancing the understanding of how cells nucleate, expand and stabilize at the nanoscale, Dow successfully invented and developed methods to produce foams with 100 nm cells and 80% porosity by batch foaming at the laboratory scale. Measurements of the gas conductivity on small nanofoam specimen confirmed quantitatively the benefit of nanoscale cells (Knudsen effect) to increase insulation value, which was the key technical hypotheses of the program. In order to bring this technology closer to a viable semi-continuous/continuous process, the project team modified an existing continuous extrusion foaming process as well as designed and built a custom system to produce 6" x 6" foam panels. Dow demonstrated for the first time that nanofoams can be produced in a both processes. However, due to technical delays, foam characteristics achieved so far fall short of the 100 nm target set for optimal insulation foams. In parallel with the technology development, effort was directed to the determination of most promising applications for nanocellular insulation foam. Voice of Customer (VOC) exercise confirmed that demand for high-R value product will rise due to building code increased requirements in the near future, but that acceptance for novel products by building industry may be slow. Partnerships with green builders, initial launches in smaller markets (e.g. EIFS

  7. FINAL REPORT FOR MOISTURE EFFECTS ON COMPACTION OF FIBERBOARD IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Estochen, E.

    2013-09-17

    Compaction of lower layers in the fiberboard assembly has been observed in 9975 packages that contain elevated moisture. Lab testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the lower fiberboard assembly, and the behavior of the fiberboard during transport. In laboratory tests of cane fiberboard, higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction, greater rate of compaction, and continued compaction over a longer period of time. In addition, laboratory tests have shown that the application of a dynamic load results in higher fiberboard compaction compared to a static load. The test conditions and sample geometric/loading configurations were chosen to simulate the regulatory requirements for 9975 package input dynamic loading. Dynamic testing was conducted to acquire immediate and cumulative changes in geometric data for various moisture levels. Two sample sets have undergone a complete dynamic test regimen, one set for 27 weeks, and the second set for 47 weeks. The dynamic input, data acquisition, test effects on sample dynamic parameters, and results from this test program are summarized and compared to regulatory specifications for dynamic loading. Compaction of the bottom fiberboard layers due to the accumulation of moisture is one possible cause of an increase in the axial gap at the top of the package. The net compaction of the bottom layers will directly add to the axial gap. The moisture which caused this compaction migrated from the middle region of the fiberboard assembly (which is typically the hottest). This will cause the middle region to shrink axially, which will also contribute directly to the axial gap. Measurement of the axial gap provides a screening tool for identifying significant change in the fiberboard condition. The data in this report provide a basis to evaluate the impact of moisture and fiberboard compaction on 9975 package performance

  8. Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1995-07-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Particular attention was paid to heavy crude oils from Venezuela, California, Alabama, Arkansas, Wyoming, Alaska, and other oil producing areas. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between {open_quotes}biodegraded{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}biotreated{close_quotes} oils. Preliminary results indicate the introduced microorganisms may become the dominant species in the bioconversion of oils. These studies also indicate the biochemical interactions between crude oils and microorganisms follow distinct trends, characterized by a group of chemical markers. Core-flooding experiments have shown significant additional crude oil recoveries are achievable with thermophilic microorganisms at elevated temperatures similar to those found in oil reservoirs. In addition, the biochemical treatment of crude oils has technological applications in downstream processing of crude oils such as in upgrading of low grade oils and the production of hydrocarbon based detergents.

  9. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  10. GIS for analysis of health effects from air pollutions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Karin; Stroh, Emilie; Pilesjoe, Petter; Welinder, Hans; Axmon, Anna; Stroemberg, Ulf; Nielsen, Joern; Assarsson, Eva

    2005-06-01

    Within the project, a survey, in which 120 adult individuals in Vaexjoe filled in a questionnaire on a daily basis for 2.5 months, was performed. Questions included self-reported health effects or other nuisance from air pollution, address of residence and work and working hours. The answers have been analysed in relation to hourly modelled levels, aggregated into daily means, of PM 10 on a 250 meters spatial resolution. The study also includes comparisons in two cities, Vaexjoe and Malmoe, of a number of different methods of using GIS for estimating individual exposure to air pollution. The measures of individual exposure compared in Vaexjoe were 1) daily mean of modelled PM 10 content at an urban measuring station, 2) content at closest point from residence, 3) interpolated content of 4 closest points from residence and 4) an hourly weighted daily mean of modelled content at closest point from work place during working hours and from residence during the rest of the day. In Malmoe, different spatial resolution (aggregation) of population data were compared when estimating individual exposure for yearly mean of modelled NO x content of 250 meters resolution. The compared resolutions for population were administrative boundary of city districts, the Swedish official statistics level 3 and 4, and regular squares of 1 km and 500 meters resolution. For the last two a comparison was also made between using modelled NO x content at square centre point or at population density centre point in a square. All estimates were compared to content at closest modelled point from residence. In the Vaexjoe study a significant increase in odds ratio for the symptom 'Wheeze and shortness of breath' as well as the nuisance 'Bad smell of air' was found, though for most of the health outcomes no significant relationship to PM 10 -content could be established. No difference could be found between different measures of exposure in relation to health outcome, although all individual

  11. Diesel Emission Control- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program- Phase II Summary Report: NOx Adsorber Catalysts; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The investigations performed in this project demonstrated the ability to develop a NO(sub x) regeneration strategy including both an improved lean/rich modulation cycle and rich engine calibration, which resulted in a high NO(sub x) conversion efficiency over a range of operating temperatures. A high-temperature cycle was developed to desulfurize the NO(sub x) absorber catalyst. The effectiveness of the desulfurization process was demonstrated on catalysts aged using two different sulfur level fuels. The major findings of this project are as follows: (1) The improved lean/rich engine calibration achieved as a part of this test project resulted in NO(sub x) conversion efficiencies exceeding 90% over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (2) The desulfurization procedure developed showed that six catalysts, which had been exposed to fuel sulfur levels of 3-, 16-, and 30-ppm for as long as 250 hours, could be recovered to greater than 85% NO(sub x) conversion efficiency over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C, after a single desulfurization event. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (3) The desulfurization procedure developed has the potential to meet in-service engine operating conditions and provide acceptable driveability conditions. (4) Although aging with 78-ppm sulfur fuel reduced NO(sub x) conversion efficiency more than aging with 3-ppm sulfur fuel as a result of sulfur contamination, the desulfurization events restored the conversion efficiency to nearly the same level of performance. However, repeatedly exposing the catalyst to the desulfurization procedure developed in this program caused a continued decline in the catalyst's desulfurized performance. Additional work will be

  12. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  13. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  14. The Effect of Luting Cement and Titanium Base on the Final Color of Zirconium Oxide Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capa, Nuray; Tuncel, Ilkin; Tak, Onjen; Usumez, Aslihan

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of different types of luting cements and different colors of zirconium cores on the final color of the restoration that simulates implant-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs) by using a titanium base on the bottom. One hundred and twenty zirconium oxide core plates (Zr-Zahn; 10 mm in width, 5 mm in length, 0.5 mm in height) were prepared in different shades (n = 20; noncolored, A2, A3, B1, C2, D2). The specimens were subdivided into two subgroups for the two types of luting cements (n = 10). The initial color measurements were made on zirconium oxide core plates using a spectrometer. To create the cement thicknesses, stretch strips with holes in the middle (5 mm in diameter, 70 μm in height) were used. The second measurement was done on the zirconium oxide core plates after the application of the resin cement (U-200, A2 Shade) or polycarboxylate cement (Lumicon). The final measurement was done after placing the titanium discs (5 mm in diameter, 3 mm in height) in the bottom. The data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's honestly significant differences (HSD) tests (α = 0.05). The ∆E* ab value was higher in the resin cement-applied group than in the polycarboxylate cement-applied group (p zirconium oxide core-resin cement-titanium base, and the lowest was recorded for the polycarboxylate cement-zirconium oxide core (p zirconium are all important factors that determine the final shade of zirconia cores in implant-supported FPDs. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Effect of the technology in transmission, distribution and in the final uses; Efecto de la tecnologia en transmision, distribucion y en los usos finales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, Elena [ed.; Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    At the moment one looks for the application of the superconductivity in the generation, transformation, transmission and storage of electrical energy. In this article recent technologies are briefly described , their advantages and their effects on the transmission and distribution networks. In some cases specific reference is made of the effect that they will have in Mexico. [Spanish] Actualmente se busca la aplicacion de la superconductividad en la generacion, transformacion, transmision y almacenamiento de energia eletrica. En este articulo se describen brevemente tecnologias recientes, sus ventajas y sus efectos sobre las redes de transmision y distribucion. En algunos casos se hace referencia especifica al efecto que tendran en Mexico.

  16. Effectiveness of the squeezing out and final squeezing out of petroleum of an increased viscosity by alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begnazarov, T.

    1979-01-01

    The remaining petroleum in the flooded zone is determined by the ratio of viscosity forces to the forces of the surface tension, which are expressed by the coefficient Ka. With this, for each kind of porous medium, there exists a natural cricial value Ka. For the purpose of studying the effect of the given parameters on the value of the remaining petroleum, experiments were carried out on artificial specimens. In the tests, using petroleum of the Mishkin deposit, the surface tension on the boundary of the petroleum with the distilled water and alkaline solutions were respectively equal to 37.1 and 1.33 dynes per centimeter. The experiments showed, that the squeezing out of the petroleum with water or alkaline solutions leads to similar results. This means, that the composite parameter Ka does not affect the value of the remaining petroleum saturation. The effectiveness of the final squeezing out of the petroleum of increased viscosity was also studied. These experiments were carried out in two variations of the injection of the squeezed out agent: in the first variation, the petroleum was squeezed out with water in the first stage, and in the second stage it was squeezed out by an alkaline solution, and in the subsequent stages, a change in the squeezing out agent took place. By finishing the first stage, the attained values of the coefficients of the squeezing out were practically similar (0.72). In the second stage, the final squeezing out of the petroleum with a solution of alkaline, provided a major effect.

  17. Labeling and effectiveness testing; sunscreen drug products for over-the-counter human use; delay of compliance dates. Final rule; delay of compliance dates; request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is delaying the compliance dates for the final rule for over-the-counter (OTC) sunscreen drug products that published in the Federal Register of June 17, 2011 (76 FR 35620). The final rule establishes labeling and effectiveness testing for certain OTC sunscreen products containing specified active ingredients and marketed without approved applications. It also amends labeling claims that are not currently supported by data and lifts the previously-published delay of implementation of the Drug Facts labeling requirements for OTC sunscreens. The 2011 final rule's compliance dates are being delayed because information received after publication of the 2011 final rule indicates that full implementation of the 2011 final rule's requirements for all affected products will require an additional 6 months. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  18. Effects of Various Physical Education Curriculum on Motor Skills in Students of Final Grades in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovan Ljubojević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Results of many researches conducted in field of physical education show that the physical education curriculum is not on the appropriate and satisfactory level. The goal of this study is to determine effects of standard and experimental education curriculum on motor skills. This study lasted for one school year, and it was conducted on the sample consisting of 113 boys, divided into control (physical education and experimental group (basketball. In order to asses motor space, following variables of Eurofit battery of tests were monitored: flamingo, hand tapping, seated forward bend (modified functional reach test, long jump, dynamo-metrics of dominant hand, lay – sit for 30'', pull-up endurance, and pin running on 10x5m. Analysis of the results during the final measurement showed that students of control group had better results in final measurement in comparison to the initial one in six out of eight variables. Students of the experimental group had improved results in 7 out of 8 variables. Experimental education curriculum with emphasize on basketball contributed to development of motor skills of students, but not at the level that would imply superiority over the control – standard education curriculum.

  19. Evaluation of effects of phenol recovery on biooxidation and tertiary treatment of SRC-I wastewater. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Watt, J.C.; Cowan, W.F.; Schuyler, S.E.

    1983-09-01

    Addition of phenol recovery to the wastewater treatment scheme in the Baseline Design for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant was evaluated as a major post-Baseline effort. Phenol recovery affects many downstream processes, but this study was designed to assess primarily its effects on biooxidation and subsequent tertiary treatment. Two parallel treatment schemes were set up, one to treat dephenolated wastewaters and the other for processed nondephenolated wastewaters, a simulation of the Baseline Design. The study focused on comparisons of five areas: effluent quality; system stability; the need for continuous, high-dose powdered activated carbon (PAC) augmentation to the bioreactor; minimum bioreactor hydraulic residence time (HRT); and tertiary treatment requirements. The results show that phenol recovery improves the quality of the bioreactor effluent in terms of residual organics and color. With phenol recovery, PAC augmentation is not required; without phenol recovery, PAC is needed to produce a comparable effluent. Dephenolization also enhances the stability of biooxidation, and reduces the minimum HRT required. With tertiary treatment, both schemes can meet the effluent concentrations published in the SRC-I Final Envivornmental Impact Statement, as well as the anticipated effluent limits. However, phenol recovery does provide a wider safety margin and could eliminate the need for some of the tertiary treatment steps. Based solely on the technical merits observed in this study, phenol recovery is recommended. The final selection should, however, also consider economic tradeoffs and results of other studies such as toxicology testing of the effluents. 34 references, 30 figures and 26 tables.

  20. Narrative Finality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  1. The effect of different thickness alumina capping layers on the final morphology of dewet thin Ni films

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin C.; Behbahanian, Amir; Stoker, T. McKay; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Hartnett, Chris; Rack, Phillip D.; Roberts, Nicholas A.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticles on a substrate have numerous applications in nanotechnology, from enhancements to solar cell efficiency to improvements in carbon nanotube growth. Producing nanoparticles in a cost effective fashion with control over size and spacing is desired, but difficult to do. This work presents a scalable method for altering the radius and pitch distributions of nickel nanoparticles. The introduction of alumina capping layers to thin nickel films during a pulsed laser-induced dewetting process has yielded reductions in the mean and standard deviation of radii and pitch for dewet nanoparticles with no noticeable difference in final morphology with increased capping layer thickness. The differences in carbon nanotube mats grown, on the uncapped sample and one of the capped samples, is also presented here, with a more dense mat being present for the capped case.

  2. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  3. [Effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on final color of heat-pressed ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D F; Zhan, K R; Chen, X D; Xing, W Z

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To analyze the effect of ceramic materials thickness and resin cement shades on the final color of ceramic veneers in the discolored teeth, and to investigate the color agreement of try-in pastes to the corresponding resin cements. Methods: Sixty artificial maxillary central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were used to simulate the natural discolored teeth and prepared according to veneer tooth preparation protocol. Veneers of different thickness in the body region (0.50 and 0.75 mm) were fabricated using ceramic materials (LT A2 shade, IPS e.max Press). The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth using the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of LV-3, LV-2, HV+3; RelyX™ Veneer: shades of TR, A3, WO) ( n= 5). A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of ceramic veneers at the cervical, body and incisal regions. Color changes of veneers before and after cementation were calculated and registered as ΔE1, and the changes between try-in paste and the corresponding resin cements were registered as ΔE2. Results: Three-way ANOVA indicated that ΔE1 and ΔE2 values were significantly affected by the ceramic thickness, resin cement shades and measuring regions ( Pceramic veneers were cemented with resin cements in shades of HV+3 and WO. The ΔE2 values of six shades ranged from 0.60-2.56. The shades of HV+3, WO and A3 resin cements were more than 1.60. Conclusions: Different thickness of ceramic materials, resin cement shades and measuring regions could affect the final color of ceramic veneers. The color differences of some resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes might be observed in clinical practice.

  4. Final technical report: The effect of physical and chemical heterogeneities in a porous medium on the transport of bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornberger, George M.; Mills, Aaron L.; Herman, Janet S.

    2001-04-01

    Among the demonstrated processes influencing the transport of bacteria through aquifers, the deposition of cells on mineral surfaces is one of the most important. Heterogeneous distribution of aquifer properties such as mineral-grain oxide coatings and preferred flow paths can control the numbers of microbes arriving a point down gradient from their injection, and these properties can also affect the distribution of the organisms remaining in the sedimentary matrix. The distribution of metal oxide coatings affects the final location of retained cells within the matrix but had no effect on total breakthrough of applied bacteria. We were able to demonstrate transverse mixing of both conservative tracers and bacteria between regions of differing hydraulic conductivity; the conservative tracer could be used to model the transverse mixing of the bacteria. We were able to show that the presence of metal oxide coatings on aquifer surfaces retarded a reactive tracer (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that simulated bacterial retardation in the laboratory. When metal oxide coatings were absent (due to bacterial establishment of a reducing environment) the tracer and bacteria were not retarded. The effect was reproduced in a tracer experiment done in the field. The results suggest that bacterial transport in the subsurface is controlled by a number of interrelated and confounding factors that prevent accurate prediction of transport given the present state of knowledge.

  5. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa

  6. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  7. Initial mandate concerning the problem of fluctuating gasoline prices and their effect on the Quebec economy : Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, R.; Ford, N. ed.

    2002-06-01

    Over a three-year period covering May 1998 to May 2001, the average price of gasoline in Quebec slowly increased from 57.1 cent per litre to 82.6 cent per litre. This 45 per cent increase in the price of gasoline worried consumers and had an effect on commercial and industrial operations throughout the province. This situation prompted the Commission de l'economie et du travail (Commission on Labour and the Economy) to initiate a mandate to examine the problem. In October 2001, experts representing energy and taxation sectors were consulted and presentations made by 17 people and organizations. The Ministre des Ressources Naturelles (Minister of Natural Resources) and the President de la Regie de l'Energie were heard in a public consultation forum. In the first part of the document, the authors explained the mechanism by which the price of gasoline and its various components are determined, identified the elements responsible for the increases in prices, and compare the prices in the different parts of the province. In part two, the responsibilities and powers of the Ministry of Natural Resources and the Regie de l'Energie with regard to petroleum products were examined. Part three described the opinions expressed and proposed recommendations obtained during the public consultation process and they were grouped under four headings: taxation, competition, consumer information, and energy savings. The final part of the document presented the recommendations of the Commission on Labour and the Economy. 15 refs., 5 tabs

  8. Development of a two-beam high-current ion accelerator based on Doppler effect. Final report (1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.I.; Yegorov, A.M.

    1995-03-01

    This Final Report presents the results of work accomplished in accordance with the Scope of Work to the Purchase Order No 4596310. The amount of works includes the following items: 1. Start of the manufacture of the Experimental Accelerating Stand (EAS)-the section for proton acceleration from 5 MeV to 8 MeV, in which RF fields are excited by an electron beam at the anomalous Doppler effect. 2. Theoretical investigation and computer simulation of field excitation and ion acceleration in the EAS. Under item 1, the EAS manufacturing is begun. To present time, a pedestal for the EAS and a stainless steel vacuum chamber for RF resonator are made (length of the chamber is about 180 cm, diameter is about 40 cm). Besides, parts of the EAS resonator with the acceleration structure are manufactured, and its assembly is begun. Under item 2, it is realized three works: calculation of increment and frequency shift of the EAS resonator excited by electron beam, calculation of the solenoid for creation of magnetic field with required spatial distribution, and theoretical investigation and computer simulation of ion acceleration in the EAS. 14 figs., 16 refs

  9. Effects of School Quality, School Citizenship Policy, and Student Body Composition on the Acquisition of Citizenship Competences in the Final Year of Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Anne Bert; Geijsel, Femke; Ledoux, Guuske; van der Veen, Ineke; ten Dam, Geert

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of general educational quality of schools, school citizenship policy, and ethnic homogeneity of the student body on the acquisition of citizenship competences in the final year of primary education. The theoretical framework is based on developmental, psychological, and sociological studies into effects of social…

  10. Effect of radiation on proteins and radiation effects in biochemistry and organic chemistry. Final report, October 15, 1957--October 14, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolbert, B.M.

    1974-01-01

    A summary is made of a fifteen year study of chemical effects of radiation of amino acids and proteins. Included is a list of publications: 54 papers, reports and abstracts, and 10 M.S. and Ph.D theses. The report concludes with details of the final two studies done under this contract. These are, first, a study of post-irradiation effects of various gases on gamma irradiated lysozyme. This study showed that H 2 S, O 2 , NO, and N 2 O treatment changed the amount of aggregation products, and also that a certain amount of the irradiated lysozyme was subject to main chain cleavage. The second was a study of proteins in rabbit eye lens cataracts induced by x-irradiation or a high galactose diet. The cataract proteins were more soluble in water than normal proteins, and were present in lower amounts in the eye lens

  11. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V. 3: Comparison of observed effects with computer simulated effects on reactor cores from seismic disturbances. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This publication contains the final papers summarizing the validation of the codes on the basis of comparison of observed effects with computer simulated effects on reactor cores from seismic disturbances. Refs, figs tabs

  12. The effects of practice on movement distance and final position reproduction: implications for the equilibrium-point control of movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaric, S; Corcos, D M; Gottlieb, G L; Ilic, D B; Latash, M L

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of two views on single-joint motor control, namely programming of muscle force patterns and equilibrium-point control, were compared with the results of experiments with reproduction of movement distance and final location during fast unidirectional elbow flexions. Two groups of subjects were tested. The first group practiced movements over a fixed distance (36 degrees), starting from seven different initial positions (distance group, DG). The second group practiced movements from the same seven initial positions to a fixed final location (location group, LG). Later, all the subjects were tested at the practiced task with their eyes closed, and then, unexpectedly for the subjects, they were tested at the other, unpracticed task. In both groups, the task to reproduce final position had lower indices of final position variability than the task to reproduce movement distance. Analysis of the linear regression lines between initial position and final position (or movement distance) also demonstrated a better (more accurate) performance during final position reproduction than during distance reproduction. The data are in a good correspondence with the predictions of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, but not with the predictions of the force-pattern control approach.

  13. The effects of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel on regional economy; Kaeytetyn ydinpolttoaineen loppusijoituslaitoksen aluetaloudelliset vaikutukset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, S. [Seppo Laakso Urban Research (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The study deals with the economic effects of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel on the alternative location municipalities - Eurajoki, Kuhmo, Loviisa and Aeaenekoski - and their neighbouring areas (in Finland). The economic influence of the facility on industrials, employment, population, property markets, community structure and local public economics are analysed applying the approach of regional economics. The evaluation of the facility`s effects on employment is based on the input-output analysis. Both the direct and indirect effects of the construction and the functioning of the facility are taken into account in the analysis. According to the results the total increase in employment caused by the construction of the facility is about 350 persons annually, at national level. Some 150 persons of this are estimated to live in the wider region and 100-150 persons in the facility`s influence area consisting of the location municipality and neighbouring municipalities. This amount is reached at the top stage of construction (around the year 2018). At the production stage - after the year 2020 - the facility`s effects on employment will be concentrated significantly more on the location municipality and the rest of the influence area than on the rest of the country, compared with the construction stage. The estimated employment growth in the production stage is approximately 160 persons at national level of which 100-120 persons live in the candidate municipality and in the rest of the influence area. There is a direct link between local employment and population development. The growth of jobs attracts immigrants affecting the development of both the number and the structure of population. The facility`s effects on population development in the alternative location municipalities are analysed using comparative population forecasts based on demographic population projection methods. According to the results the job growth caused by the facility will

  14. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  15. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 234U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-01-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution (σ e ) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of 234 U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution (σ E ) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on σ E (A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on σ E (A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on σ e (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the σ E (A) curve, and the observed peaks on σ e (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  16. Medicare and Medicaid programs; salary equivalency guidelines for physical therapy, respiratory therapy, speech language pathology, and occupational therapy services; revised effective date and technical correction--HCFA. Final rule; delay of effective date and correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-31

    This document delays the effective date of the final rule on salary equivalency guidelines, published in the Federal Register (63 FR 5106) on January 30, 1998, from April 1, 1998 to April 10, 1998. In addition, we are making a technical correction in the preamble to the January 30, 1998 final rule.

  17. Electronic state of ruthenium deposited onto oxide supports: An XPS study taking into account the final state effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larichev, Yurii V.; Moroz, Boris L.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic state of ruthenium in the supported Ru/EO x (EO x = MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 ) catalysts prepared by with the use of Ru(OH)Cl 3 or Ru(acac) 3 (acac = acetylacetonate) and reduced with H 2 at 723 K is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the Ru 3d, Cl 2p and O 1s regions. The influence of the final state effects (the differential charging and variation of the relaxation energy) on the binding energy (BE) of Ru 3d 5/2 core level measured for supported Ru nanoparticles is estimated by comparison of the Fermi levels and the modified Auger parameters determined for the Ru/EO x samples with the corresponding characteristics of the bulk Ru metal. It is found that the negative shift of the Ru 3d 5/2 peak which is observed in the spectrum of ruthenium deposited onto MgO (BE = 279.5-279.7 eV) with respect to that of Ru black (BE = 280.2 eV) or ruthenium supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 (BE = 280.4 eV) is caused not by the transfer of electron density from basic sites of MgO, as considered earlier, but by the differential charging of the supported Ru particles compared with the support surface. Correction for the differential charging value reveals that the initial state energies of ruthenium in the Ru/EO x systems are almost identical (BE = 280.5 ± 0.1 eV) irrespectively of acid-base properties of the support, the mean size of supported Ru crystallites (within the range of 2-10 nm) and the surface Cl content. The results obtained suggest that the difference in ammonia synthesis activity between the Ru catalysts supported on MgO and on the acidic supports is accounted for by not different electronic state of ruthenium on the surface of these oxides but by some other reasons.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix J to Subpart G of... - Substitutes listed in the January 29, 2002 Final Rule, effective April 1, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substitutes listed in the January 29, 2002 Final Rule, effective April 1, 2002 J Appendix J to Subpart G of Part 82 Protection of Environment... Significant New Alternatives Policy Program Pt. 82, Subpt. G, App. J Appendix J to Subpart G of Part 82...

  19. Characterization of crispness of French fries by fracture and acoustic measurements, effect of pre-frying and final frying times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, T.; Primo-Martin, C.; Vliet, van T.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of pre-frying and final frying time on the crispness of French fries was evaluated by simultaneous analysis of the fracture and acoustic properties during instrumental simulation of human chewing. The analysis of the frequency distribution of the force and sound events corresponding to

  20. Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Surgical Mesh for Transvaginal Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is issuing a final order to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for surgical mesh for transvaginal pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair.

  1. Stimulation of methane oxidation potential and effects on vegetation growth by bottom ash addition in a landfill final evapotranspiration cover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, G.W.; Ho, A.; Kim, P.J.; Kim, Sang Yun

    2016-01-01

    The landfilling of municipal solid waste is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4), contributing up to 20% of total anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The evapotranspiration (ET) cover system, an alternative final cover system in waste landfills, has been considered to be a promising way to

  2. Effect of metal opaquer on the final color of 3 ceramic crown types on 3 abutment configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Rabia; Yilmaz, Burak; Mortazavi, Aras; Ozcelik, Tuncer B; Johnston, William M

    2018-04-30

    data, a 1-way ANOVA and subsequent Tukey testing for pairwise comparisons were used. The statistical significance of the analysis of color coordinates was found to be P≤.002. Although 3-way interaction was not found to be significant (P=.335), all three 2-way interactions of the main effects were found to be significant (P≤.002). All crown types on the Zir abutment revealed color differences from the control group. The color differences of the crown types on the Op and Zir abutment configurations compared with the control (LDL/Zir) were not (P>.05) statistically different. Colors of tested crown systems on Ti backing were each unacceptably different from the control group. Colors of these systems on zirconia backing were not perceivably different. Use of opaquer on titanium backing resulted in a small color difference from the control group (P>.05) for each crown system, demonstrating that it may be used to prevent the unfavorable metal show-through that can influence the final color of all ceramic crown systems tested. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Final remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 7 of the document refers to the achievement and maintenance of a high level in the Brazilian nuclear installations, the establishment and maintenance of effective defenses against potential radiological hazards, the ability to prevent accidents with radiological consequences and preparedness for mitigating the consequences of such accidents should they occur

  4. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of {sup 234}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado Postal 31-139, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: mmontoya@ipen.gob.pe

    2008-07-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub e}) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of {sup 234}U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub E}) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on {sigma}{sub e} (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the {sigma}{sub E} (A) curve, and the observed peaks on {sigma}{sub e} (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  5. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambaram, Dev [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Misra, Mano [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Heske, Clemens [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-12-21

    The objectives included: Develop high efficiency metal oxide nanotubular array photo-anodes for generating hydrogen by water splitting; Develop density functional theory to understand the effect of the morphology of the nanotubes on the photo-electrochemical (PEC) properties of the photo-anodes; Develop kinetics and formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanotubes under different synthesis conditions; Develop combinatorial approach to prepare hybrid photo-anodes having multiple hetero-atoms incorporation in a single photo anode; Improve the durability of the material; and Scale up the laboratory demonstration to production unit.

  6. Development Of Robust IFE Laser Mirrors and Multi-Scale Modeling Of Pulsed Radiation Effects. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2009-01-01

    The following has been achieved: (1) Final design of a Deformable Grazing Incidence Mirror, (2) Formulation of a new approach to model surface roughening under laser illumination, and (3) Modeling of radiation hardening under IFE conditions. We discuss here progress made in each one of these areas. The objectives of the Grazing Incidence Metal Mirror (GIMM) are: (1) to reflect the incident laser beam into the direction of the target; (2) to focus the incident beam directly onto the target (3) to withstand the thermomechanical and damage induced by laser beams; (4) to correct the reflective surface so that the focus is permanently on the target; (5) to have a full range of motion so it can be placed anywhere relative to the target. The design was described in our progress report of the period August 15, 2003 through April 15, 2004. In the following, we describe further improvements of the final design.

  7. Photo-oxidation of proteins and its role in cataractogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2001-01-01

    by the protein, or bound chromophore groups, thereby generating excited states (singlet or triplets) or radicals via photo-ionisation. The second major process involves indirect oxidation of the protein via the formation and subsequent reactions of singlet oxygen generated by the transfer of energy to ground...... state (triplet) molecular oxygen by either protein-bound, or other, chromophores. The basic principles behind these mechanisms of photo-oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins and the potential selectivity of damage are discussed. Emphasis is placed primarily on the intermediates...

  8. The effect of melatonin on eye lens of rats exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M M; Moustafa, M A

    2001-05-01

    We investigated the influence of exogenously administered melatonin on adult rats eye lenses exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV) A and B ranging from 356-254 nm irradiation at 8 microW/cm(2). Rats exposed to this range of UV for 15 min for one week showed a significant (PUV-radiation significantly (PUV irradiation, may be the main cause of lens opacification. Melatonin injection with radiation significantly reduced (Pradiation, SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activities increased significantly (PUV radiation was as effective as melatonin treatment concurrent with UV irradiation. We conclude that melatonin may protect the eye lens from the damaging effects of UV exposure, and its actions protect lens from oxidative stress, elevating Ca(2+) levels, which are considered as an important causes of cataractogenesis.

  9. FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergen Eckert; Anthony K. Cheetham (Principal Investigator)

    2011-03-11

    information on the effects on hydrogen binding from framework modifications, including charged frameworks and extraframework cations, from reduction in pore sizes, functionalization of the organic linking group, and most importantly, that of the various types of metal sites. We provided a clear demonstration that metal sites are most effective if the metal is highly undercoordinated, open and completely accessible to the H{sub 2} molecule, a condition which is not currently met in MOFs with intra-framework metals. The results obtained from this project therefore will give detailed direction to efforts in the synthesis of new materials that can reach the goal of a practical sorption based hydrogen storage material.

  10. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujit Banerjee

    2005-12-15

    Contaminants present in paper recycling mills can degrade product properties and can also lead to substantial downtime. Of these, adhesive material such as hot melts and pressure sensitive adhesives are especially troublesome. These are known as “ stickies ” and their handling and re- moval requires process equipment such as screens and cleaners as well as chemical additives. In the preceding phase of the project we demonstrated that firing an underwater spark in a tank of stock reduces the tack of the stickies and reduces their impact. The present phase was to demon- strate the technology in full-scale trials, address any issues that might arise, and commercialize the process. Trials were run at the Appleton papers mill in West Carrollton, OH, the Graphics Packag- ing mill at Kalamazoo, MI, Stora Enso mills at Duluth, MN, and Wisconsin Rapids, WI, and the Jackson Paper mill at Sylva, NC. It was shown that the sparker not only detackified stickies but also increased the efficiency of their removal by centrifugal cleaners, improved the effectiveness of dissolved air flotation, and increased the efficiency of flotation deinking. It is estimated that the sparker improves the efficiency of hydrocyclone cleaner, deinking cells and dissolved and dispersed air flotation units by 10-15%. This translates to a corresponding energy benefit in operating these units. The technology has been licensed to Eka Chemicals, a division of Akzo Nobel.

  11. Effects of cooking method and final core-temperature on cooking loss, lipid oxidation, nucleotide-related compounds and aroma volatiles of Hanwoo brisket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicky Tri Utama

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study observed the effects of cooking method and final core temperature on cooking loss, lipid oxidation, aroma volatiles, nucleotide-related compounds and aroma volatiles of Hanwoo brisket (deep pectoralis. Methods Deep pectoralis muscles (8.65% of crude fat were obtained from three Hanwoo steer carcasses with 1+ quality grade. Samples were either oven-roasted at 180°C (dry heat or cooked in boiling water (moist heat to final core temperature of 70°C (medium or 77°C (well-done. Results Boiling method reduced more fat but retained more moisture than did the oven roasting method (p<0.001, thus no significant differences were found on cooking loss. However, samples lost more weight as final core temperature increased (p<0.01. Further, total saturated fatty acid increased (p = 0.02 while total monounsaturated fatty acid decreased (p = 0.03 as final core temperature increased. Regardless the method used for cooking, malondialdehyde (p<0.01 and free iron contents (p<0.001 were observed higher in samples cooked to 77°C. Oven roasting retained more inosinic acid, inosine and hypoxanthine in samples than did the boiling method (p<0.001, of which the concentration decreased as final core temperature increased except for hypoxanthine. Samples cooked to 77°C using oven roasting method released more intense aroma than did the others and the aroma pattern was discriminated based on the intensity. Most of aldehydes and pyrazines were more abundant in oven-roasted samples than in boiled samples. Among identified volatiles, hexanal had the highest area unit in both boiled and oven-roasted samples, of which the abundance increased as the final core temperature increased. Conclusion The boiling method extracted inosinic acid and rendered fat from beef brisket, whereas oven roasting intensified aroma derived from aldehydes and pyrazines and prevented the extreme loss of inosinic acid.

  12. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

    2007-06-30

    Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better

  13. Phrase-Final Words in Greek Storytelling Speech: A Study on the Effect of a Culturally-Specific Prosodic Feature on Short-Term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutrari, Ariadne; Tselekidou, Freideriki; Proios, Hariklia

    2018-02-27

    Prosodic patterns of speech appear to make a critical contribution to memory-related processing. We considered the case of a previously unexplored prosodic feature of Greek storytelling and its effect on free recall in thirty typically developing children between the ages of 10 and 12 years, using short ecologically valid auditory stimuli. The combination of a falling pitch contour and, more notably, extensive final-syllable vowel lengthening, which gives rise to the prosodic feature in question, led to statistically significantly higher performance in comparison to neutral phrase-final prosody. Number of syllables in target words did not reveal substantial difference in performance. The current study presents a previously undocumented culturally-specific prosodic pattern and its effect on short-term memory.

  14. Final Technical Report for GO15052 Intematix: Combinatorial Synthesis and High Throughput Screening of Effective Catalysts for Chemical Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melman, Jonathan [Intematix Corporation, Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are: to discover cost-effective catalysts for release of hydrogen from chemical hydrogen storage systems; and to discover cost-effective catalysts for the regeneration of spent chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  15. A Cost-Effectiveness Comparision of Two Types of Occupational Home Economics Programs in the State of Kentucky. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Lydia Carol Moore

    A study compared the cost effectiveness of secondary child care and commercial foods occupational home economics programs in Kentucky. Identified as dependent variables in the study were program effectiveness, cost efficiency, and cost effectiveness ratio. Program expenditures, community size, and program age were considered as independent…

  16. Effect of focusing field error during final beam bunching in heavy-ion-beam driven inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Kawata, S.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-01-01

    Emittance growth due to the transverse focusing field error is investigated during the final beam bunching in the energy driver system of heavy ion inertial fusion. The beam bunch is longitudinally compressed during the transport with the field error in the continuous focusing (CF) or the alternating gradient (AG) field lattices. Numerical calculation results show the only 2% difference of the emittance growth between the cases with and without field error in the CF lattice. In the case of the AG lattice model with the field error of 10%, the emittance growth of 2.4 times is estimated, and the major difference between the CF and AG models is indicated from the numerical simulations. (author)

  17. The effect of initial microstructure on the final properties of press hardened 22MnB5 steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvinen, Henri, E-mail: henri.jarvinen@tut.fi [Department of Materials Science, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Isakov, Matti; Nyyssönen, Tuomo [Department of Materials Science, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Järvenpää, Martti [SSAB Europe Oy, Harvialantie 420, FI-13300 Hämeenlinna (Finland); Peura, Pasi [Department of Materials Science, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-10-31

    This paper addresses the relationship between initial microstructure and final properties of press hardened 22MnB5 steels. Four commercial 22MnB5 steels having different initial microstructures were investigated. An experimental press hardening equipment with a flat-die was used to investigate material behavior in the direct press hardening process. Two austenitizing treatments, 450 s and 180 s at 900 °C, were examined. Microstructural characterization with optical and scanning electron microscopes revealed a mixture of martensite and auto-tempered martensite after press hardening. Electron backscatter diffraction data of the transformed martensite was used to reconstruct grain boundary maps of parent austenite. Grain sizes of parent austenite (mean linear intercept) were measured for each material. In addition to microstructural evaluation, quasistatic and high strain rate tensile tests at strain rates of 5×10{sup −4} s{sup −1} and 400 s{sup −1}, respectively, were performed for press hardened samples. The results show that strength and uniform elongation depend on the initial microstructure of the 22MnB5 steel, when parameters typical to the direct press hardening process are used. Parent austenite grain size was shown to influence the morphology of the transformed martensite, which in turn affects the strength and uniform elongation after press hardening. The tensile properties of the press hardened materials are almost strain rate independent in the studied strain rate range. The obtained results can be used to optimize the properties of 22MnB5 steels in the direct press hardening process. In addition, the here revealed connection between the parent austenite grain size and final steel properties should be taken into account in the development of new press hardening steel grades for automotive industry.

  18. The effect of initial microstructure on the final properties of press hardened 22MnB5 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Järvinen, Henri; Isakov, Matti; Nyyssönen, Tuomo; Järvenpää, Martti; Peura, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between initial microstructure and final properties of press hardened 22MnB5 steels. Four commercial 22MnB5 steels having different initial microstructures were investigated. An experimental press hardening equipment with a flat-die was used to investigate material behavior in the direct press hardening process. Two austenitizing treatments, 450 s and 180 s at 900 °C, were examined. Microstructural characterization with optical and scanning electron microscopes revealed a mixture of martensite and auto-tempered martensite after press hardening. Electron backscatter diffraction data of the transformed martensite was used to reconstruct grain boundary maps of parent austenite. Grain sizes of parent austenite (mean linear intercept) were measured for each material. In addition to microstructural evaluation, quasistatic and high strain rate tensile tests at strain rates of 5×10 −4 s −1 and 400 s −1 , respectively, were performed for press hardened samples. The results show that strength and uniform elongation depend on the initial microstructure of the 22MnB5 steel, when parameters typical to the direct press hardening process are used. Parent austenite grain size was shown to influence the morphology of the transformed martensite, which in turn affects the strength and uniform elongation after press hardening. The tensile properties of the press hardened materials are almost strain rate independent in the studied strain rate range. The obtained results can be used to optimize the properties of 22MnB5 steels in the direct press hardening process. In addition, the here revealed connection between the parent austenite grain size and final steel properties should be taken into account in the development of new press hardening steel grades for automotive industry.

  19. Deep inelastic final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardi, G.

    1980-11-01

    In these lectures we attempt to describe the final states of deep inelastic scattering as given by QCD. In the first section we shall briefly comment on the parton model and give the main properties of decay functions which are of interest for the study of semi-inclusive leptoproduction. The second section is devoted to the QCD approach to single hadron leptoproduction. First we recall basic facts on QCD log's and derive after that the evolution equations for the fragmentation functions. For this purpose we make a short detour in e + e - annihilation. The rest of the section is a study of the factorization of long distance effects associated with the initial and final states. We then show how when one includes next to leading QCD corrections one induces factorization breaking and describe the double moments useful for testing such effects. The next section contains a review on the QCD jets in the hadronic final state. We begin by introducing the notion of infrared safe variable and defining a few useful examples. Distributions in these variables are studied to first order in QCD, with some comments on the resummation of logs encountered in higher orders. Finally the last section is a 'gaullimaufry' of jet studies

  20. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date; reopening of administrative record. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule; delay of effective date; reopening of administrative record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-03

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is delaying until October 1, 2001, the effective date and reopening the administrative record to receive additional comments regarding certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). The other provisions of the final rule become effective on December 4, 2000. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA) and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). FDA is delaying the effective date for certain requirements relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record. FDA is also delaying the effective date of another requirement that would prohibit blood centers functioning as "health care entities" to act as wholesale distributors of blood derivatives. The agency is taking this action to address numerous concerns about the provisions raised by affected parties.

  1. Implications of Declining Enrolment for the Schools of Ontario. A Statement of Effects and Solutions. Final Report. [Incidences de la Baisse des Effectifs Scolaires sur les Ecoles de l'Ontario. Problemes et Solutions. Rapport Final].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. W. B.

    In this final report concerning declining enrollments in Ontario, the problems are defined almost entirely in economic and financial terms, and the solutions expressed in those terms. The first section of the report briefly reviews the essential background, the economic and financial constraints, and finally the demographic facts. The arguments…

  2. Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semancik, S.; Cavicchi, R. E.; DeVoe, D. L.; McAvoy, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    This Final Report describes efforts and results for a 3-year DoE/OST-EMSP project centered at NIST. The multidisciplinary project investigated scientific and technical concepts critical for developing tunable, MEMS-based, gas and vapor microsensors that could be applied for monitoring the types of multiple analytes (and differing backgrounds) encountered at DoE waste sites. Micromachined ''microhotplate'' arrays were used as platforms for fabricating conductometric sensor prototypes, and as microscale research tools. Efficient microarray techniques were developed for locally depositing and then performance evaluating thin oxide films, in order to correlate gas sensing characteristics with properties including composition, microstructure, thickness and surface modification. This approach produced temperature-dependent databases on the sensitivities of sensing materials to varied analytes (in air) which enable application-specific tuning of microsensor arrays. Mechanistic studies on adsorb ate transient phenomena were conducted to better understand the ways in which rapid temperature programming schedules can be used to produce unique response signatures and increase information density in microsensor signals. Chemometric and neural network analyses were also employed in our studies for recognition and quantification of target analytes

  3. Assessment of the effects of microbially influenced degradation on a massive concrete structure. Final report, Report 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    There is a need to estimate the effect of environmental conditions on construction materials to be used in the repository at Yucca Mountain. Previous reports from this project have demonstrated that it is important to develop an understanding of microbially influenced degradation (MID) development and its influence on massive concrete structures. Further, it has been shown that the most effective way to obtain quantitative data on the effects of MID on the structural integrity of repository concrete is to study manmade, analog structures known to be susceptible to MID. The cooling tower shell located at the Ohaaki Power Station near Wairakei, New Zealand is such a structure

  4. Regulatory Review: Delay of Effective Dates of Final Rules Subject to the Administration's January 20, 2001, Memorandum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rezendes, Victor

    2002-01-01

    ... taken effect.Citing the desire to ensure that the President s appointees have the opportunity to review any new or pending regulations, on January 20,,2001,Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff...

  5. Effects of bromacil, diuron, glyphosate, and sulfometuron-methyl on periphyton assemblages and rainbow trout : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This study documents the testing of several common herbicides used by the Oregon Department of Transportation in vegetation management. The project assessed the short- and long-term effects of Roundup, Krovar and Oust on periphyton and rainbow trout....

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation upon natural populations and ecosystems. Final report. [Ecological perspectives in land use planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Accomplishments throughout a 10-year period summarized include: a study of the effects of radiation from a ..gamma.. source on the ecology of the El Verde rain forest in Puerto Rico, with emphasis on the role of secondary succession in the recovery of forest ecosystems following irradiation; the effects of light and temperature on gaseous exchange in trees using /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ as a tracer in Palcourea; the nature of the sensitivity of pine trees to ionizing radiation and the possible synergistic effects of elevated ozone levels on radiosensitivity; the combined effects of radioactive and thermal effluents on plant communities of a swamp hardwood forest; and the development of a new conceptual approach to the evaluation of environmental quality, with emphasis on ecological perspectives in land use planning. (CH)

  7. JCCRER Project 2.3 -- Deterministic effects of occupational exposure to radiation. Phase 1: Feasibility study; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okladnikova, N.; Pesternikova, V.; Sumina, M. [Inst. of Biophysics, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Phase 1 of Project 2.3, a short-term collaborative Feasibility Study, was funded for 12 months starting on 1 February 1996. The overall aim of the study was to determine the practical feasibility of using the dosimetric and clinical data on the MAYAK worker population to study the deterministic effects of exposure to external gamma radiation and to internal alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium. Phase 1 efforts were limited to the period of greatest worker exposure (1948--1954) and focused on collaboratively: assessing the comprehensiveness, availability, quality, and suitability of the Russian clinical and dosimetric data for the study of deterministic effects; creating an electronic data base containing complete clinical and dosimetric data on a small, representative sample of MAYAK workers; developing computer software for the testing of a currently used health risk model of hematopoietic effects; and familiarizing the US team with the Russian diagnostic criteria and techniques used in the identification of Chronic Radiation Sickness.

  8. JCCRER Project 2.3 - Deterministic effects of occupational exposure to radiation. Phase 1: Feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okladnikova, N.; Pesternikova, V.; Sumina, M.

    1998-01-01

    Phase 1 of Project 2.3, a short-term collaborative Feasibility Study, was funded for 12 months starting on 1 February 1996. The overall aim of the study was to determine the practical feasibility of using the dosimetric and clinical data on the MAYAK worker population to study the deterministic effects of exposure to external gamma radiation and to internal alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium. Phase 1 efforts were limited to the period of greatest worker exposure (1948--1954) and focused on collaboratively: assessing the comprehensiveness, availability, quality, and suitability of the Russian clinical and dosimetric data for the study of deterministic effects; creating an electronic data base containing complete clinical and dosimetric data on a small, representative sample of MAYAK workers; developing computer software for the testing of a currently used health risk model of hematopoietic effects; and familiarizing the US team with the Russian diagnostic criteria and techniques used in the identification of Chronic Radiation Sickness

  9. Competitiveness effects of environmental tax reforms (COMETR). Final report to the European Commission, DG Research and DG TAXUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skou Andersen, M.; Speck, S. (Univ. of Aarhus, National Environmental Research Institute, Dept. of Policy Analysis (Denmark)); Barker, T.; Junankar, S.; Pollitt, H. (Cambridge Econometrics (United Kingdom)); Fitz Gerald, J.; Scott, S. (Economic and Social Research Institute (Ireland)); Jilkova, J. (Univ. of Economics Prague, Institute for Economic and Environmental Policy (Czech Republic)); Salmons, R.; Ekins, P. (Policy Studies Institute (United Kingdom)); Christie, E.; Michael Landesmann, M. (Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (Austria))

    2007-12-15

    COMETR provides an ex-post assessment of experiences and competitiveness impacts of using carbon-energy taxes as an instrument of an Environmental Tax Reform (ETR), which shifts the tax burden and helps reduce the carbon emissions that cause global warming. COMETR: reviews the experience in ETR in seven EU Member States (Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Finland, Slovenia, Sweden and UK); analyses world market conditions for a set of energy-intensive sectors, as a framework for considering competitiveness effects; analyses the effects of ETR on sector-specific energy usage and carbon emissions in Member States with carbon-energy taxes introduced on industry; presents a macroeconomic analysis of the competitiveness effects of ETR for individual Member States as well as for the EU as a whole; provides ex-post figures for environmental decoupling and assesses carbon leakage; reviews mitigation and compensation mechanisms for energy-intensive industries. (au)

  10. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 24. Visibility: Existing and historical conditions - causes and effects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trijonis, J.C.; Malm, W.C.; Pitchford, M.; White, W.H.; Charlson, R.

    1990-10-01

    One of the important effects associated with acid precipitation related pollutants is interference with radiation transfer (light transmission) in the atmosphere. An obvious result of such interference is visibility degradation--the impairment of atmospheric clarity or of the ability to perceive form, texture, and color. Climate modification constitutes another, somewhat less obvious, result. The purpose of the NAPAP State of Science/Technology report is to summarize current knowledge regarding these radiation transfer effects. Although the report focuses mainly on visibility issues, it does encompass the emerging field of climate modification. The links between the acid rain problem and radiation transfer effects, although indirect, are quite strong. The principal link is through sulfur dioxide emissions and sulfate aerosols. A secondary link occurs through nitrogen oxide emissions

  11. ASA conference on radiation and health: Health effects of electric and magnetic fields: Statistical support for research strategies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    This report is a collection of papers documenting presentations made at the VIII ASA (American Statistical Association) Conference on Radiation and Health entitled Health Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields: Statistical Support for Research Strategies. Individual papers are abstracted and indexed for the database.

  12. THE EFFECTS ON LEARNING FROM A MOTION PICTURE FILM OF SELECTIVE CHANGES IN SOUND TRACK LOUDNESS LEVEL. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOAKLEY, FRANCIS X.

    EFFECTS OF PERIODIC VARIATIONS IN AN INSTRUCTIONAL FILM'S NORMAL LOUDNESS LEVEL FOR RELEVANT AND IRRELEVANT FILM SEQUENCES WERE MEASURED BY A MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST. RIGOROUS PILOT STUDIES, RANDOM GROUPING OF SEVENTH GRADERS FOR TREATMENTS, AND RATINGS OF RELEVANT AND IRRELEVANT PORTIONS OF THE FILM BY AN UNSPECIFIED NUMBER OF JUDGES PRECEDED THE…

  13. Effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on residential property values and sales. Final report, April 1980-January 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, H.B.; Downing, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The study examined the effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on residential property values and number of sales within a 25-mile radius of the plant. Regression analyses, using data on 583 actual market sales of single family homes from 1977 through 1979, examined the effects before and after the accident on the basis of distance and direction from the plant and on three different property value classes. All valid single family property sales between 1975 and 1979 within the 25-mile area were examined in a time series analysis. Interviews were conducted with realtors, financial institution officials and building contractors in the area. The accident had no measurable effects, positive or negative, on the value of single family residential properties within a 25-mile radius of the plant, or in any direction from the plant, or on low, medium, or high value properties. The plant had no measurable effects on residential property values for the 2 years prior to the accident. Immediately following the accident there was a sharp decline in the number of residential sales within 10 miles of the plant, but the real estate market returned to near normal conditions within 4-8 weeks. The interviews basically confirmed the above findings

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of public education and incentive programs for controlling radon in the home. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierma, T.J.; Swartzman, D.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness in Illinois of five radon public education and incentive program options. Programs evaluated included (1) no program, (2) a toll-free hotline and information packet, (3) free short-term monitors, (4) free confirmatory monitors, and (5) low-interest loans. Existing literature and expert opinion were used to estimate program costs and public responses under the various programs. Computer simulation, with Monte Carlo sampling, was used for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. The cost-effectiveness model was analyzed based on assumed radon exposures to Illinois citizens. Results for standard conditions indicate that budget levels under approximately $30,000 do not warrant a radon education and incentive program. For budget levels of approximately $30,000 to $1 million, Program 2 was most effective, and Program 3 was most effective above this level. Sensitivity analyses indicate the results are relatively insensitive to input variable assumptions with the exception of public-response estimates. Study results suggest that all of the programs evaluated are likely to be relatively ineffective. Considerable improvement may be possible using more innovative approaches to public education

  15. Final report on impact of catchment scale processes and climate change on cause-effect and recovery-chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonschot, P.F.M.; Keizer-Vlek, H.E.; Spears, B.; Brucet, S.; Johnson, R.; Feld, C.; Kernan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Catchment wide integrated basin management requires knowledge on cause-effect and recovery chains within water bodies as well as on the interactions between water bodies and categories. In the WISER WP6.4 recovery processes in rivers, lakes and estuarine and coastal waters were evaluated. The major

  16. A Conceptual Framework for the Mission of the NIE Research and Development Center for Teacher Quality and Effectiveness: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.; And Others

    This report presents a conceptual framework for the mission of the National Institute of Education (NIE) Research and Development Center for Teacher Quality and Effectiveness. Several important issues that should be the focus of the Center are identified, and the theoretical foundations to guide the research and development activities to study…

  17. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

    2013-10-18

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing

  18. Effect of ceramic thickness and cement shade on the final shade after bonding using the 3D master system: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Javier; Gómez-Polo, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The final color of a ceramic restoration is influenced by both the ceramic thickness and the cement shade. This study aims to evaluate the color stability according to the 3D Master System of e.max ceramic discs after bonding with different shades of luting agents. A total of 120 e.max.Press 2M1 HT ceramic discs (60 discs of 1-mm thick and 60 discs of 0.5 mm thick) and three different values of Variolink Veneer cement were used (-3, 0, +3) for the cementation process. An Easyshade compact device was used to measure color shade tabs, according to the 3D Master System, on the discs both before and after the cementation protocols. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out with the spss v.21. After bonding with the different luting agents, only 30% remained as 2M1: specifically, 22% of the thinner discs and 37.3% of the thicker discs. In general, the effect of bonding increased the value and the chroma of the shade to a significant extent. Regression analyses revealed that the most significant predictor for all color parameters was cement shade, the thinner disc group bonded with -3 cement being the most unstable subgroup. According to the 3D Master System, the shade of the luting agent was the main predictor of the final color. However, the final color seems to be somewhat unpredictable, at least according to the modulating factors evaluated in the present study.

  19. Effects of x-irradiation on steroid biotransformations by testicular tissue. Final report, May 1, 1966--July 31, 1976. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, L.C.

    1976-08-01

    A number of parameters of testicular and body function were investigated after various dosages of x-irradiation to ascertain: what relationship they have to the radiation syndrome and testicular repression and regeneration of the rat; and how sensitive these parameters are to radiation. Changes in androgen synthesis were not well correlated with either body or gonad weights, hematocrit values or testicular histology. Lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, metabolism of testosterone, prostaglandins, cyclic nucleotides and serotonin metabolism were all related to the direct effects of radiation on the male gonad. Indirect effects on the testis appear to be mediated by serotonin and the pineal gland. The pineal gland appeared to be responsible for variations in androgen synthesis and radiosensitivity of the testis through its secretory products-melatonin and arginine vasopressin. These compounds have the capacity of inducing endocrine rhythms by affecting: the hypothalamus-pituitary axis; the liver; and/or the gonad directly.

  20. Effects of tuff waste package components on release from 76-68 simulated waste glass: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVay, G.L.; Robinson, G.R.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental matrix has been conducted that will allow evaluation of the effects of waste package constituents on the waste form release behavior in a tuff repository environment. Tuff rock and groundwater were used along with 304L, 316, and 1020M ferrous metals to evaluate release from uranium-doped MCC 76-68 simulated waste glass. One of the major findings was that in the absence of 1020M mild steel, tuff rock powder dominates the system. However, when 1020M mild steel is present, it appears to dominate the system. The rock-dominated system results in suppressed glass-water reaction and leaching while the 1020M-dominated system results in enhanced leaching - but the metal effectively scavenges uranium from solution. The 300-series stainless steels play no significant role in affecting glass leaching characteristics. 6 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Effects of x-irradiation on steroid biotransformations by testicular tissue. Final report, May 1, 1966--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, L.C.

    1976-08-01

    A number of parameters of testicular and body function were investigated after various dosages of x-irradiation to ascertain: what relationship they have to the radiation syndrome and testicular repression and regeneration of the rat; and how sensitive these parameters are to radiation. Changes in androgen synthesis were not well correlated with either body or gonad weights, hematocrit values or testicular histology. Lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, metabolism of testosterone, prostaglandins, cyclic nucleotides and serotonin metabolism were all related to the direct effects of radiation on the male gonad. Indirect effects on the testis appear to be mediated by serotonin and the pineal gland. The pineal gland appeared to be responsible for variations in androgen synthesis and radiosensitivity of the testis through its secretory products-melatonin and arginine vasopressin. These compounds have the capacity of inducing endocrine rhythms by affecting: the hypothalamus-pituitary axis; the liver; and/or the gonad directly

  2. Theoretical studies of multistep processes, isospin effects in nuclear scattering, and meson and baryon interactions in nuclear physics. Final technical report, 1 September 1979-30 April 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, V.A.; Landau, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Final technical report on a contract supporting theoretical studies in nuclear physics at Oregon State University is presented. The research was led by Professors Landau and Madsen and carried out in collaboration with graduate students in Corvallis and scientists at LLNL-Livermore, KFA-Julich, Purdue University-West Lafayette, University of Oregon-Eugene, Florida State University-Talahasie, and TRIUMF-Vancouver. The studies included meson exchange current effects, quark effects,and relativistic/Dirac effects deduced from spin observables in p- 3 He scattering, coupled bound and continuum eigenstates in momentum space for kaons and antiprotons, and charge symmetry violation in π scattering from trinucleons. Additional studies included microscopic optical potential calculations, multiple step processes, and differences in neutron and proton multipole matrix elements in low lying collective states and in giant resonances. 45 refs

  3. Criteria and methods for estimating external effective dose equivalent from personnel monitoring results: EDE implementation guide. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.

    1998-09-01

    Title 10 Part 20 of the Code of Federal regulations requires that nuclear power plant licensees evaluate worker radiation exposure using a risk-based methodology termed the effective dose equivalent (EDE). EDE is a measure of radiation exposure that represents an individual's risk of stochastic injury from their exposure. EPRI has conducted research into how photons interact with the body. These results have been coupled with information on how the body's organs differ in their susceptibility to radiation injury, to produce a methodology for assessing the effective dose equivalent. The research and the resultant methodology have been described in numerous technical reports, scientific journal articles, and technical meetings. EPRI is working with the Nuclear Energy Institute to have the EPRI effective dose equivalent methodology accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for use at US nuclear power plants. In order to further familiarize power plant personnel with the methodology, this report summarizes the EDE research and presents some simple guidelines for its implementing the methodology

  4. Protective effects of Morus alba leaves extract on ocular functions of pups from diabetic and hypercholesterolemic mother rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayyad, H I H; El-Sherbiny, M A; Sobh, M A; Abou-El-Naga, A M; Ibrahim, M A N; Mousa, S A

    2011-01-01

    Phytotherapy is frequently considered to be less toxic and free from side effects than synthetic drugs. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the protective use of crude water extract of Morus alba leaves on ocular functions including cataractogenesis, biochemical diabetic and hypercholesterolemic markers, retinal neurotransmitters and retinopathy of rat pups maternally subjected to either diabetes and/or hypercholesterolemia. Application of crude water extract of Morus alba resulted in amelioration of the alterations of maternal serum glucose, LDL, HDL, total cholesterol and creatine phosphokinase activity as well as retinal neurotransmitters including acetylcholine (ACE), adrenaline (AD), nor-adrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), histamine (HS), dopamine (DA) and gamma amino butyric acid (GABA). The retina of pups of either diabetic and/or hypercholesterolemia mothers exhibited massive alterations of retinal neurotransmitters. The alterations of retinal neurotransmitters were correlated with the observed pathological alterations of retinal pigmented epithelium, photoreceptor inner segment and ganglion cells and increased incidence of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis cell death. However, protection with Morus alba extract led to amelioration of the pathological alterations of retinal neurons and estimated neurotransmitters. Furthermore, a striking incidence of cataract was detected in pups of either diabetic and/or hypercholesterolemic mothers. Highest cataractogenesis was observed in pups of combined -treated groups. Our data indicate that experimental maternal diabetes alone or in combination with hypercholesterolemia led to alteration in the ocular structures of their pups, with an increasing incidence of cataract and retinopathy, and the effects of the extract might be attributed to the hypoglycaemic, antihypercholesterolemic and anti-oxidative potential of flavonoids, the major components of the plant extract.

  5. [Towards computer-aided catalyst design: Three effective core potential studies of C-H activation]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Research in the initial grant period focused on computational studies relevant to the selective activation of methane, the prime component of natural gas. Reaction coordinates for methane activation by experimental models were delineated, as well as the bonding and structure of complexes that effect this important reaction. This research, highlighted in the following sections, also provided the impetus for further development, and application of methods for modeling metal-containing catalysts. Sections of the report describe the following: methane activation by multiple-bonded transition metal complexes; computational lanthanide chemistry; and methane activation by non-imido, multiple-bonded ligands.

  6. Design, building and test of one prototype and four final position sensor assemblies: Hall effect position sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    This report covers the development of a three channel Hall effect position sensing system for the commutation of a three phase dc torquer motor. The effort consisted of the evaluation, modification and re-packaging of a commercial position sensor and the design of a target configuration unique to this application. The resulting design meets the contract requirements and, furthermore, the test results indicate not only the practicality and versatility of the design, but also that there may be higher limits of resolution and accuracy achievable.

  7. Localized corrosion of metallic materials and γ radiation effects in passive layers under simulated radwaste repository conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.W.; Kudelka, S.; Michaelis, A.; Schweinsberg, M.; Thies, A.

    1996-02-01

    The task of the project was to simulate the conditions in a radwaste repository and to perform local analyses in order to detect the critical conditions and material susceptibilities leading to localized corrosion of materials. The information thus obtained was to yield more precise data on the long-term stability of materials for the intended purpose, in order to be able to appropriately select or optimize the materials (Ti, TiO.2Pd, Hastelloy C4, fine-grained structural steel). A major aspect to be examined was natural inhomogeneities of the electrode surfaces, as determined by the grain structure of the selected materials. Thus a laterally inhomogeneous composition in the welded zone induces an inhomogeneous current distribution, and hence strong susceptibility to localized corrosion. This effect was to be quantified, and the localized corrosion processes had to be identified by means of novel, electrochemical methods with a resolution power of μm. The investigations were to be made under conditions as near to practice as possible, for instance by simulating radwaste repository conditions and performing measurements at elevated temperatures (170 C) in an autoclave. Another task was to examine the radiation effects of γ radiation on passive layers, and describe the possible modifications induced by recrystallisation, photocorrosion, or oxide formation. (orig./MM) [de

  8. Ab initio Based Modeling of Radiation Effects in Multi-Component Alloys: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane Morgan

    2010-06-10

    The project began March 13, 2006, allocated for three years, and received a one year extension from March 13, 2009 to March 12, 2010. It has now completed 48 of 48 total months. The project was focused on using ab initio methods to gain insights into radiation induced segregation (RIS) in Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. The project had the following key accomplishments • Development of a large database of ab initio energetics that can be used by many researchers in the future for increased understanding of this system. For example, we have the first calculations showing a dramatic stabilization effect of Cr-Cr interstitial dumbbells in Ni. • Prediction of both vacancy and interstitial diffusion constants for Ni-Cr and Ni-Fe for dilute Cr and Fe. This work included generalization of widely used multifrequency models to make use of ab initio derived energetics and thermodynamics. • Prediction of qualitative trends of RIS from vacancy and interstitial mechanisms, suggesting the two types of defect fluxes drive Cr RIS in opposite directions. • Detailed kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of diffusion by vacancy mechanism in Ni-Cr as a function of Cr concentration. The results demonstrate that Cr content can have a significant effect on RIS. • Development of a quantitative RIS transport model, including models for thermodynamic factors and boundary conditions.

  9. Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems (EPORA). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suomela, M.; Rahola, T.; Bergman, R.; Bunzl, K.; Jaakkola, T.

    1999-08-01

    The project EPORA 'Effects of Industrial Pollution on Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems' is a part of the Nuclear Fission Safety Research programme of the European Union. A suitable environment for the study was found in the surroundings of the Cu-Ni smelter in Monchegorsk, in NW Russia where the huge atmospheric emissions from the smelter have polluted the environment since the 1930's. Samples of soil, litter, plants and runoff water were taken. Total concentrations of the main pollutants, Ni and Cu, in the organic soil increased from about 10 mg kg -1 at the reference site in Finland to about 5000 mg kg -1 at the most polluted site in Russia. Similar trends were observed for exchangeable fractions and plant concentrations of the same elements. Concentrations of exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg in the organic soil decreased strongly with increased input of chemical pollutants. The radionuclides studied were 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 239+240 Pu, mainly originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The contribution of the Chernobyl derived 137 Cs deposition was about 10% but insignificant for the other nuclides. The activity distribution of all three radionuclides in the soil, their corresponding residence half-times as well as their aggregated trencher factors for various plants depended on the degree of pollution: Activity distribution: in the litter layer, the activity of all three radionuclides increased continually from the reference site to the most polluted site. This effect was most pronounced for 239+240 Pu and least for 90 Sr and could, at least partly, be explained by the increase of the thickness of this layer. In the root zone, the opposite effect was observed: the largest fraction of all radionuclides was found at the reference site. In the organic layer, the exchangeable fractions of 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 239+240 Pu decreased with increasing pollution. Residence half-times: in the root zone, the residence half-times of 90

  10. Effectiveness of four different final irrigation activation techniques on smear layer removal in curved root canals : a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Ahuja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of apical negative pressure (ANP, manual dynamic agitation (MDA, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI and needle irrigation (NI as final irrigation activation techniques for smear layer removal in curved root canals.Mesiobuccal root canals of 80 freshly extracted maxillary first molars with curvatures ranging between 25° and 35° were used. A glide path with #08-15 K files was established before cleaning and shaping with Mtwo rotary instruments (VDW, Munich, Germany up to size 35/0.04 taper. During instrumentation, 1 ml of 2.5% NaOCl was used at each change of file. Samples were divided into 4 equal groups (n=20 according to the final irrigation activation technique: group 1, apical negative pressure (ANP (EndoVac; group 2, manual dynamic agitation (MDA; group 3, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI; and group 4, needle irrigation (NI. Root canals were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer at coronal, middle and apical levels was evaluated by superimposing 300-μm square grid over the obtained photomicrographs using a four-score scale with X1,000 magnification.Amongst all the groups tested, ANP showed the overall best smear layer removal efficacy (p < 0.05. Removal of smear layer was least effective with the NI technique.ANP (EndoVac system can be used as the final irrigation activation technique for effective smear layer removal in curved root canals.

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation and sodium hydroxide of cell wall constituents and digestibility energy of some agricultural residues. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    The effect of various doses of gamma irradiation (0,100,150,200 KGy) and different concentrations of sodium hydroxide on crude fibre (CF), Cell-wall constituents (NDF, ADF, ADL), in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD), gross energy (GE), in vitro digestible energy (IVDE) of wheat straw (W.S) cotton seed shall (C.S.S), peanut shell (P.S), soybean shell (SB.S), extracted olive cake (O.C.E) and extracted sunflower of unpeeled seeds (S.U.E) were investigated. Results indicated that HaOH in the concentrations at (4 and 6%) had significant effects on the CF content of W.S and P.S, E.U.E, SB.S, C.S.S, O.C.E; respectively. Treating S.U.E, W.S and all other residues with NaoH (2,4 and 6%) respectively, decreased the NDF level. Irradiation dose of 200 KGy decreased CF for all residues, and it reduced the NDF for S.U.E and SB.S. However, lower irradiation dose (150 KGy) was good enough to reduce the NDF for W.S, C.S.S, P.S and O.C.E. Combined treatment resulted in better effects in reducing the concentrations of the cell-wall constituents. The digestible energy values (kJ/Kg DM) increased by 1120,1 220, 2110 (W.S); 620, 830, 1000 for P.S; 240, 500, 580 for O.C.E; 500, 850, 870 for S.U.E; 550, 1060, 1200 for SB.S and 1260, 1710, 2070 for C.S.S using 100, 150, 200, KGy respectively, in comparison to unirradiated controls. Also, the IVDE values (Kj/Kg DM) increased by 560, 1050, 1590 for W.S; 310, 460, 650 for P.S; 170, 760, 1530 for C.S.S; 450, 990, 1190 for O.C.E using 2%, 4%, 6% NaOH respectively, in comparison to controls. No changes in the IVDE values for S.U.E and SB.S. Combined treatment resulted in an even better increase in the digestible energy, except S.U.E and SB.S. (Author). 37 refs., 22 tabs., 18 figs

  12. Final report for project "Effects of Low-Dose Irradiation on NFkB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, Gayle E [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Grdina, David [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Li, Jian-Jian [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Low dose ionizing radiation effects are difficult to study in human population because of the numerous confounding factors such as genetic and lifestyle differences. Research in mammalian model systems and in vitro is generally used in order to overcome this difficulty. In this program project three projects have joined together to investigate effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. These are doses at and below 10 cGy of low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation such as X-ray and gamma rays. This project was focused on cellular signaling associated with nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) and mitochondria - subcellular organelles critical for cell aging and aging-like changes induced by ionizing radiation. In addition to cells in culture this project utilized animal tissues accumulated in a radiation biology tissue archive housed at Northwestern University (http://janus.northwestern.edu/janus2/index.php). Major trust of Project 1 was to gather all of the DoE sponsored irradiated animal (mouse, rat and dog) data and tissues under one roof and investigate mitochondrial DNA changes and micro RNA changes in these samples. Through comparison of different samples we were trying to delineate mitochondrial DNA quantity alterations and micro RNA expression differences associated with different doses and dose rates of radiation. Historic animal irradiation experiments sponsored by DoE were done in several national laboratories and universities between 1950’s and 1990’s; while these experiments were closed data and tissues were released to Project 1. Project 2 used cells in culture to investigate effects that low doses or radiation have on NFκB and its target genes manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and genes involved in cell cycle: Cyclins (B1 and D1) and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Project 3 used cells in culture such as “normal” human cells (breast epithelial cell line MCF10A cells and skin keratinocyte cells HK18) and mouse embryo fibroblast (mef

  13. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  14. Final accepted paper. Effects of turbulence near a free surface on the dynamics of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Ken; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on the dynamics of three-dimensional dam break flow is numerically investigated based on the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) equations with the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) function. It is found that the tip velocity over the ground and the impact pressure against the vertical wall in the Launder- Gibson (LG) model are in good agreement with experimental results. The dynamics of the dam break flow is subject to the viscous dissipation during the collapse of the flow, which is underestimated in the laminar model and overestimated in the realizable k - ε (RKE) model. The turbulent viscous dissipation near the free surface is comparable to that inside the water in the LG model. (author)

  15. Assessment of the economic effects of financial incentives benefitting certain plants for renewable energy utilisation in Germany. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    On account of their low sales figures, technologies for renewable energy utilisation are still rather expensive. A more decided support for their introduction to the market could boost the development in this field. The offer submitted by Fichtner Development Engineering on 21.04.1992 served as a basis for the commission by the Federal Minister for Economic Affairs. It comprised the following individual tasks; drawing up of a list of plants to be promoted; elaboration, assessment, and selection of suitable promotion mechanisms; elaboration of cause-and-effect relationships for estimating stimulus strength; principal executive questions; increase in number of plants sold and cost of promotion. The present report deals with these points. (orig./UA) [de

  16. Influence of late radiation effects on the immunological parameters of aging. Final technical report, September 1977-August 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makinodan, T.

    1983-01-01

    A series of tests of immunologic function were used in assessing the immune status of individuals who survived the atomic bombs in Japan in 1945. A-bomb survivors (n=189) residing in the US were recruited to participate in the study. Survivors exposed to varying low doses of radiation (S/sub +/ group) had healthier immune responses than those exposed to O rads (S 0 group). The difference was significant for natural cytotoxicity (p = .028). Less striking differences with the same trend (i.e., S/sub +/ healthier than S 0 ) were observed with: the mixed lymphocyte reactions, mitogenic response to PHA, interferon production, serum interferon levels (all S/sub +/ > S 0 ), frequency of detectable immune complexes, rheumatoid factor, and antimitochondrial antibodies (all S/sub +/ > S 0 ). In order to study the Japanese A-bomb survivors, a collaborative study was initiated with the Radiation Research Effects Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan. Immunologic tests were performed on blood samples from 278 individuals including 202 survivors of whom approximately one-third each were exposed to 0, 1-99, and 100+ rads at the time of the bomb. A decrease in immune responses was observed with increasing exposure. It is interesting that, consistent with our findings on the American survivors, the Japanese survivors exposed to 1-9 rads showed a small increase in natural cytotoxicity compared to the group exposed to 0 rads. Females showed a stronger dose-related decline than males (who may have shown a slight increase) with natural cytotoxicity, and both groups showed a small effect with interleukin 2 production. With both tests males were higher than females. Natural cytotoxicity increased significantly with age, as did serum immune complex levels. In the pilot study of the murine model for plasmacytoma formation, it was shown that age and radiation may both predispose to plasmacytoma formation. 22 references, 5 tables

  17. Effect of Video Triggering During Conventional Lectures on Final Grades of Dental Students in an Oral Biology Course: A Two-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Imran; Al-Jandan, Badr A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the inclusion of video triggers in conventional face-to-face lectures on the final grades of dental students in an oral biology course. The study consisted of two groups of students taking the course in two academic years at a dental school in Saudi Arabia: group 1, 2013-14 (control); and group 2, 2014-15. The total sample comprised 163 students (n=163; group 1: 71 and group 2: 92). Group 1 received lectures without any videos, whereas group 2 received lectures that included two to three videos of one to five minutes in duration with triggering effect (a video was shown every 10-15 minutes into the lecture). The final examination grades of the students were accessed retrospectively, and the data were compared with a chi-square test. The results confirmed that a higher number of students who received video triggering during lectures (group 2) performed better than their counterparts who did not receive video triggers (group 1); the difference was statistically significant (pvideo triggers may offer an advantage over conventional methods and their inclusion in lectures can be a way to enhance students' learning.

  18. Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems (EPORA). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suomela, M.; Rahola, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Bergman, R. [National Defence Research Establishment (Sweden); Bunzl, K. [National Research Center for Environmental and Health (Germany); Jaakkola, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Radiochemical Lab.; Steinnes, E. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)

    1999-08-01

    The project EPORA 'Effects of Industrial Pollution on Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems' is a part of the Nuclear Fission Safety Research programme of the European Union. A suitable environment for the study was found in the surroundings of the Cu-Ni smelter in Monchegorsk, in NW Russia where the huge atmospheric emissions from the smelter have polluted the environment since the 1930's. Samples of soil, litter, plants and runoff water were taken. Total concentrations of the mainpollutants, Ni and Cu, in the organic soil increased from about 10 mg kg{sup -1} at the reference site in Finland to about 5000 mg kg{sup -1} at the most polluted site in Russia. Similar trends were observed for exchangeable fractions and plant concentrations of the same elements. Concentrations of exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg in the organic soil decreased strongly with increased input of chemical pollutants. The radionuclides studied were {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu, mainly originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The contribution of the Chernobyl derived {sup 137}Cs deposition was about 10% but insignificant for the other nuclides. The activity distribution of all three radionuclides in the soil, their corresponding residence half-times as well as their aggregated trencher factors for various plants depended on the degree of pollution: Activity distribution: in the litter layer, the activity of all three radionuclides increased continually from the reference site to the most polluted site. This effect was most pronounced for {sup 239+240}Pu and least for {sup 90}Sr and could, at least partly, be explained by the increase of the thickness of this layer. In the root zone, the opposite effect was observed: the largest fraction of all radionuclides was found at the reference site. In the organic layer, the exchangeable fractions of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu decreased with increasing pollution

  19. Environmental effects of ash recycling on the incidence of 137Cs in vegetation and soil. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegbom, Lars; Nohrstedt, Hans-Oerjan

    2000-08-01

    Recycling of wood-ash from combustion of bio-fuel could in the future become a common practice in Swedish forestry. As a consequence of the Chernobyl radioactive fallout in 1986 large areas in central Sweden became contaminated. There is a risk that addition of wood-ash originating from these contaminated areas will increase the activity of 137 Cs in a forests if added to a non-contaminated area. We report here of measurements of 137 Cs activity in different coniferous forest compartments from seven field experiments. The activity measurements were made 5-8 years after wood-ash application. The field experiments, in a north-south transect in Sweden, have received a background activity ranging 0 - 40 kBq m -2 as a consequence of the Chernobyl fallout. The applied wood-ash had an activity ranging between 0 - 4.8 kBq kg -1 depending on origin. Samples of the various compartments, taken in autumn 1999, included samples of soil, field vegetation, needles and wood (both twigs and stem wood). The soil and the field-vegetation were analysed using a NaI detector while the samples obtained from the trees were analysed on a GeLi detector. In addition, the soil samples were also analysed for K, by extraction with 1M ammonium lactate. The highest 137 Cs activity concentration was, by far, found in the soil, the activity found in the field-layer and the trees was in general lower. At six of seven sites there were no statistically significant effects of the wood-ash application on radiation, despite the fact that the wood-ash had, at least theoretically, in one case doubled the activity. However, at one site (Vindeln), with an intermediate 137 Cs deposition (10-20 kBq m -2 ) from Chernobyl, there was a statistically significant decrease in 137 Cs activity in the soil as well as in needles and twigs at the wood-ash amended plots. This occurred despite that the wood-ash had added a considerable activity (0.63 kBq m -2 ) to the site. The same ash applied to another site also

  20. Effectiveness of radiation therapy without surgery in metastatic spinal cord compression: final results from a prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Latini, Paolo

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In assessing effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), we performed a prospective trial in which patients with this complication were generally treated with RT plus steroids, and surgery was reserved for selected cases. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-five consecutive patients with MSCC entered this protocol. Twenty (7%) underwent surgery plus RT, another 255 received RT alone. Of all eligible patients, 25 (10%) early deaths and 21 (8%) entering a feasibility study of RT without steroids, were not evaluable. Of the 209 evaluable cases, 110 were females and 99 males, and median age was 62 years. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 13 to 88) and treatment consisted of 30 Gy RT (using two different schedules) together with steroids (standard or high doses, depending on motor deficit severity). Response was assessed according to back pain and motor and bladder function before and after therapy. Results: Back pain total response rate was 82% (complete or partial response or stable pain, 54, 17, or 11%, respectively). About three-fourths of the patients (76%) achieved full recovery or preservation of walking ability and 44% with sphincter dysfunction improved. Early diagnosis was the most important response predictor so that a large majority of patients able to walk and with good bladder function maintained these capacities. When diagnosis was late, tumors with favorable histologies (i.e., myeloma, breast, and prostate carcinomas) above all responded to RT. Duration of response was also influenced by histology. Favorable histologies are associated to higher median response (myeloma, breast, and prostate carcinomas, 16, 12, and 10 months, respectively). Median survival time was 6 months, with a 28% probability of survival for 1 year. Survival time was longer for patients able to walk before and/or after RT, those with favourable histologies, and females. There was agreement between patient survival and

  1. Biogenic Aerosol - Effect on Clouds and Climate (BAECC-ERI). Extended Radiosonde Intensive Operational Period Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoll, Ken A. [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); O' Connor, E. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale properties of clouds such as lifetime, optical thickness, and precipitation are all dependent on small-scale cloud microphysical processes. Such processes determine when droplets will grow or shrink, their size, and the number of cloud droplets. Although our understanding of cloud microphysics has vastly improved over the past several decades with the development of remote sensing methods such as lidar and radar, there remain a number of processes that are not well understood, such as the effect of electrical charge on cloud microphysics. To understand the various processes and feedback mechanisms, high-vertical–resolution observations are required. Radiosondes provide an ideal platform for providing routine vertical profiles of in situ measurements at any location (with a vertical resolution of a few meters). Modified meteorological radiosondes have been extensively developed at the University of Reading for measuring cloud properties, to allow measurements beyond the traditional thermodynamic quantities (pressure, temperature and relative humidity) to be obtained cost-effectively. This project aims to investigate a number of cloud processes in which in situ cloud observations from these modified radiosondes can provide information either complementary to or not obtainable by lidar/radar systems. During two intensive operational periods (IOPs) in May and August 2014 during deployment to Hyytiälä, Finland, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) launched a total of 24 instrumented radiosondes through a number of different cloud types ranging from low-level stratiform cloud to cumulonimbus. Twelve balloon flights of an accelerometer turbulence sensor were made, which detected significant turbulence on eleven of these flights. Most of the turbulent episodes encountered were due to convective processes, but several were associated with the transition from troposphere to stratosphere at

  2. Studies on the effectiveness of measures to maintain the integrity of pressurized components in German nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmas, M.; Jendrich, U.; Michel, F.; Reck, H.; Schimpfke, T.; Walter, M.; Wenke, R.

    2013-03-01

    The overall objective of the project was to investigate the effectiveness of measures to maintain the as-built quality of the pressure-retaining components in German nuclear power plants. In particular, investigations were performed on the application of the break preclusion concept, existing monitoring systems and the significance of the pressure test as part of the inspection concept. Moreover, the KompInt knowledge base has been updated. Break preclusion for pipes was applied in all German plants already during planning or after commissioning to a varying extent. The basic features of the required assessments were considered in the German nuclear regulations for the first time by inclusion in the safety requirements for nuclear power plants of 2012. The requirements for assessments, differing in their degree of detail, in the interpretations of these safety requirements and in the safety standard KTA 3206 are still in the draft stage. For the first time, the vessels as well as housings of valves and pumps are also included in the concept. Through the use of advanced monitoring systems it was possible in German plants at an early stage to establish modes of operation that minimise the load on components, to carry out appropriate technical backfitting measures, and to identify damages. In plant areas where local water chemistry parameters may result that deviate from the specification, the effectiveness of water chemistry monitoring is limited. In this case, other operational measures must be taken. The results of the simulations performed with the help of the GRS-developed PROST computer code to determine the significance of pressure tests lead - in accordance with the results of operating experience evaluation - to the conclusion that pressure tests carried out within the pressure-retaining boundary contribute to safeguarding the integrity. The user-friendliness of the KompInt knowledge base has been increased by changing over to a new hardware, a software

  3. Medicare and Medicaid programs; physicians' referrals to health care entities with which they have financial relationships: partial delay of effective date. Interim final rule with comment period; partial delay in effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-03

    This interim final rule with comment period delays for 1 year the effective date of the last sentence of 42 CFR 411.354(d)(1). Section 411.354(d)(1) was promulgated in the final rule entitled "Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Physicians' Referrals to Health Care Entities With Which They Have Financial Relationships," published in the Federal Register on January 4, 2001 (66 FR 856). A 1-year delay in the effective date of the last sentence in Section 411.354(d)(1) will give Department officials the opportunity to reconsider the definition of compensation that is "set in advance" as it relates to percentage compensation methodologies in order to avoid unnecessarily disrupting existing contractual arrangements for physician services. Accordingly, the last sentence of Section 411.354(d)(1), which would have become effective January 4, 2002, will not become effective until January 6,2003.

  4. Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degteva, M.O.; Drozhko, E.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.; Bouville, A.C.; Miller, C.W.

    1996-02-01

    This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted

  5. The effect of building regulations on energy consumption in single-family houses in Denmark. Final version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen Kjaerbye, V. (Roskilde Univ.. Dept. of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde (Denmark)); AKF (Danish Institute of Governmental Research, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Larsen, Anders E. (Roskilde Univ.. Dept. of Society and Globalisation, Roskilde (Denmark)); Togeby, M (Ea Energy Analyses, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2010-04-15

    This paper explores how changes in regulatory requirements for energy efficiency in buildings (in the US also known as building energy codes) affect household energy consumption. The focus in this paper is on natural gas consumption by Danish single-family owner-occupied houses. Unlike most other papers investigating household energy consumption this paper uses a unique panel data set constructed by merging several administrative data bases. The data set describes house and household characteristics, outdoor temperature and actual metered natural gas consumption over 6 years (1998-2003). Applying advanced econometric methods we examine differences in heating energy consumption due to different building regulation requirements at the time of house construction. As for the effect of the building regulation, we find that changes in Danish building regulations have led to significant reductions in energy used for heating. The latest revision of the Danish building regulation covered by this paper is that of 1998. This revision has resulted in a 7 percent reduction in natural gas consumption. (Author)

  6. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  7. Influence of the physical–chemical properties of polyaniline thin films on the final sensitivity of varied field effect sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Hugo José Nogueira Pedroza Dias; Heimfarth, Tobias; Mulato, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the use of electrodeposited polyaniline (PANI) thin sensing films in pH sensors. Two configurations of the Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor (EGFET) sensor were studied: the Single EGFET (S-EGFET) and the Instrumental Amplifier EGFET (IA-EGFET) setups. The films were analyzed in both systems and the sensitivity and linearity of each sensor were compared. Initial sensitivities (70–80 mV/pH) measured in the IA-EGFET were reduced due to polymer bulk protonation after a prior measurement in the S-EGFET system. Films with high amount of deposited polymer had their sensitivities least reduced. Bulk protonation occurred due to the step potential applied to the reference electrode in the S-EGFET system. These changes were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visible reflectance spectroscopy and evaluation of CIE L*a*b* color scale. PANI pH EGFET sensors exhibited good linearity and stability that along with their high sensitivity, easy processing and low cost film production have large potential applications. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited polyaniline thin films were analyzed in two EGFET setups. • Polymer protonation provided changeable sensitivities. • Color and morphological variation confirm polymer aggregation and electrical changes

  8. Effects of atmospheric variability on energy utilization and conservation. Final report, 1 November 1976--31 October 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.; Dreiseitl, E.; Johnson, G.R.; Leong, H.H.; Macdonald, B.C.; Somervell, W.L. Jr.; Starr, A.M.; Timbre, K.O.

    1978-02-01

    A space-heating energy-consumption model for Greeley, Colorado for the winter of 1976-77 was within 98.9 percent of actual natural gas consumption for that city. Modeling of Cheyenne, Wyoming, including the testing of a new statistical scheme to develop the building census required by the energy consumption model, has progressed to the point where reliable natural gas consumption estimates can be made with the model for that community. A detailed study of temperature and surface wind patterns in and near the city of Greeley, Colorado revealed that, at times, an urban heat island effect is present, in spite of the relatively small size of that town. Various feedback mechanisms between the oceans and the atmosphere were examined. Several of these mechanisms appear to be the cause of the interannual variability of the atmosphere's general circulation and of climatic changes on a time scale of several tens of years. A recent cooling trend in the North Pacific north of 40/sup 0/N, and sea-surface temperature fluctuations with an irregular periodicity of 2 to 4 years superimposed upon this trend were studied. To advance regional long-range forecasting skills January temperature anomalies over the eastern United States were correlated with flow patterns over the U.S. and Canada.

  9. Influence of the physical–chemical properties of polyaniline thin films on the final sensitivity of varied field effect sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Hugo José Nogueira Pedroza Dias, E-mail: hugodiasmello@usp.br; Heimfarth, Tobias; Mulato, Marcelo

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the use of electrodeposited polyaniline (PANI) thin sensing films in pH sensors. Two configurations of the Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor (EGFET) sensor were studied: the Single EGFET (S-EGFET) and the Instrumental Amplifier EGFET (IA-EGFET) setups. The films were analyzed in both systems and the sensitivity and linearity of each sensor were compared. Initial sensitivities (70–80 mV/pH) measured in the IA-EGFET were reduced due to polymer bulk protonation after a prior measurement in the S-EGFET system. Films with high amount of deposited polymer had their sensitivities least reduced. Bulk protonation occurred due to the step potential applied to the reference electrode in the S-EGFET system. These changes were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visible reflectance spectroscopy and evaluation of CIE L*a*b* color scale. PANI pH EGFET sensors exhibited good linearity and stability that along with their high sensitivity, easy processing and low cost film production have large potential applications. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited polyaniline thin films were analyzed in two EGFET setups. • Polymer protonation provided changeable sensitivities. • Color and morphological variation confirm polymer aggregation and electrical changes.

  10. SolAir. Innovative solar collectors for efficient and cost-effective solar thermal power generation - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbato, M. C.; Haueter, Ph.; Bader, R.; Steinfeld, A.; Pedretti, A.

    2008-12-15

    This report presents the main results of the project. The project has been started at the end of 2007 and has been successfully finished in December 2008. The present project of ALE AirLight Energy aims at the engineering investigation and design of a novel concept of a solar collector system for efficient and cost-effective solar thermal power generation. The technology exploits an air-inflated reflective structure to concentrate solar radiation. This new arrangement reduces investment costs of the collector field and promises to be economically competitive. A first prototype, built in 2007, has been redesigned and heavily modified during this project. In the new configuration, by using secondary mirrors, the focal area is located close to the main structure and allows the integration of the receiver into the inflated structure. The topics developed in this document are as follows: (i) Design solutions for the concentrated energy receiver suitable for the revised SolAir concentrator concept. (ii) Solar flux simulation via Monte Carlo method. (iii) New version of the ALE AirLight Energy concentrator prototype. (iv) Prototype radiative flux measurements. (author)

  11. Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M.O. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E. [Branch 1 of Moscow Biophysics Inst., Ozersk (Russian Federation); Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Napier, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bouville, A.C. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Miller, C.W. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted.

  12. Effects of radiation and high heat flux on the performance of first-wall components. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1985-10-01

    The performance of high-heat-flux components in present and future fusion devices is strongly affected by materials properties and their changes with radiation exposure and helium content. In addition, plasma disruptions and thermal fatigue are major life-limiting aspects. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore required in the performance analysis, and the following results have been accomplished. An equation of state for helium has been derived and applied to helium bubble formation by various growth processes. Models for various radiation effects have been developed and perfected to analyze radiation-induced swelling and embrittlement for high-heat flux materials. Computer codes have been developed to predict melting, evaporation, and melt-layer stability during plasma disruptions. A structural analysis code was perfected to evaluate the stress distribution and crack propagation in a high-heat-flux component or first wall. This code was applied to a duplex structure consisting of a beryllium coating on a copper substrate. It was also used to compare the lifetimes of a first wall in a tokamak reactor made of ferritic or austenitic steel

  13. Effect of temperature and hydroxy-Al interlayers on Cs selectivity and fixation in river suspensions and soils. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, L.W.; Martens, D.C.; El-Prince, A.M.; Rich, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of 137/sub Cs/ by sediments from the Savannah River Plant follows a theoretically expected linear relationship between ln Kd and l/T where kd and T are the equilibrium distribution coefficient and the temperature in kelvins, respectively. The slope of these plots decreases after removal of hydroxy Al interlayers. Hydroxy Al interlayers thus make Cs + adsorption more temperature dependent. The phenomenon is explained by considering hydroxy Al interlayers as a source of hydronium ions H 3 O + , which compete with Cs for exchange positions in wedge zones. An increase in temperature favors an increase in H 3 O ions, which in turn favors less adsorption of Cs + . Aside from their thermal effect the positively charged hydroxy aluminum polymeric groups drastically decrease the cation exchange capacity and, consequently, the adsorption of cesium. The adsorption of trace radioactive cesium by sediments from the Savannah River Plant area also follows a theoretically expected linear relationship between ln Kd and the pH of the equilibrium solution. Theoretically, the slope of these plots is proportional to the fraction of surface area occupied by pH dependent charges. Experimentally, the slope becomes zero after removal of hydroxy Al interlayers. Hydroxy Al interlayers are thus the main source for the pH dependent charges, making Cs + adsorption pH dependent also

  14. The effect of sub-lethal damage repair and exchange on the final slope of cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlone, M.C.; Wilkins, D.E.; Raaphorst, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Lea-Catcheside dose rate protraction factor, G, is the most widely used model to describe the effects of dose rate on cell survival. In the linear quadratic formalism, this factor modifies the beta component of cell killing; G is greatest for acute irradiations while vanishing at low dose rates. We have found a simple compartmental model that can derive the Lea-Catcheside function. This compartmental model clearly shows that the G function can only be derived using a little known assumption: the diminution of sub-lethal damage due to exchange of repairable lesions is negligible compared to that due to repair. This assumption was explicitly stated by Lea, but it does not appear to have been restated or verified since very early work on cell survival. The implication of this assumption is that sub-lethal damage can be modeled without considering exchange, which is evidenced by the fact that the G function does not contain parameters relating to exchange. By using a new model that fully accounts for repair and exchange of sublethal lesions, a cell survival expression that has a modified G function, but that retains the linear quadratic formalism, can be obtained. At low doses, this new model predicts linear-quadratic behavior, but the behavior gradually changes to mono-exponential at high doses, which is consistent with experimental observations. Modeling cell survival of well-known survival curves using the modified linear quadratic model shows statistically significant improvement in the fits to the cell survival data as compared to best fits obtained with the linear quadratic model. It is shown that these improvements in fits are due to a superior representation of the high dose region of the survival curve

  15. Biological effects of implanted nuclear energy sources for artificial heart devices. Final report, September 1, 1968-May 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallfelz, F.A.

    1981-04-01

    This work involved a study of the biological effects of radiation from mock 30 watt plutonium-238 power sources in dogs. Dogs were implanted with radiation sources producing neutron and gamma radiation fluxes similar to that of plutonium-238, but having no associated heat, at levels of 1, 5, 15, and 70 times the radiation flux expected from a 30 watt plutonium-238 source. Times of observation varied from 0.25 to 8.0 years depending on experimental design or individual circumstances e.g. premature death from radiation related or non-radiation related causes. A number of clinico-pathologic determinations were performed on each dog at monthly intervals beginning five months before implantation and continuing until termination. Complete necropsy examinations were performed on all animals at termination. Very few abnormalities were observed in the clinical parameters measured except in the highest radiation flux groups (15X and 70X). The sperm count of males in the 15X and 70X groups demonstrated a rapid decrease with time. In the 5X group a gradual decrease in sperm count occurred with increasing time, while 1X males did not differ in sperm counts from controls. With the exception of one 15X dog which remained in the study for 6.5 years, all animals in the 15X and 70X groups were terminated at early time periods due to deterioration at the implant site characterized by abscessation and, not infrequently, tumor formation. The incidence of neoplasia increased with radiation source size. The results suggested that, although no statistically significant increases in tumor incidence were noted among groups, the incidence of neoplasia observed at autopsy tended to increase with increasing source size and radiation dose

  16. Scaling effects on H2-deflagration in containment-geometries - BASSIM. Further development and verification. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, A.K.; Wennerberg, D.; Fischer, K.

    1998-01-01

    A multidimensional mechanistic calculation procedure for simulating H 2 -deflagration in multiroom geometries was developed at Battelle in a previous project. This calculation method was verified against a number of experiments performed in BMC (Battelle Model Containment) and HDR (Heissdampf Reaktor) facilities. It turned out that the above mentioned procedure overpredicted the H 2 -burnrates in experiments in smaller facilities and therefore was unable to predict the important 'scaling influences'. It is the purpose of the present work to develop the above mentioned calculation procedure BASSIM-H 2 (mod 2.3) further in order to predict the scaling influences correctly. In the present work the combustion model was developed further such that the important phenomena e.g. ignition phase, quasi-laminar initial phase, and the turbulent phase of a H 2 premixed flame would be modelled realistically. The model developed has been verified against 16 very different experiments from 9 different facilities. The computed cases varied in volumes from 0.022 m 3 up to 2100 m 3 . These cases have also been computed with the older model verified in [15]. Based on the comparison between the computed results obtained with the new model and the computed results obtained with the old model as well as with the experimental data, the model put forward in this work is evaluated. The present model computes the scaling effects on H 2 -deflagration satisfactorily with the same set of empirical constants. The flame propagation in horizontal as well as vertical (both upwards and downwards) directions can be computed satisfactorily. The influence of flow obstructions and heat loss at walls is considered as well. (orig.) [de

  17. A study of hydrogen effects on fracture behavior of radioactive waste storage tanks. Final report, October 1992-September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; Elleman, T.S.

    1994-01-01

    The processing of high-level radioactive wastes now stored at Hanford and Savannah River Laboratories will continue over many years and it will be necessary for some of the liquids to remain in the tanks until well into the next century. Continued tank integrity is therefore an issue of prime importance and it will be necessary to understand any processes which could lead to tank failure. Hydrogen embrittlement resulting from absorption of radiolytic hydrogen could alter tank fracture behavior and be an issue in evaluating the effect of stresses on the tanks from rapid chemical oxidation-reduction reactions. The intense radiation fields in some of the tanks could be a factor in increasing the hydrogen permeation rates through protective oxide films on the alloy surface and be an additional factor in contributing to embrittlement. The project was initiated in October 1992 for a two year period to evaluate hydrogen uptake in low carbon steels that are representative of storage tanks. Steel specimens were exposed to high gamma radiation fields to generate radiolytic hydrogen and to potentially alter the protective surface films to increase hydrogen uptake. Direct measurements of hydrogen uptake were made using tritium as a tracer and fracture studies were undertaken to determine any alloy embrittlement. The rates of hydrogen uptake were noted to be extremely low in the experimental steels. Gamma radiation did not reveal any significant changes in the mechanical and fracture characteristics following exposures as long as a month. It is highly desirable to investigate further the tritium diffusion under stress in a cracked body where stress-assisted diffusion is expected to enhance these rates. More importantly, since welds are the weakest locations in the steel structures, the mechanical and fracture tests should be performed on welds exposed to tritium with and without stressed crack-fronts

  18. Numerical simulation of the effects of cooling tower complexes on clouds and severe storms. Final report, September 1976-June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orville, H.D.; Eckhoff, P.A.; Peak, J.E.; Hirsch, J.H.; Kopp, F.J.

    1979-11-01

    A two-dimensional, time-dependent model was developed which gives realistic simulations of many severe storm processes - such as heavy rains, hail, and strong winds. The model is a set of partial differential equations describing time changes of momentum, energy, and mass (air and various water substances such as water vapor, cloud liquid, cloud ice, rainwater, and hail). In addition, appropriate boundary And initial conditions (taken from weather sounding data) are imposed on a domain approximately 20 km high by 20 km wide with 200 m grid intervals to complete the model. Modifications were made to the model which allow additional water vapor and heat to be added at several lower grid points, simulating effluents from a power park. Cases were run which depict realistic severe storm situations. One atmospheric sounding has a strong middle-level inversion which tends to inhibit the first convective clouds but gives rise later to a severe storm with hail and heavy rains. One other sounding is taken from a day in which a severe storm occurred in the Miami area. A third sounding depicts atmospheric conditions in which severe storms formed in the vicinity of Huron, South Dakota. The results indicate that a power park emitting 80% latent heat and 20% sensible heat has little effect on the simulated storm. A case with 100% sensible heat emission leads to a much different solution, with the simulated storm reduced in severity and the rain and hail redistributed. A case in which water vapor is accumulated in a region and released over a broad depth results in sightly more rain from a severe storm

  19. Effects of atmospheric variability on energy utilization and conservation. Final report, 1 January 1979-31 December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.; Burns, C.C.; Cochrane, H.; Johnson, G.R.; Leong, H.; McKean, J.; Sheaffer, J.D.; Starr, A.M.; Webber, J.

    1980-04-01

    An interdisciplinary approach towards a detailed assessment of energy consumption in urban space-heating and cooling is presented in terms of measurement and modeling results. Modeling efforts concentrated on the city of Minneapolis, MN, using data from the winter seasons 1977/78 and 1978/79. Further developments of a reference model also fall back on data from Cheyenne, WY, and Greeley, CO. Mean absolute daily errors of gas consumption estimated by the physical model applied to Minneapolis are 6.26% when compared to actual energy usage for the period 12/1/77 to 2/28/78. The mean daily absolute errors for the statistical reference model for the same time period were 5.54%. Modeling of the energy consumption required detailed input of meteorological parameters from a special network of stations. As a spin-off an assessment was obtained of the effects of anthropogenic heat on urban heat-island generation under various synoptic conditions. A detailed building census, comprised of 105.722 heated structures, was obtained. A field survey in Greeley indicated that investment returns from insulating houses might not be as high as hoped for; possibly a considerable amount of insulating material is applied wastefully. Misinformation seems to be the primary cause of misguided energy conservation. Progress in conservation could be achieved if utility costs were considered in mortgage-loan applications, together with principal, interests, taxes, and insurance. Detailed energy-consumption modeling would be a premise for such fiscal-management approaches. Another extensive field survey yielded data for a local input-output model applied to the city of Greeley. Economic multipliers for dollars of output, space heating, energy use, and employment were developed and used for growth projections to the year 2003 under varying scenarios.

  20. Final Report: Development of Renewable Microbial Polyesters for Cost Effective and Energy- Efficient Wood-Plastic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N.; Emerick, Robert W.; England, Alfred B.; Flanders, James P.; Loge, Frank J.; Wiedeman, Katherine A.; Wolcott, Michael P.

    2010-03-31

    In this project, we proposed to produce wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (WFRTCs) using microbial thermoplastic polyesters in place of petroleum-derived plastic. WFRTCs are a rapidly growing product area, averaging a 38% growth rate since 1997. Their production is dependent on substantial quantities of petroleum based thermoplastics, increasing their overall energy costs by over 230% when compared to traditional Engineered Wood Products (EWP). Utilizing bio-based thermoplastics for these materials can reduce our dependence on foreign petroleum. We have demonstrated that biopolymers (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) can be successfully produced from wood pulping waste streams and that viable wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite products can be produced from these materials. The results show that microbial polyester (PHB in this study) can be extruded together with wastewater-derived cell mass and wood flour into deck products having performance properties comparable to existing commercial HDPE/WF composite products. This study has thus proven the underlying concept that the microbial polyesters produced from waste effluents can be used to make cost-effective and energy-efficient wood-plastic composites. The cost of purified microbial polyesters is about 5-20 times that of HDPE depending on the cost of crude oil, due to high purification (40%), carbon substrate (40%) and sterilized fermentation (20%) costs for the PHB. Hence, the ability to produce competitive and functional composites with unpurified PHA-biomass mixtures from waste carbon sources in unsterile systems—without cell debris removal—is a significant step forward in producing competitive value-added structural composites from forest products residuals using a biorefinery approach. As demonstrated in the energy and waste analysis for the project, significant energy savings and waste reductions can also be realized using this approach. We recommend that the next step for development of

  1. Interfacial Effects on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Graphite/Copper Composites. Final Contractor Report Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devincent, Sandra Marie

    1995-01-01

    Graphite surfaces are not wet by pure copper. This lack of wetting has been responsible for a debonding phenomenon that has been found in continuous graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites subjected to elevated temperatures. By suitably alloying copper, its ability to wet graphite surfaces can be enhanced. Information obtained during sessile drop testing has led to the development of a copper-chromium alloy that suitably wets graphite. Unidirectionally reinforced graphite/copper composites have been fabricated using a pressure infiltration casting procedure. P100 pitch-based fibers have been used to reinforce copper and copper-chromium alloys. X-ray radiography and optical microscopy have been used to assess the fiber distribution in the cast composites. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy analyses were conducted to study the distribution and continuity of the chromium carbide reaction phase that forms at the fiber/matrix interface in the alloyed matrix composites. The effects of the chromium in the copper matrix on the mechanical and thermal properties of P100Gr/Cu composites have been evaluated through tensile testing, three-point bend testing, thermal cycling and thermal conductivity calculations. The addition of chromium has resulted in an increased shear modulus and essentially zero thermal expansion in the P100Gr/Cu-xCr composites through enhanced fiber/matrix bonding. The composites have longitudinal tensile strengths in excess of 700 MPa with elastic moduli of 393 GPa. After 100 hr at 760 deg C 84 percent of the as-cast strength is retained in the alloyed matrix composites. The elastic moduli are unchanged by the thermal exposure. It has been found that problems with spreading of the fiber tows strongly affect the long transverse tensile properties and the short transverse thermal conductivity of the P100Gr/Cu-xCr composites. The long transverse tensile strength is limited by rows of touching fibers which are paths of

  2. Medicare program; update of ratesetting methodology, payment rates, payment policies, and the list of covered procedures for ambulatory surgical centers effective October 1, 1998; reopening of comment period and delay in adoption of the proposed rule as final--HCFA. Notice of reopening of comment period for proposed rule and delay in adoption of provisions of the proposed rule as final.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This notice reopens the comment period for a proposed rule affecting Medicare payments to ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) that was originally published in the Federal Register on June 12, 1998 (63 FR 32290). This document gives notice of a delay in the adoption of the provisions of the June 12, 1998 ASC proposed rule as a final rule to be concurrent with the adoption as final of the hospital outpatient prospective payment system (PPS) that is the subject of a proposed rule published in the Federal Register on September 8, 1998 (63 FR 47551). In addition this document confirms that the current ASC payment rates that are effective for services furnished on or after October 1, 1998, will remain in effect until rebased ASC rates and the provisions of the June 12, 1998 ASC proposed rule are adopted as final to be concurrent with the adoption as final of the Medicare hospital PPS.

  3. Effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime: the case of the 4s-hole lifetime of Sn metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    The first theoretical study of the effect of the final-state interaction on the initial core-hole lifetime is presented. The 4s-hole lifetime width of Sn metal is calculated by an ab-initio atomic many-body theory (Green's function method). When the final-state interaction in the 4p4d two-hole state, created by the 4s -1 -4p -1 4d -1 εf super Coster-Kronig (CK) transition of the initial 4s hole, is explicitly taken into account, the ab-initio atomic many-body calculation of the 4s-hole X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of Sn atom can provide excellent agreement with experiment in both the 4s-hole energy and the 4s-hole lifetime width. Otherwise, the many-body calculation underestimates considerably the 4s-hole lifetime width. The 4p4d two-hole state interacts strongly with the 4d triple-hole state by the 4p -1 4d -1 -4d -3 εf super CK transition. The interaction affects greatly the initial 4s-hole lifetime width

  4. A study of the effects of enhanced oil recovery agents on the quality of Strategic Petroleum Reserves crude oil. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The project was initiated on September 1, 1990. The objective of the project was to carry out a literature search to estimate the types and extents of long time interactions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents, such as surfactants, caustics and polymers, with crude oil. This information is necessary to make recommendations about mixing EOR crude oil with crude oils from primary and secondary recovery processes in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Data were sought on both adverse and beneficial effects of EOR agents that would impact handling, transportation and refining of crude oil. An extensive literature search has been completed, and the following informations has been compiled: (1) a listing of existing EOR test and field projects; (2) a listing of currently used EOR agents; and (3) evidence of short and long term physical and chemical interactions of these EOR-agents with hydrocarbons, and their effects on the quality of crude oil at long times. This information is presented in this report. Finally some conclusions are derived and recommendations are made. Although the conclusions are based mostly on extrapolations because of lack of specific data, it is recommended that the enhancement of the rates of biodegradation of oil catalyzed by the EOR agents needs to be further studied. There is no evidence of substantial long term effects on crude oil because of other interactions. Some recommendations are also made regarding the types of studies that would be necessary to determine the effect of certain EOR agents on the rates of biodegradation of crude oil.

  5. Measurement of the $\\bar{B}^0_s$ effective lifetime in the $J/\\psi f_0(980)$ final state

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The effective lifetime of the $\\overline{B}^0_s$ meson in the decay mode $\\overline{B}^0_s \\to J\\psi f_0(980)$ is measured using 1.0fb$^{-1}$ of data collected in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$,TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is $1.700 \\pm 0.040 \\pm 0.026 \\,\\mathrm{ps}$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is $CP$-odd, and $CP$ violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy $\\overline{B}^0_s$ mass eigenstate, $\\Gamma_{\\rm H} = 0.588 \\pm 0.014 \\pm 0.009 \\,\\rm{ps}^{-1}$.

  6. Ethical aspects of final disposal. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltes, B.; Leder, W.; Achenbach, G.B.; Spaemann, R.; Gerhardt, V.

    2003-01-01

    In fulfilment of this task the Federal Environmental Ministry has commissioned GRS to summarise the current national and international status of ethical aspects of the final disposal of radioactive wastes as part of the project titled ''Final disposal of radioactive wastes as seen from the viewpoint of ethical objectives''. The questions arising from the opinions, positions and publications presented in the report by GRS were to serve as a basis for an expert discussion or an interdisciplinary discussion forum for all concerned with the ethical aspects of an answerable approach to the final disposal of radioactive wastes. In April 2001 GRS held a one-day seminar at which leading ethicists and philosophers offered statements on the questions referred to above and joined in a discussion with experts on issues of final disposal. This report documents the questions that arose ahead of the workshop, the specialist lectures held there and a summary of the discussion results [de

  7. Effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations: in vitro study of color masking ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Kim, Seok-Gyu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations. Three different types of disk-shaped zirconia coping specimens (Lava, Cercon, Zirkonzahn: ø10 mm × 0.4 mm) were fabricated and veneered with IPS e.max Press Ceram (shade A2), for total thicknesses of 1 and 1.5 mm. A total of sixty zirconia restoration specimens were divided into six groups based on their coping types and thicknesses. The abutment specimens (ø10 mm × 7 mm) were prepared with gold alloy, base metal (nickel-chromium) alloy, and four different shades (A1, A2, A3, A4) of composite resins. The average L*, a*, b* values of the zirconia specimens on the six abutment specimens were measured with a dental colorimeter, and the statistical significance in the effects of three variables was analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (α=.05).The average shade difference (ΔE) values of the zirconia specimens between the A2 composite resin abutment and other abutments were also evaluated. The effects of zirconia specimen thickness (Pabutment shade (Pabutments was higher (close to the acceptability threshold of 5.5 ΔE) than th ose between the A2 composite resin and other abutments. This in-vitro study demonstrated that abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type affected the resulting shade of zirconia restorations.

  8. Microwave radiation - Biological effects and exposure standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, I.R.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal and nonthermal effects of exposure to microwave radiation are discussed and current standards for microwave exposure are examined in light of the proposed use of microwave power transmission from solar power satellites. Effects considered include cataractogenesis at levels above 100 mW/sq cm, and possible reversible disturbances such as headaches, sleeplessness, irritability, fatigue, memory loss, cardiovascular changes and circadian rhythm disturbances at levels less than 10 mW/sq cm. It is pointed out that while the United States and western Europe have adopted exposure standards of 10 mW/sq cm, those adopted in other countries are up to three orders of magnitude more restrictive, as they are based on different principles applied in determining safe limits. Various aspects of the biological effects of microwave transmissions from space are considered in the areas of the protection of personnel working in the vicinity of the rectenna, interactions of the transmitted radiation with cardiac pacemakers, and effects on birds. It is concluded that thresholds for biological effects from short-term microwave radiation are well above the maximal power density of 1 mW/sq cm projected at or beyond the area of exclusion of a rectenna.

  9. Cosmology Without Finality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahootian, F.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid convergence of advancing sensor technology, computational power, and knowledge discovery techniques over the past decade has brought unprecedented volumes of astronomical data together with unprecedented capabilities of data assimilation and analysis. A key result is that a new, data-driven "observational-inductive'' framework for scientific inquiry is taking shape and proving viable. The anticipated rise in data flow and processing power will have profound effects, e.g., confirmations and disconfirmations of existing theoretical claims both for and against the big bang model. But beyond enabling new discoveries can new data-driven frameworks of scientific inquiry reshape the epistemic ideals of science? The history of physics offers a comparison. The Bohr-Einstein debate over the "completeness'' of quantum mechanics centered on a question of ideals: what counts as science? We briefly examine lessons from that episode and pose questions about their applicability to cosmology. If the history of 20th century physics is any indication, the abandonment of absolutes (e.g., space, time, simultaneity, continuity, determinacy) can produce fundamental changes in understanding. The classical ideal of science, operative in both physics and cosmology, descends from the European Enlightenment. This ideal has for over 200 years guided science to seek the ultimate order of nature, to pursue the absolute theory, the "theory of everything.'' But now that we have new models of scientific inquiry powered by new technologies and driven more by data than by theory, it is time, finally, to relinquish dreams of a "final'' theory.

  10. The effects of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel on regional and municipal economy assessment of socio economical impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, S.; Kuisma, H.; Kilpelaeinen, P.; Kostiainen, E.

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study is to give an up-to-date assessment of the effects the construction of the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel in Eurajoki, based on latest knowledge. The disposal facility's effects on employment, population, housing construction, community structure and economy are estimated in the municipality of Eurajoki and in the wider region under the influence of the facility. The time-span of the report reaches from 2001 to the early 2020's when the facility will be in operation. The investment in research and construction of the disposal facility during the years 2004-2020 will be all together approximately 290 million euros. The estimation for the overall effect on national employment during the years 2001-2020 is circa 6 800 manyears, of which 4 200 man-years are from direct effects and 2 600 from indirect effects. The direct employment effects of the project will be at its highest approximately 325 man-year per year in 2020. The direct effect on employment during the operational period is estimated to be circa 130 man-years per year, of which the share of regular employees of Posiva is slightly over 100 man-years. At its highest, about 45 man-years per year of the total effect on employment (direct + indirect effects) will be directed to Eurajoki municipality. During the operational phase the share of Eurajoki is estimated to be circa 30 man-years per year. For the whole region, the effect of the disposal facility on employment will be significant, at its height in 2020, approximately 220 man-years per year. The disposal facility will also have an effect on the size and the structure of the population due to changes in employment and jobs. The estimation for the cumulative effect on the growth of the population caused by the facility is 80 more inhabitants in Eurajoki by 2020, which corresponds to 1,4 % of the municipality's current population. The growth of the population brought about by the facility in the whole region is estimated

  11. The feasibility of epidemiologic investigations of the health effects of low-level ionizing radiation. Final report, 3 July 1979-30 October 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Kohn, H.I.; Clapp, R.W.; Covino, S.J. Jr.; Fahey, F.H.

    1980-11-01

    This is the final report of 'A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Conducting Epidemiologic Investigations of the Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation', begun July 3, 1979. The study defines low-level ionizing radiation as a single dose of 5 rem (whole-body) or less and chronic doses that accumulate at the rate of less than 5 rem per year. The objective of this project was to determine whether or not further epidemiologic research (either expansion of current projects or initiation of new ones) would be useful at this time for quantitating the health effects due to low-level ionizing radiation. No outstanding candidate population is recommended for study since, even if the largest available populations are studied, the chance of finding a definite positive result is very small. However, the decision to conduct a study must rest heavily on social and political considerations rather than on purely scientific ones. Therefore, four populations are tentatively proposed for prospective cohort studies, with nested case-control studies as needed. Overall, the most practical approach would be to conduct a study through a national worker registry, with cancer as the endpoint of interest

  12. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuur, Edward [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Luo, Yiqi [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  13. Cosmological Final Focus Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J

    2004-01-01

    We develop the many striking parallels between the dynamics of light streams from distant galaxies and particle beams in accelerator final focus systems. Notably the deflections of light by mass clumps are identical to the kicks arising from the long-range beam-beam interactions of two counter-rotating particle beams (known as parasitic crossings). These deflections have sextupolar as well as quadrupolar components. We estimate the strength of such distortions for a variety of circumstances and argue that the sextupolar distortions from clumping within clusters may be observable. This possibility is enhanced by the facts that (1) the sextupolar distortions of background galaxies is a factor of 5 smaller than the quadrupolar distortion, (2) the angular orientation of the sextupolar and quadrupolar distortions from a mass distribution would be correlated, appearing as a slightly curved image, (3) these effects should be spatially clumped on the sky

  14. LDRD final report for improving human effectiveness for extreme-scale problem solving : assessing the effectiveness of electronic brainstorming in an industrial setting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornburg, Courtney C.; Stevens, Susan Marie; Davidson, George S.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2008-09-01

    An experiment was conducted comparing the effectiveness of individual versus group electronic brainstorming in order to address difficult, real world challenges. While industrial reliance on electronic communications has become ubiquitous, empirical and theoretical understanding of the bounds of its effectiveness have been limited. Previous research using short-term, laboratory experiments have engaged small groups of students in answering questions irrelevant to an industrial setting. The present experiment extends current findings beyond the laboratory to larger groups of real-world employees addressing organization-relevant challenges over the course of four days. Employees and contractors at a national security laboratory participated, either in a group setting or individually, in an electronic brainstorm to pose solutions to a 'wickedly' difficult problem. The data demonstrate that (for this design) individuals perform at least as well as groups in producing quantity of electronic ideas, regardless of brainstorming duration. However, when judged with respect to quality along three dimensions (originality, feasibility, and effectiveness), the individuals significantly (p<0.05) out-performed the group working together. When idea quality is used as the benchmark of success, these data indicate that work-relevant challenges are better solved by aggregating electronic individual responses, rather than electronically convening a group. This research suggests that industrial reliance upon electronic problem solving groups should be tempered, and large nominal groups might be the more appropriate vehicle for solving wicked corporate issues.

  15. Systematic investigation of drip stains on apparel fabrics: The effects of prior-laundering, fibre content and fabric structure on final stain appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Therese C; Taylor, Michael C; Kieser, Jules A; Carr, Debra J; Duncan, W

    2015-05-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is the investigation of blood deposited at crime scenes and the interpretation of that pattern. The surface that the blood gets deposited onto could distort the appearance of the bloodstain. The interaction of blood and apparel fabrics is in its infancy, but the interaction of liquids and apparel fabrics has been well documented and investigated in the field of textile science (e.g. the processes of wetting and wicking of fluids on fibres, yarns and fabrics). A systematic study on the final appearance of drip stains on torso apparel fabrics (100% cotton plain woven, 100% polyester plain woven, blend of polyester and cotton plain woven and 100% cotton single jersey knit) that had been laundered for six, 26 and 52 cycles prior to testing was investigated in the paper. The relationship between drop velocity (1.66±0.50m/s, 4.07±0.03m/s, 5.34±0.18m/s) and the stain characteristics (parent stain area, axes 1 and 2 and number of satellite stains) for each fabric was examined using analysis of variance. The experimental design and effect of storing blood were investigated on a reference sample, which indicated that the day (up to five days) at which the drops were generated did not affect the bloodstain. The effect of prior-laundering (six, 26 and 52 laundering cycles), fibre content (cotton vs. polyester vs. blend) and fabric structure (plain woven vs. single jersey knit) on the final appearance of the bloodstain were investigated. Distortion in the bloodstains produced on non-laundered fabrics indicated the importance of laundering fabrics to remove finishing treatments before conducting bloodstain experiments. For laundered fabrics, both the cotton fabrics and the blend had a circular to oval stain appearance, while the polyester fabric had a circular appearance with evidence of spread along the warp and weft yarns, which resulted in square-like stains at the lowest drop velocity. A significant (pfibre content (pfibres/yarns, while for the

  16. The effect of intake of water on the final values of body composition parameters in active athletes using two different bioimpedance analyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kutáč

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:The method of bioelectrical impedance (BIA is frequently used to estimate body composition in sports. The total body water (TBW is the basic variable that BIA measures. That implies the degree of sensitivity of BIA to the hydration of the organism, which is also demonstrated by the principles of measurement that primarily relate to the hydration of the organism. It is difficult to provide standard hydration of the organism of subjects prior to measurements when taking the measurements in the field. Objective:The objective of the study is to assess the changes in the final values of the selected body composition parameters in soccer players caused by intake of water, using two devices commonly used in the field. Methods:The research was performed in a group of 33 soccer players (mean age 20.30 ± 1.18 years. The measurements were taken using Tanita BC 418 MA (frequency 50 kHz and Nutriguard-M (frequency 100 kHz. To evaluate the effect of water intake, we took two measurements before and after the intake of 500 ml of water. The parameters measured by Tanita BC 418 MA were body weight (BW, total body water (TBW, body fat (BF, fat free mass (FFM. Nutriguard-M was used to measure total body water (TBW, intra and extracellular water (ICW and ECW, body fat (BF, fat free mass (FFM, intra and extracellular mass (BCM and ECM. The differences in the means (M1 and M2 of the monitored parameters were evaluated using the Paired Samples t-test. In statistically significant differences in the mean, the practical significance was also verified using the effect of size (Cohen's d. Results:The Tanita device showed statistically significant differences after the intake of 500 ml in parameters BW (+0.42 kg, BF (+0.39 kg, +0.53% and TBW (-0.38%. As for the Nutriguard device, statistically significant differences were found in parameters TBW (+0.77 kg, ICW (+0.83 kg, FFM (+1.05 kg, BCM (+0.79 kg and ECM/BCM (-0.01. Conclusion

  17. Effects of calcium magnesium acetate on the combustion of coal-water slurries. Final project report, 1 September 1989--28 February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levendis, Y.A.; Wise, D.; Metghalchi, H.; Cumper, J.; Atal, A.; Estrada, K.R.; Murphy, B.; Steciak, J.; Hottel, H.C.; Simons, G.

    1993-07-01

    To conduct studies on the combustion of coal water fuels (CWFs) an appropriate facility was designed and constructed. The main components were (1) a high-temperature isothermal laminar flow furnace that facilitates observation of combustion events in its interior. The design of this system and its characterization are described in Chapter 1. (2) Apparatus for slurry droplet/agglomerate particle generation and introduction in the furnace. These devices are described in Chapters 1 and 3 and other attached publications. (3) An electronic optical pyrometer whose design, construction theory of operation, calibration and performance are presented in Chapter 2. (4) A multitude of other accessories, such as particle fluidization devices, a suction thermometer, a velocimeter, high speed photographic equipment, calibration devices for the pyrometer, etc., are described throughout this report. Results on the combustion of CWF droplets and CWF agglomerates made from micronized coal are described in Chapter 3. In the same chapter the combustion of CWF containing dissolved calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) axe described. The combustion behavior of pre-dried CWF agglomerates of pulverized grain coal is contrasted to that of agglomerates of micronized coal in Chapter 4. In the same chapter the combustion of agglomerates of carbon black and diesel soot is discussed as well. The effect of CMA on the combustion of the above materials is also discussed. Finally, the sulfur capture capability of CMA impregnated micronized and pulverized bituminous coals is examined in Chapter 5.

  18. Alpha-capture reaction rates for 22 Ne (α , n) via sub-Coulomb alpha-transfer and its effect on final abundances of s-process isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatissa, Heshani; Rogachev, Grigory; Koshchiy, Yevgeny; Goldberg, Vladilen; Hooker, Joshua; Hunt, Curtis; Magana, Cordero; Roeder, Brian; Saastamoinen, Antti; Spiridon, Alexandria; Upadhyayula, Sriteja; Trippella, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    The 22 Ne (α , n) reaction is a very important neutron source reaction for the slow neutron capture process (s-process) in asymptotic giant branch stars. These direct measurements are very difficult to carry out at the energy regimes of interest for astrophysics (Gamow energies) due to the extremely small reaction cross section. The large uncertainties introduced when extrapolating direct measurements at high energies down to the Gamow energies can be overcome by measuring the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANC) of the relevant states using α-transfer reactions at sub-Coulomb energies to reduce the optical model dependence. The study of the 22Ne(6Li,d) and 22Ne(7Li,t) reaction was carried out at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The α-ANC measurements for the near α-threshold resonances of 26Mg provide constraints for the 22Ne(α,n) reaction rate. The effect of this reaction rate on the final abundances of the s-process isotopes will be discussed.

  19. Effect of Starting As-cast Structure on the Microstructure-Texture Evolution During Subsequent Processing and Finally Ridging Behavior of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Pranabananda; Patra, Sudipta; Mitra, Rahul; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2018-06-01

    Effect of the initial as-cast structure on the microstructure-texture evolution during thermomechanical processing of 409L grade ferritic stainless steel was studied. Samples from the regions of cast slab having `columnar,' `equiaxed,' and a mixture of `columnar' and `equiaxed' grains were subjected to two different processing schedules: one with intermediate hot-band annealing before cold-rolling followed by final annealing, and another without any hot-band annealing. EBSD study reveals that large columnar crystals with cube orientation are very difficult to deform and recrystallize uniformly. Resultant variations in ferrite grain structure and retention of cube-textured band in cold-rolled and annealed sheet contribute to ridging behavior during stretch forming. Initial equiaxed grain structure is certainly beneficial to reduce or even eliminate ridging defect by producing uniform ferrite grain structure, free from any texture banding. Application of hot-band annealing treatment is also advantageous as it can maximize the evolution of beneficial gamma-fiber texture and eliminate the ridging defect in case of completely `equiaxed' starting structure. Such treatment reduces the severity of ridging even if the initial structure contains typically mixed `columnar-equiaxed' grains.

  20. Effects of forming temperature and sintering rate to the final properties of FeCuAl powder compacts formed through uniaxial die compaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. M.; Ismail, M. A.; Sopyan, I.; Rahman, H. Y.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of an experimental investigation on the effects of forming temperature and sintering schedule to the final characteristics of FeCuAl powder mass formed at different temperature and sintered at different schedule. A lab-scale uni-axial die compaction rig was designed and fabricated which enabled the compaction of powder mass at room temperature as well as elevated temperature. Iron (Fe) powder ASC 100.29 was mechanically mixed with other elemental powders, namely copper (Cu), and aluminum (Al) for 60 minutes and compacted at three different temperature, i.e., 30°C, 150°C, and 200°C by applying 425 MPa of simultaneous downward and upward axial loading to generate green compacts. The as-pressed samples were inspected visually and the defect-free green compacts were subsequently sintered in an argon gas fired furnace at 800°C for 60 min at three different heating/cooling rates, i.e., 5, 10, and 15°C/min, respectively. The sintered samples were then characterised for their physical, electrical, and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the sintered samples were also analysed. The results revealed that a forming temperature of 150°C and a sintering rate of 10°C/min could produce a product with better characteristics.

  1. The effect of 17% EDTA and MTAD on smear layer removal and on erosion of root canal dentin when used as final rinse: An in vitro SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal A Mahajan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the ability of a mixture of tetracycline isomer, citric acid and detergent (MTAD and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA in removing the smear layer along with their effects on peritubular and intertubular dentinal structures by scanning electron microscopic (SEM examination. Materials and Methods: Thirty recently extracted maxillary and mandibular single-rooted human teeth were divided into 3 groups and prepared to an apical size of 30. In Group 1, 2, and 3, MTAD, EDTA, and distilled water were used, respectively, as a final rinse solution to remove the smear layer. The specimens were subjected to SEM evaluation for the presence or absence of the smear layer and degree of erosion using a scoring system. Results: The result showed that MTAD shows better smear layer removing ability and does not significantly change the structure of dentinal tubules. Conclusion: MTAD is an efficient solution for the removal of the smear layer, especially in the apical third of root canals, and does not significantly change the structure of the dentinal tubules.

  2. Study of feasibility of detecting effects of low-dose radiation in shipyard workers. Final report, May 15-August 15, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1982-12-01

    There is very little information available on the chronic health effects from repeated low-level doses of radiation. This study examines the adequacy of determining radiation exposure doses in shipyard workers, the procedures used in the radiation control programs, and the feasibility of establishing an appropriate population of nuclear and non-nuclear shipyard workers for long-term studies of low-level radiation. The availability of records and the methods of population identification and of measurement of radiation dose were determined during initial visits to the yards. Personnel, industrial hygiene, radiation and medical records were examined for suitability, completeness and accuracy. It was necessary to assure that no possible errors or omissions in personnel and radiation records existed in order that the final data will have validity. Preliminary investigations on the methods of follow-up in the Portsmouth population and the time required for each procedure were also undertaken in order to have a better estimate of the total cost for a long term study

  3. Research/Evaluate Restoration of NE Oregon Streams: Effects of Livestock Exclosures (Corridor Fencing) on Riparian Vegetation, Stream Geomorphic Features and Fish Populations; Final Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, J. Boone

    2002-09-17

    aquatic habitats and associated riparian functions; (2) a means of determining rates of aquatic habitat improvement; and (3) a basis for projecting future trends of habitat recovery. The proposed research is intended to provide an improved understanding of both the effects and effectiveness of a commonly used habitat enhancement approach in the upper Columbia River Basin. This is the exclusion of domestic livestock from streamside communities and streams via corridor fencing (exclosures). This final report is broken into three separate chapters. The first chapter covers the vegetation change associated with livestock exclusion. The second chapter focuses on the physical geomorphic changes to the streambank and channel. The final chapter covers the response of salmonids and warmwater fishes to livestock exclusion at the spatial scales of exclosures as is commonly constructed today. It is expected that this study will provide an important scientific basis, currently lacking, for understanding the ecological principles of restoration/enhancement of sustainable aquatic habitats for salmonids. Thus, the results of this work are likely to have important ramifications for habitat improvement projects within and beyond the general geographic region of northeastern Oregon.

  4. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network; final rule revision of comment period and effective dates--HRSA. Extension of comment period and delay of effective date for the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This document sets forth the revisions required by the Fiscal Year 1998 Supplemental Appropriations Act, Public Law 105-174, signed into law by the President on May 1, 1998. Section 4002 of that Act states that public comments on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) Final Rule are permitted until August 31, 1998, and that the OPTN rule will not become effective before October 1, 1998. This document is provided to notify the public about these provisions and to make corresponding changes to the regulation.

  5. Plasmasol, photovoltaic effect in a solar photo plasma. Final report of the project. Concerted action energy - 2003; Plasmasol, effet photovoltaique dans un photoplasma solaire. Rapport final du Projet. Action Concertee Energie - 2003 CNRS-MRNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this project was to study the feasibility of the solar energy photovoltaic conversion from the photo-ionization of a gaseous medium constituted of metallic vapors. After a bibliography and a recall of based physical data the report presents the absorption of the solar radiation by the cesium vapor, a simplified model of the photovoltaic effect in a photo-plasma, the experimental device and the results. (A.L.B.)

  6. DIMEC - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    1997-01-01

    Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF.......Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF....

  7. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasser, Alan H. [Fusion Theory and Computation Inc., Kingston, WA (United States)

    2018-02-02

    Final technical report on DE-SC0016106. This is the final technical report for a portion of the multi-institutional CEMM project. This report is centered around 3 publications and a seminar presentation, which have been submitted to E-Link.

  8. Korea-Japan Joint Research on Development of Seismic Capacity Evaluation and Enhancement Technology Considering Near-Fault Effect (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil; Kim, Min Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ohtori, Yasuki; Shiba, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Masato [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    We compiled the results of the source analysis obtained under the collaboration research. Recent construction scheme for source modeling adopted in Japan is described, and strong-motion prediction is performed assuming the scenario earthquakes occurring in the Ulsan fault system, Korea. Finally Qs values beneath the Korean inland crust are estimated using strong-motion records in Korea from the 2005 Off West Fukuoka earthquake (M7.0). Probabilistic seismic hazard for four NPP sites in Korea are evaluated, in which the site specific attenuation equations with Index SA developed for NPP sites are adopted. Furthermore, the uniform hazard spectra for the four NPP sites in Korea are obtained by conducting the PSHA by using the attenuation equations with the index of response spectra and seismic source model cases with maximum weights. The supporting tools for seismic response analysis, the evaluation tool for evaluating annual probability of failure, and system analysis program were developed for the collaboration. The tools were verified with theoretical results, the results written in the reference document of EQESRA, and so forth. The system analysis program was applied for the investigation of the effect of improving the seismic capacity of equipment. We evaluated the annual probability of failure of isolated and non-isolated EDG at Younggwang NPP site as the results of the collaboration. The input ground motion for generating the seismic fragility curve was determined based on the seismic hazard analysis. It was found that the annual probability of failure of isolated EDG is lower than that of non-isolated EDG.

  9. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thom, Ronald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Borde, Amy B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Woodley, Christa M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weitkamp, Laurie A. [Marine Sciences lab., Sequim, WA (United States); Buenau, Kate E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kropp, Roy K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  10. Quantification of the greenhouse effect gases at the territorial scale. Final report; Quantification des emissions de gaz a effet de serre a l'echelle territoriale. Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnin, G.; Lacassagne, S

    2003-07-01

    An efficient action against the greenhouse effect needs the implication of the local collectivities. To implement appropriate energy policies, deciders need information and tools to quantify the greenhouse gases and evaluate the obtained results of their greenhouse gases reduction policies. This study is a feasibility study of the tools realization, adapted to the french context. It was done in three steps: analysis of the existing tools, application to the french context and elaboration of the requirements of appropriate tools. This report presents the study methodology, the information analysis and the conclusions. (A.L.B.)

  11. The final effect ef extraction system in the uranyl nitrate-water-diethyl ether; El efecto final de la extraccion en el sistema nitro de uranilo-eter dietilico-agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Luina, A; Gutierrez Jodra, L; Miro, A R

    1957-07-01

    The solute transfer of uranyl nitrate from diallylether to water has been studied in a spray column using water as dispersed phase and a direction of extraction from ether to water. The column is 102 cm. long has a diameter of 4. 7 cm. The entrances of the phases are 7 7 cm. apart. The rates of flow of both phases have been used as variables and the concentration of the continuous phase has been determined; at different heights. The curves of logarithm of concentration of the continuous phase vs , distance to interphase show the presence of a drop of concentration in the entrance of the continuous phase. This depends on the rates of flow of the phases. No effect in the entrance of the dispersed phase has been found. (Author)

  12. MTX final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B. [ed.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K. [and others

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  13. MTX final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K.

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

  14. Growth effects after whole-tree harvest in final cut of Scots pine and Norway spruce forest. Final report; Tillvaexteffekternas storlek och uthaallighet efter skogsbraensleuttag i slutavverkning av tall och gran. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valinger, E. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Silviculture

    2001-12-01

    discs and branch material were weighed in the field to the nearest 0.1 g using a mechanical field scale. At the laboratory, the annual ring widths were measured along a transect using the WinDENDRO software. The arithmetic mean of the two corresponding annual ring widths was used in the further calculations to obtain diameters under bark for the successive years 1977-2000. After drying all sampled material was weighed to the nearest 0.1 g. When weighted, total dry weight of crown fractions and wood was calculated according to Albrektson, where the relation between dry and fresh weight of sample from each fraction was multiplied with total fresh weight of fraction. Treatment effects on survival and basal area growth on bark/ha after 24 years were analysed by using Tukey's studentized test on all main effect means. Multiple pair wise comparisons between treatments on single trees to establish the effects of treatment on the depending variables: dry weight of wood, needles, shoot axes and dead branches and in radial, height, and basal area and volume under bark increments were also made using Tukey's studentized test on all main effect means. Seedling survival was unaffected by treatments. Total basal area on bark (m{sup 2}/ha) was significantly reduced following WTH from the 15th year after planting. Trees on CH produced 20% more wood biomass, while biomass produced within the crown was unaffected by treatment. Height growth for trees after CH was higher the last year evaluated, while basal area and volume under bark were larger since the 12th year in comparison with WTH. BSH showed a decreased basal area growth under bark during the two four-year-periods 13-20 years after planting, and a decreased volume growth under bark since year 9 in comparison with CH. Radial growth was increased for CH up to 3 m of the stems during the 9-12 year period and at 3 m during the 13-16 year period. The study indicated a negative effect on stem growth following WTH and BSH

  15. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest

  16. Fundamental studies of the effect of crystal defects on CuInSe (sub 2)/CdS heterojunction behavior: Final report, 28 June 1993--30 June 1998; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockett, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The following results were obtained under the work funded by this subcontract: (1) Point defects and electronic properties of Cu(In(sub 1-x)Ga(sub x))Se(sub 2): New record results for hole mobilities in Cu(In(sub 1-x)Ga(sub x))Se(sub 2) based on single crystals grown by Rockett's group; Demonstrated the role of Ga in determining hole concentrations; Showed that Ga does not affect the hole mobility in this material and why this is the case; Determined the diffusion coefficient for Ga in single-crystal Cu(In(sub 1-x)Ga(sub x))Se(sub 2); Demonstrated the structure and optoelectronic properties of the CuIn(sub 3)Se(sub 5) ordered-defect phase of CuInSe(sub 2); Characterized the detailed effects of Na on Cu(In(sub 1-x)Ga(sub x))Se(sub 2) solar cells and on the fundamental properties of the material itself (reduces compensating donors in p-type materials); and In collaboration with groups at the Universities of Salford and Liverpool in the United Kingdom, studied the effect of ion implantation damage on Cu(In(sub 1-x)Ga(sub x))Se(sub 2) single-crystals. (2) Materials for and characterization of devices: Developed a novel contact metallurgy that improves adhesion to the underlying Mo back-contact in solar cells made with Cu(In(sub 1-x)Ga(sub x))Se(sub 2); (This material has also yielded substantial novel materials science behaviors, including grain rotation and growth prior to phase separation in a metastable binary alloy.) Characterized the electroluminescence as a function of temperature and Ga content in Cu(In(sub 1-x)Ga(sub x))Se(sub 2) solar cells and showed that the radiative recombination pathways are not band-to-band as in normal semiconductors, but rather, proceed through defect states; and Working with a group at the University of Uppsala in Sweden, demonstrated novel aspects of the bonding and chemistry of dip-coated CdS heterojunction materials used as heterojunction

  17. Final report of effect of irradiation on microstructure and mechanical properties on copper and copper alloys. (ITER R and D Task No. T13 and T213)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.

    1998-04-01

    The present note is the final report on investigations carried out under ITER Task No. T13 EU (1994). Most of the results of these investigations have been published in the open literature either as articles or reports. A list of the appropriate references are given. Results that have been presented at various meetings but have not been published are summarized in the present document. In addition, the present report also clarifies the status of the deliverables in the ITER Task No. T213 (EU (1995). Finally, the main conclusions emerging from these investigations are highlighted. (au)

  18. Final focus nomenclature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.

    1986-01-01

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number

  19. Final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  20. WMO Marine Final Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Final reports of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Marine Meteorology, Commission for Synoptic Meteorology, and Commission for Basic...

  1. Transacsys PLC - Final Results

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Final results from Transacsys PLC. A subsidary of this company was set up to develop the CERN EDH system into a commercial product but incurred too much financial loss so the project was cancelled (1/2 page).

  2. Final focus nomenclature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, R.

    1986-08-08

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number. (LEW)

  3. Data breaches. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-11

    This document adopts, without change, the interim final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2007, addressing data breaches of sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This final rule implements certain provisions of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006. The regulations prescribe the mechanisms for taking action in response to a data breach of sensitive personal information.

  4. Hydrological and hydrogeological effects of an open repository in Forsmark. Final MIKE SHE flow modelling results for the Environmental Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maartensson, Erik; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran

    2010-07-01

    This report presents methodology and modelling results concerning a deep-rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark. Specifically, the modelling tools MIKE SHE, MIKE 11 and MOUSE are used to quantify the groundwater inflow to the repository and associated hydrological and hydrogeological effects during the construction and operation phases. The modelling results presented in the report provide input to the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) that will be part of a permit application according to the Environmental Code. Based on an existing MIKE SHE model for Forsmark, the first step of the modelling process was to implement an updated hydrogeological model of the bedrock and to increase the vertical and horizontal extents of the model domain. Other model updates involve the vegetation classification, and implementation of SFR (final repository for short-lived radioactive waste) and the subsurface drainage system at the nearby nuclear power plant. The updated model was calibrated using measured data on groundwater levels in the Quaternary deposits and the bedrock, water levels in lakes, and stream discharges. The calibrated model was then used for simulation of undisturbed conditions (i.e. without the repository) as a reference for modelling results obtained for disturbed conditions (with the repository). The modelling results for undisturbed conditions that are presented in the report closely resemble those of the final MIKE SHE site descriptive modelling (SDM-Site Forsmark). The repository layout was implemented as pipe links (segments) in the modelling tool MOUSE, and the implemented layout was used for the modelling of disturbed conditions. The study uses an updated and verified MIKE SHE-MOUSE coupling routine that is specifically adapted for calculation of groundwater inflow to grouted rock tunnels. The vertical shafts of the repository are implemented in the form of MIKE SHE grid cells with atmospheric pressure. Modelling results for disturbed

  5. Hydrological and hydrogeological effects of an open repository in Forsmark. Final MIKE SHE flow modelling results for the Environmental Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maartensson, Erik; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran (DHI Sverige AB (Sweden))

    2010-07-15

    This report presents methodology and modelling results concerning a deep-rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark. Specifically, the modelling tools MIKE SHE, MIKE 11 and MOUSE are used to quantify the groundwater inflow to the repository and associated hydrological and hydrogeological effects during the construction and operation phases. The modelling results presented in the report provide input to the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) that will be part of a permit application according to the Environmental Code. Based on an existing MIKE SHE model for Forsmark, the first step of the modelling process was to implement an updated hydrogeological model of the bedrock and to increase the vertical and horizontal extents of the model domain. Other model updates involve the vegetation classification, and implementation of SFR (final repository for short-lived radioactive waste) and the subsurface drainage system at the nearby nuclear power plant. The updated model was calibrated using measured data on groundwater levels in the Quaternary deposits and the bedrock, water levels in lakes, and stream discharges. The calibrated model was then used for simulation of undisturbed conditions (i.e. without the repository) as a reference for modelling results obtained for disturbed conditions (with the repository). The modelling results for undisturbed conditions that are presented in the report closely resemble those of the final MIKE SHE site descriptive modelling (SDM-Site Forsmark). The repository layout was implemented as pipe links (segments) in the modelling tool MOUSE, and the implemented layout was used for the modelling of disturbed conditions. The study uses an updated and verified MIKE SHE-MOUSE coupling routine that is specifically adapted for calculation of groundwater inflow to grouted rock tunnels. The vertical shafts of the repository are implemented in the form of MIKE SHE grid cells with atmospheric pressure. Modelling results for disturbed

  6. Exterior insulating shutter final prototype design. Final report, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, G.A.; Kinney, L.F.

    1982-12-01

    The final prototype shutter described uses sliding panels composed of inch-thick thermax sandwiched between 60 mil thick ultraviolet-resistant plastic on the outside, and 20 mil stryrene on the inside. The shuter system was shown to have an effective R-value of 6 using ASHRAE procedures to convert from still air conditions to 15 mph wind conditions in a simulated cold environment. Tests were performed for cyclical operation, vulnerability to ice and wind, thermal performance, and air infiltration. Marketing efforts are described. Cost effectiveness is determined via present value analysis. (LEW)

  7. Natural gas tariffs peak-free with freedom of choice for contracts. Final report of the project 'Balancing with cost-effectiveness with regard to the profile contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    Market gardeners who approach the profile boundary of 170,000 m 3 gas may face high gas prices in certain situations. LTO Glaskracht Nederland (the Dutch association of entrepreneurs in this sector) examined this problem together with LTO Groeiservice (Organisation for Agriculture and Horticulture Growing). The final report provides recommendations for market gardeners and the organizations LTO Glaskracht Nederland and Productschap Tuinbouw (Commodity Board for Horticulture) [nl

  8. Effects by the microstructure after hot and cold rolling on the texture and grain size after final annealing of ferritic non-oriented FeSi electrical steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J.; Stöcker, A.; Franke, A.; Kawalla, R.

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic properties of fully processed non-oriented FeSi electrical steel are characterized by their magnetization behavior and specific magnetic losses. The magnetic properties are determined by the texture and microstructure. Less gamma fiber intensity and a high intensity of preferable texture components, especially cube fiber texture, are desirable to obtain an excellent magnetizing behavior. Furthermore, large grain sizes are necessary to reach low values of the specific magnetic losses. The fabrication route of the fully processed non-oriented electrical steels comprises a heavy cold rolling of the hot rolled material before final annealing. To fulfill the requirements on large grain size for low loss materials, grain growth, which appears after complete recrystallization, plays an important role. In this paper we will analyze the influence of different microstructures of the hot strip and the resulting microstructure after cold rolling on the appearance of recrystallization and grain growth after final annealing. The evolution of texture reflects the present ongoing softening processes: recovery, recrystallization and finally grain growth at the given annealing conditions. It will be shown that the image of texture at recrystallization is remarkable different from the texture at grain growth. Substantially grain growth is obtained at lower annealing temperatures for an optimum microstructure of the hot rolled material.

  9. Comparison of effects of training programs for final year nursing students in Turkey: differences in self-efficacy with regard to information literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbıçakçı, Şeyda; Gezer, Nurdan; Bilik, Özlem

    2015-02-01

    Information literate person are aware of where and how they can obtain the information they need. Little is known about student nurses information literacy skills in different education programs. To find out how final year nursing students rated their own abilities to acquire new information. This study used comparative and descriptive cross-sectional surveys. Participants were final year students in two different programs, in two different universities in Turkey. The study sample consisted of final year nursing students who received training in Classic Learning (N: 61) and Problem-Based Learning (N: 96). As an evaluation instrument for the perceptions of the students their own information literacy, a scale consisting of 28 questions with 7 Likert ratings for each was used (min: 28, max: 196). The return rates of the surveys were 96.7% in the school with classic training and 81.2% in the school with PBL. It was found that the average scores of the students were high, with a mean of 137±29 in the school where the classic training program was carried out, and 163±21 in the school where the training was PBL. A statistically significant difference was found by comparing the average scores of the two independent groups (t : -6.0; pinformation literacy. We conclude that training programs should be reviewed, and new methods should be developed based on these concepts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects by the microstructure after hot and cold rolling on the texture and grain size after final annealing of ferritic non-oriented FeSi electrical steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schneider

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic properties of fully processed non-oriented FeSi electrical steel are characterized by their magnetization behavior and specific magnetic losses. The magnetic properties are determined by the texture and microstructure. Less gamma fiber intensity and a high intensity of preferable texture components, especially cube fiber texture, are desirable to obtain an excellent magnetizing behavior. Furthermore, large grain sizes are necessary to reach low values of the specific magnetic losses. The fabrication route of the fully processed non-oriented electrical steels comprises a heavy cold rolling of the hot rolled material before final annealing. To fulfill the requirements on large grain size for low loss materials, grain growth, which appears after complete recrystallization, plays an important role. In this paper we will analyze the influence of different microstructures of the hot strip and the resulting microstructure after cold rolling on the appearance of recrystallization and grain growth after final annealing. The evolution of texture reflects the present ongoing softening processes: recovery, recrystallization and finally grain growth at the given annealing conditions. It will be shown that the image of texture at recrystallization is remarkable different from the texture at grain growth. Substantially grain growth is obtained at lower annealing temperatures for an optimum microstructure of the hot rolled material.

  11. Documenting the Effectiveness of Cosorption of Airborne Contaminants by a Field-Installed Active Desiccant System: Final Report - Phase 2D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J

    2003-01-23

    The final report for Phase 1 of this research effort (ORNL/SUB/94-SV004/1) concluded that a significant market opportunity would exist for active desiccant systems if it could be demonstrated that they can remove a significant proportion of common airborne contaminants while simultaneously performing the primary function of dehumidifying a stream of outdoor air or recirculated building air. If the engineering community begins to follow the intent of ASHRAE Standard 62, now part of all major building codes, the outdoor air in many major cities may need to be pre-cleaned before it is introduced into occupied spaces. Common air contaminant cosorption capability would provide a solution to three important aspects of the ASHRAE 62-89 standard that have yet to be effectively addressed by heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment manufacturers: (1) The ASHRAE standard defines acceptable outdoor air quality. If the outdoor air contains unacceptable levels of certain common outdoor air contaminants (e.g., sulfur dioxide, ozone), then the standard requires that these contaminants be removed from the outdoor air stream to reach compliance with the acceptable outdoor air quality guidelines. (2) Some engineers prefer to apply a filtration or prescriptive approach rather than a ventilation approach to solving indoor air quality problems. The ASHRAE standard recognizes this approach provided that the filtration technology exists to remove the gaseous contaminants encountered. The performance of current gaseous filtration technologies is not well documented, and they can be costly to maintain because the life of the filter is limited and the cost is high. Moreover, it is not easy to determine when the filters need changing. In such applications, an additional advantage provided by the active desiccant system would be that the same piece of equipment could control space humidity and provide filtration, even during unoccupied periods, if the active desiccant system

  12. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Ross

    2003-04-30

    The Final Technical Report summarizes research accomplishments and Publications in the period of 5/1/99 to 4/30/03 done on the grant. Extensive progress was made in the period covered by this report in the areas of chemical kinetics of non-linear systems; spatial structures, reaction - diffusion systems, and thermodynamic and stochastic theory of electrochemical and general systems.

  13. Regional final energy consumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report comments the differences observed between the French regions and also between these regions and national data in terms of final energy consumption per inhabitant, per GDP unit, and per sector (housing and office building, transport, industry, agriculture). It also comments the evolutions during the last decades, identifies the most recent trends

  14. The 'final order' problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, RH; Haneveld, WKK

    1998-01-01

    When the service department of a company selling machines stops producing and supplying spare parts for certain machines, customers are offered an opportunity to place a so-called final order for these spare parts. We focus on one customer with one machine. The customer plans to use this machine up

  15. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  16. Effects of disturbance on ecosystem dynamics of tundra and riparian vegetation: A project in the R4D program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Models were proposed as research tools to test the basic understanding of the structure and function of arctic ecosystems, as a means for providing initial management assessments of potential response to energy-related development, and as a vehicle for extrapolation of research results to other arctic sites and landscapes. This final summary report reviews progress made on models at a variety of scales from nutrient uptake by individual roots to nutrient availability within arctic landscapes, and examines potentials and critical limitations of these models for providing insight on patch and landscape level function in tundra regions.

  17. Cassini's Grand Finale Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    After 13 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn ended in a science-rich blaze of glory. Cassini sent back its final bits of unique science data on September 15, 2017, as it plunged into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Cassini's final phase covered roughly ten months and ended with the first time exploration of the region between the rings and planet. In late 2016 Cassini transitioned to a series of 20 Ring Grazing orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring, providing close flybys of tiny ring moons, including Pan, Daphnis and Atlas, and high-resolution views of Saturn's A and F rings. A final Titan flyby in late April 2017 propelled Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its Grand Finale orbits. Comprised of 22 orbits, Cassini repeatedly dove between Saturn's innermost rings and upper atmosphere to answer fundamental questions unattainable earlier in the mission. The last orbit turned the spacecraft into the first Saturn atmosphere probe. The Grand Finale orbits provided highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and in-situ sampling of the ring particle composition, Saturn's atmosphere, plasma, and innermost radiation belts. The gravitational field was measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the deeper atmosphere, and mass of the rings. The magnetic field provided insight into the physical nature of the magnetic dynamo and structure of the internal magnetic field. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer sampled the upper atmosphere for molecules that escape the atmosphere in addition to molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer directly sampled the composition from different parts of the main rings for the first time. Fields and particles instruments directly measured the plasma environment between the rings and planet. Science highlights and new mysteries collected in the Grand

  18. Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System; Technical Addendum to the Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Will; Tohtz, Joel

    1990-03-01

    This addendum to the Final Report presents results of research on the zooplankton and fish communities of Flathead Lade. The intent of the Study has been to identify the impacts of hydroelectric operations at Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee an to propose mitigation for these impacts. Recent changes in the trophic ecology of the lake, have reduced the survival of kokanee. In the last three year the Study has been redirected to identify, if possible, the biological mechanisms which now limit kokanee survival, and to test methods of enhancing the kokanee fishery by artificial supplementation. These studies were necessary to the formulation of mitigation plans. The possibility of successfully rehabilitating the kokanee population, is the doubt because of change in the trophic ecology of the system. This report first presents the results of studies of the population dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, upon which planktivorous fish depend. A modest effort was directed to measuring the spawning escapement of kokanee in 1988. Because of its relevance to the study, we also report assessments of 1989 kokanee spawning escapement. Hydroacoustic assessment of the abundance of all fish species in Flathead Lake was conducted in November, 1988. Summary of the continued efforts to document the growth rates and food habits of kokanee and lake whitefish are included in this report. Revised kokanee spawning and harvest estimates, and management implications of the altered ecology of Flathead Lake comprise the final sections of this addendum. 83 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

  19. CMS Is Finally Completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Yet another step in the completion of the Large Hadron Collider was taken yesterday morning, as the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid was lowered nearly 100 meters bellow ground. After more than eight years of work at the world's most powerful particle accelerator, scientists hope that they will be able to start initial experiments with the LHC until the end of this year.

  20. Catarse e Final Feliz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ávila

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: É a certeza de que nada mais – ou nada importante – pode acontecer após o final de um conto que permite o acontecimento da catarse. Se na maioria das narrativas existe algum tipo de dénouement, em algumas delas isso acontece de maneira especialmente satisfatória e afirmativa. O conto de fadas é uma dessas formas narrativas onde o efeito catártico é extremo e preenche objetivos específicos, de acordo com Bruno Bettelheim. Hollywood mimetizou essa forma como estratégia de sedução, iniciando a tradição do final feliz no cinema. A partir do conto de fadas Cinderela, em diferentes versões, juntamente com a animação homônima da Disney e ainda duas versões do filme Sabrina, será traçada aqui uma relação entre a catarse e o final feliz nos contos de fada, bem como seu uso pela indústria cultural. Palavras-chave: catarse, contos de fada, Hollywood

  1. Comparison of cost effectiveness of risk reduction among different energy systems: French case studies. Final report of the co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques

    1989-08-01

    This report presents the three French case studies performed in the framework of the coordinated research program on 'Comparison of Cost-effectiveness of Risk Reduction among different Energy Systems': Cost effectiveness of robotics and remote tooling for occupational risk reduction at a nuclear fuel fabrication facility; Cost-effectiveness of protection actions to reduce occupational exposures in underground uranium mines; Cost-effectiveness of safety measures to reduce public risk associated with the transportation of UF 6 by truck and trains

  2. Theoretical studies of multistep processes, isospin effects in nuclear scattering, and meson and baryon interactions in nuclear physics. Final technical report, 1 September 1979-30 April 1986,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, V.A.; Landau, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    The studies included meson exchange current effects, quark effects, and relativistic/Dirac effects deduced from spin observables in p -3 He scattering, coupled bound and continuum eigenstates in momentum space for kaons and antiprotons, and charge symmetry violation in π scattering from trinucleons. Additional studies included microscopic optical potential calculations, multiple step rpocesses, and differences in neutron and proton mutipole matrix elements in low lying collective states and in giant resonances

  3. Comparison of cost effectiveness of risk reduction among different energy systems: French case studies. Final report of the co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochard, Jacques [ed.

    1989-08-01

    This report presents the three French case studies performed in the framework of the coordinated research program on 'Comparison of Cost-effectiveness of Risk Reduction among different Energy Systems': Cost effectiveness of robotics and remote tooling for occupational risk reduction at a nuclear fuel fabrication facility; Cost-effectiveness of protection actions to reduce occupational exposures in underground uranium mines; Cost-effectiveness of safety measures to reduce public risk associated with the transportation of UF{sub 6} by truck and trains.

  4. Comparison of cost effectiveness of risk reduction among different energy systems: French case studies. Final report for the period 1 May 1982 - 20 February 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochard, J [CEPN Centre d` Etude sur l` Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine Nucleaire, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France)

    1989-08-01

    The report presents the three French case studies performed in the framework of the co-ordinated research programme on ``Comparison of Cost-Effectiveness of Risk Reduction Among Different Energy Systems``: cost-effectiveness of robotics and remote tooling for occupational risk reduction at a nuclear fuel fabrication facility; cost-effectiveness of protection actions to reduce occupational exposure in underground uranium mines; cost effectiveness of safety measures to reduce public risk associated with the transportation of UF{sub 6} by truck and trains. Figs and tabs.

  5. Comparison of cost effectiveness of risk reduction among different energy systems: French case studies. Final report for the period 1 May 1982 - 20 February 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1989-08-01

    The report presents the three French case studies performed in the framework of the co-ordinated research programme on ''Comparison of Cost-Effectiveness of Risk Reduction Among Different Energy Systems'': cost-effectiveness of robotics and remote tooling for occupational risk reduction at a nuclear fuel fabrication facility; cost-effectiveness of protection actions to reduce occupational exposure in underground uranium mines; cost effectiveness of safety measures to reduce public risk associated with the transportation of UF 6 by truck and trains. Figs and tabs

  6. DANAERO MW: Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Bak, Christian; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    This report describes the results of the EUDP funded DANAERO MW II project carried out by DTU Wind Energy (formerly Risø DTU) and the industrial partners, LM Wind Power, Vestas Wind Systems A/S and Siemens Wind Power. An overview of the data available from the project as well as the results from...... analysis of the data is given with the main objective to explore in detail the influence of atmospheric and wake turbulence on MW turbine performance, loading and stability. Finally, validation and demonstration of simulation codes are carried out....

  7. The final cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    Thursday 29th May, the cool-down of the final sector (sector 4-5) of LHC has begun, one week after the start of the cool-down of sector 1-2. It will take five weeks for the sectors to be cooled from room temperature to 5 K and a further two weeks to complete the cool down to 1.9 K and the commissioning of cryogenic instrumentation, as well as to fine tune the cryogenic plants and the cooling loops of cryostats.Nearly a year and half has passed since sector 7-8 was cooled for the first time in January 2007. For Laurent Tavian, AT/CRG Group Leader, reaching the final phase of the cool down is an important milestone, confirming the basic design of the cryogenic system and the ability to operate complete sectors. “All the sectors have to operate at the same time otherwise we cannot inject the beam into the machine. The stability and reliability of the cryogenic system and its utilities are now very important. That will be the new challenge for the coming months,” he explains. The status of the cool down of ...

  8. The effect of pigment matrix, temperature and amount of carrier on the yield and final color properties of spray dried purple corn (Zea mays L.) cob anthocyanin powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Fei; Giusti, M Monica

    2017-07-15

    Spray drying is an economic technique to produce anthocyanin-based colorants. High pigments yields with minimum color degradation are desirable to maximize quality and profits. This study evaluated the impacts of purple corncob (PCC) anthocyanin extraction matrices (hot water, 40% ethanol, C18 purified), drying inlet temperature (130, 150, 170°C) and amount of carrier (2%, 5%, 10% maltodextrin) on the yields and quality of PCC anthocyanin powders. Monomeric and polymeric anthocyanins, color properties (CIELch, haze), and pigments composition before and after spray drying were determined. The yield and final color quality of spray dried PCC anthocyanins were affected (p<0.05) by all parameters evaluated. The pigment matrix, inlet temperature, and carrier amount had biggest impacts on product water solubility, pigments degradation and yield, respectively. The optimal combination of hot water extracts spray dried with 5% maltodextrin at 150°C gave the highest pigment yield (∼90%) with good solubility with the least color loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION MEASURES ON KNOWLEDGE ABOUT RABIES AND ITS PREVENTIVE MEASURES AMONG FINAL YEAR NURSING STUDENTS OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Dixit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rabies continues to be a major public health challenge with around 55,000 deaths every year. Amongst the health care providers nursing personnel are often the first point of contact and hence need to be well trained in the management of rabies cases. Methods: The present study was an educational intervention study conducted among 100 final year nursing students of a Medical College Hospital to assess the knowledge regarding rabies and its transmission, first aid measures undertaken, and pre and post exposure prophylaxis measures employed to prevent the infection. Results: 66% of the students knew about the signs and symptoms of the disease, post intervention this increased to 87%. Knowledge regarding animal bites which transmit rabies improved by 86 % mode of transmission by 49 % and first aid measures undertaken following an animal bite by 12%. 15% of the students knew about the correct site and route of PEP; post intervention 91% knew about it, 87% increase was observed as regards the dose of vaccine to be administered and 73% students correctly knew about the PEP schedule post educational intervention. Knowledge regarding groups / individuals who need to receive pre-exposure prophylaxis increased by 33% and that of the schedule of pre-exposure prophylaxis by 53%. The mean pre-intervention score was 6.95 and mean post-intervention score was 13.51; the results being statistically significant. Conclusion: Substantial improvement in knowledge about the disease was noted amongst the nursing students following the educational intervention session.

  10. Final Technical Report: Role of Methanotrophs in Metal Mobilization, Metal Immobilization and Mineral Weathering: Effects on the In Situ Microbial Community and the Sustainability of Subsurface Water Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semrau, Jeremy D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); DiSpirito, Alan A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-11-06

    Activities from this DOE sponsored project can be divided into four broad areas: (1) investigations into the potential of methanobactin, a biogenic metal-binding agent produced by methanotrophs, in mitigating mercury toxicity; (2) elucidation of the genetic basis for methanobactin synthesis from methanotrophs; (3) examination of differential gene expression of M. trichosporium OB3b when grown in the presence of varying amounts of copper and/or cerium, and (4) collection and characterization of soil cores from Savannah River Test Site to determine the ubiquity of methanobactin producing methanotrophs. From these efforts, we have conclusively shown that methanobactin can strongly bind mercury as Hg[II], and in so doing significantly reduce the toxicity of this metal to microbes. Further, we have deduced the genetic basis of methanobactin production in methanotrophs, enabling us to construct mutants such that we can now ascribe function to different genes as well as propose a pathway for methanobactin biosynthesis. We have also clear evidence that copper and cerium (as an example of a rare earth element) dramatically affect gene expression in methanotrophs, and thus have an important impact on the activity and application of these microbes to a variety of environmental and industrial issues. Finally, we successfully isolated one methanotroph from the deep subsurface of the Savannah River Test Site and characterized the ability of different forms of methanobactin to mobilize copper and mercury from these soils.

  11. The Goettingen high-Tc superconductivity research pool: the effects of structure and structural defects on the performance of high-Tc superconductors. Final reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The compilation presents the final reports prepared by the various teams of the Goettingen research pool for high-Tc superconductivity. The reports are entitled: Structure and phase transition in high-Tc superconductors (Krebs/Freyhardt). Preparation and critical properties of high-Tc superconductors (Freyhardt/Heinemann/Zimmermann). EMC measurements in high-Tc superconductors (Bormann/Noelting). Phase analysis of the various phases observed in the preparation of high-Tc superconductors (Faupel/Hehenkamp). Positron annihilation in high-Tc superconductors (Hehenkamp). Preparation and characterization of thin films consisting of superconducting oxide ceramics (v. Minnigerode/Samwer). High-Tc superconductivity in monocrystals (Winzer/Beuermann). Microwave conductivity in high-Tc superconductors (Helberg). High-resolution structural analyses in high-Tc superconductors (Kupcik/Bente). Synthesis, structural analyses and spectroscopy of high-Tc superconductors (Bente). Synthesis, monocrystal growing, crystal structure of high-Tc superconductors (Schwarzmann). Ion-beam-aided studies in high-Tc superconductors (Uhrmacher). (orig./MM) [de

  12. Final Report for Project DE-SC0006958: "An Investigation of the Effects of magnetic Fields and Collisionality on Shock Formation in Radiatively Cooled Plasma Flows"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2014-11-05

    We have developed a new experimental platform to study bow-shock formation in plasma flows generated using an inverse wire array z-pinch. We have made significant progress on the analysis of both hydrodynamic and magnetized shocks using this system. The hydrodynamic experiments show formation of a well-defined Mach cone, and highly localized shock strong associated with radiative losses and rapidly cooling over the shock. Magnetized shocks show that the balance of magnetic and ram pressures dominate the evolution of the shock region, generating a low plasma beta void around the target. Manuscripts are in preparation for publication on both these topics. We have also published the development of a novel diagnostic method which allow recovery of interferometry and self-emission data along the same line of sight. Finally, we have carried out work to integrate a kinetic routine with the 3D MHD code Gorgon, however it remains to complete this process. Both undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in both the experimental work and publications.

  13. EXAFS analysis of the L3 edge of Ce in CeO2: effects of multielectron excitations and final-state mixed valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, E.; Andreatta, D.; Colavita, P.E.; Vlaic, G.

    1999-01-01

    Cerium oxide (IV) (CeO 2 ) is extensively employed in heterogeneous catalysis, particularly as a promoter of noble metal action in three-way catalysts. For this reason there is a great scientific and economical interest in the development of any possible chemical or structural analysis technique that could provide information on these systems. EXAFS spectroscopy has revealed itself as a powerful technique for structural characterization of such catalysts. Unfortunately, good quality K-edge spectra of cerium are not yet easily obtainable because of the high photon energy required (>40 keV). On the other hand, at lower energies it is easy to collect very good spectra of the L 3 edge (5.5 keV), but L 3 -edge spectra of cerium (IV) are characterized by the presence of two undesired additional phenomena that interfere with EXAFS analysis: final-state mixed-valence behaviour and intense multi-electron excitations. Here, a comparative analysis of the K, L 3 , L 2 and L 1 edges of Ce in CeO 2 has been made and a procedure for obtaining structural parameters from L 3 -edge EXAFS, even in the presence of these features, has been developed. This procedure could allow further studies of catalytic compounds containing tetravalent cerium surrounded by oxygen ligands. (au)

  14. Effect of Biodiesel Composition on Engine Emissions from a DDC Series 60 Diesel Engine: Final Report; Report 2 in a Series of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graboski, M. S.; McCormick, R. L.; Alleman, T. L.; Herring, A. M.

    2003-02-01

    NREL conducted an investigation of various biodiesel fuels produced from waste oils in order to determine the effect of biodiesel source material and ester molecular structure, nitrogen oxides, and certain unregulated pollutants.

  15. Environmental costs and benefits case study: nuclear power plant. Quantification and economic valuation of selected environmental impacts/effects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This case study is an application, to a nuclear power plant, of the methodology for quantifying environmental costs and benefits, contained in the regional energy plan, adopted in April, 1983, by the Northwest Power Planning Council, pursuant to Public Law 96-501.The study is based on plant number 2 of the Washington Public Power Supply System (WNP-2), currently nearing completion on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. This report describes and documents efforts to quantify and estimate monetary values for the following seven areas of environmental effects: radiation/health effects, socioeconomic/infrastructure effects, consumptive use of water, psychological/health effects (fear/stress), waste management, nuclear power plant accidents, and decommissioning costs. 103 references

  16. Effective clinical-scale production of dendritic cell vaccines by monocyte elutriation directly in medium, subsequent culture in bags and final antigen loading using peptides or RNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Michael; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Strasser, Erwin; Hendelmeier, Martin; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Schuler, Gerold; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination approaches are advancing fast into the clinic. The major obstacle for further improvement is the current lack of a simple functionally "closed" system to generate standardized monocyte-derived (mo) DC vaccines. Here, we significantly optimized the use of the Elutra counterflow elutriation system to enrich monocytic DC precursors by (1) developing an algorithm to avoid red blood cell debulking and associated monocyte loss before elutriation, and (2) by elutriation directly in culture medium rather than phosphate-buffered saline. Upon elutriation the bags containing the collected monocytes are simply transferred into the incubator to generate DC progeny as the final "open" washing step is no longer required. Elutriation resulted in significantly more (> or = 2-fold) and purer DC than the standard gradient centrifugation/adherence-based monocyte enrichment, whereas morphology, maturation markers, viability, migratory capacity, and T cell stimulatory capacity were identical. Subsequently, we compared RNA transfection, as this is an increasingly used approach to load DC with antigen. Elutra-derived and adherence-derived DC could be electroporated with similar, high efficiency (on average >85% green fluorescence protein positive), and appeared also equal in antigen expression kinetics. Both Elutra-derived and adherence-derived DC, when loaded with the MelanA peptide or electroporated with MelanA RNA, showed a high T cell stimulation capacity, that is, priming of MelanA-specific CD8+ T cells. Our optimized Elutra-based procedure is straightforward, clearly superior to the standard gradient centrifugation/plastic adherence protocol, and now allows the generation of large numbers of peptide-loaded or RNA-transfected DC in a functionally closed system.

  17. Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical and nuclear explosions. Final technical report, June 9, 1994--October 9, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, A.A.

    1995-04-01

    It was found that in the first approximation the mechanical effect of underground nuclear explosion is analogous to the effect of chemical explosion. Really qualitative analysis shows that accompanying mechanical effects of nuclear and chemical explosions are the same: in the both cases explosion consequences are characterized by formation of the camouplet cavity (crater after explosion near free surface), destruction of the rock massif near explosion centre, creation of the stress wave, which forms seismoexplosive effect a long distance from explosion epicentre. Qualitative likeness of underground nuclear explosions and chemical explosions is the base of modelling the mechanical effects of the underground nuclear explosion. In this paper we`ll compare two explosions: nuclear (15-04-84) and chemical (27.06.95) with large power. These explosions were realized at the same geological conditions at Degelen test area, which is a part of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. In the case of the nuclear explosion, the charge was disposed in the face of the deep horizontal gallery. The charge of the chemical explosion was a semisphere from explosives at the rock massif surface. In the both case rock massif behavior after explosions was investigated at underground conditions (in the case of chemical explosion -- in the long underground excavation from explosion epicentre). Mechanical effects from the nuclear and chemical explosions were investigated with the same methods. The changes in geological medium after a large-scale explosive actions will be analyzed in detail too. Investigations of the influence of tectonic energy on the mechanical effects after underground nuclear, explosions represents the main interest. In this paper we`ll discuss this question on the data from underground nuclear explosion, realized 08.09.89 in the deep well at the Balapan test area, at the Semipalatinsk Test Site.

  18. Pathophysiologic effects of stable iodine used as a thyroidal blocking agent to reduce thyroid radiation exposure. Final progress report, November 1, 1976--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    In order to determine whether acute administration of iodide leads to any undesirable effects in the general population, we studied a group of patients who received iodinated radiographic contrast medium in the course of routine x-ray diagnostic procedures. We were particularly interested in investigating the possibility that administration of iodine could damage thyroid follicular cells leading to release of intrathyroidal antigens such as thyroglobulin into the blood. An increase in serum thyroglobulin might, in turn, either initiate or exacerbate thyroid autoimmunity in susceptible individuals, leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. We looked for undesirable effects due to the administration of iodide in 3 ways: a possible acute toxic effect on thyroid follicular cells was investigated by determining serum thyroglobulin immediately prior to and 24 hours after injection of iodinated contrast medium; an effect on thyroid autoimmunity was investigated by determining thyroid autoantibodies immediately prior to and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinated contrast medium; and acute and chronic effects on thyroid function were investigated by performing thyroid function tests immediately prior to, 24 hours after and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinateed contrast medium.

  19. Pathophysiologic effects of stable iodine used as a thyroidal blocking agent to reduce thyroid radiation exposure. Final progress report, November 1, 1976--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    In order to determine whether acute administration of iodide leads to any undesirable effects in the general population, we studied a group of patients who received iodinated radiographic contrast medium in the course of routine x-ray diagnostic procedures. We were particularly interested in investigating the possibility that administration of iodine could damage thyroid follicular cells leading to release of intrathyroidal antigens such as thyroglobulin into the blood. An increase in serum thyroglobulin might, in turn, either initiate or exacerbate thyroid autoimmunity in susceptible individuals, leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. We looked for undesirable effects due to the administration of iodide in 3 ways: a possible acute toxic effect on thyroid follicular cells was investigated by determining serum thyroglobulin immediately prior to and 24 hours after injection of iodinated contrast medium; an effect on thyroid autoimmunity was investigated by determining thyroid autoantibodies immediately prior to and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinated contrast medium; and acute and chronic effects on thyroid function were investigated by performing thyroid function tests immediately prior to, 24 hours after and 3 to 6 months after injection of iodinateed contrast medium

  20. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  1. AIPM Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mookken

    2006-06-30

    The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

  2. Chernobyl: the final warning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, R.P.; Hauser, Thomas.

    1988-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a book has been written with firstly an introduction to the basic principles and development of nuclear power, followed by a brief review of previous nuclear power plant accidents and then a short account of the Chernobyl accident itself. The main text of the book however contains the personal story of Dr. Robert Peter Yale, head of the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles who travelled to Russia six times to help the victims of the Chernobyl accident. The final part of the book discusses the safety of nuclear power and the dangers of the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (U.K.)

  3. Multimuon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, J.-M.

    1980-04-01

    Multimuon final states have been detected by 3 experiments in the interactions of the muon beams of CERN (280 GeV) and FNAL (210 GeV) with heavy targets. For the first time production of J/PSI (3100) by space-like photons has been observed and its dependence on ν, Q 2 and t compared to Vector Dominance and photon-gluon fusion models. Also a clear signal has been seen for 3μ above QED tridents (outside J/PSI mass range) and 2μ events which are well described by charm production. An upper limit for the production of the T by high energy muons has been set

  4. Stardust Final Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Minisci, Edmondo; Summerer, Leopold; McGinty, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Space debris and asteroid impacts pose a very real, very near-term threat to Earth. In order to help study and mitigate these risks, the Stardust program was formed in 2013. This training and research network was devoted to developing and mastering techniques such as removal, deflection, exploitation, and tracking. This book is a collection of many of the topics addressed at the Final Stardust Conference, describing the latest in asteroid monitoring and how engineering efforts can help us reduce space debris. It is a selection of studies bringing together specialists from universities, research institutions, and industry, tasked with the mission of pushing the boundaries of space research with innovative ideas and visionary concepts. Topics covered by the Symposium: Orbital and Attitude Dynamics Modeling Long Term Orbit and Attitude Evolution Particle Cloud Modeling and Simulation Collision and Impact Modelling and Simulation, Re-entry Modeling and Simulation Asteroid Origins and Characterization Orbit and A...

  5. Final technical report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    gas jet chamber and laser beam path from the final focusing mirror. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1: Fundamental studies of cutting front mechanisms, beam propagation, nozzle design and chemical reactions in the cut kerf with special emphasize on high laser powers and thick sections...... cutting nozzle which can be adjusted independently to the laser beam has been developed. The position of the focus relative the workpiece can be adjusted to cutting applications with relatively large processing windows, i.e. both mild and stainless steels, and of a broad thickness range. A build-in auto......This project entails research with the goal to extend laser cutting of steel based metals to thickness above 20 mm and laser powers in the 10 kW range, with adequate accuracy and economically viable cutting speeds. The technical approach is to develop mirror based cutting heads with truly coaxial...

  6. The effects of radiation on intermediate-level waste forms. Task 3 characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) no. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, C.R.; Phillips, D.C.; Burnay, S.G.; Spindler, W.E.; Lyon, C.E.; Winter, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this programme was to determine the effects of radiation on the properties of intermediate-level waste forms relevant to their storage and disposal. It had two overall aims: to provide immediate data on the effect of radiation on important European ILW waste forms through accelerated laboratory tests; and to develop an understanding of the degradation processes so that long-term, low dose rate effects can be predicted with confidence from short-term, high dose rate experiments. The programme included cement waste forms containing inorganic wastes, organic matrix waste forms, and cement waste forms containing a substantial component of organic waste. Irradiations were carried out by external gamma sources and by the incorporation of alpha emitters, such as 238 Pu. Irradiated materials included matrix materials, simulated waste forms and real waste forms. 2 figs.; 3 tabs.; 8 refs

  7. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: TRP 9732Steel Processing Properties and Their Effect on Impact Deformation of Lightweight Structures; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srdan Simunovic; Gustavo Aramayo

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the research was to perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the effects of material and process modeling approaches on performance of Ultra Light Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) vehicle models. The research addressed numerous material related effects, impact conditions as well as analyzed the performance of the ULSAB vehicles in crashes against designs representing the current US vehicle fleet. Crash modeling simulations show a clear effect of strain-rate sensitivity on high strength steel (HSS) intensive vehicle. The influence of a strain-rate model can be an incremental sensitivity due to the increased flow stress when similar structure collapse modes are predicted. However, significant differences in crash energy management capacity can be predicted if the change in loading on members alters the predicted collapse mode of the structure. From the material substitution study it can be concluded that HSS material substitution cannot be performed on the basis of the material yield point only and that, especially for advanced HSS vehicle designs, the entire region of material plastic response has to be considered. However, the problem of modeling of the overall dynamic crush process still remains open and requires further experimental and theoretical investigation. Crash modeling simulations show a moderate effect of forming on overall crash performance. The design is the determining factor on the vehicle performance and, therefore, the results of this research cannot provide measures that can be used in a general case. However, it has been shown that for materials that have modest strain hardening, the forming effect is observable and that when more complex forming operations are used, especially in combination with rapid strain hardening materials, forming effects should be taken in the consideration in the computational crash models. crash compatibility study between ULSAB and cars of similar geometric characteristics have shown that the U LSAB

  8. BIG SCHOOL - SMALL SCHOOL. STUDIES OF THE EFFECTS OF HIGH SCHOOL SIZE UPON THE BEHAVIOR AND EXPERIENCES OF STUDENTS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARKER, ROGER G.; AND OTHERS

    STUDIES WERE MADE IN KANSAS HIGH SCHOOLS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF SCHOOL SIZE UPON THE BEHAVIOR AND EXPERIENCES OF STUDENTS. THE FOLLOWING AREAS WERE CONSIDERED-- THE SCHOOL INVOLVED IN THE STUDY, THE DATA GATHERED FROM RECORDS AND RESEARCH, OUT-OF-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES, AND THE PLACE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE TOTAL LIFE OF FOUR SMALL TOWNS.…

  9. A Study to Determine the Effects of a Comprehensive and Experiential System of Vocational Guidance and Career Development on Junior High School Pupils. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehresman, Norman D.; Vincent, Roger D.

    Comprehensive work experience and vocational guidance activities were established at the middle school level and their effects on career maturity and attitudes toward school of ninth graders were tested. The project was conducted at the Bowling Green Junior High School (Kentucky) during the academic school year of 1975-76. (The school supports a…

  10. Health and air quality 2002 phase 1 : methods for estimating and applying relationships between air pollution and health effects : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, D.V.; Brauer, M.; Koenig, J.; Caton, R.; Drawley, D.

    2003-05-01

    The British Columbia Lung Association recruited members of an expert panel to examine the relationships between exposure to air pollution and effects on human health, in particular human respiratory and cardio-vascular health. This report is intended for regulatory managers, planners, project proponents, researchers and physicians. It reports on the available literature on the subject and offers recommendations on how it can be interpreted in terms of application to problems in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. The common air contaminants that are associated with direct human health effects include nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, carbon monoxide, ozone, fine particles and inhalable particles (PM). The review did not include toxic or hazardous air pollutants that are considered to be cancer-causing agents, however, the association between air pollution and elevated rates of cancer in urban populations was considered. The panel considered: pollutant mix and exposure patterns; different types of studies such as epidemiology; sources of uncertainty; and, several criteria for judging the power of the relationships. It was concluded that some air pollutants, particularly PM 2.5 and its wood smoke component and ozone are at levels that may cause adverse health effects. It was noted that affected communities should be aware that risk increases with level of exposure and risk of health effects is very low at the lowest ambient concentrations in British Columbia and increases proportionally to ambient concentrations of PM and ozone. refs., tabs., figs

  11. An Exploratory Study of the Effect of Screen Size and Resolution on the Legibility of Graphics in Automated Job Performance Aids. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Daniel J.

    Designed to assess the effect of alternative display (CRT) screen sizes and resolution levels on user ability to identify and locate printed circuit (PC) board points, this study is the first in a protracted research program on the legibility of graphics in computer-based job aids. Air Force maintenance training pipeline students (35 male and 1…

  12. Compilation and assessment of microwave bioeffects. Final report. A selective review of the literature on biological effects of microwaves in relation to the satellite power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justesen, D. R.; Ragan, H. A.; Rogers, L. E.; Guy, A. W.; Hjeresen, D. L.; Hinds, W. T.

    1978-05-01

    Potential biological and ecological problems are the focus of a review of the world's scientific literature on biological effects of microwave radiation. The emphasis is on recently reported data and on the 2450-MHz continuous-wave (CW) radiation that is envisioned for a Satellite Power System (SPS).

  13. Effects of Binaural Sensory Aids on the Development of Visual Perceptual Abilities in Visually Handicapped Infants. Final Report, April 15, 1982-November 15, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Verna; Ferrell, Kay

    Twenty-four congenitally visually handicapped infants, aged 6-24 months, participated in a study to determine (1) those stimuli best able to elicit visual attention, (2) the stability of visual acuity over time, and (3) the effects of binaural sensory aids on both visual attention and visual acuity. Ss were dichotomized into visually handicapped…

  14. The Effects of Boys & Girls Clubs on Alcohol and Other Drug Use and Related Problems in Public Housing. Final Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Steven P.; And Others

    This comparative study evaluates the effects of Boys and Girls Clubs and related SMART Moves drug prevention programs on children and adolescents living in public housing and on the quality of life in public housing. The study involves 15 public housing developments in a representative sample of American cities and focuses on alcohol and other…

  15. DOE ASR Final Report on “Use of ARM Observations to Investigate the Role of Tropical Radiative Processes and Cloud Radiative Effects in Climate Simulations”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Qiang [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Comstock, Jennifer [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    2018-01-29

    The overall objective of this ASR funded project is to investigate the role of cloud radiative effects, especially those associated with tropical thin cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer, by analyzing the ARM observations combined with numerical models. In particular, we have processed and analyzed the observations from the Raman lidar at the ARM SGP and TWP sites. In the tenure of the project (8/15/2013 – 8/14/2016 and with a no-cost extension to 8/14/2017), we have been concentrating on (i) developing an automated feature detection scheme of clouds and aerosols for the ARM Raman lidar; (ii) developing an automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol extinctions for the ARM Raman lidar; (iii) investigating cloud radiative effects based on the observations on the simulated temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer using a radiative-convective model; and (iv) examining the effect of changes of atmospheric composition on the tropical lower-stratospheric temperatures. In addition, we have examined the biases in the CALIPSO-inferred aerosol direct radiative effects using ground-based Raman lidars at the ARM SGP and TWP sites, and estimated the impact of lidar detection sensitivity on assessing global aerosol direct radiative effects. We have also investigated the diurnal cycle of clouds and precipitation at the ARM site using the cloud radar observations along with simulations from the multiscale modeling framework. The main results of our research efforts are reported in the six referred journal publications that acknowledge the DOE Grant DE-SC0010557.

  16. Effects of aqueous humor hydrodynamics on human eye heat transfer under external heat sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiang, Kor L; Ooi, Ean H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the eye models developed in the late 90s and early 00s considers only heat conduction inside the eye. This assumption is not entirely correct, since the anterior and posterior chambers are filled aqueous humor (AH) that is constantly in motion due to thermally-induced buoyancy. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of the human eye is developed to investigate the effects AH hydrodynamics have on the human eye temperature under exposure to external heat sources. If the effects of AH flow are negligible, then future models can be developed without taking them into account, thus simplifying the modeling process. Two types of external thermal loads are considered; volumetric and surface irradiation. Results showed that heat convection due to AH flow contributes to nearly 95% of the total heat flow inside the anterior chamber. Moreover, the circulation inside the anterior chamber can cause an upward shift of the location of hotspot. This can have significant consequences to our understanding of heat-induced cataractogenesis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of heavy ions on rabbit tissues: damage to the forebrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.B.; Keng, P.C.; Lee, A.C.; Lett, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a study of progressive radiation effects in normal tissues, the forebrains of New Zealand white rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) (about 6 weeks old) were irradiated locally with single acute doses of 60 Co γ-photons (LETsub(infinity)=0.3 keV/μm), Ne ions (LETsub(infinity)=35+-3 keV/μm) or Ar ions (LETsub(infinity)=90+-5 keV/μm). Other rabbits received fractionated doses of 60 Co γ-photons according to a standard radiotherapeutic protocol. Irradiated rabbits and appropriately aged controls were sacrificed at selected intervals, and whole sagittal sections of their brains were examined for pathological changes. Forebrain damage was scored with subjective indices based on histological differences between the anterior (irradiated) and posterior (unirradiated) regions of the brain. Those indices ranged from zero (no apparent damage) to five (severe infarctions, etc.). At intermediate levels of forebrain damage, the relative biological effectiveness (r.b.e.) of each heavy ion was similar to that found for alopecia and cataractogenesis, and the early expression of the damage was also accelerated as the LETsub(infinity) increased. Late deterioration of the forebrain appeared also to be accelerated by increasing LETsub(infinity), although its accurate quantification was not possible because other priorities in the overall experimental design limited systematic sacrifice of the animals. (author)

  18. Prenatal and adult exposures to smoking are associated with adverse effects on reproductive hormones, semen quality, final height and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnborg, Trine L; Jensen, Tina K; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Exposure to tobacco smoking prenatally is a risk factor for reduced semen quality, but whether the exposure has adverse effects on reproductive hormones, pubertal development or adult BMI remain largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between...... these factors while controlling for the effects of current smoking in young adulthood. METHODS This cross-sectional study (1996-2006) included 3486 Danish men (median age: 19 years), participating in a semen-quality study. Data were obtained from questionnaires, physical examinations, semen analyses...... and assessments of reproductive hormones. The main outcome measures were markers of pubertal onset, BMI, reproductive hormones and semen variables. RESULTS Maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with earlier onset of puberty (e.g. early pubic hair development in 25.2 versus 18.9% of unexposed subjects...

  19. Effective endovascular treatment of calcified femoropopliteal disease with directional atherectomy and distal embolic protection: final results of the DEFINITIVE Ca⁺⁺ trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David; Niazi, Khusrow; Miller, William; Krishnan, Prakash; Gammon, Roger; Schreiber, Theodore; Shammas, Nicolas W; Clair, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the DEFINITIVE Ca(++) study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of directional atherectomy and distal embolic protection, used together to treat moderate to severely calcified femoropopliteal lesions. Despite advances in endovascular treatment modalities, treatment of calcified lesions remains a challenge. A total of 133 subjects with 168 moderate to severely calcified lesions were enrolled. Lesions were treated with directional atherectomy devices, coupled with distal embolic protection. The 30-day freedom from MAE rate was 93.1%. Per angiographic core laboratory assessment, the primary effectiveness endpoint (≤50% residual diameter stenosis) was achieved in 92.0% (lower confidence bound of 87.6%) of lesions. By core lab analysis, these results did not achieve the success criteria (90%) for the primary effectiveness objective. Per site assessment, the objective was met with the endpoint being achieved in 97.0% (lower confidence bound 93.8%). A mean residual diameter stenosis of 33.3% was achieved with the directional atherectomy device. This was further decreased to 24.1% with the use of adjunctive therapy. The proportion of asymptomatic subjects [Rutherford Clinical Category (RCC) = 0] increased from 0% at baseline to 52.3% at the 30-day follow-up visit. In total, 88.5% of subjects experienced an improvement of one or more Rutherford categories. The results of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ study demonstrate that the SilverHawk and TurboHawk atherectomy devices are safe and effective in the endovascular treatment of moderate to severely calcified lesions in the superficial femoral and/or popliteal arteries when used with the SpiderFX distal embolic protection device. © 2014 The Authors. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effective Endovascular Treatment of Calcified Femoropopliteal Disease With Directional Atherectomy and Distal Embolic Protection: Final Results of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David; Niazi, Khusrow; Miller, William; Krishnan, Prakash; Gammon, Roger; Schreiber, Theodore; Shammas, Nicolas W; Clair, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of directional atherectomy and distal embolic protection, used together to treat moderate to severely calcified femoropopliteal lesions. Background Despite advances in endovascular treatment modalities, treatment of calcified lesions remains a challenge. Methods A total of 133 subjects with 168 moderate to severely calcified lesions were enrolled. Lesions were treated with directional atherectomy devices, coupled with distal embolic protection. Results The 30-day freedom from MAE rate was 93.1%. Per angiographic core laboratory assessment, the primary effectiveness endpoint (≤50% residual diameter stenosis) was achieved in 92.0% (lower confidence bound of 87.6%) of lesions. By core lab analysis, these results did not achieve the success criteria (90%) for the primary effectiveness objective. Per site assessment, the objective was met with the endpoint being achieved in 97.0% (lower confidence bound 93.8%). A mean residual diameter stenosis of 33.3% was achieved with the directional atherectomy device. This was further decreased to 24.1% with the use of adjunctive therapy. The proportion of asymptomatic subjects [Rutherford Clinical Category (RCC) = 0] increased from 0% at baseline to 52.3% at the 30-day follow-up visit. In total, 88.5% of subjects experienced an improvement of one or more Rutherford categories. Conclusions The results of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ study demonstrate that the SilverHawk™ and TurboHawk™ atherectomy devices are safe and effective in the endovascular treatment of moderate to severely calcified lesions in the superficial femoral and/or popliteal arteries when used with the SpiderFX™ distal embolic protection device. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24402764

  1. Radiation effect of radioiodide therapy on the hypophyseal and hypothalamic feedback control centers for thyroid function studied by dry-mount autoradiography. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, W.E.

    1972-01-01

    Results are reported from studies in rats on the effects of β radiation from therapeutic doses of 131 I on the physiology of the pituitary gland and on brain structures considered thyroid hormone control areas. Iodine-125-labeled triiodothyronine and thyroxine and autoradiographic techniques were used to determine the cellular and subcellular localization of thyroid hormones in the brain tissues of untreated and thyroidectomized animals. The results suggest that thyroid hormones act on all neurons throughout the mature brain. (U.S.)

  2. Evaluation of the effectiveness and feasibility of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant engineered alternatives: Final report of the Engineered Alternatives Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The Engineered Alternatives Task Force (EATF) was established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) WIPP Project Office (WPO) in September 1989 (Hunt, A., 1990), to evaluate the relative effectiveness and feasibility of implementation of selected design enhancements (referred to as ''engineered alternatives'') for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These enhancements consist of modifications of existing waste forms and/or the WIPP facility, and other design variations such as passive marker systems. The purpose of this report is to summarize the methodologies and results of evaluation of the effectiveness of selected engineered alternatives relative to the existing repository design, and to discuss the feasibility of implementing these alternatives with respect to availability of technology, cost, schedule, and regulatory concerns. The EATF has concluded that a number of engineered alternatives could be implemented to improve repository performance if WIPP performance assessment determines that either gas generation or human intrusion presents a problem in demonstrating compliance. Within waste treatment, Level 3 treatments are the most effective in addressing multiple performance parameters, but tend to be the most expensive, the most difficult and time-consuming to implement, and have the greatest regulatory requirements. Level 2 treatments are less expensive, faster, require less extensive permitting, and utilize off- the-shelf technology, but are less effective in addressing multiple performance parameters. Depending upon the performance parameter, Level 1 alternatives such as alternative backfills, alternative waste containers, or modified repository design should be thoroughly evaluated and eliminated before any decision is made to treat the waste. The present uncertainty in the degree to which the baseline WIPP design complies with 40 CFR Part 191 and 40 CFR Part 268 precludes specific recommendations at this time. 130 refs., 21 figs., 37 tabs

  3. Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phases 4, 5, & 6; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, K.; Shoffner, B.

    2014-06-01

    This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires the EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light-duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use.

  4. Compilation and assessment of microwave bioeffects. Final report. A selective review of the literature on biological effects of microwaves in relation to the Satellite Power System (SPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justesen, D.R.; Ragan, H.A.; Rogers, L.E.; Guy, A.W.; Hjeresen, D.L.; Hinds, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.

    1978-05-01

    One of many alternate sources of electrical energy that are being considered by the Department of Energy is a microwave-mediated Satellite Power System (SPS). Once inserted into geosynchronous orbit at an altitude of more than 40,000 kilometers, a satellite would collect then convert the sun's energy to 2450-MHz microwaves, which would be beamed to the Earth's surface, where a rectifying antenna (rectenna) would convert the microwaves to electrical current suitable for industrial and domestic use. The expanse of each rectenna (about 10 by 13 kilometers), the power density of the continuous-wave microwave beam (approx. 23 mW/cm/sup 2/ at center, with fall off to 1 mW/cm/sup 2/ or less at the periphery of the rectenna), and the possibility that 20 or more satellite systems will eventually be operating, creates two sets of interrelated problems for biological/ecological assessment. These are 1) the effects of microwave fields of higher intensity on airborne biota (including human beings in aircraft) that may traffic the area above the rectenna and 2) the effects of virtually perpetual fields of much lower intensity on all forms of life at and beyond the rectennae's zone of exclusion. In this review, the scientific literature is examined, not only for biological effects that are pertinent to assessment of SPS, but for hiatuses of knowledge that will have to be filled before SPS can be vouched for operational safety.

  5. Final Activity Report: The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trick, Charles Gordon [Western University

    2013-07-30

    Substantial increases in the concentrations of the stronger of two Fe(III) complexing organic ligand classes measured during the mesoscale Fe enrichment studies IronEx II and SOIREE appeared to sharply curtailed Fe availability to diatoms and thus limited the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep. Detailed observations during IronEx II (equatorial Pacific Ocean) and SOIREE (Southern Ocean –Pacific sector) indicate that the diatoms began re-experiencing Fe stress even though dissolved Fe concentrations remained elevated in the patch. This surprising outcome likely is related to the observed increased concentrations of strong Fe(III)-complexing ligands in seawater. Preliminary findings from other studies indicate that diatoms may not readily obtain Fe from these chemical species whereas Fe bound by strong ligands appears to support growth of cyanobacteria and nanoflagellates. The difficulty in assessing the likelihood of these changes with in-situ mesoscale experiments is the extended monitoring period needed to capture the long-term trajectory of the carbon cycle. A more detailed understanding of Fe complexing ligand effects on long-term ecosystem structure and carbon cycling is essential to ascertain not only the effect of Fe enrichment on short-term carbon sequestration in the oceans, but also the potential effect of Fe enrichment in modifying ecosystem structure and trajectory.

  6. Chromatic correction for the final transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.; Peterson, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The final transport and focusing of the heavy-ion beam onto the fusion pellet in vacuum is complicated by several non-linear effects - namely, chromatic (momentum dependent) effects, geometric aberrations, and space-charge forces. This paper gives an example of how the chromatic effects can be nullified, at least to second order. Whether third- or higher-order terms are important is not yet clear. Space-charge effects are important but are not considered here

  7. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Isaac [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fueglistaler, Stephan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-09-19

    We have constructed and analyzed a series of idealized models of tropical convection interacting with large-scale circulations, with 25-50km resolution and with 1-2km cloud resolving resolution to set the stage for rigorous tests of convection closure schemes in high resolution global climate models. Much of the focus has been on the climatology of tropical cyclogenesis in rotating systems and the related problem of the spontaneous aggregation of convection in non-rotating systems. The PI (Held) will be delivering the honorary Bjerknes lecture at the Fall 2016 AGU meeting in December on this work. We have also provided new analyses of long-standing issues related to the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation: Kelvin waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, water vapor transport into the stratosphere, and upper tropospheric temperature trends. The results of these analyses help to improve our understanding of processes, and provide tests for future high resolution global modeling. Our final goal of testing new convections schemes in next-generation global atmospheric models at GFDL has been left for future work due to the complexity of the idealized model results meant as tests for these models uncovered in this work and to computational resource limitations. 11 papers have been published with support from this grant, 2 are in review, and another major summary paper is in preparation.

  8. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, Mayda [Northwestern University

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the design and construction of novel beam diagnostic and instrumentation for charged particle accelerators required for the next generation of linear colliders. Our main interest is in non-invasive techniques. The Northwestern group of Velasco has been a member of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) collaboration since 2003, and the beam instrumentation work is developed mostly at this facility1. This 4 kW electron beam facility has a 25-170 MeV electron LINAC. CTF3 performed a set of dedicated measurements to finalize the development of our RF-Pickup bunch length detectors. The RF-pickup based on mixers was fully commissioned in 2009 and the RF-pickup based on diodes was finished in time for the 2010-11 data taking. The analysis of all the data taken in by the summer of 2010 was finish in time and presented at the main conference of the year, LINAC 2010 in Japan.

  9. Acoustic Separation Technology; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Ahrens; Tim Patterson

    2002-01-01

    Today's restrictive environmental regulations encourage paper mills to close their water systems. Closed water systems increase the level of contaminants significantly. Accumulations of solid suspensions are detrimental to both the papermaking process and the final products. To remove these solids, technologies such as flotation using dissolved air (DAF), centrifuging, and screening have been developed. Dissolved Air Flotation systems are commonly used to clarify whitewater. These passive systems use high pressure to dissolve air into whitewater. When the pressure is released, air micro-bubbles form and attach themselves to fibers and particles, which then float to the surface where they are mechanically skimmed off. There is an economic incentive to explore alternatives to the DAF technology to drive down the cost of whitewater processing and minimize the use of chemicals. The installed capital cost for a DAF system is significant and a typical DAF system takes up considerable space. An alternative approach, which is the subject of this project, involves a dual method combining the advantages of chemical flocculation and in-line ultrasonic clarification to efficiently remove flocculated contaminants from a water stream

  10. AIMES Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Daniel S [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA); Jha, Shantenu [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Weissman, Jon [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Turilli, Matteo [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2017-01-31

    This is the final technical report for the AIMES project. Many important advances in science and engineering are due to large-scale distributed computing. Notwithstanding this reliance, we are still learning how to design and deploy large-scale production Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). This is evidenced by missing design principles for DCI, and an absence of generally acceptable and usable distributed computing abstractions. The AIMES project was conceived against this backdrop, following on the heels of a comprehensive survey of scientific distributed applications. AIMES laid the foundations to address the tripartite challenge of dynamic resource management, integrating information, and portable and interoperable distributed applications. Four abstractions were defined and implemented: skeleton, resource bundle, pilot, and execution strategy. The four abstractions were implemented into software modules and then aggregated into the AIMES middleware. This middleware successfully integrates information across the application layer (skeletons) and resource layer (Bundles), derives a suitable execution strategy for the given skeleton and enacts its execution by means of pilots on one or more resources, depending on the application requirements, and resource availabilities and capabilities.

  11. Schedulability Analysis for Java Finalizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgholm, Thomas; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Søndergaard, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Java finalizers perform clean-up and finalisation of objects at garbage collection time. In real-time Java profiles the use of finalizers is either discouraged (RTSJ, Ravenscar Java) or even disallowed (JSR-302), mainly because of the unpredictability of finalizers and in particular their impact...... on the schedulability analysis. In this paper we show that a controlled scoped memory model results in a structured and predictable execution of finalizers, more reminiscent of C++ destructors than Java finalizers. Furthermore, we incorporate finalizers into a (conservative) schedulability analysis for Predictable Java...... programs. Finally, we extend the SARTS tool for automated schedulability analysis of Java bytecode programs to handle finalizers in a fully automated way....

  12. Effects of geothermal energy utilization on stream biota and water quality at The Geysers, California. Final report. [Big Sulphur, Little Sulphur, Squaw, and Pieta Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeGore, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The discussion is presented under the following section headings: biological studies, including fish, insects, and microbiology; stream hydrology; stream water quality, including methods and results; the contribution of tributaries to Big Sulphur Creek, including methods, results, and tributary characterization; standing water at wellheads; steam condensate quality; accidental discharges; trout spawning bed quality; major conclusions; list of references; and appendices. It is concluded that present operational practices at Geysers geothermal field do not harm the biological resources in adjacent streams. The only effects of geothermal development observed during the study were related to operational accidents. (JGB)

  13. Final Technical Report: The effects of climate, forest age, and disturbance history on carbon and water processes at AmeriFlux sites across gradients in Pacific Northwest forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2016-12-03

    Investigate the effects of disturbance and climate variables on processes controlling carbon and water processes at AmeriFlux cluster sites in semi-arid and mesic forests in Oregon. The observations were made at three existing and productive AmeriFlux research sites that represent climate and disturbance gradients as a natural experiment of the influence of climatic and hydrologic variability on carbon sequestration and resulting atmospheric CO2 feedback that includes anomalies during the warm/ dry phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  14. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FINAL FINALweb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    such common items as diet, medicines or physical exercise. Considered ... (b) Tolerance: The drug user needs an increased dose to reach effects of similar intensity as ... evolved from this approach is known as person-centered therapy.

  15. The effect of soil mineral phases on the abiotic degradation of selected organic compounds. Final report, June 31, 1990--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Funds were received from the United States Department of Energy to study the effects of soil mineral phases on the rates of abiotic degradation of tetraphenylborate (TPB) and diphenylboronic acid (DPBA). In addition to kaolinite and montmorillonite clay minerals, the role of goethite, corundum, manganite, and rutile in the degradation of organoborates was also evaluated. The effects of DPBA, argon, molecular dioxygen (O{sub 2}), temperature, and organic matter on the degradation of organoborates were also measured. The results indicated that TPB and DPBA degraded rapidly on the mineral surfaces. The initial products generated from the degradation of TPB were DPBA and biphenyl; however, further degradation resulted in the formation of phenylboric acid and phenol which persisted even after TPB disappeared. The data also showed that the rate of TPB degradation was faster in kaolinite, a 1:1 clay mineral, than in montmorillonite, a double layer mineral. The initial degradation of TPB by corundum was much higher than goethite, manganite and rutile. However, no further degradation by this mineral was observed where as the degradation of TPB continued by goethite and rutile minerals. Over all, the degradation rate of TPB was the highest for goethite as compared to the other metal oxide minerals. The degradation of TPB and DPBA was a redox reaction where metals (Fe, Al, Ti, Mn) acted as Lewis acids. DPBA and argon retarded the TPB degradation where as molecular oxygen organic matter and temperature increased the rate of TPB disappearance.

  16. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-01-01

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites

  17. Development of an Effective Transport Media for Juvenile Spring Chinook Salmon to Mitigate Stress and Improve Smolt Survival During Columbia River Fish Hauling Operations, 1985 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1985-02-01

    Selected transport media consisting of mineral salt additions (Na/sup +/, Cl/sup -/, Ca/sup + +/, PO/sub 4//sup -3/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, and Mg/sup + +/), mineral salts plus tranquilizing concentrations of tricaine methane sulfonate (MS-222), or MS-222 alone were tested for their ability to mitigate stress and increase smolt survival during single and mixed species hauling of Columbia River spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). Successful stress mitigation was afforded by several formulations as indicated by protection against life-threatening osmoregulatory and other physiological dysfunctions, and against immediate and delayed hauling mortality. Effects on the seawater survival and growth of smolts hauled in transport media were used as the overall criterion of success. Of the fourteen chemical formulations tested, 10 ppM MS-222 emerged as top-rated in terms of ability to mitigate physiological stress during single and mixed species transport of juvenile spring chinook salmon at hauling densities of 0.5 or 1.0 lb/gallon. Immediate and delayed mortalities from hauling stress were also reduced, but benefits to early marine growth and survival were limited to about the first month in seawater. The two physical factors tested (reduced light intensity and water temperature) were generally less effective than mineral salt additions in mitigating hauling stress, but the degree of protection afforded by reduced light intensity was nevertheless judged to be physiologically beneficial. 36 refs., 1 fig., 19 tabs.

  18. Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phase 3; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, K.

    2014-05-01

    This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light - duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use. This report covers the exhaust emissions testing of 15 light-duty vehicles with 27 E0 through E20 test fuels, and 4 light-duty flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) on an E85 fuel, as part of the EPAct Gasoline Light-Duty Exhaust Fuel Effects Test Program. This program will also be referred to as the EPAct/V2/E-89 Program based on the designations used for it by the EPA, NREL, and CRC, respectively. It is expected that this report will be an attachment or a chapter in the overall EPAct/V2/E-89 Program report prepared by EPA and NREL.

  19. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-09-14

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites.

  20. Short communication: The effect of changing temperature and agar concentration at proliferation stage in the final success of Aleppo pine somatic embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The effect of physical and chemical conditions at proliferation stage was evaluated in order to elucidate if this stage is the determinant phase to induce a marked effect in Pinus halepensis somatic embryogenesis. Area of study: The study was conducted in research laboratories of Neiker (Arkaute, Spain. Material and methods: Pinus halepensis embryonal masses from ten embryogenic cell lines subjected to nine treatments (tissues cultured at three temperatures on media supplemented with three agar concentrations at proliferation stage. Main results: Significant differences were observed among different proliferation conditions months later at the end of maturation, germination and acclimatization stages. Research highlights: Aleppo pine embryonal masses are cultured under standard conditions on a culture medium supplemented with 4.5 g/L Gelrite® at 23ºC. However, better results in terms of plantlet production can be obtained proliferating the embryonal masses at 18ºC in a culture media with significantly lower water availability.

  1. Final report for the IAEA urban aquifers RCA : determining the effects of storm water infiltration on groundwater quality in an urban fractured rock aquifer, Auckland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.R.; Hong, Y.S.; Sheppard, D.; Roberts, K.; Viljevac, Z.; Smaill, A.; Reeves, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    Disposal of storm water in the Mt Eden-Mt Albert area of Auckland, New Zealand, is via ''soak holes'' drilled directly into the top of the fractured basalt. These soak holes receive storm water and sediment runoff from city streets throughout Mt Eden. Although this method of disposal has been used for at least 60 years, its sustainability with respect to groundwater quality has not been addressed. This study aimed to determine the impact of soakage on the chemical and isotopic composition of the groundwater. In addition, sediments captured by the soak holes were analysed to determine their effectiveness at trapping contaminants. Groundwater samples were collected between August 1998 and August 1999. Three sampling trips were carried out after rainfall events in October 1998, April 1999 and August 1999. Samples were analysed for major and trace components, including nutrients, dissolved and total heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, and Ni), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and stable and radiogenic isotopes. Cores of sediment collected in the soak holes were analysed for major components, total and leachable heavy metals, and PAHs to determine the ability of the sediments to adsorp contaminants. In summary, the Mt Eden aquifer system shows the effect of storm water infiltration rapidly after a rainfall event in some parts of the aquifer. Water quality has been effected in some areas, but in general the water quality is quite good considering the quantity of storm water discharge that has occurred in the area for the past 60 years. The relatively high quality of the water in the wells monitored may be attributed to the ability of the accumulated sediment in the soak holes and the aquifer fractures to trap contaminants. Further research is needed to determine if continued use of the groundwater system as a conduit for storm water infiltration will lead to clogging of the fractures in the aquifer and/or transport of particulates

  2. Effects of Aging Quartz Sand and Hanford Site Sediment with Sodium Hydroxide on Radionuclide Sorption Coefficients and Sediment Physical and Hydrologic Properties: Final Report for Subtask 2a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DI Kaplan; JC Ritter; KE Parker

    1998-12-04

    Column and batch experiments were conducted in fiscal year 1998 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate the effect of varying concentrations of NaOH on the sorptive, physical, and hydraulic properties of two media, a quartz sand and a composite subsurface sediment from the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site. The NaOH solutions were used as a simplified effluent from a low-activity glass waste form. These experiments were conducted over a limited (O-to 10-month) contact time, with respect to the 10,000-to 100,000-year scenarios described in the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste- Performance Assessment (ILAW-PA). Wheq these two solids were put in contact with the NaOH solutions, dissolution was evident by a substantial increase in dissolved Si concentrations in the leachates. Incremental increases in NaOH con- centrations, resulted in corresponding increases in Si concentrations. A number of physical and hydraulic properties also changed as the NaOH concentrations were changed. It was observed that quartz sand was less reactive than the composite sediment. Further, moisture- retention measurements were made on the quartz sand and composite sedimen$ which showed that the NaOH-treated solids retained more water than the non-NaOH-treated solids. Because the other chemical, physical, and hydraulic measurements did not change dramatically after the high-NaOH treatments, the greater moisture retention of the high-NaOH treatments was attributed to a "salt effect" and not to the formation of small particles during the dissolution (weathering). The distribution coefficients (IQ) for Cs and Sr were measured on the NaOH-treated sediments, with decreases from -3,000 to 1,000 and 1,300 to 300 mL/g noted, respectively, at the 0.01-to 1.O-M NaOH levels. There was no apparent trend for the Sr & values with contact time. The lack of such a trend sug- gests that dissolution of sediment particles is not controlling the drop in IQ rather, it is the competition of the added Na

  3. Final strip mine regs released

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-12

    The final interim surface mining regulations were published by the Office of Surface Mining on 12 December. Among the requirements are that the operation should minimize disturbances to the prevailing hydrological balance in order to prevent long-term adverse changes in water quality and quantity, in the depth of ground water and in the location of surface water drainage channels. Regulations for sedimentation ponds are retained but exemption may be granted to allow the pH to rise above 9 if manganese levels (4 mg/l) cannot be met. The 24-hour frequency event for which effluent limitations must be applied has been reduced from 25 years to 10 years. Large sedimentation ponds must be constructed to withstand, at a minimum, a 100-year frequency, 6-hour duration storm. The regulations are to take effect on the 3rd of May 1978.

  4. Effects of natural and forced basement ventilation on radon levels in single-family dwellings. Final report, May 90-Aug 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Reddy, T.A.

    1992-06-01

    The report gives, for the first time, results of an extensive study of the effect of ventilation on radon concentrations and radon entry rate in a single-family dwelling. Measurements of radon concentrations, building dynamics, and environmental parameters made in Princeton University research houses over several seasons and under different building operating conditions show the functional dependence of radon entry rate on basement depressurization. The work clarifies the role of natural ventilation in reducing indoor radon concentrations. The work shows conclusively that natural ventilation can decrease radon levels two ways: (1) by simple dilution, and (2) by providing a pressure break (defined as any opening in the building shell that reduces the outdoor/indoor differential pressure). This reduces building depressurization and thus the amount of radon-contaminated soil gas that is drawn into the building

  5. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies of marine macroalgae: saline desert water cultivation and effects of environmental stress on proximate composition. Final subcontract report. [Gracilaria tikvahiae; Ulva lactuca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Peterson, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    The results presented in this report address the growth potential of marine macroalgae cultivated in desert saline waters, and the effects of certain environmental stresses (e.g., nitrogen, salinity, and temperature) on the proximate composition of several marine macroalgae. Two major desert saline water types were assayed for their ability to support the growth of Gracilaria, Ulva, and Caulerpa. Both water types supported short term growth, but long term growth was not supported. Carbohydrate levels in Gracilaria were increased by cultivation under conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and low nitrogen and phosphorous availability. Data suggests that it may be possible to maximize production of useful proximate constituents by cultivating the algae under optimum conditions for growth, and then holding the resulting biomass under the environmental conditions which favor tissue accumulation of the desired storage products. 16 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Study of the combined effects of smoking and inhalation of uranium ore dust, radon daughters and diesel oil exhaust fumes in hamsters and dogs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, F.T.; Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Busch, R.H.; Stuart, B.O.

    1978-09-01

    Exposure to particulates from uranium ore dust and diesel exhaust soot provoked inflammatory and proliferative responses in lungs. Also exposure to radon and radon daughters yielded increased occurrences of bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia and metaplastic changes of alveolar epithelium. The data suggest that this cellular change is also a precursor of premalignant change in hamsters. The authors suggest an animal model other than the hamster based on two observations: (1) the Syrian golden hamster has been shown to be highly refractory to carcinoma induction; and (2) that when exposed to realistic levels of agents in life-span exposure regimens, the hamster does not develop lesions. Dog studies with cigarette smoke exposure showed mitigating effects on radon daughter induced respiratory tract cancer. Two reasons are suggested although no empirical evidence was gathered. A strict comparison of human and animal exposures and interpolative models are not possible at this time. (PCS)

  8. Effects of internal gas pressure and microstructure on the mechanisms of hot-pressing and swelling in ceramics. Final report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    The results of the study of the effects of internal and external gas pressures on ceramics are summarized. The new experimental systems for studying these phenomena are described. The study has shown that the rate of volume change in ZnO is linearly related to the total pressure driving force. Swelling and hot-pressing can be described on a consistent basis in terms of this driving force. For ZnO, Ni and UO 2 the rate of volume change is dependent on bulk diffusion. The porosity evolution during swelling is described and the resintering phenomenon is identified. Various models for pore growth and shrinkage are considered and related to the behavior of the different systems

  9. Dispersion of Metals from Abandoned Mines and their Effect on Biota in the Methow River, Okanogan County, Washington: Final Report 2002-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert

    2003-05-15

    A study of mine-waste contamination effects on Methow River habitat on the eastern slopes of the north Cascade Mountains in Washington state, U.S.A., revealed impacts at ecosystem, community, population, individual, tissue, and cellular levels. Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's, but the mines are now inactive. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to compare potentially impacted to control sites. The concentrations of eleven trace elements (i.e., Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se, and Zn) in Methow River sediments downstream from the abandoned mine sites were higher than background levels. Exposed trout and caddisfly larvae in the Methow River showed reduced growth compared to controls. Samples of liver from juvenile trout and small intestine from exposed caddisfly larvae were examined for evidence of metal accumulation, cytopathological change, and chemical toxicity. Morphological changes that are characteristic of nuclear apoptosis were observed in caddisfly small intestine columnar epithelial and trout liver nuclei where extensive chromatin condensation and margination was observed. Histopathological studies revealed glycogen bodies were present in the cytosol and nuclei, which are indicators of Type IV Glycogen Storage Disease (GSD IV). This suggests food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body resulting in poor growth. Examination of trout hepatocytes by transmission electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of electron dense granules in the mitochondrial matrix. Matrix granules contain mixtures of Cd, Cu, Au, Pb, Ni, and Ti. Contaminated sediments caused adverse biological effects at different levels of biological organization, from the cellular to ecosystem-level responses, even where dissolved metal concentrations in the corresponding surface water met

  10. World Cup Final

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  11. Climatic change and the effects on the marine ecosystem around the island of Sylt. Final report; Das marine Oekosystem um Sylt unter veraenderten Klimabedingungen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackschewitz, D.; Menn, I.; Reise, K.

    2000-05-01

    Climatic warming of 1.5 to 2.5 C with a higher water temperature may only slightly change the species spectrum of the intertidal zone of the island of Sylt (North Sea). This is shown by a comparison with tidal flats of the French Atlantic coast. Stronger effects are expected from a sea level rise and an increase in hydrodynamic forces. This may result in a decrease of eelgrass and mussel beds. On the high intertidal zone muddy flats will be replaced by sandy flats due to wave action. Enhanced erosion at the Wadden Sea shoreline will probably entail its continued petrification to prevent further losses. This will cause a decrease of natural habitats with their specific assemblages, and the esthetic appeal of the Wadden Sea will decrease too. It is proposed that sand replenishment on the Wadden Sea shoreline will better preserve the natural sequence of biotopes on the tidal flats. The erosive beach on the seaward side of the island of Sylt is both focal place for tourist recreation, and the site of a highly diverse interstitial fauna. This fauna will be able to re-establish itself three months after a campaign of sand replenishment. Sand replenishment was found to be an effective way to compensate beach erosion and, due to the quick re-establishment of the fauna, it may be regarded as an acceptable method of coastal defense from an ecological perspective. (orig.) [German] Bei einer Klimaerwaermung um 1,5 bis 2,5 C wird der direkte Einfluss hoeherer Wassertemperatur das biologische Artenspektrum im Sylter Gezeitenbereich nicht wesentlich veraendern. Dies ergibt ein Vergleich mit Watten der franzoesischen Atlantikkueste. Bedeutender sind voraussichtlich Auswirkungen hoeherer Wasserstaende und einer zunehmenden Hydrodynamik. Seegraswiesen und Muschelbaenke werden dadurch im Wattbereich abnehmen. In Ufernaehe werden schlickige von sandigen Watten verdraengt. Einer verstaerkten Erosion an ungeschuetzten Wattufern wird voraussichtlich mit weiteren Befestigungen begegnet

  12. Dynamic Effects of Tank Waste Aging on Radionuclide-Complexant Interactions - Final Report - 10/01/1997 - 10/01/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlin, Rebecca M.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B. rmchamberlin@lanl.gov; jarterbu@nmsu.edu

    2000-10-01

    The long-range objective of this project is to provide a scientific basis for safely processing high-level nuclear tanks wastes for disposal. Our goals are to identify a means to prepare realistic simulant formulations for complexant-containing Hanford tank wastes, and then use those simulants to determine the relative importance of various organic complexants and their breakdown products on the partitioning of important radionuclides. The harsh chemical and radiolytic environment in high-level waste tanks alters both the organic complexants and the metal species, producing radionuclide-chelator complexes that resist standard separation methods. A detailed understanding of the complexation reactions of the key radionuclides in tank wastes would allow for reliable, science-based solutions for high-level waste processing, but a key problem is that tank waste samples are exceedingly difficult to obtain, transport and handle in the laboratory. In contrast, freshly-prepared simulated wastes are safe and readily obtained, but they do not reproduce the partitioning behavior of actual tank waste samples. For this project, we will first artificially age complexant-containing tank waste simulants using microwave, ultrasound, and photolysis techniques that can be applied in any standard laboratory. The aged samples will be compared to samples of actual Hanford tank wastes to determine the most realistic aging method, on the basis of the organic fragments present, and the oxidation states and partitioning behavior of important radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and 239Pu. Our successful completion of this goal will make it possible for scientists in academic and industrial laboratories to address tank waste remediation problems without the enormous costs and hazards associated with handling actual tank waste samples. Later, we will use our simulant aging process to investigate the relative effects of chelator degradation products on the partitioning of important radionuclides

  13. Dynamic Effects of Tank Waste Aging on Radionuclide-Complexant Interactions - Final Report - 10/01/1997 - 10/01/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlin, Rebecca M.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.

    2000-01-01

    The long-range objective of this project is to provide a scientific basis for safely processing high-level nuclear tanks wastes for disposal. Our goals are to identify a means to prepare realistic simulant formulations for complexant-containing Hanford tank wastes, and then use those simulants to determine the relative importance of various organic complexants and their breakdown products on the partitioning of important radionuclides. The harsh chemical and radiolytic environment in high-level waste tanks alters both the organic complexants and the metal species, producing radionuclide-chelator complexes that resist standard separation methods. A detailed understanding of the complexation reactions of the key radionuclides in tank wastes would allow for reliable, science-based solutions for high-level waste processing, but a key problem is that tank waste samples are exceedingly difficult to obtain, transport and handle in the laboratory. In contrast, freshly-prepared simulated wastes are safe and readily obtained, but they do not reproduce the partitioning behavior of actual tank waste samples. For this project, we will first artificially age complexant-containing tank waste simulants using microwave, ultrasound, and photolysis techniques that can be applied in any standard laboratory. The aged samples will be compared to samples of actual Hanford tank wastes to determine the most realistic aging method, on the basis of the organic fragments present, and the oxidation states and partitioning behavior of important radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and 239Pu. Our successful completion of this goal will make it possible for scientists in academic and industrial laboratories to address tank waste remediation problems without the enormous costs and hazards associated with handling actual tank waste samples. Later, we will use our simulant aging process to investigate the relative effects of chelator degradation products on the partitioning of important radionuclides

  14. Quantification of the probable effects of alternative in-river harvest regulations on recovery of Snake River fall chinook salmon. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, S.P.; Vigg, S.

    1996-03-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the probable effects that alternative strategies for managing in-river harvest would have on recovery of Snake River fall chinook salmon. This report presents the analysis of existing data to quantify the way in which various in-river harvest strategies catch Snake River bright (SRB) fall chinook. Because there has been disagreement among experts regarding the magnitude of in-river harvest impacts on Snake River fall chinook, the authors compared the results from using the following three different methods to estimate in-river harvest rates: (1) use of run reconstruction through stock accounting of escapement and landings data to estimate harvest rate of SRB chinook in Zone 6 alone; (2) use of Coded Wire Tag (CWT) recoveries of fall chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in a cohort analysis to estimate age and sex specific harvest rates for Zone 6 and for below Bonneville Dam; (3) comparison of harvest rates estimated for SRB chinook by the above methods to those estimated by the same methods for Upriver Bright (URB) fall chinook

  15. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues by Agrocybe cylindracea and Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom fungi--assessment of their effect on the final product and spent substrate properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutrotsios, Georgios; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Zervakis, Georgios I

    2014-10-15

    Nine agro-industrial and forestry by-products were subjected to solid-state fermentation by Agrocybe cylindracea and Pleurotus ostreatus, and the process and end-products were comparatively evaluated. Grape marc waste plus cotton gin trash was the best performing medium for both fungi, while substrate composition had a marked effect on most cultivation parameters. Biological efficiency was positively correlated with nitrogen, lignin and ash, and negatively with hemicelluloses and carbohydrate content of substrates. Spent substrates demonstrated high reductions in hemicelluloses and cellulose in contrast to lignin; fibre fractions were correlated with nitrogen, fat and ash content of initial materials, while residual mycelial biomass was affected by mushroom productivity. Mushroom proximate analysis revealed significant variations of constituents depending on the substrate. Crude protein and fat were correlated with substrates nitrogen for both species. Alternative cultivation substrates of high potential are proposed, while spent material could be exploited as animal feed due to its upgraded properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Final report for the year 2001 on experimental and theoretical investigations of irradiation effects on physical and mechanical properties of iron and RAFM steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N

    2003-08-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on defect accumulation and physical and mechanical properties have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Specimens of pure iron and RAFM (reduced activation ferritic-martensic) steels were irradiated to different dose levels and at different irradiation temperatures. The resulting microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, positron annihilation spectroscopy and electrical resistivity measurements. Mechanical properties were determined by uniaxial tensile testing. Dislocation-loop interaction, formation of rafts of loops, radiation hardening and formation of 'cleared channels' were studied using different computational techniques. Experiments have shown that nano-voids are formed both in pure iron and F82H steel already at 50 deg. C. In pure iron, the formation of nano-voids is detected already at a dose level of {approx}10{sup -3} dpa. Also in iron, self-interstitial atoms were found to accumulate in the form of glissile and sessile loops; at higher dose levels, these loops led to formation of rafts of loops. Irradiation led to an increase in the yield strength, a sudden drop in the yield stress, and, at higher doses, the initiation of plastic instability immediately beyond the upper yield point. Experimental as well as the results of computer simulations are found to be consistent with the cascade induced source hardening model.

  17. Bendamustine/Mitoxantrone/Rituximab (BMR): a very effective, well tolerated outpatient chemoimmunotherapy for relapsed and refractory CD20-positive indolent malignancies. Final results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weide, Rudolf; Pandorf, Annette; Heymanns, Jochen; Köppler, Hubert

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a new chemoimmunotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory CD20-positive indolent lymphomas and CLL by combining the chemotherapeutic agents Bendamustine (B) and Mitoxantrone (M) with the monoclonal antibody Rituximab. Treatment consisted of (B): 90 mg/m2 (80 mg/m2 in CLL) day 1 + 2, (M): 10 mg/m2 day 1 and (R): 375 mg/m2 day 8,15,22 and 29. BM was repeated 3 times starting on day 36, thereafter every 4 weeks. The maximal therapy consisted of 1 x BMR followed by 5 x BM. We have treated 54 patients with BMR. Median age was 68 years (36-82). Disease distribution was as follows: 21 B-CLL, 1 B-PLL, 8 lymphoplasmacytic, 14 follicular, 2 mantle cell, 2 marginal zone, 6 secondary high grade. Median number of previous treatments was 2 (1-7). ORR was 96% with 41% CR and 55% PR. Median time to progression is 17 months in CLL and has not been reached in indolent lymphomas with a median observation time of 27 months (3-60+). The time to next antilymphoma treatment is prolonged significantly by BMR. No therapy associated death or hospitalization occurred within the study period. BMR is a well tolerated very effective outpatient treatment for relapsed and refractory CD20-positive indolent lymphomas and CLL.

  18. Evaluation of the effectiveness and feasibility of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant engineered alternatives: Final report of the Engineered Alternatives Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is an underground repository designed for the geologic disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The performance of nuclear waste repositories is governed by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The study conducted to demonstrate compliance with this regulation is called performance assessment. The EPA standard requires that DOE provide a reasonable assurance, based on performance assessment, that cumulative releases of radioactivity to the accessible environment will not exceed the standard's criteria. Preliminary performance assessment performed by SNL has indicated that the current design of the WIPP repository, together with the waste forms at the DOE storage and generating sites, may not demonstrate compliance with the EPA Standard. In view of this concern, and prompted by recommendations from external review groups, the DOE established the Engineered Alternatives Task Force (EATF) in September, 1989. The objective of the EATF is to identify potential engineering modifications (referred to as engineered alternatives) to the existing WIPP design and/or to the transuranic (TRU) waste forms, an to evaluate their effectiveness and feasibility in facilitating compliance with the EPA Standard. These alternatives would be designed to completely eliminate or reduce any problems which might cause non-compliance with the EPA Standard. 139 refs., 39 figs., 124 tabs

  19. Effects of gamma irradiation on the survival and development of Gymnophalloides seoi in C3H mice. Final report for the period 1 November 1994 - 31 October 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Yong-Vil

    1996-01-01

    Gymnophalloides seoi is a peculiar human intestinal trematode in Korea transmitted by oysters. This study was carried out to observe the effects of radiation on the infectivity of G. seoi metacercariae to C3H mice and to assess the applicability of radiation for use in the control of gymnophalloidiasis. Oysters were collected from the endemic area. Non-irradiated control, metacercaria-irradiation, and oyster-irradiation groups were prepared. One hundred metacercariae were infected orally to each mouse, and worm recovery rates of three groups were compared at the seventh day post-infection. In the metacercaria-irradiation group, the worm recovery rate was significantly reduced at radiation doses higher than 200 Gy, and the number of intrauterine eggs was significantly reduced at doses over 50 Gy. In the oyster-irradiation group, 50 Gy significantly reduced the worm recovery rate and number of uterine eggs. In the two groups, no worm was recovered at 1,000 Gy. In conclusion, G. seoi metacercariae showed some resistance to radiation at lower doses than 200 Gy, but irradiation of oyster with 200-1,000 Gy could be applied as a control measure for gymnophalloidiasis. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Hydrogen-transfer and charge transfer in photochemical and high energy radiation induced reactions: effects of thiols. Final report, February 1, 1960-january 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.G.

    1980-03-01

    Absorption of ultraviolet or visible light, or high energy radiation, may lead to highly reactive free radicals. Thiols affect the reactions of these radicals in the following ways: (1) transfer of hydrogen from sulfur of the thiol to a substrate radical, converting the radical to a stable molecule, and the thiol to a reactive thiyl radical; and (2) transfer of hydrogen from a substrate radical or molecule to thiyl, regenerating thiol. The thiol is thus used repeatedly and a single molecule may affect the consequences of many quanta. Three effects may ensue, depending upon the system irradiated: (1) the substrate radicals may be converted by thiol-thiyl to the original molecules, and protection against radiation damage is afforded. (2) The radicals may be converted to molecules not identical with the starting materials, and in both cases damage caused by radical combination processes is prevented. (3) Product yields may be increased where the initial radicals might otherwise regenerate starting materials. It was shown that rates of reaction of excited species can be correlated with triplet energies and reduction potentials, and with ionization potentials, that amines are very reactive toward excited carbonyl compounds of all types, and that yields of products from these reactions can be increased by thiols, leading to increased efficiency in utilization of light

  1. Final report for the year 2001 on experimental and theoretical investigations of irradiation effects on physical and mechanical properties of iron and RAFM steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.

    2003-08-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on defect accumulation and physical and mechanical properties have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Specimens of pure iron and RAFM (reduced activation ferritic-martensic) steels were irradiated to different dose levels and at different irradiation temperatures. The resulting microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, positron annihilation spectroscopy and electrical resistivity measurements. Mechanical properties were determined by uniaxial tensile testing. Dislocation-loop interaction, formation of rafts of loops, radiation hardening and formation of 'cleared channels' were studied using different computational techniques. Experiments have shown that nano-voids are formed both in pure iron and F82H steel already at 50 deg. C. In pure iron, the formation of nano-voids is detected already at a dose level of ∼10 -3 dpa. Also in iron, self-interstitial atoms were found to accumulate in the form of glissile and sessile loops; at higher dose levels, these loops led to formation of rafts of loops. Irradiation led to an increase in the yield strength, a sudden drop in the yield stress, and, at higher doses, the initiation of plastic instability immediately beyond the upper yield point. Experimental as well as the results of computer simulations are found to be consistent with the cascade induced source hardening model

  2. Effects of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1979-1985 Final Research Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, Patrick

    1986-05-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. Studies concerning operation of the dam on the Flathead River aquatic biota began in 1979 and continued to 1982 under Bureau of Reclamation funding. These studies resulted in flow recommendations for the aquatic biota in the main stem Flathead River, below the influence of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork. Studies concerned specifically with kokanee salmon have continued under Bonneville Power Administration funding since 1982. This completion report covers the entire study period (September 1979 to June 1985). Major results of this study were: (1) development and refinement of methods to assess hydropower impacts on spawning and incubation success of kokanee; (2) development of a model to predict kokanee year class strength from Flathead River flows; and (3) implementation of flows favorable for successful kokanee reproduction. A monitoring program has been developed which will assess the recovery of the kokanee population as it proceeds, and to recommend management strategies to maintain management goals for the kokanee fishery in the river system.

  3. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential effects of erosion and deposition on a radioactive waste repository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential impact of future geologic processes on the integrity of a deep, high-level radioactive-waste repository is evaluated. The following study identifies the potential consequences of surface erosion and deposition on sub-surface repository containment characteristics and assesses the ability to measure and predict quantitatively the rates and corresponding extent of these processes in the long term. Numerous studies of the magnitudes and rates of surficial erosion and deposition that have been used to determine the minimum allowable depth for a geologic repository (300 m - NRC Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60.122, Draft 10) are cited in this report. Measurement and interpretation of potential rates and extent of surficial processes in these studies involved considerable uncertainty, and the implications of this uncertainty on presently proposed repository siting criteria are addressed herein. Important concepts that should be considered when developing siting criteria to protect against deleterious effects arising from future erosion or deposition are highlighted. Erosion agents that could affect deep repositories are distinguished in this report so that their individual and combined impacts may be examined. This approach is recommended when evaluating potential repository sites in diverse environments that are susceptible to different agents of erosion. In contrast, agents of sedimentation are not differentiated in this report because of their relatively minor impact on a deep repository

  4. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

    2007-10-26

    Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks

  5. Final report. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant's lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  6. Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer, and radiation. Final report. [Analysis of enzymes in human cancer tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, W.E.

    1978-09-01

    Low grade tumors of various origins are chemically very different. High grade tumors, whatever their origin, are chemically very similar to one another and to embryonic tissues. Analyses of human tumor tissues and sera from cancer patients were conducted for two new groups of enzymes expected to be informative about the physiological state of the tissue. The enzymes measured in tumors and sera were chosen because they were characteristic of fetal tissues and high grade neoplasms in rats, and could, therefore, be expected to exist in human cancers (and fetuses) and to predominate more in those of higher grade malignancies. Results indicated that the classification of enzymes (or isozymes) as fetal or adult types in the rat could be extended to man. Human cancers do contain most of the enzymes expected, and lack others, as expected. Analyses of the same enzymes in sera gave less clear results. It was recognized at the outset that no simple proportionality existed between tissue and serum levels. The tendency existed in cancer patients to have in serum elevated amounts of those enzymes characteristic of undifferentiated tissues. The abnormalities in a specific patient are conditioned by his physiological state, by the grade of his tumor, and by the mass of tumor present. The tumor mass had a very significant effect, so that monitoring this tumor burden by chemical means should be quite possible. The latest work focused on particular enzymes that have not previously been measured in cancer patients. These studies concentrated on pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P-5-C) reductase and its inhibition and on lysosomal glucosidases and phosphatases. Both groups are relatively high in fetal and neoplastic tissues.

  7. Effect of Temperature on the Prevalence of Saccharomyces Non cerevisiae Species against a S. cerevisiae Wine Strain in Wine Fermentation: Competition, Physiological Fitness, and Influence in Final Wine Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-del-Real, Javier; Lairón-Peris, María; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for the fermentation of wine. Nevertheless, in the last years wineries are facing new challenges due to current market demands and climate change effects on the wine quality. New yeast starters formed by non-conventional Saccharomyces species (such as S. uvarum or S. kudriavzevii) or their hybrids (S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae x S. kudriavzevii) can contribute to solve some of these challenges. They exhibit good fermentative capabilities at low temperatures, producing wines with lower alcohol and higher glycerol amounts. However, S. cerevisiae can competitively displace other yeast species from wine fermentations, therefore the use of these new starters requires an analysis of their behavior during competition with S. cerevisiae during wine fermentation. In the present study we analyzed the survival capacity of non-cerevisiae strains in competition with S. cerevisiae during fermentation of synthetic wine must at different temperatures. First, we developed a new method, based on QPCR, to quantify the proportion of different Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed cultures. This method was used to assess the effect of competition on the growth fitness. In addition, fermentation kinetics parameters and final wine compositions were also analyzed. We observed that some cryotolerant Saccharomyces yeasts, particularly S. uvarum, seriously compromised S. cerevisiae fitness during competences at lower temperatures, which explains why S. uvarum can replace S. cerevisiae during wine fermentations in European regions with oceanic and continental climates. From an enological point of view, mixed co-cultures between S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus or S. eubayanus, deteriorated fermentation parameters and the final product composition compared to single S. cerevisiae inoculation. However, in co-inoculated synthetic must in which S. kudriavzevii or S. uvarum coexisted with S. cerevisiae, there were fermentation

  8. DE-NE0000724 - Research Performance Final Report - Investigation of Thermal Aging Effects on the Evolution of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankem, Sreeramamurthy [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Perea, Daniel E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kolli, R. Prakash [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Mburu, Sarah [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwarm, Samuel C. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-12-11

    This report details the research activities carried out under DOE-NEUP award number DE-NE0000724 concerning the evolution of structural and mechanical properties during thermal aging of CF–3 and CF–8 cast duplex stainless steels (CDSS). The overall objective of this project was to use state-of-the-art characterization techniques to elucidate trends and phenomena in the mechanical and structural evolution of cast duplex stainless steels (CDSS) during thermal aging. These steels are commonly used as structural materials in commercial light water nuclear power plants, undergoing aging for decades in operation as cooling water pipes, pump casings, valve bodies, etc. During extended exposure to these conditions, CDSS are known to undergo a change in mechanical properties resulting in a loss of ductility, i.e. embrittlement. While it is generally accepted that structural changes within the ferrite phase, such as decomposition into iron (Fe)-rich and chromium (Cr)-rich domains, lead to the bulk embrittlement of the steels, many questions remain as to the mechanisms of embrittlement at multiple length scales. This work is intended to shed insight into the atomic level composition changes, associated kinetic mechanisms, and effects of changing phase structure on micro- and nano-scale deformation that lead to loss of impact toughness and tensile ductility in these steels. In general, this project provides a route to answer some of these major questions using techniques such as 3-dimensional (3-D) atom probe tomography (APT) and real-microstructure finite element method (FEM) modeling, which were not readily available when these steels were originally selected for service in light water reactors. Mechanical properties evaluated by Charpy V-notch impact testing (CVN), tensile testing, and microhardness and nanohardness measurements were obtained for each condition and compared with the initial baseline properties to view trends in deformation behavior during aging

  9. Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-09-01

    ) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute

  10. Turbulence investigation and reproduction for assisting downstream migrating juvenile salmonids, Part II of II: Effects of induced turbulence on behavior of juvenile salmon, 2001-2005 final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.; Farley , M.; Hansen, G.; Morse , J.; Rondorf, D.

    2005-01-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide

  11. Final report. Superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Ruvalds

    1999-01-01

    Our group has discovered a many body effect that explains the surprising divergence of the spin susceptibility which has been measured by neutron scattering experiments on high temperature superconductors and vanadium oxide metals. Electron interactions on nested - i.e., nearly parallel paths - have been analyzed extensively by our group, and such processes provide a physical explanation for many anomalous features that distinguish cuprate superconductors from ordinary metals

  12. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. C. Griffith

    2007-01-01

    In this project we provide an example of how to develop multi-tiered models to go across levels of biological organization to provide a framework for relating results of studies of low doses of ionizing radiation. This framework allows us to better understand how to extrapolate laboratory results to policy decisions, and to identify future studies that will increase confidence in policy decisions. In our application of the conceptual Model we were able to move across multiple levels of biological assessment for rodents going from molecular to organism level for in vitro and in vivo endpoints and to relate these to human in vivo organism level effects. We used the rich literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing brain in our models. The focus of this report is on disrupted neuronal migration due to radiation exposure and the structural and functional implications of these early biological effects. The cellular mechanisms resulting in pathogenesis are most likely due to a combination of the three mechanisms mentioned. For the purposes of a computational model, quantitative studies of low dose radiation effects on migration of neuronal progenitor cells in the cerebral mantle of experimental animals were used. In this project we were able to show now results from studies of low doses of radiation can be used in a multidimensional framework to construct linked models of neurodevelopment using molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ level studies conducted both in vitro and in vivo in rodents. These models could also be linked to behavioral endpoints in rodents which can be compared to available results in humans. The available data supported modeling to 10 cGy with limited data available at 5 cGy. We observed gradual but non-linear changes as the doses decreased. For neurodevelopment it appears that the slope of the dose response decreases from 25 cGy to 10 cGy. Future studies of neurodevelopment should be able to better define the dose response in

  13. Final report - Sundyne Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, J.B.

    1994-09-27

    Solar cookers offer a viable alternative to conventional cooking methods in many areas, and can be an effective tool in the fight against the deforestation and desertification that plague many developing countries. However, there have been numerous obstacles to the successful dissemination of solar cookers in the past. The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities, review constraints and develop a marketing strategy to disseminate the Sundyne Solar Cooker (SSC) in developing countries.

  14. Stabilisation goals for concentrations of climate-relevant gaseous emissions: Effects and emission pathways. Final report; Stabilisierungsziele fuer Treibhausgaskonzentrationen: Eine Abschaetzung der Auswirkungen und der Emissionspfade. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onigkeit, J.; Alcamo, J.; Kaspar, F.; Roesch, T.

    2000-04-01

    Two different stabilisation goals were assumed, i.e. 550 ppm and 450 ppm of carbon dioxide. First, the global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions were calculated that are permissible to reach these goals. Secondly, the global and regional environmental effects of these concentration goals were assessed. In this, carbon dioxide, nitric oxides and methane emissions from power generation, industry and agriculture were considered. Apart from an investigation of the global reduction strategies required, a key was developed for sharing the global reduction loads between Annex B countries and non-Annex B countries. To reach a stable concentration of 550 ppm carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions per annum may increase slightly until 2030 but must be lowered to the 1990 level by 2100. In the case of 450 ppm, the 1990 level must even be halved by 2100. The consequences of climate change for agriculture, natural vegetation, availability of water, and sea levels were investigated in consideration of regional variations in carbon dioxide emissions and emission reduction measures. In spite of extensive emission control, the area of reduced agricultural productivity will grow rapidly in both cases, and natural vegetation will be endangered, although with strong regional variations. [German] Ausgehend von zwei langfristigen Klimaschutzzielen (Stabilisierung der atmosphaerischen CO{sub 2}-Konzentration bei 550 ppm und bei 450 ppm) wurde mit Hilfe des IMAGE 2.1 Modells: (1) Eine Berechnung der globalen anthropogenen Treibhausgasemissionen durchgefuehrt, die zwischen 1990 und 2100 erlaubt sind, um diese Konzentrationsziele zu erreichen. (2) Wurde eine Abschaetzung der globalen und regionalen Umweltauswirkungen durch den Klimawandel durchgefuehrt, der mit diesen Konzentrationszielen einhergeht. Bei der Analyse wurden CO{sub 2}-, N{sub 2}O- und CH{sub 4} Emissionen aus dem Energie/Industrie- und dem landwirtschaftlichen Sektor

  15. The effect of anthropogenic contaminations (PAH, PCB) on terrestrial annelids in conurban ecosystems. Final report; Einfluss von anthropogenen Schadstoffen (PAK und PCB) auf terrestrische Invertebraten urbaner Oekosysteme. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achazi, R.K.; Beylich, A.; Chroszcz, G.; Dueker, C.; Heck, M.; Henneken, M.; Flenner, C.; Froehlich, E.; Garbers, U.; Khan, M.A.; Kreibich, M.; Kronshage, J.; Philippe, L.; Pilz, C.; Rothe, B.; Schabedoth, E.; Schaub, K.; Scheiwe, E.; Schmid, C.; Steudel, I.; Struwe, M.; Throl, C.; Wuertz, S. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Back, H.; Naehring, D.; Thielemann, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Angewandte Oekologie und Umweltplanung mbH, Nussloch (Germany)

    1997-09-23

    The project was conducted from August 1993 until May 1997. The objectives were (a) an elaboration of effect concentrations and index values for organic contaminants (PAH, PCB) and heavy metals in soil of conurbations for the community of decomposers, (b) the improvement of a biotest system for the evaluation of the habitat function of contaminated soils and (c) to obtain informations concerning a controlled utilization of contaminated areas. For that purpose field investigations in former sewage water irrigation areas of Berlin, Germany, concerning the abundance, species composition and dominance structure of terrestrial annelids (Enchytraeids, Lumbricids) were performed, as well as bioassays using contaminated soils of these sites and soils spiked with bezo(a)pyrene, fluoranthene, PCB 52, Cd and Cu and experiments on accumulation, elimination and biotransformation in annelids. 12 of the 17 sites investigated lacked earthworms, while only 2 sites lacked enchytraeids. The abundance of enchytraeids was in the range of 500 to 12.500/m{sup 2}, compared to 25.000 to 280.000/m{sup 2} on reference sites. The hostility of the soils of former irrigation fields to annelids was confirmed by lamina bait tests and by bioassays with Enchytraeus crypticus, E. albidus, E. buchholzi and Eisenia f. fetida. The ecotoxicity of the combined contaminants was enforced by the acidity and the degradation of the soils. The toxicity of organic and inorganic contaminants to terrestrial annelids was definitely proved by reproduction tests in the agar test system. The applied methods of investigation can be used for evaluation of contaminated soils. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Projekt wurde von August 1993 bis Mai 1997 durchgefuehrt. Ziele waren die Erarbeitung (a) von Wirkschwellen fuer organische Schadstoffgruppen (PAK, PCB) und Schwermetalle im Boden fuer Destruenten urbaner Oekosysteme, (b) von Biotestsystemen zur Bewertung der Lebensraumfunktion belasteter Boeden und (c) von Hinweisen zur

  16. Final Performance Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houldin, Joseph [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Saboor, Veronica [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    about assessing a company’s technical assets, broadening our view of the business to go beyond what they make or what NAICS code they have…to better understand their capacity, capability, and expertise, and to learn more about THEIR customers. Knowing more about the markets they serve can often provide insight into their level of technical knowledge and sophistication. Finally, in the spirit of realizing the intent of the Accelerator we strove to align and integrate the work and activities supported by the five funding agencies to leverage each effort. To that end, we include in the Integrated Work Plan a graphic that illustrates that integration. What follows is our summary report of the project, aggregated from prior reports.

  17. Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System, 1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Will; Zubik, Raymond; Clancey, Patrick

    1988-05-01

    reproductive success in few sites. Studies of the effects of hydroelectric operations on the reproductive success of kokanee in the Flathead system have been ongoing since 1980. Results of these studies have been published in a series of annual progress reports which are detailed in Appendix G. The reports summarize spawning site inventories and spawning escapement, egg and alevin mortality rates and the mechanisms by which water level fluctuations influence mortality, creel surveys, and investigation of the population dynamics of Flathead kokanee. The Region 1 offices of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks distribute this material to the scientific community and the general public. Until recently, it was considered feasible to recover losses to the Flathead kokanee fishery by enhancing and diversifying natural reproduction. But the establishment of opossum shrimp (M. relicta) in Flathead Lake has reduced the availability of zooplankton forage in the spring and summer, and may reduce the viability of juvenile kokanee. In 1986, research was redirected to quantify this competitive interaction and to investigate artificial means of enhancing the kokanee fishery. The average density of mysid shrimp in Flathead Lake has increased to 108/m{sup 2} in 1987, and at some locations density exceeds 500/m2. Mysid grazing pressure has delayed the pulse of zooplankton production in the spring and reduced zooplankton standing crop in the summer. Cladocerans such as Daphnia thorata, the preferred food of kokanee of all ages, are the most markedly affected species. The peak density of D. thorata in the summer has declined from 4.8/liter in 1983 to O.9/liter in 1987. Growth rates of underyearling and yearling kokanee have declined, apparently as a result of the reduction in their food supply. Spawning escapement has also declined, falling from 150,000 in 1985. to 25,000 in 1986, to 600 in 1987. Fry-to-adult survival has declined from 2.5 percent to near zero. The causes of high

  18. Fluctuation effects in radiative capture to unstable final states: A test via the 89Y(rvec p,γ) reaction at Ep = 19.6 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, W.E.; Chadwick, M.; Dietrich, F.S.

    1994-11-01

    The authors have developed an extended direct-semidirect (DSD) model for fast-nucleon capture to single-particle configurations that subsequently damp into the compound nucleus or (at sufficiently high excitation energies) escape into the continuum. The inclusion of final-state fluctuation effects is an important feature of this model. To test the model they have measured the spectra of gamma rays from approximately 10 MeV to the endpoint in the 89 Y(rvec P,γ) reaction with 19.6 MeV polarized protons from the TUNL tandem accelerator. Gamma spectra were measured with a pair of 25.4 cm x 25.4 cm anticoincidence-shielded NaI detectors at angles of 30 degree, 55 degree, 90 degree 125 degree and 150 degree with respect to the incident beam. The spectra show significant analyzing powers and forward peaking of the angular distributions. These features allow for the discrimination between compound processes and direct processes. Analyzing powers and fore-aft asymmetries were observed for gamma energies below those associated with direct-semidirect transitions to known bound final states. They have also performed Hauser-Feshbach calculations of the statistical component of the gamma emission, which dominates below approximately 15--16 MeV. The extended DSD model reproduces the spectral shapes and analyzing powers above this energy quite well. There is no evidence in the present reaction that additional mechanisms, such as multistep compound or multistep direct emission, are required

  19. Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, R. Justin [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Bryan, Frank [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Tribbia, Joseph [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Park, Sungsu [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Dennis, John [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Saravanan, R. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Schneider, Niklas [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Kwon, Young-Oh [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Most climate models are currently run with grid spacings of around 100km, which, with today’s computing power, allows for long (up to 1000 year) simulations, or ensembles of simulations to explore climate change and variability. However this grid spacing does not resolve important components of the weather/climate system such as atmospheric fronts and mesoscale systems, and ocean boundary currents and eddies. The overall aim of this project has been to look at the effect of these small-scale features on the weather/climate system using a suite of high and low resolution climate models, idealized models and observations. This project was only possible due to the highly scalable aspect of the CAM Spectral Element dynamical core, and the significant resources allocated at Yellowstone and NERSC for which we are grateful.

  20. Induced seismicity. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models

  1. Final NOMAD results on $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, P.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, Barry J.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, Malcolm; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Gosset, J.; Gossling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kustov, D.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.P.; Meyer, J.P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F.F.; Winton, L.J.; Yabsley, Bruce D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.; Krasnoperov, A V

    2001-01-01

    Results from the nu_tau appearance search in a neutrino beam using the full NOMAD data sample are reported. A new analysis unifies all the hadronic tau decays, significantly improving the overall sensitivity of the experiment to oscillations. The "blind analysis" of all topologies yields no evidence for an oscillation signal. In the two-family oscillation scenario, this sets a 90% C.L. allowed region in the sin^2(2theta)-Delta m^2 plane which includes sin^2(2theta)nu_tau oscillation hypothesis results in sin^2(2theta)<1.5 x 10^{-2} at large Delta m^2 and Delta m^2 < 5.9 eV^2/c^4 at sin^2(2theta)=1. We also derive limits on effective couplings of the tau lepton to nu_mu or nu_e.

  2. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis L.; Eggleston

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to experimentally investigate asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral (Penning-Malmberg) plasma trap. These traps provide an excellent platform for transport studies since the plasmas are generally well confined. One can then study transport in a controlled manner: the plasma is perturbed and the resulting transport measured. The focus of this research is the transport produced by applied asymmetric electric fields. The main results of our research concern (1) the theory of asymmetry-induced transport, (2) an absolute comparison of theory predictions with experimental results, (3) the amplitude scaling of the transport, (4) the frequency dependence of the transport, (5) the development of techniques to determine the relative contribution of mobility and diffusion to the transport, and (6) measuring the effect of small axial magnetic variations on the transport

  3. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering; Lobban, Lance [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Crossley, Steven [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Khanna, Vikas [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Maravelias, Christos [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Petkovic, Lucia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Duong, Nhung [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2018-01-24

    The goal was to develop a biomass conversion process that optimizes fractionation and conversion to maximize Carbon efficiency and Hydrogen consumption to obtain drop-in fuels. Selective fractionation of raw biomass was obtained via multi-stage thermal fractionation to produce different streams that are enriched in a particular chemical family (acids, furanics or phenolics). These streams were later catalytically upgraded in both liquid and vapor phase to perform C-C bond formation and hydrodeoxygenation. Among various upgrading strategies investigated we have identified an effective path in which cyclopentanone is a crucial intermediate that can be derived from furfural and other furanics obtained in high concentrations from this thermal staged process. Cyclopentanone is a very versatile molecule, which can couple with itself to product high quality jet-fuel, or couple with phenolic or furanics to create long chain molecules. These (mono-oxygenated) compounds in the correct molecular weight fuel range can be hydrotreated to direct drop-in fuels. Interestingly, we have found that the conversion of furfural to cyclopentanone is not affected by the presence of acetic acid, and, more interestingly, it is enhanced by the presence of water. These are very significant findings, since water and acetic acid are always present in all streams from the primary conversion stage. These results have allowed to complete detailed life-cycle assessment and techno-economic analysis that have been back-fed to the experimentalists to refine the catalyst selection and process operations with the objective of maximizing C efficiency at minimum H utilization. These combined investigations have opened the possibility of an economically and technologically effective process that could result in commercial fuels produced from renewable sources at a cost that might be competitive with fossil fuels.

  4. Project radon final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekholm, S.; Rossby, U.

    1990-01-01

    The main radiation problem in Sweden is due to radon in dwellings. At the Swedish State Power Board, R, D and D about radon has been going on since 1980. The work has concentrated on the important questions: How to find building with enhanced radon levels?; How to accurately decide on measures that will give adequate cleaning-up results, using appropriate measurement procedures; What cleaning-up effect is possible to achieve with an electro-filter?; and What cleaning-up effects are possible to achieve with different types of ventilation systems? The R, D and D-work, has been pursued in cooperation with universities of technology in Denmark and Finland, equipment manufacturers, consultants and authorities concerned. It was decided in December 1986 to give an offer to some SSPB-employees to investigate the radon situation of their dwellings, in order to test methods of measurement and cleaning-up under realistic conditions and to develop the methods to commercial maturity. The investigation was named 'Project Radon' and was carried out in three years with costs amounting to 1 M dollars. During the project less comprehensive radon measurements, named 'trace-measurements' were undertaken in about 1300 dwellings and more elaborate measurements, leading to suggestions of actions to be taken, in about 400 dwellings. Out of the suggestions, about 50 are carried out including control measurement after actions taken. The control measurement have shown that the ability to suggest appropriate actions is very successful - in just one case was a minor additional action necessary. The high reliability is achieved by always doing elaborate measurements before suggested mitigation method is decided on. (authors)

  5. Final plenary discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federline, M.

    2004-01-01

    The subject of this seminar was 'Strategy Selection for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities' and it was clear throughout that safety of D and D operations continues to be of importance in that selection, particularly in regard to the condition of the site and the risk it represents. In this context, it was specifically noted that a safety case for D and D needs to be kept under continuous review and needs to be flexible enough to accommodate appropriate modification as the work progresses and the nature of the risk changes. It was also noted that the hazard presented by a facility in decommissioning is normally significantly less than during the operating phase (for a reactor, for example, the fuel has been removed, there are no pressurised systems and no high operating temperatures). The changing plant configuration and the reduced hazard potential lead to the observation that the safety management arrangements also need appropriate adjustment from those employed during the operating phase. It was recalled that a Task Group of the WPDD is addressing safety issues on an ongoing basis. It was also clear from the detailed presentations that techniques for D and D are already available and that they have been successfully demonstrated in practice. Nevertheless, because the costs of dismantling nuclear facilities make up at least a third of the overall D and D costs, there seemed to be a strong case for continuing R and D in this area in order to improve the cost effectiveness of such techniques. It was noted, however, that the extent of such R and D is now somewhat limited and that further work is first required to identify the most effective areas for future R and D projects. Also, throughout the seminar, it was emphasised that strategy selection must remain flexible since it is highly dependent on financing, societal input, technical feasibility, waste management options, and regulatory processes. Against this well-established background, Allan Duncan, as

  6. Final Report MEPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The MEPV Grand Challenge was focused on exploiting beneficial scaling effects in solar cells, modules, and systems to make solar power the lowest cost source of power available. The project explored new multijunction, microscale solar cell architectures, new micro-optical concentration methods, new hybrid solar collection concepts, and developed a series of prototypes to demonstrate these technologies. In addition, a detailed cost analysis was conducted to determine the costs of the proposed technologies and provide guidance for the system design efforts. Key results included demonstration of InGaP/GaAS cells transferred to active silicon cells to create a three junction cell with efficiency near 30%, the transfer of InGaAs cells to Si with demonstrated high performance of the InGaAs cell behind the Si substrate, the design, manufacture, and experimental demonstration of optics with almost 90% transmission efficiency and 100X and 200X concentration with a relatively large acceptance angle (>±1.5°), and the full assembly and demonstration of functional microconcentrator systems. The cost modeling efforts indicated that a module based on the best design resulting from the knowledge and technology develop would approach $1/Wpeak total installed system cost with no subsidies. If achieved in practice, this system would provide the lowest energy cost of any grid-tied energy source.

  7. CEEM Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, John [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2014-11-26

    reactions that produce them. In response, the CEEM team developed well-defined molecular semiconductors that produce active layers with very high power conversion efficiencies, in other words they can convert a very high fraction of sunlight into useful electrical power. The fact that the semiconductor is formed from molecular species provides the basis for circumventing the unreliability of polymer counterparts and, as an additional bonus, allows one to attain much grater insight into the structure of the active layer. The latter is particularly important because efficient conversion is the result of a complex arrangement of two semiconductors that need to phase separate in a way akin to oil and water, but with domains that are described by nanoscale dimensions. CEEM was therefore able to provide deep insight into the influence of nanostructure, through the application of structural characterization tools and theoretical methods that describe how electrical charges migrate through the organic layer. Our research in light emitting diode (LED)-based solid state lighting (SSL) was directed at improving efficiency and reducing costs to enable the widespread deployment of economically-viable replacements for inefficient incandescent, halogen, and fluorescent-based lighting. Our specific focus was to advance the fundamental science and technology of light emitting diodes to both understand factors that limit efficiencies and to provide innovative and viable solutions to the current impediments. One of the main challenges we faced is the decrease in efficiency when LEDs are driven harder to increase light output---the so called “droop” effect. It requires large emitting surfaces to reach a desired optical output, and necessitates the use of costly heat sinks, both of which increase the cost. We successfully reduced droop by growing LED crystals having non-conventional orientations. As recognized by the award of the 2014 Nobel prize to the inventors of the nitride LEDs (one of

  8. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquelyn Yanch

    2006-05-22

    This project involved the development of a method for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the investigation of Boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee. The overall objective of this work was a robust approach for rapid screening of new {sup 10}B-labelled compounds to determine their suitability for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis via Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). For BNCS it is essential to obtain a compound showing high uptake levels in the synovium and long residence time in the joints. Previously the in vivo uptake behavior of potential compounds was evaluated in the arthritic knee joints of rabbits via extensive dissection studies. These studies are very labor-intensive and involve sacrificing large numbers of animals. An in vivo {sup 10}B screening approach was developed to provide initial evaluation of potential compounds. Only those compounds showing positive uptake and retention characteristics will be evaluated further via dissection studies. No further studies will be performed with compounds showing rapid clearance and/or low synovial uptake. Two approaches to in vivo screening were investigated using both simulation methods and experimentation. Both make use of neutron beams generated at the MIT Research Reactor. The first, Transmission Computed Tomography (TCT) was developed and tested but was eventually rejected due to very limited spatial resolution using existing reactor beams. The second, in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (IVPGNAA) was much more promising. IVPGNAA was developed using computer simulation and physical measurement coupled with image reconstruction techniques. The method was tested in arthritic New Zealand rabbits previously injected intra-articularly with three boron labeled compounds and shown to be effective in providing information regarding uptake level and residence time of {sup 10}B in the joint.

  9. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargione, Joseph

    2012-02-24

    The United States has abundant wind resources, such that only about 3% of the resource would need to be developed to achieve the goal of producing 20% of electricity in the United States by 2030. Inappropriately sited wind development may result in conflicts with wildlife that can delay or derail development projects, increase projects costs, and may degrade important conservation values. The most cost-effective approach to reducing such conflicts is through landscape-scale siting early in project development. To support landscape scale siting that avoids sensitive areas for wildlife, we compiled a database on species distributions, wind resource, disturbed areas, and land ownership. This database can be viewed and obtained via http://wind.tnc.org/awwi. Wind project developers can use this web tool to identify potentially sensitive areas and areas that are already disturbed and are therefore likely to be less sensitive to additional impacts from wind development. The United States goal of producing 20% of its electricity from wind energy by the year 2030 would require 241 GW of terrestrial nameplate capacity. We analyzed whether this goal could be met by using lands that are already disturbed, which would minimize impacts to wildlife. Our research shows that over 14 times the DOE goal could be produced on lands that are already disturbed (primarily cropland and oil and gas fields), after taking into account wind resource availability and areas that would be precluded from wind development because of existing urban development or because of development restrictions. This work was published in the peer reviewed science journal PLoS ONE (a free online journal) and can be viewed here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0017566. Even projects that are sited appropriately may have some impacts on wildlife habitat that can be offset with offsite compensatory mitigation. We demonstrate one approach to mapping and quantifying mitigation costs

  10. Technical Report: Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela D.; Wang, Cheng-Yu

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this work was to develop catalyzed nanoporous materials that have superior hydrogen uptake between 300K and 400K and moderate pressures. Platinum nanoparticles were introduced to both activated carbons (ACs) and microporous metal organic frameworks (MMOFs) in order to dissociate molecular hydrogen into an active hydrogen species that diffuses from the catalyst to weakly chemisorbs to the AC/MMOF support; this combined sequence is referred to as the hydrogen spillover mechanism. For all materials studied, maximum excess hydrogen uptake was 1-1.4 wt% (excess) at 300K, falling short of DOE storage goals (5.5 wt% by 2015). Select Pt/AC materials (after in situ catalyst activation) had high uptake (up to 1.4 wt%) at low pressure which significantly exceeded that expected for physisorption. The uptake was not correlated to size of Pt catalyst, but appeared to be associated with high surface activity of the AC support and the methodology of catalyst doping. Multiple techniques were explored to introduce Pt nanoparticles into MMOFs, but most led to significant structural degradation. Ultimately, a ‘pre-bridge’ (PB) technique was used to introduce Pt/AC catalysts into MMOFs, as the PB technique led to virtually non-detectable changes in structure. At high pressure, hydrogen spillover of ~1 wt% (excess) to a PB-MMOF was very slow (i.e. >80 hours at 70-80 bar), which can be attributed to high diffusion barriers in a complex three-surface domain material (Pt, AC, MMOF) as well as unexpected evidence for mechanical instability of the undoped MMOF precursor. In a low-pressure comparison study of three PB-MMOFs, we found evidence that the doping technique may introduce defects which may contribute to enhanced adsorption at 300K. However, we could not rule out the effect of active Pt sites, as common predictors of adsorption generally favored the materials without Pt. Furthermore, spectroscopic evidence provided definitive evidence of weak hydrogen

  11. HARE: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mckie, Jim

    2012-01-09

    This report documents the results of work done over a 6 year period under the FAST-OS programs. The first effort was called Right-Weight Kernels, (RWK) and was concerned with improving measurements of OS noise so it could be treated quantitatively; and evaluating the use of two operating systems, Linux and Plan 9, on HPC systems and determining how these operating systems needed to be extended or changed for HPC, while still retaining their general-purpose nature. The second program, HARE, explored the creation of alternative runtime models, building on RWK. All of the HARE work was done on Plan 9. The HARE researchers were mindful of the very good Linux and LWK work being done at other labs and saw no need to recreate it. Even given this limited funding, the two efforts had outsized impact: _ Helped Cray decide to use Linux, instead of a custom kernel, and provided the tools needed to make Linux perform well _ Created a successor operating system to Plan 9, NIX, which has been taken in by Bell Labs for further development _ Created a standard system measurement tool, Fixed Time Quantum or FTQ, which is widely used for measuring operating systems impact on applications _ Spurred the use of the 9p protocol in several organizations, including IBM _ Built software in use at many companies, including IBM, Cray, and Google _ Spurred the creation of alternative runtimes for use on HPC systems _ Demonstrated that, with proper modifications, a general purpose operating systems can provide communications up to 3 times as effective as user-level libraries Open source was a key part of this work. The code developed for this project is in wide use and available at many places. The core Blue Gene code is available at https://bitbucket.org/ericvh/hare. We describe details of these impacts in the following sections. The rest of this report is organized as follows: First, we describe commercial impact; next, we describe the FTQ benchmark and its impact in more detail; operating

  12. CZT DTRA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the project is to understand the physical origin of electronic noise injected by the electrical contacts in CZT and CdTe, and moreover to understand how it impacts the current- voltage (IV) relationships of these materials. This understanding is critical to enabling the next crucial enhancement in the performance of CZT radiation detectors, as there have recently been impressive advancements in the growth of CZT crystals, particularly at our commercial partner Redlen Technologies. Redlen scientists have successfully reduced the size of the transport-inhibiting tellurium precipitates to be <3 micrometers, such that, with sufficiently high fields, it is possible to achieve resolution of <1% at 662 keV using suitable electrode geometries. In contrast to the excellent progress in crystal growth, practitioners in the field of radiation detection have been fabricating rather routine contacts on CZT for nearly two decades; there is no basic understanding of the semiconductor physics of the contacts, and consequently no breakthrough progress in this area. Our objective is to resolve this inadequacy in CZT diode fabrication on the basis of a science-based study, such that CZT detectors can achieve their full promise in performance as superior contacts will enable use of higher fields with lower leakage current – thereby enhancing the resolution that is possible while eliminating the well-known “tailing” effect suffered by the photopeak. Our approach is to develop methods that reduce or eliminate leakage currents in CZT devices through “engineering” the surfaces with novel treatments and structures. This includes using high density plasma etching, doping via ion implantation and metal diffusion, rapid thermal annealing, amorphous semiconductor and dielectric films, and controlled oxide growth. Using these methods, sources of injected and generated noise at the surface can be eliminated via plasma etching and film deposition or oxide growth, while

  13. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitelegge, JP; Faull, KF

    2005-06-01

    Two primary technologies have been employed for analysis and measurement of the Synechocystis proteome. (1) 2D-gel electrophoresis. Currently one of the most reliable options in quantitative proteomics, typical 2D-gel experiments use isoelectric focusing (IEF) in the first dimension. In the case of membrane proteins, detergents must be added to maintain their solubility though only neutral/zwitterionic surfactants are compatible with the IEF process. We have optimized 2D gel separations for Synechocystis proteins extracted and separated into soluble and membrane subfractions. The resolution and coverage of integral membrane proteins is only marginally satisfactory and alternatives to the first dimension are being considered. Size-exclusion chromatography under non-denaturing conditions was one option that was explored but resolution was insufficient for subfractionation of the membrane-bound proteome. A more highly resolving technique, the ''Blue-native gel'' has proven excellent for Synechocystis and we plan to set up this technology in the near future. Proteins with altered expression are being identified through standard LCMSMS technologies. The analysis of PSI, PSII and SDH deficient mutants is completed, establishing the comparative aspect of the project for integration with the ultrastructural and metabolomic experiments at ASU. We are also looking forward to receiving ftsZ and VIPP1 interruption mutants to explore the effects on the proteome of cell enlargement and disruption of thylakoid biogenesis, respectively. (2) 2D liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry of intact proteins. Early experiments with total membrane protein extracts of Synechocystis showed that the spatial resolution of the reverse-phase separation used in front of the mass spectrometer limited detection to the one hundred or so most abundant proteins. The intact mass tags (IMTs) measured in this experiment represent the first of these measurements that will

  14. PSI-Center Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, Thomas R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shumlak, Uri [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansen, Chris [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ji, Jeong-Young [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Nelson, Brian [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-04-20

    This is the Final Progress Report of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) covering March 2014 through February 2017. The Center has accomplished a great deal during this period. The PSI-Center is organized into four groups: Edge and Dynamic Neutrals; Transport and Kinetic Effects; Equilibrium, Stability, and Kinetic Effects in 3D Topologies; and Interface for Validation. Each group has made good progress and the results from each group are given in detail.

  15. TARGET 2 and Settlement Finality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan MANGATCHEV

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how TARGET 2 as system implements the idea of settlement finality regulated by Directive 98/26 EC of the European parliament and of the Council of 19 May 1998 on settlement finality in payment and securities settlement systems (Settlement Finality Directive and Directive 2009/44/EC of the European parliament and of the Council of 6 May 2009 amending Directive 98/26/EC on settlement finality in payment and securities settlement systems and Directive 2002/47/EC on financial collateral arrangements as regards linked systems and credit claims (Directive 2009/44/EC. As the title of the arti and finality of the settlement in this system.

  16. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggeman, Tim [ZeaChem Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States); O' Neill, Brian [ZeaChem Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    2016-08-17

    ZeaChem Inc. and US DOE successfully demonstrated the ZeaChem process for producing sugars and ethanol from high-impact biomass feedstocks. The project was executed over a 5-year period under a $31.25 million cooperative agreement (80:20 Federal:ZeaChem cost share). The project was managed by dividing it into three budget periods. Activities during Budget Period 1 were limited to planning, permitting, and other pre-construction planning. Budget Period 2 activities included engineering, procurement, construction, commissioning, start-up and initial operations through the Independent Engineer Test Runs. The scope of construction was limited to the Chem Frac and Hydrogenolysis units, as the Core Facility was already in place. Construction was complete in December 2012, and the first cellulosic ethanol was produced in February 2013. Additional operational test runs were conducted during Budget Period 3 (completed June 2015) using hybrid poplar, corn stover, and wheat straw feedstocks, resulting in the production of cellulosic ethanol and various other biorefinery intermediates. The research adds to the understanding of the Chem Frac and Hydrogenolysis technologies in that the technical performance of each unit was measured, and the resulting data and operational experience can be used as the basis for engineering designs, thus mitigating risks for deployment in future commercial facilities. The Chem Frac unit was initially designed to be operated as two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis, with first stage conditions selected to remove the hemicellulose fraction of the feedstock, and the second stage conditions selected to remove the cellulose fraction. While the Chem Frac unit met or exceeded the design capacity of 10 ton(dry)/day, the technical effectiveness of the Chem Frac unit was below expectations in its initial two-stage dilute acid configuration. The sugars yields were low, the sugars were dilute, and the sugars had poor fermentability caused by excessive inhibitors

  17. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loren F. Goodrich

    2011-05-31

    arena and to meet the aggressive performance goals. The latest high-performance Nb{sub 3}Sn wires are being designed with higher current densities, larger effective filament diameter, less Cu stabilizer, and, in some cases, larger wire diameters than ever before. In addition, some of the conductor designs and heat treatments cause the residual resistivity ratio (RRR, ratio of room temperature resistivity to the resistivity at 20 K) of the stabilizer to be less than 20. These parameters are pushing the conductors towards less intrinsic stability, into a region we call marginally stable. These parameters also create a whole series of challenges for routine I{sub c} testing on short-samples, even when tested with the sample immersed in liquid helium. High-current, variable-temperature I{sub c} measurements are even more difficult than those made in liquid helium because the sample is only cooled by flowing helium gas. Providing accurate I{sub c} results under these conditions requires a complex system that provide adequate cooling as well as uniform sample temperature. We have been make variable-temperature measurements for about 15 years, but we started to design the first high-current (at least 500 A), variable-temperature, variable-strain apparatus in late 2006. Our first critical-current measurements as a function of strain, temperature, and magnetic field, I{sub c}(B,T,{var_epsilon}), in a new single, unified apparatus (full matrix characterization) were made in the summer of 2008. This is the only such facility in the U.S. and it has some unique components that are not duplicated anywhere in the world. The compounding of all three variables (H, T, {var_epsilon}) makes an already labor and time intensive characterization very formidable; however, the results cannot be generated any other way and are needed to answer key questions about strain and temperature safety margins and about the reliability of using scaling laws based on small data sets to predict performance

  18. Final report of the FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project on the use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.

    1999-02-01

    Soils in developing countries are often deficient in available P, and therefore require inputs of P fertiliser for optimum plant growth and production of food and fibre. Due to economic considerations, the cost of applying imported or locally produced water-soluble P fertilisers is often more expensive than utilising indigenous phosphate rock. Phosphate rocks show large differences in their suitability for direct application and several factors influence their capability to supply phosphorus to crops. Therefore, quantifying the P availability of soils amended with phosphate rocks in a variety of crop management and environmental conditions in developing countries is imperative for making recommendations on the best type and rate of P fertiliser sources for maximum agronomic and economic benefits. P-32 isotope techniques are very useful for such studies. The background situation of phosphate research and the topics to be investigated using isotope techniques were critically examined in a Consultants Meeting held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 10 to 12 May 1993. For detailed information please refer to IAEA Report CT-1112. Based on the recommendations of this Consultants' Meeting, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture with the generous support of the French Government decided to implement the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques for Evaluating the Agronomic Effectiveness of Phosphate Fertilisers, in particular Rock Phosphates'. This final report describes the Fourth and Final RCM of the CRP which was held in Vienna, 16-20 November 1998. It also contains a full description of the project and the conclusions and recommendations of the CRP. The programme of the meeting, list of participants, summaries submitted by the participants and list of publications are included as annexes

  19. Final report of the FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research project on the use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate fertilisers, in particular rock phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, F

    1999-02-01

    Soils in developing countries are often deficient in available P, and therefore require inputs of P fertiliser for optimum plant growth and production of food and fibre. Due to economic considerations, the cost of applying imported or locally produced water-soluble P fertilisers is often more expensive than utilising indigenous phosphate rock. Phosphate rocks show large differences in their suitability for direct application and several factors influence their capability to supply phosphorus to crops. Therefore, quantifying the P availability of soils amended with phosphate rocks in a variety of crop management and environmental conditions in developing countries is imperative for making recommendations on the best type and rate of P fertiliser sources for maximum agronomic and economic benefits. P-32 isotope techniques are very useful for such studies. The background situation of phosphate research and the topics to be investigated using isotope techniques were critically examined in a Consultants Meeting held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 10 to 12 May 1993. For detailed information please refer to IAEA Report CT-1112. Based on the recommendations of this Consultants' Meeting, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture with the generous support of the French Government decided to implement the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques for Evaluating the Agronomic Effectiveness of Phosphate Fertilisers, in particular Rock Phosphates'. This final report describes the Fourth and Final RCM of the CRP which was held in Vienna, 16-20 November 1998. It also contains a full description of the project and the conclusions and recommendations of the CRP. The programme of the meeting, list of participants, summaries submitted by the participants and list of publications are included as annexes.

  20. Final focus system for TLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oide, K.

    1988-11-01

    A limit of the chromaticity correction for the final focus system of a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) is investigated. As the result, it becomes possible to increase the aperture of the final doublet with a small increase of the horizontal β function. The new optics design uses a final doublet of 0.5 mm half-aperture and 1.4 T pole-tip field. The length of the system is reduced from 400 m to 200 m by several optics changes. Tolerances for various machine errors with this optics are also studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Finally

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Broadband in Rural India is not just about connectivity. Broadband in Rural India is not just about connectivity. It is about transforming rural areas of S. Asia.

  2. HINTS Puerto Rico: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final report describes HINTS implementation in Puerto Rico. The report addresses sampling; staffing, training and management of data collection; calling protocol; findings from the CATI Operations, and sample weights.

  3. Smart roadside initiative : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This is the Final Report for the Smart Roadside Initiative (SRI) prototype system deployment project. The SRI prototype was implemented at weigh stations in Grass Lake, Michigan and West Friendship, Maryland. The prototype was developed to integrate ...

  4. Drug-eluting versus plain balloon angioplasty for the treatment of failing dialysis access: Final results and cost-effectiveness analysis from a prospective randomized controlled trial (NCT01174472)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitrou, Panagiotis M., E-mail: panoskitrou@gmail.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Rion 26504 (Greece); Katsanos, Konstantinos [Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, King' s Health Partners, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris [Department of Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •1-Year target lesion primary patency significantly higher after PCB application compared to plain balloon angioplasty in the failing dialysis access. •Significant difference in favor of PCB in cumulative primary patency of AVGs at 1 year. •No significant difference in cumulative primary patency of AVFs treated with PCB at 1 year. •Cost effectiveness analysis performed. •Paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty proves to be a cost-effective option for treating dialysis access. -- Abstract: Objective: To report the final results and cost-effectiveness analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial investigating drug-eluting balloon (DEB) versus plain balloon angioplasty (BA) for the treatment of failing dialysis access ( (NCT01174472)). Methods: 40 patients were randomized to angioplasty with either DEB (n = 20) or BA (n = 20) for treatment of significant venous stenosis causing a failing dialysis access. Both arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and synthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVG) were included. Angiographic follow up was scheduled every two months. Primary endpoints were technical success and target lesion primary patency at 1 year. Cumulative and survival analysis was performed. Incremental net benefit (INB) and incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated and the cost-effectiveness acceptability curve (CEAC) was drawn. Results: Baseline variables were equally distributed between the two groups. At 1 year, cumulative target lesion primary patency was significantly higher after DEB application (35% vs. 5% after BA, p < 0.001). Overall, median primary patency was 0.64 years in case of DEB vs. 0.36 years in case of BA (p = 0.0007; unadjusted HR = 0.27 [95%CI: 0.13–0.58]; Cox adjusted HR = 0.23 [95%CI: 0.10–0.50]). ICER was 2198 Euros (€) per primary patency year of dialysis access gained. INB was 1068€ (95%CI: 31–2105€) for a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of 5000€ (corresponding acceptability probability >97

  5. Effect of vitamin K on bone integrity and eggshell quality of white hen at the final phase of the laying cycle Efeito da vitamina K sobre a integridade óssea e da casca de ovos de poedeiras leves na fase final de postura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanir Inês Müller Fernandes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of four levels of dietary vitamin K (vit. K on production, egg quality and bone structure of laying hens near the end of the production cycle were studied. A total of 192 Hy-Line, W-36 hens, 67 weeks of age, were distributed into a completely randomized design with four treatments (0, 2, 8, 32 mg vit. K/kg of diet, six replicates and eight birds per experimental unit. Corn-soybean-meal basal diets were isonitrogenous (15.5% crude protein, isoenergetic (2,790 kcal ME/kg, isocalcium (4.25% Ca and isophosphorus (0.40% available P. Vitamin K supplementation did not alter egg mass, feed intake, feed conversion (kg/kg, bone breaking strength, specific egg gravity, eggshell weight, thickness and percentage of thin and cracked shell. A linear effect on egg weight, laying percent, and feed conversion (kg/dozen was observed, as well as a quadratic effect on the ash bone content. In conclusion, the inclusion of increasing levels of vitamin K to the diet influenced performance and bone mineralization, but not eggshell quality. The lack of consistency in the efficiency of supplemental vitamin K on eggshell quality may be due to the age of hens.Objetivou-se com este estudo avaliar o efeito de quatro níveis dietéticos de vitamina K (vit. K sobre o desempenho e a qualidade de ovos e ossos de poedeiras leves na fase final de postura. Foram utilizadas 192 poedeiras comerciais com 67 semanas de idade, distribuídas em delineamento casualizado, com quatro níveis de vitamina K (0, 2, 8, 32 mg/kg, seis repetições e oito aves por unidade experimental. As rações eram isoprotéicas (15,5% de proteína bruta, isoenergéticas (2.790 kcal de energia metabolizável/kg, isocálcicas (4,25% cálcio e isofosfóricas (0,40% fósforo disponível e foram formuladas à base de milho e farelo de soja. A suplementação de vitamina K não alterou a massa de ovos, o consumo de ração, a conversão alimentar (kg/kg, a resistência óssea a quebra, a gravidade espec

  6. Greenhouse effect gases sources and sinks (CO2, CH4, N2O) in grasslands and reduction strategies. Greenhouse effect gases prairies. Final report of the second part of the project. April 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussana, J.F.

    2004-04-01

    The project 'GES-Prairies' (Greenhouse Gases - Grasslands) had two main objectives: 1. To measure more accurately the fluxes of CO 2 , CH 4 and N 2 O of French grasslands and determine the greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of these areas. 2. To calculate the net GHG emissions of cattle production farms and finally to propose and evaluate some management scenarios leading to a reduction of GHG emissions. This project deals with three different spatial scales: the field scale, the farm scale and finally, the regional scale. At the field scale, during two years, fluxes of CO 2 , CH 4 and N 2 O were measured in a mid-mountain permanent grassland, previously managed intensively by cutting and grazing (Laqueuille, Auvergne, France). Results from the first complete year of measurements show that the extensification process (reduction of the stocking rate and stopping N fertilization) allows to stock more carbon in the ecosystem. At the farm scale, We developed a model (FARMSIM, coupled to PASIM) able to simulate the GHG balance of a livestock farm. FARMSIM has been tested with data obtained from a mixed livestock farm in Lorraine (dairy and meat production, annual average stocking rate = 1.3 LU ha -1 ) of 100 ha (including 76 ha of grasslands and 21 of annual crops). The results indicate a net emission of 175 t equivalent C-CO 2 for this farm. If expressed per unit of product, it represents 1.34 t equivalent C-CO 2 per LU and per year or 0.54 kg CO 2 per kg of milk and per year. At the regional scale/. The PASIM model has been used to simulate the European grasslands with a spatial resolution of 1' (about 200 * 200 km). For each grid cell, a sensibility analysis allowed to determine the N application which correspond to 30% of the N application that would maximize the annual yield of the pasture. Simulation runs on mixed systems (combining grazing and cutting) show that almost one half of the grassland area is, on average, used for cutting. These simulations predict N 2 O

  7. Use of nuclear and related techniques in studies of agroecological effects resulting from the use of persistent pesticides in Central America. Report of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The use of pesticides for the control of pests of agriculture and vectors of human and animal diseases in the countries of Central America is the highest per capita and one of the most intense in the world. There are reports of acute toxicity and chronic effects among farm workers. There are also reports that pesticide residues in food frequently exceed the Codex Alimentarius Commission's maximum residue levels (MRLs) and shipments of foodstuffs have been rejected by importing countries due to the presence of excessive residues of pesticides. Pesticides are also implicated in the contamination of continental and coastal waters. The indiscriminate use of pesticides would be expected to also aggravate pest problems by adversely affecting populations of beneficial arthropods and causing the development of resistance in pest populations. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated a co-ordinated research project in 1992 to generate information on residues of pesticides in the environment, their persistence under local conditions and effect on local species of beneficial arthropods in agricultural and adjacent areas in the countries of Central America. Such information could be used in the implementation of legislation to control the distribution and use of pesticides and the development and application of integrated pest management programmes. Scientists from Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and the United States of America participated in this project. This TECDOC reports on the accomplishments of the project and includes the papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Panama City, Panama, 20-24 April 1998

  8. Cassini's Grand Finale Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    After 13 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn ended in a science-rich blaze of glory. Cassini returned its final bits of unique science data on September 15, 2017, as it plunged into Saturn's atmosphere satisfying planetary protection requirements. Cassini's Grand Finale covered a period of roughly five months and ended with the first time exploration of the region between the rings and planet.The final close flyby of Titan in late April 2017 propelled Cassini across Saturn’s main rings and into its Grand Finale orbits; 22 orbits that repeatedly dove between Saturn’s innermost rings and upper atmosphere making Cassini the first spacecraft to explore this region. The last orbit turned the spacecraft into the first Saturn upper atmospheric probe.The Grand Finale orbits provided highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and in-situ sampling of the ring particle composition, Saturn's atmosphere, plasma, and innermost radiation belts. The gravitational field was measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the deeper atmosphere, and mass of the rings. The magnetic field provided insight into the physical nature of the magnetic dynamo and structure of the internal magnetic field. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer sampled the upper atmosphere for molecules that escape the atmosphere in addition to molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer directly sampled the composition from different parts of the main rings for the first time. Fields and particles instruments directly measured the plasma environment between the rings and planet.Science highlights and new mysteries gleaned to date from the Grand Finale orbits will be discussed.The research described in this paper was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2017

  9. Final disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroebel, R [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Projekt Wiederaufarbeitung und Abfallbehandlung; Krause, H [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. zur Behandlung Radioaktiver Abfaelle

    1978-08-01

    This paper discusses the final disposal possibilities for radioactive wastes in the Federal Republic of Germany and the related questions of waste conditioning, storage methods and safety. The programs in progress in neighbouring CEC countries and in the USA are also mentioned briefly. The autors conclude that the existing final disposal possibilities are sufficiently well known and safe, but that they could be improved still further by future development work. The residual hazard potential of radioactive wastes from fuel reprocessing after about 1000 years of storage is lower that of known inorganic core deposits.

  10. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  11. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of army smokes in an aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate and terrestrial ecological effects of fog oil obscurant smokes: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fellows, R.J.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of fog oil (FO) smoke obscurants were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on an exposure scenario, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters, such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and three soil types. 29 refs., 35 figs., 32 tabs.

  12. Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B.

    2013-09-17

    This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

  13. New final doublets and power densities for the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we use current and proposed final doublet magnet technologies to reoptimise the interaction region of the international linear collider and reduce the power losses. The result is a set of three new final doublet layouts with improved beam transport properties. The effect of localised power deposition and ...

  14. Bisphenol A; Final Test Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is issuing a final rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requiring manufacturers and processors of bisphenol A, hereinafter BPA, (4.4’-isopropylidenediphenol, CAS No. 80-05—7) to conduct a 90-day inhalation study.

  15. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate

  16. SLC Final Performance and Lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, Nan

    2000-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was the first prototype of a new type of accelerator, the electron-positron linear collider. Many years of dedicated effort were required to understand the physics of this new technology and to develop the techniques for maximizing performance. Key issues were emittance dilution, stability, final beam optimization and background control. Precision, non-invasive diagnostics were required to measure and monitor the beams throughout the machine. Beam-based feedback systems were needed to stabilize energy, trajectory, intensity and the final beam size at the interaction point. variety of new tuning techniques were developed to correct for residual optical or alignment errors. The final focus system underwent a series of refinements in order to deliver sub-micron size beams. It also took many iterations to understand the sources of backgrounds and develop the methods to control them. The benefit from this accumulated experience was seen in the performance of the SLC during its final run in 1997-98. The luminosity increased by a factor of three to 3*10 30 and the 350,000 Z data sample delivered was nearly double that from all previous runs combined

  17. Final storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziehm, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    As explained in the present article, operators of nuclear power plants are responsible for the safe final disposal of the radioactive wastes they produce on the strength of the polluter pays principle. To shift the burden of responsibility for safe disposal to society as a whole would violate this principle and is therefore not possible. The polluter pays principle follows from more general principles of the fair distribution of benefits and burdens. Instances of its implementation are to be found in the national Atomic Energy Law as well as in the European Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Directive. The polluters in this case are in particular responsible for financing the installation and operation of final disposal sites. The reserves accumulated so far for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants and disposal of radioactive wastes, including the installation and operation of final disposal sites, should be transferred to a public-law fund. This fund should be supplemented by the polluters to cover further foreseeable costs not covered by the reserves accumulated so far, including a realistic cost increase factor, appropriate risk reserves as well as the costs of the site selection procedure and a share in the costs for the safe closure of the final disposal sites of Morsleben and Asse II. This would merely be implementing in the sphere of atomic law that has long been standard practice in other areas of environmental law involving environmental hazards.

  18. Assessment of the effectiveness of European air quality policies and measures. Final report on Task 3.3. Survey to access successes and failures of the EU Air Quality Policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of Task 3.3 of the title project was to survey the views of European policy makers and other stakeholders directly involved in air quality policy development and implementation on the successes and failures of the present European air quality policies. The survey also included several decisionmakers from the USA, Japan and Switzerland to learn about these countries' experiences with specific air quality policies. A list of approximately 90 people to be surveyed during the project was developed. The list included representatives from the European Commission, the European Parliament, national-level representatives from the Member States, including those designated by the CAFE Steering Group, along with representatives of local authorities, NGOs, industry and academia. The survey was conducted through a questionnaire and follow-up interviews. The questionnaire consists of four major parts. Part 1 includes questions about the impact of EU legislation on air quality. Part 2 is designed to learn about stakeholder opinions on the adequacy of Community-level measures with respect to air quality protection. Part 3 asks for opinions about various measures used in Community-level legislation on air quality as well as ideas for new or modified measures that could be effective in achieving better air quality in the EU. Part 4 includes questions about stakeholder involvement and transparency and was designed to assist with the implementation of Task 3.4 (on public participation and transparency) of the project. The analysis of responses for this part of the questionnaire is presented in the parallel Report for Task 3.4. The final version of the questionnaire used to interview European stakeholders is attached as Appendix II. For the decision-makers from the USA, Switzerland, and Japan a separate questionnaire was developed, and is attached as Appendix III. In all, the team received 49 responses from the 90 enquiries.

  19. Effekte und Nachhaltigkeit von Trainingsworkshops für den mündlich-praktischen Teil des M2-Examens [Effects and Sustainability of Trainings for the Oral and Practical Part of the German Final Exam in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öchsner, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Study Goals: It is known that the manifold limitations of oral and practical examinations can be improved by specific training. With the help of an online survey, our present study analyzes the effects that can be achieved by the training conducted at the University of Ulm for examiners in the final medical examination, the long-lasting impact of the training, and differences among participant subgroups.Method: All 367 participants in the training at Ulm (2007- 2012 were contacted via email. Sixty-three persons responded to the survey that included 28 items concerning demographic data, effectiveness, and sustainability.Results: Six main effects of the training were identified (meaning effects rated with a grade of 1 or 2 on a 6-point scale by two thirds of the participants, with 1=“applicable” and 6=“not applicable”; cumulated percentage of answers of 1 or 2 in parentheses:The responses of participants trained more than two years ago were not significantly different from the answers given by recently trained persons. This is an argument for the sustainability of the training effects.Furthermore, participants without relevant prior experience in oral/practical examinations profited significantly more from the trainings, especially in the areas of stress reduction, confidence in grading, and competence in critical discrimination of grading.Conclusion: The positive and sustained effects of the examiner training argue for continuing the training program, especially for inexperienced examiners. Expansion of the successful training program to include the first medical exam should be considered.[german] Zielsetzung: Die vielfältigen Limitationen mündlich-praktischer Prüfungen können bekanntermaßen durch spezifische Trainings günstig beeinflusst werden. Die vorliegende Studie analysiert daher anhand eines Fragebogens die in Ulm durchgeführten Trainings für Staatsexamensprüfer, deren Nachhaltigkeit und mögliche Unterschiede

  20. 50 CFR 11.24 - Final administrative action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND... law judge's decision shall constitute the final administrative determination of the Secretary in the matter and shall become effective 30 calendar days from the date of the decision. ...